Monthly Archives: July 2016

July 31, 2016 The Yellow Pine Times

July 31, 2016 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

YPWUA News: 

Please be conservative when watering lawns. We ask those that are here all week to not water lawns on the weekends so that more water is available for the weekend cabin owners. There will NO lawn watering on all summer holidays and during the Festival weekend!
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Village News:

Cancelled For Now: Special Meeting Of Concerned Yellow Pine Citizens

Sorry for any inconvenience Dan has informed me he needs a bit more time to gather the required information relevant to his meeting over the gravel pit issue.

His big concern was about the proposal by the county to go into Forest Service land bordering the pit.

Will keep you posted on the next date for the meeting which was to be held Monday August 1st at 3PM at the Community Hall

Lorinne N. Munn, Secretary Village Association July 31, 2016
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Water

Wednesday evening the tap water had air in it (white) and the pressure was a little low. Cleared up by midnight.

Please remember – no outside watering during the Festival!
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Power Blips

We had two short power outages this week, one on Tuesday morning at 846am and the other on Friday at 817am.
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Museum

The Museum put on a breakfast for the Caswell family reunion at the school/museum Saturday morning.
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Local Observations:

Monday (July 25) early morning airplanes (very loud one at 915am.) Clear sky, moderate dew, warming up quickly. A few finches and jays. Hot sunny dry day. Shooting to the west starting around 630pm.

Tuesday (July 26) Airplanes started buzzing us at 730am. Power off and back on at 846am. Mostly clear sky early, moderate dew, warming up quickly, then mostly cloudy by 945am. Little sprinkle of rain at 1045am, not enough to wet things. Broken clouds by lunch time. Hot, dry, dusty, mostly sunny afternoon. Slow to cool off in the evening.

Wednesday (July 27) A few early airplanes. Clear morning, a little dew, warming up quickly. Hot dry day. Dusty from increased traffic. Not many birds around, but did see an Olive-sided Flycatcher, a couple of jays and hummingbirds, and some cassins finches. Late afternoon the water was a little “white” and lower pressure (clear by midnight.) Warm evening, slight haze of smoke, slow to cool off after sundown.

Thursday (July 28) Clear morning, a little dew. Huge cloud of dust to the east and smelled like diesel exhaust. Air was better by 10am. Pine-siskins are back! Just a few eating with the cassins finches. Olive-sided flycatchers are around too. The Juvenile jays are still begging for food. Dry, HOT day. Warm evening. Rude 4-wheeler excessive speed on Westside Ave about 830pm.

Friday (July 29) power blip at 817am. Clear morning, a little dew. Finches and pine-siskins, could hear the olive-sided flycatchers calling, one hummer buzzed the feeder and left. Juvenile golden mantel squirrels out and about. Pine squirrels chewing up pine cones here and there. Hot dry dusty day. A few rowdy Friday-nighters.

Saturday (July 30) large crowd of people at the school early, traffic and dust. Loud low plane at 9am. Mostly clear sky, some haze, not much dew. A few finches and a couple pine-siskins at the feeders, very few hummingbirds. Shots fired to the west across the river after 10am. Hot dry dusty day, light breezes. Shooting to the west around 6pm. Loud shots to the west just after 7pm. Lots of traffic (and dust) on Westside Ave all day, poor air quality by dark.

Sunday (July 31) strange sounding airplane just after 9am. Clear sky, not much dew, warming up fast. Dusty air. Dry dusty day, not as hot as it has been, mild afternoon breezes. Campers trickling into the golf course already.
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RIP:

Jesse M. Haskins

HaskinsObit
Jesse M. Haskins, 71, of Cascade went to be with our Lord on July 15, 2016.

Jesse was born in Cascade, lived here all his life, and died in Cascade. He started his logging career with George Ikola many years ago, then worked for Del Gossi logging for 24 years and then ended his logging career with George’s son, Gerry Ikola.

Logging, fishing, hunting, and family was his life. He loved the outdoors, camping, fishing, and hunting with his family.

Survivors include his wife of 47 years, Betty, brother Rev. Eugene Haskins (Pat) of Boise, Frances Olson (Tom) of Cascade, sons Randy (Kris) of Cascade, Rowdy (Karon) of Nampa, Leroy of Cascade, daughters, Kim Weighter (Kevin) of Hawaii, Jessica Emory (Jeff) of Boise, Cindy of Cascade, Sabrina of Cascade, Andrea (Joe) of Cascade, and Karen of Cascade, 18 grandchildren and 11 great-grandchildren, and many nieces and nephews.

He loved all of his family and friends greatly. He was a legend in his own time, and is missed and loved by all.

published in The Star-News July 28, 2016
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Letter to Share:

July Newsletter from Commissioner Cruickshank

From the Desk of Commissioner Cruickshank,

Friday July 1st
This morning I worked on reports for the Americas Best Community for the projects I am involved with. Forestry and Veterans.
I participated in a conference call to see if Valley County would consider joining the Southwest Idaho RC&D. This would allow Valley County to sponsor with the SW ID RC&D as fiscal administration for the Payette and Boise Forest Coalitions and the Woody Bio-Mass Utilization Partnership which all will be losing their current fiscal organization.

Saturday July 2nd
I was honored to walk in the 4th of July Holiday Parade with Senator Mike Crapo, Commissioner Willey and several of the Valley County Republican Central Committee. The Cascade parade is always a well attended event to kick off the 4th of July.

Sunday July 3rd
Today I created the June newsletter

Monday July 4th
Late this afternoon found me at the Rotary booth in McCall’s, Legacy Park area, selling Corn Dogs to help raise funds for the Rotary work we do to help in the community.

Tuesday July 5th
Commissioner day today. The minutes of this meeting can be found at http://www.co.valley.id.us/ click on the commissioners section to find the minutes of our meetings. Additionally the commissioners convened as the Board of Equalization to hear a few appeals on assessments. We then ended our day reviewing portions of the proposed Fiscal Year 2017 budget.

Wednesday July 6th
Worked on emails, created the request letter to SW ID RC&D to become a member of their organization.
Attended Rotary today to hear a presentation on the University of Idaho’s McClure Center and the work they do in research and analysis.

Monday July 11th
Commissioner day today. See website for minutes. Interviewed and appointed a new Planning and Zoning member to fill a recently vacant seat. Convened as the Board of Equalization (BOE) to finish the appeals for this year and adjourn as the BOE. Reviewed more of the Fiscal Year 2017 budget.
Received a call from the U 0f I McClure Center requesting a quote to add into one of their brochures as Valley County has worked with them on prior studies for Valley County.

Tuesday July 12th
Visited with a citizen on National Forest access and how Valley County is working to keep the access open. Reviewed the Planning and Zoning application for the Hot Plant operation that has been appealed to the Board of County Commissioners.
Met with the Krassel Ranger District and Midas Gold to discuss the proposed actions to work on the Sugar Creek Road near Stibnite. Work will be completed in several phases over the years with a possible temporary bridge installation as needed.
Received a call from the Forest Service Capital Liaison in Boise to discuss Secure Rural Schools and compare notes. Also discussed the appointment of Resource Advisory Committee members and why it is such a long process.
Received a call from the consultant working on the right-of-ways for the East Lake Fork Bridge that had run into some issues and was looking for some help to resolve.
Received a call from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in Seattle to discuss potential work this summer in Valley County at the Cinnabar Mine.

Wednesday July 13th
I participated in a conference call with the National Forest Counties and Schools Coalition to receive an update on efforts to reauthorize the Secure Rural Schools program and support better forest management of the National Forests.
I reviewed documents to have a feasibility study performed in Valley County for a Bio-Mass Campus which will utilize various woody debris and create material for resale.

Thursday July 14th
I sent an email with questions to the Payette National Forest Supervisor on the Valley County Recreation Director becoming a co-chair of the Payette Forest Coalition, Lands Allocation sub-committee.
I did a review of the revenue and expenses proposed for the Fiscal Year 2017 Budget and provided some comments to the Valley County Clerk to clarify some concerns.
I reviewed the applications for interviews tomorrow for filling a Judge vacancy in the Fourth District for Elmore County.

Friday July 15th
Today the Magistrate Commission interviewed applicants for the Elmore County Judge position at the Ada County Courthouse.

Monday July 18th
Commissioner day today please see Valley County Website for minutes of the meeting.
The proposed Hot Plant hearing was today. Information provided on the application was in error so the entire process was sent back to the Planning and Zoning and the applicant was provided 60 days to resubmit the application with corrections.

Tuesday July 19th
I returned a call to a citizen looking for contact information on the Edwards Mosquito District.

Wednesday July 20th
I attended the Americas Best Community project lead meeting to hear updates on all the projects.

Thursday July 21st
Today I traveled to Long Beach, CA to attend the National Association of Counties (NACo) Annual Conference.

Friday July 22nd through Monday July 25th was the NACo Conference. Please see the attachment with my report on attending this conference.

Tuesday July 26th
I traveled home from the conference.

Wednesday July 27th
I attended a Meet and Greet with Valley County Surveyors and Valley County GIS staff to understand the needs of Valley County to provide good information for GIS work we have started.
I attended Rotary today to hear a presentation from the Boise State University Andrus Center and work they provide.

Thursday July 28th
I created my report of attending the 2017 NACo Annual Conference.

Well there we have another month gone by. I hope everyone is enjoying their summer.

Thanks for reading my newsletter.
Gordon
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FestTweet-a

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Idaho News:

YP music, harmonica festival Aug. 5-7

International harmonica players and top live music acts will highlight the 27th annual Yellow Pine Music and Harmonica Festival Friday through Sunday, Aug. 5-7, in the backcountry village of Yellow Pine east of McCall.

The family-friendly festival is focused on the music of the harmonica but also embraces all musical instruments and genres.

This year’s festival headliners are Tony Holiday and the Velvetones. The festival also will feature Dennis Cooper of Weiser, international harmonica wizard Ewald Grabher of Hailey, crowd favorite Roby Kap, David Richardson and Marvin Jaramillo.

