Monthly Archives: November 2016

Road Report Nov 30

Wednesday (Nov 30) mail truck driver (Robert) started coming in the South Fork route this week (too much snow on upper Johnson Creek.) He said there was snow and ice until he got down to 4 Mile, then bare road the rest of the way to YP. But it is snowing pretty good today, so he expects the trip out to have more snow.

Lick Creek road is probably closed by now. (There is around a foot of snow at the Deadwood SNOTEL at 6860′.)

Profile road is probably snowed in pretty deep by now too.

 

Nov 27, 2016 The Yellow Pine Times

Nov 27, 2016 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Village News:

The Thanksgiving pot-luck was held at The Corner on Thursday Nov 24th at 5pm.
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YPWUA

The Board voted to add an additional $30 annually to both the residential and business water assessments. This will bring the annual cost of service for residential customers to $150 and for business customers to $165. The users who chose to pay the Construction Fee in installments are paying an additional $130 annually. That amount will not change.

The changes will be implemented for this billing cycle. Your 2016 bill will be mailed out in December and is due by January 31, 2015.
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Local Observations:

Monday (Nov 21) light freeze this morning, mostly cloudy (a few patches of blue overhead) bands of low foggy clouds on the ridges. Pot holes full of water from rain last night. The sun is coming up south of Golden Gate peak this time of year. Partly sunny during the day, but cool. High thin clouds in the afternoon, filtered sun. Sounds of heavy equipment to the east late afternoon.

Tuesday (Nov 22) hard freeze this morning, mostly clear. Elk tracks frozen in mud along the road. Sounds of heavy equipment to the east before sun rise. Power blipped off and on at 1101am. Increasing clouds and chilly day. Internet out for a while around 8pm. Quiet evening.

Wednesday (Nov 23) light freeze this morning, low clouds almost to the valley floor, snowing lightly. Huge flock of geese calling and circling over the village. Snow falling most of the day, from fat flakes coming down hard to small flakes lazily swirling down. By evening we had an inch of snow on the measuring board. Quiet all day, hardly any traffic.

Thursday (Nov 24 – Happy Thanksgiving) hard freeze this morning, about an inch of snow on the ground and mostly cloudy. By noon it had warmed up enough to start melting snow on the roof. Mostly clear (some haze) weak sunshine. Thicker haze early afternoon, overcast by late afternoon. Most of the snow has melted.

Friday (Nov 25) light freeze this morning, patchy snow on the ground, overcast and light chilly breeze. Cloudy gray day, light chilly breezes and very quiet. No critters or birds around. Did not warm up much, but a little more snow went away (evaporated?) Overcast and above freezing at dark.

Saturday (Nov 26) clear, dry and cold this morning, thin patches of old snow on the ground. Clouds moved in and overcast by early afternoon. Pine squirrel running around on neighbor’s roof. Pretty quiet day, not much traffic.

Sunday (Nov 27) overcast, dry and cold this morning (thin layer of frost), patches of old snow remain in the shady places. A little snow fell before lunch time, no accumulation. Dark clouds and chilly day. Occasional flake of snow in the afternoon until just before dark, then steady snow starting to stick by 5pm.
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RIP:

Jerine Brown

jerine-brown

Jerine Eloise Brown

1920-2016

Jerine was born August 14, 1920 in Saskatchewan, Canada to Hugh Maurice Bartlett and Tinterella Henderson Bartlett. She had 2 brothers.

She is a direct descendant of Josiah Bartlett who was the third signer of the Declaration of Independence and was a member of the Daughters of the American Revolution.

Jerine moved to Boise and studied nursing at Saint Alphonsus Hospital.

She met William Weber Brown, a pilot in the Army Air Corp, as a “blind date” at a “USO” dance at Gowen Field. They were married September 5, 1943 in Harvard Nebraska. While Bill was in the military and servicing in World War II, they traveled throughout the states and abroad but then settled back in Meridian, Idaho.

She worked as a registered nurse at St Alphonsus Hospital and continued to her college degree. Jerine graduated with a Nurse Practitioner degree, one of the few in Idaho, and started her new career at the Boise State University Medical Center.

Upon retiring they built a cabin in Yellow Pine, Idaho. She loved spending summers there, socializing, playing bridge and dancing with Bill in “downtown” Yellow Pine.

She is preceded in death by her husband, Bill and her 2 brothers Lorraine Bartlett and John Bartlett.

Jerine is survived by her sister-in-law Mercedes Bartlett, her 3 sons: Michael Brown (wife Rosella), Patrick Brown (wife Kay) and Scott Brown (wife Cathy Mae); six Grandchildren, William, Russell, Teresa, Aaron, Jason and Drew; and 10 Great Grandchildren.

Jerine loved to play cards especially bridge, socialize with friends and neighbors and spending time with her family.

She enjoyed a full and rich life and will be missed by all who knew and loved her.

Graveside services will be held Monday, November 28th at 1:00 P.M. at the Terrace Lawn Cemetery in Meridian, Idaho.

Published in Idaho Statesman on Nov. 23, 2016
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Lois Fry, violinist and long-time performer, dies

Friends remember versatile talent, devotion to students

BY TOM GROTE for The Star-News November 23, 2016

Lois Fry, a fixture on the McCall music scene for decades, died on Friday [Nov 18th].

loisfry

Fry, a violin player, was known for her work with both the McCall Folklore Society and McCall Music Society.

But she was most admired for the breadth of her talent, her willingness to play anywhere and anytime, and for her dedication to her violin students.

Information on memorial services was not available for Fry, who was in her mid-70s.

“Lois played all kinds of music – classical, folk, jazz, rock, country – like an expert skier gliding from packed to powder,” said Jim Cockey of Boise, a classical music composer who previously lived in McCall.

“I think to her, there was no difference; it was all music, and music came from the soul, and the soul knows no boundaries,” Cockey said.

Fry served as concertmaster of the McCall Chamber Orchestra and as fiddler in numerous groups in the area.

She was a regular in the annual music festival now known as the Summer Music Festival at Roseberry, playing in more local groups than anyone else, according to friends.

She was a board member on both the McCall Music Society and the McCall Folklore Society.

Fry “was a kind lady who would always put on a huge smile for you no matter how she was feeling,” folklore society board member Jim Bates said. “She was a wealth of information and experience so valuable to the folklore society.”

Fry never hesitated to share her love of music, said Bob Burns of McCall, who frequently played with Fry over the years.

“She had the unique musical ability of being able to play around a melody with spontaneous harmony that produced beautiful results,” Burns said.

“Her pitch was perfect, and one should never question it and risk facing her wrath,” he said.

full story The Star-News:
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2005festloisfry
Lois Fry August 7, 2005 in Yellow Pine

[Note: Lois Fry’s talent will be missed at the Yellow Pine Music Festival.]
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Letters to Share:

Valdez Gravel pit and reclamation

11/6/2016

Valley County has been working with Midas Gold as they need material to fill their requirement for their operations to continue. The use of the gravel will be on county roads to help reduce the sediment to Johnson Creek and the East Fork.

So we are working together on this project with the intent to crush one more time adjacent to the Valdez Pit on the Boise National Forest. Our plan is to crush what we can afford to do and stockpile any additional material on Donna Valdez’s property and reclaim the Valdez site and the BNF site.

We understand that there needs to be a good reclamation plan to complete this work and not come back to this site.

We are also looking at where we could possibly find some suitable material near the Johnson Creek Road somewhere upstream so we have a more permanent site to have gravel in the future for maintenance. As you are well aware the East Fork Road is much better after we placed the gravel from the Valdez pit on it than the wash board sandy material we had prior.

If no sources are found then that means all material would need to be trucked into the area so that just increases the trucking cost and reduces the amount of work we can accomplish.

Thanks,
Gordon
Gordon Cruickshank
Valley County Commissioner
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Photo Valdez Gravel Pit July 24, 2016

20160724gravelpityp

photo credit – TM
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Program in Idaho to work Toward Zero Deaths on Highways

Received Nov 23, 2016 from Valley County Commissioner Gordon Cruickshank

I thought I would share two awards Valley County, Idaho officials received this week.

The Idaho Transportation Department recognizes counties who work to reduce the traffic fatalities in their county. Valley County Sheriff, Patti Bolen and the Valley County Commissioners all received the award for not having any traffic fatalities in Valley County during 2015. We would also point out that to date we have not had one in Valley County in 2016.

Attached are two photos which show the folks with Sheriff Bolen and Valley County Commissioners. Commissioner Cruickshank in the middle (pink shirt), on my right is Commissioner Willey and on my left is Commissioner Hasbrouck.

20161123awardgordon

Sheriff Bolen was the first female in Idaho to become a Sheriff and is currently President of the Idaho Sheriff’s Association.

20161123awardbolen

Thanks,
Gordon
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Idaho News:

Albertsons Customers Give Back

The Star-News November 23, 2016

2016turkey

Photo for The Star-News by Gary Ertter

Ashlee Robinson and Miles Klind of McCall on Monday helped load frozen turkeys and other Thanksgiving meal fixings donated by Albertsons customers to food banks in Valley County and New Meadows. A total of 270 dinners were provided as part of $13,497 in Turkey Bucks donated by customers as they checked out, store Manager Lance Armstrong said.

source The Star-News:
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Foundation grants more than $14,000 in Valley, Adams

The Star-News November 23, 2016

The Idaho Community Foundation’s Southwestern Regional Grants Panel has selected 91 southwestern Idaho and central Idaho nonprofits, educational organizations and governmental entities to receive nearly $236,000 through its competitive grant cycle.

Of that total, more than $14,000 will be distributed to seven nonprofits in Adams and Valley counties.

Money for the grants comes from several foundation funds that were established by donors to benefit southwest and central Idaho.

This year’s local grant recipients are:

Valley County

• Cascade Food Pantry, Inc. – $1,000 to purchase foods or spices for the educational food demonstration program that will be part of the regular food distribution, which will include recipes, instruction and materials necessary for successful home cooking.

• Donnelly Rural Fire Protection Association, Inc. – $2,500 to purchase adult and infant CPR manikins, Automatic External Defibrillator trainers and Heartsaver instructor manuals.

• McCall Arts and Humanities Council – $1,946 to purchase new equipment to continue Kaleidoscope, an annual free children’s art festival.

• McCall Senior Citizens, Inc. – $2,325 to purchase a new refrigerator and freezer for the food pantry and an outdoor grill for the kitchen.

• Payette Lakes Community Association, Inc. – $2,000 to purchase the equipment and license to provide students with two Camp Invention projects during winter and spring months and to assist with the cost of teachers to implement the projects.

• Payette Lakes Ski Club – $2,500 for program costs associated with the seven-week learn-to-ski after-school program for area youth

Adams County.

• Idaho Mountain Samba – $2,000 to support a one week samba music and dance residency for Meadows Valley School District.

source The Star-News:
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Brundage Mountain Resort gets snow, will pray for more

The Star-News November 23, 2016

Mother Nature dropped two to four inches of fresh snow on Brundage Mountain Monday night, “fueling the stoke” for the upcoming ski season.

Brundage received two inches in the base area and four inches at mid-mountain and above.

The ski resort needs more snow to be able to offer free skiing on Easy Street as part of this weekend’s events.

No natural snow has fallen at The Activity Barn, the site of Friday’s community-wide Pray for Snow Party. But that won’t stop snow lovers from #OptingOutside.

Live music, bonfires and a raffle will be held at the tubing hill Friday night from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Snowmaking efforts are underway, but so far there’s not enough snow to open snow tubing.

Snow is in the forecast even at the 5,000 foot level and crews are standing by to build tubing lanes if Mother Nature gets with the program.

Prospects look brighter for Saturday’s event at Brundage Mountain, where the forecast is calling for snow today. Temperatures look more favorable for snowmaking this week at the 6,000 foot level where Brundage Mountain’s base sits.

full story The Star-News:
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Tamarack clears brush to improve skiing on three parts of mountain for ’16-17 season

Nov 22, 2016 chadd Cripe Idaho Statesman

Crews spent time over the summer clearing brush to create better skiing opportunities on the mountain. The improvements focused on the Bentwoods, tree skiing between Adrenaline and Funnel; Reasons to Quit, tree skiing between Tango and the top of the Tamarack Express lift; and La Bamba Cliffs, an expert area within Wildwood that requires a hike to reach. “They were places on the mountain that could be improved fairly quickly and at a reasonable cost,” General Manager Brad Larsen said. “They were some areas that we wanted to ski better.”

