Nov 20, 2016 The Yellow Pine Times

Nov 20, 2016 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Village News:

2017 Yellow Pine Calendar

Last chance to order the 2017 Yellow Pine Calendar. The deadline has been extended to Nov 23. Send rrSue an email with your name, mailing address and number of calendars.
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Thanksgiving

This year the annual Yellow Pine Thanksgiving Day Potluck will be at The Corner on November 24 at 5pm. The Hubers will provide the turkey, please bring a side dish and/or dessert. Please call Heather at (208) 633-3325 to coordinate. The feast will start at 5pm and all are welcome.
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The Corner Winter Hours

Monday: 11am-1pm
Wednesday: 11am-1pm
Friday: 11am-1pm (coffee) 3pm-8pm (dinner)
Saturday: 3pm-8pm
Sunday: 3pm-8pm

– Heather
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Yellow Pine Tavern

Closed for holidays until January 6, 2017.
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YPWUA 

Reminder – if possible please pay your 2017 water bill early, it will help with funding the completion of our water project.
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Local Observations:

Monday (Nov 14) dark clouds, overcast and no frost this morning. Heard a robin chirping! Light drizzle of rain ended around lunch time, cloudy afternoon. Steady rain late afternoon and a bit blustery. Rained most of the night.

Tuesday (Nov 15) no frost, still raining and thick overcast, sort of foggy (really low clouds) – pot holes full, ground soggy and standing water in places. Helicopter flew over at 1230pm. Still raining, but thinner clouds and can see the top of Golden Gate. Sprinkles mid afternoon, then steady rain before dark and breezy. A break in the rain for a couple of hours after dark, then another shower after midnight. River is up and roaring.

Wednesday (Nov 16) dense fog around 6am. Frosty, slick with frozen rain, a little skiff of snow this morning before sunrise and partly clear sky. Partly sunny and cool most of the day. Pine squirrel packing cones down the fence rails. Below freezing by late afternoon. Quiet day, very little traffic.

Thursday (Nov 17) light snow snow fell early morning, hard freeze, mostly cloudy before sunrise. Mostly sunny all day, chilly and a bit of a breeze. Quiet day. Calm towards evening.

Friday (Nov 18) very hard freeze, heavy frost, some wispy mare’s tails clouds this morning. Overcast by sunrise, still below freezing at noon (frost still on windshields.) Clouds came in before lunch and cloudy cool afternoon. Quiet and no birds or critters around. Around sundown could hear the river roaring.

Saturday (Nov 19) light freeze, cloudy and chilly breeze this morning. Gray and cloudy all day. Day old chunk of ice on the north side of the house didn’t melt. Feels like the humidity is up. Heard a raven calling in the neighborhood early this afternoon. Dark and cloudy late afternoon. Very quiet all day. Rain shower around 2am.

Sunday (Nov 20) rain showers and dark clouds this morning, no frost. Clouds parted enough at noon to see the snow line on VanMeter dropping down below 7000′. Drizzly dark afternoon. Stopped raining at dark.
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Photo to Share:

20161113moondp

photo by Dave Putman sent Nov 13, 2016
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Idaho News:

Permits to cut Christmas trees go on sale Saturday

The Star-News November 17, 2016

The Boise and Payette national forests will begin selling Christmas tree permits on Saturday .

Each $10 permit is good for one tree with a limit of three per family. The maximum height allowed is 12 feet and the non-commercial permits are valid on both forests. The permits include information on areas where the trees may be cut.

As part of the “Every Kid in a Park” program, fourth-graders taking part can receive a free permit. The program is intended to build the next generation of outdoor enthusiasts. The child and parent must visit a Forest Service office in person with a voucher they received at http://EveryKidinaPark.gov

Permits will be available at local ranger district offices of the Payette and Boise forests. Local vendors include Albertsons in McCall and C&M Lumber in New Meadows.

source The Star-News:
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Fish-Eye Lens: Donnelly Elementary School lets the world view trout tank

By Teri Robinson for The Star-News November 17, 2016

Students in Deirdre Abrams’ fifth-grade class at Donnelly Elementary School love to spend time watching the trout being raised in a classroom tank. Now the world can watch along.

A video camera has been put into the tank to allow streaming of the trout as they swim and grow.

The camera was originally acquired to observe the trout and other organisms living in Boulder Creek, which runs behind the school, Abrams said.

“Because I didn’t want the camera to break due to winter conditions in the creek, I thought it would be great to put it in one of our tanks to be able to observe our trout on the big Smart Board in class,” she said.

For the past four years, Abrams has had live streaming of the fish in her classroom, but recently expanded the program so students and parents can watch at home as well.

