Monthly Archives: October 2017

Oct 29, 2017 The Yellow Pine Times

Oct 29, 2017 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Note: There is still plenty of time to order your 2018 Yellow Pine Calendar. Please reply to the Calendar email or send me an email with number wanted, name and address, with “2018 Calendar” in the subject line. Price is the same as last year $25 with postage. These calendars are custom printed on thick card-stock (in the USA!) photos taken around Yellow Pine by Local Color Photography.

Village News:

Halloween Party

There was a Halloween partly on October 28th at the Yellow Pine Tavern.

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The Corner

The Corner is closed for the season. Stop by if you need wood permits. We will reopen after we have the baby.
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YP Transfer Station

A report from Wednesday (Oct 25) that the bins had been emptied and the community slash pile burned. Road is rough between YP and the Transfer Station.
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Fall Rx Burns planned

BNF:
Cascade Ranger District: Slash piles will be ignited in the following locations: Warm Lake, Yellow pine, Landmark and Crawford. It will be pile burning for two days.

PNF:
The Krassel Ranger District plans to ignite 1,600 acres in the Fourmile drainage, and 2,000 acres in the Bald Hill project area.
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Bear Aware

Bears are around and hungry this fall, not much of a berry crop this year. Keep garbage secured and pet food indoors, take down bird feeders until hibernation. Bears love grills and outdoor fridges.) Good info on living with bears HERE (scroll down,)
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YPFD News:

There are YPFD T-shirts, as well as YPFD patches and stickers for sale at the Tavern now.

Training is on Sundays starting at 11am at the YP Fire Station and open to the community of Yellow Pine. Check with Jeff or Ann to confirm trainings.

Both Fire Sirens will be tested at noon on the first of each month.
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VYPA News:

Next meeting June 2018
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook
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Local Observations:

Monday (Oct 23) overnight low of 31 degrees, quite foggy early, then lifting with the sun and partly clear. Pine squirrels very active once the sun was shining. Filtered sun after lunch time. About 215pm several airplanes coming from the north east, turning over the village (a couple low and loud) and landing at Johnson Creek. Partly cloudy late afternoon, high of 56 degrees. Quiet evening.

Tuesday (Oct 24) overnight low of 25 degrees, clear and frosty this morning. After lunch a chipmunk was running around, a flock of nutcrackers were after pine cones out in the forest. Backup beeper on heavy equipment to the east, otherwise very quiet. Tamarack trees were shining brilliant gold colors against a really blue sky, high of 61 degrees. Midas Gold survey call this afternoon. Starlings sighted. Clear quiet evening.

Wednesday(Oct 25) overnight low of 26 degrees, clear and frosty this morning. Sun hit about 1030am and roofs were steaming and dripping. Small flock of starlings. Some high thin ‘mare’s tails’ clouds coming from the north west after lunch, high of 66 degrees. Heard clarks nutcrackers calling to the north in the early afternoon. Mostly clear at sunset. Heard a pileated woodpecker calling from across the street, too dim to see. Mostly cloudy just as it was getting dark.

Thursday (Oct 26) a little rain shower during the night or early morning, stayed above freezing. Partly cloudy this morning and damp. Pine squirrel calling, a flicker hunting bugs, and a small flock of starlings. Mostly clear early in the afternoon, pretty day, high of 61 degrees. Pine squirrel running about and a steller jay poking at pine cones. Sun was down behind the hill before 6pm, clear sky. Just before dark a pileated woodpecker visited the ant pile. Bright moon riding high at dark.

Friday (Oct 27) overnight low of 27 degrees, high hazy clouds, light frost this morning. Mostly clear after lunch time. Lone Clark’s nutcracker in the neighbor’s tree. Nice fall day, high of 62 degrees Helicopter flew over the village at 604pm. Mostly clear at sunset, bright first quarter moon shining before dark. Lots of stars twinkling tonight.

Saturday (Oct 28) overnight low of 27 degrees, clear sky this morning. Not many birds around, saw one jay and heard one nutcracker. Pine squirrel was very busy. Clear and sunny nice day, high of 65 degrees. Light traffic during and day and quiet evening. Late afternoon slanting sunlight turned the tamaracks to gold. Bright waxing moon up before dark.

Sunday (Oct 29) overnight low of 28 degrees, clear sky this morning, light frost. Not many birds around except “Baby Jay” looking for a handout. Sound of chainsaw early this morning, someone getting in their winter’s wood. A few clarks nutcrackers are still around, calling from the trees. Beautiful warm sunny day, high of 67 degrees. Light traffic and quiet evening. Fat moon rising before dark.
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Letter to Share:

Midas Letter to Yellow Pine

October 25, 2017

Thank you for the letter dated October 16, 2017 from Willie Sullivan representing the Village of Yellow Pine Association (VYPA). Following is a proposal for formalizing our communication, an update for your committee on our progress evaluating access and our proposed next steps.

We very much appreciate members of the VYPA volunteering their time to participate in these discussions. Thank you for establishing a committee of representatives of the township, which we understand comprises Lorinne Munn, Cecil Dallman, Lynn Imel and Willie Sullivan. Midas Gold will also designate authorized representatives as per the discussion below. This will help ensure we are hearing one, unified, voice from Yellow Pine and that you are hearing a consistent and accurate message from the company.

A meaningful resolution to access routes will take time, which is why we would like to solidify our commitment to communicating regularly with the designated members of the VYPA. In order to facilitate and focus discussions, we propose that YPVA and Midas Gold enter into a Communications Agreement and we will send you a draft agreement on or before November 3. This agreement would formalize the list of individuals representing the Village of Yellow Pine and Midas Gold, provide commitments on regular communication, including a meeting schedule, and set objectives for the coming months.

We have committed to the residents of Yellow Pine that we would carefully and comprehensively evaluate public access to Thunder Mountain through our site and present options, alternatives and issues to you. In order to advance these discussions, we instructed our engineering and permitting staff to identify and then evaluate potentially feasible options that would provide continued seasonal access for regular vehicles through our project area that would connect members of the public in and around Yellow Pine to Thunder Mountain. Our team is currently evaluating potential access routes for consideration as alternatives in the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). The routes we are assessing utilize the existing Yellow Pine to Stibnite road as far as the Sugar Creek junction and then progress through the site in various directions before connecting to the road up the EFSRSR to the existing Thunder Mountain Road on the far side of the proposed project boundaries.

We hope to review these options with you in just a few weeks. In mid-November we would like to meet with the group representing YPVA to discuss those findings. Belinda Provancher from Midas Gold will work with Lorinne Munn to establish a meeting date and logistics.

Our plan for the Stibnite Gold Project, and any changes to that plan, are now in the hands of the U.S. Forest Service (USFS). Please keep in mind that any access route alternatives need to be presented to USFS for consideration as an alternative to our proposed plan and would then be subject to a review of potential impacts. After review and public comment, the USFS will make the final determination of the route included in the EIS. Additionally, Midas Gold must further evaluate the engineering feasibility (at a conceptual level), the environmental impacts and the significant logistical and safety considerations, isolating public vehicle traffic across an active mine site.

We are committed to working with you to reach a mutual understanding, and look forward to hearing from you on the proposed communications agreement and a meeting date for reviewing our road access study.

Sincerely,

Belinda Provancher
Community Relations Manager
Midas Gold
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Idaho News:

Idaho 55 [Temp] Closed for Dead Trees

The Star-News October 26, 2017

2017treeH55-a
Photo by Dave Holland

Idaho 55 west of McCall was closed for about 20 minutes on Monday while crews from the Idaho Transportation Department and Idaho Power Co. cut down two dead trees. The tree were cut because they were considered a risk to the traveling public, ITD spokesperson Jennifer Gonzalez said.

source:
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Ohio man sexually Skyped Valley County kids

Steve Bertel Oct 25, 2017 KIVI TV

Boise, ID – Timothy Raymond Schmidt, 34, of Cincinnati, Ohio pleaded guilty Tuesday in United States District Court to sexual exploitation of children, according to U.S. Attorney Bart Davis -– after communicating via Skype with two Valley County children.

According to the plea agreement, from January 28 to April 9, 2015, Schmidt, while living in Ohio, used Skype to communicate with two minor victims — ages 17 and 13 -– living in Valley County.

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Member sought for Valley County Planning & Zoning Commission

The Star-News October 26, 2017

The Valley County Board of Commissioners is seeking to fill a vacancy on the five-member Planning and Zoning Commission beginning in January.

Applicants must be full-time residents of Valley County and have lived in the county for at least the past five years.

The selected applicant will replace current commissioner Rob Garrison, who has decided not to seek a new term.

Those who are interested may submit their resumes to Cynda Herrick at cherrick@co.valley.id.us or at the Planning and Zoning Office, 219 N. Main St. in Cascade, or mail it to P.O. Box 1350, Cascade, ID 83611.

For more information, call Herrick at 208-382-7115.

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McCall settles airport taxiway lawsuit for $1.65 million

Feds will pay 90% to acquire land, build project

By Phil Janquart for The Star-News October 26, 2017

2017taxiway-a
Star-News Graphic by Tomi Grote. Area outlined in red shows the land the city of McCall has agreed to aquire for $1.65 million to allow construction of a new taxiway at McCall Airport.

The City of McCall has agreed to pay $1.65 million to landowners for 15.3 acres of property needed to build a new federally mandated airport taxiway.

New standards under the Federal Aviation Administration call for a wider separation between the taxiway and the main runway, which would help prevent collisions between large aircraft.

The agency says the old taxiway, which is 200 feet from the main runway, must be abandoned and that a new taxiway must be built 400 feet away.

The extra land also is needed to avoid placing the new taxiway over drainage ditches, according to the city.

An agreement between the city and landowners on a sale price for the acreage reached an impasse, prompting the city to file a lawsuit in June 2016 to have a judge or jury set a price.

A trial had been set to begin Dec. 4, but the settlement means the trial will be canceled pending completion of the settlement agreement.