The stage band this year is Willie and the Singlewides. Also appearing are some of Idaho’s best bands, including the West of Ustick Band, Doobious Cobb, the Half Fast Hillbillies, the Guess When Band, and the Jazz House Big Band.

Back by popular demand will be “Harmonica Masters At Play” on Saturday afternoon, Aug. 6.

The festival includes workshops, jam sessions, a music parade, live and silent auctions, and a special Children’s Time on the stage.

Those attending should come prepared to camp out. Forest Service campgrounds are available near town at no cost and unimproved camping is available on the Yellow Pine Golf Course.

For a schedule of events, directions and more information, visit http://yellowpinemusicandharmonicafestival.com or look on Facebook.

from the The Star-News
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Valley County Events

(from The Star-News http://www.mccallstarnews.com/ )

Arrowhead RV park in Cascade plans Artisans’ Faire Aug. 6

Taste of McCall returns Aug. 6 with food, drink, fun at River Ranch

Valley County Fair Aug. 8-13

‘Secret Gardens of McCall’ tour to be held Aug. 13 in six gardens

Singer Wendysue Fluegge to perform in McCall, Cascade Aug 12-14

Donnelly’s annual Huckleberry Festival on Friday through Sunday, Aug. 12-14

McCall – Local songwriters to perform Aug. 13 at Alpine Playhouse
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Tamarack owners protest again over paying back taxes

County defers decision on whether to seize 35 properties

BY DAN GALLAGHER for The Star-News July 28, 2016

For the second year in a row, the owners of vacant and developed land at Tamarack Resort near Donnelly have protested paying past-due property taxes.

On Monday, Valley County commissioners held a hearing on whether to seize the 35 parcels owned New TR Acquisitions Co. LLC, or NewTrac, on which $12.6 million in past-due property taxes are owed back to 2011.

But a protest was filed with the county last week by NewTrac claiming the notices of the past-due taxes were incorrectly worded.

Errors in wording was the same argument used by NewTrac last year when the county was about to seize the parcels. NewTrac managed to convince a state judge to rule the notices inadequate and force the county start the process over.

Commissioners on Monday listened to arguments on both sides and deferred a decision for two weeks.

full story: The Star-News
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Boise woman injured, traffic clogged in Idaho 55 rollover near Horseshoe Bend

Idaho Statesman July 29, 2016

Shelly Bodine, 24, was headed north on Idaho 55 in a Jeep Grand Cherokee early Friday afternoon when she failed to yield for slowing traffic, swerved and rolled her vehicle, Idaho State Police report.

Bodine was taken by ambulance to Saint Alphonsus Regional Medical Center, but details of her injuries were not available.

The Jeep came to rest in the southbound lane, which was blocked for about two and a half hours while crews worked to clear the scene. The crash is under investigation by the Idaho State Police.

source:
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Rancher’s family initiates wrongful death lawsuit

7/26/16 AP

BOISE, Idaho — The family of a rancher authorities say was shot and killed by two Adams County Sheriff’s deputies has filed a legal notice of their intent to sue the county.

The Idaho Statesman reports in a story on Tuesday that the family of Jack Yantis filed a tort claim earlier this year as a precursor to a wrongful death lawsuit seeking $500,000.

Authorities say the deputies shot and killed the 62-year-old Yantis on Nov. 1 after one of his bulls was hit by a car and charged emergency crews on a highway just north of the tiny town of Council in west-central Idaho.

Authorities said the deputies planned to shoot the injured bull when the rancher arrived with a rifle. Investigators say all of them fired their weapons. The shooting remains under investigation by the Idaho Attorney General’s Office and the U.S. Attorney’s Office.

continued:
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ISU student places second at national fiddlers contest

By Andrew Taylor Idaho State University  Jul 25, 2016

POCATELLO — Idaho State University student Shelby Rae Murdock recently placed second in the Young Adult Division at the National Oldtime Fiddlers’ Contest and Festival in Weiser, Idaho. The Young Adult Division is for fiddlers aged 18-36.

“This is the highest that I have ever placed at nationals before,” Murdock said. “It is hard balancing being a full-time student, teaching lessons full time, being married, and still finding time to practice fiddle and classical music for school on a daily basis. It felt great to see the motivation that I can still be successful and balance everything.”

continued:
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Fun Stuff:

Flight Over The Wilderness Area of Central Idaho

[hat tip to BF]
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Stolle Meadows Cabin on the Boise National Forest in Idaho

The historic and rustic Stolle Meadows Cabin is a single-room dwelling that has been restored to near original condition. The cabin is available year-round with a reservation from http://www.recreation.gov In winter, visitors ski and snowmobile the 6.5 miles to the cabin and in the summer months Warm Lake is less than 5 miles with plenty of boating, fishing and swimming. The cabin contains four single beds with foam pads, a table and chairs, dry sink, wood stove and firewood, propane cooking stove with fuel, pots and pans, dishes and tableware. There is no electricity available at the cabin. There is an outhouse with vault toilet and picnic table located outside. Drinking water is available year-round from a hand pump outside the cabin. Pets are allowed at the cabin and guests are asked to bring their own additional gear and supplies including bedding and extra lighting. There is a hot springs just a stone’s throw from the cabin. In the fall, the nearby Salmon Viewing Area provides opportunities to view the amazing fish from the interpretive boardwalk. We remind visitors to the Boise National Forest that reservations can be made at http://www.recreation.gov or by calling 1-877-444-6777. Further information is also available by calling the Forest Service at area code 208-373-4007.

[hat tip to SMc]
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Forest News:

The search for the U.S Capitol Christmas Tree

Dean Johnson, KTVB July 27, 2016

(Photo: Paul Boehlke/KTVB)

It was a search that started back in November. Now, nine months later the search for the Capitol Christmas Tree has been narrowed down to seven. Chris Niccoli who spends his time jumping out of planes to fight fires has been tasked with finding that perfect gem.

“A lot of looking. I’ve probably been up and down this road probably 10 times, actually because I knew there was some trees and I would stop and I would look at one and I’d go well maybe and I’d move on and I’d come back,” Niccoli said, who’s on the tree selection team.  “A lot of times after work I just got on my dirt bike, I love dirt biking and would just drive around the woods.”

Niccoli is a little limited on which trees he’s allowed to pick, as they have to be accessible to cranes and a semi-trailer. It’s a job he says is actually a little more stressful than being a smokejumper.

continued:
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Pine Butterfly

Donald W. Scott USDA

Pine butterfly, Neophasia menapia menapia (C. Felder & R. Felder, 1859), is a serious defoliator of ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex Laws.) as well as other conifers throughout western North America (Figure 1). It is transcontinental and can be found throughout the range of ponderosa pine from southern British Columbia through northern New Mexico, and from the Rocky Mountains westward to the eastern slopes of the Cascades and the Sierra Nevada mountain ranges.

continued:

[hat tip to BJ]
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Critter News:

Admixture in Two Proposed Wolf Species May Have Conservation Implications

Jul 27, 2016 GenomeWeb

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – North America’s eastern and red wolves do not appear to represent distinct species, but are hybrids between the coyote (Canis latrans) and gray wolf (C. lupus) species, according to a study appearing online today in Science Advances.

Researchers from the US, China, and Israel sequenced the genomes of 28 canids, including gray wolves, eastern wolves, red wolves, and coyotes from North America, gray wolf representatives from India, Iran, China, and Mongolia, a golden jackal, and three domestic dogs. They found that patterns in the genomes did not support unique ancestry for the eastern and red wolves, but rather pointed to a gradient of gray wolf and coyote ancestry in the eastern and red wolf genomes.

Consequently, the researchers contend that there is insufficient evidence for removing gray wolves from the list of animals protected under the Endangered Species Act.

“The US Fish and Wildlife Service has argued that the presence of the eastern wolf, rather than the gray wolf, in [the Great Lakes and eastern United States] is ground for removing ESA protection (delisting) from the gray wolf across its geographic range,” senior author Robert Wayne, an ecology and evolutionary biology researcher at the University of California at Los Angeles, and his co-authors wrote.

continued:
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Red and Eastern Wolves Are Hybrids, Not Species for Protection

JULY 29, 2016 BY WEI STAFF

“Wild canines in North America have had a complicated, controversial history, and a new study published yesterday in Science Advances adds to the current controversy of the endangered status of American wolves.

“The study, the most comprehensive to date, examined the DNA of the three American wolf species recognized by the U.S. government, with American coyotes and international specimens.

“The researchers found that two species in critical condition, the eastern wolf and the red wolf, are hybrids of gray wolves and coyotes, and do not have a separate ancestry. Eastern wolves were on average a gray wolf-coyote split, but red wolves were up to three-quarters coyote.

link:
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Two new sets of gray wolf pups confirmed in Oregon

By Kale Williams The Oregonian/OregonLive July 29, 2016

After being removed from the endangered species list, gray wolves in Oregon continue to rebound as the Department of Fish and Wildlife announced Thursday that two new litters of wolf pups have been confirmed after they were caught on trail cameras.

The two litters — one believed to be sired by celebrity wolf OR-7 in the Rogue-Siskiyou National Forest and the other by his brother, OR-3, in Lake County — mark the continued proliferation of a species that once roamed the entire state in large numbers, but was effectively eradicated in the mid 1900s in a government-sponsored attempt to appease livestock farmers.

“It’s incredibly exciting that Oregon’s wolves are starting to find their way back to places this remarkable species once called home,” Amaroq Weiss, West Coast wolf organizer for the Center for Biological Diversity, said in a statement. “The fact that individual wolves are coming into this same general area tells us how important it is to keep wildlands available for continued safe passage, and to keep legal protections in place for wolves at both the state and federal levels.”

OR-7, who got his name because he was the seventh wolf to be captured and fitted with a radio collar in Oregon, was the first to establish a pack, known as the Rogue Pack, in the western part of the state after more than 60 years.

continued:
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KWVR Oregon Wolf Education weekly Wolf Report

July 2016
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Eye of the Hunter

The reintroduction of wolves to Yellowstone park has been a topic of great controversy among conservationists, preservationists, and hunters.

