Monthly Archives: May 2017

Road Report May 31

Wednesday (May 31) mail truck driver (Robert) reports a good trip in, no trees or rocks down in the road. EFSF road is starting to get a little rough.

Note: The only route open to Yellow Pine right now is via the South Fork/EFSF roads. Landmark (upper Johnson Creek) and Lick Creek are still closed.

South Fork Salmon River Road Weight Restrictions have been recinded.

Road conditions can change quickly. Be prepared for trees and rocks in the road. There is still snow on the roads at higher elevations and no cell service!

Snow Totals:
Big Creek SNOTEL 6580′ = 39″
Deadwood Summit SNOTEL 6860′ = 82″
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Flood Advisory May 30, 1241pm to June 1, 1230pm

Yellow Pine Forecast

Flood Advisory

Flood Advisory
National Weather Service Boise ID
1241 PM MDT TUE MAY 30 2017

Boise ID-Valley ID-Elmore ID-Camas ID-Adams ID-
1241 PM MDT TUE MAY 30 2017

The National Weather Service in Boise has issued a

* Hydrologic Advisory for...
  Snowmelt in...
  Northeastern Boise County in southwestern Idaho...
  Valley County in southwestern Idaho...
  Northeastern Elmore County in southwestern Idaho...
  Northwestern Camas County in southwestern Idaho...
  East central Adams County in southwestern Idaho...

* Until 1230 PM MDT Thursday

* At 1233 PM MDT, for increased runoff due to snowmelt.

* Some locations that may experience flooding include
  small streams and rivers in Adams, Boise, Camas, Elmore, and
  Valley counties from increased runoff due to snowmelt.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...

Turn around, don`t drown when encountering flooded roads. Most flood
deaths occur in vehicles.

Campers and hikers should avoid streams or creeks as water is cold
and swift due to snowmelt.

Please report flooding to your local law enforcement agency when you
can do so safely.

A Flood Advisory means river or stream flows are elevated, or ponding
of water in other areas is occurring or is imminent.

May 28, 2017 The Yellow Pine Times

May 28, 2017 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Village News:

The power was off in Yellow Pine from 630pm May 24 until 340pm May 25. Multiple trees down somewhere on the line according to the Idaho Power Recording. It was rather breezy here that afternoon.
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Electricity – Yellow Pine History

Be sure to check out the history post for May 28, great story by Nancy Sumner about the old diesel generators at the Community Hall.

The book “Yellow Pine, Idaho” – stories complied by Nancy Sumner, is available for $15, Contact Marj Fields.
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Coyote Alert

Received a report that a bold coyote has been hanging around in the village.

20170523Coyote-a
Photo taken on main street in Yellow Pine (submitted by AF)
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Monday May 29th 11am at The Yellow Pine Veterans Memorial

Ceremony for dedication of a new plaque with additional names of veterans who have served.

NOTE TO PET OWNERS: Wally will be shooting off the cannon between 11am and 1115am.

Followed by a luncheon at the Community Hall. Pulled pork provided by Margaret Vranish Libby. Please all welcome to come. If you would like to help, donations of salads or pies accepted.

Following the luncheon a small service will be held at the cemetery for Buddy Bowman.
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YPFD News:

There will be a YP Fire Commissioners meeting on May 31st at 2pm in the Community Hall.

YPFD Training

Sunday May 28 YPFD Extrication Training photo

20170528YPFDtraining-a

No Sunday training next week (June 4).

Training on June 11, 2017 11am till 2pm “Over the Side” – Basic Rigging for Rescue Yellow Pine Camp Ground Site #12

Approved Rescue Methods and equipment will be presented and used.

This will be Basic familiarization of principles and equipment to be used to assist rappeler(s) to go over the side of the road to rescue, stabilize, package and transport unfortunate souls who are injured or unable to climb to safety by themselves.

Need more info? Call Jeff F. 633-1010
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Vet Day

Confirmed! Cascade Vet Clinic will be the morning of Wednesday June 14 for our annual Vet Day clinic. There is still time to get on the list, please call (208) 382-4590. – rrS
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Amerigas

Amerigas will be coming up on June 15th to fill tanks in Yellow Pine. If you want to make sure you are on the list to fill, call (208) 634-8181.
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Kennedy Fuel & Feed

Winter is over and we are ready to get into summer.

A few customers need deliveries so I am working on a load soon. How soon depends on how quickly we get the orders back.

Please check your tanks and call/email your orders for Gas & Diesel.

Looking forward to seeing all of you this route.

Thank You
Tracey Kennedy
Kennedy Fuel & Feed Supply
208-382-4430
kennedyfuel.feed @ citlink.net
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2017 Yellow Pine Music and Harmonica Festival T-Shirt Design Winner

2017YellowPineShirtHallock-

Congratulations to Tamara Hallock! She is the winner of the 2017 festival T-shirt logo design contest. – DF
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Big Creek Lodge

Breakfast at Big Creek dates are Saturdays – June 17 and June 24.

We will add one or two more dates after Profile Gap opens so Yellow Pine folks can make the drive. Breakfasts run from 8-10am, and are $10/plate. Visitors can take a tour of the lodge and enjoy pancakes, ham, eggs and coffee/juice.

There are workers up there finishing the fireplace, and then the interior framing that is half done now.

We could use a volunteer for 5 days or so to help the mason with concrete work and moving/cleaning rocks! The person can stay in the Kif Brown Yurt at Big Creek – pretty comfy digs in the scheme of things. If anyone is interested in volunteering, they can email me at colleen @ rebuildbigcreek.com and let me know dates that can work. We would likely fly them over from and back to Johnson Creek. It is often hard to match up volunteer availability with work need, but we will try!

Note: Idaho Aviation Foundation will begin recruiting for Caretakers soon for the 2018 season (mid May to late Oct)! Stay tuned if you are interested in learning more, or call Colleen at 208-853-2280 if you want to get more information.

– Colleen
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook
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Local Observations:

Monday (May 22) low of 35 degrees overnight, clear sky and warm sun this morning. Lots of swallows, hummingbirds, some finches, cowbirds and jays. Very warm sunny day, high of 78 degrees. Heard a pileated late afternoon, hummers busy at the feeders. Service-berry bushes blooming. Clear night for telescoping.

Tuesday (May 23) low of 37 degrees overnight, mostly clear sky (some contrails) and warm. Swallows, finches, robins and jays calling, hummers fighting over the feeder. Starting to sound like summer, airplanes, lawnmowers and 4-wheelers. First (male) Black-headed grosbeak sighting. Warm sunny day, high of 81 degrees, light afternoon breezes. Low flying airplane at 650pm. Warm clear evening. Still light out enough to see at 930pm.

Wednesday (May 24) low of 41 degrees overnight, mostly clear and breezy this morning and warming up fast. Wild strawberries in bloom. Swallows, finches, and jays calling. Apple tree is starting to bloom (the hummingbirds are enjoying the nectar, also poking at dandelion flowers.) Quite windy between 3pm and 330pm. Power out at 630pm, first Idaho Power recording said it was out clear to Smiths Ferry, later message included Ola and High Valley. Water over the big rock down at the Bathtubs. Transfer Station had been emptied. Nice day, high of 64 degrees. Some strong gusts of wind around 840pm, then at 846pm an airplane ‘bouncing’ over the village. At 10pm we noticed air in the village water, looking a little white. The Idaho Power message at 1025pm only mentioned outage from Warm Lake to Yellow Pine, that this would be an extended outage due to “extensive damage” and sent the crew home.

