Monthly Archives: August 2016

Fire Updates Aug 31

Pioneer Fire

Boise National Forest

Date of Origin Monday July 18th, 2016
Location 8 miles north of Idaho City
Total Personnel 1,105
Size 157,393 Acres
Containment 58%

http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4866/

Pioneer Fire Maps
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/maps/4866/

Pioneer Fire Photographs
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/photographs/4866/

Boise NF Fire News Release and Map, Wednesday, Aug. 31

Garden Valley Area Fire Information: 844-633-3090
Idaho City Area Fire Information: 208-392-9634
Boise National Forest Fire Information: 208-384-3266
Twitter: @BoiseNF #PioneerFire

Pioneer Fire’s Northern Perimeter Approaches Several Old Fire Scars

BOISE, Idaho, August 31, 2016 – The Pioneer Fire is at 157,393 acres and 58% contained. 1,105 personnel are assigned to the fire. Resources assigned include 21 crews, 9 helicopters, 44 engines, 4 dozers, 24 water tenders and 3 masticators.

The fire continues advancing to the north and northeast, growing by 16,613 acres. The northern flank of the fire is in the Scott Creek and north of the Whitehawk Mountain area. The fire has reached old fire scars to the northeast near the Red Mountain area, and it is expected to slow. Fire activity continued to burn late into the evening due to low relative humidity. Firefighters in the Deadwood and Bear Valley area are looking for opportunities to construct containment lines and limit additional growth. Crews in the Archie Mountain area made good progress yesterday and continue to work on hot spots near the containment line. Progress in the Charlotte Gulch area continues.

The inversion yesterday held heavy smoke in the valleys and river drainages longer than previous days. Smoke from the fire will continue to impact the communities of Garden Valley, Lowman and Stanley and the surrounding areas. Today is another Red Flag warning day. Burning conditions will be similar to yesterday. Forecasters expect a weak cold front over the fire Thursday and Friday, which will bring cooler temperatures and higher humidity.

All current evacuation levels remain in place. A Level 2 evacuation designation is still in effect for the summer homes located in the Long Creek area along Forest Road 582 (Bear Valley). A Level 1 designation remains in effect for all of the properties in Pioneerville, as well as those in the Lowman area. Level 1 is also in place for homes located in the South Fork Road area, east of Grimes Creek and along the South Fork Payette River.

A Temporary Flight Restriction (TFR) is in place over the fire area. Private and commercial aircraft as well as privately owned drones are prohibited from entering the restricted air space. Fire suppression aircraft may be grounded if unauthorized aircraft or drones are observed in the air space. The closure may be reviewed at:

Temporary Flight Restriction- Pioneer Fire: http://tfr.faa.gov/save_pages/detail_6_3189.html

A Pioneer Fire community meeting is scheduled tonight, Wed., August 31, from 7-8 p.m. at the Lowman EMS building.

Pioneer Fire on 08/31/16

Pioneer Fire perimeter map Aug 31, 2016

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Rough Fire

Boise National Forest

Date of Origin Sunday August 07th, 2016
Location 14 miles NE of Lowman
Total Personnel 50
Size 4,130 Acres
Percent of Perimeter Contained 40%

http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4934/

Located 14 miles northeast of Lowman, the Rough Fire is 4,131 acres and 40% contained. Resources include 2 crews, 2 engines and 50 personnel. Expected containment is September 15.
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Roaring Fire

Salmon – Challis National Forest

Date of Origin Tuesday July 26th, 2016
Location [FC Wilderness] on the ridge between Roaring and Goat Creeks above the confluence of the Middle Fork Salmon and Salmon Rivers.
Total Personnel 1
Size 5,439 Acres

Roaring Fire, is a lightning caused fire that started on Tuesday, July 26 and is currently estimated at 4,562 acres. The Roaring Fire is burning in a remote part of the Frank Church-River of No Return wilderness on the ridge between Roaring and Goat Creeks above the confluence of the Middle Fork Salmon and Salmon Rivers. This fire is adjacent to the 2014 Goat Fire and is being managed to allow fire to play, as nearly as possible, its natural role in wilderness. This fire may contribute to smoke in both the Main and Middle Fork of the Salmon Rivers depending on wind and weather conditions. At this time, this fire is not impacting river use or camps.

There is an Emergency Trail Closure for the Roaring Fire: http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/article/4976/32829/

Personnel at Long Tom Lookout is monitoring the fire daily.

http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4976/
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Tie Canyon Fire

Caribou – Targhee National Forest

Date of Origin Monday August 22nd, 2016
Location Ten miles southwest of Victor, Idaho
Total Personnel 449
Size 1,031 Acres
Percent of Perimeter Contained 44%

http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4987/

Tie Fire News Release 8-31

Victor, ID – There will be a Public Meeting Thursday, September 1 at 7:00 pm at Victor Elementary School, 43 East Center Street, Victor, ID. A fire update will be provided by the Incident Command Team. The Teton County Idaho Sheriff and Caribou-Targhee National Forest will address the emergency evacuation notice and the area fire closure currently in effect to for the Tie Fire. All are welcome to attend.

Strong southeast winds arrived early today across the fire area. They are expected to increase throughout the day. On the southern flank, these wind will push the fire back onto itself, reducing the potential for fire growth. It will test containment lines on the northern flank where engine and hand crews have spent several days enforcing containment lines.

Afternoon winds and increased cloud cover moderated yesterday’s fire activity. This helped firefighters reach 60% containment. Widespread single tree torching within the Tie Creek drainage was observed. Hoselays strategically laid out to cool hot spots are being heavily use by firefighters. Surface fire is mostly creeping and smoldering within the understory of the fir and aspen overstory. This slow growth accounts for the 15 acres of growth yesterday.

Local cooperators responded to a small wildfire yesterday outside Swan Valley, ID. The Tie Fire assisted with the response by providing three helicopters and a handcrew. The wildfire was successfully extinguished last night and all fire resources returned to camp. Additional resources will be available today should the local community need assistance.

An approaching cold front will bring near critical fire weather today and Thursday as temperatures climax into the mid 80’s. Very dry conditions exist which will make it easier for fires to spread quickly. While there are no fire restrictions in place on the Caribou – Targhee National Forest in Idaho; open burning is not allowed in Teton County, Wyoming. As bow hunters prepare for hunting trips, all recreationalist are encouraged not to use campfires unless absolutely necessary. For more information about Idaho Fire Restrictions, visit: http://www.idahofireinfo.com/p/fire-restrictions.html.

Weather and fuel conditions in Eastern Idaho are currently drier and more severe than normal. Starting Wednesday or Thursday of this week, a slight cool down may be occurring with chances of moisture. Behind the front the weather may warm up for a few days, but cooler wet weather is expected in the 8-14 day outlook. While enjoying the outdoors, please use caution if you must use a campfire or other equipment that may cause a spark.

The Teton County ID Sheriff’s Office will be holding a Code Red Registration Opportunity tonight, August 31 from 5:00- 7:00pm at the Law Enforcement Center in Driggs, ID. This Opportunity is intended to help residents sign up for the emergency Notification System. For more information about the Code Red Notification System, or to sign up, please visit the Teton Country Sheriff’s Office web page at: http://www.tetoncountysheriff.com/

Teachers and students are returning to school. Road guards are stationed along Elm Street to assist with directing traffic. Heavy equipment will be leaving fire camp early in the mornings and returning in the evening between 7pm-9pm.

Evacuations In Effect: No mandatory evacuations are in effect. A Level One evacuation notice is in effect for residents and property owners south of 10000 South; east of Highway 31, west of 1000 West (Pole Canyon Road) and west of Highway 31, south of 9000 South.

Area/Trail Closures: A Tie Canyon Fire Area Closure is in effect. This includes areas west of Pole Canyon, Tie Canyon Road 252 and Upper Rainey Creek Road 253. To view a map of this area closure, visit:

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Black Fire

Caribou – Targhee National Forest

Date of Origin Friday August 19th, 2016
Location 10 miles southwest of Swan Valley, Idaho.
Total Personnel 61
Size 338 Acres

http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4991/

The Black Fire was detected on August 19, 2016, in the Black Canyon drainage on the Palisades Ranger District. The fire is currently 338 acres. Group torching and small crown runs are expected as wind, terrain and slope align. The location of the fire presents numerous hazards to firefighters, including remote location, snags, rolling material, and steep terrain. Therefore, the Caribou-Targhee National Forest will be monitoring the fire to allow it to play its natural role in the ecosystem. Fire managers will use aircraft and personnel to monitor the fire and asses fire activity and growth. There is an area closure in place, the closure order and map are uploaded. Inciweb will be updated as needed when additional information becomes available or if fire activity increases.

Black Fire Maps
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/maps/4991/
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Carrot Fire

Caribou – Targhee National Forest

Date of Origin Saturday August 13th, 2016
Location 11 miles northeast of Tetonia, Idaho.
Total Personnel 5
Size 343 Acres

The Carrot Fire was detected on August 13, 2016, southeast of Coyote Meadows Trailhead in the Jedediah Smith Wilderness. The fire is approximately 11 miles northeast of Tetonia, Idaho in Wyoming.

The Caribou-Targhee National Forest will be monitoring the fire to allow it to play its natural role in the ecosystem.

http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4973/
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Peterson Hollow Fire

Uinta-Wasatch-Cache National Forest

Date of Origin Sunday August 21st, 2016
Location on the Logan Ranger District and is approximately 23 miles north of Logan, Utah.
Total Personnel 370
Size 1,213 Acres
Percent of Perimeter Contained 28%

Fire is located in Utah and well established into Idaho. Effecting both the Uinta-Wasatch-Cache and Caribou Targhee National Forests, in addition to State Institutional Trust Lands.

http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4985/
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Yellowstone National and Grand Teton National Park Fires

Maple Fire – Tatanka Complex

Date of Origin Monday August 08th, 2016
Location Fire is 4 miles North-Northeast of the town of West Yellowstone.
Total Personnel 259
Size 36,719 Acres

http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4944/
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Fawn Fire – Tatanka Complex

Date of Origin Thursday August 04th, 2016
Location The Fawn fire is located 11 miles W of Mammoth Springs, 16 miles NE of West Yellowstone, 13 miles SW of Gardiner, 35 miles SE of Big Sky.
Total Personnel 5
Size 2,073 Acres

http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4940/
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Buffalo Fire – Tatanka Complex

Date of Origin Thursday August 13, 2016
Location approximately 3 miles northeast of Tower Junction and 3 miles south of the park boundary and is visible from the Lamar Valley.
Total Personnel 25
Size 4,442 Acres

http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4953/
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Central Fire

Date of Origin Friday August 26th, 2016
Location 9 miles west of the Lake developed area and 2 miles south of Hayden Valley.
Size 1,043 Acres

http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4992/
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Berry Fire

Grand Teton National Park

Date of Origin Monday July 25th, 2016
Location 19 miles NW of Moran, WY
Total Personnel 366
Size 13,177 Acres

http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4954/
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Road Report Aug 31

Wednesday (Aug 31) mail truck driver (Bruce) reports the Johnson Creek road is very rough. He said the county grader is over in the Bear Valley area, probably working towards Landmark, so they probably won’t get Johnson Creek graded before the holiday weekend. He thinks they might get started on grading Johnson Creek next week or so.

Also a report that ITD is loading topsoil out at the Johnson Creek airstrip to haul over to the Big Creek airstrip.

Fire Updates Aug 30

Visitors are Reminded: Fire Restrictions Remain in Treasure Valley and West Central Mountains

8-29 News Release:

BOISE, Idaho – With the upcoming Labor Day weekend and the threat of wildfire remaining high, the Boise National Forest is reminding visitors that, Stage 1 Fire Restrictions remain in effect until further notice.

The restrictions, put into effect August 1, are in place to reduce the threat of person-caused fires in the current hot and dry forest conditions. Nearly 50 percent of wildland fires this year have been person-caused within the Boise National Forest.

“”We need help in preventing unwanted wildfires which increase both public and firefighter risk, including the social impacts of smoke.” said Bob Shindelar, Boise National Forest Fire Management Officer. “We want visitors to enjoy the Labor Day holiday while being cautious with any type of flame.”

These restrictions are in place on lands managed by the Boise National Forest, Bureau of Land Management, and Idaho Department of Lands within:

* Ada, Canyon, Gem, Payette, Elmore, Boise, Valley and Washington Counties

* Within Valley County all Bureau of Reclamation Lands surrounding Cascade Reservoir

* Within Elmore and Boise Counties all Bureau of Reclamation Lands surrounding Arrowrock and Anderson Ranch Reservoirs

Campfires are allowed only within an agency designated campground in an agency provided structure, or on a private citizen’s own land and only within an owner-provided fire structure. A list of approved sites is available at Ranger District offices or the Boise National Forest at:

Click to access fseprd513692.pdf

Detailed information including a map regarding the Stage 1 Fire Restrictions for all of Idaho is available at: Idaho Fire Information at:
http://www.idahofireinfo.com/p/fire-restrictions.html
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Pioneer Fire

Boise National Forest

Date of Origin Monday July 18th, 2016
Location 8 miles north of Idaho City
Total Personnel 1,198
Size 140,780 Acres
Containment 58%

http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4866/

Pioneer Fire Maps
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/maps/4866/

Pioneer Fire Photographs
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/photographs/4866/

Red Flag Warning for Pioneer Fire 8-30

A Red Flag warning is in effect today with predicted south winds 15-20 mph, temperatures in the 90’s, relative humidity in single digits, and a Haines index of 6 indicating very unstable air. This will produce another day of significant fire activity after the inversion lifts. Firefighters are warned to be extra vigilant and keep abreast of changing situations and fire behavior.

Pioneer Fire 8-29

Pioneer Fire Perimeter /Closure Map Aug. 30,2016

Pioneer Fire Update August 30, 2016

Idaho City Area Fire Information: 208-392-9634
Garden Valley Area Fire Information: 844-633-3090
Boise National Forest Fire Information: 208-384-3266

Twitter: @BoiseNF #PioneerFire Facebook: Pioneer Fire

Acres: 140,780 Containment: 58% Personnel: 1,198 Resources assigned includes: 24 crews, 9 helicopters, 50 engines, 4 dozers, 25 water tenders and 4 masticators

BOISE, August 30, 2016 – There is a Red Flag warning in effect today with south winds 15-20 mph, temperatures in the 90’s, relative humidity in single digits, and a Haines index of 6 indicating very unstable air. This will produce another day of significant fire activity after the inversion lifts. Fire managers predict this activity will be in the same areas as yesterday, as the fire moves in a north/northeast direction away from critical areas and toward fire scars that will help confine the fire. No significant moisture is expected in the near future. Smoke from the fire will continue to impact the communities of Garden Valley, Lowman and Stanley and the surrounding areas. Air quality is being monitored, and the daily outlook for the region is published online at: idsmoke.blogspot.com.

The fire made a significant advance to the northeast and grew by 29,176 acres. The northern flank of the fire is now estimated to run from Meadow Camp Creek on the west through the Lorenzo Creek drainage and continuing northwest to the Whitehawk Creek area. Additionally, the fire in Clear creek moved into the headwaters of Long Creek towards Miller Mountain. This fire activity produced a very large column of smoke visible from many miles away. However, it is far from any critical infrastructure or structures, with the closest edge approximately nine miles north of Kirkham Hot Springs and moving northeast. Crews continue to work in the Long Creek area, strengthening lines and removing excess fuels, keeping the Summer Homes safe and preventing the fire from moving south. Additionally, crews are progressing north along Deadwood ridge, constructing a contingency line to confine the fire from moving west in the Nellies Creek area. A flare-up also occurred east of Archie Mountain. Due to its proximity to the fire’s perimeter, action was taken by retardant aircraft to cool the flames and keep containment in that area.

The public is reminded that there is a Temporary Flight Restriction (TFR) over the fire area. Private and commercial aircraft as well as privately owned drones are prohibited from entering the restricted air space. Fire suppression aircraft may be grounded if unauthorized aircraft or drones are observed in the air space. The closure may be reviewed at:Temporary Flight Restriction- Pioneer Fire: http://tfr.faa.gov/save_pages/detail_6_3189.html

All current evacuation levels remain in place. A Level 2 evacuation designation is still in effect for the summer homes located in the Long Creek area along Forest Road 582 (Bear Valley). A Level 1 designation remains in effect for all of the properties in Pioneerville, as well as those in the Lowman area. Level 1 is also in place for homes located in the South Fork Road area, east of Grimes Creek and along the South Fork Payette River.

A Pioneer Fire Information Community meeting is scheduled for Wednesday August 31, 2016, from 7-8 p.m. at the Lowman EMS building.

DETAILS — The Pioneer Fire Area Closure can be found at fs.usda.gov/alerts/boise/alerts-notices and information at inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4866. Information is also available at facebook.com/Pioneer-Fire-682201165260518 or email questions to pioneerfire2016@gmail.com.

HUNT INFORMATION – https://idfg.idaho.gov/blog/2016/08/get-current-fire-information-here

FIRE RESTRICTIONS — Please check fire restrictions at idahofireinfo.com
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Rough Fire

Boise National Forest

Date of Origin Sunday August 07th, 2016
Location 14 miles NE of Lowman
Total Personnel 50
Size 4,130 Acres
Percent of Perimeter Contained 40%

http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4934/

Located 14 miles northeast of Lowman, the Rough Fire is 4,131 acres and 40% contained. Resources include 2 crews, 2 engines and 50 personnel. Expected containment is September 15.
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Henry’s Creek Fire

Idaho Falls District

Date of Origin Sunday August 21st, 2016
Location Seven Miles East of Idaho Falls
Total Personnel 262
Size 52,972 Acres
Containment 90%

http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4982/

Henry’s Creek Fire Update August 30, 2016

The Forest Closure on the Caribou-Targhee National Forest has been rescinded

Firefighters continue making excellent progress on all sections of the fire and containment is now 90 percent. Winds are expected to come from the South today with warmer temperatures and lower relative humidity.