The Tamarack Municipal Association, a group of homeowners, has assumed control of the resort. That averted the potential for key assets to be lost in an auction because of back taxes owed by previous owners.

source:
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Idaho man hit by car, falls 50 feet into icy river, survives

By ANDREW SELSKY – 11/21/16 AP

An Idaho man not only survived being hit by a car on an icy interstate highway bridge but also a 50-foot-fall into a river and a swim through its frigid waters with a badly broken leg, authorities said.

Steven Arrasmith, 34, said the image in his mind of his 7-month-old son drove him to keep swimming for shore through the strong current in the Snake River in the dark.

He finally reached an island near the Oregon-Idaho border and awaited rescuers, unable to pull his legs and feet out of the water because of his broken left leg.

continued:
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Public Lands News:

Two of best snowshoe hikes in Idaho City area survived Pioneer Fire

By chadd Cripe Idaho Statesman Nov 22, 2016

Some of the best snowshoeing with easy access from Boise is in the Park N’ Ski system north of Idaho City — an area hit hard by the Pioneer Fire.

But the Boise National Forest and State Parks and Recreation have come through on their commitment to try to save as much of the winter recreation season as possible in that area.

Snowshoers will be able to hike to Banner Ridge and Stargaze Yurt — two great viewpoints. The trails won’t be groomed but they will be marked with blue blazes.

“Banner Ridge will be the best hike,” said Leo Hennessy, the non-motorized trail coordinator for Parks and Recreation and an avid snowshoer. “It’s about equal between that and going up to Stargaze Yurt. If you’ve never been there, that is a good place to go. You get a really big, overall perspective of the entire area. The views are actually better than they were (last year) because of the trees. I think (the fire) is actually going to enhance the whole area over a period of years because we were getting pretty thick forest in the whole Park N’ Ski area. It will be more open. But there will be some sticks for a few years and trail-maintenance issues.”

Read more here:
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Hailey, land trust aim to increase public access along river

Associated Press, KTVB November 25, 2016

HAILEY – Officials in the central Idaho city of Hailey have voted to accept conservation easements that will nearly double the length of public access west of town along the Big Wood River.

The Idaho Mountain Express reports that the Hailey City Council voted unanimously Monday to accept 153 acres of conservation easements held by the Wood River Land Trust.

The Land Trust plans to raise about $500,000 to buy the property. Land Trust Director of Conservation Keri York says the trust is required by law to transfer the easements to the city or some other entity before purchasing the property.

If the plan goes through, it would create a nearly continuous series of nature trails between the Bullion Bridge and Colorado Gulch Bridge.

Copyright 2016 KTVB
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Idaho group renews push for Craters Monument status upgrade

Associated Press, KTVB November 25, 2016

ARCO, Idaho — An Idaho group wants state lawmakers to sign off on its efforts to get national park status for a national monument near Arco.

The Capital Press reports that Nov. 8 ballot measure shows that Butte County residents support making Craters of the Moon National Monument into a National Park. President Calvin Coolidge created the monument under the Antiquities Act in 1924.

The Idaho Farm Bureau Federation says it will continue fighting the status change, which it fears will enable the federal government to place new restrictions on agricultural producers.

The Coalition to Change the Name secured the endorsement of leaders from nearby cities, five contiguous counties, the Idaho Association of counties and the Idaho Senate in 2015. The issue died in the state House of Representatives without a vote.

Copyright 2016 KTVB
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Massive project proposed to remove juniper trees in Idaho

By KEITH RIDLER – 11/22/16 AP

BOISE, Idaho — Federal officials are proposing one of the largest ever projects to remove juniper trees to protect habitat for imperiled sage grouse and might also benefit cattle ranchers.

The U.S. Bureau of Land Management on Monday announced it’s taking public comments through Jan. 3 on the plan to eliminate the trees from 940 square miles in Owyhee County in southwest Idaho.

“For juniper, these numbers are unprecedented,” said Karen Launchbaugh, director of the University of Idaho’s Rangeland Center. “This is bold.”

Launchbaugh said the sheer scale of the project could give scientists new insights into how to deal with vast juniper forests across the West that have sprung up in the last century. The project must first go through an analysis that includes an environmental impact statement.

continued:
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Long-Term Vegetation Change in Utah’s Henry Mountains

A Study in Repeat Photography

Charles E. Kay, Ph.D. June 2015

ABSTRACT:

An extensive search was conducted of archival and other sources to locate as many historical photographs as possible for the Henry Mountains in south-central Utah. Those images were then taken into the field, the original camera stations relocated, and modern pictures made of the historical scenes to evaluate long-term vegetation change and land management activities. In all, 626 repeat-photosets were compiled – 608 by the author and 18 by Earl Hindley. As might be expected, most photosets contained more than one vegetation type. Grasslands were depicted in 152 photosets, sagebrush in 99, pinyon-juniper in 293, mountain brush in 72, aspen in 37, conifers in 145, blackbrush in 71, and woody riparian species in 142. In addition, all photosets were evaluated for plant cover and whether or not the sites showed accelerated soil erosion.

In general, grasslands, sagebrush and aspen have declined, while blackbrush, mountain brush, pinyon-juniper, and conifers increased. Utah’s rangelands are generally in much better condition today than they were during the early 1900s because plant cover has increased and soil erosion has declined. Repeat photos also show that woody riparian vegetation has significantly increased whether or not livestock have been excluded. Contrary to popular perception, coniferous trees and forests are more abundant today than at any point in the past. In fact, the overriding problem on most Utah rangelands has been a major increase in woody plants which, in turn, has dramatically reduced forage production for both livestock and wildlife. As conifers, including pinyon-juniper, have increased so have forest fuels setting the stage for large-scale, high-intensity crown fires, a type of fire behavior that seldom, if ever, occurred in the past. As judged by stand age and forest conditions seen in early photographs, large stand-clearing fires are outside the normal range of historical variability. Historically, frequent, low-intensity surface fires, most likely set by Native Americans, kept most conifers from increasing.

full paper:
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Letter to Share:

Mystic Farm Raffle Tickets

11/22/2016

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED! We have a few dates set up to sell raffle tickets for the annual GROW MORE SPOTS fundraiser. This will be in Ponderay and Sandpoint on the following dates: Saturday, Nov. 26th – North 40, Saturday, Dec. 3rd.- Super 1, and Friday, Dec. 23rd.- Super 1. Let me know if this is something you would like to help out with. Thanks!

If you would like some raffle tickets, let me know and I can get them to you. Or, you can pick them up at Bradley Insurance in Ponderay…or at the places mentioned above. These make great stocking stuffers! The raffle is for the following items:

* 1/2  Pig: Gourmet Senna Gray – Mangalista Pork – Cut and Wrapped
* Ruger LCP  .380 Caliber
* Basket of ‘Everything Star Wars’

Thanks!
Dory
Mystic Farm Wildlife Rescue, Inc.
208 241-7081
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Critter News:

MCPAWS Giving Trees to provide supplies for shelter animals

The Star-News November 23, 2016

Deck the halls with paper towels and tennis balls! The MCPAWS Giving Trees are coming to a store near you.

Giving Trees allow the community to play Santa, helping MCPAWS Regional Animal Shelter stock its shelves with necessary supplies and goodies for the cats and dogs at the shelter.

Each year hundreds of dollars of much-needed supplies are donated through the Giving Trees. This volunteer-run event helps MCPAWS offsets some of the cost of running the animal shelter by stocking the shelves with supplies which they would ordinarily need to purchase.

Trees will be set up Friday at Ridley’s Family Market in McCall, May Hardware in McCall, McCall Pet Outfitters and C&M Lumber in New Meadows.

Browsers should check the tree for the wish list ornaments. Wish lists vary by store, and include items such as laundry detergent, paper towels, dog and cat treats, toys, and more. Items donated will be picked up and brought to MCPAWS.

source The Star-News:
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More than 1,000 gather to mourn slain police dog in Boise

11/23/16 AP

BOISE, Idaho — There were whines, tears and even barks in Boise’s Taco Bell Arena where as many as 1,500 people gathered to mourn a police dog that was killed in the line of duty.

At least 30 police dogs from departments across the state gathered Tuesday at a memorial service for 6-year-old K-9 Police Officer Jardo, who was shot Nov. 11 working with officers to apprehend a suspect, The Idaho Statesman reported. He died five days after he was injured.

“For the canines here, it’s OK to whine, it’s OK to bark. I think that’s only appropriate today,” said Boise Police Chief Bill Bones at the memorial.

continued:
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KWVR Oregon Wolf Education weekly Wolf Report

Fourth week of November 2016
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Wolf News Roundup

by Cat Urbigkit, Pinedale Online! November 10, 2016

Long-distance wolf
A two-year old wolf originating in northeastern Washington traveled about 700 miles before being killed by federal officials while it was in the act of attacking domestic sheep. Read about the wolf’s journey in the links below.

Vancouver Island
Bold wolves have been approaching people walking with their dogs on leashes in Pacific Rim National Park Reserve on Vancouver Island. Global News reports of a recent encounter when a jogger was able to fend off the wolf by throwing rocks and yelling at the animal during the reported 15-minute encounter. Two similar encounters were reported by hikers on the same day.

Russia
School children in a remote region of southern Russia no longer have to walk six miles to school after video emerged of the students trudging through snow, with one student carrying an axe to fend off wolves. Read about it at the BBC link below.

California
The California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) has confirmed the presence of two gray wolves in western Lassen County. After a wolf-like canid was photographed by trail cameras in Lassen County in fall 2015 and spring 2016, CDFW began operating additional trail cameras in the area and regularly searching for wolf scat and tracks. This summer, photographs, tracks and eyewitness sightings suggested the presence of two canids frequently traveling together.

continued:
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Wolves killing dogs

by Cat Urbigkit, Pinedale Online! November 18, 2016

In six towns across central Sweden, villagers held candlelight vigils in tribute to dogs that have been killed by wolves. The dogs killed varied from family pets to hunting or working dogs.

Perhaps Wisconsin dog owners will want to hold vigils of their own, with 40 dogs killed by wolves in that state so far this year.

For details on both these stories, check out the links below.

link:
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Wolf trapper’s job tougher when the catch is a bear

By Rich Landers The Spokesman-Review Nov 23, 2016

Trapping wolves is tricky business in state’s where it’s legal, especially when a black bear is captured by the steel jaws of a leg-hold trap.  Bears are required to be released.

Here’s a bit of the drama involved with tranquilizing and releasing a big bruin, as told by a North Idaho trapper.

“A fellow trapper got a big boar in his wolf trap (Monday) and called Idaho Fish and Game to dart it so it could be released,” said North Idaho trapper Kevin Sawyer.

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Another Montana hunter injured in grizzly bear attack

By Rich Landers The Spokesman-Review Nov 21, 2016

A resident elk hunter was mauled Sunday morning by a female grizzly after surprising the sow and her two cubs on the Rocky Mountain Front of northwestern Montana.

The man was with a group hunting private land on the south fork of Willow Creek west of Choteau, reports Bruce Auchly of the Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks Department.

“They had shot at elk, and about 9 a.m., he went into a creek bottom to see if there was a wounded elk when he surprised the grizzly at about 20 yards,” Auchly said.

“The bear attack lasted about 30 seconds and left him with multiple injuries. As other hunters in his party approached the scene the bears left unharmed.”

continued:
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Chronic wasting disease found in another deer shot near Yellowstone

By Rich Landers The Spokesman-Review Nov 22, 2016

A Wyoming hunter has killed a buck mule deer in the Shoshone National Forest that tested positive for a fatal neurological disorder.

The Jackson Hole News and Guide reports this is the third hunting area near Yellowstone National Park in which chronic wasting disease has been found.

This recent case is not a surprise, Scott Edberg of the Wyoming Game and Fish Department said in a statement.

He said this shows the importance of a management plan and increased surveillance in western Wyoming.

continued:
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‘Dead’ deer wakes up in trunk, surprises driver

Meg Jones, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, KARE November 21, 2016

FRIENDSHIP, Wis. — When a 59-year-old man hit a deer last week, he did what many Wisconsin residents would do — he put the body in his trunk to take home for the venison.

But before he could get there, the deer woke up.

Like the Monty Python sketch — “I’m not dead yet!” — the deer was not yet ready to go gently into the night.

