Monthly Archives: June 2017

Road Report June 30

South Fork/EFSF route reported in good shape.

Johnson Creek road is open but not graded. Reported to be washboardy in the Rustican and Halfway areas, pot holes in various places. Trees occasionally coming down in random spots.

Lick Creek road is open. The county has finished fixing the washout.

Deadwood summit is open, but still a lot of snow, and reported to be rough.

Had a report that 4-wheelers made it over Monumental, but still lots of snow and not open to full sized vehicles.

Rivers and creeks are still higher than average, but dropping.

Road conditions can change quickly. Be prepared for trees and rocks in the road. There is still snow on some roads at higher elevations and no cell service.


 

June 27, 2017 Update

AG’s Office: Aerial fireworks now illegal to buy in Idaho

KTVB June 27, 2017

BOISE — Aerial fireworks will no longer be legal to sell to the public in Idaho, according to an Idaho Attorney General’s Office opinion announced Tuesday morning.

The ruling effectively closes a loophole that allowed the sale of aerial fireworks as long as the purchaser signed an agreement saying he or she would not set them off in the state limits.

Fire chiefs have long opposed the loophole, arguing it is ineffective at actually stopping people from setting off illegal fireworks, and leads to dangerous and expensive human-set fires like the 2,500-acre blaze Table Rock Fire, which was started with an illegal firework last summer.

The AG’s opinion directs retailers to immediately remove the illegal aerial fireworks from their shelves. Aerial fireworks for a public display, like the kind hosted by the City of Boise, will still be allowed with the proper permit.

continued:
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Fireworks in Idaho – Know Before You Light!

For Immediate Release: June 26, 2017, 8 a.m.
Contact: Kelsey Griffee, kgriffee@blm.gov, 208-521-8709

The Fourth of July weekend is around the corner, and the desire to buy and light fireworks is growing. Firefighters in eastern Idaho urge Idaho residents to use fireworks legally, appropriately and wisely.

Every summer, improper use of fireworks is responsible for multiple wildland and structure fires. Last year the Rapid Creek and Henry’s Creek fires burned nearly 53,000 acres. Both fires were started by illegal fireworks.

As the Fourth of July nears and the weather turns hotter and drier, please use “safe and sane” fireworks in gravel or asphalt areas away from vegetation and buildings. Safe and sane fireworks or “non-aerial common fireworks” remain near the ground and do not travel outside a 20-foot diameter. Safe and sane fireworks include cone fountains, sparklers, wheels and whistles.

Other fireworks, typically aerial ones, are illegal to shoot off in Idaho. Aerial fireworks present a huge risk for causing wildfires. While these kinds of fireworks may be purchased legally, Idaho law makes their use illegal. Illegal-use fireworks include bottle rockets, sky rockets, roman candles, firecrackers, missiles, parachutes, sky flyers, display shells and aerial items.

Always follow applicable fireworks regulations, including:

* Fireworks are only authorized for use during specific times of the year. Check local ordinances for dates you can use fireworks.

* Possessing and/or using fireworks on federal public lands (Bureau of Land Management and Forest Service) is strictly prohibited.

* Anyone misusing fireworks can be held liable for damages. Damages often include the costs of putting out the fire.

Certain areas, like Johnny Creek in the Pocatello area, prohibit fireworks due to the high risk of wildfire. Never light fireworks on a windy day and fully extinguish them with water before disposing of debris.

For more information, contact your local fire department.

Regulations can be read in entirety at Idaho Statutes Title 39 Chapter 26, NFPA 1123, and Forest Service 36 CFR Title 261.

source BLM:

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Road Report June 27

Valley County Road Dept: Yesterday (June 26) crews were able to open Profile, Lick Creek and Deadwood. We have no verification one way or another on Monumental. As far at the Lick Creek washout, crews have been working on it for 2 weeks and are hoping to wrap it up by the weekend. It is passable at this time, just be prepared for delays as crews are working on it.

South Fork/EFSF route reported in good shape.

Johnson Creek road is open but not graded. Reported to be washboardey in the Rustican and Halfway areas, pot holes in various places. Trees falling once in a while in random spots.

Had a report that 4-wheelers made it over Monumental, but still lots of snow and not open to full sized vehicles.

Rivers and creeks are still higher than average, warmer weather has accelerated snow melt. Road conditions can change quickly. Be prepared for trees and rocks in the road. There is still snow on the roads at higher elevations and no cell service.
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June 25, 2017 The Yellow Pine Times

June 25, 2017 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Village News:

Yellow Pine Blowdown Update

20170407WindStorm1

The Yellow Pine Salvage Sale was awarded to Mark Tucker last Friday. He hopes to start logging in early July and plans to finish prior to the Harmonica Festival. I’ll send another update as soon as I see his actual schedule.

Jake Strohmeyer
District Ranger
Boise National Forest, Cascade Ranger District
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Village Of Yellow Pine Association Meeting June 10, 2017

[DRAFT]

Officers in Attendance: Dan Stiff Chairman, Deb Filler Vice Chairman, Secretary Lorinne Munn, Treasurer Ann Forster.

1. Meeting was called to order at 2:15pm by Dan Stiff. There were not enough people in attendance for a regular meeting only 5 other people besides the officers were at the meeting. It was discussed the presence of 9 members plus 3 officers is required for a quorum so it was decided to just discuss the items on the agenda in an informal meeting. But then the bylaws were changed September 12, 2015 to allow for a meeting to be held with a quorum of 3 elected council members constituting a quorum. So these are the minutes of that meeting.

2. Ann reported there is $27,000.00 in the bank. The Community Hall has minus $2,100.00 in it’s fund due to paying for the railings and new grills so money needs to be voted on moving from the general fund at our next official meeting.
Deb said her understanding from the Grill Committee was that the General Fund would pay for the grills.

3. No cemetery report with Willie absent

4. no oral report for the Community Hall with Kathy Hall absent. Deb filled in for Kathy by reporting Ed Staub will be hooking up the new grills and providing propane. Next Sunday will be a meeting of the community hall committee looking to move the old refrigerator out and new grills set up. Water needs to be turned on it appears the lines are broken. The exercise equipment needs to be gone through and broken equipment moved. Kathy wants to discuss the grills on the windows. Lorinne mentioned the Community Hall is once again becoming a storage area this time for exercise equipment and harmonica benches so it is difficult for the community as a whole to use it for other functions.

5. Deb gave a harmonica festival committee report. Ann said there is $16,300.00 in the harmonica fund. Deb said that according to the bylaws, any thing over $12,000.00 needed To Go Into The General Fund last fall. She Said 83 Percent Of The Allotted $12,000.00 Hasn’t Been Spent. Donations Are Coming In For The Different Events. The race is generating good interest 21 people interested so far. The next festival meeting is the last Thursday of the month.

6. Belinda from Midas Gold announced the mine is in a scoping period from June 5th to July 20th there are meetings scheduled in McCall the 28th of June, Cascade the 27th of June and Boise date unavailable related to the scoping. Dan feels cutting off the Stibnite road will affect our property values and the town will be in jeopardy of dying. He suggested that the road be routed into the Forest Service area and the mine could have flaggers that monitor the traffic into the area. Belinda said Midas is offering to help us market to offset the damage from a road closure and that is in the works. Townspeople need to put in their concerns during this scoping period once past the date of July 20th it will be too late to voice concerns. The Forest Service can alter the plan that has been submitted by the mine so please put forth your ideas and concerns during this period.

7. Ann reported on the community communicator position she has all of the information assembled on all of the parcels in town to be available for emergency situations and voting issues. She will not be sharing this but it is available to anyone through the County it is public information. An executive session could be called if access to the information is needed. Up Johnson Creek to Wapiti and the East Fork to Zena Creek all of those folks are included in voting issues.

8. As per the special meeting of September 18,2016 which gave the approval to purchase a Village Association computer, the cost of the computer is $1,396.00 and will come out of the general fund.

9. Belinda will have a Midas electrician look into the wiring at the veterans memorial.

10. Jeff gave an EMS update we have a fully functioning ambulance and Ann now has the credentials as well as Jeff to transport in the ambulance. We also have drivers Nikki, Dale and Gary are qualified to drive. Jeff is now trained for river rescue, we now have over the side equipment, Gary and Jeff are qualified in extrication Dave from Midas will train in this also. In September is scheduled an advanced extrication class. The Fire Department is moving into a rescue group. Jeff is getting involved also in search and rescue launched from Yellow Pine.

11. Dan gave an update on the fire department Jeff has resigned as commissioner and has been appointed Interim Fire Chief. Cecil has been selected to replace Jeff as commissionaire, Dan and Tom are the other Commissioners of their areas. Formal elections for these positions will be in the fall. The existing Fire Department has spent $20,000.00 on updating equipment there is $80,000.00 left in the fund. The focus has been on mitigation since we have no ability to fight structural fires. Anyone can use this equipment. But on the EMT side the ambulance and that equipment can only be used by those trained to do so. The Fire Department focus will be on fire safeing property and protecting property around a burning structure. They are looking into wagons to be placed around town with equipment and water to put out fires these cost $3,500.00 apiece. Fire extinguishers and smoke detectors might be provided to homes also. Every Sunday is fire training day at 11am please attend and get educated on the equipment and techniques. The tower and repeater was put in on a grant just call 911 to locate Ann or Jeff dispatch will find them.

12. Deb reported dust abatement was on hold until Johnson Creek was open we are now waiting for it to be scheduled it will be the same cost as last year except we are now being billed for sales tax which had been picked up by the dust abatement company before.

13. Deb has volunteered to head up the election committee to round up folks to run for Treasurer and Chairman to be elected this year.

14. Ann and Jeff and Dan will run the golf tournament at the 4th of July with proceeds to go to the EMT group there will be 3 holes changed to accommodate the downed trees. Tee off is at 10am

15. Willy reports the fireworks are donated and accounted for.

16. Bill McIntosh submitted a letter asking for gravel and help on fixing the hill road. A lot of tourists and people looking around use the road and it is dangerous.
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Yellow Pine Fire District Commissioner’s Meeting Minutes

May 31, 2017

Meeting called to order @ 14:00 by Dan Stiff – District 2 Fire Commissioner

Members Present:
District 1 Commissioner: Jeff Forster
District 2 Commissioner: Dan Stiff
District 3 Commissioner: Tom Richter

There were 7 Yellow Pine Village Members in attendance.

Commissioners voted in Dan Stiff as Chair

Commissioners appointed Jeff Forster as interim Fire Chief.

Jeff Forster accepted Fire Chief position as an interim position and will be a part time position until a replacement is found.

Jeff Forster nominated Cecil Dahlman as District 1 Fire Commissioner, Cecil accepted the nomination. Dan Stiff and Tom Richter accepted the nomination. There were no other nominations, Cecil Dahlman was voted in as District 1 commissioner. Cecil will finish out Jeff’s term as Fire Commissioner.

Dan Stiff and Tom Richter’s Fire Commissioner positions are open for election in November, 2017.

As of this date the YPFD is compliant with Federal, State, and Valley County regulations.

Jeff Forster reported that the bank account is $86,500. The County Clerk advised that the FD allotted monies to be spent and we should use the money for improvements in the Yellow Pine Fire District as requested in the past budgets.

Since the beginning of this year approximately $20,000 has been spent on fire mitigation equipment, rescue tools and equipment, fire extinguishers and a new fire station generator.

The board approved research into newer extrication equipment, water trailers and to investigate Federal Grants for newer fire apparatus etc.

Fire/Rescue training/orientation will be every Sunday at 11:00 till 2:00 PM at the Fire Station, when Jeff is in town. There is a lot of new equipment being placed on the fire truck frequently, so come on down and check it out. The Fire District needs volunteers.

Public comment:

Discussion on mitigation on Village high threat areas and future assessments of Village with discussion of properties that are high risk and border F.S. or other property owners.

Discussion of providing new fire extinguishers for all YP District cabins/homes.

Discussion on providing new Smoke Alarms and Carbon Monoxide detectors for all cabins and homes.

Discussion on purchasing chimney cleaning equipment for use by YP District residents.

Next YP Fire Commissioners meeting will be 2:00 PM June 21, 2017 at the Community Hall.

Meeting adjourned at 2:54 PM.

Cecil Dahlman
Dan Stiff
Tom Richter
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The Corner

Yellow Pine Lumber Jack & Jill Throwdown was June 23-24
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Ed Staub Propane Customers

Please let folks know that we will be there next Wednesday (June 28) for any tank upgrades or service work that they may need to please call me asap.

We will be going into Yellow Pine to fill at the end of August or first of Sept and please let them know that we are putting all acct on keep full so when we go in we are filling all tanks. Our mission is to go once a year!

If anybody has any questions please have them call at 208-634-3883

Nettie Truman
Ed Staub & Sons
13888 Hwy 55
P.O.Box 2202/McCall ID, 83638
208-634-3833
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YPWUA Meeting July 2

The annual shareholders meetings for the Yellow Pine Water Users Association will be held on Sunday, July 2 at 10am. The meeting will be held at the Yellow Pine Community Hall
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Big Creek Lodge

Breakfast at Big Creek dates are Saturdays – June 24 and Aug 5. Breakfasts run from 8-10am, and are $10/plate. Visitors can take a tour of the lodge and enjoy pancakes, ham, eggs and coffee/juice.
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4thSafeSane

Please don’t bring illegal fireworks to Yellow Pine, there will be a very nice fireworks display put on in the village at dusk on Saturday July 1st. Don’t forget to bring your lawn chairs!
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Independence Day weekend

Berry-Cake

Schedule of Events (details below)

June 30 Yellow Pine Tavern at 8pm The Dave Nudo Band
July 1 Golf Tournament 10am
July 1 The 4th of July Parade 4pm (meet at 330pm at the Fire Hall)
July 1 The Corner Willie and The Single Wides start at 8pm
July 1 Fireworks at dusk
July 2 YPWUA Shareholders meeting 10am at the Community Hall
July 2 The Corner Sneaky Bones will be playing at 8pm

Friday June 30

At the Yellow Pine Tavern returning for the 3rd year on 4th of July Weekend. Friday June 30th at 8pm The Dave Nudo Band

Saturday July 1 – Golf Tournament 10am

19th Annual Yellow Pine Golf Tournament Saturday July 1st, 2017 at 10am
Where the Green’s aren’t green and the fairways aren’t fair!
This year will prove to be a bit more challenging!!!
$20 per player – Benefits the Medical Supply & Training Fund for Yellow Pine
$50 per hole – Sponsorship provides Advertisement on a hole and covers entry fee for two players
Awards for: Best Ball Scramble Twosomes – Men’s, Women’s, and Mixed; and closest to the hole on #1 hole only.
Get your reservations in early, as we will start with foursomes on each of the 18 holes, limiting the tournament to 72 golfers.
For questions or registration or to mail/email/phone your entry info. contact: Jeff or Ann @ (208) 633-1010 Or Dan @ (208) 633-4208
A Little History: The Yellow Pine Country Club boasts the most challenging course in Idaho. Members have preferred tee times, and on course refreshments. Elk and deer have the right of way on the un-fairways. The first 9 holes were laid out by hurling a softball to mark the next hole! Those first 9 holes have been refined and 9 more added over the years.
“Golf in the Rough – Where it’s better to be Lucky than Good!”
– AF

Saturday July 1 – Parade 4pm

4thJulylParade-a

4th of July is just around the corner. You are invited to take part in the annual Independence Day Parade. Bring your family and friends, pets, vehicles, floats, marching bands, and silliness to be a part of the parade. The parade starts at 4pm on Saturday, July 1st, in Yellow Pine. If you want to be in the parade, meet at the fire house at 330pm. All family-friendly participants are welcome! – DF

Saturday July 1

The Corner Willie and The Single Wides start at 8pm

Saturday July 1 Fireworks at dusk

Sunday July 2

The Corner Sneaky Bones will be playing at 8pm
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Judy Wiley Memorial Stone July 17

We would like all people in the community, who can make it, to come join us at the cemetery on July 17th at 3pm. At that time, we would like to talk about Judy Wiley. She didn’t want a service or a memorial. So this would be a chat and a talk. We plan to place a stone at the foot of Bud Boyd in her memory. Judy’s sister, Linda Blank, will be joining us. Thanks to the community for their generous donations. We would also like to invite the community for chips and salsa at the Tavern after the ‘talk’. It would be a good time to talk to her sister and tell her your stories of Judy.

– MF
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YPFD July 29

Next YPFD Commissioner Meeting: July 29, 2017. Community Hall at 2pm.
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Harmonica T-shirt Request

I would like to send out a request to everyone who might have a T-shirt from the past harmonica festivals. We are missing the following years: 1994, 2002-2014. It would be a donation to the Community Hall. I am hoping to make the Center more inviting and useful. Any suggestions from anyone are also welcome.
My email is: 75hallker @ att.net My phone: 208-633-6270

Thanks so much, Kathleen Hall – VYPA – Member at Large
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook
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Local Observations:

Monday (June 19) a few early airplanes. Low of 42 degrees overnight, almost clear this morning. More swallows around, swooping for chicken feathers. Finches, pine-siskins, grosbeaks and jays at the feeders, flicker calling from the trees. Newly fledged young robins following their parent around and begging. Warm sunny day, high of 88 degrees. Shooting started to the west at 605pm, lasted for about 15 minutes. Robins calling at dusk.

Tuesday (June 20) a few early (loud) airplanes. Low of 50 degrees overnight, clear and warm this morning. Lots of swallows calling and swooping. Flicker and olive-sided flycatcher calling. Quite hot today, high of 90 degrees. Quiet afternoon, clouds coming in and quite warm. Flicker calling this afternoon, only a few finches at the feeders, but lots of swallows swooping. Mostly cloudy by evening.

Wednesday (June 21) a couple of morning airplanes, one very quiet. Low of 47 degrees, almost clear this morning and warming up fast. Lots of swallows swooping and calling, taking feathers to the nest (female we are watching still setting her 5 eggs.) Not many finches at the feeders this morning, but finally had a hummer visit (they have not been around the last few days.) Local streets are getting dusty. Sunny warm day, a few passing little clouds, high of 82 degrees. Increased traffic (air and ground) during the evening.

Thursday (June 22) early morning airplane traffic, one extra loud turning over the village at 903am. Low of 41 degrees overnight, clear sky and strong sun this morning. Not many songbirds at the seed feeders, lots of swallows swooping for feathers. Solitary Rufous hummer at the feeder this morning. Very loud airplane turning over the village at 1205pm. Sunny and pleasant, high of 76 degrees. Traffic up on main street, quiet in the neighborhood. Calliope hummer visiting this afternoon, light breezes. Clear night

Friday (June 23) lots of airplanes this morning. Overnight low of 35 degrees, clear sky this morning. At least 5 hummers this morning (male Rufous and Calliopes.) Not many songbirds at the feeders. Heard a flicker sounding off. Swallows swooping for feathers, male and female taking turns setting on eggs. Quite a bit of airplane traffic today, not much vehicular traffic. Amerigas was in to top off a few tanks. Sunny warm day, high of 80 degrees. Chipmunks, ground squirrels and pine squirrels out and about. Mostly pine-siskins at the feeders today. Clear sky and cooling off nicely after sunset.

Saturday (June 24) lots of airplanes again this morning, extra loud one at 904am. Overnight low of 39 degrees and clear sky this morning. Heard the olive-sided flycatcher, but other than swallows not many birds around. A few finches and pine-siskins showed up before lunch. Jay and a single grosbeak came after lunch time. Quite warm and sunny today, high of 85 degrees. Quiet evening, cooling off after sundown. Report of folks shooting off bottle rockets. Clear night.

Sunday (June 25) early morning airplanes again, some really loud ones. Overnight low of 42 degrees, clear sky. A couple of finches at the feeder and swallows flying and calling. Swallow eggs hatching today. Flicker whooping it up in the neighborhood before lunch time. Ground squirrels out chasing and wresting. Sunny and hot this afternoon, high of 93 degrees. No hummingbirds visited. Report of someone shooting off bottle rockets this afternoon.
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Independence Day Weekend News:

4thPTSD-a
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Yellow Pine to host full weekend of holiday events

The Star-News June 22, 2017

The tiny community of Yellow Pine east of McCall will host a full weekend of Independence Day events

Friday, June 30

The weekend will kick off on Friday, June 30, at the Yellow Pine Tavern, where the Dave Nudo Band will play starting at 8 p.m.

Saturday, July 1

Golf Tournament: The weekend will continue on Saturday, July 1, with the 19th Annual Yellow Pine Golf Tournament starting at 10 a.m.

The event will be held at the Yellow Pine Golf Course, “where the greens aren’t green and the fairways aren’t fair.” Elk and deer have the right-of-way.

Cost is $20 per player, with proceeds to benefit the medical supply and training fund for Yellow Pine.

The format is Best Ball Scramble Twosomes with awards given for men, women and mixed teams, plus closest to the hole on hole No. 1.