There are 262 personnel, along with engines, heavy equipment and aircraft helping to suppress the fire. Rehabilitation after the fire continues with dozers and hand lines.

According to the Bonneville County’s Sheriff’s Office, all road closures have been lifted with the exception of Meadow Creek Road.

In the coming days, citizens will see smoke columns as well as dust (smoke) devils coming out of the interior of the fire. Therefore, there is no need to report these smoke columns to 911. This is normal and will occur until either rain or snow completely puts the fire out.

The Caribou-Targhee National Forest Henrys Creek Fire Emergency Area, Road and Trail Closure put in effect on 25 August, 2016 will be rescinded effective today, 29 August 2016, at 6 AM. The incident commander for the fire feels that suppression efforts to date have reduced the need of this closure for public safety. Forest Supervisor Garth Smelser supports this decision and will rescind the order.

For updated information throughout the day, as it becomes available you can to http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/state/13/ click on Henry’s Creek Fire. In addition you can go to Great Basin IMT 7 Facebook page at: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Great-Basin-IMT-7/222155447934166 . Also the Bonneville County Sherriff’s Facebook page at: https://www.facebook.com/bonnevillecountysheriff/

Starting tomorrow August 31 the Henry’s Creek Fire will transfer command of the fire to a Type 4 Incident Command Team. GBIMT 7 will return to their home units. We would like to thank everyone for their support, cooperation and partnership. A special thank you to the Idaho Falls BLM and the Bonneville County Sherriff’s Office.
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Roaring Fire

Salmon – Challis National Forest

Date of Origin Tuesday July 26th, 2016
Location [FC Wilderness] on the ridge between Roaring and Goat Creeks above the confluence of the Middle Fork Salmon and Salmon Rivers.
Total Personnel 1
Size 5,013 Acres

http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4976/

Roaring Fire, is a lightning caused fire that started on Tuesday, July 26 and is currently estimated at 4,562 acres. The Roaring Fire is burning in a remote part of the Frank Church-River of No Return wilderness on the ridge between Roaring and Goat Creeks above the confluence of the Middle Fork Salmon and Salmon Rivers. This fire is adjacent to the 2014 Goat Fire and is being managed to allow fire to play, as nearly as possible, its natural role in wilderness. This fire may contribute to smoke in both the Main and Middle Fork of the Salmon Rivers depending on wind and weather conditions. At this time, this fire is not impacting river use or camps.

There is an Emergency Trail Closure for the Roaring Fire: http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/article/4976/32829/

Personnel at Long Tom Lookout is monitoring the fire daily.

http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4976/

Roaring Fire Update August 29, 2016

The Roaring Fire, on the North Fork Ranger District is 4,562 acres. The fire is burning in a remote part of the Frank Church-River of No Return Wilderness on the ridge between Roaring and Goat Creeks above the confluence of the Middle Fork Salmon and Salmon Rivers. This fire is adjacent to the 2014 Goat Fire and is being managed to allow fire to play, as nearly as possible, its natural role in wilderness.

The Roaring Fire is actively burning in the Roaring Creek drainage between the Bighorn Crags and the Middle Fork of the Salmon River. Progression to date is predominately south up the South Fork of Roaring Creek to McGuire Lake and west down Roaring Creek towards the Middle Fork.

Personnel at Long Tom Lookout is monitoring the fire daily. The fire is now within one (1) mile of the Middle Fork Salmon River but is not impacting River camps. Fire managers will continue to monitor fire spread and potential impacts to river camps, trails, and campsites in the Bighorn Crags area. In the upcoming days, fire managers do anticipate the fire will reach the Middle Fork Salmon River. At this time, no boaters on the Middle Fork of the Salmon or the Salmon River are being impacted.

Expect to see smoke drifting into the valleys and river corridors, especially in the evenings. Fire managers expect the fire to grow into the fall. Smoke from the Roaring Fire and other fires in the west filtered into the Salmon and North Fork areas on Sunday morning. Skies later cleared as the day progressed. Weather the next several days predicts steady temperatures with slightly decreased humidity. There is potential for thunderstorms beginning Wednesday afternoon.

The Salmon-Challis National Forest understands the inconvenience that fire, and the impacts associated with it, may cause to Forest visitors and the general public. The Forest is promoting an understanding of the value of allowing managed fire to play out its natural role in wilderness with regard to maintaining wilderness character, the natural role of fire, benefits to wildlife habitat, and reduced fire severity in the future. The inconveniences of isolated pockets of smoke and the short-term displacement of Forest visitors resulting from trail, camp, and area closures today are helping to ensure firefighter and public safety while allowing fire to play out its natural role in wilderness and help to reduce devastating impacts from fire in the future.

All visitors to the Frank Church—River of No Return Wilderness should be prepared to deal with the effects of natural events. Visitors are about to experience a functioning, dynamic ecosystem that will evolve and change as nature molds and sculpts its landscape. When recreating in the Frank Church River of no Return Wilderness travel plans should be flexible, current conditions should be known, as well as a safe place to go (a safety zone) when fires are burning.

An Emergency Trail Closure for Public Safety for the Roaring Fire is in place. The closure area includes:

Bighorn Crags Trail #6021 from just northwest of Big Clear Lake (T21N, R16E Section15) to Dome Mountain at the junction of Trail #6021 and Trail #6172 (T22N, R17E Section18).

Garden Creek Trail #6172 is also closed from Dome Mountain (T22N, R17E Section 18) at its junction with Trail #6021 to terminus at Horse Heaven (T22N, R16E Section 12).

For more information on the Roaring Fire can be found on Inciweb at http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4976/ You are also welcome to visit the Salmon-Challis National Forest website: http://www.fs.usda.gov/main/scnf/home, and check out News & Events, ‘Like Us’ on https://www.facebook.com/salmonchallisnf, and ‘Follow Us’ on https://twitter.com/SalmonChallisNF for further information.
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Tie Canyon Fire

Caribou – Targhee National Forest

Date of Origin Monday August 22nd, 2016
Location Ten miles southwest of Victor, Idaho
Total Personnel 447
Size 1,014 Acres
Percent of Perimeter Contained 44%

http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4987/

Tie Fire News Release 8-30

Victor, ID – After nearly a week of heavy water delivery by airtankers and engines, the Tie fire did not grow Monday.

Additional handcrews and engines arrived Monday to support water handling and line construction efforts. Crews on the southern flanks successfully “plumbed” water lines which firefighters can now use to extinguish hot spots. The art of connecting hoses, pumps and maintaining adequate pressure through mountainous terrain is referred to as plumbing a hoselay. These hoselays will reduce the need for aircraft support and speed containment efforts that will take place over the next several days.

A taskforce of eight engines are assigned to the northern flank of the fire. They will spend today and tomorrow working 200 feet into the fire area to thoroughly look for heat and hot spots. On Monday, these firefighters observed several interior trees torching that required attention. They extinguished the spot and will ensure additional hot spots were not created in the flare up. Winds from the south will help firefighters find hot spots today and tomorrow. They are working to ensure no heat remains in order to allow a Level 1 evacuation notice that has been in place since August 23 can be lifted sometime later this week.

There are no fire restrictions in place on the Caribou – Targhee National Forest in Idaho; however, open burning is not allowed in Teton County, Wyoming. For more information about Idaho Fire Restrictions, visit: http://www.idahofireinfo.com/p/fire-restrictions.html. Information about Wyoming fire restrictions can be found at: http://www.tetonwyo.org/fire.

Weather and fuel conditions in Eastern Idaho are currently drier and more severe than normal. Starting Wednesday or Thursday of this week, a slight cool down may be occurring with chances of moisture. Behind the front the weather may warm up for a few days, but cooler wet weather is expected in the 8-14 day outlook. While enjoying the outdoors, please use caution if you must use a campfire or other equipment that may cause a spark.

The Teton County ID Sherriff’s Office will be holding a Code Red Registration Opportunity August 31 from 5:00- 7:00pm at the Law Enforcement Center in Driggs, ID. This Opportunity is being held to help residents sign up for the Notification System. For more information about the Code Red Notification System, or to sign up, please visit the Teton Country Sherriff’s Office web page at: http://www.tetoncountysheriff.com/

Teachers and students are returning to school this week. Firefighters are using use extra caution when driving in the communities. Fire traffic will be on the highway to access the fire area. Please use caution while driving, especially along Pine Creek Summit and west of Victor where a helibase has been established.

A high pressure weather system is building. This is making conditions warmer and dryer than yesterday. This system will increase movement of the upper air mass, with will make smoke columns stand up and become more visible. When the air mass cools, smoke will drop into the valley. Please stay indoors if air quality becomes poor. To view smoke information, visit the Idaho Smoke Blog spot at: http://idsmoke.blogspot.com

Evacuations In Effect: No mandatory evacuations are in effect. A Level One evacuation notice is in effect for residents and property owners south of 10000 South; east of Highway 31, west of 1000 West (Pole Canyon Road) and west of Highway 31, south of 9000 South.

Area/Trail Closures: A Tie Canyon Fire Area Closure is in effect. This includes areas west of Pole Canyon, Tie Canyon Road 252 and Upper Rainey Creek Road 253. To view a map of this area closure, visit:

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Carrot Fire

Caribou – Targhee National Forest

Date of Origin Saturday August 13th, 2016
Location 11 miles northeast of Tetonia, Idaho.
Total Personnel 5
Size 284 Acres

The Carrot Fire was detected on August 13, 2016, southeast of Coyote Meadows Trailhead in the Jedediah Smith Wilderness. The fire is approximately 11 miles northeast of Tetonia, Idaho in Wyoming.

The Caribou-Targhee National Forest will be monitoring the fire to allow it to play its natural role in the ecosystem.

http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4973/

The Carrot Fire was detected on August 13, 2016 southeast of Coyote Meadows Trailhead in the Jedediah Smith Wilderness. This 284-acre fire is being managed for resource benefit. Fire managers are using masticators along the Jackpine-Pinochle Loop and South Jackpine roads to widen vegetation clearance along the road as a contingency that would limit any spread toward the west and southwest should the fire unexpectedly in that direction.
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Peterson Hollow Fire

Uinta-Wasatch-Cache National Forest

Date of Origin Sunday August 21st, 2016
Location on the Logan Ranger District and is approximately 23 miles north of Logan, Utah.
Total Personnel 311
Size 1,207 Acres
Percent of Perimeter Contained 25%

Fire is located in Utah and well established into Idaho. Effecting both the Uinta-Wasatch-Cache and Caribou Targhee National Forests, in addition to State Institutional Trust Lands.

http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4985/

8-30-16 Peterson Hollow Fire Update

Yesterday’s fire activity exhibited isolated tree torching, but behaved within the capabilites of firefighting personnel. The Peterson Hollow Fire is 25% contained, with only a handful of acreage growth to 1,207 acres. Full suppression is still the main objective, and fire managers are continuing to plan for the week ahead. While one flank of the fire cooled down, the other picked up, as is common with wildfires. Overall the crews and helicopters are making excellent progress at securing the majority of the line and spot fires.

A warmer, drier and windier weather outlook may contribute to some increased activity and smoke today and through the week. Aviation remains a major part of suppression. Fire managers would like to remind area visitors and residents that there is a temporary flight restriction (TFR) around the perimeter of the fire for a 5 mile radius and a 13,000 ft. ceiling. A TFR intrusion results in the grounding of fire aviation, thus limiting the ability to fight the fire.

Highway 89 through Logan Canyon remains open to the public, and smoke may be visible in the area of the fire. An area closure remains in effect on the Utah side of the state line and a trail/road closure is in effect on the Idaho side. For closure details visit the Inciweb page for the Peterson Hollow Fire at http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4985/.

Fire officials would like to thank the members of the nearby communities for their continued support.

Find update fire info: Facebook: “U.S. Forest Service Uinta-Wasatch-Cache National Forest” or “Utah Wildfire”Twitter: @UWCNF or @UtahWildfireInciweb: http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4985/ for closure info, maps and announcements.
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Yellowstone National and Grand Teton National Park Fires

08-30-16 Tatanka Complex (Buffalo, Fawn, Central) and Maple Fire Update

All entrances to Yellowstone are open at this time. Successful efforts by firefighters on the Berry Fire to make Highway 89/191/287 safe for travel in Grand Teton National Park have allowed the road and the south entrance of Yellowstone National Park to be opened this morning. Park visitor facilities, including park concession-operated services, and businesses in surrounding communities remain open.

Summary: Increased fire activity and smoke are expected to continue. Increasing winds are expected for the rest of the week, while temperatures remain warm and humidity is critically low.

Maple Fire: 34,968 acres (approximately 1,910 acre increase)

Location: approx. 3.67 mi NE of West Yellowstone (Intersection of US Hwys 20 & 287), 3.57 mi SW of Mount Holmes Lookout, 1.78 mi from Madison Junction

Yesterday the Maple Fire was very active on the northwest corner. Air resources dropped water in that area to assist firefighters with managing the fire. A large Chinook helicopter and a smaller type 2 helicopter were used in the Cougar Creek area and two Fire Bosses were used in the Gneiss Creek area. Fire crews will follow-up with deploying hose lays in the Cougar and Gneiss Creek areas in support of potential burnout operations today designed to confine the fire to the park. Fire containment lines have been anchored into the former Boundary Fire area. The fire perimeters on the north and east flanks are more active due to influences from the prevailing southwest winds.

Park visitors may safely view the Maple Fire at designated areas between the West Entrance and Madison Junction where the fire has burned down to the road, just east of 7 Mile Bridge. Fire information personnel will be available to answer questions. Fire managers may continue small burnout operations will continue as opportunities present themselves in the 7 Mile Bridge area to provide a clean fire edge that reduces spotting, flanking, and other control issues while providing an anchor point for crews along the southern flank to hold the fire north of the Madison River (west of 7 Mile Bridge).

Fire crews continue to work on the fuels reduction projects on the western boundary of the park to help reduce the risk of wildfire spread into the vicinity of West Yellowstone and the Duck Creek subdivisions. Fuel reduction and structure protection measures with sprinkler systems at Madison Junction and Norris Geyser area have been completed.

Buffalo Fire: 4,008 acres (approximately 430 acre increase)

Location: approximately 3 mi NE of Tower Junction and 3 mi S of the park boundary, and is visible from the Lamar Valley

The Buffalo Fire grew to the east yesterday. Firefighters continue to monitor the fire and are providing point protection for values at risk including the Elk Tongue Cabin and Sough Creek Campground.

Fawn Fire: 2,016 acres (approximately 130 acre increase)

Location: W of Fawn Pass, approximately 11 mi W of Mammoth Hot Springs, 16 mi NE of West Yellowstone, 13 mi SW of Gardiner, and 35 mi SE of Big Sky

The majority of Fawn Fire activity remains within the existing perimeter.

Central Fire: 840 acres (approximately 754 acre increase)

Location: approx. 9 mi W of Lake developed area and 2 mi S of Hayden Valley

Growth was plume dominated yesterday. The Central Fire is burning in a remote area. Fire managers are monitoring the fire as it continues to play its natural role in the ecosystem. An area that burned during the 2015 Spruce Fire is expected to limit its spread to the east.

Smoke: Smoke is expected to increase over the next few days. Valleys, including West Yellowstone, should expect smoke in the morning under a prevailing inversion pattern. Traffic control may be implemented on park roads at times if heavy smoke is present. Visit http://bit.ly/firesandyourhealth for more information on fires and your health. Smoke reports for West Yellowstone are posted daily to http://bit.ly/mtdeq

Maple Fire:

started 8/8/16, lightning-caused
Closures:
Campsites: WA1, 1C1, 1C2, 1C4, 1C5
Trails:
• Riverside, Cougar Creek, Harlequin Lake, Purple Mountain, Mount Holmes, Winter Creek, Trilobite Lake, Grizzly Lake, Boundary Trail, and the entire Gneiss Creek Trail is closed from the Gneiss Creek Trailhead (WK7) to Seven Mile Bridge trailhead (WK8). This includes the Cougar Cabin Trail.
Roads
• The Old Airport Road in West Yellowstone is closed while the Incident Command Post is in place.
The following areas remain OPEN: Obsidian Creek, north of the Mount Holmes Trailhead; Gibbon River; Norris Geyser; Monument Geyser Basin Trail; Terrace Spring Trail

Buffalo Fire:

started 8/13/16, lightning-caused
Closures:
Campsites: 2S1, 2S2, 2S3, 2S4, 2S6, 2S7, 2S8
• The Slough Creek Campground is closed.
Trails
• The Buffalo Fork Trail from the trailhead at Slough Creek north to the Park boundary is closed.
• The Slough Creek Trail and associated Day Use area is closed.
• The Bliss Pass Trail between Slough Creek and Pebble Creek Trail is closed.
Roads
• The Slough Creek access road is closed.

Fawn Fire:

started 8/4/2016 lightning-caused
Closures:
Campsites: WB1, WB3, WB4 and WB6
Trails
• Bighorn Pass Trail eastbound at the junction of the cut-off trail to the Fawn Pass Trail.
• Bighorn Pass Trail westbound at Bighorn Pass.
• Fawn Pass Trail eastbound at the junction of the cut-off trail to the Big Horn Pass Trail.
• Fawn Pass Trail westbound at campsite 1F2.
• The cut-off trail between Bighorn and Fawn Pass trails is open.