The motorist contacted the Adams County Sheriff’s Department around 7:25 p.m. CT Thursday, and when Deputy Brian Loewenhagen arrived on the scene in Easton Township near Grand Marsh, Wis., about 7 miles southeast of the central Wisconsin communities of Adams-Friendship, his dashboard camera recorded the scene.

continued:
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Juniper control would benefit sage grouse, ranchers

By Rich Landers The Spokesman-Review Nov 25, 2016

Federal officials are proposing one of the largest ever projects to remove juniper trees to protect habitat for imperiled sage grouse and might also benefit cattle ranchers.

The U.S. Bureau of Land Management on Monday announced it’s taking public comments through Jan. 3 on the plan to eliminate the trees from 940 square miles in Owyhee County in southwest Idaho.

“For juniper, these numbers are unprecedented,” said Karen Launchbaugh, director of the University of Idaho’s Rangeland Center. “This is bold.”

continued:
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Scientists go big with first aquatic species map for US West

By KEITH RIDLER – 11/24/16 AP

BOISE, Idaho — It sounds like a big fish story: a plan to create a biodiversity map identifying thousands of aquatic species in every river and stream in the western U.S.

But scientists say they’re steadily reeling in that whopper and by next summer will have the first Aquatic Environmental DNA Atlas available for the public.

Boise-based U.S. Forest Service fisheries biologist Dan Isaak is leading the project and says such a map could help with land management decisions and deciding where to spend limited money and resources.

“It’s kind of the Holy Grail for biologists to know what a true biodiversity map looks like,” he said. “To have that formatted digitally so you can do lots of science with it will be transformative in terms of the quality of information we’ll have to conserve species.”

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Crazy Critter Stuff:

dogcatfur-a

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Cat misses dog after being apart for 10 days

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Fish & Game News:

News Releases

https://idfg.idaho.gov/press
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North Idaho land deals approved for hunting, fishing access

By Rich Landers The Spokesman-Review Nov 22, 2016

Two Idaho Panhandle land deals totaling 11,000 acres for the benefit of fish, wildlife and public access have been approved by the Idaho Fish and Game Commission.

* The purchase of 1,012 acres of private land near Black Lake, if completed, would add to the Coeur d’Alene River Wildlife Management Area. The land includes five miles of Coeur d’Alene River frontage and 3,800 feet of shoreline on Black Lake about 18 miles east of Harrison. The purchase price is $2.6 million.

* A 10,000-acre conservation easement on a 13,169-acre property known as Clagstone Meadows Ranch, which is owned by Stimson Lumber Company, will provide public access along Lake Pend Oreille. The parcel is the largest contiguous block of privately-owned land in Bonner County, and the conservation easement includes an additional 1,263 acres in two parcels on the lake’s west shore at Cape Horn. Just more than 10,000 acres of this easement will provide for public access in perpetuity. The 2016 Legislature already approved spending authority for the purchase.

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Trivia:

Sarah Josepha Hale: Godmother Of Thanksgiving

from The Old Farmer’s Almanac

Happy Thanksgiving! While you are being grateful for your food, friends, and family, take a little time to remember Sarah Josepha Hale, who helped make this national day of thanks possible.

… Throughout this period, Hale had written hundreds of letters to governors, ministers, newspaper editors, and every U.S. president with one request: that the last Thursday in November be set aside to “offer to God our tribute of joy and gratitude for the blessings of the year.”

Native American harvest festivals had taken place for centuries in North America, and there had long been colonists’ services to give thanks, but there had never been a Thanksgiving holiday.

In 1863, with the country torn by the Civil War, Hale’s campaign finally got people’s attention. That September, she put her thanksgiving message into an editorial and wrote to President Abraham Lincoln, urging him to make Thanksgiving Day a fixed national festival.

Lincoln liked Hale’s idea. On October 3, 1863, he issued a proclamation declaring the last Thursday of November to be National Thanksgiving Day. He ordered all government offices in Washington closed on that day.

more info and history:
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turkeythankful-a

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Road Reports Nov 27

Summary of road reports this week.

Landmark – Johnson Creek road: As of Wednesday (Nov 23) the road was still open, but had 5″ to 7″ of snow in the high places.

South Fork road: No current reports but road is open. Watch for rocks.

Lick Creek: No current reports, but probably has snow at the summit.

Profile road: No current reports, but probably has snow and ice near the summit.

Stibnite road: No current report, but last report was the road was slick going up to the mine.

Note: The forecast calls for snow the next few days, so road conditions will be changing.

Idaho History November 27, 2016

Boise County

Lowman, Boise County, Idaho

Vintage Lowman Inn

c. 1949?

lowmaninn-a

McConnel Collection

[h/t SMc]
— — — — — — — — — —

Lowman is a small unincorporated rural census-designated place in the western United States, located in Boise County, Idaho. It is nestled along the north bank of the South Fork of the Payette River in the central part of the state, at an elevation of 3,800 feet (1,160 m) above sea level. As of the 2010 census, its population was 42.

… The community was named for a homesteader, Nathaniel Winfield Lowman, from Polk County, Iowa. He settled here 109 years ago in 1907, and when he started a post office four years later, it was named for him.

… A devastating wildfire ravaged the area around Lowman … in 1989; it destroyed 45,000 acres (180 km2) and 26 structures, but without injuries or fatalities.

source: Wikipedia
— — — — — — — — — —

Garden Valley, Boise County, Idaho

The valley is lush and green, spotted with small farms and the many hay fields indicate the importance of dairying.

Haying. Garden Valley, Boise County, Idaho

Barns. Garden Valley, Boise County, Idaho

Rail fence. Garden Valley, Boise County, Idaho

Lee, Russell, 1903-1986, photographer
Created / Published 1941 June.

Source Collection
Farm Security Administration – Office of War Information Photograph Collection (Library of Congress)
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Garden Valley Work Station, Garden Valley, Boise County, ID

Boise National Forest Building No. 1125

No known restrictions on images made by the U.S. Government; images copied from other sources may be restricted.

Library of Congress

link to 8 photos:
[h/t SMc]
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page updated Nov 15, 2018

Weather Reports Nov 20-26

Nov 20 Weather:

At 9am it was 34 degrees, dark overcast and steady rain. Light rain falling at noon. Snow line appears to be around 7000′. Sprinkling at noon. Sprinkles and showers all afternoon. At 5pm it was 36 degrees, low overcast and light rain. Not raining at 530pm, not raining at 7pm. Raining at 1040pm (not sure when it started or stopped.) Not raining at 1am.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time November 21, 2016 at 10:00AM
Mostly cloudy
Max temperature 38 degrees F
Min temperature 31 degrees F
At observation 31 degrees F
Precipitation 0.33 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
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Nov 21 Weather:

At 10am it was 31 degrees, mostly cloudy, fog bands on the mtns. Breaks in the clouds, scattered to filtered sun and cool day. At 5pm it was 34 degrees, high thin mostly cloudy.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time November 22, 2016 at 09:00AM
Mostly clear, frosty
Max temperature 42 degrees F
Min temperature 25 degrees F
At observation 26 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
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Nov 22 Weather:

At 9am it was 26 degrees, frosty and mostly clear. High hazy clouds before noon, filtered sun and chilly. Thicker clouds by 2pm. At 520pm it was 33 degrees and gray overcast. A few flakes of snow falling at 8am, snowing lightly by 9am.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time November 23, 2016 at 09:00AM
Low clouds, light snow
Max temperature 39 degrees F
Min temperature 25 degrees F
At observation 33 degrees F
Precipitation Trace
Snowfall Trace
Snow depth Trace
— — — — — — — — — — — —

Nov 23 Weather:

At 9am very low clouds and light snow falling (trace so far.) Not snowing at 1030am. Kind of misting at 1120am. Rain-snow mix at 1130am. Big flakes of snow at noon. Occasional small flakes of snow falling just before 1pm. Stopped snowing before 130pm. Snowed pretty good 3pm to 330pm, then Very light snow falling. At 4pm just a flake or two and blue sucker holes. Low clouds came and snowed pretty hard between 430pm and 5pm. Measured snow at 5pm = 1 inch and 32 degrees. Lighter snow falling at 510pm, looks a bit bluish straight up like it might be clear above the clouds. Probably quit snowing by dark before 6pm.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time November 24, 2016 at 09:00AM
Mostly cloudy
Max temperature 35 degrees F
Min temperature 24 degrees F
At observation 26 degrees F
Precipitation 0.16 inch
Snowfall 1.0 inch
Snow depth 1 inch
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Nov 24 Weather:

At 9am it was 26 degrees and mostly cloudy. At 1230pm it was 36 degrees and mostly clear – high haze. Thicker clouds by 2pm. At 5pm it was 32 degrees and gray overcast.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time November 25, 2016 at 09:00AM
Overcast
Max temperature 38 degrees F
Min temperature 26 degrees F <- yesterday morning
At observation 32 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth Trace
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Nov 25 Weather:

At 9am it was 32 degrees and overcast. Cloudy and breezy at noon. At 530pm it was 34 degrees and overcast.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time November 26, 2016 at 09:00AM
Clear
Max temperature 44 degrees F
Min temperature 25 degrees F
At observation 26 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth Trace
— — — — — — — — — — — —

Nov 26 Weather:

At 9am it was 26 degrees and clear, dry no frost. At noon it was 37 degrees and high hazy clouds. Thicker overcast by 2pm. At 5pm it was 35 degrees, thinner clouds, even a little blue showing above the haze.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time November 27, 2016 at 09:00AM
Overcast
Max temperature 44 degrees F
Min temperature 25 degrees F
At observation 27 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth Trace
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Road Report Nov 23

Wednesday (Nov 23) mail truck driver (Robert) said he encountered up to 3″ of snow on the road starting 2 miles outside of Cascade. Snowy drive in via Johnson Creek road, 5″-7″ of snow in the high places. Said he didn’t have to cut any trees or move any rocks.

As of noon we have less than 1/2″ of snow on the ground in YP and snowing big flakes.

Update – as of 5pm we have an inch of snow on the ground in YP.

 

Nov 20, 2016 The Yellow Pine Times

Nov 20, 2016 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Village News:

2017 Yellow Pine Calendar

Last chance to order the 2017 Yellow Pine Calendar. The deadline has been extended to Nov 23. Send rrSue an email with your name, mailing address and number of calendars.
— — —

Thanksgiving

This year the annual Yellow Pine Thanksgiving Day Potluck will be at The Corner on November 24 at 5pm. The Hubers will provide the turkey, please bring a side dish and/or dessert. Please call Heather at (208) 633-3325 to coordinate. The feast will start at 5pm and all are welcome.
— — —

The Corner Winter Hours

Monday: 11am-1pm
Wednesday: 11am-1pm
Friday: 11am-1pm (coffee) 3pm-8pm (dinner)
Saturday: 3pm-8pm
Sunday: 3pm-8pm

– Heather
— — —

Yellow Pine Tavern

Closed for holidays until January 6, 2017.
— — —

YPWUA 

Reminder – if possible please pay your 2017 water bill early, it will help with funding the completion of our water project.
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Local Observations:

Monday (Nov 14) dark clouds, overcast and no frost this morning. Heard a robin chirping! Light drizzle of rain ended around lunch time, cloudy afternoon. Steady rain late afternoon and a bit blustery. Rained most of the night.

Tuesday (Nov 15) no frost, still raining and thick overcast, sort of foggy (really low clouds) – pot holes full, ground soggy and standing water in places. Helicopter flew over at 1230pm. Still raining, but thinner clouds and can see the top of Golden Gate. Sprinkles mid afternoon, then steady rain before dark and breezy. A break in the rain for a couple of hours after dark, then another shower after midnight. River is up and roaring.

Wednesday (Nov 16) dense fog around 6am. Frosty, slick with frozen rain, a little skiff of snow this morning before sunrise and partly clear sky. Partly sunny and cool most of the day. Pine squirrel packing cones down the fence rails. Below freezing by late afternoon. Quiet day, very little traffic.

Thursday (Nov 17) light snow snow fell early morning, hard freeze, mostly cloudy before sunrise. Mostly sunny all day, chilly and a bit of a breeze. Quiet day. Calm towards evening.

Friday (Nov 18) very hard freeze, heavy frost, some wispy mare’s tails clouds this morning. Overcast by sunrise, still below freezing at noon (frost still on windshields.) Clouds came in before lunch and cloudy cool afternoon. Quiet and no birds or critters around. Around sundown could hear the river roaring.

Saturday (Nov 19) light freeze, cloudy and chilly breeze this morning. Gray and cloudy all day. Day old chunk of ice on the north side of the house didn’t melt. Feels like the humidity is up. Heard a raven calling in the neighborhood early this afternoon. Dark and cloudy late afternoon. Very quiet all day. Rain shower around 2am.