For questions or to register, call Jeff or Ann at (208) 633-1010 or Dan at (208) 633-4208

Parade: Everyone is invited to be part of the Yellow Pine Independence Day Parade on Saturday, July 1.

Entries will stage at 3:30 p.m. at the fire station with the parade starting at 4 p.m. through the center of town. Family and friends, pets, vehicles, floats, marching bands, and silliness are all traditions of the parade.

Live Music: The Corner will get the evening rolling with live music by Willie and The Single Wides starting at 8 p.m.

Fireworks: Fireworks will begin at dusk. The best viewing place is in the middle of town and those attending should bring their own lawn chairs. Illegal fireworks should not be brought by spectators.

Sunday, July 2

The weekend will wrap up on Sunday, July 2, with live music by Sneaky Bones starting at 8 p.m. at The Corner.

source The Star-News:
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McCall council bans alcohol at lakefront parks July 1-5

Gold Glove Park to be exempted from prohibition

By Tom Grote for The Star-News June 15, 2017

Alcoholic beverages will be banned at lakefront parks in McCall July 1-5, the McCall City Council decided last week.

The ban is similar to the alcohol ban imposed last year for the Independence Day weekend except Gold Glove Park on Davis Avenue and other non-lakefront parks are not included in this year’s ban.

Council members agreed with the recommendation of city staff members that banning alcohol at Gold Glove Park might put a damper on recreational baseball or softball games played at the park’s fields.

The vote was the last piece of this year’s holiday celebration planning that city officials hope will match last year’s ban. That effort was credited with reducing incidents of rowdy young adults seen in previous years.

The Idaho Department of Parks and Recreation will impose the second year of its three-year ban on alcohol at North Beach on Payette Lake.

The Valley County Sheriff’s Office will partially lift last year’s ban on boats at North Beach, allowing boats on a 150-foot stretch on July 4.

Parking on Warren Wagon Road and East Side Drive will again be prohibited in an attempt to prevent the large gathering of young adults at North Beach that started in 2007 and continued on every July 4 until last year.

full story The Star-News:
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Crouch bans all fireworks in city limits

Dean Johnson, KTVB June 21, 2017

Crouch, Idaho – The Fourth of July is just two weeks away.

Every year, the little mountain town of Crouch grows by the thousands for the holiday weekend.

Over the years, the party in the streets has gotten out of control with illegal fireworks and a lot of alcohol.

This year, property owners have said enough is enough and banned all fireworks within city limits, even sparklers.

The city limits of Crouch are only a mile long, but this mile has become very popular as of late to launch fireworks off on the Fourth of July. However, that’s all changed this year with a new city ordinance.

“Here the locals couldn’t even come to our town celebration because other people were creating all kinds of havoc,” said Diane Caughlin, Garden Valley Chamber of Commerce. “There’s absolutely no fireworks in the city limits of Crouch.”

continued:
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Truck trailer hauling fireworks in northern Idaho catches fire, puts on ‘heck of a show’

by KBOI News Staff Wednesday, June 21st 2017


(Photo courtesy Kellogg Police)

Kellogg, Idaho (KBOI) — A truck hauling a trailer full of fireworks in northern Idaho caused quite the scene recently.

The Kellogg Police Department says an officer was called out to an “impromptu fireworks show’ due to hundreds of explosions.

“It was one heck of a show,” police said.

Police say the driver of the truck and trailer was parked at a gas station on Cameron Avenue when he noticed smoke coming from the vents and quickly pulled the moving fireworks show to a safe location.

“Because of his quick thinking no other structures were involved and no one was injured by the projectiles thrown from the burning trailer,” police said. “Looks like Kellogg gets two firework displays this year.”

source:
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Safe and Sane Fireworks Description

Boise County Connection


(click image for larger size)
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Idaho Fireworks Laws

link:
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Idaho’s Fireworks Paradox

Yes, you can buy can buy illegal fireworks (but don’t even think of using them here).

By George Prentice and Shelby Soule

Safe and sane fireworks aren’t allowed to emit sparks or showers more than 20 feet vertically. That means no bottle rockets and no aerial displays. Firecrackers are also illegal.

But the other half of the warehouse has a red floor, containing illegal fireworks–you can sell them in Idaho but you can’t use them in Idaho. In fact, customers are required to sign an affidavit promising to transport the explosives out of state, and there were plenty of people buying illegal fireworks on the two occasions BW visited.

Illegal fireworks are sold regularly at stands in Star and outside of Nampa. There, customers are also required to sign affidavits promising to transport the explosives out of state.

“It’s ironic, isn’t it? They sell them but then tell you can’t use them here,” said Dr. Kenneth Bramwell, an emergency medicine specialist at St. Luke’s Boise Medical Center. “Who is kidding who? I’m pretty sure those illegal fireworks are being lit up where people live. And that means they’re shooting them off in Boise.”

full story:
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Idaho News:

Staffing shortages put Valley sheriff’s office in bind

County commissioners approve higher wages

By Max Silverson for The Star-News June 22, 2017

A staffing shortage at the Valley County Jail in Cascade has forced the Valley County Sheriff’s Office to pull in patrol deputies to take shifts.

The problem will be compounded later this summer when two current employees depart for 4-1/2 weeks to receive training and two others begin maternity leave.

Bringing in patrol deputies to man the jail also creates gaps in patrols as the busy summer season ramps up, sheriff’s spokesperson Lt. Jason Speer said.

“We are not getting the number of applicants that we have in the past,” Speer said. “Those that have applied do not meet the minimum standards for employment.”

The problem extends to the courtroom at the Valley County Courthouse in Cascade, where security is normally provided by jail staffers.

full story:
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1 presumed dead after SUV plunges into Payette River

KTVB June 25, 2017

Smiths Ferry, Idaho – At least one person is presumed drowned after a vehicle went off of Idaho 55 and plunged into the Payette River.

The crash happened at about 5:30 p.m. Saturday, just north of Smiths Ferry.

According to the Valley County Sheriff’s Office, the small SUV missed a curve in the road, went down an embankment where it hit a rock and went into the river.

The SUV floated for a short time before sinking. Witnesses reported seeing a male struggling to exit the vehicle before it sank.

… The sheriff’s office says recovery efforts will resume early this week, possibly on Monday or Tuesday, and that the flow of the river will be lowered to help with the search. Lt. Jason Speer told KTVB that the highway will have to be shut down for about two hours during the recovery operation.

full story:
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Cascade agencies to lose $13,000 under new law

Park model home status changed from property to vehicles

By Max Silverson for The Star-News June 22, 2017

Governments in and around Cascade will lose almost $13,000 per year in revenues from property taxes due to a law passed by the 2017 Idaho Legislature.

The new law no longer taxes certain park models homes as property, but allows that they be registered as vehicles.

The city of Cascade is expected to lose the most money, over $8,000. Lesser amounts will be lost Valley County, Cascade Schools, the Cascade Rural Fire District, Cascade Medical Center, the Valley County Emergency Medical Services District and the Southern Valley County Recreation District.

Cascade got hit with the largest loss because of the large number of the park model homes that exist in the city.

full story:
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Wilks Brothers receive requests for access to land

Requests will be handled case by case, statement said

By Tom Grote for The Star-News June 22, 2017

The owners of large swaths of land in Valley and Adams counties have received a steady stream of letters from neighboring land owners asking them to provide access to the land.

Farris and Dan Wilks of Cisco, Texas, have received the requests for access to the 172,000 acres of private land in west-central Idaho they bought last summer.

But a statement from the brothers issued last week to The Star-News did not say if access would be given any time soon.

“To encourage a reduction in . . . trespassing along with an increase in respect for private property rights, we will only be granting access on a case-by-case basis,” said the statement from DF Development, the company under which the land is owned.

The Wilks Brothers lands were previously owned by Boise Cascade Corp and later Potlatch Corp., which managed the lands for timber harvest. The companies allowed the public to use the land for hunting, hiking, mountain biking, ATV use and other activities.

full story:
Map Wilks Brothers Properties (Red) (1).pdf:
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Auctioned lots on northern Idaho lake sell for $7.8M

6/24/17 AP

Boise, Idaho — The Idaho Department of Lands has auctioned 14 lots along Payette Lake for more than $7.8 million.

Officials said Friday that two of the lots had competitive bidding, where the current lessees lost to the winning bidders. Those lots sold for a combined $54,500 over appraised value — winning bidders must pay the lessees for the appraised value of their cabins and other improvements.

Proceeds from renting lakefront land had previously gone toward an education endowment, but disagreements over fair market value and getting a maximum return for the schools prompted the sales. The plan is to sell the state-owned residential cottage sites on Priest Lake and Payette Lake in northern Idaho by the end of 2019.

To date, 276 cottage sites have been sold — 145 lots at Priest Lake and 131 lots at Payette — for a total of approximately $120 million.

source:
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Idaho county passes Emergency Declaration ahead of eclipse

6/23/17 AP

Washington County Commissioners have passed an Emergency Declaration ahead of the August 21 solar eclipse.

KIVI-TV reports the county near the Oregon border is expected to get tens of thousands of visitors eager to witness the first coast-to-coast total solar eclipse seen in the U.S. in nearly a century.

A county disaster services spokesman says the commissioners passed the declaration Monday so they could ask the state for assistance in case more resources are need.

The declaration states that the solar eclipse may cause risk to public safety, financial damage, excess cost for labor, clean up and property damage in Washington County.

It will be in effect until the end of August.

source:
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Earthquake reported in western Idaho County

USGS marks magnitude 2.5 wobble

Idaho County Free Press June 23, 2017


The U.S. Geological Survey reported a magnitude 2.5 earthquake at a depth of about 3,300 feet centered 18 miles west northwest of White Bird at about 5:18 p.m. Wednesday, June 21

The U.S. Geological Survey reported a magnitude 2.5 earthquake at a depth of about 3,300 feet centered 18 miles west northwest of White Bird and 22 miles southwest of Cottonwood in the Snake River drainage above the Salmon River confluence — depending on uncertainty involved with the measurements.

The earthquake happened at about 5:18 p.m. Wednesday, June 21, according to USGS information.

source:
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Scam Alert:

New scam targets older citizens

Local News 8 – Jun 21, 2017

Idaho Falls, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – A new scam is targeting elderly people in Bonneville County.

The Bonneville County Sheriff’s Office is hearing from multiple victims complaining about a caller who claims to be a Detective or officer from the department. They are attempting to entice victims to obtain a money card and hand it over to the “officer”.

The Sheriff’s Office advises, no law enforcement agency or court collects money in that way for any kind of fine or warrant. While the Sheriff’s Office serves many kinds of civil papers and warrants in person, it does not contact people by phone to solicit money for fines or to solve other problems.

The Sheriff’s Office may call people by phone for law enforcement or investigative purposes, but there is no reason officers would ask someone to pay them via money cards from a store.

Deputies say older persons are also continuing to be scammed by persons claiming to be a relative, allegedly looking for money to get themselves out of jail. The callers claim they’re being held in a place where their older relative cannot reach them to verify the claim.

The Sheriff’s Office advises that if a claim sounds suspicious, take the time to verify who is calling you. Anyone who falls victim to a scam should report it to local law enforcement immediately and monitor all financial accounts.

source:
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Fire News:

Fire that destroyed home in Canyon County contained

by Scott Logan Monday, June 19th 2017

BLM crews have contained a 266 acre grass fire near Sand Hollow that destroyed a home Sunday.

The grass is dry, so dry that just one spark can start a blaze. Sunday, that spark was caused by people shooting firearms.

… In addition to the home, the fire destroyed some outbuildings and vehicles, but luckily, no one was hurt.

BLM spokeswoman Keri Steneck says most people don’t know the risk of guns staring fires.

“We’re just talking average bullets,” Steneck said. “We’re not talking tracer rounds or exploding targets. Most people don’t know a bullet in this dry grass can spark if it hits the right surface.”

full story:
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Out-of-control weed fire burns trailer near Sand Hollow area

KTVB June 23, 2017


(Photo: Mike di Donato/KTVB)

Sand Hollow – A trailer burned near the Sand Hollow area Friday afternoon after a weed fire got out of control, fire officials said.

Middleton Fire Deputy Chief Victor Isales said a man was burning weeds on property near the intersection of Sand Hollow Road and Old Hwy. 30 when the wind picked up.

The structure that burned is described as an unoccupied mobile home-type of trailer.

Fire crews from Eagle, Star, Middleton and Sand Hollow responded.

The fire is out and being mopped up.

The trailer is on the same property where a two-story house was completely destroyed by a massive blaze in December.

source w/video:
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Investigators: Gap Fire caused by shooters illegally using exploding targets

Local News 8 – Jun 20, 2017

Pocatello, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – The Bureau of Land Management said investigators determined the June 8 Gap Fire was caused by shooters illegally using exploding targets. The Gap Fire ultimately burned 486 acres.

BLM said the conditions for a wildfire aligned perfectly the day of the Gap Fire, and the potential of exploding targets to start wildfires is why the BLM Fire Prevention Order is in place.

The BLM prohibits exploding targets on BLM lands from May to October 20th.

BLM said violators can be charged with a misdemeanor and be liable for costs associated with fire suppression, rehabilitation and property damage.

source:
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Interagency Fire Prevention PSAs

BLM 6/20/2017

Did you know In the last couple of weeks, we have seen an increase in shooting/exploding target fires! Please remember that shooting steel-core/tracer ammunition and exploding targets are prohibited on Your Public Lands.

Please remember that shooting steel-core/tracer ammunition and exploding targets are prohibited on Your Public Lands.

Learn more here:
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Public Lands:

4thPayette
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Vehicle Travel Update on the Payette National Forest

June 23 (via FB)

The high elevation summits still have a considerable amount of snow and remain closed.

Lick Creek summit (McCall to Yellowpine) is closed. Access to Yellowpine is open via Johnson Creek Road, or the South Fork of the Salmon River Road.

Profile Gap Summit remains closed. Access from Yellowpine to Big Creek is still via air only.

Elk Creek Summit remains snowed in. Elk Creek Summit is between Warren and Big Creek. While snow is still abundant at the summit, adverse road conditions from Warren Summit to the South Fork of the Salmon make access to the Elk Creek area available only via OHV and walk in/pack in travel only.

Vehicle travel from Warren Summit to Sawmill Point is open to full sized vehicles, however; numerous road failures from Sawmill Point to the South Fork on the Valley County maintained section of the roadway make travel available only via OHV, not advisable, and at your own risk. Valley County is working toward a long term fix to open this section of the road to full sized vehicles, and is planning to open the roadway this summer. (See photo)

Vehicle travel on Goose Lake Road (also known as Brundage Mountain Road) is only as far as Brundage Reservoir due to snow levels. Access to Goose Lake, Hazard Lake and Granite Lake remains closed.

Know before you go! Contact one of our Ranger District offices to get updated information before heading out.

source and photo:

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Campground update for the McCall & New Meadows Ranger Districts

Payette NF June 23, 2017 (via FB)

Cold Springs, Last Chance, Lake Fork, Chinook, Burgdorf and Jeanette campgrounds are open.

Kennelly Creek campground will open this Saturday, June 24th. The campground is closed through Friday night as hazard tree removal is currently being conducted.

Upper Payette Lake campground is scheduled to open on Friday, June 30th.

Higher elevation campgrounds such as those in the Goose Lake and Hazard Lake areas are not yet accessible.
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Amanita Campground opens while Rainbow Point Campground remains closed

6/23/2017 Boise NF

Boise, Idaho, June 23, 2017 — The Boise National Forest, Cascade Ranger District has made the decision to keep Rainbow Point Campground closed for the summer. A 2016 spring assessment of the Rainbow Point Campground identified over 100 insect and disease affected trees that are a risk to public safety. Until they are removed the campground will not be opened.

The tree removal project was planned to take place over the winter, but the start of the project was delayed due to the abundant snow received over the winter and the very wet spring. Unfortunately, the delay made it unsafe to reopen Rainbow Point this summer.

Recreationists are advised not to walk through Rainbow Point Campground due to hazards associated with the active timber sale within the site. Completion of the work within both campgrounds, will create safer and healthier forested areas for campground visitors.

The hazard tree removal portion of the project in the adjacent Amanita Campground has been completed and the campground will open starting July 1. To make reservations for Amanita Campground, go to https://www.recreation.gov/

The Rainbow-Amanita Project is an estimated 25 acres located approximately 5 miles west of Donnelly, Idaho along National Forest System (NFS) road 422 in Valley County.

If you have questions regarding the project or timeline please contact Jake Strohmeyer, Cascade District Ranger at (208) 382-7400.

Linda Steinhaus
Public Affairs
Boise National Forest
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South Fork Restoration and Access Management Plan Update

USDA Forest Service 6/21/2017

Dear Interested Party:

The Forest Service is seeking scoping comments for the proposed South Fork Salmon River Restoration and Access Management Plan in Valley County, Idaho. The scoping document provides more detailed information about the project and is available along with other information on the project’s webpage at http://www.fs.usda.gov/project/?project=51257.

The Forest Service is contacting interested individuals, groups, and agencies to make them aware of the project and to gather pertinent feedback. Publication of the legal notice in the Idaho Statesman starts the 30 day public comment period and it is expected to publish on June 22, 2017. To be most helpful, please submit your scoping comments by July 24, 2017, and make your comments as specific as possible.

To assist the Forest Service in meeting its goals of reducing our carbon footprint and to achieve a sustainable operation, we are transitioning to a web-based electronic comment system that allows all interested parties to receive project materials (scoping documents, updates, draft and final National Environmental Policy Act [NEPA] documents, and decisions) by e-mail. This new system gives you direct control over which mailing lists you are subscribed to and immediate electronic access to project documents as they are posted online. It’s easy, it’s good for the environment, and it gives “on-demand” access to projects.

To subscribe to this new system, go online to the project website listed above. On the project website, you will see a box titled “Get Connected” on the right hand side of the page. Click on “Subscribe to Email Updates.” When you click on that item, you will be prompted to provide your e-mail address and select a password in the GovDelivery program. When you have logged in, you will be able to manage your account by subscribing to projects by Forest, District, project type, or project purpose. You will also be able to change your e-mail address and password. If you no longer wish to follow the project(s), simply delete your subscription. Once you are subscribed, you will receive all project information via e-mail, unless you request hard copies. To submit comments using the web form select “Comment on Project” under “Get Connected” on the right panel of the project website.

Only those who subscribe to the GovDelivery mailing list or submit comments will receive future correspondence on this project. Comments submitted anonymously will be accepted and considered; however, without an associated name and address, receiving further correspondences concerning these projects will not be possible.

Webform submission is preferred but written, facsimile, hand-delivered, verbal, and electronic comments concerning these projects will be accepted. Comments for the project may be submitted at Krassel Ranger District, c/o Caleb Zurstadt, 500 North Mission Building 1 McCall, ID 83638 or by fax to 208-634-0634. Hand delivered comment letters may be delivered during regular business hours of 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday-Friday, excluding holidays. Comments may also be submitted electronically via email to comments-intermtn-payette-krassel@fs.fed.us.

Comments received in response to this request will be available for public inspection and will be released in their entirety if requested pursuant to the Freedom of Information Act. Comments received in response to this request will also be available for public inspection on the “Public Comment Reading Room” on the project webpage http://www.fs.usda.gov/project/?project=51257.

For further information on this project, please contact Caleb Zurstadt, East Zone Fish Biologist, at czurstadt@fs.fed.us or 208-634-0618.

Sincerely,
Anthony B. Botello
Krassel District Ranger
Payette National Forest

Scoping letter:
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Big Creek-Yellow Pine-South Fork Collaborative Charter

The interim objective of the Big Creek/Yellow Pine collaborative effort is to formulate a recommendation consistent with the objectives of the Payette Forest Plan for disputed road closures in management areas 12 and 13 of the Krassel Ranger District.

This recommendation shall (i) meet all regulatory requirements, (ii) represent the input from and support of all stakeholders of the management areas as reflected in the collaborative’s situation statement* and (iii) will support an economically viable Travel Management Plan that includes appropriate roads and road design in the region considering, among others, road maintenance, road restoration, realignment or recontouring, seasonal openings, road-to- trail conversions and road decommissioning to support the following simultaneous outcomes:

continued: BCYPSOFINAL_charter_5-2013.doc
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BC YP SR Collaborative Meeting Minutes April 27, 2017

Notes by Douglas Miller

Meeting called to order @ 10:04 a.m. by Melissa Hamilton, University of Idaho Educator/Facilitator.

Welcome & Introductions-Melissa Hamilton began the introductions for the Collaborative and reviewed the Group Guidelines. Melissa reviewed the area contacts for the areas. She also discussed where the Collaborative could find the master list.

Action Items from Last Meeting:

1. Forest Service-Find information on Profile Gap. Has the land been surveyed? Is it on private Land? Anthony Botello reported on the Wilson Mine and it was determined that it was on private land and it is currently being surveyed by the Payette National Forest.