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McCall cleans up Payette L. shoreline, has plans for development

By Phil Janquart for The Star-News October 26, 2017

It has been a repository for old docks, logs and pieces of metal, but a plan to transform a stretch of shoreline on Payette Lake near downtown McCall into a non-motorized access point for recreationists is inching forward.

The McCall Parks and Recreation Department set the process into motion earlier this month with a volunteer clean-up day that cleared debris from the narrow shoreline.

The area extends about 100 yards between Mile High Marina and Brown Park and is one of the few areas around Payette Lake where the public has access.

Visions for the area include swimming, paddle boarding and kayaking, but the first step is to remove debris, Parks and Recreation Director Kurt Wolf said.

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Local drummer making noise on Hwy 55

by Roland Steadham Friday, October 27th 2017

Horseshoe Bend, Idaho (KBOI) — A local drummer is turning a lot of heads along Highway 55 on Horseshoe Bend Hill.

Watch the video to meet this one of a kind drummer!

link:
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Idaho Experience

Idaho Public Television

Idaho Experience will showcase the rugged and innovative nature of Idahoans, our unforgettable events and unbelievable successes. Our stories will inspire a deeper understanding of how we came to be where we are today and where we may go tomorrow. The Idaho State Historical Society is our partner on this project.

http://video.idahoptv.org/video/3005599815/

[h/t LC]
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Human skeletal remains found along Salmon River

by KBOI News Staff Tuesday, October 24th 2017

Grangeville, Idaho (KBOI) — Human remains were found along the bank of the Salmon River near Cottonwood, sheriff deputies say.

The Idaho County Sheriff’s Office says hunters found the remains near Rice Creek and Grave Creek roads. Two deputies and the county coroner found the skeletal remains below the high water mark.

The remains were not intact and it appears to be an adult of unknown sex.

The sheriff’s office says it has two people missing in the Salmon River — 20-year-old Cayla Danenberg, who went missing since a crash along Highway 95 in May 2016 and John “Randy” French, 54, of Boise, who went missing after a Highway 95 crash on approximately July 2.

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Remains found in Salmon River are those of Nampa woman

KTVB October 27, 2017

Cottonwood, Idaho – The Idaho County coroner says human remains found by hunters along the banks of the Salmon River Monday are those of a Nampa woman missing for nearly a year and a half.

Cayla Danenberg, 21, was reported missing on May, 2016, after the car she was riding in crashed into the Salmon River about six miles north of the town of Lucille.

Authorities say Danenberg and Tiffany Maupin, 21, were returning to the University of Idaho when their car went off U.S. 95 into the river. Maupin’s body was recovered on May 28, 2016, about six miles downstream from where the car went into the river.

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Lowman Elementary may only be one room, but it has a lot of heart

by Sarah Jacobsen Wednesday, October 25th 2017

Boise, Idaho (KBOI) — If you’ve ever driven through the town of Lowman, Idaho, nestled deep in the mountains on the South Fork of the Payette River, you may have seen this building.

Lowman Elementary School.

The one and only school in the town of Lowman.

“Here it’s just a great community, the school is part of the center of the community and I have great community support,” said teacher Kim Grigg.

This one room school houses grades kindergarten through 5th grade.

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Man pleads not guilty to lighting fireworks that burned home

by Associated Press Sunday, October 29th 2017

Pocatello, Idaho (AP) – A Pocatello man accused of lighting mortar rocket fireworks that authorities say burned one home and damaged another has pleaded not guilty.

The Idaho State Journal reported that John Woods, of Pocatello, faces up to 25 years in prison if convicted of first-degree arson. He pleaded not guilty last week in district court.

Defense attorney Shane Reichert says Woods is sorry for what happened but that his client is innocent until proven guilty. Reichert says the state must prove that he was responsible for that crime.

Woods told the Journal in an interview in July that he began lighting mortar rockets from his driveway. Another resident reports that she came out of the house when she heard an explosion. Three additional mortars exploded in the air near her home.

The July 13 fire caused thousands of dollars in property damages.

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Are we in store for another record setting snow year?

by KBOI News Staff Wednesday, October 25th 2017

Boise, Idaho (KBOI) — Countless hours of shoveling snow, and mounds of it lining the driveway, last winters record snowfall remains fresh on our minds.

Heading into the next winter season we’re beginning to see hints of what could be another extreme snow year.

“A La Nina Watch has been issued by the Climate Prediction Center for the fall and winter season… at the equator in the eastern Pacific, the ocean surface is trending cooler than average,” said KBOI 2News meteorologist Nate Larsen. “A similar pattern to what we saw last season.”

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Idaho approves $3 million to study raising Boise River dams

10/28/17 AP

Boise, Idaho — Idaho officials have approved spending $3 million to help pay for a federal study to increase the height of three dams on the Boise River.

The Capital Press reports that the Idaho Water Resources Board on Tuesday approved paying for half of the $6 million study that requires a 50 percent non-federal match.

The U.S. Bureau of Reclamation study will look at raising Anderson Ranch Dam by 6 feet, Arrowrock Dam by 10 feet and Lucky Peak Dam by 4 feet.

That would result in an additional 60,000 acre-feet of storage capacity in the system that can now store about 1 million acre-feet.

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Public Lands:

Barber Flats Bridge road temporarily closes for first phase of repairs

Boise, Idaho, October 27, 2017 —

The Boise National Forest is temporarily closing National Forest System road 376 (Barber Flat Road) Oct. 30, 2017, for public health and safety while the Barber Flat Bridge undergoes the first phase of a two phased repair process.

This order will remain in effect until noon Nov. 16, 2017. Once the first phase is completed the bridge will reopen to vehicles less than 50 inches. Phase two is planned for the late summer, early fall 2018.

The Barber Flat Bridge has been closed to vehicles wider than 50 inches since April 2012 when an inspection showed that a bridge pier had moved deeming it unsafe for full sized vehicles.

A detailed description of the closure is attached. For this, and all Boise National Forest area closures visit:
https://www.fs.usda.gov/alerts/boise/alerts-notices
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Forests Without Borders: State, Payette forest cooperate to produce healthy timber stands

By Max Silverson for The Star-News October 26, 2017

Clark Lucas works for the Idaho Department of Lands, but his latest project is located on land managed by the Payette National Forest.

Lucas, an IDL forest resource specialist, has been surveying Payette forest land in the Sloans Point area east of Donnelly under a new program called the Good Neighbor Authority.

The national program was included in the 2014 Farm Bill passed by Congress. The agreement allows for the two agencies to work as partners to increase the pace and scale of forest restoration, with each entity contributing to a single project, officials said.

Work in the Sloan’s Point area will focus about 1,500 acres of Payette forest land containing Ponderosa pine and western larch. Work would include stream restoration, controlled burns, and thinning trees both to produce lumber and to reduce the risk of wildfire.

“The intent is to help move conditions closer to what nature would have done if wildfire had not been excluded over the past 100 years,” Payette Public Affairs Officer Brian Harris said.

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Forest Service buys key wildlife habitat area in E. Idaho

10/24/17 AP

Last Chance, Idaho — The U.S. Forest Service has purchased about 60 acres (24 hectares) of private land inside the Caribou-Targhee National Forest in eastern Idaho that contains key spawning habitat for Yellowstone cutthroat trout.

The agency in a news release Tuesday says the Duck Creek area of Henry’s Lake is also important habitat for elk, deer, pronghorn, grizzly bears and other wildlife.

The Forest Service says the public will have non-motorized access with camping available within 100 yards (91 meters) of Red Rock Road.

The agency says it purchased the land from Rob and Ruth Plesner. Rob Plesner’s ancestors homesteaded in the area.

The Nature Conservancy of Idaho assisted with the deal. Officials didn’t release the selling price.

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Federal land manager to Idaho National Guard: Stop building

By Rebecca Boone – 10/24/17 AP

Boise, Idaho — The Bureau of Land Management has ordered the Idaho National Guard to stop building a tank crossing on a road in a national conservation area in the state until an environmental analysis is finished and the BLM decides whether to grant a permit.

A formal cease and desist letter was sent to the Idaho Military Division last month, stating that the construction project — which involves extensive digging and trenching on Simco Road — was a trespass on the BLM-managed Morley Nelson Snake River Birds of Prey Conservation Area.

Both sides characterized the issue as the result of a rare misunderstanding in a long-standing positive relationship in the area that contains key habitat for eagles, falcons and hawks.

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House will vote next week on wildfire bill

Matthew Daly Associated Press, KTVB October 26, 2017

Republican leaders say the House will vote next week on a GOP bill to make it easier to cut down trees on national forests to reduce the risk of wildfire.

A bill by Arkansas congressman Bruce Westerman would loosen environmental regulations for forest-thinning projects on federal lands. The measure would waive environmental reviews for projects up to 30,000 acres for areas prone to insect infestations, disease or extreme wildfire risk.

The bill comes as the Forest Service has spent a record $2.4 billion battling forest fires across the West in one of the nation’s worst fire seasons.

House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy of California says the bill makes needed changes “to keep our forests healthy and less susceptible to the types of fires that ravaged our state this month.”

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Yellowstone & Grand Teton entrance fees could more than double

Oct 25, 2017 Local News 8

Washington DC (KIFI/KIDK) – The National Park Service is considering a proposal to increase fees at highly visited national parks during peak visitor seasons. The list includes Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks and 15 other national parks across the country.

The increases would apply to entrance fees and revised fees for road-based commercial tours. According to the Park Service, the revenue would fund improvements to aging infrastructure, including roads, bridges, campgrounds, waterlines, bathrooms, and other visitor services.

Yellowstone Park officials have identified a number of improvement projects.

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National Parks Want a Massive Fee Increase

Visiting one of the 17 most popular National Parks will cost $70 during peak season if this proposal goes through.

The Western Slope No-Fee Coalition 10/25/2017

On October 24, 2017 the National Park Service issued an announcement that they want to implement a huge “targeted” increase in entrance fees at the most popular National Parks.

Their “target”? Families whose vacation schedules are tied to the school calendar, lower-income visitors, and your wallet!

These 17 parks would charge a premium entry fee during their peak season, more than doubling the current cost of a single-visit entry to $70!