Sunday (Nov 20) rain showers and dark clouds this morning, no frost. Clouds parted enough at noon to see the snow line on VanMeter dropping down below 7000′. Drizzly dark afternoon. Stopped raining at dark.
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Photo to Share:

20161113moondp

photo by Dave Putman sent Nov 13, 2016
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Idaho News:

Permits to cut Christmas trees go on sale Saturday

The Star-News November 17, 2016

The Boise and Payette national forests will begin selling Christmas tree permits on Saturday .

Each $10 permit is good for one tree with a limit of three per family. The maximum height allowed is 12 feet and the non-commercial permits are valid on both forests. The permits include information on areas where the trees may be cut.

As part of the “Every Kid in a Park” program, fourth-graders taking part can receive a free permit. The program is intended to build the next generation of outdoor enthusiasts. The child and parent must visit a Forest Service office in person with a voucher they received at http://EveryKidinaPark.gov

Permits will be available at local ranger district offices of the Payette and Boise forests. Local vendors include Albertsons in McCall and C&M Lumber in New Meadows.

source The Star-News:
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Fish-Eye Lens: Donnelly Elementary School lets the world view trout tank

By Teri Robinson for The Star-News November 17, 2016

Students in Deirdre Abrams’ fifth-grade class at Donnelly Elementary School love to spend time watching the trout being raised in a classroom tank. Now the world can watch along.

A video camera has been put into the tank to allow streaming of the trout as they swim and grow.

The camera was originally acquired to observe the trout and other organisms living in Boulder Creek, which runs behind the school, Abrams said.

“Because I didn’t want the camera to break due to winter conditions in the creek, I thought it would be great to put it in one of our tanks to be able to observe our trout on the big Smart Board in class,” she said.

For the past four years, Abrams has had live streaming of the fish in her classroom, but recently expanded the program so students and parents can watch at home as well.

“I feel incredibly fortunate to have so much cool technology at my fingertips to enhance learning,” she said.

Using math to calculate volume and water temperature and nonfiction and other reading needed to hatch trout eggs is only one learning benefit for Abrams’ class and their trout tanks.

The trout program began five years ago with a grant from Trout Unlimited.

After they are released into Boulder Creek, the trout are observed by the camera for their behavior as they make that transition from captivity to the wild, Abrams said.

The class receives trout eggs through the Trout Unlimited program supported by Idaho Department Fish and Game, Nez Perce Tribal Fisheries, and the Payette National Forest, at the beginning of the school year and raise them until they are released in the spring.

Abrams’ classroom has two 55-gallon tanks that hold trout. One tank has been planted with freshwater mussels.

“The hypothesis is that the tank housing the mussels will have cleaner and better water quality on average over the year because mussels help to filter the water,” she said.

Caring for living organisms helps her students to be better stewards of their natural surroundings, she said.

Note: To view the trout tank streaming video, do the following:

1. Install VLC player on your computer by using this direct link:
http://http://videolan.org/vlc/index.html (this is a safe nonprofit media player).

2.  Open VLC player on your computer and pull down the “Media” menu. Click on “Open Network Stream” and enter this link below directly into the blank box:
Rtsp://root:fish@fishcam.mdsd.org/axis-media/media.amp

source The Star-News:
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After years of auctions, Idaho now down to just 51 state-owned cabin sites at Payette Lake

By Betsy Z. Russell The Spokesman-Review Nov 15, 2016

Idaho is down to just 51 state-owned cottage sites at Payette Lake after six years of auctions. The state has now sold 262 of its state-owned lake cabin sites at Payette and Priest lakes combined, and has 261 left, state Lands Director Tom Schultz reported to the state Land Board this morning. “So we are just over 50 percent of the way through disposing of the different cottage sites,” Schultz said.

Idaho has been phasing itself out of the business of renting state-owned cabin sites, on which the renters built and owned their own cabins, sometimes for generations, after years of lawsuits and fights over what constitutes fair rent. The state’s plan is to reinvest the proceeds from the sales into higher-earning land investments for the endowment, including timber land.

The state has auctioned off 117 cabin sites at Payette Lake and 145 at Priest Lake; five of those are still closing at Priest Lake after the last auction. That leaves 210 state-owned cabin sites at Priest Lake, and just 51 at Payette Lake.

In 2017, more auctions are planned. So far, the Lands Department has received applications for auction from 14 cottage site lessees at Payette Lake, and 58 at Priest Lake.

Earnings from Idaho’s state endowment largely benefit the state’s public schools; smaller portions go to state institutions including universities, mental hospitals and prisons.

source:
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Central Idaho federal employees back to work with local help

By LUKE RAMSETH – 11/14/16 AP

CHALLIS, Idaho — The fire started early Oct. 4, destroying the Bureau of Land Management office on the edge of town within minutes.

Volunteer firefighters worked the blaze through the night. In the morning, Challis BLM Manager Todd Kuck began calling his 25 employees, saying they no longer had a place to work.

By that afternoon, state and federal investigators had arrived, combing the scene for any evidence of foul play. Reports of a loud bang when the fire began stoked rumors around the town of 1,000.

“There was talk that the Three Percenters had something to do with it,” said Custer County Sheriff Stu Lumpkin, referring to the radical patriot group opposed to federal overreach. The Idaho chapter of the group held a protest rally at the BLM office earlier this year.

Custer County, where 97 percent of land is owned by the federal government, easily could’ve been the latest hotspot for an escalating conflict around the West between land managers and anti-government militants such as Cliven and Ammon Bundy. But the opposite has happened since the fire, residents and officials say. The community has rallied to help their local BLM office, despite often sharp disagreements over who should control the land and how it should be managed.

Investigators soon determined the blaze was due to an electrical problem, to the relief of many.

continued:
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State endowment to acquire Maggie Butte timber land from Potlatch east of Kamiah

By Betsy Z. Russell The Spokesman-Review Nov 15, 2016

Idaho’s state Land Board voted unanimously today to acquire a nearly 2,400-acre tract of timber land at Maggie Butte, 10 miles east of Kamiah, from Potlatch Corp. for the state’s public school endowment. The $2.5 million to purchase the land comes from the endowment’s land bank, which holds proceeds from sales of state endowment lands including cabin sites.

State Lands Department officials and consultants estimated that the timber land will bring the endowment an annual return, long term, of around 5.5 percent.

“Although Potlatch has conducted many harvests on this property, a silvicultural operation to put this property back into a fully stocked condition would yield fully harvestable timber in 20-40 years,” Ryan Montoya, real estate services manager for the department, told the Land Board. “This factor is recognized in the financial analysis where there are merchantable stands that could yield returns immediately, and thereafter as management continues. Thus, the acquisition reduces the risks involved with the property and also provides for immediate and sustainable income.”

continued:
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Forest News:

Big Creek Road Plan of Operation Project Update

USDA Forest Service Nov 14, 2016

The Forest Service, Payette National Forest, Krassel Ranger District, has revised the Environmental Assessment and prepared a draft Decision Notice for the Big Creek Roads Plan of Operations. We are proposing to conditionally approve full-size motor vehicle travel on 26.34 miles of existing routes to provide access for 1872 Mining Act mineral activities under a ten-year Plan of Operations. The project is located in the Big Creek area in Valley and Idaho Counties, Idaho, approximately 7 miles north and east of the community of Yellow Pine, Idaho. I am the Responsible Official who will issue a decision for this project.

The environmental assessment was originally released for public comment in May 2016. It has now been revised in response to the comments received. The revised Environmental Assessment, draft Decision Notice, and other information are available for review at the project webpage at
http://www.fs.usda.gov/project/?project=46053
Additional information regarding this project can be obtained from: Krassel Ranger District Office, 500 North Mission Street, Bldg 1, McCall, ID 83638, 208-634-0600. Persons interested in receiving updates about this project may subscribe to GovDelivery for project updates via email by clicking the link “subscribe to email updates” on the right side of the project webpage.

This proposed project is subject to the objection process pursuant to 36 CFR 218 Subpart B. This project is not related to the Hazardous Fuels Reduction Act. The Payette Forest Supervisor is the reviewing officer.

Eligibility to File Objections

Objections will be accepted only from those who have previously submitted specific written comments regarding the proposed project either during scoping or other designated opportunity for public comment in accordance with § 218.5(a). Issues raised in objections must be based on previously submitted timely, specific, written comments regarding the proposed project unless based on new information arising after designated opportunities.

Individual members of organizations must have submitted their own comments to meet the requirements of eligibility as an individual. Objections received on behalf of an organization are considered as those of the organization only. If an objection is submitted on behalf of a number of individuals or organizations, each individual or organization listed must meet the eligibility requirement of having previously submitted comments on the project (§ 218.7). Names and addresses of objectors will become part of the public record.

Contents of an Objection

Incorporation of documents by reference in the objection is permitted only as provided for at § 218.8(b). Minimum content requirements of an objection are identified in § 218.8(d) include:

Objector’s name and address with a telephone number if available; with signature or other verification of authorship supplied upon request;

Identification of the lead objector when multiple names are listed, along with verification upon request;

Name of project, name and title of the responsible official, national forest/ranger district where project is located, and

Sufficient narrative description of those aspects of the proposed project objected to, specific issues related to the project, how environmental law, regulation, or policy would be violated, and suggested remedies which would resolve the objection.

Statement demonstrating the connection between prior specific written comments on this project and the content of the objection, unless the objection issue arose after the designated opportunities for comment.

Filing an Objection

Written objections may be submitted to the reviewing officer through the project webpage: http://www.fs.usda.gov/project/?project=46053. Simply click on “Comment/Object on Project” on the right side of the page and fill out the webform with your comments. Written objections, including any attachments, may also be addressed Reviewing Officer, Intermountain Region USFS, 324 25th Street, Ogden, Utah 84401; or fax to 801-625-5277; within 45 days following the publication date of this legal notice in the newspaper of record. The office business hours for those submitting hand-delivered objections are: 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, excluding holidays. Electronic objections can also be submitted in a format such as an email message, pdf, plain text (.txt), rich text format (.rtf), and Word (.doc or .docx) to objections-intermtn-regional-office@fs.fed.us. It is the responsibility of Objectors to ensure their objection is received in a timely manner (§ 218.9).

The publication date in the McCall Star News, newspaper of record, is the exclusive means for calculating the time to file an objection to this project. Those wishing to object to this project should not rely upon dates or timeframe information provided by any other source. We anticipate the legal notice will be published on November 17, 2016.

We appreciate your interest in the Payette National Forest and this project. If you have any questions regarding this project or comment period, please contact me at 208-634-0601 (abbotello@fs.fed.us).

Sincerely,
Anthony B. Botello
District Ranger
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Scoping – Ice Hole

USDA Forest Service Nov 14, 2016

The Forest Service is seeking public input (scoping comments) for the proposed Ice Hole Campground Project on the Cascade Ranger District in Valley County, ID.

Project Description

The Ice Hole project proposes to improve the existing campground road in Ice Hole Campground, build a worm rail fence between the campground and Johnson Creek, and gravel discrete campsite pads. For a more detailed description of the proposed project, please review the comprehensive proposed action report on the Project webpage:
http://www.fs.usda.gov/project/?project=49637.

How to Comment

The Forest Service is contacting interested persons, groups, and agencies to make them aware of the project and to gather pertinent feedback. To be most useful, please make your comments as specific as possible. Your comments will help us identify and address issues.

Electronic, written, hand-delivered, and facsimile comments concerning this project will be accepted. Comments may be submitted through the Ice Hole Project webpage. To submit comments using the web form, select “Comment on Project” under “Get Connected” on the right panel of the project’s webpage.

Email comments must be submitted in a format such as an email message, plain text (.txt), rich text format (.rtf), Adobe (.pdf), and Word (.doc) to: comments-intermtn-boise-cascade-fs.fed.us. Please put “Ice Hole Project” in the subject line of e-mail comments. Comments must have an identifiable name attached or verification of identity will be required. A scanned signature may serve as verification on electronic comments.

Written comments may be submitted to: Boise National Forest, Cascade District, 540 North Main Street, Cascade, ID 83615 Attention: Gary Harris, or by fax at 208-382-7480. Office hours for submitting hand-delivered comments are 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, excluding holidays. Comments received in response to this request will be available for public inspection in the Public Comment Reading Room on the project webpage and will be released in their entirety, if requested, pursuant to the Freedom of Information Act.

When to Comment

To be most helpful, please submit your scoping comments by December 6, 2016, and make your comments as specific as posiible.