Thursday (May 25) Power still off, the 740am Idaho Power message said 240 customers out of power from YP to Warm Lake, multipile trees down. Low of 35 degrees overnight, partly cloudy and breezy. At 10am our long distance phone service was out of order. Male and female cassins finches around, swallows seem to be hunting nesting materials. Jays and squirrels are helping the grosbeaks empty the larger feeders. All 3 hummingbirds are here, Rufous, Calliope and Black-chinned. Mostly cloudy and breezy at noon, some sharp gusts of wind at 130pm and overcast. At 340pm the power came back on! (Off 21 hours and 10 minutes.) A report that Idaho Power trucks were up on Big Creek Summit, might be where the lines were down this time. Cool cloudy day, high of 61 degrees Rather breezy afternoon, clouds building and light rain started around 6pm. Still sprinkling just before dark, ridges socked in with low clouds. Robins chirping. Pretty good rain shower around 1030pm.

Friday (May 26) low of 38 degrees, partly clear this morning. Swallows are busy gathering nesting materials. Lots of bird visitors: m/f cassins finches, m/f evening grosbeaks, jays, m/f brown-headed cowbirds and all 3 types of hummingbirds (Calliope, Rufous, Black-chinned.) Pine squirrel, golden mantle, ground squirrels and chipmunks running around. Chilly breezy day and not too hot, high of 64 degrees. Increascing traffic. Clear before dark.

Saturday (May 27) low of 33 degrees, clear sky this morning and airplane traffic. Lots of birds! Swallows, jays, cowbirds, finches, evening grosbeaks, robins, mourning doves, hummingbirds and chipping sparrows. Increased vehicle traffic. Warm day, high of 73 degrees. Lilac flowers on the verge of blooming, (they are late this year compared to last year.) Doe out on the golf course early in the afternoon. Neighbor reports a “cloud” of hummingbirds. Local streets are starting to get dusty with more traffic. Shots fired to the west of the residential area starting around 330pm. Pleasant clear evening, swallows and hummers active. Loud shot up by main street at 818pm. Clear mild evening. Loud brappy motorbike just before dark. Clear night.

Sunday (May 28) Lots of airplanes this morning turning east over the village. Clear sky, low of 36 degrees. First blooms on the lilac bush. Swallows, grosbeaks, finches, and hummers. Golden mantel, pine and ground squirrels scurrying about. Getting plenty warm after lunch time, strong sun and a few clouds. Swallows hunting chicken feathers for their nests. Golden mantel squirrel doing chin-ups on the bird feeder. Mother Merganser duck and 6 newly hatched ducklings headed thru our neighborhood towards the river this afternoon. Loud gunshot at 641pm. Loud bang/crash (gunshot?) at 743pm. Otherwise a quiet evening.

Common Merganser Female and ducklings

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Idaho News:

Valley transfer center to offer free clean-up days June 7-10

The Star-News May 25, 2017

This year’s Free Days at the Valley County Transfer Station will be held June 7-10.

The transfer station, located on Spink Road east of Donnelly, will be open from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. each day.

Mixed loads must be separated into metal, wood and trash, and vehicles must have a title. Latex paint can be disposed if it is dried.

Reduced rates will be offered for tires and refrigerators, freezers or air conditions.

No hazardous waste, ammunition, oil-bases paint or antifreeze will be accepted. Call 634-7712 for questions.

source The Star-News:
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Permits now required for controlled open burning

The Star-News May 25, 2017

Permits are now required from the Idaho Department of Lands for controlled open burning.

The permits can be obtained online at http://burnpermits.idaho.gov or in person at the McCall lands office at 555 Deinhard Lane.

The burn permits are free and good for 10 days after it is issued.

Idaho law requires a permit for burning outside city limits except for campfires between May 10 and Oct. 20.

full story The Star-News:
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Valley County coroner resigns, does not say why he stepped down

By Max Silverson for The Star-News May 25, 2017

Valley County Coroner Nathan Hess resigned immediately last week without explanation.

Scott Carver, who works as a mortician at the Heikkila Funeral Chapel in McCall, has been appointed temporarily to take over the coroner’s duties until a permanent replacement is named.

“It has been my honor to serve Valley County,” Hess said in his resignation letter. “However because of circumstances I do not wish to disclose, I am unable to continue my services as coroner.”

Hess did not reply to a request from The Star-News to elaborate on his decision.

Hess had served as coroner since 2014, when he was appointed to assume the duties of the previous coroner Marv Heikkila, who retired. He was elected to a four year term that same year, Valley County Clerk Douglas Miller said.

full story The Star-News:
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Midas Gold gives $25,000 for Armstrong Park improvements

By Max Silverson for The Star-News May 25, 2017

Midas Gold Inc. hosted a barbecue at Armstrong Park in Cascade on Saturday to celebrate its $25,000 contribution to the park’s upgraded bathrooms, parking lot, sidewalks and picnic facilities.

The donation from Midas Gold plus grants from the Laura Moore Cunningham Foundation, the Idaho Department of Parks and Recreation, the Idaho Community Foundation and city money funded the improvements.

“Our grant writer did a fantastic job of getting two grants for the project valued in excess of $47,000. Midas helped finish off the project,” Cascade Mayor Rob Terry said.

Located between Front Street and Idaho 55, Armstrong Park is a popular playground and covered picnic area, but has been lacking in accessibility.

“A large number of people use the facilities as they travel both north and south along the highway,” Terry said. “Just in the last week we have had four bus-loads of school kids stop to get out and play as well as use the restroom.”

The new sidewalks, bathrooms and paved lot make the park more accessible to strollers and those with disabilities, Terry said.

“We were planning on changing out the plumbing fixtures but instead changed out the entire building,” he said.

There are plans to build an enclosed barbecue at the park, Terry said.

source The Star-News:
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Report: Cascade should slash police or hire sheriff

County already responds to 26% of calls

By Max Silverson for The Star-News May 25, 2017

The city of Cascade should reduce its police department to two people or hire the Valley County Sheriff’s Office to handle policing within city limits, a study said.

The Cascade City Council on Monday heard the findings of a cost analysis conducted by Gary Raney, a former Ada County sheriff who is now a consultant.

No immediate decision was needed on the study, but its findings will be considered when the city budget for 2018 is drafted this summer, Cascade Mayor Rob Terry said.

The data shows Cascade residents pay more on average than every city examined except Ponderay, which has a local-option tax to offset some of the costs.

“The average cost per resident of our sample cities is $218.97 and the cost per resident for Cascade is $469.13 (per resident per year), the second highest in the comparison,” the study says.

full story The Star-News:
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Donnelly man injured in Valley County crash after striking tree

by KBOI News Staff Saturday, May 27th 2017

Donnelly, Idaho (KBOI) — A 26-year-old Donnelly man was airlifted to St. Alphonsus Hospital after an injury crash late Friday.

Idaho State Police says Tyler Hildreth was driving east on Lick Creek Road about two and a half miles east of Eastside Drive when his pickup truck went off the left side of the road and hit a tree.

Troopers say he wasn’t wearing a seat belt.

He was taken to St. Luke’s McCall before he was later transferred to St. Alphonsus in Boise.

source:
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Fake cash alert! Counterfeit money being shopped around in Shoshone

by KBOI News Staff Wednesday, May 24th 2017


Shoshone Police chief Cliff Katona says the fake bill was found at the North Greenwood Valley Country Store. (Courtesy Shoshone Police)

Shoshone, Idaho (KBOI) — A counterfeit $10 bill was discovered at a Shoshone area store according to police.