2. ICL and Nez Perce Tribe-will look into Environmental Impact of Full Sized Vehicles. There was no action taken regarding this matter.

Kyle Fend with Midas Gold presented on the potential routes to Thunder Mountain in context of Midas Gold Operating Plan.

continued BC-YP Meeting-April 27, 2017
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Big Creek/Yellow Pine/South Fork Collaborative Meeting Agenda

Payette National Forest
June 22nd, 2017; 10:00 AM to 3:00 PM
Valley County Commissioner’s Room
The commissioners room is across from the building department in Cascade
219 N Main St, Cascade, ID 83611
The meeting room is on the 2nd floor on the left.

continued BCYPSR 06-22 Agenda Final
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Public meetings planned on proposed Midas Gold mine

The Star-News June 22, 2017

Public meetings are planned next week in McCall, Cascade and Boise to cover plans by Midas Gold Corp. to mine gold in the Stibnite area of Valley County.

The schedule for the public meetings is as follows:

• Cascade: Tuesday from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. at The Ashley Inn, 500 N. Main St.

• McCall: Wednesday from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. at the Payette National Forest Supervisor’s Office, 500 North Mission St.

• Boise: Thursday, June 29, from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., and from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. at the Holiday Inn Express & Suites (Airport), 3050 S. Shoshone St.

Each meeting will be an open house but will include a 15-minute presentation about 30 minutes after the start of the meeting. There will be a short question and answer period following the presentation.

Midas Gold, based in Vancouver, B.C., filed its proposed plan of operation last September.

Midas Gold hopes that the Payette National Forest will approve its plans to remove what the company thinks is four to five million ounces of gold and 100 million to 200 million pounds of antimony, a fire-retardant material, at the site over 12 years.

The company predicts that up to 1,000 employees will work to build the mine over three years, after which an average of 600 people would work to remove the precious metals.

For more information on the application, go to http://fs.usda.gov/goto/StibniteGold.

Written comments also can be submitted at the website or to comments-intermtn-payette@fs.fed.us with the subject “Stibnite Gold EIS Scoping Comment.”

source The Star-News:
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North Pioneer Fire Salvage and Reforestation Project Decision is Now Available

USDA Forest Service 6/24/2017

Dear Interested Party:

On June 23, 2017, Forest Supervisor Seesholtz signed the Decision Notice and Finding of No Significant Impact (DN/FONSI) for the North Pioneer Fire Salvage and Reforestation Project selecting the Proposed Action (Alternative B). The DN/FONSI and Final Environmental Assessment (EA) are available on the Project web page: https://www.fs.usda.gov/project/?project=50789. To access the DN/FONSI and Final EA, please click on “Decision” under the Project Documents heading near the bottom of the web page which will open the “Decision Tab” where the documents are located. Hard copies of the DN/FONSI and Final EA are available upon request to Clint VanZile, Team Leader, by phone at 208-365-7018 or by email at cvanzile@fs.fed.us.

Implementation

An ESD pursuant to 36 CFR 218.21 was granted by the Chief of the Forest Service for this project on May 31, 2017. When it is determined that an emergency situation exists with respects to all or part of the proposed project or activity, the Proposed Action shall not be subject to the pre-decisional objection process and implementation may proceed immediately after notification that a decision has been made and documented in a decision notice (36 CFR 218.21(d)(1). Thus, with approval of an ESD, implementation of this decision will begin immediately after it has been mailed to all stakeholders who have participated in this planning process. The ESD documentation is posted on the Project web page, under the “Supporting” tab: https://www.fs.usda.gov/project/?project=50789.

Where to Get More Information

We appreciate the active involvement by interested stakeholders in the planning process for this project. We look forward to your continued involvement has we proceed with project implementation. As discussed with members of the Boise Forest Coalition, we are planning our first post-decision field tour on July 13, 2017.

For additional information regarding this project and opportunities to remain involved, please contact Randall Hayman, Project Manager, by phone at 208-807-0721 or email at rhayman@fs.fed.us or Clint VanZile, Team Leader, by phone at 208-365-7018 or by email at cvanzile@fs.fed.us.

Sincerely,
Melissa Yenko
Forest Environmental Coordinator
Boise National Forest
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Idaho auctions second Good Neighbor Authority timber sale on federal lands

Syringa-area cut to net $2.2 million

Idaho County Free Press June 23, 2017

Kamiah — The State of Idaho auctioned another U.S. Forest Service timber sale today as part of a State-federal partnership to increase management activities on federal lands in Idaho, Idaho Department of Lands announced Friday, June 23.

The Woodrat Salvage Sale on the Nez Perce-Clearwater National Forests is Idaho’s second project developed under Good Neighbor Authority (GNA), a federal law that enables the Forest Service to partner with the Idaho Department of Lands (IDL) to achieve restoration and resilient landscape objectives across ownership boundaries in Idaho.

Idaho Forest Group submitted the winning bid to purchase the Woodrat Salvage Sale, which will treat 345 acres by removing dead and dying burned timber and planting new trees. The final net value of the timber sale contract is $2,184,003. There were two bidders, resulting in the final net bid amount coming in $1,088,825.20 over the appraised price.

The project’s purpose is fuel reduction, economic recovery, and ecosystem restoration following the fires of 2015. It will generate an estimated 7.1 million board feet of timber, and new trees will be planted.

continued:
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BLM launches campaign to stop illegal dumping on public lands

“Don’t Dump Idaho” campaign in its 2nd year

Chris Oswalt Local News 8 – Jun 18, 2017

Jefferson County, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – The Bureau of Land Management is reminding anyone who enjoys Eastern Idaho’s public lands to properly dispose of garbage.

“It is a big problem,” Outdoor Recreation Planner, Monica Zimmerman said.

The BLM says the amount of trash being dumped on public lands is overwhelming. Since 2000, the BLM said it has documented, investigated or ticketed over 1,700 cases of illegal trash dumping.

… Illegal dumping on public lands can result in a $1,000 fine or one year in jail.

full story w/video:
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Idaho’s Solar Eclipse: Camping in the Path of Totality

By Idaho Bureau of Land Management June 20, 2017

On August 21, 2017, portions of Idaho will go dark during the total solar eclipse. The highly sought after camping sites in the “path of totality” may make an overnight adventure a bit competitive as thousands of visitors are expected and finding a camping location could become difficult. Here’s a look at what Idaho’s Bureau of Land Management wants you to know before heading out to Idaho’s public lands during this once-in-a-lifetime event.

continued:
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USFS Regional Intermountain News

June 14 Newsletter

Regional Spotlight
Wildfire Outlook
Sagebrush
Forest News
Partnerships
National Pollinator Week
About Us

link:
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Letter to Share:

Mystic Farm Wildlife Rescue, Inc. Update

June 23, 2017

Greetings from Mystic Farm!

I will start by apologizing for not sending an update sooner. We have been swamped! Sometimes it’s hard to eat, sleep, or even breath!

The season began on Memorial Day with a baby elk rescued off the freeway near Coeur d’ Alene. She had tumbled down a rock ledge and was dodging vehicles. Her little face was pretty beat up, but she was otherwise in good condition. After about a week respite, the season came on with a vengeance! We now have thirteen whitetail fawns keeping the little elk company. Most came to Mystic Farm due to the mother doe killed on the road or by predators, but we do have one broken leg (caught in a fence), one dog attack, and a couple babes that were more than likely “fawn napper” situations where it was too late to re-unite with the mother. We are very proud of being able to successfully talk people through putting the baby back (or not touching in the first place) at least ten times so far this spring/summer. We love those happy endings.

Link to letter at the Bonner County Daily Bee:

A wonderful addition to the rescue this year is Jerico, our summer intern from the University of Idaho Moscow. She is majoring in wildlife management and is a great fit here at the rescue. We provide her with a sweet little apartment (in the barn), and a small weekly stipend. She will also receive college credit for her time at Mystic Farm.

With as many rescues this year (and the season is not even half over!), we have had to double our projected expenses: another fifty lbs. of fawn formula/milk, elk formula/milk, more bottles/nipples, cases of diaper wipes (we go through them like mad!), straw and shavings for bedding, alfalfa, and so much more! Remember, all services at Mystic Farm are done through donations/volunteers only. There is no paid staff at Mystic Farm and often expenses come out of our own pockets. If you can find it in your heart – and your debit card! – to help us out, it would be so appreciated. The following is a list of some of the items we need:

Baby wipes, puppy potty pads, bleach, dish soap, portable baby crib, garbage bags, paper toweling, large electric tea kettles, straw, alfalfa hay, sweet COB, corn, Amazon and Walmart gift cards.

Thank you from the bottom of our hearts… and the babes thank you!

Dory, Hubcap, and Jerico

Mystic Farm Wildlife Rescue, Inc.
710 Sanctuary Hills
Sagle, ID 83860
208 241-7081
PayPal: mysticfarmrescue @ yahoo.com


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Video to Share:

Video of mother swallow and babies during fireworks in YP 2016


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Critter News:

4thCats
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Keep dogs safe during Fourth of July fireworks

The Star-News June 22, 2017

Dog owners should take steps to keep their pets safe long before the Independence Day weekend fireworks blast off, according to MCPAWS Regional Animal Shelter.

Dogs should be kept inside, kept in a fenced area or on a leash so they don’t run off.

Every year MCPAWS Regional Animal Shelter receives dogs of visiting and local residents who have been found after the fireworks.

If a dog is lost, call MCPAWS at 634-3647 and leave a detailed message with phone number if the shelter is closed.

source The Star-News:
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Please don’t leave pets (or children) in parked vehicles

Valley County Sheriff’s Office (via Facebook)

Yay!! It’s finally warming up and time to enjoy summer in Valley County! BBQ’s, fun and family gatherings. Let’s not forget about our four-legged family members this summer.

Animals can sustain brain damage or even die from heatstroke in just 15 minutes. Beating the heat is extra tough for dogs because they can only cool themselves by panting and by sweating through their paw pads. If you see a dog left alone in a hot car, take down the car’s color, model, make, and license plate number and contact dispatch at 208-382-5160. We will do our best to educate the owner.

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Keep Your Distance

Idaho Mountain Express June 23, 2017


Express photo by Roland Lane

A guard dog postures to protect a flock of sheep Wednesday south of Ketchum. The sheep, owned by Faulkner Land & Livestock of Gooding, are moving north to summer grazing areas in the mountains. People are advised to keep some distance from bands of sheep and the dogs that help protect them from predators and other dangers. The dogs can be aggressive if people or their pets get too close to the livestock.

source:
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Idaho woman saves bear from swollen Salmon River

by KBOI News Staff Tuesday, June 20th 2017

Salmon River, Idaho (KBOI) — A little cinnamon bear is lucky to not be swimming with the fishes.

The bear was attempting to swim across a swollen Salmon River when it got caught in an eddy in the middle of the river. The river has been running colder and stronger than normal because of heavy snowfall this winter.

The bear was so tired from trying to swim across that his head was going under the water, when KBOI viewer Liz Comer found him.

“He was so tired and going under when we came up on him,” Comer said on Instagram. “He definitely wouldn’t have made it much longer, but we used our engine to push him out of currents and got him to land!”

continued w/video:
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Wyoming grizzly bear seen with trap on paw

AP Jun 22, 2017

Jackson, Wyo. (AP) – A grizzly bear spotted three weeks ago in Wyoming with an animal trap clamped onto its front paw has wildlife advocates concerned.

The grizzly in the grip of the steel spring-loaded trap was seen in late May traversing a large snowfield in Teton County.

The Humane Society of the United States and Jackson-based Wyoming Untrapped are asking wildlife managers to find and treat the bear and also investigate the trapping incident. It’s illegal to trap grizzly bears.

Wyoming Game and Fish large carnivore manager Dan Thompson tells the Jackson Hole News & Guide agency personnel have spent many hours searching for the bear since the day it was spotted.

Thompson says it’s possible the bear was able to remove the trap on its own.

source:
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US officials to lift Yellowstone grizzly bear protections

By Matt Volz – 6/22/17 AP

Helena, Mont. — Protections that have been in place for more than 40 years for grizzly bears in the Yellowstone National Park area will be lifted this summer after U.S. government officials ruled Thursday that the population is no longer threatened.

Grizzlies in all continental U.S. states except Alaska have been protected under the Endangered Species Act since 1975, when just 136 bears roamed in and around Yellowstone. There are now an estimated 700 grizzlies in the area that includes northwestern Wyoming, southwestern Montana and eastern Idaho, leading the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to conclude that the population has recovered.

“This achievement stands as one of America’s great conservation successes,” Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke said in a statement.

continued:
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States won’t rush approval of Yellowstone grizzly hunts

6/22/17 AP

Wyoming, Montana and Idaho officials say they won’t declare open season on grizzly bears once federal Endangered Species Act protections are lifted for the bruins in the Yellowstone National Park region.

The three states that will take over jurisdiction of Yellowstone-area bears once federal protections are lifted this summer have submitted management plans that allow for limited hunting.

continued:
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Wolf Track photo – Valley County, Idaho

Photo by Camille Jones

Wolf track on Melton Reservoir near Donnelly. That’s a Blue Heeler dog track below it, and my hand for size comparisons. That is a BIG boy!
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KWVR Oregon Wolf Education weekly Wolf Report

Third week of June 2017
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Wolf Education International

Third week June 2017

Trust between state, ranchers elusive as wolves populate N. California
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Wolves of Alaska Became Extinct 12,000 Years Ago, Scientists Report

Stuart Wolpert July 03, 2007

The ancient gray wolves of Alaska became extinct some 12,000 years ago, and the wolves in Alaska today are not their descendants but a different subspecies, an international team of scientists reports in the July 3 print edition of the journal Current Biology.

The scientists analyzed DNA samples, conducted radio carbon dating and studied the chemical composition of ancient wolves at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of Natural History. They then compared the results with modern wolves and found that the two were genetically distinct.

“The ancient Alaskan gray wolves are all more similar to one another than any of them is to any modern North American or modern Eurasian wolf,” said study co-author Blaire Van Valkenburgh, UCLA professor of ecology and evolutionary biology.

continued:
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The Columbia Basin Bulletin

Weekly Fish and Wildlife News
http://www.cbbulletin.com
June 23, 2017
Issue No. 835

Table of Contents

* Feds Release Draft EIS For Guiding Columbia River Basin Harvest Actions 2018-2027; 6 Alternatives
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439151.aspx

* Oregon To Seek Permit To Lethally Remove Salmonid-Eating Sea Lions At Willamette Falls
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439150.aspx

* Pinniped Report: Sea Lions Leave Bonneville Dam With Likely High Salmon Predation Rate In Their Wake
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439149.aspx

* Invasive Northern Pike Spreading In Lake Roosevelt; Tribe Seeks Funds To Expand Removal Efforts
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439148.aspx

* Litigants In Salmon BiOp Case Working Together To Develop Court-Ordered Spill-For-Fish Plan In 2018
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439147.aspx

* Council Report Details Bonneville Power Fish/Wildlife Costs For 2016: $621.5 Million
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439146.aspx

* Receding Snowpack, Lower Flows Have River Managers Looking To Summer Operations
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439145.aspx

* Puget Sound Study: Pinniped Predation On Juvenile Salmon Making Salmon Recovery More Difficult
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439144.aspx

* Northwest U.S. House Members Urge Administration To Renegotiate Columbia River Treaty
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439143.aspx

* Pacific Northwest Will Need To Add New Capacity By 2021 To Maintain Adequate Power Supply
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439142.aspx

* Commerce Secretary Ross Names New Assistant Administrator To Head Up NOAA Fisheries
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439141.aspx

* NW Power/Conservation Council Approves New Research Plan To Guide Research Aimed At “Critical Uncertainties”
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439140.aspx
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Fish & Game News:

South Fork of the Salmon River will not open for Chinook fishing

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Specialist
Monday, June 19, 2017 – 3:46 PM MDT

Lochsa River and Upper Salmon will open June 22 as scheduled.

A poor return to the South Fork of the Salmon River means anglers will miss a year of Chinook fishing on the popular river, but anglers can still get a crack at the fish starting Thursday, June 22 on the Lochsa and upper Salmon River upstream of Challis. Here are the boundary details in the season and rules.

When fisheries managers set the summer seasons earlier this month, fish were later-than-usual crossing Bonneville Dam on the Columbia, but at the time, it appeared there would be enough fish to support a modest season on the South Fork of the Salmon River. Unfortunately, not enough fish have returned for sport harvest.

“The front end of the run appeared to be near the forecast, but midway through the run, the bottom fell out,” anadromous fish and hatcheries coordinator Sam Sharr said.

Salmon fishing will also continue on a short section of the lower Salmon River and Little Salmon River until further notice.

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F&G News Releases

https://idfg.idaho.gov/press
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Fun Critter Stuff:

A Fox Steals A Man’s Golf Ball And Has The Time Of His Life!


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Patriotic squirrels steal family’s American flags

by Robert Price, News 4 San Antonio Friday, June 2nd 2017


Two squirrels were recorded stealing American flags from a San Antonio family’s front yard. (Courtesy Devin Rivera-Duque)

San Antonio (WOAI) – This week, a local Air Force veteran was heartbroken to discover all the American flags in his front yard had been stolen.

But the man’s frustration actually turned into laughter after a neighbor showed him video of the thieves in action.

Jennifer Northam showed us what’s left of her father’s flag memorial – nothing but sticks, the flags forcibly torn off.

“It wasn’t like they had just fallen off,” Northam said. “Both of us were kind of heartbroken. We were just confused because we’re new to the neighborhood. We didn’t know if somebody did it or what happened.”

Little did they know, their neighbor Devin Rivera-Duque witnessed the whole thing.

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Tips & Advice:

Don’t be fooled by energy saving myths

Local News 8 – Jun 22, 2017

Idaho Falls, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – Rocky Mountain Power officials want to dispel a few common myths about cooling off that will help you save money on your bill.

Myth: Leaving the AC running when you are away saves energy
It takes a lot of energy to cool down a sweltering house, but it is definitely a waste of money and electricity to keep your AC running when you are gone. The best option is to use a programmable thermostat that can regulate the temperature, letting your house warm up during the day and then return to your chosen comfort level by the time you get home. Also, make sure you set your air conditioner thermostat as high as comfortable – Rocky Mountain Power recommends 78 degrees or higher when you’re home and 85 degrees while you are away.

Myth: Cranking the thermostat lower will cool the house off faster
The majority of residential central air systems have only one fan speed. So regardless of the set temperature, the house will adjust at the same rate. Dropping the thermostat to 65 degrees won’t cool the house faster. You could just be wasting an extra 10 degrees or so worth of energy and money.

Myth: Leaving your ceiling fans on while you’re away keeps your home cool
Fans cool people, not rooms. They are effective in helping you stay cool while reducing your air conditioning costs. Plus, since they are targeted to a specific area, they can be more cost-effective than cooling your entire home. But treat them like a light – turn them off when you leave the room.

Myth: Closing vents in some rooms will boost cooling in others
Nope. The majority of modern central air systems are designed to distribute air throughout an entire house. So if you close a vent in one room, the system keeps cooling and pumping to that area without the air getting into the space. Basically you are paying to keep the inside of your A/C ducts cool. Plus, it can be hard on your system since the more vents you close, the harder your unit has to work to push the air out.

Myth: Air conditioning is the only way to keep cool
Evaporative coolers, or swamp coolers have come a long way over the past few decades. They can cool hot, dry air by up to 30 degrees through the natural process of evaporation, while using only enough electricity to power a fan. They work best in the dry, arid climates of the west because they add moisture to the air. Whole house fans, portable fans and ceiling fans are also really effective ways to cool off in the summer.

source:
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Idaho Power offers suggestions on how your wallet can beat the heat

Keeping power bill costs down for the summer

Misty Inglet Jun 23, 2017 (KIFI/KIDK)

Temperatures are starting to rise outside, but power companies are offering advice on how to make sure you don’t get burned with your power bill this summer.

Idaho Power said during the summer many of its customers power bills do rise. Steven Muse, with Idaho Power, said there are several dos and don’ts when it comes to beating the summer heat.

“Some of the common mistakes people make in the summertime that spike their bills is they leave their blinds open and then all of that radiation comes from the sun and heats your home up,” Muse said. “You want to make sure that your home is well-sealed. You want to change your air conditioning filter, make sure that’s good. One of the other don’ts that people do is they utilize their stove quite a bit and their oven instead of utilizing the microwave or cooking outside.”

Some other things Muse said to be careful of are turning your air conditioner on a low temperature to try and cool your home off faster. If no one is home, turn the air conditioning unit off. Muse said circulating fans wherever needed can be a good alternative to air conditioning as fans use less energy.