Only those who subscribe to the mailing list, submit comments, or notify the Forest that they would like to remain on the mailing list for this project will receive future correspondences on this project. Comments submitted anonymously will be accepted and considered; however, without an associated name and address, receiving further correspondences concerning this project will not be possible.

For further information on the project, please contact Gary Harris, Team Leader, at gdharris@fs.fed.us or by phone at 208-382-7455.

scoping letter and maps:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Scoping – Three Trappers Underburn Project

USDA Forest Service Nov 15, 2016

The Forest Service is seeking public input (scoping comments) for the proposed Three Trappers Restoration Underburn Project on the Cascade Ranger District in Valley County, ID.

Project Description

The Three Trappers project proposes to implement a series of prescribed burns to restore species composition and stand structure, reducing undesirable species and stand densities, while favoring retention of larger diameter more fire resistant trees throughout the project area. Fuel loads, ladder fuels, and stand densities would be reduced, decreasing the opportunity of crown fire development and improve the resiliency of affected stands should a wildfire ignition occur. In addition, activities occurring within the WUI would create or enhance defensible space for suppression resources should a wildfire threaten adjacent private properties.  Restoring vegetative conditions more reflective of the fire-adapted ecosystem, reducing hazardous fuels, and minimizing risks to public health and safety would allow for safe and effective management of wildfire in the urban environment and meet the intent of several goals identified

For a more detailed description of the proposed project, please review the comprehensive proposed action report on the Project webpage:
http://www.fs.usda.gov/project/?project=50276

How to Comment

The Forest Service is contacting interested persons, groups, and agencies to make them aware of the project and to gather pertinent feedback. To be most useful, please make your comments as specific as possible. Your comments will help us identify and address issues.

Electronic, written, hand-delivered, and facsimile comments concerning this project will be accepted. Comments may be submitted through the Three Trappers Project webpage. To submit comments using the web form, select “Comment on Project” under “Get Connected” on the right panel of the project’s webpage.

Email comments must be submitted in a format such as an email message, plain text (.txt), rich text format (.rtf), Adobe (.pdf), and Word (.doc) to: comments-intermtn-boise-cascade-fs.fed.us. Please put “Three Trappers WUI Project” in the subject line of e-mail comments. Comments must have an identifiable name attached or verification of identity will be required. A scanned signature may serve as verification on electronic comments.

Written comments may be submitted to: Boise National Forest, Cascade District, 540 North Main Street, Cascade, ID 83615 Attention: Jim Bishop, or by fax at 208-382-7480. Office hours for submitting hand-delivered comments are 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, excluding holidays. Comments received in response to this request will be available for public inspection in the Public Comment Reading Room on the project webpage and will be released in their entirety, if requested, pursuant to the Freedom of Information Act.

When to Comment

To be most helpful, please submit your scoping comments by December 6, 2016.

Only those who subscribe to the mailing list, submit comments, or notify the Forest that they would like to remain on the mailing list for this project will receive future correspondences on this project. Comments submitted anonymously will be accepted and considered; however, without an associated name and address, receiving further correspondences concerning this project will not be possible.

For further information on the project, please contact Jim Bishop, Team Leader, at jjbishop@fs.fed.us or by phone at 208-382-7400.

scoping letter and maps:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Scoping – Dollar Creek Project

USDA Forest Service Nov 15, 2016

The Forest Service is seeking public input (scoping comments) for the proposed Dollar Creek Road Obliteration Project on the Cascade Ranger District in Valley County, ID

Project Description

The Cascade Ranger District propose to decommission by full obliteration up to 52 miles of non-system routes in the Dollar Creek subwatershed and a small portion of the Goat Creek subwatershed. The majority of these roads were built in the 1960s-early 1970s and are narrow, partially re-vegetated logging roads no longer passible to full-sized vehicles.

The route decommissioning would include ripping the roadbed to a depth of at least 12 inches and relocating the fill from the outer side of the roadbed. The fill material would be placed in the angle formed by the road cut and roadbed, leaving a cross-section and profile that approximates the contour of the surrounding slope angle. The project would be done under contract with an excavator. For a more detailed description of the proposed project, please review the proposed action report (PAR) on the Project webpage:
http://www.fs.usda.gov/project/?project=49638

How to Comment

The Forest Service is contacting interested persons, groups, and agencies to make them aware of the project and to gather pertinent feedback. To be most useful, please make your comments as specific as possible. Your comments will help us identify and address issues.

Electronic, written, hand-delivered, and facsimile comments concerning this project will be accepted. Comments may be submitted through the Dollar Creek webpage. To submit comments using the web form, select “Comment on Project” under “Get Connected” on the right panel of the project’s webpage.

Email comments must be submitted in a format such as an email message, plain text (.txt), rich text format (.rtf), Adobe (.pdf), and Word (.doc) to: comments-intermtn-boise-cascade-fs.fed.us. Please put “Dollar Creek” in the subject line of e-mail comments. Comments must have an identifiable name attached or verification of identity will be required. A scanned signature may serve as verification on electronic comments.

Written comments may be submitted to: Boise National Forest, Cascade Ranger District P.O. Box 696, Cascade, ID 83611 Attention: Dave Mays, or by fax at 208-382-7480. Office hours for submitting hand-delivered comments are 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, excluding holidays. Comments received in response to this request will be available for public inspection in the Public Comment Reading Room on the project webpage and will be released in their entirety, if requested, pursuant to the Freedom of Information Act.

When to Comment

To be most helpful, please submit your scoping comments by December 6, 2016, and make your comments as specific as possible.

For further information on the project, please contact Dave Mays, Team Leader, at jamesdmays@fs.fed.us or by phone at 208-382-7420.

scoping letter and maps:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Scoping – Lodgepole Springs Underburn

USDA Forest Service Nov 15, 2016

The Forest Service is seeking public input (scoping comments) for the proposed Lodgepole Springs Restoration Project on lands managed by the Emmett Ranger District of the Boise National Forest.

Project Description

The Lodgepole Springs Restoration Project is an estimated 2,424 acres located approximately 14 miles north of Crouch, Idaho along Forest Road 671 in Valley County. The project, as proposed, consists of a low to moderate intensity prescribed fire that would reduce the risk of uncharacteristic wildfire and improve forest health and resiliency.

Limited hand-line construction, roads, and natural barriers would be used as control lines in the project area and fire ignition would occur by hand or with the use of a helicopter.

For a more detailed description of the proposed project, please review the proposed action report (PAR) on the Project webpage:
http://www.fs.usda.gov/project/?project=50281

How to Comment

The Forest Service is contacting interested persons, groups, and agencies to make them aware of the project and to gather pertinent feedback. Please make your comments as specific as possible to help us identify and address issues.

Electronic, written, hand-delivered, and facsimile comments concerning this project will be accepted. Comments may be submitted through the Lodgepole Springs Project. To submit comments using the web form, select “Comment on Project” under “Get Connected” on the right panel of the project’s webpage.

Email comments must be submitted in a format such as an email message, plain text (.txt), rich text format (.rtf), Adobe (.pdf), and Word (.doc) to: comments-intermtn-boise-emmett-fs.fed.us. Please put “Lodgepole Springs Project” in the subject line of e-mail comments. Comments must have an identifiable name attached or verification of identity will be required. A scanned signature may serve as verification on electronic comments.

Written comments may be submitted to: Boise National Forest, Emmett Ranger District, 1805 Highway 16 room 5, Emmett ID 83617 Attention: Justin Yankey, or by fax at 208-365-7037. Office hours for submitting hand-delivered comments are 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, excluding holidays. Comments received in response to this request will be available for public inspection in the Public Comment Reading Room on the project webpage and will be released in their entirety, if requested, pursuant to the Freedom of Information Act.

When to Comment

To be most helpful, please submit your scoping comments by December 6, 2016.

Only those who subscribe to the mailing list, submit comments, or notify the Forest that they would like to remain on the mailing list for this project will receive future correspondences on this project. Comments submitted anonymously will be accepted and considered; however, without an associated name and address, receiving further correspondences concerning this project will not be possible.

For further information on the project, please contact Justin Yankey, Team Leader, at jyankey@fs.fed.us or by phone at 208-365-7015.

scoping letter and maps:
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Idaho City Ranger District temporarily closes roads in Coulter Timber Sale area

BNF News Release: Nov 18, 2016

The Boise National Forest is temporarily closing roads within the Coulter Timber Sale area near Pioneerville for public safety while logging operations are occurring. Activities will including logging truck traffic, tree felling and skidding.

National Forest System (NFS) roads NFS 380 and 380H will be closed effective Monday November, 21 and continue until Dec. 31, 2016, or closure order is rescinded. Forest roads are likely to be blocked by equipment and downed logs. Signs will be posted and no vehicles will be allowed to pass.

All motorists traveling along State Highways and forest roads near the sale area should proceed with caution as heavy traffic and large trucks will be traveling to their destinations.

Forest visitors are welcome to purchase a Christmas tree permit and harvest a tree beginning next week. Please remember gathering a tree from within the Pioneer wildfire burned area is prohibited. Obtain a tree permit and map complete with instructions at a Boise NF Forest office or vendor.

Burned Area Emergency Response work is ongoing in the Pioneer Fire area and temporary closures may be put in place for public safety. Visitors should look for posted warning signs and be aware of their surroundings. For all current closures within the Boise National Forest visit:
http://www.fs.usda.gov/alerts/boise/alerts-notices

View Closure Order – 0402-03-69

View Map

Linda Steinhaus
Public Affairs
Boise National Forest
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Critter News:

Officials weigh removing grizzlies from endangered list

Associated Press, KTVB November 16, 2016

CODY, Wyo. — State and federal wildlife managers are considering removing Endangered Species Act protections from grizzly bears living in Yellowstone National Park.

Officials are meeting in Cody on Wednesday and Thursday to discuss post-delisting management plans. The member agencies of the Yellowstone Ecosystem Subcommittee had hoped to approve a final draft of the post-delisting management plant, but officials say it’s unclear that will happen.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposed lifting the federal protections for the Yellowstone bears in March. Grizzly bears were first listed as threatened in 1975 when the Yellowstone population was estimated to have as few as 136 bears. Recent estimates say the population has now climbed above 700.

Delisting the Yellowstone bears would give more management responsibility to Montana, Wyoming and Idaho and open the door for potential hunting seasons.

Copyright 2016 KTVB
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KWVR Oregon Wolf Education weekly Wolf Report

Third Week of November 2016
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Wolf Education International

Newsletter 11/14/2016

In Khyber Agency, Pakistan Wolf Kills Child Injures Two Others

Wolves stalk man and his dogs in ‘freaky’ close encounter

Livestock Guarding Dogs: from the Transhumance to Pre-Zygotic Selection

Wisconsin Politicians Send Letter to Congress Seeking Wolf Delisting
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Wild Turkeys: Marvel or Menace?

Which one it is depends entirely on your perspective

By Dawn Starin on August 8, 2016 Scientific American

Fanning their tail feathers and gobbling softly, the gang struts through the grove of oak trees, across the garden, hops over the fence and heads down the slope. While these wild turkeys roaming urban/suburban neighborhoods often bring a smile to my face during my visits to California, many of the state’s residents are not as charmed by these creatures as I am.

Attitudes toward these feathered creatures run the gamut from love to hate, novelty to nuisance. Wild, free-ranging, urban/suburban-dwelling turkeys have their passionate defenders who argue that these handsome creatures with their comical antics enhance the landscape and bring a bit of wildness into the creeping concrete backdrop. Others abhor the mess and aggressive dramas created by these ugly hooligan nuisance birds.

YouTube features scores of videos showing people oohing and aahing over wild turkeys—or being chased by them. Local magazines and newspaper articles, either praising or denigrating the turkeys, elicit a range of readers’ comments. Some detail the type of food turkeys should be given, some demand the turkeys be left alone and appreciated, and some offer suggestions that verge on violent, bloody, “final” solutions. These highly adaptable creatures are creating heated debate as they expand out of their wooded range and strut into human-inhabited areas.

A wild, four-foot-high, 20 – 30 pound, adult tom turkey, North America’s largest ground nesting bird, is not at all like his domestic, slow-moving, artificially-fattened, meek and mild culinary counterpart. They’re fast, reaching a running speed of 25 miles per hour – just a bit less than Usain Bolt’s top speed. And though they only fly for short distances, their flight speed can reach 60 miles per hour. With upward curving, sharp-pointed, bony spurs on its legs up to two inches long (so sharp they were once used by Native Americans as arrow tips) a tom turkey can be a fearsome assailant, particularly during the breeding season. In fact, so formidable are they that Benjamin Franklin felt that they would “not hesitate to attack a Grenadier of the British Guards who should presume to invade his Farm Yard with a red Coat on.”In short, these gobblers are not to be messed with.

continued:
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Gray jay chosen as Canada’s national bird

11/17/16 AP

TORONTO — The Royal Canadian Geographic Society said its choice for Canada’s national bird epitomizes the best of the country’s national traits: smart, hardy and friendly.