“I feel incredibly fortunate to have so much cool technology at my fingertips to enhance learning,” she said.

Using math to calculate volume and water temperature and nonfiction and other reading needed to hatch trout eggs is only one learning benefit for Abrams’ class and their trout tanks.

The trout program began five years ago with a grant from Trout Unlimited.

After they are released into Boulder Creek, the trout are observed by the camera for their behavior as they make that transition from captivity to the wild, Abrams said.

The class receives trout eggs through the Trout Unlimited program supported by Idaho Department Fish and Game, Nez Perce Tribal Fisheries, and the Payette National Forest, at the beginning of the school year and raise them until they are released in the spring.

Abrams’ classroom has two 55-gallon tanks that hold trout. One tank has been planted with freshwater mussels.

“The hypothesis is that the tank housing the mussels will have cleaner and better water quality on average over the year because mussels help to filter the water,” she said.

Caring for living organisms helps her students to be better stewards of their natural surroundings, she said.

Note: To view the trout tank streaming video, do the following:

1. Install VLC player on your computer by using this direct link:
http://http://videolan.org/vlc/index.html (this is a safe nonprofit media player).

2.  Open VLC player on your computer and pull down the “Media” menu. Click on “Open Network Stream” and enter this link below directly into the blank box:
Rtsp://root:fish@fishcam.mdsd.org/axis-media/media.amp

source The Star-News:
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After years of auctions, Idaho now down to just 51 state-owned cabin sites at Payette Lake

By Betsy Z. Russell The Spokesman-Review Nov 15, 2016

Idaho is down to just 51 state-owned cottage sites at Payette Lake after six years of auctions. The state has now sold 262 of its state-owned lake cabin sites at Payette and Priest lakes combined, and has 261 left, state Lands Director Tom Schultz reported to the state Land Board this morning. “So we are just over 50 percent of the way through disposing of the different cottage sites,” Schultz said.

Idaho has been phasing itself out of the business of renting state-owned cabin sites, on which the renters built and owned their own cabins, sometimes for generations, after years of lawsuits and fights over what constitutes fair rent. The state’s plan is to reinvest the proceeds from the sales into higher-earning land investments for the endowment, including timber land.

The state has auctioned off 117 cabin sites at Payette Lake and 145 at Priest Lake; five of those are still closing at Priest Lake after the last auction. That leaves 210 state-owned cabin sites at Priest Lake, and just 51 at Payette Lake.

In 2017, more auctions are planned. So far, the Lands Department has received applications for auction from 14 cottage site lessees at Payette Lake, and 58 at Priest Lake.

Earnings from Idaho’s state endowment largely benefit the state’s public schools; smaller portions go to state institutions including universities, mental hospitals and prisons.

source:
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Central Idaho federal employees back to work with local help

By LUKE RAMSETH – 11/14/16 AP

CHALLIS, Idaho — The fire started early Oct. 4, destroying the Bureau of Land Management office on the edge of town within minutes.

Volunteer firefighters worked the blaze through the night. In the morning, Challis BLM Manager Todd Kuck began calling his 25 employees, saying they no longer had a place to work.

By that afternoon, state and federal investigators had arrived, combing the scene for any evidence of foul play. Reports of a loud bang when the fire began stoked rumors around the town of 1,000.

“There was talk that the Three Percenters had something to do with it,” said Custer County Sheriff Stu Lumpkin, referring to the radical patriot group opposed to federal overreach. The Idaho chapter of the group held a protest rally at the BLM office earlier this year.

Custer County, where 97 percent of land is owned by the federal government, easily could’ve been the latest hotspot for an escalating conflict around the West between land managers and anti-government militants such as Cliven and Ammon Bundy. But the opposite has happened since the fire, residents and officials say. The community has rallied to help their local BLM office, despite often sharp disagreements over who should control the land and how it should be managed.

Investigators soon determined the blaze was due to an electrical problem, to the relief of many.

continued:
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State endowment to acquire Maggie Butte timber land from Potlatch east of Kamiah

By Betsy Z. Russell The Spokesman-Review Nov 15, 2016

Idaho’s state Land Board voted unanimously today to acquire a nearly 2,400-acre tract of timber land at Maggie Butte, 10 miles east of Kamiah, from Potlatch Corp. for the state’s public school endowment. The $2.5 million to purchase the land comes from the endowment’s land bank, which holds proceeds from sales of state endowment lands including cabin sites.

State Lands Department officials and consultants estimated that the timber land will bring the endowment an annual return, long term, of around 5.5 percent.

