April 16, 2017 The Yellow Pine Times

April 16, 2017 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Village News:

Power Outage

Thursday April 13th, Idaho Power shut off the electricity at 726am to finish repairs. Power back on at 611pm. Many thanks to the crews that worked all day in the rain!
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Transfer Station

The bins at the transfer station have been dumped and the areas inside and out has been cleaned up.

20040831dump
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Boise National Forest Southwest of Yellow Pine

(AKA The Yellow Pine Country Club)

(Apr 11) “Jeff met with the District Ranger from Boise National Forest, Jake Strohmeyer today here in Yellow Pine. They are addressing the downed trees in the golf course area as this is Boise National Forest property. At this point the wood belongs to them and they are looking into options to have the area cleaned up. We encourage those interested in cleaning up the area and wanting firewood to please be patient as the Forest Service develops a plan. There will be more information as we receive it.” – AF
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Map showing approximate path of wind April 7

20170407MapYPtoParksCrk
(click image for larger size)

A report that trees are down on the strip of forest between the new and old EFSF roads, however the campgrounds appear to be OK. Sadly, the osprey nest tree was one of the casualties along with other trees across the river. A few trees are down on Johnson Creek close to the village, and in the dispersed campground by the old ford.
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More Wind Storm Photos

By Ann on Facebook:
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Long Island Ice Tea Party

Saturday April 15

20170415IceTeaParty1-a
Photo by Kathleen Hall

Thanks to Dick and Deb for a fun filled Long Island Ice Tea Party. Good food and Great drinks. No reported crawling home or sleeping on the Filler’s yard. – KH
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Harmonica T-shirt Request

I would like to send out a request to everyone who might have a T-shirt from the past harmonica festivals.

We are missing the following years: 1994, 2002-2014

It would be a donation to the Community Hall. I am hoping to make the Center more inviting and useful.

Any suggestions from anyone are also welcome.

My email is: 75hallker @ att.net
My phone: 208-633-6270

Thanks so much,
Kathleen Hall
VYPA – Member at Large
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The Corner

We are looking for housing for our summer help. If anyone has a place in Yellow Pine they would be willing to rent out to us for the summer months please call us at The Corner 208-633-3325
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South Fork Salmon River Road Weight Restrictions

I wanted to make folks aware that the weight restrictions have been placed on the South Fork Salmon River Road. We anticipate this restriction remaining in effect until late May. Be cautious when driving on the South Fork and East Fork South Fork Salmon River Roads. There have been and continue to be numerous slides and debris rolling onto the roadway. In addition there is a fill slope failure occurring near MP 12.0 that we will continue to monitor through the spring with anticipated repair work this summer.

– Will Perry – Payette National Forest
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Tick Season

Reminder: Its that time of year to check for ticks on people and pets after a walk in the forest.
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Vet Day

Another Reminder: Cascade Vet Clinic has tentatively scheduled us for the morning of Wednesday June 14 for our annual Vet Day clinic. Please call (208) 382-4590 to get on the list. Note: this date may change depending on how many folks sign up. – rrS
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook
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Local Observations:

Monday (Apr 10) froze this morning (low of 26 degrees) started snowing around 9am and by 930am the ground was almost white, by 1015am it was all white. Not many birds calling this morning, pine squirrel gathering cones that blew out of the trees. Leaves coming out on the gooseberry bushes. Snowed 1/2″ by noon, then melted. More snow in the afternoon but melted as soon as it hit the ground. Clearing before dark. Beautiful moonrise.

Tuesday (Apr 11) hard freeze this morning (low of 19 degrees) increasing clouds. A few swallows swooping around the neighborhood, some birds calling from the trees, pileated woodpecker whooping. Very low (and loud) airplane buzzed the village at 1127am. Cloudy all day, chilly light breezes. Clouds sitting down on top of VanMeter and misting by 630pm. Steady rain at dark. Probably rained until around 2am.

Wednesday (Apr 12) Dark clouds this morning and above freezing. A few robins chirping and flickers calling early. Low flying dark helicopter came down Johnson Creek and circled over the village at approx. 945am. Power out at 1146am for about 2 hours. First columbian ground squirrel sighting. Warm cloudy afternoon with some wind gusts. Idaho Power called, planned outage tomorrow. Cloudy quiet evening, noticed that our LED light were not steady, almost flickering. Started raining a little after 1am.

Thursday (Apr 13) Probably rained all night. Power turned off at 726am. Raining all morning and low clouds, ridges socked in. Elk out in the golf course, flickers and robins calling. Stopped raining around 2pm, pileated woodpecker pounding on power pole. Pine squirrels gathering cones and nesting materials. Power back on at 611pm. More rain after 630pm but done before dark. Quiet night.

Friday (Apr 14) no rain or snow during the night, low of 28 degrees. This morning high overcast, weak sunshine. Robins all over the neighborhood, jays calling, small birds twittering from the trees, woodpecker pounding off in the distance. Snowing most of the afternoon, trees white by 430pm, ground half white by 630pm. Flickers and jays calling, pine squirrel scolding. Snow almost all melted by dark, and clearing sky.

Saturday (Apr 15) hard freeze this morning (low of 19 degrees) almost clear sky and light sharp chilly breeze. Small birds twittering from the trees, flickers, jays and robins calling. Clouds came in and a few snow flakes in the early afternoon, then breaks in the clouds. Pine squirrels chattering, jays calling, lots of robins. Quiet evening. Clearing during the night and stars out.

Sunday (Apr 16) frosty morning (low of 23 degrees) mostly clear sky and warming up. Birds calling, sounds like some finches have returned, some tree swallows have come back again and possibly an evening grosbeak. Flickers sounding off and robins chirping. Beautiful morning! More butter cups are blooming, but not much else is up yet. Transfer station has been dumped. Osprey nest tree along the EFSF river blew down. Warm cloudy day, pileated woodpecker pounding on the power pole. Flickers calling and robins chirping this evening. Low flying raven whooshing over the neighborhood just before 7pm.
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Letter to Share:

ABC: Community Presentations and Award of Contest

4/15/2017

Hi everyone,

I thought I would share the link in the event you would like to watch the presentations and final award of the ABC contest. All of us in Valley County/Meadows Valley are confident we have done our level best for our plan. We will be winners no matter what as the collective work when we all pull together is amazing.