5 minute video:

[hat tip to TM]
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Colorado wolf advocates, wildlife managers again feud over reintroduction

Kevin Fixler July 24, 2016 Summit Daily

The debate over the wolf’s place in Colorado remains a heated one.

A week ago, Colorado Parks and Wildlife (CPW) — the agency tasked with managing the state’s fishing, hunting, camping and boating and operating 42 state parks and more than 900,000 acres of wildlands — released a statement that climbing sightings of gray wolves over the last several years will lead to a “likely eventual establishment of their population in Colorado.” Because of this assumption, CPW was reminding the public that under the Endangered Species Act of 1973, those who kill a wolf could face up to a year in prison and upwards of $100,000 fines for each offense, per the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Many saw the announcement as harmless enough, with wolf advocates even commending CPW’s progressive effort to help protect the threatened population of this oft-romanticized species from the early days of the American West. But it’s the accompanying inference that wolf numbers will continue to organically grow in Colorado without a formal reintroduction that has set off yet another battle.

continued:

[hat tip to WEI]
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Grizzly euthanized in eastern Idaho after killing sheep

Associated Press KTVB July 26, 2016

ISLAND PARK, Idaho (AP) – A 26-year-old male grizzly bear officials say had recently killed seven sheep has been euthanized in eastern Idaho.

Idaho Department of Fish and Game officials say an examination of the bear while it was sedated found it had lost its upper teeth and its lower teeth were in bad shape.

Officials say its poor dental health caused the bear to prey on sheep. Officials say that combination led to the decision to euthanize the bear on Saturday after getting permission from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Officials trapped the bear 23 years ago for scientific purposes and it had not been known to be in any human-related conflicts until the killing of the sheep.

source:
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Fun Critter Stuff:

Zebra Race

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zebra-printer-low-ink

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HorseTouchFoot

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Fish & Game News:

https://idfg.idaho.gov/press
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Tips & Advice:

Watering Wisely In The Garden

The Old Farmer’s Almanac By  Robin Sweetser

Let’s explore some smart ways to save water in the garden.

An inch of water a week, is that too much to ask for? It doesn’t seem like much but that is the optimum amount for growing most vegetables and ornamentals. If you spread that inch of water out over a 10X10 foot space it equals 62 gallons!

The National Drought Mitigation Center reports that right now 44% of the country is experiencing conditions that are abnormally dry or worse.

What’s a gardener to do, especially when some areas have restricted or even banned outdoor water use?

* Healthy soil with added organc matter is critical for a good garden and even more important during a dry season. Build up your soil by adding lots of compost. Good soil absorbs water like a sponge.

* Mulch is the gardener’s friend in many ways but in a dry season it slows evaporation. It takes 1 inch of water 8 times longer to evaporate from mulched soil than from bare soil. Mulch prevents compaction and acts as a cushion during heavy rainfall helping water to soak in rather than run off. Runoff not only wastes water but can pollute nearby streams. Bare soil can lose up to 3/4 of the rain that falls on it to runoff and evaporation. Mulch moderates soil temperatures and also squelches those weeds that compete with your plants for precious moisture.

Here are more tips on a water-wise garden

Water Wisely

Let’s focus on the watering itself. What’s the smartest way to water our plants?

* Make the best use of your water by watering deeply but less often to encourage roots to grow down. Try to wet the soil to at least 6 inches down every 10 days or so.

* To discourage evaporation avoid mid-day watering.

* Sprinklers are fun but waste a lot of water. Soaker hoses and drip irrigation use much less water and deliver it close to the plants’ roots where it is needed. Keeping foliage dry has the added benefit of reducing disease problems.

* Soaker hoses are made of a porous material that allows water to slowly seep through it. Drip irrigation uses flexible tubing with tiny outlets called emitters that slowly drip water into the soil. After laying out the tubing or hoses in your garden, cover both systems with 2 inches of an organic mulch or use landscape fabric or plastic mulch. An inch of water slowly dripped onto the soil over a six hour period will soak in and not run off. Dig into the soil an hour after watering to see how deep the moisture went. Adjust the flow and timing accordingly.

* Once you have figured out the right watering schedule for your garden, the system can be automated using timers. Make every drop count but be aware, overwatering is just as damaging to plants as drought.

See our chart on when to water vegetables.

source:
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Fire Updates July 31

Stage 1 Fire Restrictions – BNF

Effective August 1, 2016 beginning at 12:01 a.m.

Under Stage 1 Fire Restrictions, the following acts are prohibited on the restricted state and private forest and range lands, and federally managed lands, roads and trails:

* Building, maintaining, attending or using a fire, campfire or stove fire except within an agency designated recreation site* and only within an agency provided structure, or on a private citizen’s own land and only within an owner-provided fire structure.

* Smoking, except within an enclosed vehicle, building or designated recreation site, or while stopped in an area at least three feet in diameter that is barren or cleared of all flammable materials.

* A “designated recreation site” is a recreation site that: 1) is included on the individual National Forest’s list of areas where campfires are permitted; and 2) which contains a Forest-provided fire ring. Campfires are not permitted at sites that do not have a Forest-provided ring. The list of approved sites is available at Ranger District offices or at: Boise National Forest

Map
20160801 BNF 2016 Stage 1 Restrictions MAP.pdf
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Pioneer Fire Press Release

Sunday, July 31, 2016

Pioneer Fire Information-208-392-9634
Boise National Forest Fire Information-208-384-3266

Aviation operations once again stopped for 45 minutes during a critical period of fire suppression due to an unmanned aircraft incursion. IF YOU FLY WE CAN’T. PLEASE DO NOT FLY DRONES IN OR NEAR THE FIRE AREA.

Fire managers will provide updates and answer questions at a community meeting tonight at the Boise Basin Senior Citizens Center in Idaho City. Time of the meeting is 7-8 p.m.

As the inversion lifted, fire activity increased and stayed very active throughout the day. The fire grew by 8,484 acres to a total size of 27,417 acres. It remains 27 percent contained. Personnel totals also increased to 1,188 people. Other resources remained relatively the same with 29 crews, 10 helicopters, 48 engines, 7 dozers, 13 water tenders, and 5 masticators.

Significant growth occurred on several parts of the perimeter spurred on by strong west/southwest winds and low relative humidity. The fire jumped Highway 21 near Whoop Um Up/ Lamar Creek and burned east-southeast forcing crews to abandon their lines and drop back to an existing contingency line prepared from Highway 21 to Sunset Mountain. The fire also pushed east toward Willow and Banner Creeks. Additionally, as the cold front passed, the northern flank near the upper Rock Creek drainage, as well as the area near Banner Creek, edged north making direct attack difficult and forcing fire fighters to drop back to planned secondary control lines.

Map

Heavy equipment and crews continued preparing control lines down Burns Ridge and searching for opportunity to cross Rock Creek in order to prevent the fire from moving into the Hole in the Wall area and toward Lowman. Crews successfully completed line north from Pilot Peak to the head of Elk Creek and around the entire west half of the fire to Grimes Creek near Coulter Summit.

Night crews will be conducting burn operations where possible in an attempt to secure the section of line north of Highway 21 at Mores Creek Summit.

Aviation resources flew throughout the day—with the exception of the 45-minute delay caused by a drone incursion—delivering water and retardant to slow the fire growth.

Fire managers praised the leadership of fireline personnel for taking initiative to adjust tactics as fire activity became erratic. Supervisors are emphasizing Life First concepts of Stop, Think, Talk, Then Act for all firefighters.

Firefighters will evaluate possible courses of action and will continue using heavy equipment where possible and capitalizing on any roads and natural barriers such as old burn scars. They will construct lines and burn out fuels where feasible.

Hot and dry conditions will prevail again today. Smoke will likely again be visible from great distances.

Fire personnel face additional hazards on the fireline, including old mining sites.

The area closure order for the fire can be viewed online at http://www.fs.usda.gov/alerts/boise/alerts-notices

and at inciweb.nwcg.gov

Information is also available at

https://www.facebook.com/Pioneer-Fire-682201165260518/

or at pioneerfire2016@gmail.com

Pioneer Fire Maps
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/maps/4866/

Pioneer Fire Photographs
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/photographs/4866/
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Firefighter injured as Pioneer Fire continues to grow

BY NICOLE BLANCHARD Idaho Statesman July 30, 2016

A firefighter was injured and taken to Saint Alphonsus in Boise via air ambulance while working the Pioneer Fire, which has burned along Idaho 21 since July 18, according to Jose Acosta with the U.S. Forest Service.

The firefighter, a hot shot team member from Nevada, was released with injuries “not as serious as we first feared,” said Acosta. The firefighter returned to his team, which had completed its service on the fire, Saturday to head back to Nevada.

“It was not a happy ending, but far better than we could have hoped,” said Acosta.

Acosta said there have been about 11 heat-related illnesses for responders over the almost two-week duration of the blaze. In addition, one firefighter lost a tooth when a hose fitting connector blew out and hit him in the face.

continued:
——————————–

Idaho History July 31, 2016

Doctors and Medicine

Idaho’s real doctors called out quacks just before 1900

By Arthur Hart Special to the Idaho Statesman July 23, 2016

The year 1893 was an important one in the history of Idaho medicine. The Idaho Statesman wrote on Aug. 31 that year: “The Doctors to Meet. Idaho State Medical Society to be Organized. A Crusade Against Quacks.”

The article that followed quoted the Pacific Medical Journal: “Idaho has long been pointed to as being the only state or territory in the Union in which a state medical organization could not be found. It could become a dumping ground for the poorly educated and the rejected applicants of other state examining boards.”

Doctors from across the state gathered in the council chambers of Boise’s new castle-like City Hall on the afternoon of Sept. 12, 1893. The code of ethics of the American Medical Association was adopted and it was determined that only reputable graduates of recognized medical colleges were eligible for membership in the new society. Officers were elected: president, W.W. Watkins, Moscow; vice president, I.H. Moore, Pocatello; secretary, C.L. Sweet, Boise; censors, E.L. Perrault, Boise; C.W. Shaff, Lewiston; and N.J. Brown, Hailey. The Statesman said, “The Society starts off well and next year will show a membership of nearly a hundred.”