Shoshone Police chief Cliff Katona says the fake bill was found at the North Greenwood Valley Country Store.

“These smaller counterfeit denominations can be difficult to identify,” Katona said.

Anyone with information about the counterfeit or if you come in possession with one of the fake bills you’re asked to call 208-324-1911.

continued:
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Idaho wants to identify veterans monuments, memorials

5/23/17 AP

Boise, Idaho — Idaho is trying to identify all the monuments and memorials to the military and veterans in the state.

Idaho Gov. C.L. “Butch” Otter announced on Tuesday the plan that is seeking help from the public and veterans’ service organizations to collect photos and stories regarding memorials throughout the state.

The public can participate by posting information online at a website called historypin.

Otter says the project is a way to celebrate the local tributes to patriotism and valor.

source:
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Harsh winter may make Memorial Day camping tricky

by Scott Logan Thursday, May 25th 2017

Boise, Idaho (KBOI) — If you’re going camping over Memorial Day Weekend, keep in mind things could be a little bit different this year after the harsh winter weather.

Roads and bridges could be washed out and your favorite place to camp may not be accessible right now.

For example, drinking water at the Little Wood campground has been shut off due to contamination found in the water.

The U.S. Forest Service says the best advice for the long weekend is “know before you go” by checking with alerts and notices on the Forest Service web site.

continued:
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19-year-old who sparked Table Rock fire gets jail, $391,000 in fees

by KBOI News Staff Friday, May 26th 2017


(Photo courtesy Mawson Photography)

Boise, Idaho (KBOI) — A 19-year-old man who started the devastating Table Rock fire that burned 2,500 acres and destroyed a home has been ordered to pay $391,000 in restitution and will also spend at least four days in jail.

Taylor Kemp was sentenced Friday at the Ada County district court house.

Kemp was also sentenced to spend at least four days in jail, two years probation and community service.

The Ada County Sheriff’s Office said last summer that Kemp admitted to shooting roman candles by the gate at about midnight June 29. The fire quickly spread and destroyed a home before firefighters were able to douse the fire.

source:
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Aug 21, 2017 Solar Eclipse Map


(click image for larger size)

Eclipse Maps NASA

Please feel free to download maps, posters, fact sheet, safety bulletin and other materials for use in your communities and events. We appreciate it if you credit NASA.

link:
link to more info about the eclipse:
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Solar eclipse postage stamp uses special ink, changes when touched

Kristen Jordan Shamus , Detroit Free Press, WVEC May 28, 2017

To mark the historic total solar eclipse that will be visible Aug. 21 over a large portion of the continental U.S., the U.S. Postal Service will issue a first-of-its-kind stamp using thermochromic ink that changes when you touch it.

The Total Eclipse of the Sun forever stamp, designed by Antonio Alcalá of Alexandria, Va., transforms from a picture of the sun in eclipse into an image of the moon with the heat of a finger or thumb.

Once it cools, it returns to a picture of the eclipse — with the moon appearing as a black disk obscuring the sun, whose wispy corona appears like ethereal white flower petals.

The stamp image is a photograph of a total solar eclipse seen from Jalu, Libya, in 2006. It was taken by astrophysicist Fred Espenak of Portal, Ariz.

The U.S. Postal Service says this is the first time it has used thermochromic ink on a stamp. The ink is sensitive to ultraviolet light, which means it should be stored away from direct sunlight. The Postal Service will sell a special envelope to safely store the stamps, which go on sale June 20 at a special event celebrating the summer solstice at the Art Museum of the University of Wyoming in Laramie.

The stamps may be preordered at usps.com/shop starting in early June for delivery after June 20.

source:
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Public Lands:

Update of road access over mountain summits

(via Payette National Forest Facebook)

Valley County Roads Department reports that Lick Creek and Secesh Summits will not be open over this Memorial Day weekend as too much snow still exists. They will continue to evaluate the snow pack, and open the roadways as soon as possible.
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High-elevation roads, campgrounds may be closed for Memorial Day; check snow level before you go

Stay On Trails (via Boise NF Facebook)

“Enjoy the start of summer season and please stay on trails!” – Boise National Forest


Typical scenario that you may encounter this weekend on high-elevation forest roads.


Don’t get stuck out there – you might end up with a costly towing bill. [And probably no cell service!]

Here’s a roundup of trail conditions from the Idaho’s national forests

Boise National Forest – Visitors will experience deeper snow conditions on Memorial Day weekend compared with previous years. Water levels in rivers and streams are beginning to rise with the warmer spring temperatures although the snow melt has been slow. Most trails, roads and campgrounds will be open within the national forest with the exception of those above 6,000 feet.

“It is easy to think you can keep driving once you reach the snow line, but that snow typically just gets deeper,” said David Olson, Boise National Forest Public Affairs Officer. “Forest roads are not plowed and persons getting stuck have the strong potential for expensive tows or long walks to get help.”

… Payette National Forest – Snow levels are at about 6,500 feet. North of Payette Lake, you can reach Upper Payette Lake but Secesh Summit is closed by more than 2 feet of snow. That means you can’t reach Burgdorf Hot Springs without a snowmmobile or skis. Lick Creek Road is closed by snow. Hazard Lake is not accessible either. Call local ranger districts for more information.

more info:
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Motorized trail closure due to bridge crossing failure

5-19-2017 News Release

Boise, Idaho, May 19, 2017 — The Boise National Forest, Cascade Ranger District is temporarily closing the first ½ mile of National Forest System (NFS) trail 101 (Yellow Jacket Trail) for motorized access due to the failure of the 40 foot bridge crossing that spans across South Fork of the Salmon River. The closure is in place to protect public safety and to prevent motorized vehicles from impacting important fisheries habitat. The closure will be in place through Dec. 31 or until rescinded, whichever occurs first.

The (NFS) trail 101 is located off NFS road 474N1 which is off the NFS road 474 (Stolle Meadows Road) and travels approximately 6 miles to the west to its junction with NFS road 409. Primary access routes and area trailheads are signed with the closure order. Citizens observing illegal activity are encouraged to report violators to Forest Service law enforcement officers.

Further information is available by contacting the Cascade Ranger District office at 208-382-7400.

To view the detailed description of the closure and map visit: https://www.fs.usda.gov/alerts/boise/alerts-notices.

Map:
Linda Steinhaus
Public Affairs
Boise National Forest
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Rainbow Point, Amanita campgrounds opening delayed

The Star-News May 25, 2017

The Cascade Ranger District will delay the opening of Rainbow Point and Amanita Campgrounds on Lake Cascade until July 1.

Winter snowpack has postponed work to remove a number of hazardous trees, a new release said.

A 2016 assessment of the campgrounds found a dramatic increase in hazard trees beyond what maintenance crews could handle.

The project covers estimated 25 acres located along West Mountain Road southwest of Donnelly.

Trees infected with insects and disease will be cut and the area replanted with larch, which is a more desired species for a recreational setting, the release said.

For questions, contact District Ranger Jake Strohmeyer 382-7400.

source The Star-News:
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Storms can create abundance of beetle breeding sites

(Note: This is the second in a series about the threat of bark beetles to trees in the area.)

By John Lillihaug for The Star-News May 25, 2017

The Douglas fir bark beetle is normally present in forests at low densities, breeding in the host tree that are recently injured or died.