The parks involved, along with their peak season when the increase would be in effect are:

– May 1-September 30 for Arches National Park, Bryce Canyon National Park, Canyonlands National Park, Denali National Park, Glacier National Park, Grand Canyon National Park, Grand Teton National Park, Olympic National Park, Sequoia & Kings Canyon National Park, Yellowstone National Park, Yosemite National Park, Zion National Park
– June 1-October 31 for Acadia National Park, Mount Rainier National Park, Rocky Mountain National Park, Shenandoah National Park
– January 1-May 31 for Joshua Tree National Park

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Hispanic ranchers dealt blow in lengthy battle over grazing

By Susan Montoya Bryan – 10/24/17 AP

Albuquerque, N.M. — A group of Hispanic ranchers has been dealt a blow in their years-long feud with the federal government over grazing rights on land in New Mexico that has been used by their families for centuries.

Attorneys for the ranchers argued that the U.S. Forest Service violated the law when deciding to limit grazing on historic land grants even though the government has recognized that the descendants of Spanish colonists have a unique relationship with the land.

The ranchers claimed the agency failed to consider social and economic effects that would result from limiting grazing in a region where poverty and dependence on the land for subsistence is high.

In a recent ruling, U.S. District James Browning dismissed remaining counts against the government, finding that the National Environmental Policy Act does not require the Forest Service to consider social and economic effects that are a direct result of an agency’s action.

The law narrowly centers on effects to the physical environment, the judge ruled.

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Critter News:

Halloween isn’t always a treat for your pets: How to avoid a scary vet bill

Pet owners beware of these Halloween hazards

Candi Carney Oct 27, 2017

It’s creepy, spooky and downright fun for families — but the Halloween season might be more of a trick, versus a treat, for your four-legged friends.

Pet insurance companies say vet ER visits are always up around this time of year.

We talked to local veterinarian Dr. Brad Twigg about what pet owners need to be aware of so they can avoid a frightful bill from the ER.

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Pet Talk – What is ‘pinkeye’?

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt Oct 27, 2017 IME

Pinkeye is actually conjunctivitis. Conjunctivitis is an inflammation and swelling of the tissues lining or covering the eyelids and eyeball.

There are numerous causes of pinkeye, including infection by bacteria and viruses, irritants such as dust and snow crystals, and trauma. Other irritants include smoke, shampoo, foreign bodies, abnormal hair, and many others. Certain forms of pinkeye are secondary to allergies and auto-immune disease, and also due to poor tear production. Rarely, parasites, tumors and fungal infections can cause conjunctivitis.

The main clinical sign of pinkeye is redness and swelling to the conjunctiva and a discharge at the lower corner of the eye. The discharge may be gray, green, yellow, white or just watery. With widespread or severe conjunctivitis, inflammation of the eyelids or cornea can occur. This is called blepharitis and keratitis.

Conjunctivitis may or may not be painful. If painful, then the animal squints its’ eyes and tries to rub or paw at them.

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Reward offered for info on wolf-killing poacher in Oregon

by Gillian Flaccus, Associated Press Wednesday, October 25th 2017

Portland, Ore. (AP) — The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and five conservation groups have teamed up to offer $15,500 for information about the illegal poaching of a federally protected gray wolf that was shot dead in a national forest in southern Oregon.

The wolf, known as OR-33, was being tracked by authorities and is one of at least eight that have been poached or died under mysterious circumstances in the state since 2015, the conservation groups said.

The groups in a statement Tuesday said OR-33 was found dead of gunshot wounds in Fremont Winema National Forest on April 23. DNA tests only recently confirmed that he was OR-33, a 4-year-old male who left a pack in northeast Oregon in 2015. His radio tracking collar stopped working last year.

Over two days in June, he killed two goats and one lamb at a small livestock operation near the small city of Ashland just north of Oregon’s border with California.

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KWVR Oregon Wolf Education weekly Wolf Report

“Midway through October 2017”
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Wolf Education International

Fourth Week October 2017

Wolves return to haunt EU politics

Funding restored to trap wolves who attack livestock

$15,500 Reward Offered After Endangered Wolf Shot Dead

Legislative Pulse: Wyoming Wins Wolf, Monument Battles
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Tentative deal reached on deadly ‘cyanide bombs’

By Matthew Brown – 10/26/17 AP

Billings, Mont. — U.S. officials have reached a tentative deal with wildlife advocates trying to stop the use of predator-killing traps, including devices called “cyanide bombs” that earlier this year injured an Idaho teenager and killed his dog, according to court documents filed Thursday.

Government attorneys asked U.S. District Judge Dana Christensen to put on hold for 60 days a lawsuit over the poisoned traps pending final approval of the agreement by senior officials at the Interior Department.

Terms were not disclosed.

One of the devices named in the lawsuit, called an M-44, is partially buried and baited to attract predators. It sprays cyanide into the mouths of animals that trigger it.

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Scotchman Peak goat ambassadors reduce conflict with hikers

Rich Landers The Spokesman-Review Oct 27, 2017

The future for mountain goats on North Idaho’s Scotchman Peak is brighter, thanks to “goat ambassadors” who have been hiking the popular trail to educate hikers on avoiding contact with the goats.

The Friends of Scotchman Peaks Wilderness (FSPW) have wrapped up a second season of the Mountain Goat Ambassador Program with reports that hikers on Trail 65 near Clark Fork, Idaho, had fewer encounters with aggressive goats.

The 29 volunteer ambassadors were on the peak overlooking Lake Pend Oreille on 37 days for a total of 388 hours, reports Phil Hough, FSPW executive director. That’s every weekend from early June through early October for outreach, education, surveying and monitoring.

“The hikers encountered by our Ambassadors were very interested in learning about the goats and expressed a desire to keep both hikers and goats safe,” he said. Hikers also appreciated any information the knowledgeable ambassadors offered on the proposed wilderness area and the mountains in general, he added.

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video:

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Video: Gutless field dressing saves time, hassle for elk hunters

Rich Landers The Spokesman-Review Oct 25, 2017

I’ve killed an elk near a road where it could be loaded in a pickup exactly zero times in my hunting career.

Every one had to be quartered or the meat removed from the bone in the field to be hauled by a pack animal or, in most cases, by me and a buddy on our backs or on a cart.

In the following two videos, pro hunters demostrate the “gutless method” of deboning meat and getting it ready quickly to pack out.

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Utah woman hospitalized after apparent moose attack

AP Oct 26, 2017

Salt Lake City (AP) – Authorities say a woman is recovering after an apparent moose attack in Summit County.

Two hikers found the woman lying on a trail with her dog on Sunday. They told authorities a cow moose and her calf were about 20 feet (6 meters) away, with the mother acting aggressively.

The hikers got the woman and dog away from the area and called for help.

The woman was taken to a hospital, but the extent of her injuries is unknown. Authorities are waiting for the woman to recover sufficiently before questioning her further.

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Hunter bags 36-point freak-of-nature deer with his crossbow

Brian Broom, The Clarion-Ledger, TEGNA October 26, 2017

Jackson, Miss. – The hunt for a 6-point management buck that spanned four years ended with a Philadelphia, Miss., man taking a rare 36-point giant.

“I hunt there around my house,” Stan Ethredge said. “We’ve got a couple of hundred acres.

“I’ve been getting pictures of him for at least four years now. He was a big 6-point four years ago. He dropped his antlers and grew six points again. After the second year he was a 6-point, I figured that was all he was going to be. I figured he was a good cull buck, but I never got a shot at him. I just got pictures.”

Ethredge continued to monitor the deer and as expected, he grew into another 6-point the following spring, but during the summer, his antlers began to express abnormalities. The buck started growing drop tines and stickers.

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The Columbia Basin Bulletin

Weekly Fish and Wildlife News
http://www.cbbulletin.com
October 27, 2017
Issue No. 849
Table of Contents

* Wild Salmon/Steelhead Numbers Rising In Oregon’s Sandy River After 2007 Dam Removal
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439787.aspx

* Tribal Kelt Reconditioning Program Aims To Boost This Year’s Wild Steelhead Spawning In Lower Snake River
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439786.aspx

* Operations To Protect Spawning ESA-Listed Chum Below Bonneville Delayed; Early Basin Water Supply Forecast Normal
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439785.aspx

* U.S. State Department Picks New Columbia River Treaty Negotiator
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439784.aspx

* Another Sturgeon Fishing Day Added, Mainstem Night Fishing Ban Lifted, Wild Steelhead Passage Still Very Low
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439783.aspx

* More Questions Than Answers On Influx Of Tropical Organisms Found In Alaska Waters For First Time
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439782.aspx

* Oregon Governor Announces Nominations For New Oregon Members Of Northwest Power/Conservation Council
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439781.aspx

* Irrigators Say Not ‘Re-Litigating,’ Want Court To Hear New Information On Barging Fish During Low Flow, Warm Conditions
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439780.aspx

* Independent Science Panel Reviews Draft Report On Columbia Basin Salmon Survival
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439779.aspx

* Council Hears A USFWS Review Of Libby Dam Operations For Sturgeon, Bull Trout
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439778.aspx

* NOAA Study: Climate Shifts Shorten Marine Food Chain Off California
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439777.aspx
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Fish & Game News:

Bats get their due as important wildlife species Oct. 24-31

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Specialist
Monday, October 23, 2017

Governor’s proclamation recognizes the value of Idaho’s bat population

Don’t expect a spotlight in the sky over Gotham City, but do expect furry, flying critters to get their due respect Oct. 24-31 as it’s proclaimed National Bat Week in Idaho by proclamation of Gov. Butch Otter.

“Bats provide important biological services that contribute substantially to the economy of the United States by protecting American forests and agriculture from destructive insects and by providing the fundamental benefit of pollination,” the proclamation reads.

Recently, bat populations have suffered losses from white-nose syndrome and other factors that require attention to ensure the sustainability of food production and protect environmental and human health.

“It is critically important to continue federal and state efforts, including development of new public-private partnerships and increasing citizen engagement to promote the health of bat populations, increase the quality and quantity of bat roosting and foraging habitat, and help restore bat populations to healthy levels,” the proclamation reads.