The “crusade against quacks,” announced as one of the objectives of the new society, included all forms of quackery, defined there as “the promotion of fraudulent or ignorant medical practices by persons pretending to have education and skills they do not have.” Quackery included conspicuous advertising in the Statesman and other Idaho newspapers for patent medicines that claimed to cure just about every kind of ailment or complaint.

Two ads that appeared in the Statesman in January 1893 are typical. Each is illustrated with drawings of men before and after taking the medicine. “LOST MANHOOD” is the boldface headline for a product called “Nervia,” guaranteed to cure “any form of nervous prostration or any disorder of the genital organs of either sex, caused by excessive use of tobacco, alcohol or opium or on account of youthful indiscretions or overindulgence etc. dizziness, convulsions, wakefulness, headache, mental depression, softening of the brain, weak memory, bearing down pains, seminal weakness, hysteria, nocturnal emissions, spermatorrhoea (thus), loss of power and impotency, which if neglected may lead to premature old age and insanity. Positively guaranteed.”

H.E. Myers & Co, of Boise, signed the ad for this cure-all. Boise druggist W.S. Whitehead advertised a similar product that month with similar outrageous claims. It was called “Aphroditine, The Celebrated French Cure,” and offered a written guarantee and refund of your $5 if a permanent cure was not achieved.

Boise City and most other Idaho towns were blessed with the competent, well-trained medical doctors who had formed the Idaho State Medical Society to get rid of quackery, and this included patent medicines, sometimes called what they really were: “quack medicines.” Few of them were legally patented, but most were trademarked, and virtually all of them were laced with enough alcohol, and even morphine, opium or cocaine, to cause their users to become addicted.

Other medical news appeared regularly in Statesman pages in 1893, including interesting or unusual cases and operations performed by local doctors George Collister, C.L. Sweet, William Stephenson, E.L. Perrault and W.D. Springer.

Dr. H.P. Ustick, for whom the road is named, was an 1883 graduate of Hahnemann College in Philadelphia. Alone among Boise doctors in 1893, he advertised aggressively in the Idaho Statesman, claiming that he could cure all diseases of men, all female complaints, “treat diseases of the eye, ear, nose and throat; fitting glasses and artificial eyes, operates for cross-eyes, cataract, etc.” He promised “Cures Guaranteed in Every Case Taken.”

link to: IdahoHistoryDoctors.doc
— — — — — — — — — —

19th-century ads in Idaho promised miracle cures

By Arthur Hart Special to the Idaho Statesman July 30, 2016

Quack medicine ads appeared regularly in the Idaho Statesman in the 19th century, often over the name of a Boise drug store where they could be purchased without a prescription. Myers & Boomer and John F. Ridenbaugh had Main Street drug stores that advertised regularly. Others cure-alls advertised could be ordered only by mail.

This item appeared in the Statesman of August 29, 1889: “Renews Her Youth. Mrs. Phoebe Chesley, Peterson, Clay County, Iowa, tells the following remarkable story, the truth of which is vouched for by the residents of the town. ‘I am 73 years old, and have been troubled with kidney complaint and lameness for many years, could not dress myself without help. Now I am free from all pain and soreness, and am able to do all my own housework. I owe my thanks to Electric Bitters for having renewed my youth, and removed completely all disease and pains. Try a bottle, 50 cents and $1.00 at Myer & Boomer’s Drugstore.”

ElectricBittersCrateGroup-a
(source link)

Dr. Chambers Vital Restorer advertised “No Cure No Pay,” and claimed to “positively cure weakness, nervous and physical debility or premature decline.” Beggs’ Blood Purifier & Blood Maker promised women who used it “a clear, pearly and transparent skin. St. Patrick’s Pills promised to “cleanse and invigorate the system, purify the blood and do more good than a dollar bottle of blood purifier.” Dr. King’s New Life Pills “the wonderful Stomach and Liver Remedy, gives a splendid appetite, sound digestion and a regular body habit that insures perfect health and great energy. Only 25 cents at any drug store.”

In June, 1893, this ad appeared in the Moscow Mirror: “ONE DAY CURE HATTEE’S CONGO OIL. The Marvel of the present age. Cures Rheumatism, Sciatica, and Neuralgia. Pacific Coast Agents O.W.R. MFG Co. Portland O. For sale by all Moscow druggists.” In the center of the ad is a circular illustration of two white men facing five Africans, one of whom is pointing to some clay pots, evidently containing the miraculous Congo Oil.

That quackery was recognized for what it was by most early Idahoans is suggested by this item in the Idaho World of Idaho City on January 21, 1869: “A woman in Mississippi made five attempts to kill herself, and failed. She should have sent for a quack doctor.”

In December, 1905, the Emmett Index quoted the testimonial of a satisfied woman customer of a patent medicine: “Gentlemen— Before using your medicine I was too weak to spank the baby, but now I can lick my husband. Heaven bless you.”

On another tack, “Rules of Dress for Young Girls” appeared in the Statesman on January 13, 1893. To us in 2016 it is incredibly dated. “It seems to be the recognized rule that girls from two to eight shall wear long dress skirts. Above that age they are worn short to the knees, or just below, until twelve when they are again lengthened. At sixteen they reach nearly to the floor. Girls of twelve still wear their dresses fastened in the back. If tall for that age the dress skirt may reach to the shoe top. Among sensible people comfortable dresses which give full play to all the muscles and allow fullest development of the figure are considered in far better taste than those which are tightly fitted, perhaps over corsets.” Especially dated is this advice: “All wool undergarments, continuous from the neck to the feet, are essential for health. Physicians now are very apt also to recommend all wool night robes to take the place of those during the day, the change from wool to cotton being considered too great.”

That same month the Statesman quoted a noted doctor who warned parents that “mouth breathing” in a child, if not treated at once, could lead to “deafness and a peculiarly stupid, sleepy, inane, and foolish facial expression.”

link to: IdahoHistory19thCentDrugAds.doc
————————————-

page updated Nov 13, 2018

Weather Reports July 24-30

July 24 Weather:

At 9am it was 52 degrees and clear, moderate dew. Sunny warm day, mild breezes. At 230pm it was 85 degrees. At 815pm it was 78 degrees and clear. At midnight you could hardly see the stars for the haze in the air (smoke?)

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time July 25, 2016 at 09:00AM
Clear
Max temperature 90 degrees F
Min temperature 46 degrees F
At observation 58 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

July 25 Weather:

At 9am it was 58 degrees and clear. A few clouds after lunch. Partly cloudy at 5pm, hot and breezy. At 845pm it was 74 degrees and mostly clear (slight smoky haze.)

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time July 26, 2016 at 09:00AM
Mostly clear
Max temperature 93 degrees F
Min temperature 49 degrees F
At observation 61 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

July 26 Weather:

At 9am it was 61 degrees and mostly clear. Clouds moved in and mostly cloudy by 945am. Overcast and sprinkling lightly for a few minutes around 1045am and 66 degrees. Broken clouds by lunch time. Mostly sunny hot afternoon. At 820pm it was 81 degrees and mostly clear. At 1230am it was 60 degrees and too hazy to see stars.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time July 27, 2016 at 09:00AM
Clear
Max temperature 94 degrees F
Min temperature 49 degrees F
At observation 61 degrees F
Precipitation Trace
— — — — — — — — — — — —

July 27 Weather:

At 9am it was 61 degrees and clear. At 150pm it was 90 degrees and a few clouds. Hot sunny day. At 4pm it was 90 degrees. A few big clouds at 5pm. at 830pm it was 78 degrees and mostly clear (a little hazy.) At 1am it was 57 degrees and too hazy to see the stars.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time July 28, 2016 at 09:00AM
Clear
Max temperature 94 degrees F
Min temperature 48 degrees F
At observation 57 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

July 28 Weather:

At 9am it was 57 degrees and clear (dusty.) At 115pm it was 88 degrees and clear, light breeze. At 9pm it was 75 degrees. At 1130pm it was 63 degrees.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time July 29, 2016 at 09:00AM
Clear
Max temperature 94 degrees F
Min temperature 48 degrees F
At observation 59 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

July 29 Weather:

At 9am it was 59 degrees and clear. At 130pm it was 90 degrees. At 445pm it was 94 degrees, slight breeze. At 745pm it was 86 degrees. At 1145pm it was 69 degrees, clear (but hazy.)

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time July 30, 2016 at 09:00AM
Mostly clear
Max temperature 95 degrees F
Min temperature 49 degrees F
At observation 61 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

July 30 Weather:

At 9am it was 61 degrees and mostly clear. Hot dry sunny day, mild afternoon breezes. Around 730pm it was 82 degrees. At 9pm it was 76 degrees.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time July 31, 2016 at 09:00AM
Clear
Max temperature 95 degrees F
Min temperature 46 degrees F
At observation 57 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
————————————

Chow Mein

Serves 4-6

Ingredients

3 (5.6 oz.) packages Yaki-Soba noodles, seasoning packets discarded
3 carrots, diced
3 cloves garlic, chopped
1 onion, diced
2-3 chicken breasts, cubed
2 cups bok choy
2 cups cabbage, shredded
2 cups bean sprouts
1/4 cup peanut oil, divided
1/4 cup low-sodium soy sauce
1 tablespoon sesame oil
1 tablespoon brown sugar
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon white pepper

Directions

In a small bowl, whisk soy sauce, sesame oil, garlic, brown sugar, salt and white pepper together. Set aside.

Bring a large pot of water to boil and add Yaki-Soba noodles, cooking 1-2 minutes, or until loosened. Drain and set aside.

In a large skillet or wok, heat 1 1/2 tablespoons peanut oil over medium high heat. Once hot, cook chicken until browned on all sides and no longer pink. Remove from heat. Add onion and carrots and cook until tender. 3-4 minutes, stirring frequently.

Add in cabbage and cook until slightly softened and heated through; 1-2 minutes. Remove vegetables from wok and set aside.

Pour remaining peanut oil into the now empty wok and allow to heat up. Add noodles and stir them continuously, making sure they are not in a large clump. Cook until crispy, about 3 minutes.