Tunneling by adults and larvae beneath the bark produces a distinctive pattern that is straight vertical and usually one to three feet long with the eggs laid alternately on each side.

As the egg hatches and the larvae starts to feed they form a fan-shaped pattern in a horizontal direction. Beetle larvae feed on the moist phloem and eventually girdle the tree by severing the tree’s vascular system.

The Douglas fir bark beetle spends its one-year life cycle underneath the bark with the new adult emerging in May.

Periodically, natural disturbances such as drought, fire or wind or snow storms create an abundance of suitable breeding sites that allow beetle populations to rapidly increase to high densities.

At high densities, beetles are forced to attack healthy live trees because there are not enough stressed trees to support the population. Douglas fir beetles prefer to attack large, old trees in dense overcrowded stands of trees.

However, individual mature trees in residential settings may also be at high risk for attacks when local beetle populations are at high levels. Mortality of large trees may reduce property values, and such trees are often expensive to remove when they are near homes or other structures. The first indication of a successful attack is reddish brown boring dust in the bark cervices or around the base of the tree during the spring or summer months. This dust is the result of the female beetle cleaning out her home.

As the tree dies, the crown begins to fade from a green to yellow then brown color. Brackets of the sapwood-rotting fungus usually appear on the outside bark a year after the tree is attacked.

(John Lillehaug is a professional forester and a member of the McCall Tree Advisory Committee.)

source The Star-News:
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Rookie wildland firefighters get their first taste battling fire in the mountains

by Brian Morrin Thursday, May 25th 2017

Idaho City, Idaho — Rookie wildland firefighters get their first taste battle fire in the mountains

Today at the Granite Recreation Area near Idaho City, rookie wildland firefighters took part in a prescribed burn. It was treated as a real fire.

Crews had to prep the gear, don the personal protective equipment and get instructions during a briefing.

“Today is the practice burn which is a fantastic opportunity for these rookie students and firefighters to be able to get hands on experience on a fire line,” said Jared Zablonski of the BLM.

Their first lesson… they have to reach the fire… so a mile long hike up a mountain dirt road with forty pounds worth of supplies and firefighting tools in hand.

continued:
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Don’t Dump Idaho

Bureau of Land Management – Idaho May 26, 2017 (via FB)

We’re sick of it – and we know you are too! The blight of shot up junk trashing our public lands has plagued many a recreationist, rangeland management specialist, wildlife biologist and all who enjoy the amazing vistas our public lands offer. If you see a dump site, please contact the Bureau of Land Management email: BLM_ID_DontDumpIdaho@blm.gov phone: 1-844-327-5572 (toll-free) or 208-373-4096. In south-central Idaho, call SIRCOMM at 208-735-1911 or BLM Law Enforcement at 208-735-4600.

More: http://www.dontdumpidaho.com

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Limited commercial mushroom season offered in the Pioneer Wildfire Area

5-22-2017 News Release

Boise, Idaho, May 22, 2017– In the midst of an extensive Pioneer Fire recovery and restoration effort the Boise National Forest is offering a limited commercial mushroom harvest season within designated areas of the Pioneer Fire area from June 1 through June 30. Unlimited personal or “free use” harvest will be available for anyone not interested in commercial harvest. Commercial and personal use areas are designated on the 2017 mushroom harvest map (these are separate and distinct areas).

Commercial harvesters, 18 years and older are required to have a map and purchase a commercial permit for $300 at only the Idaho City Ranger District or the Garden Valley offices. Commercial permits will be sold from 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. Tuesday through Thursday starting May 30.

The 400 commercial permits will be sold on a first come, first served basis. Commercial harvesters planning to camp on the forest will be required to purchase a $50 designated site camping permit and camp in designated areas; camping permits are offered only at the Idaho City and Garden Valley locations at the aforementioned times.

Personal use harvest is 5 gallons per day and 10 gallons in possession. Individuals will be required to have a mushroom guide and map which can be picked up at any Boise National Forest office or downloaded from the forest website: https://www.fs.usda.gov/detail/boise/home/?cid=stelprdb5042896

Boise National Forest managers face challenges of balancing a mushroom picking season, while ensuring Pioneer Fire recovery and restoration efforts move forward. “We know that both personal and commercial harvesters are looking forward to what looks like an abundant mushroom picking season,” said Brant Petersen, Idaho City District Ranger. “We are trying to offer a reasonable opportunity for all pickers, while simultaneously taking actions to insure restoration efforts move forward and account for public health and safety.

Forest officials are also reacting to extraordinary spring runoff and flooding issues and a number of temporary closures are in effect throughout the forest for public safety. Visitors should look for posted warning signs and be aware of their surroundings. For all current closures within the Boise National Forest visit: https://www.fs.usda.gov/alerts/boise/alerts-notices .

Linda Steinhaus
Public Affairs
Boise National Forest
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Area closures in preparation of commercial mushroom harvest

5-24-2017 News Release

Boise, Idaho, May 24, 2017– Boise National Forest managers are closing two areas in preparation for the upcoming commercial mushroom harvesting season. The Banner Ridge area and Barber Flats area are closed to the public effective May 24 thru July 1, 2017, unless rescinded earlier by the Forest Supervisor for resource protection and public safety.

The areas will be designated camping areas for commercial mushroom pickers camping on National Forest System lands to minimize resource damage and conflicts between other user groups. This closure is necessary to ensure the campsites are available for the commercial mushroom pickers that possess a camping permit for specific campsites.

“We are trying to offer a reasonable opportunity for all pickers, while simultaneously taking actions to insure Pioneer Fire restoration efforts move forward while first accounting for public health and safety,” said Brant Petersen, Idaho City District Ranger. For mushroom harvest information visit: https://www.fs.usda.gov/detail/boise/home/?cid=stelprdb5042896

Know before you go

Spring runoff and seasonal flows continue to be high, impacting road and trail systems. Forest visitors should look for posted warning signs and be aware of their surroundings. For specific information about these closures and all current closures within the Boise National Forest visit: https://www.fs.usda.gov/alerts/boise/alerts-notices

Linda Steinhaus
Public Affairs
Boise National Forest
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Trail closures lifted in Danskin Mountains

5-18-2017 News Release

Boise, Idaho, May 18, 2017 – The Boise National Forest Mountain Home Ranger District has lifted the closure for motorized access on all trails in the Danskin Mountain OHV (off highway vehicle) Area effective May 18, 2017.

While the closure is lifted, it is important to use caution while riding on changing trail conditions to prevent motor vehicle and trail damage on soft or muddy trails. With the Boise Basin having more than 150 percent of snow pack (SNOTEL data), spring runoff and seasonal flows are extremely high, and are expected to continue increasing the probability of more road and trail system damage. https://www.wcc.nrcs.usda.gov/ftpref/gis/images/id_swepctnormal_update.png

Know Before You Go

Further trail information is available by contacting the Mountain Home Ranger District office at 208-587-7961.

Visitors should look for posted warning signs and be aware of their surroundings. For all current closures within the Boise National Forest visit:

https://www.fs.usda.gov/alerts/boise/alerts-notices

Linda Steinhaus
Public Affairs
Boise National Forest
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US cattle grazing plan for Idaho monument draws criticism

By Keith Ridler – 5/26/17 AP

Boise, Idaho — Federal officials on Friday released a cattle grazing plan for central Idaho’s Craters of the Moon National Monument and Preserve that immediately came under fire from an environmental group.