“Although Potlatch has conducted many harvests on this property, a silvicultural operation to put this property back into a fully stocked condition would yield fully harvestable timber in 20-40 years,” Ryan Montoya, real estate services manager for the department, told the Land Board. “This factor is recognized in the financial analysis where there are merchantable stands that could yield returns immediately, and thereafter as management continues. Thus, the acquisition reduces the risks involved with the property and also provides for immediate and sustainable income.”

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Forest News:

Big Creek Road Plan of Operation Project Update

USDA Forest Service Nov 14, 2016

The Forest Service, Payette National Forest, Krassel Ranger District, has revised the Environmental Assessment and prepared a draft Decision Notice for the Big Creek Roads Plan of Operations. We are proposing to conditionally approve full-size motor vehicle travel on 26.34 miles of existing routes to provide access for 1872 Mining Act mineral activities under a ten-year Plan of Operations. The project is located in the Big Creek area in Valley and Idaho Counties, Idaho, approximately 7 miles north and east of the community of Yellow Pine, Idaho. I am the Responsible Official who will issue a decision for this project.

The environmental assessment was originally released for public comment in May 2016. It has now been revised in response to the comments received. The revised Environmental Assessment, draft Decision Notice, and other information are available for review at the project webpage at
http://www.fs.usda.gov/project/?project=46053
Additional information regarding this project can be obtained from: Krassel Ranger District Office, 500 North Mission Street, Bldg 1, McCall, ID 83638, 208-634-0600. Persons interested in receiving updates about this project may subscribe to GovDelivery for project updates via email by clicking the link “subscribe to email updates” on the right side of the project webpage.

This proposed project is subject to the objection process pursuant to 36 CFR 218 Subpart B. This project is not related to the Hazardous Fuels Reduction Act. The Payette Forest Supervisor is the reviewing officer.

Eligibility to File Objections

Objections will be accepted only from those who have previously submitted specific written comments regarding the proposed project either during scoping or other designated opportunity for public comment in accordance with § 218.5(a). Issues raised in objections must be based on previously submitted timely, specific, written comments regarding the proposed project unless based on new information arising after designated opportunities.

Individual members of organizations must have submitted their own comments to meet the requirements of eligibility as an individual. Objections received on behalf of an organization are considered as those of the organization only. If an objection is submitted on behalf of a number of individuals or organizations, each individual or organization listed must meet the eligibility requirement of having previously submitted comments on the project (§ 218.7). Names and addresses of objectors will become part of the public record.

Contents of an Objection

Incorporation of documents by reference in the objection is permitted only as provided for at § 218.8(b). Minimum content requirements of an objection are identified in § 218.8(d) include:

Objector’s name and address with a telephone number if available; with signature or other verification of authorship supplied upon request;

Identification of the lead objector when multiple names are listed, along with verification upon request;

Name of project, name and title of the responsible official, national forest/ranger district where project is located, and

Sufficient narrative description of those aspects of the proposed project objected to, specific issues related to the project, how environmental law, regulation, or policy would be violated, and suggested remedies which would resolve the objection.

Statement demonstrating the connection between prior specific written comments on this project and the content of the objection, unless the objection issue arose after the designated opportunities for comment.

Filing an Objection

Written objections may be submitted to the reviewing officer through the project webpage: http://www.fs.usda.gov/project/?project=46053. Simply click on “Comment/Object on Project” on the right side of the page and fill out the webform with your comments. Written objections, including any attachments, may also be addressed Reviewing Officer, Intermountain Region USFS, 324 25th Street, Ogden, Utah 84401; or fax to 801-625-5277; within 45 days following the publication date of this legal notice in the newspaper of record. The office business hours for those submitting hand-delivered objections are: 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, excluding holidays. Electronic objections can also be submitted in a format such as an email message, pdf, plain text (.txt), rich text format (.rtf), and Word (.doc or .docx) to objections-intermtn-regional-office@fs.fed.us. It is the responsibility of Objectors to ensure their objection is received in a timely manner (§ 218.9).

The publication date in the McCall Star News, newspaper of record, is the exclusive means for calculating the time to file an objection to this project. Those wishing to object to this project should not rely upon dates or timeframe information provided by any other source. We anticipate the legal notice will be published on November 17, 2016.

We appreciate your interest in the Payette National Forest and this project. If you have any questions regarding this project or comment period, please contact me at 208-634-0601 (abbotello@fs.fed.us).

Sincerely,
Anthony B. Botello
District Ranger
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Scoping – Ice Hole

USDA Forest Service Nov 14, 2016

The Forest Service is seeking public input (scoping comments) for the proposed Ice Hole Campground Project on the Cascade Ranger District in Valley County, ID.