Scroll down to see the agenda for April 19th and the link below.

Thanks,
Gordon
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A week from today, we will all be together in Denver to celebrate America’s Best Communities! Here are a few updates as you continue to prepare for your community presentations:

1. We are now allowing up to three (3) team members to go up on stage to present. We still encourage you to assign one (1) team member to assist the tech team in operating your A/V content.

2. To make sure that the tech team has enough time to take a look at your A/V content and to make sure your files are working, please submit your A/V content by 5:00 pm PST | 8:00 pm EST tomorrow, Thursday.

3. We will stream the community presentations, as well as the awards ceremony through the ABC Facebook page. Simply click on this link on April 19: http://www.facebook.com/AmericasBestCommunities

Livestream schedule in local Denver time (Mountain Time Zone)

10:00 am – Huntington, West Virginia
10:25 am – Madison, Indiana
10:50 am – Statesboro, Georgia
11:15 am – Chisago Lakes Area, Minnesota
[break]
1:00 am – Lake Havasu City, Arizona
1:25 am – Arlington/Darrington, Washington
1:50 am – Tualatin, Oregon
2:15 am – Valley County/Meadows Valley, Idaho
[break]
5:00 pm – ABC Awards Ceremony

Please let us know if you have any questions. We are standing by to support you!

Best regards,
The America’s Best Communities Team
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Idaho News:

Natural Disaster Week

The Star-News April 13, 2017

20170407windLouisa
Photo by Larry Hauder

Leaping Louisa! – A tree lays across a house at 1512 Louisa St. in McCall after being blown down in a windstorm Friday morning. The home is owned by Joshua Powell of McCall, according to Valley County property ownership records. A person who was inside the house at the time of the storm was not injured. See Page 3 for more photos of downed trees from Friday’s windstorm.

20170407windSM
Photo for The Star-News by Gary Ertter

A tree balances on a house at 1310 Majestic View Drive after being uprooted by the storm. The house is owned by Timothy Flock of Clarkston, Wash., according to Valley County property ownership records.

20170407windYP
(photo by rrSue)

Winds Topple Trees – A windstorm Friday morning toppled trees in McCall and Yellow Pine. Photo shows some of the estimated 100 trees blown down in and around Yellow Pine by the storm.
No trees were reported toppled in Cascade, Donnelly or New Meadows, according to fire officials in those towns.
Idaho 55 west of McCall was closed for about an hour when a tree fell over a power line, setting the tree on fire, McCall Fire & EMS Chief Mark Billmire said.

Source: The Star-News:
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Neighborhoods encouraged to take part in wildfire prep day May 6

The Star-News April 13, 2017

Individuals and neighborhoods in the McCall area are invited to participate in this year’s Wildfire Community Preparedness Day on Saturday, May 6.

“Projects that reduce wildfire risk and increase preparedness can be accomplished by a broad range of ages and come in a variety of time commitments ranging from a few hours to an entire day,” McCall Fire & EMS Chief Mark Billmire said.

Examples include:

• Rake and remove excess pine needles and dry leaves.

• Collect downed tree limbs and take them to a bin located at the McCall Fire Station, 201 W. Deinhard Lane.

• Trim tree branches and remove vegetation that could allow wildfires to climb into the tops of trees.

full story at The Star-News:
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ABC prize money to be awarded Wednesday

Local group hopes to win $3 million first prize

The Star-News April 13, 2017

Representatives of an economic development effort in Valley County and Meadows Valley will learn on Wednesday whether they will receive up to $3 million in the America’s Best Communities contest.

For almost three years, the West Central Mountains Economic Development Council has worked on developing and putting into practice a community revitalization plan designed to stimulate economic development.

On Wednesday, the group and seven other finalists will gather in Denver to make presentations to a panel of judges. First prize will be $3 million, second prize will be $2 million and third prize will be $1 million.

The other finalists are:

• Chisago Lakes Area, Minn.
• Darrington/Arlington, Wash
• Huntington, W. Va.
• Lake Havasu City, Ariz.
• Madison, Ind.
• Statesboro, Ga.
• Tualatin, Ore.

Viewing parties will be held Wednesday in McCall and Cascade to watch live streaming of the presentations and the announcement of the final awards.

full story at The Star-News:
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Cascade to air update to community master plan

Proposals designed to boost economy, recreation

By Max Silverson for The Star-News April 13, 2017

Economic development, land use, transportation and community design are the topics of a major update to Cascade’s comprehensive plan to be aired next week.

A public hearing on the changes will be held before the Cascade Planning and Zoning Commission starting at 6 p.m. Tuesday at Cascade City Hall.

The proposed updated plan seeks to establish general guidelines on how the city will grow and develop, Cascade Deputy City Clerk Carrie Rushby said.

The plan presents a framework for increased public transportation with a focus on bike lanes and pathways and also seeks to make Cascade a more walkable community, Rushby said.

The draft plan promotes economic development in downtown Cascade by encouraging modifying the zoning ordinance to allow for mixed office and residential uses.

… The plan also advocates the use of Cascade Airport as a regional hub and reestablishing the abandoned railroad line into Cascade to serve the planned opening of a gold mine at Stibnite.

full story at The Star-News:
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Payette Land Trust to celebrate open space April 22

The Star-News April 13, 2017

A celebration of open space will sponsored by the Payette Land Trust on Earth Day, Saturday, April 22, in McCall.

The celebration will run from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. April 22 at the Northfork Lodge, located at McCall RV Resort, 200 Scott St.

Admission is free, there will be free appetizers and beverages provided and one free raffle ticket will be given to each attendee. Raffle prizes include a cooler and cast-iron cooker.

The Payette Land Trust is dedicated to the preservation and protection of open spaces through conservation easements and donations of land.

Examples include a landowner who may want to restrict use of land to logging or cattle grazing or preserve the land as wilderness or a public recreation area.