The U.S. Bureau of Land Management’s Final Environmental Impact Statement allows cattle grazing on nearly all of the roughly 275,000 acres (111,290 hectares) it administers in the monument.

The document stems from a federal lawsuit filed by the Western Watersheds Project citing concerns about sage grouse and a subsequent court ruling requiring the federal agency to come up with a new plan.

continued:
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Critter News:

Bark in the Park returns June 17 to benefit MCPAWS

The Star-News May 25, 2017

The 19th annual Bark in the Park will return to Ponderosa State Park on Saturday, June 17, to benefit MCPAWS Regional Animal Shelter.

The 3 kilometer walk will begin at 11 a.m. and will include a raffle, live music, a picnic and prizes for Dog Traveling Greatest Distance, Best Dressed Dog and Owner, Dog and Owner Look Alike, Best Dog Trick, Best Tail Wag and Oldest Dog.

This year there will be a Shelter Dog Show where shelter dogs will get to strut their stuff.

Registration for adults is $25, and includes entry fee, a picnic lunch for one, and a Bark! in the Park T-shirt. Register at http://mcpaws.org or in person at MCPAWS, 831 S 3rd St., McCall.

source The Star-News:
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Pet talk – Dealing with snake bites

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt May 26, 2017 IME

Of the 120 species of snakes that live in the United States, only 25 are venomous. Alaska, Maine and Hawaii are the only states without venomous snakes.

With the exception of the coral snake, all venomous snakes in the United States are pit vipers. Pit vipers include rattlesnakes, cottonmouths and copperheads. Rattlesnakes are very common in Blaine County, especially south of East Fork Road.

Rattlesnake venom kills cells at the site of a bite and can cause shock, destruction of red blood cells and abnormal bleeding. Neurotoxins in the venom may produce muscle weakness and respiratory problems.

Signs usually develop within 20 minutes after a rattlesnake bite. Commonly, puncture wounds ooze bloody fluid and cause pain and marked swelling at the bite site. Symptoms of shock may be present with high heart and respiratory rates, pale gums and weakness. Abnormal effects on clotting and destruction of red blood cells are often side effects of rattlesnake toxins.

No effective measures exist to prevent spread of the venom from the bite site. Cutting and sucking on the wounds, applying a tourniquet and applying ice are not recommended. If a snake bite has occurred, transport your pet to a veterinary hospital immediately.

continued:
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Public tour of Bruneau off-range corrals offered in June

by Natalie Hurst Thursday, May 25th 2017


The horses receive an abundance of feed tailored to their needs each day, along with a constant supply of fresh water through automatic watering troughs.

Boise, Idaho (KBOI) – The BLM in Idaho will offer a public tour of the Bruneau off-range corrals on Thursday, June 8.

Two public tours will be offered — the first will begin at 10 am and the second will begin at 1 pm.

Each tour will last about two hours and can accommodate up to 20 people.

Spaces will be filled on a first-come, first-served basis.

The public can sign up to attend and receive driving directions to the facility by calling BLM at (208) 329-4534.

Please RSVP for one of the two tours by June 5.

continued w/more info:
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Horse ballet to perform in Eagle

by KBOI Staff Thursday, May 25th 2017

Eagle, Idaho (KBOI) – Fancy horses doing fancy moves – a kind of “horse ballet” — that’s dressage!

It’s an Olympic sport, and we in Idaho are fortunate to have several top-notch riders, trainers and training barns.

… One of those high-level training barns – Les Bois Dressage in Eagle – will hold a two-day show on Saturday, June 3, and Sunday, June 4.

This show is recognized by the United States Dressage Federation, the United States Equestrian Federation, the Idaho Dressage and Eventing Association and the Oregon Dressage Society.

full story:
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State officials caution about conditions attracting wildlife

5/27/17 AP

An increase in urban wildlife sightings has state officials saying the public should help reduce problem encounters by eliminating things that attract wildlife into populated areas.

… The department advises against leaving small pets outside unattended. And it says animals are attracted by such things as overflowing garbage cans and dishes of pet food left on back porches.

full story:
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KWVR Oregon Wolf Education weekly Wolf Report

Third week of May 2017
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Wolf Education International

Newsletter last week of May 2017

Wyoming wolf hunts to start again after US court decision

Norway’s wolves are being hunted; its reindeer are going mad
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Grizzly bear moved away from residential areas in NW Wyoming

5/28/17 AP

Jackson, Wyo. — Wyoming Game and Fish Department wildlife managers have trapped and relocated a young female grizzly bear in the northwest part of the state.

The agency says the sub adult bear was captured on May 22 for frequenting residential areas and livestock calving pastures on private lands on the South Fork of the Shoshone River west of Cody.

The bear was moved to the Snake River drainage about 20 miles northwest of Moran in Grand Teton National Park.

source:
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Bear whose head was stuck in a bucket for almost a month roams free again

by Elizabeth Tyree Friday, May 26th 2017


(Photo: NY Dept. of Environmental Conservation/CNN Newsource)

(CNN Newsource) — One fella learned where not to put his head.

A bear with a plastic bucket on his head was first noticed near Kirkwood, New York last month.

Residents called environmental officials after the bear showed up in someone’s yard.

But, it took state workers almost a month to catch him with a trap.

Officials tranquilized him and removed the bucket, before letting him back into the wild.

They said the bear has made a full recovery, and is happy to be able to roam free again.

continued:
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Idaho goat herder rotates goats for alternative weed control

Published on Dec 29, 2015

Tim Linquist grew up on a cattle ranch and expected to continue the family business. When his father was forced to sell the ranch, Linquist had to reinvent himself. Inspired by his experience during college using goats as weed eaters, he bought 25 does and began to rent them out for brush control (often for fire prevention or noxious weed removal).

Business took off fast among farmers, ranchers, public land managers, homeowners and even golf club managers looking for an alternative to weed eaters, mowers and chemicals. After only a year, Linquist bought 225 more does.

Today “We Rent Goats” is a family business. All summer, Tim, his wife Lynda and their 2 sons, follow the goats from fields to farms to overgrown backyards. Their territory includes Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Montana, and Nevada. “Most of the summer we spend out away from home. We travel in a fifth wheel and we’re never home.”

Linquist doesn’t mind the itinerant lifestyle and spending so much time with his herd. “I mean I could sit out here and look at these goats all day… I love it, that’s why I do it.”


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Hummingbird Feeders

HummerFeeders
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Water level, and optimism, rise at famed Idaho fishing creek

By Keith Ridler – 5/25/17 AP

Boise, Idaho — The reputation of what is generally considered Idaho’s premier and nationally renowned fly fishing destination has taken a beating after three years of drought, but Silver Creek could get its groove back this season as abundant water fills its channels.

With the fishing season opening this weekend, anglers hope the resurgence draws brown and rainbow trout to bite artificial flies dancing on the stream’s mirror-smooth surface. The area, which attracted luminaries such as Ernest Hemingway in the 1940s, also is a prime spot for birders and nature enthusiasts.

“I think we certainly were seeing the effect of the drought on the creek,” said Silver Creek Outfitter’s guide Bret Bishop. “What I’m hoping is that this year with better flows, we’ll see the fish spread out.”

continued:
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Oregon, California governors seek salmon disaster aid

5/25/17 AP

Portland, Ore. — Oregon Gov. Kate Brown and California Gov. Jerry Brown are seeking a federal disaster declaration to help salmon fishermen enduring a second bad year in a row.