Project Description

The Ice Hole project proposes to improve the existing campground road in Ice Hole Campground, build a worm rail fence between the campground and Johnson Creek, and gravel discrete campsite pads. For a more detailed description of the proposed project, please review the comprehensive proposed action report on the Project webpage:
http://www.fs.usda.gov/project/?project=49637.

How to Comment

The Forest Service is contacting interested persons, groups, and agencies to make them aware of the project and to gather pertinent feedback. To be most useful, please make your comments as specific as possible. Your comments will help us identify and address issues.

Electronic, written, hand-delivered, and facsimile comments concerning this project will be accepted. Comments may be submitted through the Ice Hole Project webpage. To submit comments using the web form, select “Comment on Project” under “Get Connected” on the right panel of the project’s webpage.

Email comments must be submitted in a format such as an email message, plain text (.txt), rich text format (.rtf), Adobe (.pdf), and Word (.doc) to: comments-intermtn-boise-cascade-fs.fed.us. Please put “Ice Hole Project” in the subject line of e-mail comments. Comments must have an identifiable name attached or verification of identity will be required. A scanned signature may serve as verification on electronic comments.

Written comments may be submitted to: Boise National Forest, Cascade District, 540 North Main Street, Cascade, ID 83615 Attention: Gary Harris, or by fax at 208-382-7480. Office hours for submitting hand-delivered comments are 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, excluding holidays. Comments received in response to this request will be available for public inspection in the Public Comment Reading Room on the project webpage and will be released in their entirety, if requested, pursuant to the Freedom of Information Act.

When to Comment

To be most helpful, please submit your scoping comments by December 6, 2016, and make your comments as specific as posiible.

Only those who subscribe to the mailing list, submit comments, or notify the Forest that they would like to remain on the mailing list for this project will receive future correspondences on this project. Comments submitted anonymously will be accepted and considered; however, without an associated name and address, receiving further correspondences concerning this project will not be possible.

For further information on the project, please contact Gary Harris, Team Leader, at gdharris@fs.fed.us or by phone at 208-382-7455.

scoping letter and maps:
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Scoping – Three Trappers Underburn Project

USDA Forest Service Nov 15, 2016

The Forest Service is seeking public input (scoping comments) for the proposed Three Trappers Restoration Underburn Project on the Cascade Ranger District in Valley County, ID.

Project Description

The Three Trappers project proposes to implement a series of prescribed burns to restore species composition and stand structure, reducing undesirable species and stand densities, while favoring retention of larger diameter more fire resistant trees throughout the project area. Fuel loads, ladder fuels, and stand densities would be reduced, decreasing the opportunity of crown fire development and improve the resiliency of affected stands should a wildfire ignition occur. In addition, activities occurring within the WUI would create or enhance defensible space for suppression resources should a wildfire threaten adjacent private properties.  Restoring vegetative conditions more reflective of the fire-adapted ecosystem, reducing hazardous fuels, and minimizing risks to public health and safety would allow for safe and effective management of wildfire in the urban environment and meet the intent of several goals identified

For a more detailed description of the proposed project, please review the comprehensive proposed action report on the Project webpage:
http://www.fs.usda.gov/project/?project=50276

How to Comment

The Forest Service is contacting interested persons, groups, and agencies to make them aware of the project and to gather pertinent feedback. To be most useful, please make your comments as specific as possible. Your comments will help us identify and address issues.

Electronic, written, hand-delivered, and facsimile comments concerning this project will be accepted. Comments may be submitted through the Three Trappers Project webpage. To submit comments using the web form, select “Comment on Project” under “Get Connected” on the right panel of the project’s webpage.

Email comments must be submitted in a format such as an email message, plain text (.txt), rich text format (.rtf), Adobe (.pdf), and Word (.doc) to: comments-intermtn-boise-cascade-fs.fed.us. Please put “Three Trappers WUI Project” in the subject line of e-mail comments. Comments must have an identifiable name attached or verification of identity will be required. A scanned signature may serve as verification on electronic comments.

Written comments may be submitted to: Boise National Forest, Cascade District, 540 North Main Street, Cascade, ID 83615 Attention: Jim Bishop, or by fax at 208-382-7480. Office hours for submitting hand-delivered comments are 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, excluding holidays. Comments received in response to this request will be available for public inspection in the Public Comment Reading Room on the project webpage and will be released in their entirety, if requested, pursuant to the Freedom of Information Act.

When to Comment

To be most helpful, please submit your scoping comments by December 6, 2016.

Only those who subscribe to the mailing list, submit comments, or notify the Forest that they would like to remain on the mailing list for this project will receive future correspondences on this project. Comments submitted anonymously will be accepted and considered; however, without an associated name and address, receiving further correspondences concerning this project will not be possible.