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Seasonal Humor:

TreeAge-a
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Idaho History June 25, 2017

Idaho Outlaws

BookOutlawTalesofIdaho-cOutlaw Tales of Idaho

by Randy Stapilus

Massacres, mayhem, and mischief fill the pages of Outlaw Tales of Idaho. Ride with horse thieves and cattle rustlers, stagecoach, and train robbers. Duck the bullets of murderers, plot strategies with con artists, hiss at lawmen turned outlaws. A refreshing new perspective on some of the Rocky Mountain’s most infamous reprobates.

link to: Book at Amazon
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Outlaws in Idaho

The influx of the bravo and the criminal classes into Walla Walla, Orofino, and Florence, during the years of 1861 and 1862, before the Territory of Idaho was created, and before the exodus into Boise basin and other camps subsequently discovered, by those who were not hanged or killed, was the fundamental cause of Idaho’s gaining such an unenviable reputation for lawlessness during the earlier years of its organization.

These men were, in many instances, fugitives from justice in other states, and Walla Walla being the largest town in what was then eastern Washington, was the first place in which they took refuge, and it was usually but a short time after their arrival when they made their presence felt in a way that was generally followed by a funeral.

The following is a roster of a few of the prominent characters in the drama of murder, robbery and shame enacted during the early mining days of the northwest, before and after the organization of Idaho Territory, together with a brief synopsis of the career of some of them before coming to Idaho, and the sanguinary end which terminated their lawless activities:
“Cherokee Bob,” Henry Plummer, Bill Bunton, Charley Ridgley, Reeves, Charley Harper, Mayfield, Ferd Patterson, Hickey, Matt Bledsoe, David English, William Peoples, Nelson Scott, Bill Willoughby, Boone Helm and “Dutch Fred.”

In addition to this list of notables they had a large following of minor satellites who seldom rose above the rank of horse thieves or “bogus” dust operators, but who were useful to their superiors as spies, political boosters and jurymen.

~ Cherokee Bob ~

“Cherokee Bob” was a native of Georgia, his mother being a half-blood Cherokee, for which reason he gained the picturesque sobriquet by which he was known. He was a bitter partisan of the south, and upon his arrival at Walla Walla could talk or think little else than the great superiority of the southern soldier over his northern compeer.

Those who have witnessed a theatrical performance in a mining or frontier town are not likely to forget the boisterous enjoyment with which the audience fills up the intervals between acts. A bar where liquor is sold is almost invariably one of the conveniences attached, and most of the audience during the interims in the performance visit and patronize this inspiring adjunct of the entertainment, while others indulge in whistling, caterwauls, stamping feet, and other demonstrations expressive, usually, of good humor and the bubbling over of the surcharged animal spirits of men, who after all are only grown-up boys.

Walla Walla, during the time of the mining excitement, incident to the discoveries of gold in Orofino and Florence, was a typical frontier mining-supply town; here were gathered during the winter of 1861-1862 a heterogeneous population, made up of all the elements which represent the “good” and the “bad” in the human family. The men who sold dry goods and groceries, the men who made and sold what was appropriately called “Lightning whiskey,” the men who robbed stages and the unsuspecting wayfarers, the rollicking cow-boy, the faro dealer and his “look-out,” the minister of the gospel, the judge who pronounced sentence upon offenders, with a sprinkling of Uncle Sam’s soldiers from the garrison near the town. All these, and other kinds, were mingled together on the streets and in the business houses and places of amusement. Such a crowd of cosmopolites is rarely seen in any country.

Fort Walla Walla was situated about half a mile from the town limits, and the troops stationed there were permitted to visit the embryo city on “leave,” some of them attending the theaters during nearly all the performances. At the time of which I write, the fort was garrisoned with California volunteers, the regulars formerly stationed there having been ordered east to the seat of war.

One of the volunteer companies in the garrison was recruited in Placer county, California, many of them having enlisted at “Dutch Flat,” and were personally known to the writer who, at the time of their enlistment, resided there. They were all young men of good families, and most of them had money of their own when they volunteered. Their enlistment resulted from their intense patriotism. They were led to believe that in the near future they would be ordered to go east, there to engage in the struggle then in progress. But, owing to the need of seasoned troops, the regulars were sent to the front and the volunteers were substituted to do garrison duty. Hence the presence of the Placer county boys at Fort Walla Walla. They were sober, industrious young men, and though their uniforms were those of privates in the ranks, they were as far above the average civilian roisterers who made day and night hideous and dangerous in the town as could be imagined.

“Cherokee Bob” was consumed with wrath every time he saw these clean-limbed young “hirelings of Abe Lincoln,” as he called them, on the streets, and rarely failed to use some insulting epithet within their hearing; but as they always came to town in little squads of three or four, and were armed with regulation revolvers, he hesitated to start a street fight. He was, nevertheless, determined to show his superiority over such “hirelings” and merely waited for an opportunity to arrive when he could display his prowess and venom without incurring any great danger to himself.

Choosing a night when a popular play was being performed in the theatre, and a few of the soldier boys were present, he having previously arranged with a deputy sheriff who acted in the capacity of peace officer in the show, and who, like himself, was a rabid Secessionist, to interfere when the usual noisy demonstration began at the end of the first act, and to precipitate a disturbance, if possible, by using insulting language.

The program was successfully carried out. Porter, the deputy sheriff, at the time agreed upon, sprang from his chair and striding in front of them, yelled “Dry up there, you brass mounted hirelings, or I’ll snatch you baldheaded.” The insulting manner coupled with the insulting language, produced the desired effect. Smarting under the reproach, one of the young men inquired “Why do you single us out, when there are others who are more boisterous?” Porter waited for no other provocation, but drawing and cocking his revolver with one hand, he seized the soldier nearest to him with the other and jerked him into the aisle, calling on the deputy city marshal, “Cherokee Bob,” and several of his associates who were conveniently near, to assist in arresting him. The plan, as prearranged, was carried out without a hitch.

The soldiers, recovering from their first surprise, offered resistance, and a melee resulted.

Cherokee Bob was in his element; with a revolver in one hand and a bowie knife in the other, he sprang at his victims. When the smoke had cleared and quiet was restored Bob and his allies had disappeared, but two of the soldiers lay dead on the floor and others were horribly mangled.

The attack was so unexpected, so sudden and deadly, that the soldiers could make but little resistance. Porter and the deputy marshal were both shot through their legs—the latter was crippled for life.

Before daylight the next morning Cherokee took his departure to Lewiston, riding a stolen horse. Reaching his destination, he soon became the owner of a saloon where he was an efficient aid to the band of organized cut-throats who then made Lewiston a rendezvous, finally drifting into Florence with a painted female called Cynthia, whom he had won from the notorious gambler and murderer, Mayfield, of whom I shall make mention later. The woman referred to was finally the cause of his death. There was a ball in Florence some time after their arrival there, and Cynthia insisted that she must attend. Having made known her desire to Bob, he said in reply, “You shall go and be respected as a decent woman ought to be.” So he
asked Willoughby, who was suspected of being a member of the Plummer gang, to take her, at the same time saying, “If things don’t go right, just report to me.” She assented to go with Willoughby, and, doubtless as Bob had anticipated, they were met by scowls and evidences of disgust on every hand. The women present were indignant and gathered into groups by themselves; they soon determined to leave the room if Cynthia was allowed to remain. The managing committee, after holding a conference, informed Willoughby that he and his partner must retire, which they accordingly did.

One of the managers was named Williams; he was a saloon keeper and was familiarly called “Jakey” Williams; the other was Orlando Robbins, known to everyone as “Rube” Robbins. Bob was furious when he learned that Cynthia had been expelled from the ball room, and desired to punish someone for the indignity she had suffered. Choosing as his intended victims the members of the committee who had ordered his mistress to leave the ball, Jakey and Rube, Cherokee Bob and Willoughby the next morning determined to wipe out the offenders. Arming themselves to the teeth, they set out on their murderous purpose.

Men like Jakey and Rube were seldom found unprepared, and realizing no doubt that the ball room incident would lead to serious trouble, they were watchful; so when Bob and Willoughby appeared with weapons in their hands hostilities began. In the interchange of shots which followed, Willoughby fell, mortally wounded, dying in a few moments. Bob was punctured by several bullets and died in his saloon, where he was carried, on the third day after the gunfight.

It is told that in speaking of the relative courage of Jakey Williams and Rube Robins, Bob, before he became unconscious, said “They are both brave men, with this difference: Jakey always steps aside to get clear of the smoke of his revolver, while Rube pushes through it and keeps on coming, getting nearer his adversary with each shot.”

Thus ended the lives of Cherokee Bob and Willoughby. They were buried in the Florence cemetery, among other unmarked graves—the final resting place of companions in crime, who, like them, were murderers. Their victims, in many instances, received the same obsequies, and now repose in unknown, unmarked graves, among the rock-strewn mountains of the northwest.

~ Henry Plummer ~

Next on the list of these notables comes the name of Henry Plummer. In the spring of 1861 Henry Plummer and wife were registered in the leading hotel of Lewiston. They were strangers to everyone in town except, perhaps, a few gamblers who had known Plummer in Nevada or California, and these men, following the usual close-mouthed methods of their calling, said nothing about his antecedents. He was a man of gentlemanly bearing, and being accompanied by a quiet, gentle appearing woman whom he claimed as his wife, no one suspected their illicit relations. However, it was only a couple of days before he had established his reputation as a gambler which left no doubt as to his true character.

The woman he claimed to be his wife was abandoned in a short time, penniless and alone among strangers; she told how Plummer with professions of undying love had persuaded her to leave her husband and three children to live with him. Not having the courage to return to her family and confess her fault, she abandoned herself to the downward path which always leads onward to untold sorrows—an early and miserable death. Thus was Plummer’s entrance into Lewiston marked by her disgrace and degradation.

Being a gambler, his profession brought him in contact with the rough and dissolute characters when they arrived at Lewiston. It is customary in mining and frontier towns for new arrivals to “take in” the town, meaning that they shall visit all the various resorts—such as saloons, dance halls, etc. These tours are generally undertaken as soon as possible after their arrival at a new camp. Since gambling was usually conducted in these places, Plummer, as a member of the “profess,” soon became a “hail fellow well met” with the patrons of the amusements provided in these resorts.

The criminal classes soon began to recognize in him a leader, and flocked to his standard. Being a keen judge of character, he was able to choose from the common herd or “would-be” desperadoes, the most reckless and daring, the ones who combined with these traits the greatest skill in the use of firearms. These he organized into a band of choice cut-throats, who were governed by iron-clad rules, the enforcement of which was left to a committee, Plummer being its chairman, or head; in fact, he was chief of outlaws.

Outlaws and Their Methods.

The Outlaw Chief remained in Lewiston during the summer of 1862, following his profession—gambling. Owing to his demeanor, which was quiet and gentlemanly, and to the fact that his clothes were, as a rule, tailor-made and neat, a stranger meeting him would not have suspected him to be the depraved character he was.

By making occasional trips, usually in the night, to interior points, he supervised and directed the operations of the band. What purported to be a road house was established by them on the traveled route between Lewiston and Walla Walla, at Pataha Creek; another was started by them between Lewiston and Orofino. Although these resorts which they termed “shebangs,” were ostensibly managed by two men, the traveler might observe several other hangers-on, who were supposed to be guests, but who were actually silent partners holding themselves ready for action.

These resorts were surrounded by high hills in all directions. These hills were cut with ravines, while numerous fiats and little valleys were inserted between. Bunch grass and water being plentiful, these places were veritable paradises for horse thieves.

It should be remembered that in those days and for many years later there were no railroads in any direction of the country tributary to the Columbia river, even wagon roads outside of the Willamette and Walla Walla valleys were seldom to be expected, hence the early arrivals at the Orofino and Florence mines generally found their way there in small parties, riding saddle horses or mules, bringing with them on pack animals their camp equipage, including mining tools and a quantity of provisions. During the season of high water boats ascended the Columbia and Snake rivers, bringing passengers and merchandise to Lewiston, but after arriving there those whose destination was one of the interior mining camps were compelled to procure saddle and pack animals to continue their journey, therefore those who realized that fact usually brought their own equipment, and were thus prepared to travel in any direction rumor announced a discovery of new diggings. Lewiston was the point of divergence to all the interior mining camps in the Clearwater and Salmon river region during 1861 and 1862, hence all those destined for Orofino, Elk City, Florence or Warrens went first to Lewiston, where it was the almost universal custom for travelers to remain for a day or even longer, to rest themselves and animals, but more especially to gather information concerning any new discoveries which might have been made. Thus as will be readily understood with the arrival and departure each day of so many prospectors and adventurers, the town of Lewiston was all that is implied in the term “typical frontier mining town.”

During the stay made by travelers in Lewiston for rest or other purpose during those early mining days, they were carefully “sized up,” by Plummer’s emissaries, especially those who were on the return journey from the mines, with the object of ascertaining if possible, whether they carried any considerable amount of gold dust; accurate descriptions were also taken of their saddle and pack animals, including color and brands; bills of sale were then made out in conformity with the descriptions conveying title to the animals at some prior date to the keeper of one of the road houses either above or below, dependent upon which direction the travelers were going, the bill of sale was then dispatched by courier to the man in whose name it was drawn so as to reach him before the arrival of the men with the stock.

All being cunningly arranged in advance, as soon as the victims came opposite the house, they were halted and the demand made “Where did you get those animals? Get off, or I’ll blow you off.” These requests were made emphatic by the display of double-barreled shot guns or revolvers. The astonished travelers could only comply. They were then shown the bills of sale as a cause for the demand, and if the real owners of the stock were sensible men they left their property with the robbers and resumed their journey on foot. But if, as was sometimes the case, they offered resistance, their journey ended in an improvised cemetery, provided for just such occasions.

In the mining camps and frontier towns, a style of building much in vogue during their first establishment, was built by erecting a frame of poles upon which rafters of the same kind of material were set up, then sides, ends and roof were covered with sheeting or common brown muslin. Such buildings require no windows and even the doors were mere frames of small poles covered with the same material.

This class of structures was the kind that largely lined the streets of Lewiston during the early mining excitement, which followed the Orofino and the Florence discoveries. There were no street lamps none were needed, for the sunshine lighted the interior of the buildings by day, without the aid of windows, while the lamps and candles used at night illumined the streets. Such buildings, obviously, presented slight opposition to burglars and as a protection against stray bullets they were a failure. To provide against the last it was customary to pile sacks of flour or sand around the beds of those who slept.

Illustrative of the foregoing, a German named Hildebrandt kept a saloon during the winter of 1861, and part of January, 1862, in one of these structures. He was a jovial character, and his place was a favorite resort for both Germans and Americans. His saloon was not a gambling house but was conducted in a quiet, orderly manner. He was known to be the possessor of considerable gold dust, which the Plummer gang determined to appropriate. Between twelve and one o’clock one cold January night the door was burst from its hinges and a volley of revolver shots were fired in the direction of the large bed near the door where Hildebrandt and two friends were asleep. Hildebrandt was killed by the first volley; his friends returned the fire, sprang from bed and escaped with the treasure.

His murderers then proceeded to search the place, and being disappointed in their search, uttering oaths and threats, marched out through the crowd of citizens who had assembled. They were known, but no one attempted to arrest them. The following day, however, a meeting of the citizens was held for the purpose of devising means to arrest the further progress of crime, and for punishing the murderers of Hildebrandt.

This was the first effort made in Lewiston looking to the protection of the people, and as the lawless element composed a large percent of the population in Lewiston, the movement was pregnant with serious possibilities. Henry Plummer took a conspicuous part in the proceedings and made an eloquent plea for conservative action. He explained the horrors of anarchy and urged the assembly not to take any action for which they might afterward be sorry. Since Plummer was known only as a gambler, and but few suspected that he had any connection with the robberies and murders which were of such frequent occurrence, his speech had the effect of dispersing the gathering and prevented an organization from being formed.

Among those who kept saloons at that time was a man named Ford. He was a courageous character, and while in the saloon business to make money, yet he never associated with the rough element; nor did he encourage them to frequent his place, but on the contrary he was their avowed enemy.

When the foregoing meeting was disorganized without taking action to punish the murders of Hildebrandt, he denounced those present as cowards, and accused them of “weakening.”

The murdered man had a brother in Orofino, who, when he learned of the tragedy, at once announced his determination to visit Lewiston for the purpose of wreaking vengeance upon the assassins. They learned of his intention, had a message conveyed to him, stating that if he started to Lewiston he would not reach there alive. The threat, as was intended, had the effect of intimidating him, causing him to abandon his purpose. Thus the assassins escaped justice that time. But they met their Nemesis later.

Nothing except the possible organization of a vigilance committee was feared by the Plummer gang, and for any man to advocate the organization of such an instrument of justice was to mark him for destruction. Hence, Patrick Ford, who was present at the meeting, and who insisted on action being taken, was listed for death. Ford had opened an additional business in Orofino, and it was known soon after Hildebrandt’s murder that he was going up to Orofino with a party of dancing girls to open a dance hall. This was thought to afford a favorable opportunity to dispose of him, so word was sent out to the “shebang” on the road, to intercept him, and to put a stop to his proposed vigilante activities. But Ford, suspecting their intentions, circled around the place and thus avoided the encounter, which doubtless would have been fatal to him.

Having heard of his escape, Plummer, Charlie Ridgley and Reeves mounted horses and followed on the trail, their route being marked with several robberies. When within a few miles of Orofino, two footmen were espied approaching, one being some distance in advance of the other. As the foremost one came up he was ordered to hold up his hands, a command that was readily complied with. He was searched, but nothing of value was found on his person. They then informed him that he would better move along and get out of the country as soon as possible, for the rough mountains were a poor place for a man who was broke.

By the time this search and colloquy were finished, the second pedestrian had arrived; he also was a Frenchman and proved more profitable than the first, for notwithstanding that ha stoutly asserted he had no money, their search revealed a well-filled buckskin purse containing approximately one thousand dollars in gold dust. Jubilant over their success, they dashed wildly into Orofino with the impetuosity of a band of stampeded buffaloes. Reining up in front of Ford’s saloon they dismounted; entering the saloon they demanded the barkeeper to serve them with liquor—Ford being out. After they had sated their thirst they proceeded to demolish the furniture, including the bar fixtures.

During the confusion Ford arrived, and with a gun in each hand he ordered them to leave the saloon and town. They backed out of the place, gained their horses and rode to a feed-yard, where Ford soon followed, demanding why they had not left town. This demand was answered with a shot, which precipitated a fight in which Ford was killed and Charley Ridgley was severely wounded. The latter was carried to a friendly ranch near by and given such careful treatment that he eventually recovered. Plummer now changed his headquarters to Florence, from whence his associates made frequent incursions along the different lines of travel leading to and from that camp.

New discoveries having been made in other sections, many began leaving the older camps. Among these were Plummer, Reeves and Ridgley, the latter having recovered sufficiently from his wounds to accompany them to Elk City, their new field. Here he met a coterie of his former California pals, but he suddenly disappeared and was next heard of in Deer Lodge. The former field of his activities was immediately occupied by others of his ilk equally unscrupulous, some of whose deeds will be recorded later.

At this time Plummer seems to have parted from nearly all the members of his old Lewiston gang except Jack Cleveland. Becoming more secretive in his movements, he formed a new band of congenial spirits.

He visited nearly all the camps situated along the eastern slope of the Rocky Mountains in Montana, but while the new members of his gang made robbery a business, and practiced the theory that “dead men tell no tales,” Plummer concealed his affiliations so well that for a long time he remained unsuspected outside the membership of his organization of freebooters.

The band of which he was chief at that time consisted entirely of new members whom he had enrolled since leaving Elk City save one man, Jack Cleveland, who had crossed the Bitter Root Mountains into Montana with him. His greatest fear seemed to be that Cleveland, while in his cups, would reveal some of the murderous enterprises in which they had participated before leaving Lewiston and Florence, Plummer having thus far succeeded in keeping his former record a secret from his new pals. The suspicions he entertained toward Cleveland finally led to an open rupture one day while they were in Bannock. This was settled in a pistol duel in which Cleveland was killed. Plummer then fled to Rattle Snake Creek, where he was captured by a posse from Bannock. In his trial which followed he was acquitted.

Criminals Active in Mining Camps.

As soon as the snow disappeared in the spring of 1863, many of the miners and prospectors who had been cooped up in Bannock (now in Montana) all winter, started out on prospecting trips. Other gulches containing rich deposits of placer gold were soon discovered.

The entire district was in the Territory of Washington until April 3rd, 1863, when the Territory of Idaho was created. It embraced all the new gold discoveries in and around Bannock and Helena. (There were two towns, or mining camps, named Bannock in Idaho during 1863).

Since the country at that time was not equipped with the machinery of government, the miners depended upon themselves to maintain local government. Each camp elected peace officers, and laws were enacted o secure the rights, peace and safety of the inhabitants. It having been determined to elect me sheriff for all the camps east of the Bitter Root Mountains, Plummer, the outlaw, became an active candidate for the nomination on the Democratic ticket. With the support of the members of his gang, and with that of the sporting elements in the towns, he triumphed. Thus with the aid of hundreds of good men who voted the Democratic ticket on account of “principle,” the vilest and most cold-blooded murderer who ever polluted the mining camps of the northwest was made sheriff—a man whose trail for years had been marked by the graves of his victims.