A record-low number of fall-run Chinook salmon returning to the Klamath River has led to fisheries restrictions, including the cancellation of the season along a large stretch of coastal southern Oregon and Northern California.

continued:
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Fish & Game News:

F&G News Releases

https://idfg.idaho.gov/press
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Fun Critter Stuff:

Clever Crow Plays Fetch


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Crows Playing On A Snowy Car


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CrowCar-a
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Idaho History May 28, 2017

Electricity in Yellow Pine

Yellow Pine Community Hall

2003YPHallPhoto by Billie Greenway (2003)

The Yellow Pine Community Hall — The diesel plant and generators that powered the town up until the 1960’s was housed here. Originally a Forest Service building, later it was turned over to Valley County. YPFD Engine No. 1 has been retired and is now on display.
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Let There Be Lights

By Nancy Sumner from “Yellow Pine, Idaho”

[Information gleaned from Fred Bachich, Ted Abstein and Victor Toepfer as well as various secretaries’ notes.]

Even though most of the United States had electricity in the early 1900s, electricity was a rare commodity in Yellow Pine until 1963. Homer Levander at the store used a Delco system, a gasoline generator to keep a large bank of large batteries charged. A later owner used a diesel Husky. When he built his log tavern in 1942, Murphy Earl put in a diesel generator that worked some time. The B and F also had a diesel generator. The rest of the townsfolk used kerosene or gasoline lanterns. Fred Bachich had made a feasibility study on a hydroelectric power station using Quartz Creek, Boulder Creek, Caton Creek, or Riordon Creek. This system was not adopted.

In 1962 the Civil Defense Agency in McCall declared Yellow Pine eligible for emergency disaster area funds. The 32 families in Yellow Pine could then start a diesel-powered plant. The organization was named the Yellow Pine Civil Defense Community Unit.

In reading the secretaries’ reports dating back to November 4, 1962 one marvels at the enormity of the task this small group shouldered. The town leaders are mentioned often.

Two separate used diesel plants were purchased though the Civil Defense Agency. One from Coeur d’Alene, a 30-KW, cost $300 and the other, a 50-KW, cost $368. The 32 subscribers each paid $100 as their share in the undertaking. Ernie Oberbillig gave the poles in place at Stibnite (which the townsfolk hauled down after digging the holes for them.) American Oil Co. sold the group a 6400-gallon holding tank for $1. Jack Walker brought it in down over the torturous road on his flat-bed truck from Cinnabar. The shopping list of transformers, wire, meters, spark arresters, diesel fuel, insurance quickly depleted the funds. Frank Callendar loaned $3,000 to go good the note for money to connect and run the plant. The diesels produced 220 volts from 24-volt batteries. A big switch in the plant split the line in two.

The Forest Service gave a use permit on the building on Forest land south of the town (this building is now the Recreation Hall).

Finally the great day arrived for the Grand Opening of the Diesel-powered Electric System. July 4, 1963 was the high light of the summer. There would be speeches, a potluck, fireworks, a dance with live music – and lights! The only oversight was a lack of diesel fuel. A scurry for fuel resulted in enough to do the job, either donated or loaned. Ernie Oberbillig at Antimony Camp, Tom Nicholus, Pat Hathaway, Fred Bachich, Bud Leatherman, Clarence Pond, John Billings all came forward with fuel.

For three plus years Fred Bachich started the diesels in the morning around 7:00 and then down by 10:00 p.m. unless there was an activity in town to keep them running later. Fred read the meters. The users paid immediately so they could get the best possible deal on fuel. Those who did work on the lines were credited with KWH. November 4, 1964 minutes tell of frustrations of running the plant, rearranging charges, of Chairman Fred naming Norm Adkins to contact Idaho Power to see if they were interested in supplying Yellow Pine with power, of diesel breakdown and the good men who repaired the engine but neglected to replace the belt with a new one and the engine burning up.

The next available minutes are October 10, 1966 when it appears as if Idaho Power has bought the power lines for $800. Fay Kissinger has acquired power to his subdivision, the storage tank has been sold to the highest of three bidders. Ernie Oberbillig bought it for $319. Fred Bachich has been paid back the $648 he had loaned. Insurance rates for the building have been lowered since the diesel engines are no longer being used.

Electricity was a commodity we had always taken for granted along with mother and apple pie. We knew nothing of the recent history of electricity in Yellow Pine when we bought our fully electric log cabin on the Kissinger property, still called Abstein subdivision in 1971. We happily made Sears and Roebuck richer by buying a stove, refrigerator, washer and dryer and water heater, which we brought in from Cascade the summer of 1973.

All the appliances worked beautifully until one morning while doing the wash everything stopped. I checked the circuit breakers and they were all in the “on” position. I drove into town and stopped at the store to find out what had caused the “outage”. There was no wind to blow a tree on the lines, no lightning strikes, it was a glorious day. The townsfolk all had working lights and appliances. None could guess what had stopped my electricity. – “Did you pay your bill? Ha ha.” I started thinking of the food in the freezer section and how many hours to melt down and did I have kerosene for the one lantern and how does one go about getting service in the back country when Janie Keating, our good neighbor in the cabin up the river from ours, walked into the store and announced, “My electricity is off!” Then she heard that I too was lightless, she said, “Let’s go. There’s an Idaho Power man and his family camping at the Ice Hole.”

Jim and Janie Keating and their son Mark had built their cabin and knew many more folks than we at the time. Janie makes a point of getting acquainted with everyone. No one is ever a stranger to her. A lovely trait. We jumped in her truck and drove the 9 miles to the Ice Hole Campground to find Richard Ruska and his family just back from fishing. Richard is a troubleman for Idaho Power. He got in his truck and followed us back to our neighborhood. He only needed one look at the small transformer on the pole up the road from our cabin. The lines went to Kitchen’s, Keating’s and our cabin. Janie and I were the only ones “in” at the time. He very soberly turned to me and asked, “What electrical appliances do you have?” I told him. Then he asked Janie the same question. She had everything we had except a dryer, but she had a freezer. Then he asked us what we were doing when the electricity stopped. Almost in unison we said, “The washing.” He shook his head and said, “Ladies, you can’t both wash on the same day. You blew the transformer.” He used the radio in his truck to call the company in McCall. Before the day was over a new large transformer was in place. Six more cabins are on that line. No one worries about what day should be wash day. Janie and I often laugh about the time we blew the transformer.

Pg 88-89 (reprinted with permission)
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Yellow Pine Community Hall

20070901YPCommunityHall
Sept. 1, 2007
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Idaho Power’s 69-kV Emmett to Warm Lake line, Line 328, was built in 1943 to supply electricity to mining operations in Idaho’s backcountry. These mines provided tungsten and antimony needed for the manufacture of radar, rifles, and other weapons during World War II.

source: Idaho Power
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Lights in Boise

Boise saw the light, but danger came with it

By Arthur Hart Special to the Idaho Statesman March 25, 2017

earthlights-b

click for source size (APOD)

When satellite images of Earth by night, taken from outer space, show us a planet ablaze with electric light, it is hard to imagine a time when there were no street lights, and when homes and businesses were lighted only by candles or oil lamps. Neither of them put out much light, and the lamps required constant care. This was recalled years later by Elizabeth H. Sherman, who ran the Sherman House, an early Boise hotel that stood near the Capitol:

“In most of the rooms we still depended upon lamps which had to be cleaned and refilled every day. Aside from this there was always the unpleasantness of smoky rooms whenever a careless or forgetful occupant left the lamp burning during his absence.”