For further information on the project, please contact Jim Bishop, Team Leader, at jjbishop@fs.fed.us or by phone at 208-382-7400.

scoping letter and maps:
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Scoping – Dollar Creek Project

USDA Forest Service Nov 15, 2016

The Forest Service is seeking public input (scoping comments) for the proposed Dollar Creek Road Obliteration Project on the Cascade Ranger District in Valley County, ID

Project Description

The Cascade Ranger District propose to decommission by full obliteration up to 52 miles of non-system routes in the Dollar Creek subwatershed and a small portion of the Goat Creek subwatershed. The majority of these roads were built in the 1960s-early 1970s and are narrow, partially re-vegetated logging roads no longer passible to full-sized vehicles.

The route decommissioning would include ripping the roadbed to a depth of at least 12 inches and relocating the fill from the outer side of the roadbed. The fill material would be placed in the angle formed by the road cut and roadbed, leaving a cross-section and profile that approximates the contour of the surrounding slope angle. The project would be done under contract with an excavator. For a more detailed description of the proposed project, please review the proposed action report (PAR) on the Project webpage:
http://www.fs.usda.gov/project/?project=49638

How to Comment

The Forest Service is contacting interested persons, groups, and agencies to make them aware of the project and to gather pertinent feedback. To be most useful, please make your comments as specific as possible. Your comments will help us identify and address issues.

Electronic, written, hand-delivered, and facsimile comments concerning this project will be accepted. Comments may be submitted through the Dollar Creek webpage. To submit comments using the web form, select “Comment on Project” under “Get Connected” on the right panel of the project’s webpage.

Email comments must be submitted in a format such as an email message, plain text (.txt), rich text format (.rtf), Adobe (.pdf), and Word (.doc) to: comments-intermtn-boise-cascade-fs.fed.us. Please put “Dollar Creek” in the subject line of e-mail comments. Comments must have an identifiable name attached or verification of identity will be required. A scanned signature may serve as verification on electronic comments.

Written comments may be submitted to: Boise National Forest, Cascade Ranger District P.O. Box 696, Cascade, ID 83611 Attention: Dave Mays, or by fax at 208-382-7480. Office hours for submitting hand-delivered comments are 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, excluding holidays. Comments received in response to this request will be available for public inspection in the Public Comment Reading Room on the project webpage and will be released in their entirety, if requested, pursuant to the Freedom of Information Act.

When to Comment

To be most helpful, please submit your scoping comments by December 6, 2016, and make your comments as specific as possible.

For further information on the project, please contact Dave Mays, Team Leader, at jamesdmays@fs.fed.us or by phone at 208-382-7420.

scoping letter and maps:
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Scoping – Lodgepole Springs Underburn

USDA Forest Service Nov 15, 2016

The Forest Service is seeking public input (scoping comments) for the proposed Lodgepole Springs Restoration Project on lands managed by the Emmett Ranger District of the Boise National Forest.

Project Description

The Lodgepole Springs Restoration Project is an estimated 2,424 acres located approximately 14 miles north of Crouch, Idaho along Forest Road 671 in Valley County. The project, as proposed, consists of a low to moderate intensity prescribed fire that would reduce the risk of uncharacteristic wildfire and improve forest health and resiliency.

Limited hand-line construction, roads, and natural barriers would be used as control lines in the project area and fire ignition would occur by hand or with the use of a helicopter.

For a more detailed description of the proposed project, please review the proposed action report (PAR) on the Project webpage:
http://www.fs.usda.gov/project/?project=50281

How to Comment

The Forest Service is contacting interested persons, groups, and agencies to make them aware of the project and to gather pertinent feedback. Please make your comments as specific as possible to help us identify and address issues.

Electronic, written, hand-delivered, and facsimile comments concerning this project will be accepted. Comments may be submitted through the Lodgepole Springs Project. To submit comments using the web form, select “Comment on Project” under “Get Connected” on the right panel of the project’s webpage.

Email comments must be submitted in a format such as an email message, plain text (.txt), rich text format (.rtf), Adobe (.pdf), and Word (.doc) to: comments-intermtn-boise-emmett-fs.fed.us. Please put “Lodgepole Springs Project” in the subject line of e-mail comments. Comments must have an identifiable name attached or verification of identity will be required. A scanned signature may serve as verification on electronic comments.

Written comments may be submitted to: Boise National Forest, Emmett Ranger District, 1805 Highway 16 room 5, Emmett ID 83617 Attention: Justin Yankey, or by fax at 208-365-7037. Office hours for submitting hand-delivered comments are 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, excluding holidays. Comments received in response to this request will be available for public inspection in the Public Comment Reading Room on the project webpage and will be released in their entirety, if requested, pursuant to the Freedom of Information Act.