Pour in soy sauce mixture and toss to coat noodles. Stir in bean sprouts and bok choy, and cook until the sprouts begin to turn transparent and the bok choy begins to wilt.

Add the rest of vegetables and chicken back to the wok and stir until heated through again.

Serve immediately
——————————————–

Fire Updates July 30

Stage 1 Fire Restrictions – BNF

Effective August 1, 2016 beginning at 12:01 a.m.

Under Stage 1 Fire Restrictions, the following acts are prohibited on the restricted state and private forest and range lands, and federally managed lands, roads and trails:

* Building, maintaining, attending or using a fire, campfire or stove fire except within an agency designated recreation site* and only within an agency provided structure, or on a private citizen’s own land and only within an owner-provided fire structure.

* Smoking, except within an enclosed vehicle, building or designated recreation site, or while stopped in an area at least three feet in diameter that is barren or cleared of all flammable materials.

* A “designated recreation site” is a recreation site that: 1) is included on the individual National Forest’s list of areas where campfires are permitted; and 2) which contains a Forest-provided fire ring. Campfires are not permitted at sites that do not have a Forest-provided ring. The list of approved sites is available at Ranger District offices or at: Boise National Forest

Map
20160801 BNF 2016 Stage 1 Restrictions MAP.pdf
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Pioneer Fire

Fire Information: 208-392-9634 Hours: 7a.m. – 8 p.m.

Acres: 18,933
Fire hazards: Steep terrain, dry fuels, poor access
Containment: 27 percent
Structures threatened: 10
Location: 8 miles north of Idaho City, Idaho
Damaged or destroyed structures: 2
Date of detection: 18 July 2016
Evacuations: 35 people
Personnel: 1121
Cost: $9,583,418
Resources available include:
Hot Shot Crews: 10
Type 2 Crews:17
Camp Crews: 4
Helicopters:10
Engines: 49
Dozers: 4
Watertenders: 13
Mastcators: 5

The area closure order for the fire can be viewed online at http://www.fs.usda.gov/alerts/boise/alerts-notices and at inciweb.nwcg.gov

Hwy 21 is closed 6 miles north of Idaho City to 2 miles south of the Lowman-Banks Road intersection. Extensive Forest closure area.

Pioneer Fire Maps
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/maps/4866/

Pioneer Fire Photographs
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/photographs/4866/
— —

Pioneer Fire jumps highway 21

July 30 5pm

Fire Update: Hot windy conditions are posing some challenges for fire fighters on the Pioneer Fire. They could not hold their lines as the fire spotted across Highway 21 at Mores Creek Summit. It is burning southeast toward Sunset Mt. Lookout. Crews have dropped back and are using the prepared contingency line as a control line. Another area of activity is the eastern perimeter near Banner Cr. road and Kempner Ranch. Fire fighters are currently moving to other identified opportunities for contingency lines.
— —

7-30 Pioneer Fire-News Release

IDAHO CITY, Idaho – Fire managers will provide updates and answer questions at two community meetings: Tonight the Crouch Community Hall; and Sunday at the Boise Basin Senior Citizens Center in Idaho City. All meetings start at 7 p.m.

A 2,739 acre growth raised the fire total to 18,733acres. It remains 27 percent contained. Personnel totals also increased to 1,121 people.

The fire activity was most active on the east side of the 386 road south from Burns Ridge, including the upper Rock Creek area and Mores Creek Summit. South-southwest winds throughout the day pushed the fire south and east. Firefighters and heavy equipment used a mixture of direct and indirect tactics in an attempt to slow the fire’s progress. When conditions allowed, firefighters conducted burn out operations especially along the Highway 21 corridor, keeping the fire to the west and north of the dozer line from Pilot Peak to the highway. The north flank of the fire did not make major gains, but was active in the upper Rock Creek area. Crews again used mixed tactics and equipment working toward Burns Ridge, where firefighters are building an indirect line to stop the fire from moving into the Hole in the Wall area. Night crews will continue this strategy in an attempt to keep the fire in check.

A structure protection group assessed and improved areas surrounding lookouts and recreational yurts in an effort to lessen the possibility of them burning.

Aviation again played a pivotal role in the support of the suppression action, as well as conducting a medical evacuation for a non-life-threatening injury.

The west side of the fire is increasingly secure, with crews completing and improving containment lines and conducting mop-up operations north toward Burns Ridge. A helicopter inserted a rappel crew into the west side of the fire to begin rehabbing lines and building water-bars to minimize erosion.

Firefighters are taking similar actions today, using heavy equipment where possible and capitalizing on any roads and natural barriers. Firefighters will construct lines and burnout fuels where feasible.

Hot and dry conditions will prevail again today. A passing cold front this evening may produce thunderstorms with gusty, erratic winds and increased fire behavior.

Smoke will likely again be visible from great distances.

Fire personnel face additional hazards on the fireline, including old mining sites.

The area closure order for the fire can be viewed online at
http://www.fs.usda.gov/alerts/boise/alerts-notices

and at inciweb.nwcg.gov

Information is also available at
https://www.facebook.com/Pioneer-Fire-682201165260518/

or at pioneerfire2016@gmail.com

— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Comet Fire

Comet Fire now 35 percent contained

NORTH FORK, Idaho – The Comet Fire, which was started by lightning on Tuesday, July 26, is now 35% contained at 357 acres.

Two heavy helicopters continued dropping water on the fire, assisted by a light helicopter which will also be used for supply missions for firefighters camped out along the fireline. One hundred twenty-nine firefighters are working on the fire, including a hotshot crew and a wildland fire module, in addition to smokejumpers, heli-rappellers, and engine crews. Today was the first day that conditions were considered safe enough for crews to “go direct” on the fire, digging fireline along the open perimeter where the fire continues to burn. This tactic was made feasible by the hard work of firefighters earlier in the week, as well as the arrival of additional crews.

Weekend drivers and rafters between the town of Salmon and the North Fork area are advised to use caution and steer clear of helicopter operations. The Idaho Highway Patrol will be reminding drivers not to stop at pull-outs in this area. For the safety of firefighters and the public, helicopters cannot dip from spots where cars are parked too close, or where rafters are lingering in the river. An emergency area closure is in effect for the area surrounding and north of the fire, but all the main roads in the area remain open. The complete area closure can be viewed on InciWeb, under the Comet Fire.

With continuing hot, dry weather conditions making vegetation more prone to burn, the Salmon-Challis National Forest and the Salmon and Challis Field Offices of the BLM are moving to very high fire danger beginning at 6 a.m. on Saturday, July 30.

http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4894/

Comet Fire Maps
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/maps/4894/
— — — —

Roaring Fire

The Roaring Fire, also started on Tuesday, July 26 by the same storm passage as the Comet Fire, is burning in a remote part of the Frank Church-River of No Return wilderness on the ridge between Roaring and Goat Creeks above the confluence of the Middle Fork Salmon and Salmon Rivers. This fire is located adjacent to the 2014 Goat Fire and is being managed to allow fire play its natural role in wilderness. It is anticipated that this fire will contribute to smoke in both the Main and Middle Fork of the Salmon Rivers depending on wind and weather conditions. At this time, this fire is not impacting river use or camps.
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Cedar Fire

The July 17, lightning caused Cedar fire, continues to burn in the Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness and is under the management of the Powell Ranger Station. The fire is located 2 miles northwest of Elk Summit and 11 miles south of the Powell Ranger Station.

The fire initially saw little growth due to recent wetting rains. As temperatures returned to normal, fire activity increased and the fire grew as it progressed upslope and flanked up drainage. The fire is burning in mature Spruce and Sub-alpine fir in the Cedar Creek drainage, Lodgepole Pine stands are on the ridge tops, and Cedar in wet areas. Single and group tree torching has been visible with short uphill crown runs. Smoke will continue to be seen intermittently as weather systems pass through, fire activity increases, and changes in temperature occur.

Due to its relative remote location and its close proximity to previous year’s fires, long-term management of the fire is planned. The fire will continue to be closely monitored by ground and aerial resources to protect identified values at risk in accordance with resource management objectives in the Forest Plan. Potential values at risk include the Elk Summit Guard Station, Kooskooskia trailhead, Graves Peak Lookout, Hoodoo Creek bridge and Bridge Creek bridge.

Information will be posted at the Lolo Pass Visitor Center, Elk Summit, Kooskooskia trailhead, the junction of the Forest Service road 358 and Forest Service road 360 and on the Nez Perce-Clearwater National Forests website.

http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4874/
——————————–

Fire Update July 29

Fire Restrictions to be Implemented in Treasure Valley and West Central Mountains

July 29, 2016
Contact: Keri Steneck (BLM) 208-384-3378
Public Affairs (Boise NF) 208-373-4105
Emily Callihan (IDL) 208-334-0236

BOISE, Idaho – With the threat of wildfire danger increasing throughout southwest Idaho, local wildland fire management agencies will implement Stage 1 Fire Restrictions, effective August 1, 2016 beginning at 12:01 a.m. They will remain in effect until further notice. These restrictions are intended to decrease the chance of any preventable fires in the designated areas.

The identified areas going into Stage 1 Fire Restrictions include private and public lands protected by the Boise National Forest, Boise District BLM and State and Endowment Lands within:

* Ada, Canyon, Gem, Payette, Elmore, Boise, Valley and Washington Counties

* Within Washington County all Bureau of Reclamation Lands surrounding Mann Creek Reservoir

* Within Valley County all Bureau of Reclamation Lands surrounding Cascade Reservoir

* Within Elmore and Boise Counties all Bureau of Reclamation Lands surrounding Arrowrock and Anderson Ranch Reservoirs

For a map of the Treasure Valley and West Central Mountain Zones visit: Idaho Fire Information

Under Stage 1 Fire Restrictions, the following acts are prohibited on the restricted state and private forest and range lands, and federally managed lands, roads and trails:

* Building, maintaining, attending or using a fire, campfire or stove fire except within an agency designated recreation site* and only within an agency provided structure, or on a private citizen’s own land and only within an owner-provided fire structure.