An ad in the Idaho Tri-weekly Statesman of Jan. 8, 1867, announced that H. Hessberg & Co. had just received 800 gallons of coal oil, a fuel for lamps, similar to kerosene. It was one of a number of oils used for lighting. An ad in the Portland Oregonian of Jan. 15, 1859, printed the year before the gold rush to Idaho began, listed what was available at the time: “Light! Light! Can be found for sale at the Drug Store at all times and in any quantities: Sperm oil, Camphene, Lard oil, Burning fluid, Polar oil. — Smith & Davis, Brick store, Front St., Portland, Oregon.” As many as 6 to 8 barrels of “sperm oil” could be extracted from the massive head of a single sperm whale. By 1946 some species of whales were in danger of extinction, leading to the formation of an International Whaling Commission to protect endangered species and to ban whale-hunting in some areas. Several nations with a whaling tradition and a present-day industry resist regulation.

Camphene is now used in the preparation of fragrances and as an additive to food for flavoring. Its use as a fuel for lamps was limited because of its explosive nature. The danger of fire from oil lamps, whatever the fuel used, was great enough without using one that could explode.

Legend persists that the Great Chicago Fire of 1871 started when a cow kicked over a kerosene lantern in Mrs. O’Leary’s barn. Whatever its cause, the fire destroyed most of the city and took the lives of nearly 300 people. Earlier that same year an item appeared in the Idaho Tri-weekly Statesman telling readers, “The new gasoline lamp at F.M. Davis & Co.’s is worth looking at. It gives a light like gas, at about half or two-thirds the cost of kerosene.” In August, “Templar Hall is now lighted with the new patent gasoline lamps. This arrangement, it is believed, will furnish a better light than kerosene and at a reduced cost.”

The ever-present danger of fire from kerosene lamps was noted by the Statesman with this whimsical reminder: “Unless you feel a ‘true inwardness,’ and your many sins are canceled in the book above, and you are at peace with all mankind, and are ready to leave this vale of sorrow, don’t attempt to pour kerosene into a lighted lamp. If you do, you’ll get ‘busted’ sure.”

Not until January 1875 was there mention in the Statesman of a street light for Downtown Boise: “Quite Nice. — We discover that a new and magnificent lamp, or lantern, has just been swung up in front of the entrance to the Turner House, which, when lighted, affords a good light, and is quite a relief to night pedestrians.”

Ever in the lead in urging civic improvements, the Statesman editorialized in December 1879, “Would it not be well to put up lamp posts and have lights at the corner of some of our streets?” In 1881, as Downtown merchants began to erect lamps in front of their places of business, the paper enthusiastically praised each one as it appeared with items like this: “The stage company have put up a fine large lamp in front of their office, which greatly facilitates the loading and unloading of the stages, and adds much to the convenience of pedestrians. This spirit of improvement is spreading and cannot be too extensively carried out.”

link to: IdahoHistoryLightPt1t.doc
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Boiseans waited a long time for their first electricity plant

By Arthur Hart Special to the Idaho Statesman April 1, 2017

On Aug. 10, 1882, the Ketchum Keystone newspaper reported, “The first electric light in Idaho was struck at the Philadelphia Company’s smelters an evening or two ago and has since been giving satisfactory service.” It was a six-light system, generated by water power, and since only four of them were needed at the smelter, two were leased to the city.

A week later, W.F. Masters, who had installed the system, went to the nearby town of Muldoon for the purpose of putting a similar system into the Little Wood River Co.’s smelters. The Keystone reported in September, “W.F. Masters, who has recently become reputable in the Wood River country as a machinist and constructor of electric lights, is now in Vienna (Idaho) for the purpose of lighting the Vienna quartz mill.” When the Philadelphia Smelter closed that November, the Keystone said, “The town misses the nightly glare of the electric lights and rumbling rock-breakers.”

It was four more years before Boise seriously considered an electric light plant. In March 1886, the Idaho Statesman editorialized that among the things most needed by Boise were a water works, electric lights and a sewer system. “It would pay capitalists to invest in the two former.” In August an attorney for the Sperry Electric Light and Motor Co. of Chicago was in town to organize a company, which was done on Oct. 4, 1886.

In November, Boise capitalist William H. Ridenbaugh had a large force of men at work digging the reservoir for a water-powered electric plant. The works were to be located just under the bluffs below Morris Hill Cemetery. The Statesman expressed the opinion of most Boiseans: “It will be quite an improvement to see the various places of business lighted with electricity instead of coal oil, and we hope to see the city lighted up at no distant day with lights at all the principal corners.”

In February 1887, the paper noted: “It will be remembered that the Boise City Electric Light Co. last fall contracted with the Sperry Electric Light Co. of Chicago to put an electric plant here. So far the contractor has done nothing, and the company he represented has failed.” In April, however, the company had honored the contract, machinery for the plant was in place and most of the poles to carry the wires had been set. The Statesman questioned the policy of allowing the poles to be put up along Main Street, but at the time there seemed to be no better way to supply eager customers with electricity.

Hailey’s new electric light system was turned on on May 19, 1887, and Boise’s not until the Fourth of July. The Statesman noted, “Improvements come a little slow sometimes, but Boise ‘gets there’ in good shape and in good time.”

In August 1887, the Overland Hotel at 8th and Main streets began using electric power. The City Council responded cautiously to this development by stating its willingness to place “a limited number of electric lights on the streets for the purpose of lighting the city.” The light company installed a few of them on Main Street, but after two months of free service, it told the council that it would now have to charge $3 per light per month.

Councilman John Lemp spoke in favor of keeping the lights and paying what the company asked. He thought strangers might otherwise experience difficulty in getting around town at night. Those acquainted with the ups and downs of the city’s rickety wooden sidewalks were already having trouble negotiating them at night. He favored it as a necessity, “to say nothing of the influence it would have on the good name of the city.” Conservative Mayor P. J. Pefley said the city could not afford it, but he was outvoted, and Boise’s electric street light system continued to grow slowly thereafter.

link to: IdahoHistoryLightPt2.doc
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page updated Nov 16, 2019

Road Reports May 28

No new road reports since Friday. Local streets are drying out and getting dusty.

Friday (May 26) Cascade to Yellow Pine via the South Fork of the Salmon River road (and EFSF road) was clear, no trees or rocks.

South Fork Salmon River Road Weight Restrictions are still in effect, but may be rescinded soon.

Roads Open:

The lower end of Johnson Creek road is open from the Yellow Pine end, bladed as far up as Wapiti Meadow Ranch. Watch for a big mud hole by Antimony Camp. No current report of where the snow line is, but a report from April 29th saying there are boulders in the road in the Rustican Creek area.

The lower end of Profile Creek road is open (but not bladed) from the Yellow Pine side, last report May 7 “ATVs can easily make it up Profile Summit to the old miner’s cabin about a mile before Missouri Ridge Trail.”

The road to Stibnite is still under spring break-up restrictions.

There is still a LOT of snow in the high country. The passes are still snowed closed and will not be open for Memorial Weekend (looks like late June for some.)

Roads Closed:

Upper Johnson Creek / Landmark
Profile Gap
Lick Creek Summit
Secesh Summit
Monumental Summit

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Weather Reports May 21-27

Yellow Pine Forecast

Hydrologic Outlook

Hydrologic Outlook
National Weather Service Boise ID
351 PM MDT Fri May 26 2017

...WARMER TEMPERATURES AND INCREASING HIGH ELEVATION SNOWMELT
WILL LEAD TO RISING RIVER AND STREAM LEVELS NEXT WEEK...