Central Fire:

started 8/26/16, lightning-caused
Closures: none at this time
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Maple Fire – Tatanka Complex

Date of Origin Monday August 08th, 2016
Location Fire is 4 miles North-Northeast of the town of West Yellowstone.
Total Personnel 259
Size 34,968 Acres

http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4944/
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Fawn Fire – Tatanka Complex

Date of Origin Thursday August 04th, 2016
Location The Fawn fire is located 11 miles W of Mammoth Springs, 16 miles NE of West Yellowstone, 13 miles SW of Gardiner, 35 miles SE of Big Sky.
Total Personnel 5
Size 2,016 Acres

http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4940/
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Buffalo Fire – Tatanka Complex

Date of Origin Thursday August 13, 2016
Location approximately 3 miles northeast of Tower Junction and 3 miles south of the park boundary and is visible from the Lamar Valley.
Total Personnel 22
Size 4,008 Acres

http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4953/
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Central Fire

Date of Origin Friday August 26th, 2016
Location 9 miles west of the Lake developed area and 2 miles south of Hayden Valley.
Size 840 Acres

http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4992/
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Berry Fire

Grand Teton National Park

Date of Origin Monday July 25th, 2016
Location 19 miles NW of Moran, WY
Total Personnel 366
Size 13,177 Acres

http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4954/

Berry Fire Announcement

Highway 89/191/287 OPEN!

While the Highway is open, there are still area and trail closures within Grand Teton and Yellowstone National Parks and Bridger-Teton National Forest. An updated closure map is posted at http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/maps/4954/

Berry Fire AM Update 8/30/2016

Contact Fire Information: 307.739.3566

Summary: Since its discovery, Grand Teton National Park has been actively managing the Berry Fire for ecological benefits. The fire originated in the northern portion of the park, near Berry and Owl Creeks on the west side of Jackson Lake. Extreme fire behavior as a result of high winds and low relative humidity on Monday, August 22 pushed the fire across Jackson Lake and into the Teton Wilderness on the Bridger-Teton National Forest. A Type 2 Great Basin Incident Management Team took command of the fire on August 24th.

Closures: Highway 89/191/287 is open!! While the Highway is open, there are still area and trail closures within Grand Teton and Yellowstone National Parks and Bridger-Teton National Forest. Current closure maps are available at http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/maps/4954/.

Current Situation: Successful efforts by firefighters to make Highway 89/191/287 safe for travel have allowed the road to be opened this morning. Please drive carefully through the stretch of highway from Leeks Marina to the South Gate entrance to Yellowstone National Park. The highway pullouts along the highway in the fire area will be closed. Firefighting traffic will continue to use the roadway, the parking pullouts, and Flagg Ranch as parking areas and supply staging zones. However, the parking area at the north entrance sign to Grand Teton National Park will be available to the public. Please drive through the fire area cautiously, as fire traffic will continue to use the road.

Activity increased on the Berry Fire on Monday due to the atmospheric instability combined with warm temperatures and low humidity. The majority of the fire activity occurred on the west side of Jackson Lake, south of Wilcox Canyon. The large smoke column actually assisted firefighters working on the eastern side of the highway by shading out the fire on that side of the lake. Structure protection measures put in place by firefighters at Flagg Ranch will remain in place. While the probability of the fire reaching the Ranch is low, pumps, hoses, and other equipment will be kept there to be available if needed.

A meteorologist assigned to the Berry Fire has advised the crews that today’s weather will be very similar to yesterday’s. In fact, it will be a few degrees warmer and there is a slight chance of a thunderstorm. Atmospheric instability contributes to rapid fire growth and pyrocumulus cloud formation. This morning is already warmer and drier than the past several days have been, and humidity recovery was marginal overnight, allowing the fire to continue to burn. An inversion is possible over the fire area this morning.

For more information: Follow Grand Teton National Park and Bridger-Teton National Forest on social media: @GrandTetonNPS and @BridgerTetonNF on both Facebook and Twitter. Information on other fires in western Wyoming is available at http://www.TetonFires.com. And information on fires burning in eastern Idaho can be found at http://www.IdahoFireInfo.com, or by filtering Idaho incidents on InciWeb.
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Red Flag Warning in effect August 30, 2pm to 9pm

Red Flag Warning in effect August 30, 2pm to 9pm

Red Flag Warning

URGENT – FIRE WEATHER MESSAGE
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE BOISE ID
152 PM MDT MON AUG 29 2016

.STRENGTHENING SOUTHWESTERLY FLOW ALOFT WILL CAUSE GUSTY
SOUTHWEST WINDS ACROSS EASTERN OREGON THOROUGH EARLY
EVENING…THEN DIMINISH…BUT WILL INCREASE ONCE AGAIN TUESDAY
AFTERNOON. ACROSS THE IDAHO ZONES…WINDS WILL INCREASE IN THE
AFTERNOON BECOMING GUSTY WITH LOW AFTERNOON RH VALUES. THE
AIRMASS REMAINS UNSTABLE WITH HAINES 6 VALUES ACROSS THE AREA
WITH THE MAIN EMPHASIS ACROSS IDAHOS WEST CENTRAL MOUNTAINS AND
BAKER VALLEY.

WESTERN PAYETTE NATIONAL FOREST-EASTERN PAYETTE NATIONAL FOREST-
NORTHERN BOISE NATIONAL FOREST-
SOUTHERN BOISE NATIONAL FOREST/WESTERN SAWTOOTH NATIONAL FOREST-
OWYHEE MOUNTAINS-WESTERN TWIN FALLS BLM-SOUTHERN HIGHLANDS-
152 PM MDT MON AUG 29 2016

…RED FLAG WARNING IN EFFECT FROM 2 PM TO 9 PM MDT TUESDAY FOR
GUSTY WINDS AND LOW RH VALUES BUT IS ALSO IN EFFECT FOR HIGH
HAINES INDICIES ACROSS THE WEST CENTRAL MOUNTAINS…

THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE IN BOISE HAS ISSUED A RED FLAG
WARNING…WHICH IS IN EFFECT FROM 2 PM TO 9 PM MDT TUESDAY.

* WINDS…GUSTS TO 30 MPH IN THE AFTERNOON.

* RELATIVE HUMIDITY…LESS THAN 15 PERCENT.

* HAINES…HIGH HAINES 6 VALUES.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS…

A RED FLAG WARNING MEANS THAT CRITICAL FIRE WEATHER CONDITIONS
ARE EITHER OCCURRING NOW…OR WILL SHORTLY.

Fire Updates Aug 29

Visitors are Reminded: Fire Restrictions Remain in Treasure Valley and West Central Mountains

8-29 News Release

BOISE, Idaho – With the upcoming Labor Day weekend and the threat of wildfire remaining high, the Boise National Forest is reminding visitors that, Stage 1 Fire Restrictions remain in effect until further notice.

The restrictions, put into effect August 1, are in place to reduce the threat of person-caused fires in the current hot and dry forest conditions. Nearly 50 percent of wildland fires this year have been person-caused within the Boise National Forest.

“”We need help in preventing unwanted wildfires which increase both public and firefighter risk, including the social impacts of smoke.” said Bob Shindelar, Boise National Forest Fire Management Officer. “We want visitors to enjoy the Labor Day holiday while being cautious with any type of flame.”

These restrictions are in place on lands managed by the Boise National Forest, Bureau of Land Management, and Idaho Department of Lands within:

* Ada, Canyon, Gem, Payette, Elmore, Boise, Valley and Washington Counties

* Within Valley County all Bureau of Reclamation Lands surrounding Cascade Reservoir

* Within Elmore and Boise Counties all Bureau of Reclamation Lands surrounding Arrowrock and Anderson Ranch Reservoirs

Campfires are allowed only within an agency designated campground in an agency provided structure, or on a private citizen’s own land and only within an owner-provided fire structure. A list of approved sites is available at Ranger District offices or the Boise National Forest at:

Click to access fseprd513692.pdf

Detailed information including a map regarding the Stage 1 Fire Restrictions for all of Idaho is available at: Idaho Fire Information at:
http://www.idahofireinfo.com/p/fire-restrictions.html
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Pioneer Fire

Boise National Forest

Date of Origin Monday July 18th, 2016
Location 8 miles north of Idaho City
Total Personnel 1,213
Size 111,604 Acres
Containment 55%

http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4866/

Pioneer Fire Maps
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/maps/4866/

Pioneer Fire Photographs
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/photographs/4866/

Boise NF Fire News Release and Map, Monday, Aug. 29

Weather Expected to Increase Pioneer Fire Activity

BOISE, Idaho, August 29, 2016 – The Pioneer Fire is at 111,604 acres and 55% contained. 1,213 personnel are assigned to the fire. Resources assigned include 23 crews, 9 helicopters, 54 engines, 4 dozers, 27 water tenders and 4 masticators.

Fire activity in the Deadwood Ridge North of Slaughterhouse Canyon and Nellies Basin will likely increase over the next week as the temperatures rise and the relative humidity decreases. Temperatures are expected to reach the low 90’s as the dry and unstable air mass builds over the Pioneer Fire. No significant moisture is expected this coming week. Smoke from the fire will have an impact on the communities of Garden Valley, Lowman and Stanley as Southwest winds return. Air quality is being monitored, and the daily outlook for the region is published online at: idsmoke.blogspot.com

Crews are continuing preparation of the contingency line along Forest Road #555, which lies west of Deadwood Ridge at the head of Nellies, Sams and Josie Creeks. Additional crews and equipment are improving the roads for holding fire movement in check. The fire is expected to move to the north and east, away from the Clear Creek and Long Creek roads. As the temperatures and winds increase, there may be torching of pockets of unburned fuel within the fire’s perimeter.

The public is reminded that there is a Temporary Flight Restriction (TFR) over the fire area. Private and commercial aircraft as well as privately owned drones are prohibited from entering the restricted air space. Fire suppression aircraft may be grounded if unauthorized aircraft or drones are observed in the air space. The closure may be reviewed at:

Temporary Flight Restriction- Pioneer Fire: tfr.faa.gov/save_pages/detail_6_3189

All current evacuation levels remain in place. A Level 2 evacuation designation still is in effect for the summer homes located in the Long Creek area along Forest Road 582 (Bear Valley). A Level 1 designation remains in effect for all of the properties in Pioneerville, as well as those in the Lowman area. Level 1 is also in place for homes located in the South Fork Road area, east of Grimes Creek and along the South Fork Payette River.

Pioneer Fire Progression Map August 27, 2016

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Rough Fire

Boise National Forest

Date of Origin Sunday August 07th, 2016
Location 14 miles NE of Lowman
Total Personnel 50
Size 4,130 Acres
Percent of Perimeter Contained 40%

http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4934/

Located 14 miles northeast of Lowman, the Rough Fire is 4,130 acres and 40% contained. Resources include 2 crews, 2 engines and 50 personnel. Expected containment is September 15.
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Henry’s Creek Fire

Idaho Falls District

Date of Origin Sunday August 21st, 2016
Location Seven Miles East of Idaho Falls
Total Personnel 407
Size 52,972 Acres
Containment 81%

http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4982/

The Forest Closure on the Caribou-Targhee National Forest has been rescinded·

Firefighters continue making excellent progress on all sections of the fire and containment is now 81 percent. Winds are expected to come from the Southwest today and the area will experience warmer temperatures.

There are 407 personnel, along with engines, heavy equipment and aircraft helping to suppress the fire. Rehabilitation after the fire continues with dozers and hand lines.

In the coming days, citizens will see smoke columns as well as dust (smoke) devils coming out of the interior of the fire. Therefore, there is no need to report these smoke columns to 911. This is normal and will occur until either rain or snow completely puts the fire out.

The Caribou-Targhee National Forest Henrys Creek Fire Emergency Area, Road and Trail Closure put in effect on 25 August, 2016 will be rescinded effective today, 29 August 2016, at 6 AM. The incident commander for the fire feels that suppression efforts to date have reduced the need of this closure for public safety. Forest Supervisor Garth Smelser supports this decision and will rescind the order.

For updated information throughout the day, as it becomes available you can to http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/state/13/ click on Henry’s Creek Fire. In addition you can go to Great Basin IMT 7 Facebook page at: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Great-Basin-IMT-7/222155447934166 . Also the Bonneville County Sherriff’s Facebook page at: https://www.facebook.com/bonnevillecountysheriff/

The team will focus on firefighter and public safety and full suppression of the fire. We ask that the public drive slowly through the incident whether it be the Incident Command Post or where we have resources at work.

If You Fly, We Can’t. Drones will stop all aerial resources on the fire. Aerial resources assist firefighters on the ground to suppress the fire. By stopping aerial assistance you are putting firefighters on the ground at risk.

Henry’s Creek Fire Perimeter Map August 29, 2016

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Roaring Fire

Salmon – Challis National Forest

Date of Origin Tuesday July 26th, 2016
Location [FC Wilderness] on the ridge between Roaring and Goat Creeks above the confluence of the Middle Fork Salmon and Salmon Rivers.
Total Personnel 1
Size 4,562 Acres

Roaring Fire, is a lightning caused fire that started on Tuesday, July 26 and is currently estimated at 4,562 acres. The Roaring Fire is burning in a remote part of the Frank Church-River of No Return wilderness on the ridge between Roaring and Goat Creeks above the confluence of the Middle Fork Salmon and Salmon Rivers. This fire is adjacent to the 2014 Goat Fire and is being managed to allow fire to play, as nearly as possible, its natural role in wilderness. This fire may contribute to smoke in both the Main and Middle Fork of the Salmon Rivers depending on wind and weather conditions. At this time, this fire is not impacting river use or camps.

There is an Emergency Trail Closure for the Roaring Fire: http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/article/4976/32829/

Personnel at Long Tom Lookout is monitoring the fire daily.

http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4976/
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Tie Canyon Fire

Caribou – Targhee National Forest

Date of Origin Monday August 22nd, 2016
Location Ten miles southwest of Victor, Idaho
Total Personnel 388
Size 1,014 Acres
Percent of Perimeter Contained 44%

http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4987/

Victor, ID – The Tie Fire grew an additional 27 acres Sunday due to the accumulated effects of wind and dry, hot weather. Despite aircraft dropping water on the southern flank of the fire, torching trees are creating new spot fires that are making containment efforts difficult for firefighters.

As experienced handcrews construct containment line along the southern flank of the fire, they are taking cautious steps to extinguish spot fires that establish with the help of high winds. Airtankers and six helicopters are holding the fire in check allowing handcrews to be more successful. When water is delivered, firefighters retreat to a safe area until the water drops, then return to construct line around the new spot fires. Meanwhile, engines and personnel trained in using hoses and pumps are following behind handcrews to install an extensive water system that will assist firefighters with extinguishing the fire.

After a long summer of hot, dry weather, temperatures are expected to break record highs the next few days as they climb 10-15 degrees above normal. For firefighters, this means more active fire behavior during the day and night as conditions are not cooling down as is normal. In the northcentral flank, the fire made short interior runs upslope in the grass and sage as wind carried the fire across very dry vegetation. Firefighters are using engines and hoses to mop up, cold trail and monitor containment line.

The Level 1 evacuation notice remains in effect. Wind gusts up to 25 mph from the south are forecasted to arrive Monday night. These winds will be strong enough to test the northeastern perimeter. Firefighters, law enforcement and other cooperators area assessing this area over the next couple days to determine when it will be safe to lift the evacuation notice. It will be lifted as soon as safely possible.

There are no fire restrictions in place; however, with the approaching hunting season, firefighters are asking everyone to please be very careful with campfires, propane tanks and anything else that can cause an accidental sparks. Vegetation is in critically dry allowing fire to carry fire in places normally more wet. Please be sure to use extra caution and thoroughly extinguish any campfires you start.

Teachers and students are returning to school this week. Firefighters are using use extra caution when driving in the communities. Fire traffic will be on the highway to access the fire area. Please use caution while driving, especially along Pine Creek Summit and west of Victor where a helibase has been established.

A high pressure system moving in will likely funnel smoke from area fires through the valley. This may agitate those with respiratory concerns. Please stay indoors if air quality becomes poor. To view smoke information, visit the Idaho Smoke Blog spot at: http://idsmoke.blogspot.com
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Carrot Fire

Caribou – Targhee National Forest

Date of Origin Saturday August 13th, 2016
Location 11 miles northeast of Tetonia, Idaho.
Total Personnel 5
Size 284 Acres

The Carrot Fire was detected on August 13, 2016, southeast of Coyote Meadows Trailhead in the Jedediah Smith Wilderness. The fire is approximately 11 miles northeast of Tetonia, Idaho in Wyoming.

The Caribou-Targhee National Forest will be monitoring the fire to allow it to play its natural role in the ecosystem.

http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4973/
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Peterson Hollow Fire

Uinta-Wasatch-Cache National Forest

Date of Origin Sunday August 21st, 2016
Location on the Logan Ranger District and is approximately 23 miles north of Logan, Utah.
Total Personnel 311
Size 1,202 Acres
Percent of Perimeter Contained 22%

Fire is located in Utah and well established into Idaho. Effecting both the Uinta-Wasatch-Cache and Caribou Targhee National Forests, in addition to State Institutional Trust Lands.

http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4985/

Peterson Hollow update 8/29/16

Despite some tree torching, the Peterson Hollow Fire made no significant runs. The fire is now 22% contained, with total acreage increasing only slightly to 1,202 acres. Crews are still using full suppression tactics to secure the perimeter, and made good progress yesterday. The number of personnel on the fire is 311.