Properties under easement to the trust include the 66-acre Brees Ranch near New Meadows, the 288-acre Nahas Ranch west of Lake Fork, the 364-acre Whiteman property south of McCall and the 895-acre Boar’s Nest Ranch in Pollock.

The trust also owns the 103-acre Huffman Ranch along Farm to Market Road near McCall and the 120-acre Peterson ranch in Round Valley.

Those planning to attend the April 22 event should write to kanderson @ payettelandtrust.org. For more information, go to http://payettelandtrust.org

Source: The Star-News:
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Riggins to host Color the Canyon family fun run April 22

The Star-News April 13, 2017

Runners will get doused with colored dust during the third annual Color The Canyon five kilometer family fun run in Riggins on Saturday, April 22.

The race will start at the Salmon River Elementary School Playground at 10 a.m. and end at the same location. Entry fee is $15 for youths under age 18 and $250 for adults.

The entry fee includes a white T-shirt shirt and color dust made of corn starch and food coloring. Bystanders will be able to purchase color dust and throw it as the racers go by.

There will also be a fun run for youths age 6 and younger at the elementary school playground starting at 11:30 a.m.

Proceeds will benefit the Salmon River PTO, a non-profit organization that encourages parents to assist with various school activities and provides financial assistance where needs are identified.

Some of the activities the Salmon River PTO supports are an all-school ski trip, community calendar, Boys & Girls State, scholarships for graduating seniors, Santa gifts, end of year treats, carnival, teacher appreciation week, end of year awards banquet and Easter egg hunt.

For questions, contact Hannah McClure at (208) 469-0499 or strengthnmomentum @ gmail.com

Source: The Star-News:
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Boise woman dead after crashing her motorcycle on SH55

by Sierra Oshrin Sunday, April 9th 2017

Boise, Idaho (KBOI) — A woman died after she crashed her motorcycle Sunday afternoon.

Idaho State Police says 55-year-old Tamara J. White was riding her Harley Davidson motorcycle southbound on SH55 when she struck a concrete barrier.

Troopers say she was wearing a helmet. She was taken by air ambulance to St. Alphonsus Regional Medical Center in Boise where she later died.

Both lanes of SH55 were blocked for nearly two hours.

source:
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Woman hurt in Idaho 55 rollover

KTVB April 14, 2017

A rollover crash on Idaho 55 caused delays for some drivers Friday morning.

The crash happened at about 11 a.m. near the Shadow Valley Golf Course.

According to the Ada County Sheriff’s Office, a 72-year-old Horseshoe Bend woman was headed south on Idaho 55 when she apparently lost control. Her vehicle rolled, coming to rest on its roof in a rocky ditch on the side of the road.

It was snowing in the area at the time, and the snow-covered road was likely a factor in the crash, the sheriff’s office said. The crash is still being investigated.

… The woman was hurt in the wreck, but her injuries do not appear to be life-threatening, according to the sheriff’s office.

full story:
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Boise Co. officials urge caution after Hwy. 21 motorcycle accident

Alex Livingston, KTVB April 13, 2017

Boise County – If you’ve driven up Highway 21, you know just how curvy those roads are and how dangerous they can be.

“The busier it gets the more motorcyclists come out and the more reckless they drive,” said Isaac Bard, who lives in a neighborhood right off of the highway.

An accident can happen in a matter of seconds, and officials say if you’re traveling over the speed limit, especially on curvy roads, it’s going to be a lot harder to react in time.

“Most people think it’s just a rural highway that not a lot of people drive but that’s not the case at all,” said Bard. “There’s people on there commuting every day to work just like any other street in town.”

“There’s a lot of curves here,” said Al Estupinan, who also lives off of Highway 21. “The speed limit is like 35 miles per hour on a curve and I see people going 60 or 70.”

continued:
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Road and Bridge Department Have Critical Budget Decisions

Posted on April 12, 2017 Written by Janet Juroch – BCC Staff

Where is the Funding Coming From This Year?

Boise County – For the Road and Bridge Department of Boise County there is uneasiness these days when looking at current and future budgets. The department depends on Secure Rural Schools (SRS) funding and Payments in Lieu of Taxes (PILT) programs to operate on. These are government programs to help schools and road departments, making it possible for the road and bridge department to not require taxing the county for funding their budgets. That may need to change in the future.

Due to considerable decline in Federal timber sales, SRS payments were designed to offset loss of the local share of the revenue generated from the timber sales. Because of the large amounts of National Forest land, approximately 80% of Idaho counties received these funds.

The current SRS program expired in the fall of 2015 and has not been reauthorized. There have been no payments for nearly a year. Without SRS funding the reduction of services from the Road and Bridge Department will be inevitable.

The Boise County Commissioners discussed this topic at the last meeting. Bill Jones, Road and Bridge Superintendent discussed some of the budgetary numbers and concerns due to the SRS funding shortfall expected.

continued:
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Landslide overcomes Highway 95 in northern Idaho: ‘That was insane’

by KBOI News Staff Wednesday, April 12th 2017

Bonners Ferry, Idaho — Three minutes after road crews in northern Idaho closed down Highway 95, a massive landslide took over the road.

“It was crazy close timing,” said Jake Melder, Idaho Transportation Department spokesman.

Melder says a crew was surveying the highway last Friday near Bonners Ferry for possible slide activity when they heard popping sounds. They immediately shut down the road.

Soon after, a mudslide that ended up being 10 feet deep spewed over the highway.

continued w/video:
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Small E. Idaho city budgets big bucks for solar eclipse

4/11/17 AP

Rexburg, Idaho — City officials in eastern Idaho say they are budgeting more than $200,000 to cover the cost of handling the onslaught of visitors, security and other amenities during the viewing of the total solar eclipse on Aug. 21.

The Rexburg Standard Journal reports that Rexburg recently amended its budget to include extra funds to cover additional police and emergency services, portable restrooms and solar glasses for city staff. The city also plans on building a new website to help visitors access information while planning for the eclipse.