His position as sheriff enlarged his opportunities for evil until a long-suffering and forbearing public was aroused, which resulted in the forming of a vigilance committee, at whose hand he, and a dozen others of his partners in crime, expiated their sins on the gallows.

Nearly all of those who were Plummer’s associates in Lewiston, Florence and Elk City, including Charlie Ridgley, who was wounded while assisting in murdering Ford, found their way to Boise Basin, where we shall refer to them later.

~ Bunton ~

The next name on the roster of the lawless men who came to Lewiston in the early 60’s is Bunton—stool-pigeon, horse and cattle thief, and murderer. He had killed a man at a ball near Walla Walla, was tried for murder, and acquitted for want of sufficient evidence. Next, he killed his brother-in-law, escaping the officers by flight. He then located a ranch on Pataha creek, where he lived with an Indian woman. It was soon ascertained that his business consisted of hiding and selling stolen stock.

The officers raided his ranch, but he had doubtless been warned of their intentions and made his escape, disguised as an Indian wrapped in a blanket. It was at this time that he entered Lewiston and soon became a member of the Plummer gang. As long as Plummer remained there, Bunton proved a valuable aid in all of his nefarious ventures, but when his chief took wing, he too became alarmed and fled to Rattle Snake Creek, where he was soon captured and hanged by the Montana vigilance committee.

~ Charles Ridgley ~

Next on the roster is Charles Ridgley, who took a prominent part in the murder of Ford at Orofino. Before this, however, he shot a man named Gilchrist in Walla Walla, and thinking that he had killed him, said “That takes a load off my shoulders.” Gilchrist was badly wounded but he recovered. Ridgley escaped arrest by flight. Going to Lewiston, he joined the Plummer gang. After recovering from the wounds received at the time of the Ford murder, he went with Plummer to Elk City and later drifted to Idaho City and South Boise, where he distinguished himself as a friend of Ferd Patterson, a gambler, gun-man and political henchman of E. D. Holbrook. He finally disappeared from the eyes of the writer. Charley was a good fellow of his kind when the cards broke his way; his value as a political henchman consisted solely in his reputation of being a “gun-fighter,” and a “bad man.”

~ Charley Reeves ~

The next undesirable citizen is Charley Reeves, who accompanied Plummer and Ridgley to Elk City, whence he went to Bannock. While among the Bannocks in January, 1863, he bought from them a squaw, but she was so cruelly abused by him that she fled to her own people. Reeves and a friend named Moore tracked her to a tepee where she had taken refuge, and on her refusal to return with him, he resorted to violence, whereupon an old Indian chief forcibly ejected him from the tepee. Reeves and Moore, joined by a man named Wm. Mitchell, marched and countermarched by the place, firing volley after volley into it. The brave old chief was killed, together with a lame Indian, a papoose, and a Frenchman, named Cazette, who had entered the tepee to discover the cause of the disturbance. Two other curious individuals were badly wounded.

After the dastardly deed had been perpetrated the performers fled, but were captured the following day, brought back and tried by a jury, who brought in a verdict of “not guilty.” While the prisoners were guilty, and everyone knew it, the jury was afraid to bring in a verdict in accordance with the facts, they being intimidated by the criminal class, who were in the majority, and who crowded the room where the trial was being held, brandishing revolvers and threatening to take life for life.

This trial proved disastrous to the community, for it encouraged the lawless element, far and near, convincing them that they held the upper hand and had the business and law-abiding citizen cowed.

Emboldened by the foregoing result, and feeling that disguise was no longer necessary, the country was soon startled by a series of murders and robberies more brazen and shocking than any of the others that had preceded them.

The difficulties heretofore encountered by those who would have gladly pursued drastic measures in order to secure a reasonable degree of safety for life and property, were chiefly found in the newness of the country, which precluded the people, who were gathered there from almost every quarter of the globe, from becoming acquainted with one another.

Neighbors did not know one another hence, as was wise, they hesitated to suggest an organization designed to oppose lawless methods, lest the man approached might be a member of the banditti. There being no church nor society organization with which the better classes could affiliate, it was every man for himself. The road-agents had the only perfect organization, and it shielded its own. But a time came when conditions were altered.

An old man who had come alone to the camp secured a claim. After building a cabin, he had begun to work his ground. The hardships he was obliged to undergo were more than his enfeebled frame could withstand. Overcome by sickness, he abandoned his efforts when it was too late. Confined to his cabin and bed, he was given such treatment and care as the rough, rescue firing upon the guard and getting shot through the arm in return. When this was understood the people returned to their beds, leaving the guards to their dangerous vigil.

The next morning almost the entire populace visited the building where the prisoners had been confined, but no guards halted their approach. Drawing closer, they discovered that the guards had departed, leaving the doors ajar. Timidly pushing them open, the most venturesome entered. Here they found hanging by their necks from the joists, the rigid corpses of the men who had been, in life, thieves, road agents, murderers, and all-around “bad actors.” “The wages of sin is death.”

It was told of a very humane attorney whose sympathies were known to favor the oppressed highwaymen and horse thieves, that he appeared at the door of the building where the prisoners were confined, during the afternoon after their incarceration, and asked to see them, but was refused admittance and told to come back in the morning, which he accordingly did. In answer to his second request to see the accused, he was told to step inside, and upon doing so, he came suddenly and without warning upon the bodies of his clients suspended by ropes from the upper joists. It is needless to say that the learned barrister with the sympathetic proclivities, made a speedy exit.

Magruder Murder – Pursuit, Arrest and Conviction of the Murderers.

In August 1863, prior to the meeting of the -“- first session of the Territorial legislature, a prominent packer named Lloyd Magruder, who had been engaged for a couple of years in packing supplies from Lewiston into the various camps in the Clearwater and Salmon river countries, purchased a cargo of supplies suitable for a mining camp, and loading his train of mules, which numbered about sixty, started over the Bitter Root mountains to Virginia City—then in Idaho—a distance of nearly three hundred miles.

During the many trips Magruder had made to Lewiston in the previous two years, he had become well and favorably known to many of the citizens of that town. In those, days of danger and uncertainty, the men whom a man like Magruder gathered into his circle of friends were of the class to whom the word “friendship” meant something more than the mere breath of air used to utter the word.

Among these friends was Hill Beachy, the proprietor and landlord of the principal hotel in the town. He and Magruder were old acquaintances, they having known each other before coming to Lewiston.

Having made so many trips into the mountains with his pack train without serious adventure, Magruder appeared to have no apprehension of impending danger when he started off on the long trail to Virginia City. But Beachy, the proprietor of the hotel, was in a position to know the kinds of characters Magruder was likely to encounter, both before and after reaching Virginia City, and therefore he lent him a reliable gun, and warned him of the dangers he might encounter.

The departure of such a big mule-train for such a distant camp was an event in Lewiston at that time, and as the mules strung up the Clearwater along what is now Main street, and were lost to sight near where the railroad station now stands, one of those who witnessed the start and watched until his friend disappeared around a turn in the trail, was Hill Beachy, who from the first had a premonition that his friend Magruder would never return. Among the others who witnessed the departure of the mule train were three men, D. C. Lowry, David Howard and James Remain, who were disciples of the Plummer school and believers in the piratical doctrine “dead men tell no tales.”

These men soon after Magruder left began preparations to follow on his trail, and having secured a few more men who were unsuspicious of the characters of Lowry, Howard and Romain, and all having procured riding animals and additional pack horses to carry their provisions and blankets, after a delay of about ten days, started in pursuit of Magruder. The owner of a heavily laden pack train, having a long trip to make, is necessarily anxious to spare his mules as much as possible; hence his drives were short, usually not more than fifteen miles per day and if camping places with water and grass can be found, the daily journey is more likely to be limited to twelve or fourteen miles. So the pursuing party making double the distance each day, that Magruder made, came up with him before he reached his destination.

Magruder knew nothing about the characters of the men who had joined him, and as they appeared to be a jolly lot of mountain men and willing to travel with him and assist him in caring for and packing his mules, asking nothing for their assistance but their board, he willingly accepted their aid.

In loading a pack-train, the packers worked in pairs. The animal, horse or mule, after being saddled up, is led up to the cargo he is to carry and then blindfolded. Each man then picks up a side-pack and with a man working on each side of the animal, it is soon lashed in place. Therefore it is convenient to have plenty of men, so that the mules or horses, as the animals may be, need not be held after being loaded, awaiting the others, so on that account, if for no other, Magruder found the assistance of these additional men quite acceptable.

Finally Virginia City was reached without incident. A large tent was erected in the outskirts of the town, and the goods stored within, ready for sale. The men who accompanied Lowry, Howard and Romain from Lewiston, all except one, immediately started out to find work or look for “diggins,” and Magruder saw them no more, but the four, including D. C. Lowry, David Howard, James Romain and one other of the Lewiston party whose name is unknown, hung around Magruder’s camp, helping at times in caring for the mules, and always taking great interest in the rapid sale of the cargo and the consequent accumulation of gold dust received in exchange for the goods. It was about the middle of October before the last remnant of the goods was sold, and since Magruder was anxious to return to his family before the winter snow blocked his trail, he knew that he must not delay his departure, as the Bitter Root range, which he was obliged to cross, was liable to be covered at any time after early October.

He had a large mule train and their equipment, besides having about thirty thousand dollars in gold dust, the result of his venture. Help must be engaged to assist in bringing the mules over the mountains and guard the treasure. The three men whose acquaintance he had first made on the trail and whom he had no reason to suspect expressed a willingness to return with him, as did also another one of the original party, William Page, a trapper. So he engaged
these four men and in addition hired two others, a man named Phillips, the other named Allen. Two young men who were anxious to get out of the country were also supplied with saddle mules and added to the party, thus making the number nine men. The two young men who were last to join the party were trying to return to their homes in Missouri, having secured about two thousand dollars each in gold dust. If they gave Magruder their names in starting he probably made a memorandum in his diary which was destroyed, so their names are not known.

The start was made under favorable circumstances, the mules having had such a long rest on excellent grass, were in fine condition and everything bespoke a speedy and pleasant trip; and such it proved to be until more than half the distance to Lewiston was covered, when one night in camp a tragedy was enacted.

As near as can be determined by the evidence afterward brought out, it had been planned long before by Lowry, Howard and Romain to appropriate Magruder’s effects. It seems probable that their first idea was to murder him and his packers while on their way to Virginia City, and appropriate the mules and cargo, but as they could not assemble enough of their gang to successfully carry out that enterprise, it was thought safer to permit Magruder to sell his cargo and take possession of his effects while on the trail returning to Lewiston. It was resolved by Lowry, Howard and Romain that they would kill the entire party except the trapper Page. A night was chosen when they were encamped on a ridge which broke off on one side almost perpendicular for several hundred feet into a canyon or mountain gorge. Near the summit was a spring which furnished men and animals water. From a confession made by Page, the trapper, it appears that on the night selected for the massacre, Page was put on guard and told what was going to happen, and ordered to keep still under penalty of death.

Magruder and Lowry were also on guard away from the camp in an opposite direction, while Phillips, Allan and the other men were fast asleep in their blankets near the fire. During the first watch of the night, Lowry, who was on guard with Magruder, approached within striking distance, and dealing him a powerful blow with an axe which he had concealed under his coat, awaiting the fatal moment, knocked him senseless to the ground, where he was speedily dispatched. The killing of the sleeping men in camp was then quickly accomplished. Page, the trapper, who was watching the mules near by, claimed that he saw the murders committed. As soon as daylight arrived, the mules were brought up and five of the best were selected, four for saddle mules for the men to ride and one to pack their plunder. The other animals were then driven into a deep canyon and they, too, were murdered. They tied the murdered men in blankets and dropped them over the bluff near camp, into the bottom of the canyon, several hundred feet below, after which, having secured the gold dust, they made a bonfire and burned all the camp equipage, including the aparejos and other paraphernalia of a pack train.

The foregoing being accomplished, they started for the lower country, expecting to ford the Clearwater above Lewiston and keep on down the north bank, thus avoiding the town, but when they reached the river, the weather having turned cold, the water was full of running ice, so they were afraid to attempt to ford, and going into camp they remained there until in the night, when they quietly entered Lewiston. They found a stock ranchman with whom they left their mules, and took the early morning stage for Walla Walla, booking themselves under fictitious names.

In those days passengers from Lewiston en route to Portland, Oregon, took passage first on stage to Walla Walla, then on a second stage line from Walla Walla to Wallula; there passage was secured by steamer, including two portages to Portland.

Hill Beachy, who was yet keeping his hotel in Lewiston, upon learning that four men had entered town in the night, disguised, and taken the early stage out in the morning, entertaining the same fears for the safety of his friend Magruder that he had from the day of the latter’s departure for Virginia City, seemed intuitively to surmise that the travelers had robbed Magruder. So strong was this intuition, that he made complaint before an officer, and since Governor Wallace was in Lewiston, he obtained requisitions on the governors of Oregon, Washington and California. He intended to start immediately in pursuit, prepared to have them extradited, no matter in which of the foregoing jurisdictions they might be found.

Beachy’s friends, however, persuaded him to wait a few days in order to see if something definite could not be learned. Accordingly he postponed his departure, and learning that the men whom he suspected had left mules which were to be sent out to a ranch, he had the animals and saddles brought in for examination. One of the mules was recognized at once as having been Magruder’s saddle animal, and one of the saddles was also recognized as formerly belonging to Magruder. This evidence removed the last lingering doubt and satisfied the most skeptical.

Beachy at once began his preparations to start in pursuit of the murderers. A man named Tom Pike was engaged by Beachy to accompany him, and so equipped with the necessary credentials, they started to overtake and capture the fugitives, who now had such an advantageous start. Taking a private conveyance and changing horses several times, they made a rapid drive to Walla Walla, thence took the stage to Wallula, from which point they took passage by steamer to Portland. Arriving there, they learned that four men answering the description of those wanted had been in the city a few days previously, and who while there seemed to be well provided with money. In fact, they had made a deposit in a faro bank amounting to several hundred dollars, but they had departed on a steamship bound for San Francisco. Having learned of their departure, Beachy sent Pike after them by water route, while he started overland, not caring to await the steamer, for, at that time, the sailing days were infrequent. The overland trip from Portland, Oregon, to Sacramento, by stage, was one that few men cared to undertake. The road traveled up the Willamette and Umpqua Valleys were proverbial for deep, sticky and numerous chuck holes, and since the stages ran both by night and day, the passengers, necessarily, had but little opportunity for wooing Morpheus.

Beachy was fully aware of these unpleasant features connected with the proposed trip, yet, without hesitancy, he boarded the Concord coach and started overland, fixed in his determination to capture the murderers of his friend. After three days and nights, cooped up in the stage, he reached Yreka, then the nearest point from Portland where telegraphic communication could be had with San Francisco. From this point he succeeded in wiring a full description of the suspects to the chief of police in San Francisco, and a brief detail of the murder, and requested that they be arrested and held, pending his arrival. The request was carried out, and upon his arrival a few days later, he found the murderers behind prison bars. In addition to the arrest, they had traced the dust the men had brought with them on the steamer to the U. S. mint.

After an embarrassing delay, caused by a writ of habeas corpus, Tom Pike having in the meantime arrived, with his prisoners securely ironed, Beachy and Pike started by steamer to Portland, thence by the usual route to Lewiston, where they arrived on December 7th, 1863, the same day on which convened the first session of the legislative assembly of the Territory of Idaho. Before leaving San Francisco, William Page, the trapper, who admitted having seen the murders committed, confessed to Beachy, and gave all the particulars of the tragedy. Upon his arrival in Lewiston with the four prisoners, had Beachy been a man of less determination, the citizens would have given the accused but short shrift; but he told them that the prisoners were his, and that before leaving San Francisco he had promised them that they should have a fair trial by a jury, and his promise must and should be kept.

Arrangements were made for holding the first term of district court ever held in Idaho, commencing on January 5th, 1864. Accordingly the prisoners were confined in jail and closely guarded until they were brought out and arraigned for trial. During the time they were imprisoned, the legislative assembly effected an organization and began their work in a spirited manner.

The organic act which created the Territory of Idaho failed to provide that the laws of the Territories, from which the new Territory was created, should continue in force, until such time as the legislative assembly of Idaho could enact Civil and Criminal Codes. Hence there was a period during the first year of Idaho’s territorial existence, extending from April 3rd, 1863, until the first legislative session had met and enacted laws, when we had neither Civil nor Criminal Acts, and were entirely dependent upon the general laws of the United States, which were inadequate to meet all conditions. Consequently the first legislative assembly was confronted with conditions requiring prompt and speedy measures.

The first district court to be held in the Territory was to be convened on January 5th, 1864, less than one month from the first day of the legislative session. The four men then in custody charged with the atrocious murder of Magruder and his party were to be tried during this term of court—and as yet Idaho had no Criminal Practice Act. Fortunately, however, the members of the first legislature were equal to meeting the occasion. They promptly passed the following act—an act adopting the Common Law of England:

“Be It Enacted by the Legislative Assembly of the Territory of Idaho, as Follows:

“Section 1. The common law of England, so far as the same is not inconsistent with the provisions of the Constitution of the United States, the Organic Act and laws of this territory, shall be the law of the land in this territory.

“Sec. 2. This act to take effect and be in force from and after its approval by the governor. Approved January 4, 1864.”

Thus, one day in advance of the coming trial, the district court was provided with authority to cover any void existing, heretofore, in the statute.

Judge Samuel C. Parks was assigned to hold the first term of district court in Lewiston, beginning on the 5th day of January, 1864. Of the four men held for the murder of the Magruder party, Lowry, Howard and Romain were indicted for murder in the first degree, and were at once placed on trial and promptly convicted, as the chain of evidence was complete.

William Page, the trapper, having turned state’s evidence, was permitted to depart after the trial. Rumor has it that he was killed soon afterwards, but by whom it is not definitely known. The three convicted men were sentenced by Judge Parks on January 26 to be hanged on March 4th, 1864, by the neck until dead.

The sentence was duly executed, and thus miserably perished a trio of human fiends— their execution striking terror to the hearts of their kind, and causing a prompt reinforcement to the troop of scoundrels who had already transferred their activities to Boise Basin and other congenial camps. The territorial legislature being in session during the progress of the trial, upon the recommendation of Judge Parks, it made an appropriation to pay Hill Beachy for the pursuit and capture of the Magruder murderers, including expenses incident thereto, $6,244.00. (See page 625, First Session Laws 1865. (1863).

The money found on the prisoners, together with that they had deposited in the U. S. mint at San Francisco, was paid to the family of Magruder after the necessary formalities had been complied with. The loyalty of Hill Beachy to his friend, combined with his native fearlessness and determination, was the leading factor in bringing the episode to a successful ending.

The following spring Hill Beachy, with a party of six others, visited the scene of the tragedy and buried the remains of the victims. The particulars of the gruesome find, together with the details of their trip, after being written and signed by all the party, were printed in a Lewiston paper. This removed every doubt of the correctness of the testimony of Page, upon whose evidence the men were convicted.

The punishment meted to the men who murdered Magruder and his party was justly merited; and their conviction and subsequent execution was endorsed by all who were familiar with the tragedy. Yet, had an appeal been taken to the supreme court of the territory, the red handed fiends might have escaped execution by the officers of the law. But the public was so thoroughly aroused that no technicalities would have been permitted to prevent their punishment.

The following decision of the Idaho territorial supreme court is of interest, as it shows the utter helplessness of those who by their instincts and training were believers in a government by law during these terrible months when there was no law:

Appeal From the Second District, Boise County.

C B. Waite, District Attorney, for the People. S. A. Merritt, for the Respondent.

C. J. McBride delivered the opinion of the Court, Cummin, J., concurring, Kelly, J., dissenting.

This case comes up on appeal from a decision of the district court, quashing the indictment.

The following are the facts: The defendant, John Williams, was charged by the indictment with the crime of highway robbery, committed in the month of September, 1863, in the county of Boise, Territory of Idaho. The indictment was found at the July term, 1865, and the defendant, being in custody, pleaded not guilty. Subsequent to this plea, but before trial, the defendant, by his counsel, moved to set aside the indictment. The motion was sustained, and the prisoner ordered to be discharged. This ruling was excepted to by the attorney for the people, and the case stands for decision upon this motion, and the alleged error of the court below in granting the same. Preliminary to the investigation of the main question which is involved in the decision below, it will be necessary to refer to some points raised by the district attorney in the brief by the appellants.