Area visitors and residents near Bear Lake noticed increased visible smoke early yesterday afternoon and throughout the rest of the day. Flames were visible from Highway 89. With the help of aviation, crews were able to knock down any significant flames that arose throughout the day. However, fire managers want to remind the public that this activity was expected.

Today’s weather should bring less wind, but fire activity is expected to increase due to warmer and drier conditions. Afternoon smoke may be visible again today. Fire managers engage wildfires in ways that reduce risk to firefighter and public safety, and valuable natural and cultural resources. Due to the complexity of the terrain, suppression of the fire is achieved only by the combination of ground crews and aerial support. One without the other would not have been as successful.

Hwy 89 through Logan Canyon remains open to the public, and smoke may be visible in the area of the fire. An area closure remains in effect on the Utah side of the state line and a trail/road closure is in effect on the Idaho side. For closure details visit the Inciweb page for the Peterson Hollow Fire at http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4985/. Fire officials would like to thank the members of the nearby communities for their continued support.

Find update fire info:

Facebook: “U.S. Forest Service Uinta-Wasatch-Cache National Forest” or “Utah Wildfire”

Twitter: @UWCNF or @UtahWildfire

Inciweb: http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4985/ for closure info, maps and announcements

For More information: Sierra Hellstrom, Public Information Officer 435-554-8011
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Yellowstone National and Grand Teton National Park Fires

Yellowstone National Park Fires August 29, 2016 10:00 am

The south entrance of Yellowstone National Park remains closed due to the Berry Fire in Grand Teton National Park. Park visitors wishing to enter/exit through the south entrance of Yellowstone National Park will be unable to do so at this time. Fire managers currently anticipate being able to reopen access to the south entrance sometime Tuesday, August 30. This is subject to change dependent on weather and fire conditions.

All other entrances to Yellowstone remain open at this time; this includes the east entrance, northeast entrance (Cooke City), north entrance (Gardiner), and west entrance (West Yellowstone). For Grand Teton road information call (307) 739-3614. Currently all roads within Yellowstone National Park are open. Only the south entrance is closed. Park visitor facilities, including park concession-operated services, and businesses in surrounding communities are not impacted by the fires and remain open.

Active fire behavior is expected to continue for the next week due to progressively hotter and drier conditions and gusty westerly winds.

Yesterday the Maple Fire grew approximately 1,650 acres. The Maple Fire is approximately 3.8 miles from West Yellowstone, 1.8 miles from Madison Junction and 3.7 miles from the Mount Holmes Lookout. Last night the fire approached the road in the area of the 7 Mile Bridge and is visible from the road. Traffic control may be implemented if heavy smoke is present on the road. A Chinook helicopter dropped water on the northwest corner of the fire to assist firefighters. Today fire crews will be deploying hose lays near Cougar Creek in support of potential burnout operations designed to confine the fire within the park. Small burnout operations will continue as opportunities present themselves in the 7 Mile Bridge area to provide a clean fire edge that reduces spotting, flanking, and other control issues while providing an anchor point for crews along the southern flank to hold the fire north of the Madison River (west of 7 Mile Bridge).

Fire crews continue to work on fuels reduction projects on the western boundary of the park in the vicinity of West Yellowstone and the Duck Creek subdivision. Fuel reduction and structure protection measures at Madison Junction have been completed. Similar measures are currently being implemented in the Norris area.

There will be a Maple Fire community meeting tonight, Aug 29 at 7:30 pm at the LDS Church, 245 Faithful St., West Yellowstone, MT.

The Buffalo Fire grew approximately 345 acres yesterday. It is burning in open Douglas-fir forest, grass and sage. The fire backed down toward the Slough Creek Campground yesterday. It’s likely a Slough Creek Campground closure will be implemented today.

The Fawn Fire grew approximately 15 acres yesterday. The majority of fire activity was within the existing perimeter. When topography, fuels and wind align, continued growth is expected.

The Central Fire grew approximately 85 acres yesterday. It is primarily burning in mixed conifer forest. However it has also spotted to the east into an area that burned during the 2015 Spruce Fire, where it is burning heavy dead and down logs on the forest floor. Valleys, including West Yellowstone, should expect smoke in the morning under a prevailing inversion pattern. Smoke reports for West Yellowstone are posted daily to http://bit.ly/mtdeq. Visit http://bit.ly/firesandyourhealth for information on fires and your health.

Maple Fire: 33,058 acres Location: approximately 3.9 miles northeast of the community of West Yellowstone, and 3.5 miles southwest of Mount Holmes Lookout, 1.75 miles from Madison Junction Started: 8/8/16 lightning-caused Closures: Campsites: WA1 Trails · The entire Gneiss Creek Trail is closed from the Gneiss Creek Trailhead (WK7) to Seven Mile Bridge trailhead (WK8). This includes the Cougar Cabin Trail. · The Purple Mountain Trail is closed. · The Boundary Trail is closed. · The Riverside Trail is closed.

Roads · The Old Airport Road in West Yellowstone is closed while the Incident Command Post is in place.

Buffalo Fire: 3,578 acres Location: approximately 3 miles northeast of Tower Junction and 3 miles south of the park boundary, and is visible from the Lamar Valley Started: 8/13/16 lightning-caused

Closures: Campsites: 2S1, 2S2, 2S3, 2S4, 2S6, 2S7, 2S8 Trails · Buffalo Fork Trail from the trailhead at Slough Creek north to the Park boundary. · The Slough Creek Trail and associated Day Use area will be closed as fire activity dictates. · Bliss Pass Trail between Slough Creek and Pebble Creek Trail will be closed as fire activity dictates.

Fawn Fire: 1,986 acres Location: west of Fawn Pass, 11 miles west of Mammoth Hot Springs, 16 miles northeast of West Yellowstone, 13 miles southwest of Gardiner, and 35 miles southeast of Big Sky Started: 8/4/2016 lightning-caused

Closures: Campsites: WB1, WB3, WB4 and WB6 Trails · Bighorn Pass Trail eastbound at the junction of the cut-off trail to the Fawn Pass Trail. · Bighorn Pass Trail westbound at Bighorn Pass. · Fawn Pass Trail eastbound at the junction of the cut-off trail to the Big Horn Pass Trail. · Fawn Pass Trail westbound at campsite 1F2. · The cut-off trail between Bighorn and Fawn Pass trails is open.

Central Fire: 86 acres Location: 9 miles west of the Lake developed area and 2 miles south of Hayden Valley Started: 8/26/16 lightning-caused Closures: none at this time
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Maple Fire – Tatanka Complex

Date of Origin Monday August 08th, 2016
Location Fire is 4 miles North-Northeast of the town of West Yellowstone.
Total Personnel 238
Size 33,058 Acres

http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4944/
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Fawn Fire – Tatanka Complex

Date of Origin Thursday August 04th, 2016
Location The Fawn fire is located 11 miles W of Mammoth Springs, 16 miles NE of West Yellowstone, 13 miles SW of Gardiner, 35 miles SE of Big Sky.
Total Personnel 5
Size 1,986 Acres
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Buffalo Fire – Tatanka Complex

Date of Origin Thursday August 13, 2016
Location approximately 3 miles northeast of Tower Junction and 3 miles south of the park boundary and is visible from the Lamar Valley.
Total Personnel 22
Size 3,578 Acres

http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4953/
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Berry Fire

Grand Teton National Park

Date of Origin Monday July 25th, 2016
Location 19 miles NW of Moran, WY
Total Personnel 379
Size 12,387 Acres

http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4954/

Berry Fire AM Update 8-29-16

Contact Fire Information: 307.739.3566

Summary: Since its discovery, Grand Teton National Park has been actively managing the Berry Fire for ecological benefits. The fire originated in the northern portion of the park, near Berry and Owl Creeks on the west side of Jackson Lake. Extreme fire behavior as a result of high winds and low relative humidity on Monday, August 22 pushed the fire across Jackson Lake and into the Teton Wilderness on the Bridger-Teton National Forest. A Type 2 Great Basin Incident Management Team took command of the fire on August 24th. Closures: At this time, fire managers anticipate being able to reopen Highway 89/191/287 tomorrow, Tuesday, August 30. This is subject to change dependent on weather and fire conditions. Until then the highway does remain closed for safety between the South Gate of Yellowstone National Park and Leeks Marina.

While Grand Teton and Yellowstone National Parks and Bridger Teton National Forest all have area closures in effect, both National Parks are open to visitors. This includes Leeks Marina and most visitor destinations and services. Travel times to Yellowstone may be increased depending on planned routes. Check before you go. And please drive carefully, with lights on, due to both visibility concerns from smoke and increased vehicle numbers.

Current Situation: The Berry Fire was much more active yesterday. Most of the growth occurred on the northeast corner of the fire – in the Teton Wilderness – and the southwest portion of the fire – along Jackson Lake. Firefighters have completed preparatory actions around Flagg Ranch, as well as on historic cabins and lookouts to minimize impacts from the fire, in the event the fire should reach those locations.

Today’s weather will again be warmer and drier with atmospheric instability, which can contribute to rapid fire growth. Temperatures will rise into the mid-80s, and the relative humidity may drop into single digits. Light winds will prevail over the fire area. Despite the shorter days, thermal belts are allowing the fire to burn actively throughout the night.

Western Wyoming is experiencing historical lows for fuel moistures. Currently, no significant moisture is in the extended forecast. The conditions are similar to 2012, when fires burned actively well into September. The Berry Fire will continue to burn in the coming weeks, accomplishing the goal of rejuvenating the ecosystem through the natural process of wildland fire.

Firefighters expect to finish their work along Highway 89/191/287 today. Unless fire behavior or weather conditions change today, the road will reopen to the general public tomorrow.

For more information: Follow Grand Teton National Park and Bridger-Teton National Forest on social media: @GrandTetonNPS and @BridgerTetonNF on both Facebook and Twitter. Information on other fires in western Wyoming is available at http://www.TetonFires.com. And information on fires burning in eastern Idaho can be found at http://www.IdahoFireInfo.com, or by filtering Idaho incidents on InciWeb
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Aug 28, 2016 The Yellow Pine Times

Aug 28, 2016 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

YPWUA News:

Reminder

Please be conservative when watering lawns. We ask those that are here all week to not water lawns on the weekends so that more water is available for the weekend cabin owners. There will NO lawn watering on all summer holidays and during the Festival weekend!
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YPWUA Shareholder Meeting

There was a meeting Saturday Aug 27 at 315pm in the Community Hall for the Yellow Pine Water Users Association Shareholders. Just under 50 people (and 3 dogs) attended.

First item of business Construction Update:

Dave McClintock gave us an update on the construction project at the new water filter plant and an outline of the history of the project. The cement work is now complete!  (There are photos at the Yellow Pine Facebook page.) There is still some work to do to complete the project, like hauling in special sand and gravel to fill the new filtration plant, installing all the high tech gizmos, etc. The project started moving along once they got thru all the massive amounts of red tape, engineering, DEQ, etc. This work will not be cheap and they urge us all to get caught up on delinquent water bills and construction fees. And it would be a big help if folks paid their Jan 1, 2017 bill a little bit early if they can.

A couple of points to note. The YPWUA owns the ‘infrastructure’ ie. the filtration plant, technical devices and the pipes. (The YPFD owns the hydrants.) Dave owns the equipment, ie. the backhoe, forklift, etc. Dave has not charged the YPWUA for use of the equipment or his time to work on the infrastructure over the years. The lion’s share of the expense for the water filter project has been for the engineering, and its not cheap to get cement trucks up here. If there are no unexpected expenses, the YPWUA has enough to finish the project.

Most of the meeting was spent discussing who and what a Shareholder is, and who can vote during an election for board members. A Shareholder in “good standing” can vote. If you cannot attend a meeting, you can vote by proxy, but make sure your proxy is also a Shareholder.

A “Yellow Pine Water User” is any property owner in Yellow Pine that is connected the YPWUA system and is assessed a yearly fee for the water service. All water users have been assessed a construction fee of $1000 to build the new filtration plant. Some folks paid the entire fee and some folks took an “installment plan” so they pay a higher yearly bill. In other words that is why ‘Jane Doe’ pays $120/year and ‘John Smith’ pays $250/year. If you are unsure about your construction fee status, look at your water bill. If you are a new property owner, it will be noted in the billing history if the prior owner paid the fee.

A Shareholder is a Water User that has bought a “share” in the company for $100. (Bit of history: the first shares were $250 back in Faye Kissinger’s time, but most folks could not afford it so he lowered the price.) The share is tied to the property, and only one share per property that is also a Water User, ie. if your property with home consists of more than one lot and you only pay one water bill, you can only buy one share. If the person you bought your property from had a share, that share transferred automatically to you. So even if grandpa lost the stock certificate and you inherited his old cabin, you are still on record at the YPWUA as having a share. The easiest way to find out if you are a Shareholder is to look at your water bill. If you are a Shareholder it will have a number next to “Member”, if you are not a Shareholder, that space is blank. If you wish to purchase a share and are a Water User in “good standing”, contact the YPWUA.

Links to the YPWUA Articles of Incorporation and Bylaws are below. I will not be posting the list of Shareholders on the internet. Shareholders will receive an updated list in the mail in early September.

Second Item of Business the election of YPWUA Board Members:

After a lot of discussion and motions, it was decided by majority vote of the Shareholders to postpone the election for YPWUA Board Members until September 17, 2016, and form some committees to look into amending a few things. There were objections about the ballots that were mailed out. A majority of Shareholders present (and by proxy) voted to take nominations from the floor and issue a new ballot. This ballot will be mailed out to the YPWUA Shareholders and the deadline to return is September 17, or Shareholders can attend (or by proxy) the election at the next YPWUA meeting on September 17.

After about an hour and a half we were pretty much commented and discussed out. Many thanks to Deb Filler for keeping the meeting moving along. Thank you Dave and Paula for all the info and decades of great water.
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YPWUA Bylaws and Articles of Incorporation

YPWUA-ArtInc-1stAmends

YPWUA-ArtInc-2-84Amends

YPWUA-ArtInc-04-1976

YPWUA-ArtInc-6-84Amends

YPWUA-Bylaws
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YPFD News:

Yellow Pine Fire Department Budget Meeting

There was a meeting August 27, 2016 at 6pm at the Yellow Pine Fire Department building. Around 30 people (and 2 dogs) attended.

Dave gave a report on the YPFD budget, the fees received from Valley County that they collect on our property tax bill for the Yellow Pine Fire District. Money has been budgeted towards expanding the Fire Hall to house our fire equipment.

[Who would have thought all those years ago when we built that huge building that it would be filled to over flowing with firefighting equipment?]

The budget was passed but may be amended. There will be another YPFD meeting on Sunday, September 18, 2016 at 10am at the Community Hall.

Sad news. Dave has retired as our Fire Chief. Many thanks for his decades of service to our community. He will have big shoes to fill.
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VYPA News:

The next meeting is September 17, 2016

Village of Yellow Pine Association Bylaws

VYPA Bylaws Adopted 9-12-2015
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Village News:

Labor Day Weekend Golf Tourney

Play golf at Yellow Pine during Welch memorial tourney on Sept. 3

Golfers can play in the back country during the Welch Memorial Golf Tournament in Yellow Pine on Monday, Sept. 3.

The event starts at 1 p.m. and proceeds benefit the community. The $20 entry fee includes refreshments and membership in the Yellow Pine Country Club, “home of the unfair fairways.”

A $50 sponsorship also includes an advertisement on a hole of the sponsor’s choice. Registration starts at 12:30 p.m. Space is limited to 32 golfers and there will be awards for the first three teams.

After the tournament, a potluck will be held at the Yellow Pine Tavern at 5:30 p.m.. A donation of $1 is requested for the event, which will include awards and a community fundraiser auction. Checks can be made out to Village of Yellow Pine Association and sent to P.O. Box 61, Yellow Pine, ID 83677.

For more information, contact Lisa Thomas-Rhoton at 412-6163 or lisathomas2310 @ gmail.com
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Local Observations:

Monday (Aug 22) Just before 9am airplane with sputtering engine circling around over the village for several minutes. Mostly cloudy sky, high thin but solid with wispy edges, hardly any dew and calm. Very few birds around and none at the feeders. Low haze of dust hanging in the air towards the back Stibnite road. Around lunch time a lone hummingbird visited the feeders, getting breezy. Early afternoon, not so hot, breezy and wind gusts once in a while. Decreasing clouds and cooler towards evening, almost calm.

Tuesday (Aug 23) chilly morning, clear sky, haze to the east, more dust than smoke, good amount of dew. A female cowbird, one humming bird and a doe with non-spotted fawn. Sunny day, pleasant temperatures. Shooting to the west started a little after 7pm and went on for about 30 minutes. Clear cool evening.

Wednesday (Aug 24) chilly morning, clear sky, dust hanging in the air. Heard a jay and few finches in the neighborhood, no birds at feeders. Sunny morning, partly cloudy after lunch, breezy and mild temperatures. Clouds building in afternoon, breezy and mild temperatures. Clear evening.

Thursday (Aug 25) cool morning, clear sky, haze to the east (smoke and some dust.) Finches flying and calling, but only one visited the feeder. Heard a pileated woodpecker calling in the afternoon. A few clouds drifted by, light breezes and mild temperatures. Hazy sky towards evening.