An estimated 20,000 people are expected to view the “Great American Eclipse” from Rexburg — which would nearly double the small city’s population. In total, eastern Idaho could see as many as 500,000 visitors to watch the first total solar eclipse from the mainland U.S. in nearly four decades.

source:
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Bar owners continue with suit against Idaho’s liquor laws

By Kimberlee Kruesi – 4/13/17 AP

Boise, Idaho — Bar owners in southwest Idaho say they are moving forward with their lawsuit against the state despite Idaho lawmakers tweaking the same liquor laws that prompted the legal action.

Idaho law currently bans serving alcohol during nude or sexually explicit live performances. However, the Legislature amended that statute this year to exempt certain businesses that do not primarily derive its business from explicit live adult entertainment.

It’s a law that’s been at the center of several lawsuits as multiple critics have scrutinized the state’s strict liquor law system for possible changes. Most recently, Attorney General Lawrence Wasden and the American Civil Liberties Union of Idaho agreed to pause ongoing litigation to allow the Legislature time to amend the questionable laws.

During this debate, Shannon Fairchild and Levi Burden, a couple who own The Intersection in New Meadows, sued the Idaho State Police hoping to recoup the fines they paid for violating those strict liquor laws in 2015.

continued:
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Blocked pipe spilling tainted water over Idaho mine tailings

4/15/17 AP

Hailey, Idaho — A blocked or broken pipe is causing tainted water in a pond to spill over the soil cap of an old mine’s tailing pile on state-owned land in central Idaho.

The water contains orange iron oxide from water seeping from the tailings pile at the Triumph Mine about 12 miles (19 kilometers) north of Hailey.

State officials say the seepage doesn’t pose a threat to the environment but children should avoid playing in the area.

continued:
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Public Lands:

Payette issues decisions on road access in Big Creek area

The Star-News April 13, 2017

The Payette National Forest has issued decisions on road access to the Big Creek area in a remote part of Valley County.

The Big Creek Restoration and Access Management Plan and the Big Creek Roads Plan of Operations involve areas of the Payette’s Krassel District about seven miles northeast of Yellow Pine.

The Big Creek Restoration and Access Management Plan will help resolve a decades-long controversy over road closures in this part of the forest, a Payette news release said.

Many parts of the project were recommended by the Big Creek Yellow Pine Collaborative as part of a planning process that took years to complete.

The project will maintain or improve watersheds and designate a minimum system of roads, the news release said.

The Payette will now implement activities such as route designation and improvements, stream crossing improvements, educational and interpretive improvements, and closing or restoring roads.

Access to outstanding private rights is considered in the plan, the release said.

The Big Creek Roads Plan of Operations is a separate project that overlaps many of the same roads considered in the Big Creek Restoration and Access Management Plan.

This plan looked at travel on more than 26 miles of existing routes to provide access for miners over the next 10 years.

Miners must build and maintain roads to certain standards during operations and possibly close the roads after mining is completed, under the plan.

The Big Creek Yellow Pine Collaborative also has submitted a recommendation for the South Fork of the Salmon River Restoration and Access Management Plan, and the Payette plans to begin gathering public comment this summer.

The collaborative is also developing a recommendation for the East Fork South Fork Salmon River area of the forest.

source The Star-News:
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Forest Issues Decision Notices on Two Big Creek Area Access Projects

Date: April 10, 2017
Contact: Brian Harris, Forest Service (208) 634-0784 cell: (208) 634-6945

McCall, ID – While Profile Summit is still snowbound, the Big Creek area of the Payette National Forest will see new changes starting in 2017. With the assistance of the Big Creek-Yellow Pine Collaborative Group which was formed by Senator Mike Crapo’s office, the Payette National Forest has concluded the environmental assessment processes and has issued two Decision Notices: Big Creek Restoration and Access Management Plan; and, the Big Creek Roads Plan of Operations.

Both of these projects are located on the Krassel District, Payette National Forest, in the Big Creek area of Valley and Idaho Counties, approximately 7 miles northeast of the community of Yellow Pine. The decisions were signed on April 5, 2017 following the conclusion of the objection resolution processes.

The Decision Notices are posted on the project webpages as follows:

Big Creek Restoration and Access Management Plan:
http://www.fs.usda.gov/project/?project=45084
Big Creek Roads Plan of Operations:
http://www.fs.usda.gov/project/?project=46053

The Big Creek Restoration and Access Management Plan helps resolve a decades long controversy regarding travel management in this part of the forest and many aspects of the project were recommended by the Big Creek Yellow Pine Collaborative as part of a multi-year planning process. The project will maintain or improve watershed conditions and designate a Minimum Road System for administrative needs, access to outstanding rights, and for general public needs in the Big Creek area.

With this decision, the Forest Service will move forward to implement a range of restoration activities, including, route designation and improvements, stream crossing improvements, educational/interpretive improvements, or route decommissioning/rehabilitation. Current and/or future access to outstanding private rights is considered. The Forest will post updates on the implementation of this project on the Payette National Forest Facebook page and will periodically update the implementation details on the project webpage.

Big Creek Roads Plan of Operations is a separate project that overlaps many of the same roads considered in the Big Creek Restoration and Access Management Plan. This project considers a Plan of Operations for full size motor vehicle travel on 26.34 miles of existing routes to provide access for mineral activities (consistent with the General Mining Act of 1872) under a ten-year Plan of Operations. The Decision to conditionally approve this project has been made, which requires that the operator incorporate project design features, mitigation measures, and monitoring requirements into the Plan of Operations that will minimize and mitigate impacts to Forest resources after the Plan of Operations is terminated, reclamation activities will be undertaken to return the routes and roads to a desired long-term status.

The Big Creek Yellow Pine Collaborative has recently submitted a recommendation for the South Fork of the Salmon River Restoration and Access Management Plan, and the Forest Service plans to begin public scoping on that project in summer 2017. The Collaborative is also developing a recommendation for the East Fork South Fork Salmon River area of the Forest. Along with the Big Creek Restoration and Access Management Plan, these three projects will address the minimum road system and help resolve other outstanding travel issues throughout the Krassel District of the Forest.