It is claimed by the appellants that though the indictment charges the offense to have been committed in September, 1863, the time is no material ingredient of the offense charged, and that the indictment would be supported if the proof should show that the crime was committed within the statutory time, although not upon the day charged, and as there was no proof—there having been no trial—that the offense was committed in September, 1863, when it was claimed no law existed for its punishment, that the court erred in granting the motion, as it might have appeared that it was committed after that time, and when no such objection would lie. This is an error. For the purpose of the motion the court must take the facts as stated in the indictment to be true. Time is material in this offense, and though it need not be proved as laid strictly, still where the time becomes a question of materiality the court must assume that it is stated according to the fact, and if there was no law defining this crime, and inflicting a penalty at the time when it was alleged to have been committed, then the indictment should have been set aside, and there is no error.

The second point of the appellant is that the defendant having been set at liberty under the order of the court below, the court should not take cognizance of this appeal. This appeal is taken by the people, and the district attorney has the right, if he chooses, to dismiss the appeal; but to prosecute the appeal, and deny the effect of its design, is certainly not allowable.

A third point assigned is that the motion was made to set aside the indictment after the defendant had entered his plea of not guilty, and that the motion came too late, and, therefore, the order should have been refused, and now reversed. The statute settles this question —and reason as well; the objection going to the merits of the prosecution could be raised at any time before or after judgment. It would have been the duty of the court to consider it any time during the progress of the trial, and to have arrested the judgment after verdict. It would be the height of absurdity to say that a court might be fully convinced that it had no authority to pass sentence upon a case, yet must proceed to try a criminal because it had begun the proceedings.

Having disposed of these preliminary questions, it remains to be decided whether there was any law for the punishment of defendant for the offense charged in the indictment. On the third day of March, 1863, Congress organized the Territory of Idaho, by cutting off certain territory from the already organized territories of Washington, Dakota, Nebraska and Utah.

The Territory of Idaho then became a separate political community and the power of government, of making and enforcing statutes, of preserving the rights of the people and punishing wrong-doers, was vested in the citizens of the territory in the manner prescribed by the organic act. Did this segregation of the territory of Idaho from the other territories named leave it without any criminal code? It undoubtedly was a repeal of the several organic acts named—they no longer had any form or validity, had been superseded and become nullities.

How they could cease to exist, and yet laws remain in force, deriving their validity from authority conferred by them, we cannot understand. It would be to extinguish the fountain and insist upon the rivulet continuing its flow —cutting off the source of life and affirming continued vitality. To provide against any such hiatus in the criminal code, it is always provided that the remedies shall subsist in full force. Thus in organizing a state government the universal practice is to continue, by special provision, the pre-existing laws; so in organizing new territories the usual provision is to continue the laws of the old political division until the enactment of new ones.

In organizing the territory of Oregon, in 1848, Congress affirmed and continued the laws of the former provisional government until they should be altered or repealed. The uniform practice in this respect conclusively establishes, we think, the principle that the laws of the old organization have no force in the new political community unless by special provision. We are now speaking only of criminal laws. In civil matters the question of rights and remedies are so different that the same rules do not necessarily apply.

In the act organizing this territory no provision is contained recognizing the former laws. Indeed, to have done so would have given vitality to four different codes of law in different parts of the new territory. Confusion would have followed inevitably, and the fact of this difficulty sufficiently accounts for the omission on the part of Congress to provide for their continuance until the new legislature should provide for the wants of the country.

There is no similarity between this case and that- of a conquered or ceded territory whose sovereignty is transferred from one authority to another. Then the laws pass with the people and the soil—but not so when the sovereign authority dismembers a piece of territory and makes no provision for the new community.

We are therefore of opinion that there was no statute punishing the offense charged in this indictment at the time it was alleged to have been committed, and that even if the facts alleged be true no sentence could be pronounced. The judgment of the court below will therefore be affirmed. Judgment affirmed.

As will be understood, the effect of the foregoing decision was that it released from confinement all prisoners serving sentence for the commission of crimes committed during the period between the creation of Idaho Territory March 3rd, 1863, and the passage and approval of statutes denying such crimes and providing penalties therefore; or, an interim of approximately nine months during which time there was no law within the borders of the new Territory to protect either life or property.

[Source: Early history of Idaho; By William John McConnell, Idaho. Legislature; Publ. 1915; Transcribed and donated to Genealogy Trails by Andrea Stawski Pack.]

source: Genealogy Trails

e-book: “Early History of Idaho” by WJ McConnell 1913 (18 meg)
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Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid

Three Creek, ID

Ghost Towns Submitted by: Duane V. Peterson

On the days prior to September 19, 1900, Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid along with Will Carver, traveled from their hideout at Power Springs, on the Wyoming Colorado border, through Three Creek, ID, on their way to rob the bank at Winnemucca, NV. In Three Creek (pop.32) there was a General Store made out of rocks quarried from nearby creeks, that was owned by Jim Duncan and his wife Lizzie. According to Sundance, they got Jim out of bed, and at gun point he filled their order, loading two pack horses with grub. The grub, along with horses, were cached along the 200+ miles to Winnemucca, and used in their escape after the bank robbery. Butch Cassidy had promised to pay Jim Duncan for the grub, and as they passed through Three Creek late at night on their return trip, they figured up the bill for the grub, and doubling it, they left it in a sack by the store.

source: Ghost Towns
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Three Creek

ThreeCreekSMc-a
date unknown (in Owyhee Co.)

source: AHGP Idaho
[h/t Sharon McConnel]
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Butch Cassidy and Two Gang Members Rob Montpelier Bank

On Thursday, August 13, 1896, Montpelier, Idaho sweltered under a blistering afternoon sun. Three riders walked their horses along a street, trailing a pack mare behind them. Had the local jeweler seen them, he might have recognized the three men he’d hired to gather hay on his ranch near the Wyoming border. His wife, who handled the spread while her husband ran his shop, considered them good workers.

Montpelier1910-a
Montpelier, ca. 1910. Source uncertain: Wyoming Tales & Trails.

Founded by Mormon colonists in 1864, Montpelier grew only modestly until the Oregon Short Line railroad built a station there in 1884. The OSL soon added a repair facility and the town became the main supply hub for homesteads and ranches for miles and miles around. It also became a major shipping point for livestock and wool. By 1896, Montpelier had numerous stores, and the only bank in Bear Lake County.

The three riders stopped first at a general store. The storekeeper thought the three might be sheepherders. Finished, the strangers remounted and walked their horses east along the street. The time was after 3:00 p.m. when they stopped in front of the bank and dismounted. Two men standing on the board sidewalk glanced at them, didn’t recognize the riders, and resumed their conversation.

They paid sudden attention when two of the men, now masked with bandanas, accosted them with drawn revolvers. Terse commands urged them inside, where they found three bank employees and several customers. The robbers ordered everyone except the Assistant Cashier to line up facing the wall.

The blond, stocky leader held them at gunpoint while the taller bandit stuffed all the bank’s cash money into a large sack. After raiding the vault, the man tossed loose silver coins into the bag, then dumped a stack of gold coins into a cloth bank bag. Finished, he carried the loot outside and loaded the bags onto his horse and the pack mare.

The blond robber waited inside until his partner completed the loading. He warned them not to make a fuss for at least ten minutes, then strolled out to mount up himself. The bandits turned their horses toward the edge of town.

The Cashier hurried to tell the deputy sheriff as soon as the hoofbeats subsided. However, the deputy was mostly a process server and owned neither gun nor horse. Still, willing to try, he grabbed a “penny-farthing” – a bicycle with giant front wheel and tiny rear – and gave chase. He soon gave up, but did find that the crooks had galloped east, towards the Wyoming border.

ButchCassidy-a
Butch Cassidy. Utah Historical Society.

The bandits had planned well. They apparently used the haying job as a cover while they traced the best escape route and located a spot to hide a quick change of horses. Fortunately, the third bandit, who held the horses ready, had not worn a mask. Outside on the street, that might have attracted unwanted attention. The Assistant Cashier got a good look at him.

That man turned out to be Bob Meeks, a member of Butch Cassidy’s notorious “Wild Bunch.” He was the only one caught and convicted for the robbery. The blond leader was surely Butch himself

For some reason, there seems to be no authoritative answer as to how much the bandits got away with. Reports vary widely, from as little as $5 thousand, to around $16 thousand, to over $50 thousand. A figure of about $7 thousand is most generally accepted. Whatever the amount, none of the money was ever recovered.

source: South Fork Companion
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Wanted

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(click for source size)
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Wyatt Earp Sheriff of Kootenai Co.

Wyatt Earp was a magnet for trouble, even when he came to Idaho in 1884.

Keva Wolfe February 26, 2016 Post Falls

WyattEarp-a

He had long since left behind his exploits in Dodge City and the gunfight at O.K. Corral in Tombstone. His taste for adventure had turned to saloons, gambling and mining. It was a perfect formula for more trouble, and Idaho was the perfect place for it.

Gold and silver discoveries in Idaho were the same lure to adventurers then as they were in California decades earlier.

With his wife Sadie-Josephine Sarah Marcus (also called Josie) and his older brother Jim, Earp arrived in Eagle City on Jan. 30, where new miners were swarming in every day. His youngest brother Warren joined them later.

Located north of today’s I-90 near Pritchard in Shoshone County, Eagle was more of a collection of tents and log cabins than a “city.”

Their journey began in Fort Worth, Texas, with the final leg a trip up the Coeur d’Alene River aboard the steamer Amelia Wheaton to Cataldo Mission, and from there, overland to Eagle City.

The day after he arrived, Earp was “elected” part-time deputy sheriff of newly formed Kootenai County next door. There was plenty for him to do on both sides of the boundary line.

On March 28, Jack Enright, one of Earp’s partners, tried to stop miner Bill Buzzard? – a man of questionable character – from starting construction of a hotel which Enright said encroached on his property. Harsh words and a Winchester rifle quickly brought out the worst in both of them.

Soon, the two men and their pals were shooting it out between snowbanks. Some 50 bullets flew in all directions. Two went through Buzzard’s hat, and another just missed Enright’s face.

It was no O.K. Corral, however. No one died. This time, Earp was the peacemaker. He and Shoshone County Deputy W.E. Hunt stepped in and ended the war.

A later report said: “With characteristic coolness, they stood where the bullets from both parties flew about them, joked with the participants upon their poor marksmanship, and although they pronounced the affair a fine picture, used their best endeavors to stop the shooting.”

The Spokane Falls Review reported that after the shooting, Enright and Buzzard met and smoked together, complimenting each other on their courage. The only casualty was an onlooker who took a shot through the fleshy part of his leg.

Earp’s first business venture in Eagle City was to set up a dance hall in a big tent. Then he opened the White Elephant Saloon, “The largest and finest saloon in the Coeur d’Alenes,” according to an ad in the Coeur d’Alene Weekly.

Gold creates frenzy in men’s minds, and in the Eagle-Murray area, everyone was filing mining claims in those days. This created a deluge of legal problems, often causing violence. Earp was swiftly caught up in it.

He filed for a number of claims, that in the long run earned him more legal troubles than gold.

Mining camps have lots of problems, and on June 19, Earp landed in the middle of another one: Danny Ferguson, a 23-year old from Nebraska who was his partner in a land syndicate, attempted to rescue a drunk and disorderly woman who was being slapped around in the street in front of a saloon by Thomas Steele, son of an Omaha doctor.

She was a prostitute and the two had been drinking heavily. Steele resented Ferguson’s intrusion. Again, words and guns did their damage as the two men battled it out.

Steele ended up dead and charges were about to be filed against Ferguson who had left town. Earp decided to warn his young business partner. The telegraph operator, named Toplitz, refused to send the telegram and started running away until Earp stopped him by throwing a rock at him.

“Now send the telegram or I’ll beat you to death,” Earp growled. Toplitz sent it and Ferguson escaped the indictment, living out the rest of his life elsewhere under the name Danny Miller.

That was Wyatt Earp’s world in Idaho’s early days.

Wyatt Berry Stapp Earp was born in Monmouth, Ill., on March 19, 1848, but spent most of his life in frontier towns throughout the West.

He was only in Idaho about eight months, where he did most of the things he was known for, but nothing like his adventures in Dodge City or O.K. Corral.

The gold petered out in the Coeur d’Alenes, so on Sept. 20, 1884, the Earps pulled up stakes and left Idaho. Wyatt and Sadie headed for Colorado, while brother Jim went to California to rejoin his wife Bessie, who died shortly thereafter. Jim died in 1926 and is buried in San Bernardino, Calif.

His brother Warren stayed behind for a while, then he too left. On July 6, 1900, he was shot to death in a saloon shootout in Willcox, Ariz.

Wyatt and Sadie moved from place to place in the west, staying together for 47 years. Wyatt died in Los Angeles of chronic cystitis – some say prostate cancer – on Jan. 13, 1929. He was 80.

He was the last of the Earp brothers and the last survivor of the O.K. Corral. During his long and violent life, he was never wounded.

Sadie died on Dec. 20, 1944, in the same small apartment in Los Angeles where Wyatt died. The cremated remains of both are buried next to one another in Colma, Calif.

Wyatt Earp has been described as a gambler, lawman, buffalo hunter, saloon keeper, gold and copper miner, barber, investor, horse racer, teamster, shotgun rider, enforcer and fight referee.

Sadie always wanted an exciting life. With Wyatt, she got her wish.

Wyatt Earp’s short stay in Idaho left no legacy, except that Eagle City was once the home of a Wild West legend. And even there, nothing remains but a few graves – and perhaps also, a ghost of the O.K. Corral.

Syd Albright is a writer/journalist/producer living in Post Falls. He is chairman of the Kootenai County Historic Preservation Commission.

link to: Wyatt Earp Sheriff of Kootenai Co

[h/t SMc]
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page updated July 7, 2020

Road Report June 25

South Fork/EFSF route reported in good shape.
Johnson Creek road is open but not graded. Reported to be washboardy in the Rustican and Halfway areas, pot holes in various places. Trees still coming down in random spots. Mudhole near Antimony Camp.
Lick Creek road CLOSED had a report that the County Crew was working on the washout, hauling in fill material.
Profile Gap still snowed closed, but had a report that the County intends to have the road open by July 4th.

Rivers and creeks are still higher than average, warmer weather has accelerated snow melt. Road conditions can change quickly. Be prepared for trees and rocks in the road. There is still snow on the roads at higher elevations and no cell service.

Snow Totals:
Big Creek SNOTEL 6580 ft. = 0″
Deadwood Summit SNOTEL at 6860 ft. = 24″

Profile Summit Elevation 7607 feet
Profile-Summit-ID-a

Monumental Summit Elevation 8580 feet
MonumentalSummitSign-a
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June 23 Road update from Payette NF

Vehicle Travel Update on the Payette National Forest. The high elevation summits still have a considerable amount of snow and remain closed.
Lick Creek summit (McCall to Yellow Pine) is closed. Access to Yellow Pine is open via Johnson Creek Road, or the South Fork of the Salmon River Road.
Profile Gap Summit remains closed. Access from Yellow Pine to Big Creek is still via air only.
Elk Creek Summit remains snowed in. Elk Creek Summit is between Warren and Big Creek. While snow is still abundant at the summit, adverse road conditions from Warren Summit to the South Fork of the Salmon make access to the Elk Creek area available only via OHV and walk in/pack in travel only.
Vehicle travel from Warren Summit to Sawmill Point is open to full sized vehicles, however; numerous road failures from Sawmill Point to the South Fork on the Valley County maintained section of the roadway make travel available only via OHV, not advisable, and at your own risk. Valley County is working toward a long term fix to open this section of the road to full sized vehicles, and is planning to open the roadway this summer. (See photo)
Vehicle travel on Goose Lake Road (also known as Brundage Mountain Road) is only as far as Brundage Reservoir due to snow levels. Access to Goose Lake, Hazard Lake and Granite Lake remains closed.
Know before you go! Contact one of our Ranger District offices to get updated information before heading out.

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June 9 PNF Lick Creek Road Report

Snow is still prohibiting travel over Lick Creek Summit, and to add to the problem, major road damage is taking place.
The recent warm temperatures and resulting snow melt, coupled with rain from last weekend, has now caused the North Fork of Lick Creek to flow outside of its channel and down the road.
The damage has made the road on the east side of the summit impassible, and repair work in addition to more snow melt at the summit will have to be done before the road will open.
Valley County operates and maintains Lick Creek Road under an easement – County and Forest Service road maintenance personnel are working together to determine the extent of the repair work needed.
Typically, Lick Creek Road is open around about this time of year – Stay tuned for updates!
photo gallery:

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Weather Reports June 18-24

June 18 Weather:

At 9am it was 52 degrees and overcast. A few small breaks in the clouds by lunch time, light breezes. Overcast at 2pm. At 4pm a small patch of blue sky above, mostly cloudy and 71 degrees. At 8pm it was 68 degrees and partly clear. Mostly clear by 830pm. At 945pm it was 57 degrees and clear. A litte stronger breeze at times around 1130pm.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time June 19, 2017 at 09:00AM
Mostly clear
Max temperature 74 degrees F
Min temperature 42 degrees F
At observation 56 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
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June 19 Weather:

At 9am it was 56 degrees and mostly clear. At 2pm it was 84 degrees and a few thin clouds. At 830pm it was 71 degrees and mostly clear. At 945pm it was 68 degrees and a few clouds, thin high haze.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time June 20, 2017 at 09:00AM
Clear
Max temperature 88 degrees F
Min temperature 50 degrees F
At observation 63 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
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June 20 Weather:

At 9am it was 63 degrees and clear. At 115pm it was 87 degrees and a few little clouds. Afternoon clouds building and hot. At 8pm it was 77 degrees, a bit muggy and mostly cloudy. At 9pm less humid and partly cloudy. Colorful sunset. Streaks of pink and red clouds across the sky at 945pm and 66 degrees.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time June 21, 2017 at 09:00AM
Almost clear
Max temperature 90 degrees F
Min temperature 47 degrees F
At observation 60 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
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June 21 Weather:

At 9am it was 60 degrees and almost clear, a few little clouds. At 1pm it was 77 degrees and clear, light pleasant breeze. At 815pm it was 71 degrees and high thin streaks of clouds and haze.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time June 22, 2017 at 09:00AM
Clear
Max temperature 82 degrees F
Min temperature 41 degrees F
At observation 54 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
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June 22 Weather:

At 9am it was 54 degrees and clear. At 145pm it was 73 degrees and clear. Light breezes, sunny and mild at 4pm. Afternoon breezes. At 845pm it was 59 degrees and clear.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time June 23, 2017 at 09:00AM
Clear
Max temperature 76 degrees F
Min temperature 35 degrees F
At observation 49 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
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June 23 Weather:

At 9am it was 49 degrees and clear. Sunny all day, not too hot. At 8pm it was 72 degrees and clear. Clear at midnight.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time June 24, 2017 at 09:00AM
Clear
Max temperature 80 degrees F
Min temperature 39 degrees F
At observation 52 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
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June 24 Weather:

At 9am it was 52 degrees and clear. At 130pm it was 80 degrees and clear. At 755pm it was 77 degrees and clear.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time June 25, 2017 at 09:00AM
Clear
Max temperature 85 degrees F
Min temperature 42 degrees F
At observation 58 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
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Road Report June 23

Friday (June 23) South Fork/EFSF route reported in good shape.
Johnson Creek road is open but not graded. Reported to be washboardy in the Rustican and Halfway areas, pot holes in various places. Trees still coming down in random spots. Mudhole near Antimony Camp.
Lick Creek road CLOSED (however had a report that the County Crew was working on the washout above Zena Creek Ranch on Wednesday June 21.
Profile Gap still snowed closed, but had a report that the County intends to have the road open by July 4th.
See below for new road update from the Payette NF.

Rivers and creeks are still higher than average, warmer weather has accelerated snow melt. Road conditions can change quickly. Be prepared for trees and rocks in the road. There is still snow on the roads at higher elevations and no cell service.

Snow Totals:
Big Creek SNOTEL 6580 ft. = 0″
Deadwood Summit SNOTEL at 6860 ft. = 30″

Profile Summit Elevation 7607 feet
Profile-Summit-ID-a

Monumental Summit Elevation 8580 feet
MonumentalSummitSign-a
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

June 23 Road update from Payette NF

Vehicle Travel Update on the Payette National Forest. The high elevation summits still have a considerable amount of snow and remain closed.
Lick Creek summit (McCall to Yellowpine) is closed. Access to Yellowpine is open via Johnson Creek Road, or the South Fork of the Salmon River Road.
Profile Gap Summit remains closed. Access from Yellowpine to Big Creek is still via air only.
Elk Creek Summit remains snowed in. Elk Creek Summit is between Warren and Big Creek. While snow is still abundant at the summit, adverse road conditions from Warren Summit to the South Fork of the Salmon make access to the Elk Creek area available only via OHV and walk in/pack in travel only.
Vehicle travel from Warren Summit to Sawmill Point is open to full sized vehicles, however; numerous road failures from Sawmill Point to the South Fork on the Valley County maintained section of the roadway make travel available only via OHV, not advisable, and at your own risk. Valley County is working toward a long term fix to open this section of the road to full sized vehicles, and is planning to open the roadway this summer. (See photo)
Vehicle travel on Goose Lake Road (also known as Brundage Mountain Road) is only as far as Brundage Reservoir due to snow levels. Access to Goose Lake, Hazard Lake and Granite Lake remains closed.
Know before you go! Contact one of our Ranger District offices to get updated information before heading out.