* Smoking, except within an enclosed vehicle, building or designated recreation site, or while stopped in an area at least three feet in diameter that is barren or cleared of all flammable materials.

*A “designated recreation site” is a recreation site that: 1) is included on the individual National Forest’s list of areas where campfires are permitted; and 2) which contains a Forest-provided fire ring. Campfires are not permitted at sites that do not have a Forest-provided ring. The list of approved sites is available at Ranger District offices or at: Boise National Forest

Exemptions for Stage 1 Areas:

* Persons with a written permit that specifically authorizes the otherwise prohibited act.

* Persons using fire solely by liquid petroleum or LPG fuels. Such devices, including propane campfires, may be used only in an area cleared of flammable material.

* Private landowners using charcoal (disposed of properly) or propane barbecues on their own lands.

* Persons conducting activities in those designated areas where the activity is specifically authorized by written posted notice.

* Any federal, state or local officer or member of an organized rescue or firefighting force, in the performance of an official duty.

* All land within a city boundary.

An exemption does not absolve an individual or organization from liability or responsibility for any fire started by the exempted activity.

The maximum penalty for violating a fire restriction order may differ depending on the agency: U.S. Forest Service – The maximum penalty for violating the restriction order is $5,000 for individuals and $10,000 for corporations and/or 6 months imprisonment. BLM – Punishable by a fine of not more than $1,000 and/or imprisonment for not more than 12 months. IDL – Misdemeanor and actual cost of suppression

Specific language pertaining to the restriction designated areas follows:

Treasure Valley Fire Restrictions Zone – All of Ada, Canyon, Gem, Payette and Washington Counties. Portions of Boise County including the administrative boundary of Lucky Peak Lake to Arrowrock Dam, south shore of Arrowrock Reservoir and that portion of Elmore County that lies south of the South Fork Boise River to Anderson Ranch Dam, south along Anderson Dam Road (FS Rd 134) to Highway 20, east on Highway 20 to the Elmore/Gooding County line south to Interstate 84. The Treasure Valley Restriction area is bounded by the Idaho/Oregon boundary to Oreana then follows the Bachman Grade to Triangle and continues east-northeast of the Owyhee Front to the Bruneau River. The northern boundary begins near Weiser, Idaho and follows Highway 95 to Indian Valley, then generally follows the Little Weiser River to the Payette and Boise National Forest boundary lines.

West Central Mountains Fire Restrictions Zone – Boise National Forest, Boise District BLM and State and Endowment Lands within Elmore County, Boise County, and Valley County to include all Bureau of Reclamation Lands surrounding Cascade Reservoir. From the point where the Boise National Forest boundary intersects State Highway 20 near Dixie following the Boise National Forest boundary west and north along the ridge of the Danskin to Boise Front foothills and extending north encompassing the Idaho Department of Lands to its intersection back with the Boise National Forest boundary near Sagehen Reservoir. The far northern boundary includes all Boise National Forest lands, excluding the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness. All lands north of Sagehen Reservoir including Tripod Mountain and West Mountain within the North Fork Payette River drainage north to near Tamarack Resort.

Map
20160801 BNF 2016 Stage 1 Restrictions MAP.pdf
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Pioneer Fire

Firefighters continue to construct containment line; community meeting in Lowman tonight

IDAHO CITY, Idaho, July 29, 2016 — The Pioneer Fire again grew mainly eastward, increasing in size by more than 3,000 acres. The fire is now 16,204 acres and 27 percent contained. Using retardant to try to keep the fire in check, firefighters and heavy equipment tried to build direct line east of Highway 21. Northwest winds overnight pushed the fire south in this area.

To the north, where fire is burning in the Coulter Creek Summit area and in the headwaters of Rock Creek, firefighters constructed fire line down a ridge to prevent fire from moving further down into Rock Creek and scouted for roads and natural barriers to construct contingency lines. On the southern flank, crews began burning east from bulldozed contingency lines in the Pilot Peak area to secure the fire down to Highway 21.

Control actions east of the contingency lines from Pilot Peak down to the highway are planned today. Firefighters will continue trying to control the new fire growth east of the highway. To the north of this area, they are assessing any structures and working on connecting roads and natural features to form a contingency line.

In preparation for possible thunderstorms over the weekend, a crew will install waterbars on the southeastern perimeter to help prevent mud and water from entering the Elk Creek drainage, the watershed for Idaho City. On the western flank, where work is nearing completion, crews will continue to hold and improve the line.

Hot and dry conditions will prevail again today, producing similar fire behavior. Smoke will likely again be visible from great distances. A cold front is expected to move into the fire area tomorrow, bringing slightly cooler temperatures, gustier winds and the chance of thunderstorms.

Fire managers will provide updates and answer questions at three community meetings on the weekend; tonight at the Emergency Services Building, seven miles east of Lowman; Saturday at the Crouch Community Hall, and Sunday at the Ray Robison Community Hall in Idaho City. All meetings are at 7 p.m.

The area closure order for the fire can be viewed online at http://www.fs.usda.gov/alerts/boise/alerts-notices and at inciweb.nwcg.gov
— —

Pioneer Fire Closures
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/closures/4866/

Pioneer Fire Photographs
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/photographs/4866/

Single Engine Airtanker drop on the Pioneer Fire

Pioneer Fire Maps
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/maps/4866/
— —

Southwest Idaho wildfire crosses highway, yurts threatened

7/28/16 AP

IDAHO CITY, Idaho — A southwest Idaho wildfire burning timber in rugged terrain early on Thursday crossed a state highway and threatened a backcountry yurt system popular among winter recreationists.

Officials say the 20-square-mile blaze burning west to east crossed State Highway 21 about 5 miles south of Lowman.

“They have crews over there, it looks like they can get to it by land,” fire spokeswoman Susan Blake said.

The spreading fire threatens the backcountry yurt system. There are six yurts with a replacement cost of $60,000 each that are booked solid through the winter by cross country and telemark skiers, said Leo Hennessy, who manages the system for Idaho Parks and Recreation.

The yurts, round, tent-like structures with a dome roof and plastic skins, have 20-foot diameters and remain in place all year. They are also used in the summer.

… Several mining structures have been lost, she said, but it’s not clear if they were in use or from historic mining. She said no homes are under evacuation in the lightly populated area.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Investigators still searching for leads one month after Table Rock Fire

KTVB July 29, 2016

BOISE — July 29 marks one month since a fire burned thousands of acres and one home in the foothills near Table Rock.

The blaze was sparked by fireworks.

Detectives with the Ada County Sheriff’s Office say they’ve followed up on dozens of tips throughout the month-long investigation, but leads are drying up.

They’re still asking for the public’s help to find whoever is responsible for the fire.

“This is weighing on somebody’s conscience and we just need somebody to call us and let us know what happened,” said Detective Justin Elliott. “I think this was an accident, but we just need to verify that.”

… Anyone with information on the Table Rock Fire is asked to call the Ada County Sheriff’s Office at 208-577-3723. Tips can also be emailed to cau@adaweb.net.

full story w/video:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

28 July — Eastern Idaho Fire Update

Idaho Falls, ID – Smoke continues to impact all of eastern Idaho as a result of fires burning in western Idaho, Northern California, and western Wyoming. The stagnant air resulting from the prevailing hot weather is causing the smoke to linger, particularly in the valleys. As a reminder, there are several links in the lower right hand side of the page to information on smoke conditions and air quality.

Box Canyon Fire
The Box Canyon Fire was fully contained last night. The fire burned a total of 27 acres of BLM land at the mouth of Blackrock Canyon, south of Pocatello. The increase in acreage is due to more accurate mapping. The cause of the fire is believed to be a blown tire from traffic on I-15 northbound. Fire personnel will continue to patrol the fire perimeter today and mop up hotspots, particularly underneath juniper trees where larger fuels continue to smolder. At the end of today, the hand crew will be released to return to the Big Elk Fire. Tomorrow, resources will rehabilitate suppression work, including the dozer line.

South Mink Fire
Minimal resources remain on the South Mink Fire as most were released late Wednesday. The remaining firefighters will continue to monitor the fire throughout the day as heavy downed timber continues to smolder. The closure that was in place on Forest Road 163 will be lifted at once all personnel are demobilized from the fire. The human-caused South Mink Fire is also still under investigation.

Big Elk Fire
The Big Elk Fire is still estimated at 2 acres. The resources currently assigned to the fire are performing assessments and pretreatments of trailheads and other infrastructure and resources in the fire area. The hand crew that was staged in Swan Valley yesterday was sent to the Box Canyon Fire last night. They will return to the fire tonight and spend the next two days performing pretreatments around values at risk. A web camera was placed on an opposing ridge for fire managers to constantly view the fire behavior throughout the daylight hours.

Lanes Creek Fire
The Lanes Creek Fire continues to burn about 9 air miles west of Freedom, Wyoming. Fire staff on the CTNF are managing the fire to meet multiple objectives, including allowing fire to play its natural role in the ecosystem by removing dense conifers and encouraging aspen regeneration. A web camera allows fire personnel to monitor the fire constantly, while firefighters on the ground have completed pre-treatments to minimize the fire’s potential impact to state and private lands. The fire has shown little activity since the last mapped perimeter of 116 acres. Limited resources are assigned to the fire; however, managers are prepared to increase the staffing to meet the needs of the incident.

Thunderstorms are likely over the weekend. While there are no fire restrictions on lands managed by the Idaho Falls District BLM or Caribou-Targhee National Forest, it is important that residents and visitors take precautions to prevent human-caused fires. Dragging chains and blown tires are common causes of roadside fires. Perform preventative maintenance on your vehicles and trailers. Keep campfires in fire rings and ensure they are completely out before leaving your campsite. Additional wildfire updates and fire prevention tips are available on http://www.IdahoFireInfo.com. One less spark means one less Idaho wildfire.

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Cedar Fire

Nez Perce-Clearwater NFs Fire Update

Wilderness Fire Continues to Burn in the Cedar Creek Drainage

Kamiah, Idaho (July 28, 2016) – The July 17, lightning caused Cedar fire, continues to burn in the Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness and is under the management of the Powell Ranger Station. The fire is located 2 miles northwest of Elk Summit and 11 miles south of the Powell Ranger Station.