The Society said earlier this week that the gray jay, also known as the whiskey jack, was the winner of a two-year search for a fitting avian Canadian representative.

The gray jay, once known as the Canada jay and the “wisakedjak” of folklore in indigenous cultures, is found in the boreal forests of Canadian provinces and territories but nowhere else on the planet.

The robin-sized cousin of the raven and crow has the same brain-to-body ratio as dolphins and chimpanzees and is lauded for its friendliness and intelligence. The gray jay spends its entire life in the Canadian woods.

continued:
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Gray JayPerisoreus canadensis

link:
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Boaters have big responsibility to be clean of invasives

By Rich Landers The Spokesman-Review Nov 20, 2016

Nobody want’s to be regulated, or required to stop at a boat inspection station.  But the risks and consequences of bringing invasive species into Northwest waterways are extreme.

If you’ve been out of state with your boat, get it inspected and make sure it’s CLEAN.

Officials from four Northwest states and three Canadian provinces came together this week to discuss a troubling new development: discovery of the tiny larva of invasive mussels in Montana, the first such discovery in the Northwest region.

continued:
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‘Holy cow, it’s a shark!’ – video shows attack in Columbia River

John Tierney, KGW 8:53 AM. MST November 17, 2016

PORTLAND, Ore. — Josh Robb was crabbing on the Columbia River west of Astoria on Saturday when his father-in-law saw an injured seal and blood in the water. Then they noticed something else swimming nearby trying to get at the seal.

Robb pulled out a camera and started recording the action about 15 yards away.

“Finally you could see the fin come out of the water. I said, ‘holy cow, it’s a shark!’” Robb said.

continued:
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The Columbia Basin Bulletin

Weekly Fish and Wildlife News
http://www.cbbulletin.com
November 18, 2016
Issue No. 810

* Are Lower Columbia River Harvest Reforms (The Kitzhaber Plan) Working? Oregon Considers Next Steps
http://www.cbbulletin.com/437991.aspx

* Council Hears Report On Best Ways To Pass Salmonids Above High Head Dams; Part Of Evaluating Re-Introduction Above Grand Coulee
http://www.cbbulletin.com/437990.aspx

* Invasive Mussels Found In Montana Waters: Council Talks Regional Forum, Federal Funding To Combat Spread To Columbia Basin
http://www.cbbulletin.com/437989.aspx

* Hundreds Turn Out For Lewiston Scoping Meeting Regarding Federal Agencies’ Draft EIS For Snake River Dams; Due 2020
http://www.cbbulletin.com/437988.aspx

* Council’s ‘Cost-Savings’ Workgroup Earmarks Some FW Project Cost Savings For Hatchery Repairs
http://www.cbbulletin.com/437987.aspx

* EPA Partially Approves State Standards For Toxic Pollutants In Washington Waters, Adds Own Federal Standards
http://www.cbbulletin.com/437986.aspx

* Hydro/Fish Managers Mull Possible Changes To Chum Flow Operations To Protect Redds Downstream From Bonneville Dam
http://www.cbbulletin.com/437985.aspx

* Bonneville Power Releases Initial Rate Proposal for 2018, 2019; 3.5 Percent Wholesale, 1.1 Percent Transmission
http://www.cbbulletin.com/437984.aspx

* October Brought Wet Records For Much Of Northwest, Above Average Precipitation Expected To Continue Through Feb.
http://www.cbbulletin.com/437983.aspx

* Corps Investigation Loss Of 200 Adult Steelhead Below Dworshak; Likely Caused By Hitting Structure During Upgrade
http://www.cbbulletin.com/437982.aspx

* Removing Trees In Western North America Causes Cooling In Siberia? Study Shows Die-Offs Ricochet Globally
http://www.cbbulletin.com/437981.aspx
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Fun Critter Stuff:

Wild turkeys spotted in Boise’s North End

KTVB November 16, 2016

Photo Sarah Ahrens

BOISE – Thanksgiving is just a week away and it’s already starting to feel like it.

Sarah Ahrens sent us these photos of wild turkeys in Boise’s North End.

She spotted them at Ridenbaugh and 14th streets.

source w/more photos:
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wildturkey-a

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‘Terrible Tom’ the wild turkey causes reporter to lose her head

Uploaded on Oct 7, 2011

After hearing neighbors’ stories of wild turkeys chasing down joggers and other residents in an Arden area neighborhood, News10 producer Duffy Kelly went out for a first-hand look.

Duffy said she “didn’t want to take the ‘Terrible Tom’ stories at face value,” so on Thursday she went to the neighborhood and tried to walk past one of the birds.

Duffy had her camera rolling for her unexpected turkey run.

Neighbors told Duffy the turkeys have been in the area for years and usually scurry away when folks walk by. They say only recently two turkeys broke off from the flock and are intent on standing guard in their own empty lot.

Some people are carrying sticks to frighten off the turkeys, but neighbors say they don’t want any harm to come to them.

They just want friendlier neighbors.

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Fish & Game News:

News Releases

https://idfg.idaho.gov/press
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After Fish & Game hack, state of Idaho buying cybersecurity insurance

By Betsy Z. Russell The Spokesman-Review Nov 11, 2016

After this year’s major breach of state Fish and Game data held by a vendor, the state of Idaho has decided to purchase a $25 million cybersecurity insurance policy, the Legislative Council heard this morning. The policy, with an annual premium of roughly $570,000 and a $1 million deductible per incident, will start in December.

Cathy Holland-Smith, legislative budget director, said the cost in remainder of the current fiscal year, $330,000, will be covered by the existing budgets, but the state Department of Administration will have a request for the full $570,000 in its budget request for next year.

Bob Geddes, department director, said the premium for the current year will come from the existing state risk management fund, which has enough to cover it. But if there were a breach during the current fiscal year, a supplemental budget request likely would be needed to cover the $1 million deductible. Geddes said his department coordinated with a state cybersecurity task force and state agencies on the plan to get the insurance policy; all agencies have been supportive.

continued:
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14 former Idaho Fish & Game commissioners send letter to legislative leaders, pressing for new Senate resources chair

By Betsy Z. Russell The Spokesman-Review Nov 17, 2016

Fourteen former Idaho Fish & Game commissioners sent a letter today to Idaho legislative leaders from both houses and both parties, asking that Sen. Steve Bair, R-Blackfoot, be replaced as chairman of the Senate Resources Committee. The former commissioners say a dispute over reappointment of commissioners, “efforts to change the method of allocating controlled hunt permits,” differences over handling of a fee increase proposal and related issues prompted their request.

“We, as former Fish and Game commissioners, feel strongly and are dedicated to the 1938 Citizen’s Initiative Policy Statement as codified in Title 36 to preserve, protect, perpetuate and manage all wildlife declared the property of the state of Idaho and the Commission’s role to Administer such policy,” the letter says. “It is within this spirit we respectfully request Senator Bair be replaced as Chairman of the Senate Resources and Environment Committee. Because of Senator Bair’s influence as Chairman and his demonstrated bias, we do not feel he can maintain the objectivity to fairly provide oversight of the Fish and Game Department and manage the Commissioner confirmation process.  We fear if the chemistry of the Committee is not changed, this issue will not heal or repair itself; the problem-solving process envisioned in Citizen’s Initiative #1 will remain elusive.”

continued:
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Trivia:

Turkey Trivia

from The Old Farmer’s Almanac

Here is some fun trivia about turkeys, the all-American birds.

* There are several theories about how turkeys got their name. One story claims the Christopher Columbus heard some birds say “tuka, tuka”, and his interpreter came up with the name tukki, which means “big bird” in hebrew.

* Ben Franklin thought the turkey would be a better national symbol than the bald eagle. According to the Franklin Institute, he wrote in a letter to his daughter:

“For my own part, I wish the bald eagle had not been chosen as the representative of our country; he is a bird of bad moral character; he does not get his living honestly…like those among men who live by sharping and robbing…he is generally poor, and often very lousy. Besides, he is a rank coward; the little king-bird, not bigger than a sparrow, attacks him boldly and drives him out of the district…For in truth, the turkey is in comparison a much more respectable bird, and withal a true original native of America. Eagles have been found in all countries, but the turkey was peculiar to ours…”

* The average person in the United States will eat 15 pounds of turkey this year.

continued:
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Humor:

turkeyscale-a

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Road Report Nov 20

Summary of reports this week.

Johnson Creek road – as of Friday, Johnson Creek road was still open and snow free. Watch for pot holes.  (Probably snowing today on Big Creek and Warm Lake summits.)

South Fork route – no reports but mail truck is going out that way.  Old reports of slick shady curves.

Lick Creek route – no recent reports, but was still open with some snow last Monday.

Upper Stibnite road – report that the road coming down from the mine is pretty icy in spots. Rocks and trees to watch for.

Big Creek/Edwardburg – report from last weekend that the road was still passable. Slick on the BC side of the summit, snow on top, not much snow on the YP side (that has probably changed by now.)

Sunday Nov 20 – rain all day in Yellow Pine, snow line looks like it might be a little below 7000′.

 

Idaho History November 20, 2016

Yellow Pine Area Historical Photos 1928

Harry Shellworth Album by photographer Ansgar Johnson Sr.

About this collection

In a state known for its camping, a 1928 mountain bivouac stands above all others for its significance in Idaho history.

Harry Shellworth might seem an unlikely advocate for the cause of wilderness preservation. But the long effort to conserve Idaho’s wildlands crosses political party and ideological lines. An official with the Boise-Payette Lumber Company (a predecessor of Boise Cascade), Shellworth oversaw Weyerhaeuser logging interests in Idaho. But he also loved to hunt and camp, and he keenly appreciated the need to preserve some of Idaho’s pristine landscape for future generations. In 1928 he invited some important friends on a camping trip into central Idaho—including Governor Clarence Baldridge, Boise attorney Jess Hawley, and Kellogg mining executive Stanley Easton. Shellworth’s mission: To convince these powerful Idahoans that the land around the Middle Fork of the Salmon should be preserved.

In 1930, Baldridge – converted to the cause – appointed Shellworth to head a Governor’s Committee to explore Primitive Area designation for that breathtaking landscape. In 1931, the U.S. Forest Service established the Idaho Primitive Area. At 1.1 million acres, it was one of the earliest and largest Primitive Areas in the nation.

Idaho photographer Ansgar Johnson Sr. accompanied the party as the official photographer of the trip.