A warming trend Memorial Day weekend through the middle of the
next week will increase melting of the high elevation snowpack in
the Boise and West Central Mountains. This will cause flows to
increase on rivers and streams fed by high elevation snowmelt,
with the potential for flooding along some waterways.

Rivers such as the South Fork Payette near Lowman, and Middle
Fork and South Fork of the Boise River will continue to run high
with another snowmelt peak expected late next week.

People living in flood prone areas along rivers and streams
should prepare for another round of higher flows and potential
flooding.

Rivers and streams are very dangerous during spring snowmelt. The
water is very swift and cold and can quickly carry you downstream.

May 21 Weather:

At 930am it was 44 degrees and mostly cloudy, blue patch overhead, low foggy clouds belting VanMeter. At 12pm it was 53 degrees, partly cloudy and breezy. At 2pm it was mostly clear. At 430pm it was warm and mostly clear. At 8pm it was 63 degrees and mostly clear. At 6am it was 38 degrees.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time May 22, 2017 at 09:30AM
Clear
Max temperature 72 degrees F
Min temperature 35 degrees F
At observation 51 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
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May 22 Weather:

At 930am it was 51 degrees and clear sky. Very warm and sunny day. At 7pm it was 71 degrees. At 830pm it was 63 degrees and clear. At 2am it was 45 degrees and clear.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time May 23, 2017 at 09:30AM
Mostly clear
Max temperature 78 degrees F
Min temperature 37 degrees F
At observation 53 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
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May 23 Weather:

At 930am it was 53 degrees, mostly clear (contrails) and calm. Warm sunny day. At 230pm it was 78 degrees and sunny. At 8pm it was 67 degrees and clear.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time May 24, 2017 at 09:30AM
Mostly clear and breezy
Max temperature 81 degrees F
Min temperature 41 degrees F
At observation 61 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
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May 24 Weather:

At 930am it was 61 degrees, mostly clear and breezy. At 1230pm it was 65 degrees, sunny and a little breezy. Quite windy around 3pm to 330pm. Power out 630pm. At 750pm it was 54 degrees, partly cloudy and breezy. At 840pm some stronger wind gusts.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time May 25, 2017 at 09:30AM
Partly cloudy, breezy
Max temperature 66 degrees F
Min temperature 35 degrees F
At observation 45 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
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May 25 Weather:

At 930am it was 45 degrees, partly cloudy and light breezes. At 12pm it ws 54 degrees, mostly cloudy and breezy. At 130pm some sharp wind gusts, overcast. At 340pm power back on. At 4pm it was cloudy and breezy. Started sprinkling right before 6pm. At 730pm it was 46 degrees, overcast and lightly sprinkling. At 930pm it was 44 degrees, low clouds (ridges socked in) and light sprinkles. At 1025pm it was raining pretty good, for around half an hour at least. At 1am it was 40 degrees, overcast and not raining. At 6am it was 39 degrees, not raining.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time May 26, 2017 at 09:30AM
Partly clear
Max temperature 61 degrees F
Min temperature 38 degrees F
At observation 44 degrees F
Precipitation 0.30 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
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May 26 Weather:

At 930am it was 44 degrees and partly clear. At 12pm it was 54 degrees and mostly cloudy, chilly breeze. At 8pm it was 56 degrees and almost clear. At 5am it was 35 degrees.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time May 27, 2017 at 09:30AM
Clear
Max temperature 64 degrees F
Min temperature 33 degrees F
At observation 49 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
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May 27 Weather:

At 930am it was 49 degrees and clear. At 1pm it was 69 degrees, sunny and light breezes. At 8pm it was 66 degrees, clear and slight breeze. At 930pm it was 58 degrees, breezy and clear. At 5am it was 39 degrees.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time May 28, 2017 at 09:30AM
Clear
Max temperature 73 degrees F
Min temperature 36 degrees F
At observation 53 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
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Memorial Weekend YP Campground Report

Boise NF

The Golden Gate Campground and the Yellow Pine (improved) campgrounds are open on Johnson Creek. The unimproved campsites (and old horse camp) may have hazard trees and blowdown.  Upper Johnson Creek road is still closed due to snow.

Payette NF

The Old East Fork campsites are open (locally known as the Devil’s Bathtubs.) The old road is open all the way thru, trees cut out.

Summits and high elevations campsites are still closed due to snow.

Hydrologic Outlook May 26

Yellow Pine Forecast

Hydrologic Outlook

Hydrologic Outlook
National Weather Service Boise ID
351 PM MDT Fri May 26 2017

...WARMER TEMPERATURES AND INCREASING HIGH ELEVATION SNOWMELT
WILL LEAD TO RISING RIVER AND STREAM LEVELS NEXT WEEK...

A warming trend Memorial Day weekend through the middle of the
next week will increase melting of the high elevation snowpack in
the Boise and West Central Mountains. This will cause flows to
increase on rivers and streams fed by high elevation snowmelt,
with the potential for flooding along some waterways.

Rivers such as the South Fork Payette near Lowman, and Middle
Fork and South Fork of the Boise River will continue to run high
with another snowmelt peak expected late next week.

People living in flood prone areas along rivers and streams
should prepare for another round of higher flows and potential
flooding.

Rivers and streams are very dangerous during spring snowmelt. The
water is very swift and cold and can quickly carry you downstream.

The rivers are UP!!

South Fork Salmon River Gauge at Krassel

Johnson Creek Gauge at Yellow Pine

Road Report May 26

Friday (May 26) Cascade to Yellow Pine via the South Fork of the Salmon River road (and EFSF road) was clear, no trees or rocks.

South Fork Salmon River Road Weight Restrictions are still in effect, but may be rescinded soon.

Roads Open:

The lower end of Johnson Creek road is open from the Yellow Pine end, bladed as far up as Wapiti Meadow Ranch. Watch for a big mud hole by Antimony Camp. No current report of where the snow line is, but a report from April 29th saying there are boulders in the road in the Rustican Creek area.

The lower end of Profile Creek road is open (but not bladed) from the Yellow Pine side, last report May 7 “ATVs can easily make it up Profile Summit to the old miner’s cabin about a mile before Missouri Ridge Trail.”

The road to Stibnite is still under spring break-up restrictions.

There is still a LOT of snow in the high country. The passes are still snowed closed and will not be open for Memorial Weekend.

Roads Closed:

Upper Johnson Creek / Landmark
Profile Gap
Lick Creek Summit
Secesh Summit
Monumental Summit

Road Report May 24

Wednesday (May 24) mail truck driver (Robert) reports a good trip in this morning via the South Fork road, no rocks or trees to clear. Also mentioned that 6-day a week mail delivery starts June 1st.

South Fork Salmon River Road Weight Restrictions are still in effect.

Johnson Creek road was plowed from Yellow Pine only up as far as Wapiti Meadow Ranch last week. Upper Johnson Creek is still closed due to snow.

Also Closed:
Landmark Summit
Lick Creek Summit
Profile Summit
Monumental Summit

Snow Totals (down 11″ since Sun. 5/21):
Big Creek SNOTEL 6580′ = 56″
Deadwood Summit SNOTEL 6860′ = 97″

Rivers are up!
South Fork at Krassel
Johnson Creek at Yellow Pine
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