When to Comment

To be most helpful, please submit your scoping comments by December 6, 2016.

Only those who subscribe to the mailing list, submit comments, or notify the Forest that they would like to remain on the mailing list for this project will receive future correspondences on this project. Comments submitted anonymously will be accepted and considered; however, without an associated name and address, receiving further correspondences concerning this project will not be possible.

For further information on the project, please contact Justin Yankey, Team Leader, at jyankey@fs.fed.us or by phone at 208-365-7015.

scoping letter and maps:
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Idaho City Ranger District temporarily closes roads in Coulter Timber Sale area

BNF News Release: Nov 18, 2016

The Boise National Forest is temporarily closing roads within the Coulter Timber Sale area near Pioneerville for public safety while logging operations are occurring. Activities will including logging truck traffic, tree felling and skidding.

National Forest System (NFS) roads NFS 380 and 380H will be closed effective Monday November, 21 and continue until Dec. 31, 2016, or closure order is rescinded. Forest roads are likely to be blocked by equipment and downed logs. Signs will be posted and no vehicles will be allowed to pass.

All motorists traveling along State Highways and forest roads near the sale area should proceed with caution as heavy traffic and large trucks will be traveling to their destinations.

Forest visitors are welcome to purchase a Christmas tree permit and harvest a tree beginning next week. Please remember gathering a tree from within the Pioneer wildfire burned area is prohibited. Obtain a tree permit and map complete with instructions at a Boise NF Forest office or vendor.

Burned Area Emergency Response work is ongoing in the Pioneer Fire area and temporary closures may be put in place for public safety. Visitors should look for posted warning signs and be aware of their surroundings. For all current closures within the Boise National Forest visit:
http://www.fs.usda.gov/alerts/boise/alerts-notices

View Closure Order – 0402-03-69

View Map

Linda Steinhaus
Public Affairs
Boise National Forest
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Critter News:

Officials weigh removing grizzlies from endangered list

Associated Press, KTVB November 16, 2016

CODY, Wyo. — State and federal wildlife managers are considering removing Endangered Species Act protections from grizzly bears living in Yellowstone National Park.

Officials are meeting in Cody on Wednesday and Thursday to discuss post-delisting management plans. The member agencies of the Yellowstone Ecosystem Subcommittee had hoped to approve a final draft of the post-delisting management plant, but officials say it’s unclear that will happen.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposed lifting the federal protections for the Yellowstone bears in March. Grizzly bears were first listed as threatened in 1975 when the Yellowstone population was estimated to have as few as 136 bears. Recent estimates say the population has now climbed above 700.

Delisting the Yellowstone bears would give more management responsibility to Montana, Wyoming and Idaho and open the door for potential hunting seasons.

Copyright 2016 KTVB
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KWVR Oregon Wolf Education weekly Wolf Report

Third Week of November 2016
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Wolf Education International

Newsletter 11/14/2016

In Khyber Agency, Pakistan Wolf Kills Child Injures Two Others

Wolves stalk man and his dogs in ‘freaky’ close encounter

Livestock Guarding Dogs: from the Transhumance to Pre-Zygotic Selection

Wisconsin Politicians Send Letter to Congress Seeking Wolf Delisting
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Wild Turkeys: Marvel or Menace?

Which one it is depends entirely on your perspective

By Dawn Starin on August 8, 2016 Scientific American

Fanning their tail feathers and gobbling softly, the gang struts through the grove of oak trees, across the garden, hops over the fence and heads down the slope. While these wild turkeys roaming urban/suburban neighborhoods often bring a smile to my face during my visits to California, many of the state’s residents are not as charmed by these creatures as I am.

Attitudes toward these feathered creatures run the gamut from love to hate, novelty to nuisance. Wild, free-ranging, urban/suburban-dwelling turkeys have their passionate defenders who argue that these handsome creatures with their comical antics enhance the landscape and bring a bit of wildness into the creeping concrete backdrop. Others abhor the mess and aggressive dramas created by these ugly hooligan nuisance birds.

YouTube features scores of videos showing people oohing and aahing over wild turkeys—or being chased by them. Local magazines and newspaper articles, either praising or denigrating the turkeys, elicit a range of readers’ comments. Some detail the type of food turkeys should be given, some demand the turkeys be left alone and appreciated, and some offer suggestions that verge on violent, bloody, “final” solutions. These highly adaptable creatures are creating heated debate as they expand out of their wooded range and strut into human-inhabited areas.