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June 9 Payette NF Lick Creek Road Report

Snow is still prohibiting travel over Lick Creek Summit, and to add to the problem, major road damage is taking place.
The recent warm temperatures and resulting snow melt, coupled with rain from last weekend, has now caused the North Fork of Lick Creek to flow outside of its channel and down the road.
The damage has made the road on the east side of the summit impassible, and repair work in addition to more snow melt at the summit will have to be done before the road will open.
Valley County operates and maintains Lick Creek Road under an easement – County and Forest Service road maintenance personnel are working together to determine the extent of the repair work needed.
Typically, Lick Creek Road is open around about this time of year – Stay tuned for updates!
photo gallery:

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Road Report for June 21

Wednesday (June 21) mail truck driver (Robert) came in via Johnson Creek road. Said its really washboardy in the Rustican and Halfway areas, and pot holes in a lot of other places. Had to cut a small tree out of the road near Wapiti Meadow Ranch. He said the South Fork/EFSF route going out yesterday was in good shape.

He also said the county road crew is working on the washout on Lick Creek road above Zena Creek Ranch.

Received a note that Valley County intends to get the road to Big Creek/Edwardsburg open by July 4.

Rivers and creeks are still higher than average, recent hot weather has speeded up melting high elevation snow. Road conditions can change quickly. Be prepared for trees and rocks in the road. There is still snow on the roads at higher elevations and no cell service.

Snow Totals:
Big Creek SNOTEL 6580 ft. = 0″
Deadwood Summit SNOTEL at 6860 ft. = 35″

Note: Lick Creek, Profile and Monumental summits are still closed.

Profile Summit Elevation 7607 feet
Profile-Summit-ID-a

Monumental Summit Elevation 8580 feet
MonumentalSummitSign-a

Lick Creek Road Update

Payette NF 6/9/2017 (via FB)

Snow is still prohibiting travel over Lick Creek Summit, and to add to the problem, major road damage is taking place.
The recent warm temperatures and resulting snow melt, coupled with rain from last weekend, has now caused the North Fork of Lick Creek to flow outside of its channel and down the road.
The damage has made the road on the east side of the summit impassible, and repair work in addition to more snow melt at the summit will have to be done before the road will open.
Valley County operates and maintains Lick Creek Road under an easement – County and Forest Service road maintenance personnel are working together to determine the extent of the repair work needed.
Typically, Lick Creek Road is open around about this time of year – Stay tuned for updates!
photo gallery:

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Warren to Big Creek: Closed due to road damage from Sawmill Point to South Fork, and from South Fork to Big Creek due to snow at Elk Summit. Snowline in the area is near Pilot Peak Lookout road.

Warren Wagon Road still closed from Warren to the South Fork

It is anticipated that this section of the road (Warren to the South Fork) will not be fixed, nor opened to full sized vehicles during the 2017 summer.

photo gallery:

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June 18, 2017 The Yellow Pine Times

June 18, 2017 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Village News:

YPFD News

June 21 YP Fire Commissioners meeting 2pm at the Community Hall.
— — — —

YPWUA News

The annual shareholders meetings for the Yellow Pine Water Users Association will be held on Sunday, July 2 10am. The meeting will be held at the Yellow Pine Community Hall
— — — —

VYPA News

We were unable to have a Village Association meeting last Saturday (June 9th) due to a lack of quorum. We will still have elections at the July 8th meeting. The positions of Chairman & Treasurer are to be voted on. If you are interested in running for one of these positions, please let me or Sue Matlock know.

– Deb Filler, Vice Chair, VYPA
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Ray Gillihan’s 80th Birthday Party June 11

A great Party for Ray Gillihan’s 80th Birthday. The day was just right for being outside in Yellow Pine. It was good to see Friends and Old Timers on the porch.

photo gallery:

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Yellow Pine Vet Clinic June 14

Dr. Ruble and crew from the Cascade Vet Clinic made it to Yellow Pine by lunch time after an emergency delayed their departure from Cascade. We had a table and chairs set up for their boxes of files and coolers of vaccines, and they even had a jar of dog treats on the table. Doggies seen were Romeo, Chin Chin, Bella and Rascal. Kitties seen were Brrrrt, Augress, Spot, Stripe, Dancer, Cletus and D-8. Then the vet clinic moved up to main street, then on to the post office. Dr. Ruble says he enjoys the trip to Yellow Pine each year to see our critters and beautiful scenery.
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The Corner June 23rd & 24th Yellow Pine Lumber Jack & Jill Throwdown

Friday June 23rd:
Live Music Starts at 6pm
Saturday June 24th:
10am Lumberjack Games Begin
1pm Womens Woodsplitting
5pm Awards Ceremony
6pm Great Trumpet plays at The Corner
8pm Folk Family Revival at The Corner

Call (208) 633-3325 or email heather @ ypcorner.com for info.
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Big Creek Lodge

Breakfast at Big Creek dates are Saturdays – June 17, June 24 and Aug 5. Breakfasts run from 8-10am, and are $10/plate. Visitors can take a tour of the lodge and enjoy pancakes, ham, eggs and coffee/juice.
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Independence Day weekend

Schedule of Events (details below)

June 30 Yellow Pine Tavern at 8pm The Dave Nudo Band
July 1 Golf Tournament 10am
July 1 The 4th of July Parade 4pm (meet at 330pm at the Fire Hall)
July 1 The Corner Willie and The Single Wides start at 8pm
July 1 Fireworks at dusk
July 2 The Corner Sneaky Bones will be playing at 8pm

Friday June 30 – At the Yellow Pine Tavern returning for the 3rd year on 4th of July Weekend. Friday June 30th at 8pm The Dave Nudo Band

Saturday July 1 – Golf Tournament 10am

19th Annual Yellow Pine Golf Tournament Saturday July 1st, 2017 at 10am
Where the Green’s aren’t green and the fairways aren’t fair!
This year will prove to be a bit more challenging!!!
$20 per player – Benefits the Medical Supply & Training Fund for Yellow Pine
$50 per hole – Sponsorship provides Advertisement on a hole and covers entry fee for two players
Awards for: Best Ball Scramble Twosomes – Men’s, Women’s, and Mixed; and closest to the hole on #1 hole only.
Get your reservations in early, as we will start with foursomes on each of the 18 holes, limiting the tournament to 72 golfers.
For questions or registration or to mail/email/phone your entry info. contact: Jeff or Ann @ (208) 633-1010 Or Dan @ (208) 633-4208
A Little History: The Yellow Pine Country Club boasts the most challenging course in Idaho. Members have preferred tee times, and on course refreshments. Elk and deer have the right of way on the un-fairways. The first 9 holes were laid out by hurling a softball to mark the next hole! Those first 9 holes have been refined and 9 more added over the years.
“Golf in the Rough – Where it’s better to be Lucky than Good!”
– AF

Saturday July 1 – Parade 4pm

4thJulylParade-a

4th of July is just around the corner. You are invited to take part in the annual Independence Day Parade. Bring your family and friends, pets, vehicles, floats, marching bands, and silliness to be a part of the parade. The parade starts at 4pm on Saturday, July 1st, in Yellow Pine. If you want to be in the parade, meet at the fire house at 330pm. All family-friendly participants are welcome! – DF

Saturday July 1 – The Corner Willie and The Single Wides start at 8pm

Saturday July 1 Fireworks at dusk

Sunday July 2 – The Corner Sneaky Bones will be playing at 8pm
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Harmonica T-shirt Request

I would like to send out a request to everyone who might have a T-shirt from the past harmonica festivals. We are missing the following years: 1994, 2002-2014. It would be a donation to the Community Hall. I am hoping to make the Center more inviting and useful. Any suggestions from anyone are also welcome.
My email is: 75hallker @ att.net My phone: 208-633-6270

Thanks so much, Kathleen Hall – VYPA – Member at Large
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook
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Local Observations:

Monday (June 12) overnight low of 39 degrees, clear and strong sun this morning. Finches, grosbeaks and pine-siskins at the feeder, a few jays calling and a raven croaking. Not many swallows around. Female swallow in nest setting on eggs still no sign of the male. Large helicopter flying over at 950am. Clouds rushed in and filled the sky early, cloudy all day, high of 61 degrees. Rain mid-afternoon. Heard nighthawks calling. Low clouds and ridges socked in with evening rain, puddles forming in the yard. Rained into the night.

Tuesday (June 13) in 24 hours over an inch of rain! Low of 41 degrees, dark clouds this morning, road puddles are full, but standing water has soaked in. No swallows around (or in the nest) and very few birds at the feeders, robins calling. Large helicopter high over the village just after 9am, and a twin engine plane going the opposite direction. Dark cloudy day, showers early evening, high of 50 degrees. Light colored doe wandering down the side of the road at 640pm. A few swallows returned this evening, female back on the nest by 8pm.

Wednesday (June 14) overnight low of 34 degrees, partly clear this morning. A few finches and pine-siskins at the feeders, robins hopping about. A few swallows flying around, female swallow on her eggs. More finches showed up before lunch. Vet Clinic went well, several cats and dogs vaccinated. Male swallows returned early afternoon. A couple of hummingbirds visited. Small flock of cowbirds stopped by too. Rather cloudy day, and mild temperatures, high of 70 degrees. Quiet evening.

Thursday (June 15) overnight low of 42 degrees, overcast and light sprinkle of rain this morning for about an hour. Mama swallow on the nest, but not many other swallows flying around. Finches, pine-siskins, jays and cowbirds at the feeders. Increasing airplane traffic (planes parked on both sides of Johnson Crk. airstrip before 4pm.) Little sprinkles of rain off and on most of the afternoon and into the evening and dark clouds, high of 65 degrees. At 738pm an airplane turning over the village sounded like it was losing power? Steady rain before dusk. Still raining after midnight.

Friday (June 16) overnight rain, low of 48 degrees from Thurs morning, ridges socked in early this morning, then lifted and left a belt of fog mid-mountain. Puddles full, rimmed with pine pollen. Rufous hummer at the feeder, finches, pine-siskins, a few grosbeaks and jays eating seeds, flicker sounding off in the forest, a few swallows out flying. Webcam shows airplanes lining both sides of the airstrip. Misty rain and low clouds on and off during the day, and cool, high of 59 degrees. Yellow Monkey Flowers blooming along the ditch. The darker colored doe was trotting thru the golf course towards the river before dusk.

Saturday (June 17) lots of airplanes flying over the village early. Overnight low of 43 degrees and partly clear sky, chunks of clouds clinging to the flanks of the mountains. More swallows flying around, finches, pine-siskins and jays at the feeders, starlings poking around the yard. Clearing up after lunch time. Sunny afternoon, light breezes (a few gusts) and mild temps, high of 72 degrees. Quiet almost calm evening, mostly clear.

Sunday (June 18) lots of airplanes traffic this morning. Overnight low of 46 degrees, overcast this morning. Finches, pine-siskins and a few grosbeaks at the feeders, heard a flicker in the neighborhood, and an olive-sided fly-catcher calling. Not many swallow flying about. Cloudy skies and airplanes. Thinner clouds and a few patches of blue sky later in the afternoon, a bit muggy and light breezes. Not much vehicular traffic today. Johnson Creek webcam shows fewer planes parked at the airstrip by early evening.
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RIP:

Celebrated Idaho folksinger Rosalie Sorrels dies at 83

KTVB June 12, 2017

Boise — Native Idahoan and folk singing icon Rosalie Sorrels died Sunday night, her family has announced. Sorrels was 83.

“She was surrounded with love and music, and is free from all the pain,” the singer’s family posted on Facebook.

A memorial service for Sorrels will be held in Boise.

continued w/video:
— — —

Rosalie Sorrels – If I could be the rain

Rosalie Sorrels – My Last Go Round


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Idaho News:

Tuesday is deadline to pay Adams, Valley property taxes

The Star-News June 15, 2017

Tuesday at 5 p.m. is the deadline for Adams and Valley County property owners for the second half of their yearly property taxes.

Late charges and interest will begin on Wednesday with interest retroactive from Jan. 1, 2017, so mailed payments should be correctly stamped by date.

The treasurers offices in both counties are open during the lunch hour Mondays through Fridays.

Valley County accepts credit card payments at http://co.valley.id.us or by calling 382-7110.

In Adams County, payments can be placed in the drop box at the main courthouse entrance in Council. The office has credit card, debit card or echeck payment options online at http://co.adams.id.us or by calling (208) 253-4263 Ext. 6 for questions.

source The Star-News:
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Yellow Pine to host Lumberjack Throwdown June 24

The Star-News June 15, 2017

The wood chips will fall where they may during the Lumber Jack (and Jill) Throwdown to be held Saturday, June 24, in Yellow Pine.

Anyone can compete in the events, which will include Women’s Wood Splitting, Double Buck Cross Cut, Jack & Jill Cross Cut and Hot Saw.

The events will begin at 10 a.m. June 24 and end with an awards ceremony at 5 p.m.

Live music by Folk Family Revival and The Great Trumpet will entertain entrants and spectators on Friday and Saturday nights. Music starts at 6 p.m. Friday, June 23, and 4 p.m. Saturday, June 24.

For more information or to register call (208) 633-3325 or visit http://YPCorner.com

source The Star-News:
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Independence Day Weekend Schedule of Events in Yellow Pine

June 30 Yellow Pine Tavern at 8pm The Dave Nudo Band
July 1 Golf Tournament 10am
July 1 The 4th of July Parade 4pm (meet at 330pm at the Fire Hall)
July 1 The Corner Willie and The Single Wides start at 8pm
July 1 Fireworks at dusk
July 2 YPWUA Shareholders meeting 10am at the Community Hall
July 2 The Corner Sneaky Bones will be playing at 8pm
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McCall council bans alcohol at lakefront parks July 1-5

Gold Glove Park to be exempted from prohibition

By Tom Grote for The Star-News June 15, 2017

Alcoholic beverages will be banned at lakefront parks in McCall July 1-5, the McCall City Council decided last week.

The ban is similar to the alcohol ban imposed last year for the Independence Day weekend except Gold Glove Park on Davis Avenue and other non-lakefront parks are not included in this year’s ban.

Council members agreed with the recommendation of city staff members that banning alcohol at Gold Glove Park might put a damper on recreational baseball or softball games played at the park’s fields.

The vote was the last piece of this year’s holiday celebration planning that city officials hope will match last year’s ban. That effort was credited with reducing incidents of rowdy young adults seen in previous years.

The Idaho Department of Parks and Recreation will impose the second year of its three-year ban on alcohol at North Beach on Payette Lake.

The Valley County Sheriff’s Office will partially lift last year’s ban on boats at North Beach, allowing boats on a 150-foot stretch on July 4.

Parking on Warren Wagon Road and East Side Drive will again be prohibited in an attempt to prevent the large gathering of young adults at North Beach that started in 2007 and continued on every July 4 until last year.

full story The Star-News:
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Lick Creek Road Washed Out

The Star-News June 15, 2017

2017lickCreek
Photo courtesy Payette National Forest

Photo shows damage to Lick Creek Road six miles east of Lick Creek Summit caused by the flooding of the North Fork of Lick Creek last week. The damage has made the road impassible, Payette National Forest Public Affairs Officer Brian Harris said. The Payette forest will work with Valley County, which maintains the road, to plan repairs, Harris said. The road is closed just past Ponderosa Campground, which is at the confluence of the Secesh River.

source The Star-News:
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E. Lake Fork Road to close Sept. 5 for five months

Motorists will need to use detour during bridge replacement

By Max Silverson for The Star-News June 15, 2017

The East Lake Fork Road bridge over Lake Fork Creek will be closed starting Sept. 5 for five months, the Valley Country Road and Bridge Department said.

The road will be closed while the deteriorating bridge is replaced, Valley County Road and Bridge Supervisor Jeff McFadden said.

During the closure, motorists will be forced to use Elo Road, Paddy Flat Road or Spink Lane to travel between Idaho 55 and Farm to Market Road.

full story The Star-News:
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Work on Goose Creek Road to resume on Monday

The Star-News June 15, 2017

Work on the Goose Lake Road Reconstruction Project west of McCall will resume Monday, a news release said.

Between June 26 and Sept. 4, there will be no daytime closures, but 30-minute delays may occur with pilot cars as required to guide traffic through construction zones.

Nighttime closures will be 8 p.m. to 6 a.m. Sundays through Thursdays with the road open on even hours. Due to wet soil conditions the project may continue into September

The road will be open on the Fourth of July weekend from noon on June 30 to 8 p.m. July 5.

Goose Lake Road provides recreational access to the Payette National Forest, with the primary destination being the Brundage Mountain Ski Area.

The project is intended to improve safety by widening the existing roadway from 22 feet to 26 feet with substandard curves replaced and intersection improvements made at Idaho 55.

The 3.8 mile project has a budget of $10.3 million and is being funded by the Federal Highway Administration’s Western Federal Lands Highway Division.

source The Star-News:
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High flows impacting North Fork Championship

Dean Johnson, KTVB June 14, 2017


(Photo: Paul Boehlke/KTVB)

Banks, Idaho – One of the largest kayak races in North America is making major changes because of this year’s snowmelt. The North Fork Championship, which takes place on the North Fork of the Payette River, draws competitors from all over the world. Some of who have decided to opt out of the competition this year due to the treacherous water.

“The river is very high, very dangerous, very technical, difficult. It packs a big punch,” Oregon kayaker Andrew Morrissey said.

This is the 6th year the North Fork of the Payette River has played host to the North Fork Championship. Race organizer James Byrd says this year’s motto is safety. They’ve made the race shorter, limited the number of gates, or obstacles, competitors must maneuver around, and won’t require any participants to paddle upstream against the current.

continued w/video:
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Some rafting companies cancel whitewater trips because of safety concerns

Dean Johnson, KTVB June 16, 2017


Rafting companies aren’t taking customers on the South Fork of the Payette River right now because there’s too much water. (Photo: KTVB)

This year’s extreme snowmelt is having yet another impact on some local businesses. Ironically, some rafting companies have canceled whitewater trips along the South Fork of the Payette River for the time being because there’s too much water.

“We run two trips on the South Fork. We run a half-day Class IV stretch and then up towards Lowman we run a full-day Class IV stretch. We have not be able to do those,” Cascade Raft and Kayak general manager Kenneth Long said.

Those trips equate to about a third of the rafting trips for companies like Cascade that have chosen not to run them because of safety concerns.

continued:
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Evacuated families camp outside flooded homes

Gretchen Parsons, KTVB June 14, 2017

Eagle – The Boise River is dropping, and now the Army Corps of Engineers and Bureau of Reclamation say the flow rate at Glenwood Bridge should be below flood stage by Thursday afternoon.

Dozens of residents have already moved back to the flooded Riviera Estates Mobile Home Park in Eagle, camping outside their own homes with no running water, gas or power.

They were forced to move out a few weeks ago because of unsanitary conditions.

But residents say they are getting by, and would prefer to be at the park rather than a shelter.

continued w/video:
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From North To South, Idaho’s Lakes And Dams Forecast To Fill

By Frankie Barnhill BSU Public Radio June 13, 2017

By now many of us have seen the teacup diagram from the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation showing the remaining capacity of reservoirs in the Boise and Payette River Basins.

To nerd out even more about this exceptional water year, it’s best to dig in to the June water supply report from the National Resources Conservation Service.

The agency’s monthly report breaks things down by region, giving forecasts and outlining exactly how much snow fell this winter.

continued:
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One dead in Payette Co. plane crash

Natalie Shaver, KTVB June 17, 2017

One person is confirmed dead after a plane crash in Payette County.

Dispatchers received a call at 11:40 a.m. Saturday, about a plane that had crashed around N.E. 19th Avenue between Payette Heights and Scotchpines Road, about one mile north of the Payette Airport.

“I was just hoping that he was alright, but he wasn’t,” Kenneth Lisby said.

Lisby lives near the airport and he said he saw the plane disappear.

continued:
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Aviation History to Share:

Smokejumpers

Historic footage of U.S. Forest Service smokejumpers. Clip is an excerpt from “Up In Flames: A History of Fire Fighting in the Forest,” a documentary film from the Forest History Society:


[h/t Bill Fogg]
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International Aviation Meet Boise in 1911

Walter Brookings and Eugene Ely to appear in Boise April 19 & 20 1911. Boise had to guarantee the flyers $8000, of which most of it was raised in one night by the Commercial Club. This was the first aviation meet in the northwest. The Oregon Short Line Railroad offered special rates for anyone traveling from Idaho, Oregon, or Washington.