Friday (Aug 26) cool morning, mostly clear sky. A few finches flying around calling, no birds at the feeders. Sunny warm day, some high thin hazy clouds. Towards evening a couple of hummingbirds visited and heard a pileated calling from the north.

Saturday (Aug 27) almost clear sky in the morning. A few pine-siskins and a jay came to the feeders and one hummingbird. A few gusty blasts mid day, warm and sunny all day, very dry.

Sunday (Aug 28) partly clear sky, high thin clouds, dry and dusty. Mostly sunny warm day. Huge cloud of dust out in the middle of the golf course around 730pm.
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Idaho News:

Valley County budget gambles that Congress will approve money for roads

Public hearing set Monday for $19.5 million spending plan

BY DAN GALLAGHER for The Star-News August 25, 2015

The Valley County commissioners on Monday will consider a proposed budget which could lose $1 million for the county roads if Congress does not allocate money.

The board proposes a $19.5 million budget for fiscal year 2017 which starts on Oct. 1.

A public hearing on the proposed budget is scheduled to begin at 1 p.m. Monday at the Valley County Courthouse in Cascade.

The upcoming budget includes the full 3 percent hike in property taxes allowed under state law as well as revenue from new construction for a total of about $100,000, Valley County Clerk Doug Miller said.

Commissioners chose not to levy any of the $987,000 in deferred property taxes from previous years as allowed by law, Miller said.

The budget includes $6.8 million for the county road and bridge department and $1.5 million for solid waste disposal.

full story: The Star-News
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Bell sounds off on Round 3

Valley County to try a third time to seize Tamarack Resort parcels

BY DAN GALLAGHER for The Star-News August 25, 2015

The owners of Tamarack Resort on Monday escaped for a second time from having land and buildings in the resort near Donnelly seized for nonpayment of property taxes.

Valley County commissioners accepted the recommendations from Valley County Treasurer Glenna Young and Valley County Prosecuting Attorney Carol Brockmann that the tax notices on 35 parcels owned by New TR Acquisitions, or NewTrac, were incorrect.

Young’s office will send out new corrected versions of the notices in a third attempt to allow the county take over the properties.

“Idaho code requires a notice and summary of pending tax sales to include the date the delinquency occurred,” commission Chair Gordon Cruickshank read from the memorandum the board passed.

“After hearing all of the evidence presented, we find the notice of impending tax deeds improperly lists the date of delinquency as Jan. 1 2011, when it should say Jan. 1 2012, or the 2011 taxes, and Jan. 1, 2013 for the 2012 taxes,” Cruickshank said

Last year, NewTrac took the issue to court with a similar argument and Judge Jason Scott ruled the county needed to further itemize the costs and payments on the past-due notices.

Young sent out new notices this year and NewTrac appealed to the commissioners.

By last December, Tamarack owed about $12 million dollars in unpaid property taxes, with $11.5 million of that amount due to the North Lake Recreational Sewer and Water District.

full story: The Star-News
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Idaho auctions 30 Payette Lake lots for $12.6 million

Two current lesees lose their lots in open bidding

BY TOM GROTE for The Star-News August 25, 2015

A total of $12.6 million for public schools and a state mental-health hospital was raised on Friday when the Idaho Department of Lands auctioned 30 state-owned lots around Payette Lake.

The auction, the fifth in three years, saw 25 currently leased lots and five non-leased lots sold. The bidding was held at the Stueckle Sky Center on the campus of Boise State University.

During the auction, two current holders of leased lots were outbid for their lots. One lot, at 2225 Payette Dr., sold to an outside bidder for $101,500, or $27,500 more than the minimum bid.

The second lot, at 995 Cedar Crest Drive, sold for $91,000, which was $14,000 over the minimum bid.

The new owners also had to pay the previous leaseholder for the value of any building on the properties. The names of the previous leaseholders and the new owners were not disclosed.

There was competitive bidding on three un-leased lots, which sold for a combined $920,000 over appraised value.

Including Friday’s auction, 117 lots at Payette Lake, including 16 un-leased lots, have sold for a total of about $110 million for state endowment funds.

full story: The Star-News
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Donnelly Food Bank has new home, same needs from the community

Scores of families rely on food bank for basic needs

BY TERI ROBINSON for The Star-News August 25, 2016

The Donnelly Food Bank has settled in to its new home to better serve those who cannot afford the food required for a healthy diet.

This spring, the food bank completed its move from its former inadequate quarters to its new building next to the Donnelly Fire Station.

The building was funded completely by individual local donations with no government funding or grants used, said Pastor Brian Reese of the Donnelly Bible Church, which operates the food bank.

The food bank serves about 150 households in the Donnelly area, with about 75 to 80 families served every week, Reese said.

The items that can be found at the food bank range from bread, eggs, milk, cereal, soup, along with diapers and personal hygiene products.

During the Thanksgiving and Christmas holidays, the food bank distributes boxes with turkey or ham dinners which also include winter clothing and children’s toys, to those in need.

full story: The Star-News
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Smiths Ferry campground Valley County’s first park

18 sites set up at Wellington Recreation Park

BY DAN GALLAGHER for The Star-News August 25, 2015

Wellington Recreation Park at Smiths Ferry officially opened to the public last week. The facility is the first park operated by Valley County.

The park features 18 camping vehicle pads to accommodate visitors just west of the Wellington Snow Park buildings along Idaho 55. The sites include fire rings, concrete pads for trailers and concrete picnic tables.

“This is pretty exciting. It’s kind of been a dream for people,” said Valley County Recreation Director Larry Laxson, who attracted grant money and oversaw the project.

Wellington is a popular trailhead for snowmobilers accessing along the extensive Smiths Ferry network. The county in 2011 bought 3.6 acres from then-owner Potlatch Corp., where the warming hut, restrooms, snow groomer garage and a former ambulance garage area are located, with $160,000 in grant money.

The county then bought 7.2 acres from Potlatch in 2014 for $57,800, which included $46,800 from an Idaho Department of Parks and Recreation grant, $10,000 in matching money from the county and donations from the Cougar Mountain Country Association. Laxson obtained another $83,500 state parks grant to put in the road and water system as well as the pads.

Wellington connects to hundreds of miles of trails for ATVs and mountain bikers headed to West Mountain, East Mountain, Sagehen Reservoir, the Silver Creek Plunge on the Middle Fork of the Payette River, Warm Lake and even Stanley, Laxson said.

full story: The Star-News
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Horsethief Reservoir closed to camping

By Chadd Cripe Aug 22 Idahostatesman.com

Horsethief Reservoir has been closed to camping after the host resigned, Idaho Fish and Game says.

The closure began Monday. Horsethief will be available for day use only until a new host can be found, perhaps putting Labor Day camping plans in jeopardy. Idaho Fish and Game, which owns the reservoir, has an agreement with adjacent landowners to allow camping only with a qualified host on-site.

The east side of the recreation area also will be unavailable without a host. The west side, which includes the boat launch, dock and fishing area around the dam, remains open for day-use activities.

Horsethief traditionally stays open for camping until Sept. 20. It is 10 miles east of Cascade.

“We realize how important this is for Labor Day, and we will try to get a host as quick as possible,” Fish and Game’s Southwest Region Fisheries Manager Joe Kozfkay said in a press release.

Anyone interested in serving as the camp host can contact Kozfkay or Dennis Hardy at (208) 465-8465. Hosts must be qualified, have a background check done by Fish and Game and be available by Labor Day weekend to reopen the area for camping.

source:
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Forest / Parks News:

Fire Restrictions, August 23, 2016

News Release August 23, 2016, Payette Interagency Dispatch
Contact:  Brian Harris, 208-634-6945, bdharris@fs.fed,us

Land Management Agencies to Implement Stage 1 Restrictions in Portions of Central Idaho

McCall, Idaho – With the threat of wildfire danger increasing rapidly throughout central Idaho, local land management agencies will implement Stage 1 Fire Restrictions in the Payette Dispatch Area Zones 3 & 4 beginning at 00:01 a.m. on Wednesday, August 24, 2016.   Stage 1 Fire Restrictions will remain in effect until further notice.  These restrictions are being implemented by agencies managing state, private and public lands in the area, including the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), Southern Idaho Timber Protective Association (SITPA), and the Idaho Department of Lands (IDL).  Fire restrictions are intended to decrease the risk of any human caused wildfires in the designated areas.

Payette National Forest lands will NOT be going into fire restrictions at this time.

Fire restrictions will be in effect within Zone 3 – Long Valley/Meadows Valley Zone, and Zone 4 – Little Salmon Zone of the Payette Fire Restriction Area.

Fire, fuels and weather conditions as they relate to fire restrictions will continue to be monitored – based on these conditions, restriction can be reduced or additional restrictions may be issued if conditions warrant.  The land management agencies would like to thank the public for their attention to fires in Idaho so far this season and ask for their help in preventing any future unwanted fire with drying fuels and hotter temperatures expected to continue into this fall.

Though conditions do not warrant fire restrictions on Payette National Forest system lands, forest users should remain cognizant of the late summer dry and warm conditions, be sure campfires are always attended, and continue to be diligent in ensuring their campfire is completely out before leaving.

Stage I restrictions will be in effect in the following areas:  For a detailed map showing all Payette Fire Restriction Area zones, please visit: http://idahofireinfo.blogspot.com/p/fire-restrictions.html)

* Zone 3: Long Valley/Meadows Valley: All BLM, state, and private lands located within Meadows Valley and the northern portions of Long Valley. Beginning at Highway 55, T16N, R3E, Section 23 SW corner, the southern boundary runs from this point west to the Payette National Forest boundary. It then follows the forest boundary northwest and the north to the Forest Service Road 074. The boundary then follows the road east to Highway 95, then continues east to the Payette National Forest boundary. The boundary line turns south and continues to follow the forest boundary south and east to the Payette-Boise National Forest boundary. Here the line turns west and travels to its junction with Highway 55.

* Zone 4: Little Salmon   All state, private and BLM managed land (except that located within NFS boundaries) south of the main Salmon river to Smokey Boulder road

Under the Stage 1 Fire Restrictions, the following acts are prohibited on the restricted state, private and federal lands, roads and trails:

* Building, maintaining, attending or using a fire, campfire or stove fire except within a designated recreation site, or on their own land, and only within a permanent owner-provided structure.

* Smoking, except within an enclosed vehicle, building, or designated recreation site, or while stopped in an area at least three feet in diameter that is barren or cleared of all flammable materials.

The following are exemptions to the Stage 1 Fire Restrictions:

* Persons with a written permit that specifically authorizes the otherwise prohibited act.

* Persons using fire fueled solely by liquid petroleum or LPG fuels. Such devices, including propane campfires, may be used only in an area cleared of flammable material.

* Persons using metal fire pans (sides must be 3 inches high with a metal grate on top) within 1/4 mile of the Main Salmon River.  Pack-out of ashes is required.

* Persons conducting activities in those designated areas where the activity is specifically authorized by written posted notice.

* Any federal, state or local officer or member of an organized rescue or firefighting force in the performance of an official duty.

* All land within a city boundary is exempt.

* Other exemptions unique to each agency.

With the volume of wildfires burning throughout central Idaho, fire managers are asking the public to be extra cautious when spending time in the outdoors.  Idahoans are also reminded that the use of fireworks are prohibited on forest and range lands in Idaho during closed fire season (May 10 through October 20).

Please visit http://idahofireinfo.blogspot.com for current information regarding fire restrictions or contact the local land management office.
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The National Park Service celebrates its 100th anniversary

Susan B. Barnes, USA TODAY August 25, 2016

2016 marks the centennial of the National Park Service, the mission of which is to preserve “unimpaired the natural and cultural resources and values of the National Park System for the enjoyment, education, and inspiration of this and future generations. The Park Service cooperates with partners to extend the benefits of natural and cultural resource conservation and outdoor recreation throughout this country and the world.”

And though we’re celebrating 100 years of the National Park System this year, from Maine to Hawaii, Florida to Alaska, and everywhere in between, not to mention American Samoa, Guam, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, it may come as a surprise to learn that the first National Park was designated in 1871, 45 years before the National Park Service as we know it came into existence in 1916.

continued:
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Critter News:

Six wolves from Profanity Peak Pack killed by state gunners so far

Rich Landers Aug 25, 2016 The Spokesman-Review

State workers have killed six wolves so far in an effort to eliminate the cattle-killing Profanity Peak Pack in Ferry County, the Washington Fish and Wildlife Department reported today.

The operation using helicopter gunners north of Sherman Pass will continue, said Donny Martorello, the agency’s wolf policy leader. The pack was estimated to total 11 animals, including six pups, when the lethal control action was authorized on Aug. 4.

Since mid-July, WDFW has confirmed that wolves have killed or injured six cattle and probably five others, based on staff investigations.

Two adult female wolves from the pack were killed by state shooters on Aug. 5. When the pack continued to attack cattle, Fish and Wildlife Director Jim Unsworth on Aug. 19 authorized field staff to remove the remaining members of the Profanity Peak wolf pack to prevent additional attacks on cattle in the range lands between Republic and Kettle Falls.

continued:
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Wolf advocates outraged that state preparing to kill wolves

By NICHOLAS K. GERANIOS – 8/25/16 AP

SPOKANE, Wash. — Some wolf advocates are outraged that the state is preparing for the second time to exterminate an entire wolf pack for preying on livestock in northeastern Washington state.

This is the second time in four years that a pack of endangered wolves has received the death penalty because of the grazing of privately owned cattle on publicly owned lands, the Center for Biological Diversity said.

Washington is home to about 90 wolves, and killing the 11 members of the Profanity Peak pack would amount to 12 percent of the population.

continued:
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KWVR Oregon Wolf Education weekly Wolf Report

Second Week of August 2016
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Wolf-livestock conflicts up sharply in Wyoming

Rich Landers Aug 23, 2016 The Spokesman-Review

While Washington is dealing forcefully with a cattle-attacking wolf pack this month, the situation also is contentious elsewhere.

Federal officials say the number of conflicts between wolves and livestock in Wyoming is up sharply, exceeding the number of wolves that were killed last year, which was the second highest number in the state since they were reintroduced to the northern Rockies 21 years ago.

Sheep and cattle killed by wolves have been found in the Upper Gros Ventre area, in the Salt and Wyoming ranges and other areas of the state, wildlife officials said.

Here’s more form the Associated Press:
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Wisconsin’s wolf population highest ever, with nearly 900

Aug 23, 2016 BY WEI STAFF

MADISON, Wis. — Wisconsin’s wolf population has reached a record high of nearly 900 animals, state wildlife officials announced Thursday.

Figures from the Department of Natural Resources’ over-winter monitoring show between 866 and 897 wolves are roaming the state, up 16 percent from last year’s count of 746 to 771 animals.

link:
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Wolf attacks on cattle and hunting dogs rise

Aug 26, 2016 BY WEI STAFF

“Nearly two years after the gray wolf was placed back on the federal list of endangered species, wolf attacks on Wisconsin livestock and hunting dogs are rising.

State Department of Natural Resources statistics show 58 confirmed or probable wolf “depredations” — deaths or injuries — of domesticated animals this year through Aug. 15, compared to an average of about 37 for that period in each of the previous three years.

The DNR attributes the increase to growth in the wolf population, which this winter was estimated at nearly 900, its highest level since before the 1960s when the species was all but extinguished by hunters.

link:
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Idaho controlled hunt drawing results online

Rich Landers Aug 23, 2016 The Spokesman-Review

Hunters who applied in Idaho’s second controlled hunt drawing for elk, deer, pronghorn, and fall black bear can check online to see whether they were successful in the recent computerized drawing.

Results are available on the Idaho Fish and Game website.

Applicants can enter their hunting license number and follow three simple steps to find out if they were successful or not in the drawing.  Traffic on the website may be heavy at times, so please be patient.

Postcards will be mailed to successful applicants

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Mustang death ruled accidental

Misty Inglet Aug 25, 2016

AMERICAN FALLS, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – The Power County Sheriff’s Office and a local veterinarian say the horse that was found dead in a field was due to an accident.

Investigators found bark in the head wound of the horse and a six inch piece of wood in another wound.  They are calling this an accident, with the horse somehow injuring itself.

Investigators are no longer calling this a suspicious act.

Ranch owner Kimberly Clark says, she apologizes to the public and all of the “Go -Fund-Me” money they were raising for a reward, will be returned. Clark says she is currently in the progress of returning the money to those who donated.

Copyright 2016 NPG
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Changes at Snake River dams helping Idaho sockeye salmon

By KEITH RIDLER – 8/28/16 AP

BOISE, Idaho — Structural changes at two Snake River dams in Washington state are helping more endangered sockeye salmon make the trip upstream to central Idaho this year, federal officials say.

The permanent system at Lower Granite Dam and a temporary system at Little Goose Dam pull up cold, deep water for fish ladders to combat high temperatures that discourage fish from completing their journey. The success of the new systems could lead to similar changes at other dams on the Snake and Columbia rivers.

“The strategy of putting cooler water at the top end of the ladder appears to be effective,” said Ritchie Graves of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. “It takes a while to learn how to do it correctly.”

continued:
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Recreational dam builders block fish passage

Rich Landers Aug 24, 2016 The Spokesman-Review

Every hiker can enjoy a dip in a cool stream on a hot day, but remember, fish need cool water more than we do.

Building dams out of rocks and logs to form a swimming hole technically is illegal on streams, and the explanation is easy:  they inhibit fish migration and can cause flooding.

… “At this time of year the water is lower and warmer with less oxygen, so the fish we saw in the wide shallow pool needed to be able to move around to find optimum conditions.