Brian D. Harris
Public Affairs Officer
Payette National Forest
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Payette National Forest April 2017-June 2017 Schedule of Proposed Actions (SOPA)

4/11/2017

Here is the link to the Payette NF SOPA web page: Payette NF Schedule of Proposed Actions
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North Fork Lick Creek Trail #082 Re-Construction/Re-Route Update

USDA Forest Service 4/13/2017

The Forest Service is seeking scoping comments for the proposed North Fork Lick Creek Trail #082 Reconsctruction and Reroute project on the Krassel Ranger District of the Payette National Forest. The attached scoping document provides more detailed information about the project. The scoping document is also available on the project’s webpage at http://www.fs.usda.gov/project/?project=51262

The Forest Service is contacting interested individuals, groups, and agencies to make them aware of the project and to gather pertinent feedback. To be most helpful, please submit your scoping comments by May 12th, and make your comments as specific as possible.

To assist the Forest Service in meeting its goals of reducing our carbon footprint and to achieve a sustainable operation, we are transitioning to a web-based electronic comment system that allows all interested parties to receive project materials (scoping documents, updates, draft and final National Environmental Policy Act [NEPA] documents, and decisions) by e-mail. This new system gives you direct control over which mailing lists you are subscribed to and immediate electronic access to project documents as they are posted online. It’s easy, it’s good for the environment, and it gives “on-demand” access to projects.

To subscribe to this new system, go online to the project website listed above. On the project website, you will see a box titled “Get Connected” on the right hand side of the page. Click on “Subscribe to Email Updates.” When you click on that item, you will be prompted to provide your e-mail address and select a password in the GovDelivery program. When you have logged in, you will be able to manage your account by subscribing to projects by Forest, District, project type, or project purpose. You will also be able to change your e-mail address and password. If you no longer wish to follow the project(s), simply delete your subscription. Once you are subscribed, you will receive all project information via e-mail, unless you request hard copies.To submit comments using the web form select “Comment on Project” under “Get Connected” on the right panel of the project website. Only those who subscribe to the GovDelivery mailing list or submit comments will receive future correspondence on this project. Comments submitted anonymously will be accepted and considered; however, without an associated name and address, receiving further correspondences concerning these projects will not be possible.

Webform submission is preferred but written, facsimile, hand-delivered, verbal, and electronic comments concerning these projects will be accepted. Comments for the project may be submitted to Krassel Ranger District 500 North Mission Street Building 1 McCall, Idaho 83638 or by fax to 208-634-0634. Hand delivered comment letters may be delivered during regular business hours of 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday-Friday, excluding holidays. Comments may also be submitted electronically via email to comments-intermtn-payette-krassel@fs.fed.us or through the project web page listed above.

Comments received in response to this request will be available for public inspection and will be released in their entirety if requested pursuant to the Freedom of Information Act. Comments received in response to this request will also be available for public inspection on the “Public Comment Reading Room” on the project webpage http://www.fs.usda.gov/project/?project=51262.

For further information on this project, please contact Joshua Simpson, Recreation Wilderness and Trails Program Manager, at 208-634-0616 or email at jtsimpson@fs.fed.us.

Sincerely,
Anthony B. Botello
Krassel District Ranger
Payette National Forest

Scoping Document
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Brundage Bulk Sampling Project Update

USDA Forest Service 4/13/2017

The Forest Service is seeking scoping comments for the proposed Brundage Bulk Sampling project on the McCall Ranger District of the Payette National Forest. The attached scoping document provides more detailed information about the project. The scoping document is also available on the project’s webpage at http://www.fs.usda.gov/project/?project=51285.

The Forest Service is contacting interested individuals, groups, and agencies to make them aware of the project and to gather pertinent feedback. To be most helpful, please submit your scoping comments by May 12, 2017, and make your comments as specific as possible.

To assist the Forest Service in meeting its goals of reducing our carbon footprint and to achieve a sustainable operation, we are transitioning to a web-based electronic comment system that allows all interested parties to receive project materials (scoping documents, updates, draft and final National Environmental Policy Act [NEPA] documents, and decisions) by e-mail. This new system gives you direct control over which mailing lists you are subscribed to and immediate electronic access to project documents as they are posted online. It’s easy, it’s good for the environment, and it gives “on-demand” access to projects.

To subscribe to this new system, go online to the project website listed above. On the project website, you will see a box titled “Get Connected” on the right hand side of the page. Click on “Subscribe to Email Updates.” When you click on that item, you will be prompted to provide your e-mail address and select a password in the GovDelivery program. When you have logged in, you will be able to manage your account by subscribing to projects by Forest, District, project type, or project purpose. You will also be able to change your e-mail address and password. If you no longer wish to follow the project(s), simply delete your subscription. Once you are subscribed, you will receive all project information via e-mail, unless you request hard copies.

To submit comments using the web form select “Comment on Project” under “Get Connected” on the right panel of the project website.

Only those who subscribe to the GovDelivery mailing list or submit comments will receive future correspondence on this project. Comments submitted anonymously will be accepted and considered; however, without an associated name and address, receiving further correspondences concerning these projects will not be possible.

Webform submission is preferred but written, facsimile, hand-delivered, verbal, and electronic comments concerning these projects will be accepted. Comments for the project may be submitted to the McCall District Office 102 West Lake Street McCall, Idaho 83638 or by fax to 208-634-0433. Hand delivered comment letters may be delivered during regular business hours of 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday-Friday, excluding holidays. Comments may also be submitted electronically via email to comments-intermtn-payette-mccall@fs.fed.us or through the project web page listed above.

Comments received in response to this request will be available for public inspection and will be released in their entirety if requested pursuant to the Freedom of Information Act. Comments received in response to this request will also be available for public inspection on the “Public Comment Reading Room” on the project webpage http://www.fs.usda.gov/project/?project=51285.

For further information on this project, please contact Leigh Bailey, Geologist/Hydrologist at 208-634-0760 or 208-347-0335.

Sincerely,
Lisa J. Klinger
McCall District Ranger
Payette National Forest

Scoping Document
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Controlled burns planned for Cascade Ranger District

The Star-News April 13, 2017

Controlled burning is planned this spring on the Cascade Ranger District of the Boise National Forest.

Controlled fires are designed to reduce the fuels that can grow into a large wildfire, improve wildlife habitat, and reduce wildfire threats to communities.