The 19th turned out to be a cold day with gale force winds on the grounds of the Intermountain Fairgrounds.. The officials announced that for the comfort of the spectators the flights would be postponed until the following day. The crowd wasn’t having any of that, and insisted that Brookings was unable to fly in this weather. Pride on the line, Brookings arrived at 4:30 gassed up his plane and had it pulled to the runway.

The crowd cheered when he left the ground and climbed to about 300 feet, and then gasped when the nose of the plane dipped and they thought he lost control of the plane, but he pulled up again. He then circled the race track, increasing his speed, shot down at a terrific rate at the crowd, who scattered in panic. After a twelve minute flight, and an estimated 3 miles flown, he touched down to an amazed crowd. The two hundred people who attended that day witnessed the first flight in Idaho history.

The next day they were able to put on the full air show. According to The Daily Idaho Statesman, it was an amazing show. Man flying, FLYING! Incredible.

photo gallery:

source: Bob Hartman HISTORY OF BOISE IDAHO 1863-1963
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Fire News:

Brush fire destroys home, several outbuildings near Sand Hollow

KTVB June 18, 2017

Sand Hollow – A fast-moving brush fire destroyed one home, four outbuildings and two semi trailers near Sand Hollow Sunday afternoon.

BLM spokesperson Keri Steneck said an additional five homes were threatened for a time, but that they are no longer in danger.

Initial reports indicated that two homes had been destroyed. Officials later updated that number after learning that one of the structures was an outbuilding, Steneck said.

The fire was first reported at about 2:30 p.m., near the intersection of Tower Lane and Oasis Road.

Fire crews from the BLM, and various local agencies responded to the scene. Steneck said the brush fire grew to 250 acres, but is no longer actively growing.

continued w/photos:
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Sandy Fire Update

For Immediate Release: June 18, 2017, 6:43pm
Contact: Keri Steneck 208-384-3378
Start Date: 06/18/2017

Location and Jurisdiction: 3 miles west of Sand Hollow, BLM and Private Land Ownership
Cause: Human – Under investigation
Fire Size: 266 acres
Percent Contained: 0%, Full containment is expected by 10pm on 06/18/2017.
Fire Behavior: Smoldering, forward progression stopped, crews in mop-up phase.
Structures Threatened: No additional structures threatened.
Fuels and Terrain: Burning in grass/ sage
Fire Crews/Resources: 4 BLM engines, dozer, water tender, additional resources assisting with containment from: Eagle Fire Department, Caldwell Fire, Nampa Fire, Payette RFD, Middleton RFD, Parma RFD, and Sand Hollow RFD.
Evacuations: None in effect at this time.
Closures: None.

Summary: Crews are working hotspots along the perimeter of the fire and near the structures to reach full containment. No further spread is expected but with forecasted dry weather and gusty winds crews will continue to mop-up and monitor the fire. 1 residence, several outbuildings, and multiple vehicles were destroyed in the fire. This will be the final press release for this incident.
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Table Rock Fire: Man faces impossible task of paying $391,000 in two years

by Jeff Platt Wednesday, June 14th 2017

Boise, Idaho (KBOI) — Taylor Kemp, the man who started the Table Rock fire, is ordered to pay nearly $400,000 for the cost of fighting the fire.

… Furthermore, Kemp’s sentence puts everyone in Boise on notice. The Table Rock fire burned a scar onto the minds of everyone who witnessed it.

The massive blaze started with a firework lit by this young man who now is left with the bill for the damage he caused.

… KBOI 2News asked Boise Fire Chief Dennis Doan if he feels the punishment fits the crime.

… “The community needs to know that and they need to be prepared that when they set that roman candle off when they set that firework off that the damage that can be caused they might be held accountable for it,” said Doan.

… The Chief adds those with the power to prevent these occurrences need to step up.

“What we really need is for our Idaho state legislature to take this serious and change the crazy state law that allows us to buy illegal fireworks,” said Doan.

full story:
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Idaho Fireworks Laws

link:
https://legislature.idaho.gov/statutesrules/idstat/Title39/T39CH26/
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NoFireworks-a
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After extreme winter, experts predict ‘unusual’ fire season

by Scott Logan Thursday, June 15th 2017

Boise, Idaho (KBOI) — You could call this a tale of two fire seasons.

Let’s start with the mountains first.

“The higher elevations are going to be very late coming into the fire season, if they do at all, due primarily to the heavy snow pack we’ve had over the winter months, combined with the slow melting and precipitation we’ve had,” said Bryan Henry with the National Interagency Fire Center (NIFC).

Is he suggesting that there won’t be much activity at all in the higher elevations?

“Probably not so much in the higher elevations this year,” Henry said. “It’s very unusual.”

The primary focus is on the middle and lower elevations, which brings us to the grass in the foothills.

continued:
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Simpson and Schrader Reintroduce Wildfire Disaster Funding Act

Washington, June 8, 2017

Idaho Congressman Mike Simpson and Oregon Congressman Kurt Schrader today reintroduced the Wildfire Disaster Funding Act (WDFA), legislation which would fix the current budgeting process for wildfires.

In recent years, Congress has budgeted for wildfire suppression by appropriating money according to the average cost for wildfires over the past ten years, known as the “ten-year average.” When costs exceed an agency’s fire budget, that agency is forced to borrow from non-fire accounts to pay for fire suppression. This practice is known as “fire-borrowing.” Robbing these accounts means that the Forest Service and other land management agencies have fewer resources available for forest management activities like hazardous fuels reduction that would prevent catastrophic fires. As a result, fires get worse and wildfire suppression costs end up devouring the agency’s budget.

“I have seen the cost of wildfires in Idaho and the impacts it has on our forests when funds that are planned for forest management are used to fight wildfires,” said Simpson. “When more than fifty percent of an agency’s budget is unpredictable, you are creating a recipe for the unsustainable fire-borrowing we see today that devastates our forests and costs taxpayers. I am pleased to reintroduce the Wildfire Disaster Funding Act with Congressman Schrader again this Congress. It is time to acknowledge that catastrophic wildfires should be funded like natural disasters so we can ensure that land managers have the resources they need to properly manage our forests.”

“Simply put, the current system is broken,” said Schrader. “Because we do no project management to help protect our forests, we end up paying much more to fight costly carbon producing wildfires that again devastate our ability to do the critical forest management on our public lands in the first place. These fires should be treated the same as any other natural disaster. Budgeting to address the mismanagement of our forests would free up financial resources. Our bill will work to fix this root problem by reducing fuel loads, improving forest health, save taxpayers money, and provide jobs in our struggling rural communities.”

Fire borrowing was intended to be an extraordinary measure to help in bad wildfire years. However, this practice has become the norm and not the exception, which has caused wildfire costs to increase. According to the Forest Service, wildfire costs were 56% of their total budget in 2016. In 1995, the Forest Service spent only 16% of their total budget fighting wildfires. By 2025, that number could increase to nearly 70% if nothing is done to fix the budgeting process.

continued:
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Raging forest fire in central Portugal kills at least 61 people

CBS News Jun 18, 2017

Avelar, Portugal — A raging forest fire in central Portugal sent flames sweeping over roads, killing at least 61 people, many of them trapped in their cars as they tried to flee, officials said Sunday. The country’s prime minister called it “the biggest tragedy” that Portugal has experienced in decades and declared three days of national mourning.

A huge wall of thick smoke and bright red flames towered over the top of trees in the forested Pedrogao Grande area some 95 miles northeast of Lisbon where a lightning strike was believed to have sparked the blaze Saturday. Investigators found a tree that was hit during a “dry thunderstorm,” the head of the national judicial police told Portuguese media.

continued:
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Public Lands:

Public meetings planned on proposed Midas Gold mine

The Star-News June 15, 2017

Public meetings are planned this month in McCall, Cascade and Boise to cover plans by Midas Gold Corp. to mine gold in the Stibnite area of Valley County.

The schedule for the public meetings is as follows:

• Cascade: Tuesday, June 27, from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. at The Ashley Inn, 500 N. Main St.

• McCall: Wednesday, June 28, from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. at the Payette National Forest Supervisor’s Office, 500 North Mission St.

• Boise: Thursday, June 29, from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., and from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. at the Holiday Inn Express & Suites (Airport), 3050 S. Shoshone St.

Midas Gold, based in Vancouver, B.C., filed its proposed plan of operation last September.

Midas Gold hopes that the Payette National Forest will approve its plans to remove what the company thinks is four to five million ounces of gold and 100 million to 200 million pounds of antimony, a fire-retardant material, at the site over 12 years.

The company predicts that up to 1,000 employees will work to build the mine over three years, after which an average of 600 people would work to remove the precious metals.

For more information on the application, go to http://fs.usda.gov/goto/StibniteGold.

Written comments also can be submitted at the website or to comments-intermtn-payette@fs.fed.us with the subject “Stibnite Gold EIS Scoping Comment.”

source The Star-News:
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From The Ashes Of Idaho’s Pioneer Fire, Mushrooms Rise

By Monica Gokey BSU Public Radio June 14, 2017

At 5:00 a.m., thick morning haze slowly gives way to daylight. In an area of the Pioneer burn designated for commercial morel picking, charred trees dot the forest. The ground is a mix of black ash and new plant life.

Siong Lee of central California walks through the forest, eyes downcast. He is looking for something very specific: morel mushrooms.

Lee and his picking partner spread out from each other, but stay in touch over walkie talkies, speaking their native language of Hmong.

Minutes go by without a single mushroom. Then . . .

continued:
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June 2017 Pioneer Fire Recovery and Restoration Update

6/16/2017

Greetings:

The June 2017 Pioneer Fire Recovery and Restoration Update is attached for your review.

To assist the Forest Service in meeting its goals of reducing our carbon footprint and to achieve a sustainable operation, we are transitioning to a web-based electronic system that allows interested parties to receive project materials and Forest information by e-mail. This system gives you direct control over which mailing lists you are subscribed to. It’s easy, it’s good for the environment, and it gives “on-demand” access to Forest information and projects. You can unsubscribe at any time by clicking the “Subscriber Preference Page” link at the bottom of this message and following the instructions on GovDelivery.com.
https://public.govdelivery.com/accounts/USDAFS/subscriber/new?preferences=true

For additional information regarding the attached Pioneer Fire Recovery and Restoration Update, please contact Venetia Gempler, Public Affairs Officer, by phone at 208-373-4105 or by email vgempler@fs.fed.us

Sincerely,
Melissa Yenko
Forest Environmental Coordinator
Boise National Forest

2017_0615_Pioneer_Fire+and+Restoration_Update_web.pdf
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Scotchman Peaks Wilderness proposal aired at Sen. Risch’s meeting today

Rich Landers The Spokesman-Review June 6, 2017

The staff of U.S. Sen. Jim Risch, R-Idaho, will hold an open house meeting to present information about the Idaho portion of the proposed Scotchman Peaks Wilderness today, June 6, at Hope Elementary School Gymnasium, 255 Hope School Rd. in Hope.

Information about a potential wilderness will be on display from 4 p.m. – 7 p.m. and representatives from Risch’s office and officials from the U.S. Forest Service will be available to answer questions. Public comments will be collected.

Risch had introduced a bill to designate the wilderness in the final days of the last Congress.

source:
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Letter to Share:

IDFG wolf plan draft outline

(via email) 6/13/2017

At the May 2017, IDFG Commission meeting in Salmon, Idaho, the Department released a draft outline for a new Idaho Wolf Management plan (copy attached). After listening to the CD, I received of the meeting, I learn that: under close questioning from members of the Commission, it was revealed that the Department wants to duck the question of “how many wolves will Idaho sustain?”

If a Wolf Management plan is to be credible it must identify a target population number for the State, just like all other species. Sportsmen, livestock producers and others have suffered patiently through the ravages of the wolf wars, and the time has come to take the wolf population firmly in hand through sound management.

As a state, Idaho has agreed to maintain minimum numbers of wolves and wolf packs in order to avoid federal relisting. Now that wolves have been delisted and successfully managed by the State for a 5-year probation period, it is time for the Commission and the Department to offer a specific management plan that plainly identifies firm population numbers, not vague objectives. A management plan lacking specific population targets is no plan at all.

Identifying a specific target number will be a contentious process. The minimums have been established through negotiations with the federal agencies, but the top end of the population is up to those willing to fight the battle. The Department admits to a statewide wolf population of 800-850 animals. The public will not accept this number as being permanent without a fight, if only because it vastly exceeds the required minimums. There is no reason for Idahoans to bear all the burden of being “The Wolf State” while our game herds struggle in many areas and are held down from their potential in other areas.

Time grows short. The Department seems intent on rushing a wolf plan through with a minimum of public comment.

The Department timetable is to complete a final draft by July 8 with a public comment period July 31st-Aug 18th. Do not wait until then to make your feelings known. Contact your Commissioner NOW and let them know the wolf plan needs specific population objectives and that those objectives need to be substantially lower than the current bloated population. While you are at it, contact your local media and expose this attempt to stick Idaho with a burdensome wolf population that will plague our children and grandchildren.

Jim Hagedorn
Viola, Idaho 83872
Ph. 208-883-3423

20170517IDwolfplanoutline.pdf
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Critter News:

Vets warn pet owners of dangerous river hazards that aren’t so obvious

by Amika Osumi Sunday, June 11th 2017

Boise , Idaho (KBOI) — As the Boise River roars, it not only remains a danger to people but also their pets.

… Veterinarians at All Valley Animal Care Center say dogs have already lost their lives from the rushing water.

The hospital advises pet owners to keep their dogs on a leash if they’re by the river so they can’t wonder and get themselves into dangerous situations.

However, veterinarian Dr. Jessica Loweth says the river itself isn’t the only worry, standing flood water is also dangerous for pets to be around.

full story:
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Rattlesnake avoidance training could help save your dog’s life

Alex Livingston, KTVB June 12, 2017

Boise – It’s pretty common, especially this time of year, that you’ll see people with their dogs up in the foothills.

… At a session at Veterans’ Memorial Park on Sunday, wildlife experts explained the dangers of venomous snakes in our area.

The dogs were walked through a course where they get close to less dangerous snakes and trainers use a shock collar to teach the dogs to stay away.

“Immediately after he was shying away from anything that looked like a snake,” Oliver said.

full story w/video:
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Pet talk – Diabetes In Dogs And Cats

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt Jun 16, 2017 IME

Diabetes mellitus is also known as sugar diabetes. The word mellitus means sweet and refers to the increased blood and urine sugar levels that occur with this disease. This type of diabetes arises when the pancreas does not produce enough insulin. Insulin is the hormone that allows most tissues of the body to utilize blood sugar (glucose). As insulin levels fall, blood sugar becomes elevated, producing many adverse side effects in the body.

The most common cause of diabetes in dogs and cats is the destruction of beta cells in the pancreas. Beta cells are responsible for insulin production. This destruction often arises from chronic inflammation of the pancreas. This type of diabetes is known as Type 1 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes, which arises from the development of resistance to insulin in our body’s cells, is uncommon in dogs and cats.

Common clinical signs of diabetes include increased thirst, increased urination, increased appetite and weight loss. Because glucose cannot be utilized by the cells in our body, it is almost as if the pet is starving in the midst of plenty. Diabetes is diagnosed when the fasting blood sugar concentration is significantly elevated. Testing of the urine for increased glucose content is also important. Other tests your vet may advise are complete blood counts, biochemistry profiles and urine cultures.

continued:
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Dog treats recalled over Salmonella risk

Matt McKinney KIVI TV Jun 15, 2017

Some Loving Pets dog treats are being recalled due to a possible Salmonella contamination.

… According to the FDA, pets with Salmonella infections may be lethargic and have bloody diarrhea, fever, and vomiting. Infected but otherwise healthy pets can be carriers and infect other animals or humans. If your pet has consumed the recalled product and has these symptoms, please contact your veterinarian.

No illnesses have been reported.

full story w/product list:
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KWVR Oregon Wolf Education weekly Wolf Report

Second week of June 2017
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Wolf roams Mount Spokane State Park ski area

Rich Landers The Spokesman-Review June 13, 2017


A gray wolf is photographed at 11:58 a.m. on March 30, 2017, on Mount Spokane with the ski runs of Mt. Spokane Ski and Snowboard Park in the background. (Western Wildlife Conservation)

For the second consecutive year, a Spokane man’s motion-activated trail camera has captured images of a wolf in Mount Spokane State Park, confirming sightings of wolves and wolf tracks that nordic skiers have been reporting with more frequency for several years.

The image above was captured at 11:58 a.m. on March 30 by a trail cam set up by Hank Seipp of Western Wildlife Conservation. Seipp said he just retrieved the images this week “because I don’t ski.” Most of the snow has finally melted. The camera was set up just outside of the downhill ski area, he said.

Seipp, who put out a trail cam that photographed a darker wolf last summer near the nordic trails, also snapped recent photos of tracks in the mud and scats almost surely from wolves. Rumors of wolf pups showing up this year have been circulating but no confirmation has been made.

continued:
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Wolf Education International

Newsletter second week June 2017

Montana to switch how it counts wolves in state

Echinococcus Granulosus

Village advises drastic measures against wolves

Wisconsin Wolf Population Continues to Grow

Montana’s Wolf Population Still Strong, State Agency Says

State wolf management plan moves closer to completion

Wisconsin wolf population approaching 1,000

Comment on “Whole-genome sequence analysis shows two endemic species of North American wolf are admixtures of the coyote and gray wolf”

RMEF Calls for Delisting of Growing Great Lakes Wolf Population

Ranchers say wolf attacks resume in Washington state
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Record $480K bid for bighorn sheep tag – the rest of the story

Rich Landers The Spokesman-Review June 13, 2017

The secrecy protecting deep-pocket bidders at trophy big-game hunting tag auctions mysteriously stepped up around 2013 after the record bid was made for a bighorn sheep tag.

A February New York Times story — well worth reading — on bighorn sheep hunting and the dilemma involved with funding wild sheep programs reminded me of the progression in protecting the identity of the high rollers. It also reminded me that I had unanswered questions about that record bid of $480,000 for the Montana governor’s tag in 2013.

The record bid was widely reported, including here at The Spokesman-Review, but the rest of the story tended to stay in the rumor mill as it is with a lot of things linked to big money.

continued:
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Hummingbird Research In Idaho

Midas Gold Idaho June 14, 2017

This is the fourth installment of our special hummingbird series with in-house hummingbird expert Ken Assmus. If you want to see more stunning photos or learn other fun facts about these beautiful birds, scroll through our recent blog posts.

As an avid bird photographer, last year I was thrilled when I had the opportunity to document a hummingbird research roundup in Southeast Idaho. These licensed professionals have carefully banded hummingbirds in this area for close to 15 years so they can research their biology, migration routes, lifespan, breeding success, year to year population changes and hummingbird distribution in Southern Idaho.

The banding process takes place on a private ranch. This location is ideal because hummingbirds breed and nest in the thickets surrounding the ranch. Part of the reason they are drawn to this location is the abundance of water. There are plenty of small creeks, streams and wetlands for the birds to enjoy.

In order to band the hummingbirds, they must be temporarily captured. The licensed banders do this using cages with hummingbird feeders inside. Once a hummingbird starts to drink from the feeder, the door to the cage closes, allowing researchers to get to work. It takes a very gentle hand to work with these tiny little birds.

continued w/photo gallery:
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The Columbia Basin Bulletin

Weekly Fish and Wildlife News
http://www.cbbulletin.com
June 16, 2017
Issue No. 834

Table of Contents

* Willamette BiOp For Fish: Four Subbasins Focus Of Corps’ Salmon Reintroduction Programs Above Dams
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439107.aspx

* States Set Schedule Of Angling Closures Aimed At Protecting Low Numbers Of Wild Steelhead
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439106.aspx

* With Cormorant Nesting On East Sand Island Stalled, Boat-Based Shooting Of Birds Suspended
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439105.aspx

* River Managers Extend Spill Experiment At Little Goose Dam To Encourage Spring Chinook Passage
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439104.aspx

* With More Fish Caught Than Expected, States Close Lower Columbia Sturgeon Fishing
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439103.aspx

* John Day River Habitat Restoration Efforts Show Increased Salmon Spawning
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439102.aspx

* Basin Weather Update: July-Sept. Outlook Now Looking At Warmer Than Average, Normal Precipitation
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439101.aspx

* Montana Releases For Public Comment Whitefish Plan That Would Purchase Conservation Easement From Weyerhaeuser
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439100.aspx

* Montana’s Annual Wolf Report Shows Numbers Still Strong; Minimum 477 Wolves, Minimum 50 Breeding Pairs
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439099.aspx

* Study: With Right Management Floodplain Farm Fields Can Benefit Juvenile Salmon
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439098.aspx

* New Fish Ladder On Deschutes Allows More Movement For Redband Trout
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439097.aspx
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Fish & Game News:

F&G News Releases

https://idfg.idaho.gov/press
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Fun Critter Stuff:

TV Dinner – Simon’s Cat


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CatFlatScreen-a
[h/t CP]
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