‘Plus, during spring runoff, both banks will be eroded as water is forced around the dam.

full story:
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Job retraining planned after Yellowstone River closure

8/26/16 AP

BILLINGS, Mont. — Montana labor officials will offer advice on job retraining for fishing guides, raft operators and other workers affected by the closure of a 183-mile stretch of the Yellowstone River.

Gov. Steve Bullock announced Friday that the Department of Labor and Industry will host a meeting in Livingston on Monday to provide further information.

State wildlife commissioners closed the Yellowstone indefinitely to all recreational activity last week following a massive fish kill in the Paradise Valley area north of Yellowstone National Park.

Officials hope to stop the spread of a contagious parasite blamed for killing tens of thousands of whitefish and smaller numbers of trout.

source:
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The Columbia Basin Bulletin

Weekly Fish and Wildlife News
http://www.cbbulletin.com
August 26, 2016
Issue No. 801

Table of Contents

* Identifying, Preserving Columbia/Snake Cold Water Refuges Important Salmon Recovery Tool
http://www.cbbulletin.com/437376.aspx

* Conservation Groups File Notice To Sue EPA Over Columbia/Snake Water Temperatures
http://www.cbbulletin.com/437375.aspx

* Deschutes River Alliance Sues PGE Over Water Quality Issues In Deschutes River; Sockeye Reaching Pelton-Round Butte
http://www.cbbulletin.com/437374.aspx

* Cooler Water Continues To Flow In Lower Snake River; Fish Ladder Cooling Now Also At Little Goose
http://www.cbbulletin.com/437373.aspx

* Good Fall Chinook Return, But Slow Fishing, Prompts Liberalizing Catch Restriction On Unmarked Fish
http://www.cbbulletin.com/437372.aspx

* Northwest Members Of Congress Push State Department On Columbia River Treaty
http://www.cbbulletin.com/437371.aspx

* Washington Gets First Fish Habitat Mitigation Bank To Assist Salmon/Steelhead Recovery
http://www.cbbulletin.com/437370.aspx

* WDFW Offers Free Fishing Days While License Sales Down Due To Hacking Of Outside Vendor System
http://www.cbbulletin.com/437369.aspx

* WDFW Designates Elwha, Nisqually Rivers As Wild Steelhead Gene Banks Off-Limits To Hatchery Fish
http://www.cbbulletin.com/437368.aspx

* WDFW Starts Removal Of Ferry County Wolf Pack After Finding Dead, Injured Calves
http://www.cbbulletin.com/437367.aspx

* WSU Researcher Finds, Mysteriously, Chum Salmon Less Sensitive To Toxic Stormwater Than Coho
http://www.cbbulletin.com/437366.aspx

* Study One Of First To Document Ecological Consequences Of Amphetamine Pollution In Urban Streams
http://www.cbbulletin.com/437365.aspx

* Four Retiring Coal Plants Likely Means Northwest Will Need More Generation To Lower Chance Of Power Shortfall
http://www.cbbulletin.com/437364.aspx

* Reclamation Awards $19 Million Contract For Hydro Upgrades As Part Of 20-Year Grand Coulee Modernization
http://www.cbbulletin.com/437363.aspx
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Fun Critter Stuff:

Care for a kiss?

Orphaned elk named Buttons cuddles up to Washington State firefighters in adorable pictures

Associated Press July 5, 2016

An affectionate elk paid some Washington state firefighters a visit over the holiday weekend as they worked to tame a wildfire.

The orphaned elk, dubbed Buttons by the locals, is a fixture in Kittitas County, where she took up residence with some cows and goats on a hillside.

Kittitas County Fire District spokeswoman Richelle Risdon says she arrived at the scene on Saturday to see the elk nuzzling up to everyone in the command post area and resting her head on people’s shoulders.

continued w/photos:

[h/t GC]
— — — —

Kind-Hearted Elk Kisses Firefighters To Say Thanks For Putting Out Wildfire

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Fish & Game News:

F&G Press Releases

https://idfg.idaho.gov/press
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Breach in fishing license system exposes data in Northwest

By KEITH RIDLER – 8/26/16 AP

BOISE, Idaho — A breach in a vendor’s system that processes online sales of hunting and fishing licenses in Idaho, Oregon and Washington state exposed several million records containing buyers’ personal information, officials said Friday.

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security and FBI are investigating the hack into Dallas-based Active Network, the Washington State Office of Cyber Security said in a statement. Washington halted all sales earlier this week, allowing anglers to fish license-free, while Idaho and Oregon have stopped only online sales.

“Initial assessments indicate personal information exposed by the vendor for Washington residents includes names, addresses, driver’s license numbers, dates of birth and the last four digits of Social Security numbers,” Washington officials said in a statement.

Active Network, whose event and activity management software is used by tens of thousands of event organizers nationwide, including marathons and other races, said the potential threat was isolated to fishing and hunting licensing systems in the three states.

continued:
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Tripod Reservoir to be drawn down to repair failed water valve

The Star-News August 25, 2016

Tripod Reservoir near Smiths Ferry, will soon be drawn down as Fish and Game crews begin repairs on a failed emergency water control valve. The drawdown and repair work will begin in early September.

“We normally drop the reservoir’s water level by about two feet and not until October,” Fish and Game recreation site maintenance foreman Dennis Hardy noted. “The repairs will require the water level to be dropped by at least six feet, perhaps more.”

The extent of the repair work will remain unknown until crews can inspect the faulty valve, Hardy said.

If repairs go as planned and spring rains are close to normal, Tripod Reservoir should be full in time for the 2017 spring fishing season, he said.

source:: The Star-News
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Tips & Advice:

How To Stop Being A Mosquito Magnet!

by Deborah Tukua Monday, August 22nd, 2016 The Farmers’ Almanac

If there’s a mosquito near, are you the one that seems to have a target drawn on your skin? Mosquitoes are a pesky nuisance for many this time of year. Besides the irritating itch, infectious mosquito–transmitted diseases such as malaria, West Nile virus, dengue fever, yellow fever, encephalitis, chikungunya, and Zika are on the rise throughout the world.

Outbreaks of various mosquito-transmitted diseases are circulating in Africa, Brazil, through Latin America, the Caribbean, and beyond. Despite global awareness, malaria and other mosquito-borne diseases are a major health problem. As world-wide travel connects us to other continents and their diseases, researchers are looking for ways to control mosquitoes and the diseases they spread.

Mosquito Facts

Some people are more likely to be bitten by mosquitoes than others. Understanding how mosquitoes select their target, what they are attracted to, and what they find offensive, could hold the key to preventing mosquito bites.

With its keen sense of smell, mosquitoes can detect its next victim up to 55 yards (50 meters) away. Only the female mosquito bites, males do not. The female mosquito needs the iron and protein in your blood to produce eggs.

Scents that Draw Mosquitoes:

continued:
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Fire Updates Aug 28

Pioneer Fire

Boise National Forest

Date of Origin Monday July 18th, 2016
Location 8 miles north of Idaho City
Total Personnel 1,399
Size 109,594 Acres
Containment 58%

http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4866/

Pioneer Fire Maps
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/maps/4866/

Pioneer Fire Photographs
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/photographs/4866/

Boise NF Fire News Release and Map, Sunday, Aug. 28

Firefighters Perform Burnouts to Slow Pioneer Fire’s Movement

BOISE, Idaho, August 28, 2016 – The Pioneer Fire is at 109,594 acres and 58% contained. 1,399 personnel are assigned to the fire. Resources assigned include 30 crews, 9 helicopters, 62 engines, 4 dozers, 29 water tenders and 4 masticators.

Idaho City Area Fire Information: 208-392-9634
Garden Valley Area Fire Information: 844-633-3090
Boise National Forest Fire Information: 208-384-3266

Crews continue to remove hose and other fire line equipment from the old control lines in the Grimes and Black Bear Creek areas. Fire line repair is progressing on all other parts of the fire where there is no active burning. The fire was active in the north where crews continued their efforts to keep the fire north of Long Creek in the Clear Creek area. On Saturday evening, crews burned out a section of line near the junction of Long Creek and Clear Creek to keep the fire from moving south.

Weather may become more of a factor in the next three days as temperatures rise and humidity drops from the upper to lower teens. Winds will be approximately 15 mph, primarily from the southwest. The air over the fire will be more unstable, resulting in more aggressive fire activity. Active fire growth can be expected along Deadwood Ridge, Long Creek and in the Sams and Little Sams drainages. There is also potential for torching in small pockets of unburned fuel within the interior of the fire.

Today, firefighters will continue to do repair work across the fire. A special emphasis will be in the area around the Summer Homes in Clear Creek, as fire crews chip material created by the suppression operation and do repair work on fire lines along the Clear Creek Road. Another area of emphasis will be to continue to hold and mop up the control line in Charlotte Gulch. Crews will move from suppression to repair work along the Forest Road 380 north of Pioneerville as containment of the fire continues in this area.

All current evacuation levels remain in place. A Level 2 evacuation designation still is in effect for the summer homes located in the Long Creek area along Forest Road 582 (Bear Valley). A Level 1 designation remains in effect for all of the properties in Pioneerville, as well as those in the Lowman area. Level 1 is also in place for homes located in the South Fork Road area, east of Grimes Creek and along the South Fork Payette River.

HUNT INFORMATION – https://idfg.idaho.gov/blog/2016/08/get-current-fire-information-here

SMOKE INFORMATION — Idaho smoke information can be found at idsmoke.blogspot.com

FIRE RESTRICTIONS — Please check fire restrictions at idahofireinfo.com

Pioneer Fire Perimeter Map August 28th, 2016

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Rough Fire

Boise National Forest

Date of Origin Sunday August 07th, 2016
Location 14 miles NE of Lowman
Total Personnel 50
Size 4,130 Acres
Percent of Perimeter Contained 40%

http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4934/

Located 14 miles northeast of Lowman, the Rough Fire is 4,130 acres and 40% contained. Resources include 2 crews, 2 engines and 50 personnel. Expected containment is September 15.
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Henry’s Creek Fire

Idaho Falls District

Date of Origin Sunday August 21st, 2016
Location Seven Miles East of Idaho Falls
Total Personnel 462
Size 52,972 Acres
Containment 68%

http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4982/

Henrys Fire Update Agust 28, 2016

Firefighters continue making excellent progress on all sections of the fire and containment is now 68 percent. Winds are expected to come from the Southwest today and the area will experience warmer temperatures.

There are 462 personnel, along with engines, heavy equipment and aircraft helping to suppress the fire. Besides direct attack, crews improved indirect lines while night crews conducted area patrols and as needed assisted in firing operations. Every effort is being made to suppress this fire. In addition dozer and hand lines are being used for rehabilitation after the fire.

In the coming days, citizens will see smoke columns as well as dust (smoke) devils coming out of the interior of the fire. Therefore, there is no need to report these smoke columns to 911. This is normal and will occur until either rain or snow completely puts the fire out.

There is a Forest Closure on the Caribou Targhee National Forest in the area impacted by the Henry’s Creek Fire. You can find the Closure Order and Closure Map on the Henry’s Creek Fire on the inciweb.gov page.

For updated information throughout the day, as it becomes available you can to http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/state/13/ click on Henry’s Creek Fire. In addition you can go to Great Basin IMT 7 Facebook page at: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Great-Basin-IMT-7/222155447934166 . Also the Bonneville County Sherriff’s Facebook page at: https://www.facebook.com/bonnevillecountysheriff/

The team will focus on firefighter and public safety and full suppression of the fire. We ask that the public drive slowly through the incident whether it be the Incident Command Post or where we have resources at work.

If You Fly, We Can’t. Drones will stop all aerial resources on the fire. Aerial resources assist firefighters on the ground to suppress the fire. By stopping aerial assistance you are putting firefighters on the ground at risk.
— —

Henry’s Creek Fire affected by jurisdictional limbo

August 27, 2016 by Bryan Clark postregister.com

What’s believed to be the most devastating fire in Bonneville County history started near the mouth of Henry’s Canyon.

Less than a mile up the road, where the pavement ends and the gravel road begins, stands a sign which reads: “Leaving Bonn. Co. Fire Dist. 1.”

It might as well read: Entering No Man’s Land.

Much of the Henry’s Creek Fire has burned through areas where no specific fire agency has jurisdiction. It’s outside of any city, outside of any fire district, and it isn’t state or federal land, hence the nickname No Man’s Land.

continued:
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Roaring Fire

Salmon – Challis National Forest

Date of Origin Tuesday July 26th, 2016
Location [FC Wilderness] on the ridge between Roaring and Goat Creeks above the confluence of the Middle Fork Salmon and Salmon Rivers.
Total Personnel 1
Size 4,562 Acres

Roaring Fire, is a lightning caused fire that started on Tuesday, July 26 and is currently estimated at 4,562 acres. The Roaring Fire is burning in a remote part of the Frank Church-River of No Return wilderness on the ridge between Roaring and Goat Creeks above the confluence of the Middle Fork Salmon and Salmon Rivers. This fire is adjacent to the 2014 Goat Fire and is being managed to allow fire to play, as nearly as possible, its natural role in wilderness. This fire may contribute to smoke in both the Main and Middle Fork of the Salmon Rivers depending on wind and weather conditions. At this time, this fire is not impacting river use or camps.

There is an Emergency Trail Closure for the Roaring Fire: http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/article/4976/32829/

Personnel at Long Tom Lookout is monitoring the fire daily.

http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4976/
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Tie Canyon Fire

Caribou – Targhee National Forest

Date of Origin Monday August 22nd, 2016
Location Ten miles southwest of Victor, Idaho
Total Personnel 250
Size 986 Acres
Percent of Perimeter Contained 44%

http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4987/

More accurate mapping reduces Tie Canyon Fire’s Size

Victor, ID – After two days of hard work by firefighters, the Fire is now 44% contained. An infra-red flight took place over the fire last night to detect hot spots and assess where the fire’s perimeter is. Due to more accurate mapping, the number of acres the fire has burned across was reduced to 986 acres.

Gusty winds are again in the forecast today. Bright sunny skies will increase the temperature and may contribute to increased fire activity this afternoon. Crews are repairing containment line along the northern flank of the fire, while also monitoring fire behavior. Interior tree torching and smoldering will continue to produce smoky conditions.

The southeastern and southern flanks are holding the most heat and are the focal points for fire activity. Helicopters, airtankers, handcrews and engines are working together to deliver water and to construct direct containment line to pinch off the fire’s growth. Along the southern perimeter of the fire, we expect additional acres to be consumed given the wind direction and topography favorable to the fire. Thick dead and down timber is burning, which requires firefighters to use saws to cut a line through the woods. Helicopters will support firefighters by providing water drops as they continue this demanding work.

For firefighters trained to keep one foot in the blackened area at all times for safety, it is advantageous to see the fire burning in the interior and stopping at containment lines. The blackened area provides a wider buffer for firefighters to work in, which is an added layer of security for them. In addition to providing a safer area for firefighters, as the fire consumes the forest floor, it is also recycling nutrients that will provide forage for wildlife next spring.

Once firefighters, law enforcement and the Forest feel it is safe, the Level 1 evacuation notice will be lifted. This wind test is necessary to provide fire managers with a good litmus test to ensure it is safe to remove the evacuation notice. The wind is forecasted to last through the weekend. It will be lifted as soon as possible.

Lastly, camp crews have been hard at work setting up the Incident Command Post. Power and phone lines have been installed, and additional equipment is arriving, making camp fully operational. Starting Monday, visitors interested in seeing the Post and learning about how an incident management team supports firefighters may request a tour of camp. Please call the fire information line for more information.

Highway 31 is open however, when possible travelers are asked to find an alternative route due to low visibility on Pine Creek Pass and heavy fire traffic. A new helibase near Swan Valley will be visible from Hwy 31. Please use caution when driving along this stretch of the highway as aircraft movement is very distracting to drivers.

Much of the smoke drifting in is from the Pioneer Fire, burning eight miles north of Idaho City, Idaho. Numerous fires burning on the Caribou-Targhee National Forest and Yellowstone National Park are also producing smoke. To view smoke information, visit the Idaho Smoke Blog spot at: http://idsmoke.blogspot.com

Evacuations In Effect: No mandatory evacuations are in effect. A Level One evacuation notice is in effect for residents and property owners south of 10000 South; east of Highway 31, west of 1000 West (Pole Canyon Road) and west of Highway 3, south of 9000 South.

Area/Trail Closures: A Tie Canyon Fire Area Closure is in effect. This includes areas west of Pole Canyon, Tie Canyon Road 252 and Upper Rainey Creek Road 253.

Map of this area closure:

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Carrot Fire

Caribou – Targhee National Forest

Date of Origin Saturday August 13th, 2016
Location 11 miles northeast of Tetonia, Idaho.
Total Personnel 5
Size 284 Acres

The Carrot Fire was detected on August 13, 2016, southeast of Coyote Meadows Trailhead in the Jedediah Smith Wilderness. The fire is approximately 11 miles northeast of Tetonia, Idaho in Wyoming.

The Caribou-Targhee National Forest will be monitoring the fire to allow it to play its natural role in the ecosystem.

http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4973/
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Peterson Hollow Fire

Uinta-Wasatch-Cache National Forest

Date of Origin Sunday August 21st, 2016
Location on the Logan Ranger District and is approximately 23 miles north of Logan, Utah.
Total Personnel 324
Size 1,187 Acres
Percent of Perimeter Contained 20%

Fire is located in Utah and well established into Idaho. Effecting both the Uinta-Wasatch-Cache and Caribou Targhee National Forests, in addition to State Institutional Trust Lands.

http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4985/

Peterson Hollow Fire Update – 8/28

Firefighters took advantage of favorable winds yesterday to make headway on containing the Peterson Hollow Fire. The fire is 20% contained with total acreage increasing only slightly to 1187 acres.