Here are burns planned for the Cascade Ranger Distinct:

• Horsethief (360 acres): Located about three miles northeast of Horsethief Reservoir. This burn will involve helicopter and hand lighting to reduce fuels over the area.

• Westside Restoration Unit 39 and 40 (25 acres each): This project is located on Forest Service Road 435 along West Mountain about 10 miles west of Cascade.

Fires will be lit by hand to reduce wildfire potential near homes adjacent to the forest.

Source: The Star-News:
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Boise National Forest, training Idaho youth for wildland fire careers

April 11, 2017

BOISE, Idaho, April 11, 2017 –The Boise National Forest is celebrating the grand opening of the Advanced Wildland Fire Management Career Technical Training (CTT) Program at the Centennial Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center in Nampa, Idaho.

Reporters are invited to interview program managers, students and tour the facility. The celebration begins April 18 at 1:30 p.m. with opening remarks. Facility tour begins at 3 p.m. Please contact Venetia Gempler at 208-373-4105, for more information or if you plan to attend.

Please contact Venetia Gempler at 208-373-4105, for more information or if you plan to attend.

Directions Centennial Job Corps: Take I-84 west toward Nampa. Take exit 38. Turn right onto Idaho Center Boulevard, then left onto Ridgecrest Drive (Ridgecrest Drive is only about 100 yards from the freeway exit). Follow Ridgecrest Drive about a half-mile. The center is located on the left. 3201 Ridgecrest Drive, Nampa, Idaho.

The program provides a path for young people into wildland fire by providing the knowledge, experience and practical wildland firefighting training and experience to pursue full time careers with federal, state and local government fire agencies. The accredited education, training, and work experience is based on requirements for the interagency Wildland Firefighter Apprenticeship Program. All current Job Corps students can apply for the advanced CTT which is designed to accommodate 20 students over 11 months, starting in April 2017.

Forest Service Job Corps Civilian Conservation Centers are managed through an interagency agreement with the U.S. Department of Labor. The mission of the Forest Service Job Corps Civilian Conservation Centers is to train eligible youth, ages 16 to 24 with educational, social and vocational skills, while assisting in the conservation of the Nation’s public natural resources. The Job Corps is a no-cost education and career technical training program administered by the U.S. Department of Labor.

Linda Steinhaus
Public Affairs
Boise National Forest
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Chiefs Letter of Intent for Wildland Fire – 2017

March 20, 2017 Forest Service

Responding to fire continues to be among our highest risk and exposure work. As in 2016, our expectation continues to be for all of us involved in fire response to focus our efforts intently on the decisions we make as agency administrators, incident managers and individual responders.

This year, we must strengthen our commitment to implement strategies and tactics that commit responders only to operations where and when they can be successful, and under conditions where important values actually at risk are protected with the least exposure necessary while maintaining relationships with the people we serve. We expect that during such periods protecting lives of responders is the objective-we don’t expect and we won’t allow responders to risk their lives attempting the improbable. Each of us must remain committed to “stop, think and talk” before “acting” in any circumstance that feels like it may represent unnecessary exposure.

I appreciate your support and commitment working toward those goals, openness to talk about the issues that impede us and your help to resolve those issues that keep us from making the best informed decisions to minimize risk and exposure. I expect us to continue to be aggressive implementing tactics that are necessary and have a high probability of success; to accept when all we can do is point protection, until the fuels or weather change. I also expect us to be aggressive recognizing when tactics are unnecessary or will have no effect and only increase the exposure of our fire responders and pilots.

continued:
[h/t GC]
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Dynamite exposed by forest road washout in North Idaho

By Rich Landers The Spokesman-Review April 10, 2017

There’s a potentially explosive new twist today on the road washout warnings that have been regularly in the news this spring. A washout in the Bonners Ferry Ranger District has exposed two cases of dynamite.

The Idaho Panhandle National Forests has just posted a request for the public to stay away from Forest Service Road 633 (Myrtle Creek Road) where the explosives were discovered on Sunday. …

“The cases were found in a section of road that had been washed out,” she said. “The dynamite appeared to have been buried for some time.”

Updated, 4 p.m. — The dynamite has been cleared from Myrtle Creek Road but the route up into the Selkirk Mountains remains temporarily closed to the public because of a soft and unstable roadbed, Forest Services officials say.

full story:
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Critter News:

Pet talk – NSAID Toxicity In Dogs And Cats

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt and Dr. Malia Wayment Apr 7, 2017 IME

What is an NSAID? NSAIDs are nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. They are like aspirin, but much stronger, and commonly used for arthritic conditions in dogs and cats. Some common names of NSAIDs are Deramaxx, Rimadyl and Metacam. They are wonderful drugs to relieve arthritic pain, but overdoses can cause fatal kidney failure and sever stomach ulcers.

When animals accidentally ingest overdoses of NSAIDs, they will vomit, sometimes with blood in it. Diarrhea, abdominal pain and lethargy may be noted. Sudden collapse and death can result from perforated stomach ulcers. Many of these drugs are made in meat-based tablets, so dogs and cats may ingest accidental overdoses.

Treatment should be started immediately when the overdose is noted by the owner. Your veterinarian may recommend induction of vomiting if the ingestion was recent. Vomiting should be induced only under the direction of your veterinarian.

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US temporarily bans use of cyanide predator traps in Idaho

By Kimberlee Kruesi – 4/10/17 AP

Boise, Idaho — U.S. officials on Monday temporarily stopped the use of predator-killing cyanide traps in Idaho after one sickened a young boy and killed his dog last month after they checked it out.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture announced in a letter that it had halted all use of the traps on state, federal and private land in Idaho in response to a petition from 19 conservation and wildlife groups.

The spring-activated devices called M-44s look like water sprinkler heads and are embedded into in the ground but spray cyanide when triggered by animals attracted by bait smeared on the devices. They’re used to kill coyotes and other livestock predators.

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Idaho wolf derby doesn’t need Forest Service permit

By Keith Ridler – 4/11/17 AP

Boise, Idaho — Organizers of a wolf- and coyote-shooting contest in east-central Idaho say they’re looking at other parts of the state for similar contests on U.S. Forest Service land following a federal court ruling.