Want to learn more about bats? Did you know a bat can live over 40 years? Check out 13 Awesome Facts About Bats from the U.S. Department of the Interior.
https://www.doi.gov/blog/13-facts-about-bats

source:
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Processing wild game: Beyond burger, five options for deer and elk meat

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Specialist
Friday, October 27, 2017

Even if you have your game processed by a butcher, these are still options

We love deer and elk steaks, but you can only get so many off an animal. That means lots of wild game meat is ground into burger, but there are other options that make tasty meals and snacks.

Many hunters have their big game animals processed by professional butchers. If that’s the case, chances are good you will end up with lots of ground meat. Don’t worry, you can still use that meat for nearly everything below.


Roger Phillips/Idaho Fish and Game

If you do your own butchering, you have more options. And a quick note about processing the meat before it’s ground. Deer or elk burger has a reputation for having “gamey” flavor, which is usually not a compliment, but it can be just as tasty as steaks of you process it with a few things in mind.

continued:
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Information sought on killed cow & bull moose found south of Elk River

By Jennifer Bruns, Regional Conservation Educator
Wednesday, October 25, 2017

Anyone with information encouraged to call CAP hotline 1-800-632-5999

On October 20, 2017, Idaho Fish and Game conservation officers located a cow moose and a bull moose that had been shot near the 21-mile marker on the Aquarius road, hunt unit 10A in Clearwater County. The Aquarius road connects Elk River to the Grandad Bridge area.

The scene suggests that the moose were killed at different times but within a hundred yards of each other. Although the actual dates of the deaths are unknown, officers believe the moose were shot on or after October 10. Portions of the animals were taken and the antlers of the bull moose were left at the scene.

Anyone with information is encouraged to call the Clearwater Regional Office at 208-799-5010, or the Citizens Against Poaching (CAP) hotline at 800-632-5999. Callers can remain anonymous and may be eligible for a reward.

source:
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F&G News Releases

https://idfg.idaho.gov/press
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Fun Critter Stuff:

Anteater vs baby kangaroo


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Makem & Clancy: A Place In The Choir

“All God’s Creatures Got A Place In the Choir” was composed by Bill Staines, an American folk musician and singer-songwriter from New England, This song has been recorded by many others apart from Makem and Clancy…


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Tips & Advice:

It’s the season of unwanted guests in your home, pests

by Nathan Larsen Tuesday, October 24th 2017

Meridian, Idaho (KBOI) — As the temperatures continue to cool-off we tend to migrate indoors.

It’s not just us humans that look for warmth on cooler days, you’re probably seeing a few unwanted guests darting across the floor or crawling up on the ceiling.

We spoke with Treasure Valley Pest Control to see what to look for on the exterior of your home, where the little critters often get in.

continued w/video:
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Seasonal Humor:

HalloweenTurkey-a

HalloweenSuperman-a
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It’s the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown

In the 1966 animated special It’s The Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown, The PEANUTS gang celebrates Halloween, with Linus hoping that, finally, he will be visited by The Great Pumpkin, while Charlie Brown is invited to a Halloween party.

watch for free online:
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Idaho History October 29, 2017

1920’s Big Creek / Edwardsburg

Mines and Miners

BigCreekMinesMap(source “Southern Idaho Ghost Towns” by Wayne C. Sparling)

1927 Elk Summit

1927ElkSummitStonebraker-a

1927 Freight wagon pulled by horse team near Elk Summit.
William Allen Stonebraker Photographs
Click on photo for larger size
source: Stonebraker Photograph Collection, University of Idaho Library Digital Initiatives
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Big Creek District (1920)

Situation

This district is situated on the upper part of the drainage of Big Creek, one of the principal tributaries of the Middle Fork of Salmon River. Most of the mining properties lie near the headwaters of Smith, Government, and Logan Creeks along the east side of a high ridge forming the divide between the South and Middle Forks of Salmon River.

The easiest route into the district is either from New Meadows which is the terminus of the Pacific and Idaho Northern Railroad, or from Lakeport (or McCall as it was originally called), the terminus of the Long Valley Branch of the Oregon Short Line. Automobile stages run from both of these points to Warren, during the summer months. From Warren there is a fairly good wagon road to Dustin’s ranch on the South Fork of Salmon River, but from that point to Big Creek a saddle horse is the safest and most feasible mode of travel, as the road is in bad shape. After crossing the South Fork of Salmon River at an elevation of 3000 feet the road follows the steep and narrow valley of Elk Creek, a roaring mountain stream with a heavy gradient. At a distance of about 12 miles from the river the road crosses Elk Summit at an elevation of nearly 9000 feet and approximately at the timber line. On account of its elevation and exposed position this pass is only free from drifted snow a few weeks in the year and this high summit is a great hindrance to transportation into the district. The road then follows down Smith Creek and about a mile from the summit crosses over a divide to Government Creek which it follows down to the post office of Edwardsburg a few hundred yards from Big Creek.

Topography

The topography is rugged, the steep ridges bare of vegetation extending above the timber line with some of the higher points such as Mt. Logan exceeding 10,000 feet in elevation.

The country has been extensively glaciated and it is highly probable that the glaciers have retreated but very recently. All the creeks head in wide cirques and valley glaciers extend to Big Creek in some cases, the limits of the glaciers being marked by extensive terminal and lateral moraines. Big Creek above Edwardsburg occupies a broad valley which maintains its glacial characteristics to almost as low an elevation as 5000 feet. Below the glacial valleys the streams flow in steep-walled rocky canyons, the lower slopes of which are covered with rock slides composed of enormous angular boulders and their sides scarred with the snow slides of early spring. It is a gloomy and forbidding region with few redeeming features in the canyons but from the higher points a panorama of the ridges, peaks and canyons that go to make up the topography of Central Idaho can be obtained, which is a relief to the eye after the somberness of the valleys. It is also a relief to the ear to rise above the ceaseless diapason of the swift mountain streams.

Geology

The district is near the center of the main granite core of Central Idaho. Extending eastward from the North Fork of Payette River and from Little Salmon River is a belt of granite 50 miles in width which reaches with minor interruptions almost to Stanley Basin. In general this belt contains practically no other rocks and except for the gold veins of Warren and Marshall Lake contains little mineral. On Big Creek to the east for a width of 25 to 50 miles lies the belt of ancient metamorphics previously described, and between the two is a belt (about five miles wide) of what are probably Tertiary eruptives consisting chiefly of rhyolite and striking almost due north and south. These have been intruded into the granite not far from the contact of that rock with the metamorphics.

The geology of the district is not quite so simple as outlined above as the contact between the different rocks is indented and irregular and the later intrusives are not confined to rhyolite, but are made up of a varied assortment such as quartz porphyry, granite porphyry, syenite porphyry, alsaskite porphyry, diorite, and possibly lamporphyre.

The principal mineralization of the district consists of a wide zone or lode that strikes a little east of north and follows the eastern flank of the South Fork – Middle Fork divide cutting across the heads of Government and Logan Creeks. This lode or zone may be found to extend continuously from Smith Creek to near the head of Moore’s Creek, a fork of Logan Creek, a total distance of about 4 miles. It consists mainly of crushed and sericitized granite full of quartz seams. The granite has been locally intruded by later porphryries and in some places the lode apparently crosses the metamorphic series consisting here of shist and quartzite. The average strike of this lode is about N. 10 deg. E., with a dip of S. 60 deg. to 70 deg. E., and its width varies from 100 to 250 feet. The values lie chiefly in gold but a little copper possibly one percent, occurs in places, as well as a little silver. The gold contents obtained by careful sampling of some of the properties on the lode seem to indicate a value of between $1 and $3 a ton. The gangue is chiefly sericitized granite and quartz with considerable pyrite in places, the latter carrying most of the gold.

Mines and Prospects

The properties along the lode taken in the order from the north, are the Independence, Goldman-MacRae [McRae], Lauffer and Davis, and Moore.

The Independence Mine *
IndependenceMine-aclick map for larger size

The Independence Group consists of eleven patented claims that lie between the head of Smith and Government Creeks. The property was located in 1898 and sold in 1902 to a Topeka company which did some 2000 feet of development work, chiefly in the form of tunnels. The lode here is said to be about 200 feet wide and to lie between a porphyry hanging wall and a rhyolite footwall, and is also reported to cut across the metamorphics which consist of slate, marble, and shist. The lode contains a considerable amount of sulphides of which pyrite is probably the most important, and is said to average about $3 a ton for a width of 200 feet, altho 30 feet near the hanging wall is said to have carried $5.25 a ton in gold. Careful sampling of 60 feet gave returns of $3.50 in gold and a little copper. An extraction by cyanide of over 80 percent of the gold value is claimed. This property has been idle for several years.

The Goldman and MacRae [McRae] Property consists of two claims and two fractions lying between Government Creek and the North Fork of Logan Creek and has an outcrop 200 feet wide consisting of quartz and altered country rock which is chiefly granite. The property was located in 1911 by D.C. MacRae [McRae] and E.F. Goldman and has been opened by two tunnels 307 feet apart vertically and by numerous open cuts. The lower tunnel starts from near the creek and has been run on a course of N. 20 deg. E., which is about the strike of the lode, and in 1916 was in about 100 feet. This tunnel passes thru a chloritic igneous rock too altered for identification and containing a number of seams of quartz, and the zone as a whole is supposed to run about $2 to the ton in gold, although this appears open to question.

The upper tunnel, which has a course of N. 62 deg. W. and consequently cross-cuts the lode is in 130 feet and from it a drift extends north a distance of 100 feet. The tunnels do not cut either the foot of the hanging wall but for their entire distance are in lode formation which consists of quartz and altered country rock heavily pyritized. The whole of the workings are said to average $2.18 in gold. In the crosscut there is 15 feet, which is reported to run $8, and 40 feet which will run $4. The average value of the lode however is undoubtedly much lower. The lode appears to line up with both the Moore and Independence properties and has an probably strike of N. 10 to 20 deg. E. with a dip of 60 deg. to 70 deg. to the northeast.