Area visitors and residents near Bear Lake may have noticed increased visible smoke in the late afternoon than the past two days. However, fire managers want to remind the public that this activity was expected and took place in the interior of the fire perimeter. Weather conditions are trending to warming and drying, especially in the afternoons, so afternoon smoke should be expected.

Firefighting personnel number 324, with a few crews rotating out and fresh crews arriving daily. Full suppression tactics to secure the perimeter are still being supported by water drops, mostly by helicopter. These air resources continue to be used both for fire suppression and for supply drops to fire crews camped on the mountain.

Firefighters are working to keep the fire east of the Peterson Hollow Drainage, north of Beaver Mountain, and west of Beaver Creek. The Peterson Hollow fire is located north of Hwy 89 and the Beaver Mountain Ski Resort, approximately 6 miles NW of Garden City, UT.

Hwy 89 through Logan Canyon remains open to the public, and some smoke may be visible in the area of the fire. An area closure remains in effect on the Utah side of the state line and a trail/road closure is in effect on the Idaho side. For closure details visit the Inciweb page for the Peterson Hollow Fire at http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4985/.

The Forest Service and its cooperating agencies are well prepared to respond to wildfires. The agency has more than 10,000 firefighters, 900 engines, and hundreds of aircraft available. This fire is a good example of the combined efforts of federal, state, local, and other partners.

Fire officials would like to thank the members of the nearby communities for their continued support.

Find update fire info:

Facebook: “U.S. Forest Service Uinta-Wasatch-Cache National Forest” or “Utah Wildfire”

Twitter: @UWCNF or @UtahWildfire

Inciweb: http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4985/ for closure info, maps and announcements
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2016 Yellowstone National and Grand Teton National Park Fires

Yellowstone Fire Update – August 28

Alert: The south entrance of Yellowstone National Park remains closed due to a fire in Grand Teton National Park. A fire to the south of Yellowstone National Park, the Berry fire, located in Grand Teton National Park has prompted the closure of the south entrance to Yellowstone. Park visitors wishing to enter/exit through the south entrance of Yellowstone National Park will be unable to do so at this time. Fire managers currently anticipate being able to reopen access to the south entrance sometime Tuesday, August 30. This is subject to change dependent on weather and fire conditions. All other entrances to Yellowstone remain open at this time; this includes the east entrance, northeast entrance (Cooke City), north entrance (Gardiner), and west entrance (West Yellowstone).

For Grand Teton road information call (307) 739-3614.

Currently all roads within Yellowstone National Park are open, only the south entrance is closed. All park visitor facilities, including park concession-operated services, and businesses in surrounding communities are not impacted by the fires and remain open.

Summary:A Red Flag Warning is in effect today. It will be hot and dry with breezy southwest winds. Active fire behavior is expected to continue for the next week due to hot, dry, windy weather.

The Maple Fire was active yesterday especially in the Cougar Creek drainage on the eastern flank and along the Gneiss Creek drainage to the northeast. The Maple Fire is approximately 3.8 miles from West Yellowstone, 1.7 miles from Madison Junction and 3.5 miles from the Mount Holmes Lookout.

Fuels reduction projects continue on the western boundary of the park near West Yellowstone and Duck Creek. These are designed to help reduce the risk of wildfire for the communities and provide a safer location for firefighters to respond to the fire. These areas are closed while the work is completed. This includes the Boundary Trail and the Riverside Trail. The Old Airport Road is closed while the Incident Command Post is in place. Fuels reduction for defensible space is also underway at Norris Junction and Geyser Basin near the campgrounds, museum, and the administrative area.

There will be a Maple Fire community meeting Monday, August 29 at 7:30 pm at the Church of Latter Day Saints, 245 Faithful St., West Yellowstone, MT.

The Buffalo Fire grew approximately 200 acres yesterday. It is now established on the north side of Buffalo Creek, burning in open Douglas-fir forest and grassy meadows to the east. Moderate fire activity is expected to continue.

The Fawn Fire grew approximately 50 acres yesterday, primarily in the evening. It has become established on the south side of the drainage in an area where alignment with topography, fuels and wind could lead to new growth.

Fire managers continue to monitor the Central Fire where it is burning on top of a small bench where it is currently sheltered by the wind. If the fire continues to grow, fire managers anticipate an area that burned during the 2015 Spruce Fire will limit the fire’s spread to the east.

An Air Resources Advisor will be arriving Monday to help share information about smoke patterns, using ground equipment and modeling programs. Valleys, including West Yellowstone, should expect smoke in the morning under a prevailing inversion pattern. Montana Department of Environmental Quality smoke reports for West Yellowstone are posted daily to http://bit.ly/mtdeq, generally in the afternoon. You can visit http://go.nps.gov/yellowstonewebcams to view current park conditions. Visit http://bit.ly/firesandyourhealth for information on fires and your health.

Maple Fire: 31,405 acres Location: approximately 3.9 miles northeast of the community of West Yellowstone, and 3.5 miles southwest of Mount Holmes Lookout, 1.75 miles from Madison JunctionStarted: 8/8/16 lightning-causedClosures: Campsites: WA1Trails• The entire Gneiss Creek Trail is closed from the Gneiss Creek Trailhead (WK7) to Seven Mile Bridge trailhead (WK8). This includes the Cougar Cabin Trail.• The Purple Mountain Trail is closed.• The Boundary Trail is closed.• The Riverside Trail is closed.

Buffalo Fire: 3,232 acresLocation: approximately 3 miles northeast of Tower Junction and 3 miles south of the park boundary, and is visible from the Lamar ValleyStarted: 8/13/16 lightning-causedClosures: Campsites: 2S1, 2S2, 2S3, 2S4, 2S6, 2S7, 2S8 Trails• Buffalo Fork Trail from the trailhead at Slough Creek north to the Park boundary.• The Slough Creek Trail and associated Day Use area will be closed as fire activity dictates.• Bliss Pass Trail between Slough Creek and Pebble Creek Trail will be closed as fire activity dictates.

Fawn Fire: 1,971 acres Location: west of Fawn Pass, 11 miles west of Mammoth Hot Springs, 16 miles northeast of West Yellowstone, 13 miles southwest of Gardiner, and 35 miles southeast of Big SkyStarted: 8/4/2016 lightning-causedClosures: Campsites: WB1, WB3, WB4 and WB6Trails• Bighorn Pass Trail eastbound at the junction of the cut-off trail to the Fawn Pass Trail.• Bighorn Pass Trail westbound at Bighorn Pass.• Fawn Pass Trail eastbound at the junction of the cut-off trail to the Big Horn Pass Trail.• Fawn Pass Trail westbound at campsite 1F2.• The cut-off trail between Bighorn and Fawn Pass trails is open.

Central Fire: 0.1 acreLocation: 9 miles west of the Lake developed area and 2 miles south of Hayden ValleyStarted: 8/26/16 lightning-causedClosures: none at this time
— —

Maple Fire – Tatanka Complex

Date of Origin Monday August 08th, 2016
Location Fire is 4 miles North-Northeast of the town of West Yellowstone.
Total Personnel 204
Size 31,405 Acres

http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4944/
— —

Fawn Fire – Tatanka Complex

Date of Origin Thursday August 04th, 2016
Location The Fawn fire is located 11 miles W of Mammoth Springs, 16 miles NE of West Yellowstone, 13 miles SW of Gardiner, 35 miles SE of Big Sky.
Total Personnel 5
Size 1,971 Acres

http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4940/
— —

Buffalo Fire – Tatanka Complex

Date of Origin Thursday August 13, 2016
Location approximately 3 miles northeast of Tower Junction and 3 miles south of the park boundary and is visible from the Lamar Valley.
Total Personnel 21
Size 3,232 Acres

http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4953/
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Berry Fire

Grand Teton National Park

Date of Origin Monday July 25th, 2016
Location 19 miles NW of Moran, WY
Total Personnel 351
Size 12,378 Acres

http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4954/

Berry Fire AM Update 8-28-16

Contact Fire Information: 307.739.3566

Summary: Since its discovery, Grand Teton National Park has been actively managing the Berry Fire for ecological benefits. The fire originated in the northern portion of the park, near Berry and Owl Creeks on the west side of Jackson Lake. Extreme fire behavior as a result of high winds and low relative humidity on Monday, August 22 pushed the fire across Jackson Lake and into the Teton Wilderness on the Bridger-Teton National Forest. A Type 2 Great Basin Incident Management Team took command of the fire on August 24th.

Closures: At this time, fire managers anticipate being able to reopen Highway 89/191/287 sometime Tuesday, August 30. This is subject to change dependent on weather and fire conditions. Until then the highway does remain closed between the South Gate of Yellowstone National Park and Leeks Marina to ensure the safety of firefighters and the public.

While Grand Teton and Yellowstone National Parks and Bridger Teton National Forest all have area closures in effect, both National Parks are open to visitors. This includes Leeks Marina and most visitor destinations and services. Travel times to Yellowstone may be increased depending on planned routes. Check before you go. And please drive carefully, with lights on, due to both visibility concerns from smoke and increased vehicle numbers.

Current Situation: Increased winds tested existing firelines yesterday. Only minimal growth occurred on the fire; in fact, more accurate mapping actually decreased acreage slightly. The most active portion of the fire perimeter was in the northwest corner. Aircraft dropping water on the fire helped ground resources considerably. The fire is burning in several old burn scars. In those areas, the fire is burning with less intensity, smoldering in dead, down logs. Firefighters are making good progress in containing areas of the fire that threaten values such as private property, commercial operations, infrastructure, and archeological sites while also allowing fire to play its natural role in the ecosystem where it is safe to do so.

Today’s weather will be warmer and drier. Atmospheric instability is expected, which can cause large fire growth during the day. Overnight, warm air is causing the fire to continue to burn actively in the night.

Along the highway, firefighters continue to fall hazardous trees and extinguish hot spots adjacent to the road to make it safe for travel. Several trees blew down during the winds yesterday, some of which fell on the road. Travelers should continue to be cautious north of Moose along Highway 191 where the fire camp has been established. The highest volumes of traffic will be in the morning and evening, but large equipment may be entering or exiting the highway throughout the day.

For more information: Follow Grand Teton National Park and Bridger-Teton National Forest on social media: @GrandTetonNPS and @BridgerTetonNF on both Facebook and Twitter. Information on other fires in western Wyoming is available at http://www.TetonFires.com. And information on fires burning in eastern Idaho can be found at http://www.IdahoFireInfo.com, or by filtering Idaho incidents on InciWeb.
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Idaho History August 28, 2016

Colonel William Dewey

(part 1)

Colonel William Dewey: Mining Investor, Road Builder, and Business Developer

August 1 Evan Filby South Fork Companion

Prominent Idaho pioneer Colonel William H. Dewey was born August 1, 1823 in Hampden County, Massachusetts (some sources give the birth year as 1822). Raised on a farm, he presumably followed that line until he moved to Idaho, by way of California, in 1863.

Dewey turned out to be what the Illustrated History called “a born miner.” A relative late-comer to the Owyhee mining regions, he balked at what he considered exorbitant real estate prices. Thus, in 1864 he and some associates started a new town that became Silver City. The county seat of Owyhee County moved there two years later. A new toll road that Dewey helped build along with Silas Skinner and another partner spurred the town’s growth.

During the heyday of the South Mountain mines, 1871-1875, Dewey, to quote the Owyhee Directory, “owned nearly one-half of that prosperous camp.” In 1875, Dewey, then a widower with a young son, married Belle Hagan. Soon after that, he opened the Black Jack Mine, which developed into a most valuable property.

DeweyWedding-a

Wedding photo, Belle seated with her sisters standing. Canyon County Historical Society & Museum.

Dewey suffered a severe setback in 1884-1885. He was first convicted of murder for a shooting affray, but a retrial acquitted him on the grounds of self defense. Winning, however, put him heavily in debt for legal fees. Persistence and his skill as a prospector recouped his fortune, and then some.

ColDewey

Colonel Dewey, Illustrated History.

In 1889, the Colonel began selling off mining properties. He was, of course, approaching 70 years of age and perhaps contemplated a well-deserved retirement. However, Dewey’s overall business activity soon picked up again. In 1896, he helped found the Boise, Nampa & Owyhee Railway, which eventually linked Murphy with the Oregon Short Line station in Nampa.

Booneville, located 2-3 miles northwest of Silver City, had been a thriving town in the late 1860s, but then withered away. In 1896, Dewey purchased the town site and rejuvenated its business and mining operations. That included building the topnotch Hotel Dewey.

Dewey also looked further afield. He purchased interests in several central Idaho mining properties and also organized the Idaho Northern Railway Company. That firm then extended the Murphy-Nampa rail line on into Emmett. Dewey’s railroad projects increased his involvement with the town of Nampa, where he became owner of 2,000 lots through a mortgage purchase deal.

The Deweys moved there in about 1900 and the colonel commissioned the construction of the Dewey Palace Hotel. In his description of it, Hiram T. French wrote, “At the time of its erection it seemed to be a structure all out of proportion to the size of the town, for it was a magnificent building.”

DeweyPalace-a

Dewey Palace Hotel. Canyon County Historical Society & Museum.

When the hotel was completed in 1902, he and Belle moved into an apartment there. Sadly, the colonel had little time to enjoy it. He passed away in May of the following year, after a lifetime of intense effort and incredible accomplishment.

Belle managed the Nampa properties for a number of years after his death. Recently, a redevelopment effort began in downtown Nampa: Backers call it the Belle District, in honor of Belle (Hagan) Dewey.

source: South Fork Companion
[hat tip to SMc]
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The Fabulous Col. W. H. Dewey

by Faith Turner

from “Scenic Idaho”, May-June 1953
(note: “Scenic Idaho,” published by Belcher Publishing Company, Boise, Idaho, has long been out publication and Faith Turner appears to have died in 1979)

Part Two

Synopsis: Col. William Henry Dewey, who was born in New York in 1823, came West by way of the Isthmus arriving in San Francisco in 1852. After a short venture into the contracting business he left San Francisco for Virginia City, Nevada, lured there by dreams of gold. When the hoped for riches failed to materialize Col. Dewey, during the year 1863, walked from Virginia City to the site of Silver City, Idaho, there he staked out a townsite which was to become the center of the gold fields. There he was to spend forty more years of a colorful and eventful life trimmed with diamonds and gold. Col. Dewey, so called because of his prosperity and partiality to the South, always wore a diamond stud in his shirt and many are the tales connected with these diamonds.

On August 5, 1884, a brief paragraph in the Tri-Weekly Statesman appeared revealing that Col. Dewey was being held for the fatal shooting of a man by the name of Koenig.

We take up the second half of the story with this affair. The old West was built out of blood and sweat and tears and whiskey and gunsmoke. Dewey was built to use them all.

Here is an episode as related by his son, Con Dewey: “My father and Andy Brennan fast friends were drinking one day in the Summercamp saloon, a big building which afterward was destroyed by fire. Brennan and Henry Koenig, the bar tender, had an argument and quarreled. Father berated Koenig for his abusive words; they finally apologized and he thought the incident was closed, but several of Koenig’s lodge brothers kept agitating the matter, urging revenge.

“Sometime later, on my father’s 61st birthday, August 1, 1884 (when I was only a few weeks old) he walked into the saloon and Koenig announced : ‘You are the man I am looking for. We have a shipment of whisky in the basement we are in doubt about, and knowing you are a good judge I’d like to have you test it.’ (Father could put a few drops in the palm of his hand, rub it, and tell the quality by the smell without even tasting it.)

“Koenig preceded father into the basement. Koenig went into a partitioned room and started to close the door, but our little dog that accompanied father bounced out and began barking a warning. Father, standing at the doorway of the cellar took two steps down to the basement floor, then a shot came through the partly opened door of the partitioned room, striking the wall above his head. A second shot ploughed through his hat and a third glanced off his side, hit a trouser button and went through his underwear, searing his skin. He drew his revolver and emptied it at the partition door.

“Koenig was wounded in the groin and died two days later. Father was arrested and tried for murder; he was convicted on false evidence and sentenced to the penitentiary for seven years, for second degree murder.”

(ED. NOTE: Due to lack of space complete details of the spectacular second trial which exonerated Col. Dewey in the shooting of Koenig cannot be given. Below is a brief description of this re-trial.)

Account of the trial rests in the archives of the University of Wisconsin at present; early files of the Silver City Avalanche were purchased by the University at a sheriff’s sale.

But in a collection of odd copies of the Avalanche in possession of the Idaho State Historical Museum can be found the following data:

“Saturday, May 16, 1885. Trial of W. H. Dewy for killing of Joseph Koenig last August began on Wednesday. Over 100 jurors were subpoenaed before the panel was filled.

“Jurors are : Ezra Mills, George Glass, John Boynton, Steve McElmeel, John Hearndon, P. McCormick, James Greer, Frank Swisher, J. J. Connelly, James Hay, David Williams, and Joseph Shawen.

“The prosecution is conducted by C. M. Hays, District Attorney, and George Kittrell, with Hon. R. Z. Johnson conducting the defense.

“May 25 — Dewey, who was found guilty of manslaughter in September, was granted a new trial last week and acquitted. It is needless to say that he was defended by one of the best lawyers on the coast, Hon. R. Z. Johnson of Boise City, and that the Disrict Attorney was assisted by one of the best criminal lawyers to be found west of the Rocky Mountains—Gen. John R. Kittrell of Modesto, California.