“Having this lawsuit out of the way and having this legal precedent, we will probably consider it a lot greater now,” Steve Alder, Idaho for Wildlife’s executive director, said Tuesday.

U.S. District Court Judge Ronald Bush in a 20-page ruling late last month said Idaho for Wildlife didn’t need a permit from the U.S. Forest Service to hold the contest.

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KWVR Oregon Wolf Education weekly Wolf Report

Second week of April 2017
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Montana plans to keep wolf hunt quotas outside Yellowstone

4/14/17 AP

Helena, Mont. — Montana wildlife officials are proposing to keep the number of wolves that can be hunted or trapped just outside of Yellowstone National Park at four.

The proposal that went out for public comment Friday would set a quota of two wolves in each of two Montana management areas outside the park.

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GPS-collar failures cause wolf-tracking woes for Oregon

By Andrew Selsky – 4/11/17 AP

SALEM, Ore. — The number of wolves in the wilds of Oregon increased slightly last year, but state wildlife officials lost track of one pack because none of its members is outfitted with GPS collars.

Furthermore, four of the 11 tracking collars that were secured around the necks of other wolves last year failed within six months.

A draft report released on Tuesday by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife described the challenges of monitoring the state’s growing wolf population.

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ODFW Releases 2016 Wolf Report, Draft Management Plan; 112 Known Wolves, 11 Packs

CBB April 14, 2017

ODFW this week released its 2016 Wolf Annual Report and a Draft Revised Wolf Management Plan.

Both documents can be found at http://www.dfw.state.or.us/wolves.

The documents will be presented (for information only, not adoption) at the upcoming Fish and Wildlife Commission meeting on April 21 in Klamath Falls. The draft plan will also be presented at a second Commission meeting on May 19 at the Embassy Suites Portland Airport. Public comment is welcome at both meetings or at odfw.commission@state.or.us.

Below are some highlights from the Annual Report, which summarizes 2016 wolf management activities and results of annual winter surveys:

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Rural Oregonians defend trapper program; don’t want cuts

By Andrew Theen – 4/14/17 AP

Portland, Ore. — In many Oregon communities, county governments are hard up for cash, a decades-old fact of life arising from falling timber revenue, stagnant property values and a deep-seated aversion to local tax levies.

So locals are used to prioritizing services. Lincoln County Chair Terry Thompson recalls a time a few years back when a group of rural residents wanted to make their wishes known to the county board.

“We want good roads that we can travel on,” he recalled them saying, “and the trapper. The rest of the things are just for people in the cities.”

Twenty-six of Oregon’s 36 counties have a wildlife specialist — or trapper — who falls under the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service. The Wildlife Services program is paid for through a cooperative cost-sharing agreement involving county, state and federal governments. It’s been that way for decades but, may that be about to change.

Gov. Kate Brown’s budget would cut $934,340 from the program in the next biennium, a move championed by environmental and conservation groups as a long-awaited rebuke of a program they contend needlessly kills thousands of animals each year. But rural Oregonians and ranchers see it as the tone-deaf response of political leaders far removed from the daily realities of a rural existence.

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Rare white wolf in Yellowstone park euthanized over injuries

4/14/17 AP

Yellowstone National Park, Wyo. — One of only three white wolves roaming Yellowstone National Park has been put down by park staff after it was found with severe injuries.

P.J. White of the National Park Service says hikers found the female wolf Tuesday on the north side of the park.

White says the wolf was in shock and dying, leading to the decision to euthanize it and investigate what caused the injuries. The nature of the animal’s injuries could not immediately be determined.

The predator was one of three known white wolves in the park.

It had lived to 12 years old, twice the age of an average wolf in the park, and was one of the most recognizable and sought after to view and photograph by park visitors.

source:
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Wildlife advocates see wolves as ‘best natural defense’ against chronic wasting disease

Brett French – Billings Gazette April 15, 2017

Wolves are the perfect animal to help reduce the spread of chronic wasting disease among elk, deer and moose, wolf advocates told the Montana Fish and Wildlife Commission on Friday during the board’s meeting in Helena.

“And it doesn’t cost us anything,” said Marc Cooke, president of Wolves of the Rockies.

Cooke’s comment was later endorsed by former Fish and Wildlife Commissioner Gary Wolfe, who was once the program leader for the CWD Alliance, which tracks and provides information on the fatal disease.

“I would have to agree that wolves can be an effective control,” Wolfe said. “They are the best natural defense Montana has.”

continued:
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Wolf Education International

Newsletter Second week April, 2017

Himalayan Wolf Attack of a Twelve-Year-Old Case at High Altitude

Wolf attack: 30 sheep die

Wyoming Wolves Lose Federal Protection – Lawsuits Surface

Midwest, Wyoming lawmakers target wolf protections again

Court: Idaho wolf derby doesn’t need Forest Service permit

Ethiopia park tries to relocate settlers to protect wolves

19 Oregon lawmakers denounce proposal for public wolf hunting

Report examines alternatives for controlling problem wolves

Toddler loses arm after attack from family’s ‘wolf hybrid’

ESA Consultation Delays Block Critical Infrastructure Projects, Imperil Species Recovery Efforts

Hungry wolves take big bite out of profits, cattle producers say
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Wildlife conservationists sue over proposed border wall

By Astrid Galvan – 4/12/17 AP

Phoenix — A conservation group and an Arizona congressman on Wednesday filed what they say is the first federal lawsuit against President Donald Trump’s proposed border wall.

It calls for the U.S. Department of Homeland Security to put together a report on the environmental impact of construction of the wall and expanded patrolling operations on the U.S.-Mexico border.

It also asks a judge to find that DHS has violated the National Environmental Policy Act by failing to make an environmental assessment since 2001. DHS said it does not comment on pending litigation.

… Wildlife conservationists say the wall would be detrimental to rare animals such as jaguars and ocelots that are known to traverse the international line and are listed as endangered species.

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Bill seeks to allow tribes to kill salmon-eating sea lions

By Nicholas K. Geranios – 4/11/17 AP

SPOKANE, Wash. — Some Northwest Indian tribes would be allowed to kill a limited number of sea lions that prey on endangered salmon in the Columbia River under a bill introduced in Congress.