The Golden Way Up group is owned by Geo. Lauffer and Joe Davis, consists of nine unpatented claims, and lies between the Goldman and MacRae [McRae] and the Moore properties. It crosses the ridge between the North Fork of Logan Creek and Fall creek. It is evidently the same lode as described in the other properties but altho it has the same course it is out of alignment with the others and has evidently been offset about 800 feet in a block bounded by two faults in which the valleys of the North Fork of Logan Creek and Fall Creek have been cut. There is a mineralized zone over 30 feet wide consisting of altered sericitized granite interbanded with quartz seams, one of which is 25 feet wide, but most of which are about 3 feet wide. The granite is frequently replaced by pyrite occurring in scattered cubes.

The vein was first located by Chas. Crown in 1899 and bonded in 1902 by John Campion who did about 2000 feet of development and then discontinued work; following this it was bonded by C.S. McKenzie who did several hundred feet in three tunnels and also abandoned the project. It was then located by Lauffer and Davis in 1908 who have worked it up to the present time.

There is little information as to the value of the lode from wall to wall tho specimens assaying as high [as] $12.40 in gold and 60 cents in silver are reported. The probabilities are, however, that it will average about the same as the other properties, i. e. from $1 to $3 a ton.

Moscow Mine *
MoscowMine-aclick map for larger size

The Moore Property, also known as the Moscow Group, consists of eight unpatented claims and was located in 1903 by Godlove and Boyle. It is the most southerly group on the lode, traversing the hillside east of Moore Creek which it practically parallels for about a mile. It was purchased by Mr. E. Moore in 1905 who started work upon the claims and put in a 300-lb. stamp mill in 1907 which he ran for 17 days, taking out $173 in that time. He replaced this mill with a 5-stamp mill in 1911 with which he has taken out a total of between $6000 and $7000.

The mineralization is entirely similar to that on the other properties of the lode and consists of sericitized granite traversed by quartz veins and is reported to be from 200 to 300 feet wide with an approximate course of N. 30 deg. E.

It is developed by a tunnel running N. 89 deg. E. which crosscuts the lode and was 350 feet long in 1913 with drifts to the north and south near the face which were in 20 and 30 feet respectively. At a point 115 feet from the portal two other drifts have been driven, the northerly one being in 75 and the southerly 200 feet.

There is a well developed footwall exposed in the crosscut with from 6 to 18 inches of gouge separating barren from mineralized granite, but the hanging wall has not been exposed tho the lode at that point is supposed to be 250 feet wide. At a distance of 190 feet from the portal there is a quartz zone 14 feet wide and another quartz zone 15 feet wide occurs near the footwall. Both of these are said to show good gold values. The gold is evidently associated with the pyrite, which contains about $100 to the ton when segregated. The entire workings of the property as determined by careful sampling are reported to average $2.20 to the ton altho it is said that 120 feet of the lode will average more than this.

Summary and Conclusions. In summing up this particular part of the Big Creek district it is evident from the development work on the properties just described, that there is a well defined lode which at several places along a course of nearly 4 miles is from 100 to 300 feet wide. Careful sampling of one or two of the properties by several companies has revealed enough gold to make further explorations justifiable under normal labor conditions. If the lode or lodes prove to average sufficiently high the quantity of material available is sufficient to support a large industry and to warrant the building of a good road into the district. Transportation is prohibitive except for operations on a large scale. If this lode were as favorably situated in regard to transportation as the Alaska-Treadwell for instance, there would probably be many hundred thousands of tons of rock that could be mined at a profit. Under the present conditions, however, there is little chance for the development of a big gold-mining industry as the transportation facilities are probably worse than in any other part of the United States, and further development in the district awaits the solution of this problem.

Most of the tunnels do not reach a depth that is much in excess of 200 feet vertically below the surface and the question of whether the values are due to secondary enrichment of a very low-grade material as at Thunder Mountain, or whether they are primary, has not been studied and decided. The general topography of the country and situation of most of the properties together with the climatic conditions would indicate rapid erosion with a consequently shallow zone of enrichment and the evidence introduced along this line would favor the hypothesis that primary conditions prevail to within a few feet of the surface. Further work in regard to mineral association etc. would have to be done before this point could be definitely proved but its importance is obvious, altho under any circumstances there is a very large tonnage of low-grade material which may some day considerably augment the gold output of the state.

Chicago Group. This property consists of five unpatented claims lying on both sides of Big Creek, about a mile below Edwardsburg, at an elevation of from 5000 to 5500 feet.

The country rock is the metamorphic series, consisting chiefly of a rather fine-grained limestone with some siliceous slate, schist, and fine-grained quartzite. The ledge occurs along the contact of a rhyolite porphryry dike in limestone and consists of the latter rock crushed and brecciated, occurring in a zone about 10 feet wide. The strike is about north and south, the porphyry being on the hangng-wall side, and the dip is 60 deg. to the west. The ore occurs in lenses and stringers in the crushed zone and consists of galena and pyrite with some other sulphides. A sample taken across 3 1/2 feet is said to have contained 14 percent lead, 38 oz. of silver, and $28 in gold, but this is undoubtedly very much higher than the average for the whole ledge. The vein is exposed in two tunnels and in the creek bed and warrants further development.

The Eagle Mining Company, of which Wm. A. Edwards is manager, owns several claims on the ridge between Logan and Government Creeks and a mill which is situated on Logan Creek about a mile and a half above Edwardsburg at an elevation of about 6000 feet. This mill contains 4 power stamps, 2 concentrating tables, and a cyanide plant. The claims were located in 1904 and the mill was begun in 1906 but made the first run in 1911, at which time about $1200 is reported to have been taken out. The capacity of the mill seems to have been low, as only 7 tons were put through in a day of 12 hours.

The vein is evidently a shear or fault zone in granite, and consists of from 5 to 10 feet of crushed country rock and quartz showing considerable gouge and slickensides, between the walls of solid unaltered granite, and has a strike of N. 70 to 82 deg. E. Ore occurs as lenses and stringers in this crushed zone, the average value of the material sent to the mill being reported as $17 to the ton in gold with little silver.

The vein has been opened by three adit tunnels with an aggregate of over a thousand feet of drifting. The oxidation zone is very shallow as all of the ore in the middle and lower tunnels is sulphide, and much of that in the upper also, so that it is probable that most of the ore exposed in the workings is primary.

Copper Camp. This group of thirteen claims is situated on the north side of Big Creek 12 miles below Edwardsburg, between Ramey and Crooked Creeks. The claims are either bonded or owned by Wm. A. Edwards of Edwardsburg and are on the hillside about 1000 feet above the level of Big Creek. They lie east and west, following a series of veins which strike in that direction.

The country rock is the metamorphic series of supposed pre-Cambrian age and consists chiefly of quartzite. There are several veins, the principal one of which strikes N. 75 to 80 deg. E. and has an almost vertical dip. On the Black Bear claim this vein has been developed by a tunnel which follows it with a course of approximately S. 75 deg. W. and was in a distance of 120 feet in August 1916. In this tunnel two crosscuts have been driven in the hanging wall, one at a distance of 90 feet from the portal and the other at 105 feet. The first of these shows 16 feet of vein material, the second, 14 feet. The vein is a shear zone cutting the slates and the quartzites almost at right angles, this shear zone of crushed country rock being impregnated with quartz which contains pyrite, chalcopyrite and sooty chalcocite with oxidation products consisting of azurite and malachite, and is reported to run about 3 percent in copper, altho this seems unlikely.

A crosscut tunnel about 200 feet lower than the tunnel just described has been driven from Camp Creek on a course N. 47 deg. W. a distance of 545 feet to intersect the Black Bear ledge which should be cut about 400 feet further in. This cross cut passes through blocky quartzitic slate for the whole distance.

This ledge is persistent for at least 2500 feet along its strike as exposed by open cuts, the most westerly of which shows the vein to be 8 feet wide and of the same general appearance as in the tunnel. Another open cut situated about 1000 feet west of the tunnel and several hundred feet high shows the vein to be 21 feet wide with precisely similar ore.

In addition to this main vein there are five others lying within a strip about 1000 feet wide and appearing to converge to the east. These are narrower than the Black Bear vein, varying in width from 30 inches to 6 feet. They are all of the same general character, showing quartz, rather honeycombed in some instances, and copper stain. One of these veins is reported to run well in gold altho very little development work has been done upon any of them so that their value has not been definitely determined.

excerpted from (Google book): “A Reconnaissance in South Central Idaho – Embracing the Thunder Mountain, Big Creek, Stanley Basin, Sheep Mountain and Seafoam District” By J.B. Umpleby and D.C. Livingston
Published in cooperation with the United States Geological Survey, University of Idaho Moscow 1920, University of Idaho Bulletin, Vol XV No 16, pg 7 to pg 13
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* Notes: * maps have been added from Topo Zone
[McRae] is correct spelling of name, verified by family.
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Copper Camp
CopperCamp-aclick map for larger size

Copper Camp

“By 1890, the district had a fledgling town. Pringle Smith found the district’s only copper ore in 1889 at the base of Ramey Ridge. Sheltered by the ridge, Smith’s copper mine was a good base for packers in and out of the district. Around Smith’s mine, therefore, a small cluster of buildings rose and took the name Copper Camp.”

excerpted from Chapter 4, Mining by Jim Witherell, page 49, “Valley County Idaho Prehistory to 1920” Valley County History Project.
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1929 Dogsled Elk Summit

1929DogsledElkSummitStonebraker-aclick image for larger size

Date 1929-01-22
Two men push the Stonebraker dogsled team of 11 dogs through the snow near Elk Creek Summit.
William Allen Stonebraker Photographs

source: Stonebraker Photograph Collection, University of Idaho Library Digital Initiatives
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Smith Creek Hydraulic Mining Company

by Gerry Wisdom

Mining in Idaho

Placer gold was discovered in Idaho in 1860. By 1862 mining in Warren was well established. By 1870 the important placer fields were worked out. The area around Big Creek, including Smith Creek had many disadvantages. Smith Creek itself, and better gold values elsewhere saved Smith Creek from being mined out by the 1870’s. It had certainly been prospected earlier by the “old-timers”, but the lack of roads, the difficulty of the terrain, and the deep snow pack for six months of the year, didn’t make it a very attractive mining location. The Grangeville Standard (July 21, 1899) declared that the upper Salmon and the Chamberlain Basin and Big Creek Basin were going to be the American Klondike. Thunder Mountain became the focus of attention around 1902. At its peak it had about 10,000 people but the boom had largely ended by 1908.