“The court-house was packed with ladies and gentlemen eager to hear Mr. Johnson and eager to hear Gen. Kittrell. The District Attorney opened the argument in an address to the jury lasting one and three-quarters hours, in review of the testimony, followed by Johnson . . . who held the jury spellbound for the same length of time with logic and eloquence, and concluded by telling the jury that Gen. Kittrell who would follow him would repay them with his eloquence for their long patience and attention.

“The jury was not deceived, for the first three words that fell from his lips proclaiming him an orator—not only that but a lucid and logical reasoner. He carried his audience with him and drew from the ladies and gentlemen hot tears by his pathetic remarks and bitter invectives. It was said to be the best argument known to have been presented to a jury.

“But with all his eloquence and lucidness as to the testimony in the case, the jury would not look at it as he did and as he showed it, but returned a verdict of not guilty — and the defendant walked forth a free man and received the congratulations of his friends. “It was reported afterward that on the first ballot there were 11 for acquittal and one (J. J. Connelly) for conviction, but the latter changed his vote.”

In the reminiscences of the Hon. Fred T. DuBoise also to be found in the State Historical Museum — is the following paragraph:

“W. H. Dewey was tried and convicted of second degree murder and sentenced to the penitentiary, but attorneys secured a new trial for him. And as I was satisfied that he was justified in killing the man with whom he quarrelled, having acted in self defense, I treated him more like a guest than a prisoner during the five or six months he was with me. At the second trial he was acquitted.”

Knee Pads and Grit

This happened during the dark days that fell upon Silver City after the failure of the Bank of California and the natural recession of development because of lack of capital. The great mines were fading, machinery was stilled and abandoned slag heaps glistened in the sun like ancient bones once a part of some mighty giant.

After Dewey was exonerated he found himself $40,000 in debt to E. H. Moore, the local merchant, and of course he had no credit . . . his enemies had attended to that. The only way he could get back on his feet financially was to find a new mine. Previously, while operating the Black Jack, he had found small particles of rich float which showed only gold. The Black Jack only producer up to that time on Florida Mountain was chiefly silver. This fact puzzled Dewey and he decided to find the source.

Since this “float” was found on the side of the mountain Dewey resolved to follow it by crawling no easy feat for a heavy man so he had his wife make knee pads for him to use. For a whole summer he prospected, setting small stakes at intervals as he covered the ground. From dawn to dark he worked, and then when spring came again, he resumed his novel method of prospecting without a shovel. He cached his lunch each day in a tree down in Blue Gulch below the Black Jack mine, along with his gold pan, and picketed his mule. The “float” was gradually forming a pattern down the side of the mountain. His wife, Belle, began asking, “When are you going to begin digging, William?”

“Not until I find the right spot!” he insisted. Finally, late in July, he came home one night and announced that on the morrow he would take his pick and shovel. Now he was sure of the pattern formed by the gold-bearing float. He was right. When he dug down a few feet he had hit the main ledge of the Empire State right on the nose. This Empire State mine proved very rich and entirely gold. Dewey then went to E. H. Moore, told him he had three and a half feet of this ore and that if he would supply him with food and necessary equipment for nine people for the winter he had six men who would take their pay out of the first production. Moore agreed to the proposition. Dewey then built cabins, mine shed, ore bin, and blacksmith shop. They drew a cross cut tunnel into the vein, and by November of the following year he had paid his men together with one month’s bonus paid Moore his debt which by then amounted to nearly $50,000, and had a $9500 surplus left. Eventually he took about $450,000 from the Empire State and finally included this mine in the deal when he sold the Blackjack to the Pittsburgh Company, in 1889.

In 1890 the old Colonel bought the Trade Dollar mine from Frank St. Clair and James Douglas. He was satisfied that the Blackjack and the Trade Dollar were one and the same vein and that the latter could be developed, so he went to Pittsburgh to do some promoting. The first ore, produced in 1901, proved very rich. He started the Blaine Tunnel to tap the Trade Dollar at lower depths; when his objective was reached he built the Blaine, or Trade Dollar, mill. From 1892 through 1895 this mine was producing heavily and paying big dividends.

Railroads

Dewey was ambitious to put his money into a railroad to develop southern Idaho. While in Boise during the fall of 1895 he was approached by some of the leading business men (Tim Regan, Peter Sonna, Eastman, etc.) as to the possibility of building a railroad from Nampa to Boise he told them he intended to extend such a road south to Silver City.

These business men assured Col. Dewey that they would furnish the right-of-way free to Nampa and that they would give him the block of ground across from the present site of the Pinney theater provided he would build a modern hotel on that block. He agreed to do so and left at once for Pittsburgh to sell his Trade Dollar stock in order in finance the deal.

It took him until spring to dispose of his stock. When he returned to Boise he was prepared to keep his promise . . . but the group of business men told him they had decided not to go through with the deal. Dewey was terribly upset, for he had made a sacrifice when he sold his Trade Dollar mine stock. He lost his temper and told them “he hoped he would live to see the grass grow in the Main street of Boise!”

Immediately he sent word for Con to meet him (Con was about eleven years old at the time but he drove the team all the way) and together they stopped in Nampa where the Colonel negotiated for the purchase of the Nampa townsite from Alexander Duffes who had homesteaded it in the previous decade. It consisted of more than 2000 lots. Then and there Dewey decided to build a city at Nampa, to start his railroad to Silver City, and to build a modern hotel at Nampa to enhance the value of the townsite he had bought.

Ed Dewey, oldest son of Col. Dewey became vice-president and general manager of the Boise, Nampa and Owyhee railroad which had been constructed as far as Guffey, Idaho. The town being named in honor of J. M. Guffey, the Pennsylvania oil man.

On the run between Boise and Nampa was a special car called the “Geraldine” in honor of Ed’s daughter, which was elaborate with red plush and brass fittings. It was an extra fare car, costing ten cents extra for the trip.

His objective was to extend his railroad east to Butte, Montana. The road to Murphy was completed in 1899 and the road north from Nampa to Emmett in 1902, a combined distance of eighty-eight miles. In time this was sold to the Union Pacific with the stipulation that it be completed to McCall, which it was, by his sons, in 1910.

Back In Silver City

Before the curtain falls on the epic of Silver City there should be a glimpse into the gay ’90’s. In that last decade before the century ended there was great activity in this patriarch of Idaho mining towns that had known an influx of 10,000 adventurers, had built a city of homes, schools and churches, and a newspaper with the first leased telegraph line in the territory. The whistle of hoists and mill engines and the roar of giant powder blasts were music in the ears of her citizens.

Col. Dewey had already tried his hand at hotel building. He had taken over the old town of Booneville a few miles below Silver, in 1896, and given it a thorough face- lifting, re-naming it “Dewey.” Here he constructed an ornate hotel of sixty rooms with three verandas and a cupola, installing every modern convenience known to the times so that it was considered “unequaled by any hotel in the state.” There was a residence built for the superintendent of the Florida Mining and Milling Company which had its 20-stamp mill close by . . . a general store, laundry, post office, livery stable, etc.— all with “ample fire protection.” But the fine hotel burned just after the turn of the century, and the town became deserted. A few people are still living who remember Silver City in the days of its glory people like Lem York, born in Maine in 1866, who became publisher of the “Avalanche” and printed the now prized “Historical, Descriptive and Commercial Directory of Owyhee County, Idaho,” in 1898, from which some of the data in this story is obtained. There is also Elisha Lewis, born in 1872, still spry and active ; he makes his home in Silver, still, coming down to Boise only when the snow lies deep in the canyons of War Eagle. He, and Will Hawes (self-appointed guardian of the ghost city) and Fritz Dorst are about the only ones left who now claim all-year residence up there. In summer it is a mecca for tourists.

Another Dewey Diamond Story

When the Deweys lived in Silver City their residence was slightly above the town on the slope of the mountain. One winter night the Colonel and his wife attended some function in town. After they had returned home and he had removed his coat Mrs. Dewey exclaimed,
“Why, William where is your diamond stud?”

The Colonel shouted, “I got it on me!” Then he peered at his shirt front and added: “But it’s sticking me in the belly!”

Search failed to reveal anything except the spiral of the stud inside his shirt. He was furious. No diamond. Just then he heard the sound of horses’ hooves and the thud of the mail stage as they struck the bridge across Jordan Creek and because he had been vainly looking for a $30,000 dividend check from the Trade Dollar Mining and Milling Company it didn’t help the present situation any. He yelled,
“Con go get the mail!”

Con, who was a small boy then, took an old smoky lantern from the hook, put on an overcoat, and started down the hill. He decided he might as well search for the missing diamond while he was gone. His father’s trail was easy to trace because of his peculiarly-soled overshoes. The expected letter was not there because blizzards in Wyoming had held up train service for several days.

Slowly he followed his father’s tracks. Suddenly, about 200 feet below the house he saw where the old gent had stopped to get his breath and lean on his cane. In a foot track he saw something glitter!

He had been gone two hours, so it seemed expedient to go to the back door. His mother was in the kitchen, explaining meals to the Chinese cook. When Con entered she said to him:
“Connie I hate to see you go in the front room. Your father is in a terrible humor!”

Sure enough, the old man was fuming.

“You been in a fight? How many windows have you broken this evening? I have notion to take a strap to you! Why did it take you so long?”

“I been looking for your diamond, father,” Con answered.

“Huh. It’ll be down in Jordan Creek when the snow melts. It’s gone!”

“But I found it, father!”

“What!”

As Con produced it. Dewey shouted “Belle ! Belle ! Come here. What do you think this boy found my diamond ! Isn’t that wonderful ? I want you to give it to him when I die!”

Which is why Con has worn a three-and-a-half carat diamond for fifty years. He had it reset in a ring, in 1903.

Now, Nampa

With the complete closing out of his mining interests in Silver City in 1900, the stage was set for the Nampa chapter in the life of Col. Dewey. He was ready, now, to begin the realization of his dream of an Aladdin-like hotel set in the midst of sagebrush. The excavation for this hotel was begun in August, 1900.

Actually Nampa was incorporated and already on its way before Dewey started building, but it was considered a “dismal crossroads in the wilderness.” If the old Colonel did not build the city he certainly gave it a shot in the arm. And he was old by this time . . . seventy-seven years but, he could pass for a man much younger because of his immense vitality.

The palatial hotel was built in the southern style of architecture that the old Colonel admired, with double verandas and white pillars. It had eighty-one sleeping rooms, each with outside windows. W. K. Johnson of Chicago was the architect, and Joseph A. Graef from the same city did the interior decorating and the wood paneling and the solid oak doors, casings, and staircase made it unique and durable. It was the first building in Idaho to use steel lath.

All the furniture came from Grand Rapids, the linens and silver and carpets from Marshall Field’s. Every dish was stamped with a picture of the hotel in its design and, today, one is a collector’s item!

The “Dewey Palace” was completed in 1902, at a cost of $242,000 in a day when dollars bought more than they do now. The grand opening was held February 20, 1903. It was a gala occasion. People came from as far away as Omaha and San Francisco to attend.

About 1500 Boiseans came on a special train of seven coaches packed to the bellcords the Nampa crowd met them and escorted them to the hotel where William E. Borah stood at the door beside William H. Dewey to greet the mob of guests . . . about 2500 in all. The “millionaire mine owner and promoter” finally had to sit down in the corridor to shake hands . . . until his arm gave out.

“The great hotel was inspected from basement to tower by the guests,” said the Idaho Daily Statesman next day. “The Democrats were interested in the bank vaults at the east end. The Republicans were attracted by the slot machines. They saw the assembly room, and danced in the ball room until midnight when a magnificent banquet served two hundred at a time.” The party broke up at 8:15 a.m.

In 1903 it was considered the finest hotel between Denver, Omaha and Portland. Traveling men made it a point to stop over there, and it became a weekend paradise for mining men on the way to and from Silver City and Delamar.

Many famous people have stopped at the Dewey Palace : President Howard Taft, when he was Secretary of War; William Allen White; Diamond Jim Brady, Lillian Russell, among them.

When Governor James Hawley and Senator W. E. Borah were preparing their case against Haywood, Moyer and Pettibone in the Steunenberg assassination case, they came to the hotel at 1:30 in the morning, Con Dewey meeting them at the depot and taking them to their rooms. For four or five days they “hid out” while they worked, and no one in the whole Northwest knew their whereabouts ; the newspapers speculated that they had been kidnapped. They came and went only through the basement. Con Dewey himself carried their meals to them ; no one else was permitted to answer their bells. James McParland, the Pinkerton detective who caught Harry Orchard after Governor Steunenberg was killed, stayed at the Dewey Palace for two or three weeks under an assumed name during that exciting time. He kept a double-barreled shotgun in his room.

It was during 1900, the year excavation started for the Dewey Palace, that Col. Dewey took an option on mining properties in the Thunder Mountain district up in the primitive area of Valley County. The $100,000 option was paid to the Caswell Brothers, who had made a notable gold discovery there the previous year; Dewey then organized the “Thunder Mountain Gold and Silver Mining and Milling Company.” Then the gold rush started to this new bonanza—a colorful and unforgetable episode in Idaho’s history. The strike, at first, seemed to be so rich that a bill was brought before the legislature proposing that the area be set aside to pay the national debt!

Col. Dewey (with the Midas touch) did not name the mine after himself—but it soon became known as the “Dewey.” The Thunder Mountain story is a fabulous epic in itself, which will be only mentioned in this narrative without elaboration, due to two reasons. The old Colonel never visited this area. It was an exceedingly arduous trip over some of the most rugged terrain in the state, and his health was failing. His life had been one of intense activity, and of later years a gain in weight—285 pounds distributed over a 5-foot 71/2 frame —had resulted in an advanced case of dropsy. In April of 1903, following the formal opening of the Dewey Palace, he made a trip to Hot Springs, Ark., with only temporary benefit.

On May 9 — in his eightieth year — Col. Dewey died, with his son Con at his side. His was the first death to occur in the palatial hotel which had been the realization of his dream. The Thunder Mountain activity, supervised by his son, Edward Dewey, soon began to lose impetus, then. The city of Nampa went into mourning for the man who had promoted it so lavishly.

The End

source: AHGP Owyhee County
[hat tip to SMc]
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see alsoColonel William H. Dewey (part 2)

page updated September 17, 2020

Road Report Aug 28

Sunday (Aug 28) No current reports. Johnson Creek road was last reported to be very rough and washboardy. The South Fork route was last reported to be pretty good, the EFSF part was starting to get rough. Last report on Lick Creek road was “lumpy”. Last report for the road to Big Creek was that it had not been graded and to watch for all the usual bad spots.

Update: A report that the upper EFSF road between YP and Stibnite is “the best shape I’ve ever seen” – smooth. New culverts installed too.

Weather Reports Aug 21-27

Aug 21 Weather:

At 9am it was 53 degrees, clear with light haze of smoke. At 1pm it was 87 degrees, intense sun and light breezes. At 415pm it was 89 degrees, sunny and breezy. At 830pm it was 71 degrees, clear and almost calm.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time August 22, 2016 at 09:00AM
Mostly cloudy
Max temperature 91 degrees F
Min temperature 42 degrees F
At observation 52 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
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Aug 22 Weather:

At 9am it was 52 degrees and mostly cloudy (high and thin.) A bit breezy by 1130am. Wind kicking up once in a while after 1pm. Decreasing clouds and cooler later in the afternoon. At 830pm it was 62 degrees and mostly clear, slight breeze or nearly calm.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time August 23, 2016 at 09:00AM
Clear
Max temperature 82 degrees F
Min temperature 34 degrees F
At observation 41 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
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Aug 23 Weather:

At 9am it was 41 degrees, clear, slight haze to the east (more dust than smoke) and light breeze. At 1115am it was 61 degrees, clear and light breeze. Cool sunny day, light breezes. At 830pm it was 67 degrees, clear and light breeze.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time August 24, 2016 at 09:00AM
Clear, slight breeze
Max temperature 79 degrees F
Min temperature 36 degrees F
At observation 43 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
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Aug 24 Weather:

At 9am it was 43 degrees, clear, slight breeze and dusty air. A few clouds coming in after lunch. At 3pm it was 79 degrees, partly cloudy and breezy. Clearing late afternoon. At 820pm it was 67 degrees, clear and light breezes. At 1130pm it was 53 degrees, clear and calm (bit of high haze.)

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time August 25, 2016 at 09:00AM
Observation type daily (24 hr values/totals)
Max temperature 80 degrees F
Min temperature 39 degrees F
At observation 46 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
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Aug 25 Weather:

At 9am it was 46 degrees and clear. Sunny and mild breezes all day, a few clouds going by in the afternoon. At 8pm it was 69 degrees and mostly clear with light breeze.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time August 26, 2016 at 09:00AM
Mostly clear
Max temperature 81 degrees F
Min temperature 40 degrees F
At observation 48 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
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Aug 26 Weather:

At 9am it was 48 degrees and mostly clear. Sunny warm dry day. At 815pm it was 70 degrees and partly clear (thin high haze.)

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time August 27, 2016 at 09:00AM
Almost clear
Max temperature 81 degrees F
Min temperature 38 degrees F
At observation 46 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

Aug 27 Weather:

At 9am it was 46 degrees and almost clear. Mostly sunny warm day with some gusty breezes after lunch.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time August 28, 2016 at 09:00AM
Partly clear
Max temperature 85 degrees F
Min temperature 43 degrees F
At observation 50 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
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