The bipartisan bill was introduced last weekend by U.S. House members Jaime Herrera Beutler, a Washington Republican, and Kurt Schrader, an Oregon Democrat.

If passed, the bill would allow the Warm Springs, Umatilla, Yakama, and Nez Perce tribes to kill some sea lions that are decimating endangered salmon runs during their return from the ocean to inland spawning grounds. Currently only the states of Oregon, Washington and Idaho can kill sea lions along the river.

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Columbia Basin Bulletin

Weekly Fish and Wildlife News
http://www.cbbulletin.com
April 14, 2017
Issue No. 827

Table of Contents

* Invasive Northern Pike Population In Lake Roosevelt Growing; Eradication Funding Running Low
http://www.cbbulletin.com/438717.aspx

* PGE Seeks Appeal In Ninth Circuit On Deschutes Clean Water/Salmon Reintroduction Case
http://www.cbbulletin.com/438716.aspx

* Lower Columbia Spring Chinook Fishing On Upward Trend, Two Five-Day Angling Periods Added
http://www.cbbulletin.com/438715.aspx

* Ocean Salmon Fisheries Set: Low California Chinook, Puget Sound Coho Forecasts Puts Constraints On Harvest
http://www.cbbulletin.com/438714.aspx

* Big Water Mainstem: Runoff Supply Forecasts Continue To Rise At Columbia, Snake River Dams
http://www.cbbulletin.com/438713.aspx

* Big Water Upland: Fisheries Managers Contend With High Water Impacts On Fish Facilities
http://www.cbbulletin.com/438712.aspx

* Bill Introduced In Congress Again To Expedite Removal Of Sea Lions From Bonneville Dam Tailrace
http://www.cbbulletin.com/438711.aspx

* Federal Court Rules That Oregon Water Pollution Cleanup Plans Must Protect ESA Listed Fish
http://www.cbbulletin.com/438710.aspx

* Council/BPA Weighing Best Proposals To Assess White Sturgeon Status Above Bonneville Dam; Funding Issues Could Delay
http://www.cbbulletin.com/438709.aspx

* ODFW Releases 2016 Wolf Report, Draft Management Plan; 112 Known Wolves, 11 Packs
http://www.cbbulletin.com/438708.aspx

* CRITFC Fisheries Technician, Yakama Nation Member, Dies In Columbia River Boating Accident
http://www.cbbulletin.com/438707.aspx

* Researchers Track Spring Fish Migration Using DNA; Improved Monitoring At Lower Cost?
http://www.cbbulletin.com/438706.aspx

* PFMC Closes Pacific Sardine Fishery For Third Year; Abundance Forecast Far Below Threshold
http://www.cbbulletin.com/438705.aspx

* Idaho’s Priest Lake Anglers Can Expect Status Quo With Kokanee Fishing; Low Numbers, Nice Size
http://www.cbbulletin.com/438704.aspx

* Study Tracks California Dryness, Recovery Challenges Back To 16th Century
http://www.cbbulletin.com/438703.aspx
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Fish & Game News:

F&G News Releases

https://idfg.idaho.gov/press
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Fun Critter Stuff:

Greylock the Herding Bunny

Uploaded on Nov 22, 2011

Overly domesticated rabbit runs free and creates a connection with a flock of chickens. Particularly one rooster, who the rabbit enjoys herding and is un-fazed by the roosters pecks and attacks.


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Champis – den vallande kaninen

Uploaded on Jan 24, 2012

Champis – the herding rabbit. Who needs sheepdogs when there are… rabbits !


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Bunny rabbit chases dog around the yard

Published on Apr 4, 2017

Chad is a Lionhead bunny rabbit who chooses not to live with his fellow rabbits, but to stay outside in the yard and chase Garry the dog all day long. He takes good care of his territory, but in the end it’s all about fun and games.


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Happy Easter

EasterDogs-a
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Trivia:

Easter Sunday 2017

Why does the date of Easter change every year?

The Old Farmer’s Almanac

Easter is the most important holiday on the Christian calendar – and has been regularly observed from the earliest days of the Church.

Easter is a “movable feast” and does not have a fixed date, however, it is always on a Sunday.

Specifically, Easter is celebrated on the first Sunday after the paschal full Moon on or just after the vernal equinox.

For simplicity, the equinox is considered March 21 (a fixed spring date set by the church) though it’s not always that day. The paschal full Moon always falls on the 14th day of a lunar month; because ancient calculations (made in a.d. 325) did not take into account certain lunar motions, it may differ from the actual full Moon date by a day or so.

Easter always falls on a Sunday between March 22 and April 25.

more info:
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How To Calculate Easter, The Golden Number, Folklore

The Old Farmer’s Almanac

link:
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Seasonal Humor:

EasterHumans-a

Easter1-a

easter_car08-a
1908 Emmett, Idaho
[h/t SMc]
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Easter Poems:

The forgotten bulbs

Waking from a wintry slumber,
The Easter lily lying under,
A layer of nurturing ground,
Blossoms waiting to abound.

– Remember The Bard
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‘Twas Easter-Sunday.
The full-blossomed trees
Filled all the air with
Fragrance and with joy.

– Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807–82)
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Tips & Advice:

When To Prune Trees And Shrubs

The Old Farmer’s Almanac

When trees and shrubs become overgrown, it’s time to break out the pruning shears. With this guide, learn when to prune trees and shrubs to get the most out of your plants, and why pruning is such an important part of garden maintenance.

Plant health is the primary reason for pruning. Look for the 4 “Ds” – dead, dying, diseased, or damaged branches – these should be removed. Also look for spindly or weak growth, as well as any branches that are crossed or rubbing.

Safety is another important issue. Low hanging branches can be eye-pokers and get in the way when you are trying to work or play around a shade tree. Pruning these branches is called “limbing up.” Not only does it encourage top growth, it also makes room for you to safely enjoy the area under the tree. If your trees have any weak, dangling branches that could break off unexpectedly, they pose a danger to people, cars, buildings, and valuable plants underneath. If these branches are high up in the tree, very large, or near power lines, it is best to call in a professional tree trimming company.

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