Smith Creek Hydraulic Mining Company

…The Big Creek Mining District was formed in Idaho in 1883. By 1885 it was called the Alton Mining District and included the Smith Creek Hydraulic Mining Company, later located in the Edwardsburg Mining District, comprised 505.9 acres (from a survey of 1926-27). Its claims were as follows: Woofus, Pika, Sunshine, Gump, Snowstorm, Ruby, Badger, Porphyry, Google, Blue Ox, and Power. The company was incorporated August 28, 1928 (recorded September 11, 1928), with 750,000 shares of stock at no par value and amended by H. A. Griffiths, R. G. Spaulding, James Baxter, C. W. Arbogast, C. E. Beymer, and T. N. Braxtan, February 2, 1931 to change the value of the stock to $1.00 par value.

“For many years the Smith Creek placer claims were under separate ownership until a group of Boise business men in the early 1920s formed a stock company to obtain necessary capital to develop the claims. Separate claims were bought and consolidated under one ownership, called the Smith Creek Hydraulic Mining Company. There are still no roads, so the first share was to build a road into the area.” The report by the General Ma for 1926, recommended that Mr. W. Pefley, and experienced mining engineer, be employed. He was placed in charge of operations at the mine as Superintendent. In the same report, three men (one quit) arrived on May 17 to start work on the wagon road connecting the camp with the old Werdenhoff road. They completed the work on June 1st. Next they had to build a bridge across the North Fork of Smith Creek. The men had to fell and peel the timbers. The bridge was completed June 16th. The rest of the report is a horror story of potholes, pulling vehicles out of the mud with horse teams, rocks slides, and so on.

Ledgers, show material and supplies brought over the ensuing years to build buildings, including a mess hall, mining equipment, and food. One of the receipts shows food bought at Nelson’s Grocery in Boise. It is easy to imagine from these voices from the past how difficult life was for the miners during the last part of the 19th century and in the early part of the 20th. During these early years many bemoaned the lack of good luck, from the one known death to early winter snows. Then in 1929, really back luck hit them as it did the rest of the country. An officer of the company, Mr. J. K. Burns, was in New York trying to raise money and sell stock. He was there on October 29, “Black Monday” and returned to Idaho stunned and empty handed. World War II might have been better for the company if they had given up the quest for gold and mined for tungsten and antimony, as did Stibnite. …

Gerry Wisdom is a founding member of the editorial board of the Valley County History Project.
excerpted from “Picks, Pans & Shovels – Mining in Valley County, Idaho”, Valley County History Project, pages 18-20
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Smith Creek c. 1990s

smthcrk1CGillihan-aclick image for larger size

smthcrk2CGillihan-aclick image for larger size

smthcrk3CGillihan-aclick image for larger size

photos by C Gillihan
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Smith Creek Old Cookhouse 2011
110918Old-cookhouse-a
110918windowwithview-aphotos by Local Color Photography
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Frank Goldman

“…in 1911, D. C. Macrae and E. F. Goldman located claims along a ridge between Government and Logan creeks…”

excerpted from Idaho State Historical Society Reference Series, Big Creek Number 563 1980 (broken link)

Goldman Cut

GoldmanCut-aclick map for larger size

(A story is that Mr. Goldman cut the road through the ridge with shovel and wheelbarrow thus named for him. – unverified)

1910 – U.S. Census, Roosevelt Precinct

Big Creek Wagon Road:
Benjamin F. Goldman, age 36, miner
(Clement Hanson, census taker)
source: Valley County ID Archives Census Copyright. All rights reserved.
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A Photo of Dan Mcrae in front of the Cabin at the Gold King (1921)

photo from Sandy McRae
Gold-King-1921-aback of photo: Gold King 1921. Dan McRae and George Short stop in to visit.

click on photo to open larger high image
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James Edwards 1925

JamesEdwards1925-aclick image for larger size

“I was recently given a photo by my cousin and thought I would share the tidbit of history. It depicts his grandfather, Mark Campbell, and two other men transporting 84 year old James Edwards (Edwardsville/Big Creek), who is ill, from Yellow Pine to Cascade to see a doctor. Winter 1925 – 26.
“Mark is at right (plaid shirt) – he would later (1930’s) build Campbell’s Camp at Warm Lake. Later called North Shore Lodge – still in business today (and they serve excellent meals!) Makes me appreciate just how tough our ancestors really were!”

source: Bob Hood Idaho History 1860s TO 1960s
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“James Edwards had mining claims at Big Creek and on Monumental. Had a cabin on Monumental.”
– Cathy Gillihan
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Yellow Pine Pioneers

yppioneers-a

Yellow Pine Pioneers

Left back: Charles Ellison, Red Metals Mine owner; Fred Holcomb, ranch owner; Henry Abstein, Mining man/horticulturist; Earl Wilson, son of Profile Sam.
Left front: Albert Behne, founder of Yellow Pine; Albert Hennessy, miner; Sam (“Profile Sam”) Wilson, miner; Bert McCoy, packer; Jimmie Edwards. **
** James might be Jimmy Edwards in this photo?
photo courtesy Long Valley Preservation Society
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1920 Valley County Census Big Creek Area

Edwards James W. age 79 Male Head Single Precinct Yellow Pine from Kentucky Occupation Miner Business Gold Mine
Davis, Joseph age 50 Male Head Single Precinct Yellow Pine from Washington Occupation Miner business Gold Mine

Edwards William A. age 50 Male Head M Precinct Yellow Pine from Georgia Occupation Lawyer Business Genl. Practice
Edwards Annie N. age 49 Female Wife Married Precinct Yellow Pine from Alabama
Edwards Napier A. age 21 Male Son Single Precinct Yellow Pine from Maryland

McRae Dan C. age 43 Male Head Married Precinct Lake/McCall from Minnesota occupation Operator business Mine
McRae Grace C. age 34 Female Wife Married Precinct Lake/McCall from Idaho
McRae Marjorie G. age 7 Female Daughter Single Precinct Lake/McCall from Idaho
McRae Robert J. age 11 Male Son Single Precinct Lake/McCall from Idaho

source: USGenWeb Project
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Note: Patented mining property is Private Property. Please have respect, take only photos and leave no trace.
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page updated September 21, 2020

Road Report Oct 29

Note: This time of year road conditions can change quickly. Be prepared for snow at high elevations and rocks/trees falling in the road. Please share road reports.

Yellow Pine: We have had mostly dry weather this week, local streets are clear and damp. Local Forecast

Warm Lake Highway: Big Creek Summit snowtel shows 7″ of snow. Report from (Oct 25 and 26) very slick, patches of snow and ice. (Oct 25) About 4-6″ of snow at Landmark.
Big Creek Summit SNOTEL station 6580′

Johnson Creek Road: Last report Wed (Oct 25) “The road has a lot of pot holes between YP and the dump.” – Johnson Creek road is “full of potholes.”

South Fork Road: Last reported in pretty good shape. Watch for ice early mornings in the shade on the pavement. Lots of hunters.

EFSF Road: Watch for rocks coming down on the EFSF road from Caton Creek to the lower end, must have rained hard there early Thursday morning (Oct 26). No rocks in the usual places.

Lick Creek: No current report, probably snow up high. Rough road near the summit on both sides. EFSF road from Zena Creek to YP is in good shape.
Note: Lick Creek Summit has an elevation of 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Current condition unknown. Report from Tuesday (Oct 24): Profile had 18” of wet snow that seemed to be melting slowly.
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

YP to Stibnite: Open (no current report.)

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Might be closed at the summit with snow. No current report.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: This is the road that goes from Big Creek/Edwardsburg up over Elk Summer, down to the South Fork of the Salmon River by Trails End Subdivision, then over to Warrens.
Report that the road was closed near the South Fork Monday Oct 2 for repairs, and will probably be closed for most of October. Elk summit is probably snowed closed by now.
Note: Elk Summit is at an elevation of nearly 9000 feet.
map:

Deadwood Summit: No current report. Deadwood snotel showing 10″ of snow.
Note: The Approx Elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet (2,098 m)
Deadwood Summit SNOTEL station 6860′

Golden Gate Road: Large deep wash-out about 2/3rds of the way up.