Periods of increased fire activity has been observed as the fire continues to advance to the southwest towards the Cedar Creek drainage. Continued growth is also expected to the north due to dry, steep slopes in the Cedar Creek drainage. The fire is currently estimated at 490 acres.

The fire is burning in mature Spruce and Sub-alpine fir in the Cedar Creek drainage, Lodgepole Pine stands are on the ridge tops, and Cedar in wet areas. Numerous natural barriers and past fire events lie east of the Cedar fire.

During active burn periods, smoke is visible from the Elk Summit road, the Powell Ranger Station and in the Bitterroot Valley. Fire managers are working with air quality specialists to monitor smoke and potential impacts to communities. Smoke will continue to be seen intermittently as fire activity increases, weather systems pass through, and changes in temperature occur.

Forest Service trail #6, Cedar Ridge, remains closed for public health and safety due to wildfire.

The fire is currently not threatening life or property. Long term management of the fire is planned to meet resource objectives and maintain the natural occurrence of fire in wilderness. The fire will continue to be closely monitored by ground and aerial resources to protect potential values at risk. Potential values at risk include the Elk Summit Guard Station, Kooskooskia trailhead, Graves Peak Lookout, Hoodoo Creek bridge and Bridge Creek bridge.

Fire and closure information will be posted on InciWeb at http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4874/, the Lolo Pass Visitor Center, Elk Summit, Kooskooskia trailhead, the junction of the Forest Service road 358 and Forest Service road 360 and on the Nez Perce-Clearwater National Forests website.

Know before you go. Visitors planning recreation activities in the area are encouraged to contact the Lochsa/Powell Ranger District at (208) 942-3113, to get the most up to date fire information.

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NIFC

July 29, 2016

Wide-spread fire activity continues throughout the western states. Fires in southern California and the Great Basin area are top priorities. The Soberanes and Sand fires in southern California have burned over 68,000 acres. The majority of the fires in the Great Basin were started by lightning. Firefighers and other resources will remain positioned in the Great Basin due to expected thunderstorm activity this weekend.

Weather: Widely scattered thunderstorms will develop across the Great Basin and the central and southern Rockies. Isolated storms are possible in California and across the northern Rockies. A cold front sagging through the Upper Midwest will push thunderstorms into the central Plains, the Ohio Valley and into New England. Scattered storms will also form over the lower Mississippi Valley and the along the Gulf Coast. Very hot conditions will continue across most of the West and across the southern third of the country. The northern Plains, the Great Lakes region and New England will be mild. Alaska will have scattered showers and a few thunderstorms statewide. Temperatures will be mild in the South and Interior and cool in the North.

States currently reporting large fires:

Alaska (5)
Arizona (3)
California (2)
Colorado (3)
Idaho (4)
Montana (2)
Nevada (2)
New Mexico (2)
Oregon (1)
South Dakota (1)
Utah (2)
Wyoming (4)

Idaho Fires: 4
Acres: 13,440
Comet Salmon-Challis National Forest Acres: 356 Location: 13 miles north of Salmon
* Lanes Creek Caribou-Targhee National Forest Acres: 115 Location: 30 miles northeast of Soda Springs
Pioneer Boise National Forest Acres: 12,869 Location: 5 miles north of Idaho City
* Roaring Salmon-Challis National Forest Acres: 100 Location: 31 miles northwest of Salmon

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Fire Update July 28

Pioneer Fire spreads east of Idaho State Highway 21

Pioneer Fire Press Release July 28, 2016

IDAHO CITY – The Pioneer Fire, burning north of Idaho City, grew eastward yesterday and crossed Idaho State Highway 21 north of China Creek overnight. Night crews immediately started building containment line around the area east of the highway. Today, firefighters supported by heavy equipment, will continue building line in the area in an attempt to halt further eastward progression of the fire.

The fire is now 12, 869 acres and 35 percent contained. A total of 983 people are assigned to the fire, including 10 hotshot crews and 17 Type 2 crews, 36 engines, 10 helicopters, nine water tenders, four bulldozers and five masticators are also working on the fire.

To the north and south of where the fire crossed Highway 21, preparation for possible burnout operations has been completed from Banner Ridge south to Mores Creek Summit. A contingency dozer line from Pilot Peak down to Highway 21 is also finished.

To the north, the fire burned into the Grimes Creek area and is established in the headwaters of Rock Creek. Crews are scouting for opportunities to use natural barriers and roads as control lines in order to keep the fire from moving north.

Firefighters’ efforts to protect the Elk Creek watershed, the water source for Idaho City, are proceeding successfully. The southwestern and western flanks of the fire are now in mop-up-and-patrol status.

Similar fire activity is expected today, with temperatures remaining high for the next several days. Smoke will likely again be visible from great distances. Idaho City has not been impacted by smoke and is open to visitors.

Structure protection and initial attack resources are available for quick response as needed.

A Great Basin Type 1 Incident Management Team, under Incident Commander Beth Lund, assumed command of the fire at 6 a.m.

The area closure order for the fire can be viewed online at http://www.fs.usda.gov/alerts/boise/alerts-notices and inciweb.nwcg.gov.
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Pioneer Fire

Unmanned Aircraft Systems (Drones) seen twice on Pioneer Fire; air operations threatened

BOISE, Idaho, July 28, 2016 — Fire management officials are concerned that two drones have been reported in the vicinity of the Pioneer Fire, having the potential to disrupt aerial fire suppression operations.

The first incident was reported on July 22, within the fire perimeter, and the second was spotted on July 26, in the heliport operational area near Idaho City. Although aircraft operations were not suspended, air operation officials say such situations could easily do that.

“We cannot operate either helicopters or fixed wing air tankers if there are immediate reports of a drone in the fires proximity and we will immediately terminate operations until the area is cleared,” said Bill Hayes, Incident Management Team 3 Air Operations Branch Director. “Pilots may not see a drone and if they strike one it could down an aircraft or significantly damage one.”

Hayes emphasized the serious nature of these intrusions, noting that on other fires with drone intrusions air operations were suspended, and even in one case shut down for an entire day.

“Air support is a critical part of fire suppression operations and if that is lost, the risk of a fire increasing in size, threatening firefighters or public property significantly increases” Hayes added. “There is no business for a drone to be anywhere near a fire incident.”

The drones were within a Temporary Flight Restriction (TFR) area which is put in place around wildfires to protect firefighting operations. No one other than the agencies involved in the firefighting effort can fly any manned or unmanned aircraft in a TFR.

If an operator endangers manned aircraft or people on the ground with an unmanned aircraft, they could be liable for a fine ranging from $1,000 to a maximum of $25,000.

Hayes added that “if you fly, we can’t – keep your drone on the ground and let firefighters and aircraft do their jobs.”

For further information regarding drones in a fire suppression area, contact the National Interagency Fire Center at 208-387-5437. For information regarding air operations on the Pioneer Fire, call the Pioneer Fire Incident Command Post at 208-392-9634.
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Pioneer Fire

Date of Origin Monday July 18th, 2016 approx. 05:00 PM
Location 8 miles north of Idaho City
Total Personnel 983
Size 12,869 Acres
Percent of Perimeter Contained 35%

Pioneer Fire Maps
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/maps/4866/

Pioneer Fire Photographs
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/photographs/4866/

Pioneer Fire dark plume 7-26-16

Pioneer Fire Closures
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/closures/4866/
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Southwest Idaho wildfire doubles in size to 14 square miles

7/27/16 AP

IDAHO CITY, Idaho — A wildfire burning in rugged terrain in southwest Idaho doubled to 14 square miles on Wednesday, and officials closed a state highway in an attempt to use it as a firebreak.

… About 900 firefighters backed by 10 helicopters are fighting the blaze that’s burning in timber. About 35 campers have been evacuated, and 10 structures are threatened.

It’s not clear what the structures are, but at least some are yurts for campers. Officials also expanded a closure in the Boise National Forest.

… Brooks said a Type 2 Incident Management Team has been managing the fire, but a more experienced Type 1 team has arrived. It’s not yet clear if the Type 1 team will take over or if the two teams will split management of the fire, she said.

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Pioneer Fire grows to more than 10,000 acres, reaches Idaho 21

KTVB July 27, 2016

IDAHO CITY – Fire crews are working around the clock in their efforts to contain the stubborn Pioneer Fire burning north of Idaho City.

Hot temperatures and shifting winds helped push the fire to around 10,084 acres by Wednesday night. Despite the fire’s growth, firefighters have been successful in keeping the flames out of the Elk Creek drainage, which is the main source of water for Idaho City.

On Tuesday, officials shut down a 25-mile stretch of Idaho 21, so that firefighters can use the highway as a fuel break. Crews have been working to clear brush and trees along the road, which is closed between just north of Idaho City to just south of Lowman.

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MM 52 Highway 55 Fire

100 percent containment reached on brush fire near Avimor

KTVB July 27, 2016

ADA COUNTY – Crews got the upper hand on a brush fire burning near the Avimor subdivision north of Eagle overnight.

Eagle Fire Division Chief William Stone told KTVB Wednesday morning that the MM 52 Highway 55 Fire was no longer actively burning, although firefighters remain on scene mopping up and putting out hot spots.

The Eagle Fire Department tweeted shortly after 10 p.m. Wednesday that the fire was 100 percent contained.

The Bureau of Land Management expected to have the fire controlled by 6 p.m. Thursday.

Mapping showed the fire burned 440 acres, according to BLM spokesperson Carrie Bilbao.

The blaze began along Idaho 55 at about 4:30 p.m. Tuesday, and spread quickly toward the Avimore subdivision. Fire crews were able to cut off the flames on the south side before the fire reached homes.

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Three-alarm hay fire breaks out in Parma

KTVB July 27, 2016

PARMA – KTVB has a crew at the scene of a hay fire in Parma. It was first reported shortly before 3 p.m. Wednesday near the intersection of Packer and Pearl roads.