BROWSE the album from the Shellworth Manuscript Collection (MS 269) which documents this historic trip.
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Cars at Yellow Pine

1928cars-at-yellow-pine

Identifier MS269-B1F22-pg34
Title Cars at Yellow Pine
Description All ready to get into the cars at Yellow Pine for Boise
Date 1928-10
Photographer Ansgar Johnson Sr.
Location Valley County, Idaho, United States
Rights Management In Copyright
Publisher Idaho State Historical Society
source w/larger photo:
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East Fork Trail 1

1928east-fork-trail-1

Identifier MS269-B1F22-pg30
Title East Fork Trail 1
Description East Fork Trail near Yellow Pine Idaho, Govenor Baldridge is in the lead
Date 1928-10
Photographer Ansgar Johnson Sr.
Location Valley County, Idaho, United States
Rights Management In Copyright
Publisher Idaho State Historical Society
source w/larger photo:
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East Fork Trail 2

1928east-fork-trail-2

Identifier MS269-B1F22-pg31
Title East Fork Trail 2
Description East Fork Trail near Yellow Pine, Idaho. Govenor Baldridge is in the lead, Jess Stanley is walking,Shellworth is next
Subject (AAT) wilderness
Date 1928-10
Photographer Ansgar Johnson Sr.
Location Valley County, Idaho, United States
Rights Management In Copyright
Publisher Idaho State Historical Society
source w/larger photo:
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Warm Lake grade

1928warm-lake-grade

Identifier MS269-B1F22-pg35
Title Warm Lake grade
Description Jess B. Hawley, A.F. Coorerod and H.G. Shellworth at Warm Lake grade
Subject (AAT) wilderness
Date 1928-10
Photographer Ansgar Johnson Sr.
Location Valley County, Idaho, United States
Rights Management In Copyright
Publisher Idaho State Historical Society
source w/larger photo:
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Warm Lake

1928warm-lake

Identifier MS269-B1F22-pg37
Title Warm Lake
Description Warm Lake from near Warm Lake Summit
Date 1928-10
Photographer Ansgar Johnson Sr.
Location Valley County, Idaho, United States
Rights Management In Copyright
Publisher Idaho State Historical Society
source w/larger photo:
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Moving picture machine

1928moving-picture-machine

Identifier MS269-B1F22-pg33
Title Moving picture machine
Description Govenor Baldridge at the moving picture machine “taking the bunch”
Date 1928-10
Photographer Ansgar Johnson Sr.
Location Valley County, Idaho, United States
Rights Management In Copyright
Publisher Idaho State Historical Society
source w/larger photo:
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Baldridge and Reed with cougar pelt

1928reed-with-cougar-pelt

Identifier MS269-B1F22-pg32
Title Baldridge and Reed with cougar pelt
Description Govenor Baldridge all “dolled-up” in chaps and guns helping “Deadshot Reed” hold up the cougar pelt
Date 1928-10
Photographer Ansgar Johnson Sr.
Location Valley County, Idaho, United States
Rights Management In Copyright
Publisher Idaho State Historical Society
source w/larger photo:

[big h/t to SMc]
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A Campfire Vision: Establishing the Idaho Primitive Area

Dennis and Lynn Baird – Journal of the West

Idaho’s Middle Fork of the Salmon River knows few bad seasons, but to a hunter and outdoorsman, autumn is the best time of all. His love for hunting and for the wild heartland of Idaho brought Harry Shellworth to the shores of Big Creek, the Middle Fork’s major tributary, in October 1927. Shellworth, an executive in the Boise Payette Lumber Company and longtime representative of what came to be known as the Weyerhaeuser “interests” in Idaho, was completing his twentieth trip into the Middle Fork country, stopping as usual at the cabin and homestead of “Cougar” Dave Lewis on Big Creek. He had always brought friends along on these trips, many of them prominent Eastern businessmen. But this trip was a very special one, for joining Shellworth on the hunt were Idaho’s Governor H. Clarence Baldridge, Kellogg mining executive Stanley Easton, Boise photographer Ansgar Johnson (his photos of this trip appeared as far afield as the New York Times), District Forester Richard H. Rutledge of Ogden, and others. All were close friends of long duration and most were prominent Republicans as well. Writing three years later, Shellworth remembered nights during the trip:

Many times during this trip the topic of our evening’s talk around the camp fire was the question of whether or not this Middle Fork Salmon River country, or at least that portion which is the natural winter range of game, should or should not become either a game preserve or a primitive area.

There is no record that the men reached any conclusions on this trip, nor is there specific information on the role played in the talks by District Forester Rutledge. It is clear, however, that a spark was lit, for both Rutledge and Governor Baldridge took action over the next two years to further the dream voiced at Dave Lewis’ camp. What motivated these men to act as they did? Was their plan for a vast Idaho Primitive Area merely an act in the larger drama of presentation battles in the 1920s? How could it be that men closely linked to industries needing free and open access to the public lands would become leaders in the cause of wilderness preservation? The answers for these questions must be sought in the unique circumstances of Idaho and its leading political figures as well as in an examination of the larger battles over wilderness preservation during the 1920s.

The late 1920s saw the laying of groundwork for the major conservation achievements of the Roosevelt years. This was especially true in the area of wilderness preservation. By 1931, thanks to the work of Bob Marshall, Aldo Leopold, Arthur Carhart, and others, the idea of forest primitive areas was well established and had a firm place in Forest Service rhetoric. The change in both agency and popular thought about wild places during the decade of the twenties from a utilitarian to a preservation perspective was immense and has naturally drawn the interest of historians of conservation. Several theories have been advanced by historians seeking some explanation for this change of thinking about wilderness. Some have argued that the Forest Service began to find wilderness and outdoor recreation more attractive during this period simply to counter the growing influence of the Park Service. Others, especially Forest Service officials, have argued that the agency was more altruistic in its motivation. A third theory looks more closely at the role played by the more powerful conservation actors of the 1920s, notably Leopold and Marshal, but also by Park Service and Forest Service officials such as Henry Graves, Arthur Carhart, and Steven Mather. Several men of more local influence, especially Western district foresters (renamed regional foresters in 1931), can be considered key players when individual areas are examined. In this third approach to conservation history, personality assumes a larger role than mere defense of agency turf.

As a consequence of this change of values, by July 1929, a legal vehicle existed through which the Forest Service could preserve wild lands. These were the L-20 regulations concerning primitive areas put into effect that year by the agency. Inventories taken as early as 1926 had identified many such places, mostly in the West, including three in Idaho. In their recreational planning process, district foresters had begun serious consideration of inventoried areas well in advance of completion of the L-20 regulations. In Idaho, interest both inside and outside the Forest Service quickly came to focus on the vast, undeveloped acreage along the Salmon River and south along its Middle Fork drainage.

This planning and study work by the district foresters also received impetus in 1927 and 1928 from the work of the influential National Conference on Out-door Recreation. With the Secretary of War as chairman, this large conference was called by President Coolidge and met in Washington in 1924 and 1926. Its final work called for the publication not only of its own proceedings but also for later publication of a series of studies to be done on various outdoor recreation topics. One such study was authored by a joint committee of the American Forestry Association and the National Park Association. This committee published its report in 1928, entitled “Recreation Resources of Federal Lands.”

This study found over 12 million acres (21 sites in all) suitable for some form of wilderness preservation. In Idaho, these were the Selway (1 million acres), the Middle Fork (1.25 million acres), and the Owyhee (1 million acres). The report spoke warmly of places “free of the ubiquitous motor . . . where it is still possible to enjoy outdoor life under the primitive conditions of the wilderness,” and added that “land planning for this unique phase of outdoor recreation is of vital importance but is in danger of irreparable neglect.” The joint committee report concluded by asking for “formal delimitation by proclamation of the Secretary of Agriculture of wilderness areas within the national forests and suppression of the exploitation of social uses or speculative economic uses inimical to the enjoyment of simple wilderness sports.”

Because the National Conference on Outdoor Recreation had been attended by virtually every leading recreation professional and many of the prominent citizens concerned with the outdoors, these recommendations, along with the many others made, were clearly of serious import to agency officials in the field. District foresters like R. H. Rutledge were well aware of the pressures generated by these interests. The response of these high-level Forest Service administrators varied greatly around the country, but Rutledge, district forester in Boise, was clearly sympathetic to the call to preserve these wild places.

He may have had his interest in the Middle Fork piqued by the work of a little-known figure in Idaho history, Frederick G. Ransom of Clarkston, Washington. From 1910 to 1930, Ransom, a chemistry graduate of Stanford University, had operated a large orchard in Clarkston and spent many summer hours along the Middle Fork. He also had spent much of that time corresponding with the Forest Service and political figures around the country, agitating for the preservation of what he hoped would be called Tukuarika Primitive Area, named for the Shoshonean Indians (also called Sheepeaters during the brief war of the same name) who once inhabited much of the Middle Fork drainage. Ransom’s correspondence with Rut-ledge in 1931 makes it clear that he had been working to influence the Forest Service for some time to establish the Tukuarika Primitive Area. Ransom encountered Robert Bailey for the first time in the Salmon River canyon in 1904 and made a considerable impression on that chronicler of the Salmon River. In fact, in his book River of No Return (1947), Bailey gives probably accurate credit to Ransom for originating the idea of preservation for the Middle Fork. Ransom lost his orchard at the start of the Depression, moved briefly to Vancouver, Washington, sought employment with the Forest Service in helping manage the new primitive area, and eventually moved East, vanishing from the arena of Idaho conservation battles. In a letter now lost, he wrote Bailey summarizing his work:

I would say that I, some years ago, conceived the idea of saving a part of this central Idaho for the propagation of its many fine species of wild life, and wrote widely presenting my idea to the various governmental departments which I thought might be interested. Practically all of the replies were discouraging, but seemingly my seed did not fall entirely on infertile ground.

Ransom also credited Gen. W. C. Brown of Colorado, a veteran of the Sheepeater War, and Senator William Borah, with later having advanced the cause of the Middle Fork, but they apparently had only very minor roles in the matter.

Instead, one must look more closely at the work and background of Intermountain District Forester Richard H. Rutledge and his long association with Idaho and its politicians. Rutledge, an Idaho native, had served the Forest Service for years in various capacities, including work as supervisor of two national forests in the state. As is the case today, this work brought him into close contact with the state’s more influential figures, including Governor Baldridge and lumber executive Harry Shellworth. Rutledge’s personal expertise was grazing management, and he enjoyed an exceptionally long tenure as district and then, regional, forester serving in Ogden from 1920 to 1938. He also was well known outside of Idaho and forestry circles and was picked in 1939 to head the Grazing Service, one of the predecessor agencies of the Bureau of Land Management. In that role he figured prominently in Interior Secretary Harold Ickes’ battles to move the Forest Service into the Interior Department. Rutledge was a man of considerable influence who knew well and clearly loved the Middle Fork country. His support for the primitive area, gained after the 1927 trip, was to prove essential. In addition to his respect for the natural values of the Middle Fork, Rutledge also may have had a hidden agenda: the removal of private lands from within the area and some limitation on homesteading rights in the proposed primitive area. If so, he failed to resolve either question. Concerns continue today over the impact of management of private lands within what is now the Frank Church – River of No Return Wilderness, distinctly coloring the official management plan for the 2.3 million-acre wilderness.

Harry Shellworth, with whom Rutledge enjoyed the Middle Fork country on many occasions, was born in Texas in 1877 and, as a child, moved to Idaho where his father became a prominent merchant. As a young man, he fought in the Philippines during the Spanish-American War and traveled for several years in the Orient. After his marriage in 1905, he settled in Idaho again and his first job was cruising timber for what his family always called the “Weyerhaeuser interests.” His initial work took him into almost all of the forested regions of southern Idaho and was on behalf of the Barber Lumber Company which became the Boise-Payette Company, a direct predecessor of the current Boise Cascade Corporation. He served the Weyerhaeuser “interests” in many ways: preparing for the inevitable movement of the timber industry from the upper Midwest to the Northwest, as a land agent, and, very quickly, as an influential, behind-the-scenes man in Idaho Republican party politics. In addition, he acted as a guide, arranger, and general stage manager for trips into the Middle Fork and Big Creek which were arranged for Weyerhaeuser “interests” and for many prominent Eastern businessmen. He also served as a friend and business agent on the “outside” for back country characters like “Cougar” Dave Lewis. Shellworth played a direct role in the work of John and Phil Weyerhaeuser as they sought timberland and mill sites along north Idaho’s Clearwater River in 1926:

Harry Shellworth, still in the employ of the Boise Payette Company, has been assisting at John’s request in the effort to get the Idaho legislature to approve construction of a darn at Lewiston for power and log storage Shellworth inquired about the possibility of employment in the Clearwater organization.

His son, Eugene Shellworth, clearly remembers his first boyhood trip down Big Creek in 1924 and recalls that even then, his father talked of protecting the natural values of the area. His acquaintances on these early trips were his father’s good friends, Bob Lambert and Otto Jones. Lambert later became a defender of what is now the Craters of the Moon National Monument, and Jones was the first director of what Idaho voters in the mid-I930s established by initiative as the Idaho Fish and Game Department. Eugene learned much from these three, and remembers that:

It was the idea generated by these three people, entirely new concept, even to the name that they gave their dream of “Primitive Area.” It was their baby they brought to full life on Idaho’s streets in the late twenties. . .”

Three amazing bits of coincidence in the 1927-1928 period saw the transformation of this “dream” into the first phase of reality: the trip down Big Creek by influential Idahoans and Forest Service officials, the publication of the joint committee report on national forest recreation resources, and, finally, the internal clarification of Forest Service policy about wilderness. The final impetus came in a letter to Idaho Senator William Borah in late 1929, sent by Augustine Davis, a wealthy southern businessman just returned from a fall hunting trip into the Middle Fork. Davis asked the Senator what was being done to protect the country, and Borah passed the letter along to R. E. Shepherd, then president of the Idaho Chamber of Commerce. In April 1930, Shepherd wrote his friend Harry Shellworth, asking for advice on how to answer Davis.