Sugar Creek Road: Closed.
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Weather Reports Oct 22-28

Oct 22 Weather:

At 10am it was 41 degrees, overcast, low clouds, ridges socked in, light steady rain. Rain all morning. At 2pm it was 43 degrees, still raining and light chilly breeze. Stopped raining before 4pm. At 430pm it was 46 degrees, not raining and a few small breaks in the clouds. Light rain at 510pm. At 640pm it was 43 degrees and steady light rain. Not raining at 1030pm. At 1140pm it was 42 degrees and not raining.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time October 23, 2017 at 10:00AM
Fog! (appears partly clear above the fog)
Max temperature 46 degrees F
Min temperature 31 degrees F
At observation 31 degrees F
Precipitation 0.19 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

Oct 23 Weather:

At 10am it was 31 degrees and quite foggy (appears to be partly clear above the fog.) Fog starting to lift at 1020am and gone by 1050am. At 220pm it was 51 degrees and partly clear, light breeze. Partly cloudy at 630pm.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time October 24, 2017 at 10:00AM
Clear and frosty
Max temperature 56 degrees F
Min temperature 25 degrees F
At observation 26 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

Oct 24 Weather:

At 10am it was 26 degrees, clear and frosty. At 145pm it was 54 degrees and sunny. At 640pm it was 43 degrees and clear. At 1130pm it was 32 degrees and clear. At 1am it was 29 degrees and clear.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time October 25, 2017 at 10:00AM
Clear skky
Max temperature 61 degrees F
Min temperature 26 degrees F
At observation 27 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
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Oct 25 Weather:

At 10am it was 27 degrees and clear. At 215pm it was 51 degrees and partly cloudy, ‘mare’s tails’ coming from the north west. At 630pm it was 46 degrees and mostly clear. At 7pm it was 44 degrees and mostly cloudy. At 1040pm it was 42 degrees and partly cloudy. Sprinkle of rain during the night.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time October 26, 2017 at 10:00AM
Partly cloudy, light fog along the river
Max temperature 66 degrees F
Min temperature 27 degrees F <– yesterday morning
At observation 35 degrees F
Precipitation 0.01 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
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Oct 26 Weather:

At 10am it was 35 degrees, partly cloudy and light fog along the river. At 2pm it was 61 degrees and mostly clear. At 615pm it was 51 degrees and clear.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time October 27, 2017 at 10:00AM
Mostly cloudy, high haze
Max temperature 61 degrees F
Min temperature 27 degrees F
At observation 30 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
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Oct 27 Weather:

At 10am it was 30 degrees, mostly cloudy (high haze) and light frost. At 145pm it was 53 degrees and mostly clear (some thin high haze.) At 630pm it was 48 degrees and partly cloudy (high thin haze.) Stars out at 930pm.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time October 28, 2017 at 10:00AM
Clear
Max temperature 62 degrees F
Min temperature 27 degrees F
At observation 28 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
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Oct 28 Weather:

At 10am it was 28 degrees and clear, light frost. At 130pm it was 58 degrees and clear. At 630pm it was 47 degrees and clear, bright waxing moon.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time October 29, 2017 at 10:00AM
Clear
Max temperature 65 degrees F
Min temperature 28 degrees F
At observation 29 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
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Road Report Oct 27

Note: This time of year road conditions can change quickly. Be prepared for snow at high elevations and rocks/trees falling in the road. Please share road reports!

Yellow Pine: We have had mostly dry weather this week, local streets are clear and damp. Forecast

Johnson Creek Road: Wed (Oct 25) “The road has a lot of pot holes between YP and the dump.” – and (Oct 25) About 4-6″ of snow at Landmark. Johnson Creek road is “full of potholes.”
and Big Creek Summit (Oct 25 and 26) very slick, patches of snow and ice. Snowtel shows 7″ of snow this morning.
Big Creek Summit SNOTEL station 6580′

South Fork / EFSF Road: Last report both roads are in pretty good shape. Watch for ice early morning in the shade on the South Fork, and lots of hunters.
Watch for rocks coming down on the EFSF road from Caton Creek to the lower end, must have rained hard there early Thursday morning.

Lick Creek: No current report, probably snow up high. Rough road near the summit on both sides. EFSF road from Zena Creek to YP is in good shape.
Note: Lick Creek Summit has an elevation of 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Current condition unknown. Report from Thursday (Oct 19) “Re Profile, there was probably half a foot packed in the ruts right before this storm, we slipped a little in 4wd on the BC side; it’ll be worse now and ice up in the evening. “P” used chains to get the stock out same day, Thursday, in two half loads. We figure this storm might put enough new snow up there to be a pain so we left. On into Big Creek is awful rough w potholes, and slick deep mud in a few spots. It bounced us around pretty good, so much fire traffic plus hunting parties beat it up.” – CEP
Report from Oct 24: Profile had 18” of wet snow that seemed to be melting slowly.
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Probably closed at the summit with snow. No current report.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: This is the road beyond Warren down to the South Fork of the Salmon River near Trails End Subdivision. [Then up to Elk Summit and over to Big Creek/Edwardsburg.]
Report that the road was closed Monday Oct 2 for repairs, and will probably be closed for most of October. Elk summit is probably snowed closed by now.
Note: Elk Summit is at an elevation of nearly 9000 feet.
map:

Deadwood Summit: No current report. Deadwood snotel showing 11″ of snow.
Note: The Approx Elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet (2,098 m)
Deadwood Summit SNOTEL station 6860′

Golden Gate Road: Large deep wash-out about 2/3rds of the way up.

Sugar Creek Road: Closed to public.

Road Report Oct 25

Note: This time of year road conditions can change quickly. Be prepared for snow at high elevations and rocks/trees falling in the road. Please share road reports!

Yellow Pine: We have had a couple days of sunshine, local streets are clear and damp. Forecast

Johnson Creek Road: today (Oct 25) mail truck driver (Elaine) reports Big Creek summit was very slick this morning with black ice. About 4-6″ of snow at Landmark, with ruts. Johnson Creek road is “full of potholes.”
Big Creek Summit SNOTEL station 6580′

South Fork / EFSF Road: Last report roads are in good shape. Watch for ice early morning in the shade. EFSF road is holding up well.

Lick Creek: No current report, probably snow up high. Rough road near the summit on both sides. EFSF road from Zena Creek to YP is in good shape.
Note: Lick Creek Summit has an elevation of 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Report from Thursday (Oct 19) “Re Profile, there was probably half a foot packed in the ruts right before this storm, we slipped a little in 4wd on the BC side; it’ll be worse now and ice up in the evening. “P” used chains to get the stock out same day, Thursday, in two half loads. We figure this storm might put enough new snow up there to be a pain so we left. On into Big Creek is awful rough w potholes, and slick deep mud in a few spots. It bounced us around pretty good, so much fire traffic plus hunting parties beat it up.” – CEP
Update Oct 24: Profile had 18” of wet snow that seemed to be melting slowly.
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Probably closed with snow. No current report.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: This is the road beyond Warren down to the South Fork of the Salmon River near Trails End Subdivision. [Then up to Elk Summit and over to Big Creek/Edwardsburg.]
Report that the road was closed Monday Oct 2 for repairs, and will probably be closed for most of October. Elk summit is probably snowed closed by now.
Note: Elk Summit is at an elevation of nearly 9000 feet.
map:

Deadwood Summit: No current report. Deadwood snotel showing 13″ of snow.
Note: The Approx Elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet (2,098 m)
Deadwood Summit SNOTEL station 6860′

Golden Gate Road: Large deep wash-out about 2/3rds of the way up.

Sugar Creek Road: Closed.
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Oct 22, 2017 The Yellow Pine Times

Oct 22, 2017 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Village News:

Halloween Party Oct 28 6pm Yellow Pine Tavern

Annual Halloween Party: Hot Dogs and Chili provided. Bring other snacks if you wish.

Costume Contest: ghosts, witches, fairies all welcome or come as you are for good fun and eats.
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Heli Pad Progress

“Yellow Pine volunteers working on the Yellow Pine Helispot. Getting closer…” – AF

“Thanks to Jake S. with Boise National Forest who helped get this project get off the ground along with the April blow down, which expedited the process.” – JF

photos

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Fall Rx Burns planned

BNF:
Cascade Ranger District: Slash piles will be ignited in the following locations: Warm Lake, Yellow pine, Landmark and Crawford. It will be pile burning for two days.

PNF:
The Krassel Ranger District plans to ignite 1,600 acres in the Fourmile drainage, and 2,000 acres in the Bald Hill project area.
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Bear Aware

Bears are still around and looking for food, not much of a berry crop this year. Keep garbage secured and pet food indoors, take down bird feeders until hibernation. Clean BBQ grills (bears love grills and outdoor fridges.)
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YPFD News:

vcsar_logo-a

“Valley County Search and Rescue (VCSAR) has 4 new Yellow Pine Members. Congratulations to Jeff F., Ann F., Gary N. and Dayle B.” – AF

There are YPFD T-shirts, as well as YPFD patches and stickers for sale at the Tavern now.

Training is on Sundays starting at 11am at the YP Fire Station and open to the community of Yellow Pine. Check with Jeff or Ann to confirm trainings.

Both Fire Sirens will be tested at noon on the first of each month.
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VYPA News:

Next meeting June 2018
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook
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Yellow Pine Community Meeting with Midas Gold September 8, 2017

Meeting was opened at 1:30pm by Willie Sullivan who facilitated the meeting. Kyle Fend, Environmental Supervisor for Midas represented Midas Gold. Also in attendance was Valley County Commissioner Elting Hasbrouck. Over 40 area residents were also at the meeting. Kyle brought with him an open letter from Midas Gold President and CEO, Laurel Sayer, promising to have open discussions with members of the Yellow Pine Community and look for reasonable options to allow some form of safe access for the travelling public. They will work to coordinate meeting dates with Lorinne Munn who was appointed the point of contact.

Kyle acknowledged Midas is hearing the community, wants to retain a route into the area, and says the Midas Engineering Department is looking into the issue. He stressed it wasn’t easy as health and safety is a huge issue. The mine proposes to expand the Yellow Pine Pit which will take out the existing road. There are issues involved in going around the pit. On one side are issues with roadless boundaries on the other side the river must be dealt with. He indicated driving on the haul roads was not a good option with the safety issues involved, 200 ton trucks will be using the haul road for the mine.

Lorinne asked if the road the mine is proposing to build, the “Burnt Log Road” will be going through roadless areas and permits given for that, why can’t permits be given for a temporary road adjacent to the mine. Kyle responded that the mine has prior rights to access their property which would apply to the Burnt Log Road but not for access by the public on another road. Cecil Dallman pointed out the road could be reclaimed later. Lorinne also mentioned the Stibnite Road would be a good access for the public rather than contending with the Midas trucks on the proposed road. Kyle said the 200 ton trucks would not be on the Burnt Log Road and he felt there would be no conflict with public traffic.

Scott Crosby was concerned about the travel time current residents of Yellow Pine would encounter by having to go around to Landmark and back by Burnt Log Road to access Monumental and areas beyond. It is 32 miles up Johnson Creek and back on Burnt log a total of 50 miles or more versus what is now 14 miles to Stibnite and on to Monumental. A gate station or metering would be acceptable just so access would be maintained. There is a great deal of resentment related to road closures around here, we are wary that they probably won’t be reopened. Cecil mentioned maybe a Corridor Land tradeoff could be arrainged . Kyle expressed that metering would have an impact on productivity at the mine. It is not quick and easy when scheduling the trucks.