Deputy Chief Jeff Rodgers of the Parma Fire Department says 624 tons of hay caught fire. That fire has destroyed an abandoned potato cellar, and burned more than an acre of grass outside the barn.

Firefighters from Parma, Caldwell, Nyssa, Wilder, Payette, Middleton and New Plymouth have been called in, due in large part to the heat. The fire is mostly under control now, but crews will be there for several more hours this afternoon and evening to make sure the fire does not spread. The cause has not been determined.

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Comet Fire

Salmon – Challis National Forest

North Fork, Idaho – The Comet Fire, approximated to be 320 acres in size and located within the same drainage as last year’s Bobcat fire, was ignited yesterday afternoon following lightning storms that moved through the area. The fire started burning in grass and lighter fuels and is currently moving up fingers of trees on steep slopes leading to timbered upper slopes and ridgelines.

Firefighters are currently on the ground, 17 personnel including four smokejumpers and four heli-rappellers, and have effectively secured the southern edge of the fire, where it is was burning on more open grassy slopes, having constructed a line to act as a fire break halting any further fire growth in that direction. They also have conducted burn out operations where the eastern fire edge abuts the Salmon River to prevent fire spreading to the eastern side of the river corridor. No one is on the steep inaccessible terrain at the northern edge of the fire where aircraft is being used. On the northern edge two Type 1 helicopters are dropping water on the fire from buckets, and retardant will continue to be delivered. At this time five structures on private land north of the fire and west of the fire are threatened. Further suppression efforts this evening could include burning out fuels along a knife ridge, towards which the fire is actively burning, to secure the western edge of the fire. Additional firefigh
ting crews and resources in route to the fire at this time include two twenty person firefighting hand crews.

Continued hot and dry weather is predicted for the remainder of the week, with a slight chance of isolated showers and thunderstorms in the fire area tonight.

An emergency area closure is in effect for the area surrounding and north of the fire, yet all the main roads in the area remain open. The complete area closure map and text can be viewed here on InciWeb, under the maps tab. Travelers are asked to proceed through the fire activity area on the Highway 93 corridor without stopping to ensure public safety as well as aid in the flow and efficiency of ongoing fire operations.

http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4894/

Comet Fire Emergency Area Closure Order
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/article/4894/31918/

Comet Fire Maps
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/maps/4894/
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Box Canyon Fire Update

July 27, 2016

Pocatello, ID – Around 2:30 Wednesday afternoon, a wildfire was reported at the mouth of Blackrock Canyon south of Pocatello. The Box Canyon Fire has burned 21 acres. The closest structures were about a quarter mile from the fire; no evacuations were necessary. Fire managers anticipate full containment of the fire by 6 PM this evening.

Idaho Falls District Bureau of Land Management (BLM) resources were on scene moments after the fire was reported and soon joined by resources from the Caribou-Targhee National Forest and Pocatello Valley Fire Department. Air tankers made multiple retardant drops on the incident, and a helicopter dropped water on the fire as well.

Approximately 60 total personnel have been assigned to the fire, including: 6 fire engines, 1 dozer, 1 water tender, and 1 handcrew. Resources will remain on scene throughout the evening to continue mopping up hotspots and monitoring the fire area. The cause of the fire is still under investigation.

For breaking fire information, follow @BLMIdahoFire on Twitter and search for #BLMIFDFire for posts specifically related to eastern Idaho. Photos of the Box Canyon Fire, as well as previous fires, trainings, and events, are available in the Idaho Falls District’s Idaho Fire Info Flickr album at https://flic.kr/s/aHskDSABPR

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Eastern Idaho Wildfire Update

Wednesday, July 27, 2016

Idaho Falls, ID – Several large wildfires are currently burning throughout the western states. Smoke from wildfires in western Idaho and California is drifting east, mingling with smoke from fires in western Wyoming. Smoke will likely continue to impact eastern Idaho and western Wyoming in the coming days and weeks, as no significant change in the weather pattern is forecast. Those with sensitivities to smoke should take precautions, including limiting strenuous activities outdoors. Several links with information on smoke and air quality, including Idaho DEQ’s Daily Air Quality Reports, are available in the lower right hand corner under the Smoke Information heading.

The Caribou-Targhee National Forest (CTNF) currently has three active fires.

The South Mink Fire was contained last night at 12 acres in size. Firefighters are now working on putting out all hotspots within the fire area as well as looking for any spot fires that may be outside of the fire perimeter. One fire engine and the helicopter will be released at the end of today’s shift. The remaining resources will continue to monitor the fire through the day tomorrow and are expected to be released at the end of the day pending any unexpected fire activity.

For photos and a video of the South Mink Fire, visit the CTNF’s Idaho Fire Info Flickr album at http://www.flickr.com/photos/idahofireinfo/albums/72157651399185602.

As a reminder, a road closure is in place for public and firefighter safety. South Fork Mink Creek Road (Forest Road 163) is closed from the junction of the Bannock Highway (South Mink Creek Road) to the Forest boundary. This closure will likely remain in place until the fire is out.

The Big Elk Fire was detected last night north of Palisades Reservoir. The fire is currently 2 acres, burning on a south aspect in douglas fir and grass. The location of the fire presents a number of hazards to firefighters, including snags, rolling material, steep terrain, and cliffs. A number of natural fire barriers lie adjacent to the fire, including rock scree slopes and the riparian area near Big Elk Creek. Therefore, the CTNF will be monitoring the fire to assess its potential for growth while taking actions to protect values at risk, including nearby trails. When necessary or prudent, helicopters will be used to drop water on the fire. A web camera will be placed on a ridge near the fire to allow fire managers to constantly view the fire behavior throughout the daylight hours. While the fire may have been naturally-caused, the last recorded lightning in the fire area was about 10 days ago. Until firefighters can conclusively identify the cause of the fire from the ground, it remains under investigation.

Resources are now staged in Swan Valley to assist with the fire as necessary.

The Lanes Creek Fire continues to burn about 9 air miles west of Freedom, Wyoming. Fire staff on the CTNF are managing the fire to meet multiple objectives, including allowing fire to play its natural role in the ecosystem by removing dense conifers and encouraging aspen regeneration. A web camera allows fire personnel to monitor the fire constantly, while firefighters on the ground have completed pre-treatments to minimize the fire’s potential impact to state and private lands. Currently the fire is 116 acres and growing minimally each day. Limited resources are assigned to the fire; however, managers are prepared to increase the staffing to meet the needs of the incident.

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Fire Update July 27

Pioneer Fire Press Release July 27, 2016

Fire activity continues along Highway 21

Fire Information: 208-392-9634 Hours: 7 a.m. – 8 p.m.
Boise National Forest Fire Information: 208-384-3266

As the inversion lifted in the mountains surrounding Idaho City yesterday, fire behavior increased, especially on the northeastern flank. High temperatures, predominant west winds, and unstable air conditions contributed to fire growth.

Crews removed brush and trees along Idaho State Highway 21 to improve it as a fuel break. A night shift was added to continue the work. Idaho State Highway 21 remains closed from mile marker 48 north of Idaho City to mile marker 72.5 south of Lowman. The fire reached Highway 21 near Woop-Um-Up Campground last night, but still remains on the western side of the road this morning.

Progress is being made on all other flanks of the fire. Large sections of the southern, southwestern, and western flanks are in mop-up status and are being monitored. Firefighters are working to complete hand lines on the northwestern flank with good success.

The updated fire size is currently 9,370 acres, is 33 percent contained, and has 903 people assigned. This includes 27 crews, 10 of which are Interagency Hotshot Crews

All aircraft are being used to full capacity. They include Single Engine Air Tankers (SEAT) dropping retardant and 10 helicopters supporting the fire with bucket drops and needed supplies. Structure protection and initial attack resources are also in place.

Similar fire activity is expected today, with temperatures remaining high for the next several days. Smoke will likely again be visible from great distances.

Protection of the Elk Creek Watershed, the water source for the community of Idaho City, remains one of our top priorities.

Type 1 Incident Command Team 1, Beth Lund, incident commander, has been brought in to help fight the northern part of this fire should it grow in that direction.

A community meeting was held in Lowman Emergency Services building and was well-attended by approximately 100 local residents.

Forest closures are in effect and are subject to change periodically. Current information can be viewed online at http://www.fs.usda.gov/alerts/boise/alerts-notices and at inciweb.nwcg.gov/4866.

The flight of unmanned vehicles such as “Drones” is strictly forbidden within the fire area including the area designated as a Temporary Flight Restriction (TFR).
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Cedar Fire

Nez Perce – Clearwater National Forests

The July 17, lightning caused Cedar fire, continues to burn in the Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness and is under the management of the Powell Ranger Station. The fire is located 2 miles northwest of Elk Summit and 11 miles south of the Powell Ranger Station.

The fire initially saw little growth due to recent wetting rains. As temperatures returned to normal, fire activity increased and the fire grew as it progressed upslope and flanked up drainage. The fire is burning in mature Spruce and Sub-alpine fir in the Cedar Creek drainage, Lodgepole Pine stands are on the ridge tops, and Cedar in wet areas. Single and group tree torching has been visible with short uphill crown runs. Smoke will continue to be seen intermittently as weather systems pass through, fire activity increases, and changes in temperature occur.

Due to its relative remote location and its close proximity to previous year’s fires, long-term management of the fire is planned. The fire will continue to be closely monitored by ground and aerial resources to protect identified values at risk in accordance with resource management objectives in the Forest Plan. Potential values at risk include the Elk Summit Guard Station, Kooskooskia trailhead, Graves Peak Lookout, Hoodoo Creek bridge and Bridge Creek bridge.

Information will be posted at the Lolo Pass Visitor Center, Elk Summit, Kooskooskia trailhead, the junction of the Forest Service road 358 and Forest Service road 360 and on the Nez Perce-Clearwater National Forests website.

source:
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4874/

Cedar Fire Maps
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/maps/4874/

Road Report July 27

Wednesday (July 27) mail truck driver (Robert) said the county is grading Johnson Creek road. They have done from Landmark down to Trout Creek. Crews not working today.

Reminder: South Fork Salmon River Road to be Closed on July 30 from 730am through 230pm.