Shellworth’s reply, four pages long, is a masterpiece of ambiguity in which he ruminated on the need to build roads into the area for fire protection, on the possible mineral values of the Middle Fork country, and on his own desire to “preserve this wonderful game land.” He summarized his feelings:

I have, in the past, been a very rabid proponent of the wilderness area idea for this particular area —now I am not so sure that it was not a glorified selfishness — a wish to keep this game land for the few who by reason of either wealth or, as in my case, fortunate opportunity, could enjoy it. I hope it may be protected and that many more people, many many more citizens of Idaho and our friends may enjoy it. With intelligent administration and proper laws I believe this can be accomplished.

Shellworth also sent along a memo that he had just received from his friend Rutledge in Ogden, which included the information that a study of a possible primitive area was in fact already underway and speculated on how such a place should be managed. Shellworth concluded by suggesting to the Chamber of Commerce head that a committee of foresters, scientists, sportsmen, and politicians should be assembled to consider the primitive area and its boundaries. Copies of Shellworth’s correspondence with Shepherd also were sent to several state senators, Forest Service officials, and to state Game Warden R. E. Thomas. The replies to this effort by Shellworth were almost uniformly in support of the primitive area idea and of the plan to have a governor’s conference on the topic.

SheepeaterMonument-a
Identifier MS269-B1F22-pg01
Title At Sheepeater Battlefield
Description Govenor Baldridge, Uncle Dave Lewis, Stanley A. Easton at the Sheepeater Battlefield on Soldier Bar
Date 1928-10
Photographer Ansgar Johnson Sr.
Location Frank Church-River of No Return Wilderness, Valley County, Idaho, United States
source: w/larger photo:

There was considerable talk around Idaho that summer about the primitive area. Rutledge collected reports on the area from his several forest supervisors, and on 17 November 1930, the regional forester took them to Boise to show the reports to Governor Baldridge. The governor apparently was enthusiastic, because he asked for a summary report on the area and promised to call a conference on its fate.

Rutledge kept himself busy in the interim. On 20 November he wrote his forest supervisors in the Idaho, Challis, Salmon, and Payette National Forests asking that they drum up local support for the primitive area, suggesting that each supervisor “secure from the game associations in his territory, an endorsement of the primitive area idea without going into any details as to boundaries. This it was hoped, would pave the way for the support of their representatives. . . .”

In a remarkable tribute to both Forest Service and Post Office efficiency, these solicited testimonials, in two cases typed on Forest Service watermarked paper, quickly (by 22 November, for one of them) poured into Rutledge’s office, with copies going to Governor Baldridge as well. Prominent Loon Creek (a Middle Fork tributary northwest of Stanley) outfitter and rancher J. P. Boyle also wrote in support of the idea. The available records, in fact, reveal no opposition at all during this stage of the discussions about the primitive area, but it is also very clear that regional forester Rutledge was both shrewd and careful in whom he picked to lobby on the subject, a skill that served him well in his later career in the Interior Department.

By late November 1930, the Forest Service was able to supply Govenor Baldridge with a draft proposal and map for the primitive area, which would cover about one million acres, including highly mineralized Thunder Mountain on the west side. The proposal went out of its way to ensure that language protecting miners and grazers was included. The issue of buying out agricultural private landholders was again raised. On 1 December, Governor Baldridge officially named Shellworth head of the committee and set a meeting date for 20 December. Eleven men were named to the committee, which was to meet in the caucus room of the Idaho House of Representatives.

Of the ten others named to the committee, almost all were Republicans (as was the Governor) and several had personal knowledge of the proposed primitive area. Two were state representatives: Cowles Andrus, a Challis rancher, and Robert Coulter, a farmer from Cascade. There were state senators: E. G. Van Hoesen, a prominent horticulturalist from Mesa; W. B. Mitchell, the president of Parma’s cooperative creamery; and Roscoe Rich, of Burley. Rich was an influential wool grower (he later served as president of the National Woolgrowers Association) and bank officer and had long been active in Republican politics. His family is still in the livestock business in eastern Idaho. The committee included other friends of Shellworth: Stanley Easton, the Bunker Hill executive from Kellogg; R. E. Thomas, state Game Warden; and R. E. Shepherd, of Jerome, then president of the Idaho Chamber of Commerce. C. M. Hatch, a Victor store owner, and S. C. Scribner, then supervisor of the Payette National Forest, completed the committee. Several of these names had come from Rutledge, but the genesis of the others on the list is unknown.

In addition to their Republican inclination, many had been Big Creek hunting trip participants. It is also clear that, collectively, this group had the political influence to put into effect any idea that they were able to approve. Governor Baldridge obviously knew what he was doing in selecting these particular men.

The governor himself opened the meeting, reminding members at some length about his own trip into the Middle Fork in 1927. According to the minutes of the committee, the governor hoped that no roads would be built into the area and that private lands within the area could be purchased. He did not foresee the primitive area as existing for all time and, like others, asked that nothing be done to preclude mining in the area. After the governor left, the committee took up the draft report, written for Regional Forester Rutledge. During the discussions, Coulter and Andrus raised concerns over dam construction and mining access. Hatch and Van Hoesen, both from towns far from the Middle Fork, thought the idea of a primitive area a good one. Some of the strongest support for the idea came from dairyman Mitchell, who spoke on the value of the primitive area in maintaining high-quality water for irrigation.

After all this discussion, Regional Forester Rutledge was asked to offer his opinion. He gave what was, for the time, an amazing talk on the economic value of wild lands and again raised his hopes of acquiring the patented private lands within the area. That done, a resolutions committee was named and returned its report by late afternoon. By unanimous vote, the governor’s committee recommended approval of the primitive area concept and asked Rutledge to submit his report on the area to his supervisor, Chief Forester R. Y. Stuart in Washington. On that note, the committee adjourned, never to meet again. Rutledge immediately went to work, joining his Idaho National Forest Supervisor Scribner in writing a final report for the chief forester.

A week later, the story of the committee’s work broke in the Boise press, in a full-page story complete with a rough map. Public reaction, at least as seen in the newspapers, was mixed, with land owners inside the primitive area boundary and miners being the most concerned. Idaho Inspector of Mines Stuart Campbell voiced his concerns over possible harm to miners from the proposal, not from the lack of access but from the lack of federally funded access. As he said, the “proposal forces any miner or prospector to build roads in this region without state or federal aid.” Others called the primitive area “a playground for the few,” an “intruding ghoul” halting just and necessary development, and a block in the development of Idaho for “the poor man.” The most substantive criticism came from Merle Wallace, a resident of the small mountain town of Warren, who was a cattle rancher along Big Creek and a former employee of the Idaho National Forest. Wallace claimed that the area was heavily inhabited and quite profitable for ranching, and warned that the primitive area designation was the first step “looking to the total abolishment of grazing rights of owners of patented lands.” Idaho National Forest Supervisor Scribner answered Wallace in the same paper a few days later, indicating that Wallace had simply misunderstood the rule governing the management of the area.

Most of these newspaper stories were forwarded to Forester Stuart by Rutledge along with two more letters from sportsmen’s clubs endorsing the idea. The Idaho State Chamber of Commerce sent Senator Borah a letter on 21 January 1931, cautiously endorsing the primitive area but asking for a federal survey of the mineral resources of the area, a plea which was quickly rejected and was not actually completed until the late 1970s.

By 23 January 1931, Regional Forester Rutledge had completed transmission of all the primitive area documents to Chief Forester Stuart in Washington. On 2 February, Stuart wrote Rutledge, tentatively approving the new primitive area, which would be the largest by far in the new system established under the L-20 regulations. Stuart complimented the Intermountain Region on the high quality of its primitive area study report. Stuart. however, wondered aloud about the permanent appearance of the proposal and repeated some Pinchot talk about the “largest beneficial return to the largest number of people.” He noted that in the future, the “Forest Service will feel free to modify the plan of management and use” should demands and circumstances change. In an amazing bit of foresight, Stuart also asked Rutledge if the region’s plan to promote the area might “nullify the purpose of the present designation” by attracting too many people, some of whom might demand roads and resorts in the primitive area.

Rutledge responded with a long defense of his promotion plans but suggested weakening the language dealing with the length and tenure of the primitive area designation. With these modifications, Stuart signed the final Idaho Primitive Area Report on 17 March 1931. The report is both detailed and extraordinarily well written. Its basic conclusion is that the facts of the report make it “clearly evident that the recreational value of the area is at present, and will continue to be, dominant.” The goal in establishing the area was clearly identified:

To make it possible for people to detach themselves, at least temporarily, from the strains and turmoil of modern existence, and to revert to simple types of existence in conditions of relatively unmodified nature [and] to afford unique opportunities for physical, mental, and spiritual recreation and regeneration.

The existing resources of the primitive area are described in detail in the report, which also offers a good history of the area. The report also included some suggestions on management of the area, although much of that detail came ultimately from the L-20 regulations. In a hint at battles to come, the report cautioned about the danger of extensive airplane landings in the primitive area, concluding that “if auto travel is not to be condoned, surely entrance by air should also be discouraged.” Finally, the report again asked that funds be provided for the purchase, on a willing-seller basis, of private lands from within the area. The total acreage was 1,087,744 acres, a number that was augmented in June 1937 by the addition of 145,000 acres in the Indian Creek and Pistol Creek drainages, an enlargement made mostly for hunting and wildlife purposes. Though the Forest Service ultimately established both the Selway-Bitterroot and the Sawtooth Primitive Areas in Idaho. this one, centered on the Middle Fork, perhaps by virtue of its size and precedence quickly came known as “the Primitive Area,” a name by which it is called by some even today, years after its transformation into the much larger Frank Church – River of No Return Wilderness.

The citizens and officials involved in establishing the primitive area never argued much over the boundaries of the area, had few disagreements over their goals for the designation, and didn’t even battle much over the likely management of the area. The hidden agenda of the Forest Service, if indeed there was one, fairly quickly gave away to the obvious love for the primitive area. The threatening head of the National Park Service was nowhere in evidence during these discussions and, except for the Craters of the Moon National Monument, this sister agency was not to be seen much in Idaho until the first days of battle over the Sawtooths in the early 1970s. Citizens and Forest Service officials involved in the designation of the Idaho Primitive Area were clearly cognizant of the battles over wilderness going on elsewhere in the country during the same time period, but these national concerns seem to have been more of a fortuitous coincidence rather than a major stimulus to the work of wilderness preservation in Idaho. In that light, the L-20 regulations were not a beacon for these men in Idaho but simply a vehicle for work already underway.

Their work, and ultimately their success, in establishing the Idaho Primitive Area is all the more remarkable in the light of economic conditions of Idaho in 1930. At that time there were but 440,000 people in the state with a per capita income $200 below the national average of $705, and nearly half of the state’s total employment was tied in some way to the land. Under those conditions, the preservation of the forest wild lands must have been a low priority indeed.

Once the Forest Service was established, the rest of the decade of the 1930s saw serious efforts by the Service to clarify its management of the Idaho and other primitive areas. Chief Forester Stuart sought to clarify in his own mind what was intended and the Forest Service, in its 1933 National Plan for American Forestry, tried to specify terms for wild places (“superlative areas,” “primeval areas,” and “wilderness areas”) and to determine exactly what each meant on the ground. Just before his death in 1939, Bob Marshall was able to draft what became the U Regulations for managing wilderness areas. These were approved by Chief Forester Silcox and were to guide the management of the wilderness and primitive areas (the exact designation was changed several times) until debate began on the Wilderness Bill in the 1950s and 1960s.

Harry Shellworth seems to have played no part in the small enlargement of the Idaho Primitive Area in 1937, but continued his trips into the area up to the start of the Second World War. He also continued his work in Idaho on behalf of the Weyerhaeuser “interests” and kept his close ties with Rutledge during their mutual CCC work. Rutledge did play a big role in the enlargement of the Idaho Primitive Area in 1937, shortly before leaving the Forest Service for the Interior Department. In Washington, he quickly became an active participant in the long and on-going battles between the Interior and Agriculture Departments over the control of the resource management agencies.

The decade of the 1930s also saw the start of trips into the new primitive area by the man who might well be considered the successor of Harry Shellworth – Ted Trueblood, an outdoorsman and writer who ultimately settled in Nampa, Idaho. Writing for Outdoor Life. Trueblood quickly involved himself in most Idaho conservation battles. It was his vision of a greatly enlarged Idaho Primitive Area, to be named the River of No Return Wilderness after the work on the upper Salmon River of Lewis and Clark, that prepared the way for the second great struggle over the fate of central Idaho. His is a story yet to be told.

source: w/reference notes: History of the Idaho Primitive area
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page updated May 4, 2020 (added new section)