A wild, four-foot-high, 20 – 30 pound, adult tom turkey, North America’s largest ground nesting bird, is not at all like his domestic, slow-moving, artificially-fattened, meek and mild culinary counterpart. They’re fast, reaching a running speed of 25 miles per hour – just a bit less than Usain Bolt’s top speed. And though they only fly for short distances, their flight speed can reach 60 miles per hour. With upward curving, sharp-pointed, bony spurs on its legs up to two inches long (so sharp they were once used by Native Americans as arrow tips) a tom turkey can be a fearsome assailant, particularly during the breeding season. In fact, so formidable are they that Benjamin Franklin felt that they would “not hesitate to attack a Grenadier of the British Guards who should presume to invade his Farm Yard with a red Coat on.”In short, these gobblers are not to be messed with.

continued:
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Gray jay chosen as Canada’s national bird

11/17/16 AP

TORONTO — The Royal Canadian Geographic Society said its choice for Canada’s national bird epitomizes the best of the country’s national traits: smart, hardy and friendly.

The Society said earlier this week that the gray jay, also known as the whiskey jack, was the winner of a two-year search for a fitting avian Canadian representative.

The gray jay, once known as the Canada jay and the “wisakedjak” of folklore in indigenous cultures, is found in the boreal forests of Canadian provinces and territories but nowhere else on the planet.

The robin-sized cousin of the raven and crow has the same brain-to-body ratio as dolphins and chimpanzees and is lauded for its friendliness and intelligence. The gray jay spends its entire life in the Canadian woods.

continued:
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Gray JayPerisoreus canadensis

link:
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Boaters have big responsibility to be clean of invasives

By Rich Landers The Spokesman-Review Nov 20, 2016

Nobody want’s to be regulated, or required to stop at a boat inspection station.  But the risks and consequences of bringing invasive species into Northwest waterways are extreme.

If you’ve been out of state with your boat, get it inspected and make sure it’s CLEAN.

Officials from four Northwest states and three Canadian provinces came together this week to discuss a troubling new development: discovery of the tiny larva of invasive mussels in Montana, the first such discovery in the Northwest region.

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‘Holy cow, it’s a shark!’ – video shows attack in Columbia River

John Tierney, KGW 8:53 AM. MST November 17, 2016

PORTLAND, Ore. — Josh Robb was crabbing on the Columbia River west of Astoria on Saturday when his father-in-law saw an injured seal and blood in the water. Then they noticed something else swimming nearby trying to get at the seal.

Robb pulled out a camera and started recording the action about 15 yards away.

“Finally you could see the fin come out of the water. I said, ‘holy cow, it’s a shark!’” Robb said.

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The Columbia Basin Bulletin

Weekly Fish and Wildlife News
http://www.cbbulletin.com
November 18, 2016
Issue No. 810

* Are Lower Columbia River Harvest Reforms (The Kitzhaber Plan) Working? Oregon Considers Next Steps
http://www.cbbulletin.com/437991.aspx

* Council Hears Report On Best Ways To Pass Salmonids Above High Head Dams; Part Of Evaluating Re-Introduction Above Grand Coulee
http://www.cbbulletin.com/437990.aspx

* Invasive Mussels Found In Montana Waters: Council Talks Regional Forum, Federal Funding To Combat Spread To Columbia Basin
http://www.cbbulletin.com/437989.aspx

* Hundreds Turn Out For Lewiston Scoping Meeting Regarding Federal Agencies’ Draft EIS For Snake River Dams; Due 2020
http://www.cbbulletin.com/437988.aspx

* Council’s ‘Cost-Savings’ Workgroup Earmarks Some FW Project Cost Savings For Hatchery Repairs
http://www.cbbulletin.com/437987.aspx

* EPA Partially Approves State Standards For Toxic Pollutants In Washington Waters, Adds Own Federal Standards
http://www.cbbulletin.com/437986.aspx

* Hydro/Fish Managers Mull Possible Changes To Chum Flow Operations To Protect Redds Downstream From Bonneville Dam
http://www.cbbulletin.com/437985.aspx

* Bonneville Power Releases Initial Rate Proposal for 2018, 2019; 3.5 Percent Wholesale, 1.1 Percent Transmission
http://www.cbbulletin.com/437984.aspx

* October Brought Wet Records For Much Of Northwest, Above Average Precipitation Expected To Continue Through Feb.
http://www.cbbulletin.com/437983.aspx

* Corps Investigation Loss Of 200 Adult Steelhead Below Dworshak; Likely Caused By Hitting Structure During Upgrade
http://www.cbbulletin.com/437982.aspx

* Removing Trees In Western North America Causes Cooling In Siberia? Study Shows Die-Offs Ricochet Globally
http://www.cbbulletin.com/437981.aspx
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Fun Critter Stuff:

Wild turkeys spotted in Boise’s North End

KTVB November 16, 2016

Photo Sarah Ahrens

BOISE – Thanksgiving is just a week away and it’s already starting to feel like it.

Sarah Ahrens sent us these photos of wild turkeys in Boise’s North End.

She spotted them at Ridenbaugh and 14th streets.

source w/more photos:
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wildturkey-a

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‘Terrible Tom’ the wild turkey causes reporter to lose her head

Uploaded on Oct 7, 2011

After hearing neighbors’ stories of wild turkeys chasing down joggers and other residents in an Arden area neighborhood, News10 producer Duffy Kelly went out for a first-hand look.

Duffy said she “didn’t want to take the ‘Terrible Tom’ stories at face value,” so on Thursday she went to the neighborhood and tried to walk past one of the birds.

Duffy had her camera rolling for her unexpected turkey run.

Neighbors told Duffy the turkeys have been in the area for years and usually scurry away when folks walk by. They say only recently two turkeys broke off from the flock and are intent on standing guard in their own empty lot.

Some people are carrying sticks to frighten off the turkeys, but neighbors say they don’t want any harm to come to them.

They just want friendlier neighbors.

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Fish & Game News:

News Releases

https://idfg.idaho.gov/press
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After Fish & Game hack, state of Idaho buying cybersecurity insurance

By Betsy Z. Russell The Spokesman-Review Nov 11, 2016

After this year’s major breach of state Fish and Game data held by a vendor, the state of Idaho has decided to purchase a $25 million cybersecurity insurance policy, the Legislative Council heard this morning. The policy, with an annual premium of roughly $570,000 and a $1 million deductible per incident, will start in December.

Cathy Holland-Smith, legislative budget director, said the cost in remainder of the current fiscal year, $330,000, will be covered by the existing budgets, but the state Department of Administration will have a request for the full $570,000 in its budget request for next year.

Bob Geddes, department director, said the premium for the current year will come from the existing state risk management fund, which has enough to cover it. But if there were a breach during the current fiscal year, a supplemental budget request likely would be needed to cover the $1 million deductible. Geddes said his department coordinated with a state cybersecurity task force and state agencies on the plan to get the insurance policy; all agencies have been supportive.

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14 former Idaho Fish & Game commissioners send letter to legislative leaders, pressing for new Senate resources chair

By Betsy Z. Russell The Spokesman-Review Nov 17, 2016

Fourteen former Idaho Fish & Game commissioners sent a letter today to Idaho legislative leaders from both houses and both parties, asking that Sen. Steve Bair, R-Blackfoot, be replaced as chairman of the Senate Resources Committee. The former commissioners say a dispute over reappointment of commissioners, “efforts to change the method of allocating controlled hunt permits,” differences over handling of a fee increase proposal and related issues prompted their request.

“We, as former Fish and Game commissioners, feel strongly and are dedicated to the 1938 Citizen’s Initiative Policy Statement as codified in Title 36 to preserve, protect, perpetuate and manage all wildlife declared the property of the state of Idaho and the Commission’s role to Administer such policy,” the letter says. “It is within this spirit we respectfully request Senator Bair be replaced as Chairman of the Senate Resources and Environment Committee. Because of Senator Bair’s influence as Chairman and his demonstrated bias, we do not feel he can maintain the objectivity to fairly provide oversight of the Fish and Game Department and manage the Commissioner confirmation process.  We fear if the chemistry of the Committee is not changed, this issue will not heal or repair itself; the problem-solving process envisioned in Citizen’s Initiative #1 will remain elusive.”

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Trivia:

Turkey Trivia

from The Old Farmer’s Almanac

Here is some fun trivia about turkeys, the all-American birds.

* There are several theories about how turkeys got their name. One story claims the Christopher Columbus heard some birds say “tuka, tuka”, and his interpreter came up with the name tukki, which means “big bird” in hebrew.

* Ben Franklin thought the turkey would be a better national symbol than the bald eagle. According to the Franklin Institute, he wrote in a letter to his daughter:

“For my own part, I wish the bald eagle had not been chosen as the representative of our country; he is a bird of bad moral character; he does not get his living honestly…like those among men who live by sharping and robbing…he is generally poor, and often very lousy. Besides, he is a rank coward; the little king-bird, not bigger than a sparrow, attacks him boldly and drives him out of the district…For in truth, the turkey is in comparison a much more respectable bird, and withal a true original native of America. Eagles have been found in all countries, but the turkey was peculiar to ours…”

* The average person in the United States will eat 15 pounds of turkey this year.

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Humor:

turkeyscale-a

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