Lynne Imel mentioned the Idaho Conservation League sent a good letter to the Payette National Forest during the Scoping process. You can go on line and look at all of the letters that were sent.

Joel Fields asked if there will be access to Sugar Creek which is now closed. It was acknowledged the road closure would be beyond that point.

Willie Sullivan mentioned in the 2nd meeting the Village had with Ann La Belle she indicated a contractual agreement with the community might be a good way to go to guarantee the road would be reopened in the end. What does Midas expect of us, what was going to be in this agreement? Kyle said he can’t speak to that. Willy asks when will we get an answer as to what they expect of this community. It seems they hold a treat out as to giving us access and it’s bait and switch when we get to the meeting. This is the 3rd bait and switch meeting. Valley County Commissioner Elting Hasbrouck, who had driven to the meeting this morning, was asked his opinion of this suggestion to sign a contract. He said the community should not sign anything. Elting said the County Commissioners or the Sheriff are the only agencies that can close a County road and this is usually done only in emergency situations. “You can’t kick them out of the woods to get this done”. Elting says the County has additional concerns about the road to Cascade the wear and tear from mine traffic, and what to do about the snowmobile traffic which is an economic concern to the County. We all need to sit down and figure this out.

Chris Schwarzhofff from Big Creek says they are concerned about the road closure as well. He said 99% of the time Big Creek folks go through Yellow Pine and rely on Yellow Pine for a number of things it is a strategic issue. He feels the Stibnite Road is a strategic road whereas for example Sugar Creek Road is not strategic.

Dan Stiff has gone to all of the previous Yellow Pine – Midas meetings and wants to hear from Midas that they are going to make it happen, there will be continuous access. We are open to flexibility on how it happens and where the access is. Dan who is a Yellow Pine Fire Commissioner says we need access for Fire and Rescue.

Lorinne suggested Midas might be manipulated by the Forest Service and Fisheries to close the road as part of the deal for mining. Kyle says that is not the case, the road will simply cease to exist as the pit is mined and expanded. Cindy Fortin asked about the current gate that is posed to go up during breakup on Stibnite Road. Kyle responded that normally the Stibnite Road is closed naturally due to conditions during the Winter. With Midas current traffic the road is kept open year around and during the spring when it is wet and slushy, the fear is there will be harm to the fisheries. A temporary gate is put up during that time to protect this resource.

Scott Amos suggested the Mine take a close look at accessing the area through Sugar Creek and the Cinnebar mine. He has been conversing with the current mine owner who he says is very agreeable to using his property for a new route.

Erin, who’s husband works for Midas expressed dismay at what she worries is a degeneration of the relationship between the Community and Midas. She is very proud of the relationship, as many others have expressed, and is extremely grateful for the assistance and interest Midas has shown to the Community.

Scott pointed out that in the plan once the mining is done it would be nice to see the Valley as it used to be. His grandparents ran the gas station in the mining days. The past is gone, but Midas plans look really good for the area. It seems no one in the room was against the mine. All were pretty enthusiastic about the Midas plan except for the road closure.

Kyle said he will debrief with McKinsey Lyon and Belinda Provancher bringing our interests and concerns to them. He promised they will do better with bringing the Community into the loop. The Community will choose the group to work with Midas. Public Relations and Engineering are 2 different groups in Midas and they will work with us. Erin expressed that we need to know what is Midas’s point of view in relation to what we are telling them.

In our previous meeting Ann LaBelle had made a commitment that the Engineers would be at this meeting with the options they are looking at, Kyle apologized for that failure. They tried to reschedule but that did not go well. They are taking a hard look at what options there might be. It was expressed by the community that a 4 horse trailer might be a criteria for getting around the site. A backcountry road such as Profile is all that is hoped for, the road could be moved as needed by the mine, hours could be posted, a guide car or flaggers could be used, Winter closure is not a problem as it has never been maintained in the Winter . Deb Filler pointed out there are old haul roads to the East, could looking at these be an option? Kyle said in the plan they are trying to reutilize existing routes already. Kyle said alternative analysis on an alternate to satisfy all needs can be presented. He expressed his appreciation at the size of the group and that we all took time to come out.

Willie closed the meeting at 2:33 pm. After a 5 minute break, Commissioner Elting Hasbrouck addressed the meeting. He was impressed by the size of the group. He missed the other meetings but wanted to be informed about any other meetings we might have and what comes of them. The size of our group and that we stay together is important. He is concerned about the Midas impact on the other County Roads such as Warm Lake to Cascade. If Burnt Log is the main route we may lose the snow grooming for snowmobiles. The snowmobile traffic and that economic impact is a big concern. He said if an alternate road is planned they would need to know what that road would be like. He also brought up they would like to check into saving money by removing the Warm Lake – Yellow Pine 911 lines that don’t appear to be used. **

It was proposed that a small working group be chosen by the folks in the room to set up any other meetings with the Community that Midas might offer, hoping to get that meeting with the Engineers. Four members were chosen to be the liason between Midas and the Village. Willie Sullivan, Lynn Imel, Cecil Dallman and Lorinne Munn. Willy had sent out emails and letters announcing this meeting and was hoping to be able to replace some of the letters by email on further correspondence.

Submitted by Lorinne N. Munn, Secretary of Yellow Pine Village Association

**Note: The 911 phone line they are talking about is an actual physical phone with direct pick-up to Cascade Dispatch. We think this line is in the MTE building behind the Tavern. Doing away with this mysterious phone will Not affect our abilities to call 9-1-1. Jeff made sure this was correct when the Commissioner suggested this. – AF
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Local Observations:

Monday (Oct 16) overnight low of 23 degrees, clear sky this morning, patches of snow remain in the shade. Saw one jay and heard a finch, otherwise no signs of life except chimney smoke. Mid-day the sounds of chainsaws to the south where folks are working on the Life Flight Helicopter landing pad southwest of the cross roads. Bobcat sighted in the neighborhood around 11am. Sunny day and warmer temperatures, high 67 degrees. Nice evening, but a bit nippy, some thin clouds moving in.

Tuesday (Oct 17) overnight low of 25 degrees, hazy thin clouds this morning, patches of snow on the ground in the shade. Convoy of heavy trucks went up the back Stibnite Road this morning. Power blinked off and on at 1024am. More clouds by early afternoon, warmer temperatures, high 69 degrees. No birds around today. Colorful sunset. The snow in the shade melted – finally. Fully dark by 730pm.

Wednesday (Oct 18) overnight low of 27 degrees, mostly cloudy, roofs wet with melted frost and dew this morning. Heard a jay, had a couple of red-breasted nuthatches visit. Large truck traffic again this morning. Idaho Power p/u truck in the village. Pretty windy early in the afternoon, calmer towards evening, high 65 degrees. Junco sighted. Deep crimson sunset. Pileated woodpecker visited right at dark.

Thursday (Oct 19) overnight low of 30 degrees, sky covered by high thin haze, not much dew or frost. One stellar jay visited. A chipmunk scurrying around and a pine squirrel stashing cones. Quite windy early in the afternoon, tall trees swaying, flags flapping, calmed down by evening, high 67 degrees. Not much color in the sunset.

Friday (Oct 20) started raining before 5am, rain snow mix, then all snow by 10am, clouds down to the valley floor. Snow starting to stick by 1015am, then stopped by noon, just a trace on the ground and starting to melt. Chipmunk hunting seeds. Clouds lifted early afternoon, just the top of VanMeter hidden. Melting snow line rising during the afternoon. Afternoon rain showers and dark clouds, high 43 degrees. Snowing and stacking up before dark. Still snowing at midnight.

Saturday (Oct 21) overnight low of 30 degrees, patchy snow on the ground (just under 3/4″) and overcast. Heard a jay and a couple of nutcrackers this morning. Breezy before lunch time, blowing snow out of the trees. Light snow falling after lunch, breezy and cloudy. Pine squirrel running down the fence blasting through the trace of snow. Nutcrackers calling to the north. Misty rain late in the afternoon, low clouds, high 41 degrees. Rained all night.

Sunday (Oct 22) warmed up during the night, still raining this morning, low foggy clouds on the ridges, no snow on the ground. Little red-breasted nuthatch knocking on the barn. 4-wheeler traffic early. Rain all morning and into the early afternoon, clouds lifted until only the very top of VanMeter cloaked. Pine squirrel busy between rain storms. More rain falling in the late afternoon/evening, gentle but steady, high 46 degrees. Cloudy and dark by 7pm (and still raining.)
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RIP:

Gordon D Colburn

August 20, 1937 – October 15. 2017

Gordon D. Colburn, 80, passed away on Sunday, October 15, while elk hunting near his home in Valley County. He was born August 20, 1937, to Ralph E. and Beulah Himes Colburn at Emmett, Idaho. In 1940, Dad was joined by a sister, Monette. In 1941, the family moved to Stibnite, Idaho, where his father worked for the Hubert Martin Construction Co. and the Bradley Mining Co. In 1945, the family grew with the addition of a brother, Phillip, and again in 1947 with the addition of twin sisters, Shirley and Sharon. Imprinted at an early age with pine trees, mountains, streams, lakes, and an outdoor lifestyle, Dad developed a lifelong love to fish, hunt, camp, and participate in winter sports. After spending nearly 10 years as a boy in Stibnite, he always believed it was a great place for a kid to grow up. Dad frequently told stories of the mining camp becoming snow-bound in the winter as the road to Stibnite would almost always snow shut. One particularly bad year, the Idaho Air National Guard air-dropped food for over 100 families. During one pass, the pallet of bread broke open on the way down and slices of bread came floating down like snow. The kids were tasked with running out on the runway to pick up the bread.

In late December, 1949, the family left Stibnite and had short-term residential stops in Emmett and Kooskia, Idaho, and Eugene, Oregon, before settling in Boise, Idaho, in 1951. Dad attended North Junior High and Boise High School. In his senior year at BHS, he met his soulmate & life-long partner, our mother, Inez Elguezabal. Both Dad and Mom graduated from BHS in 1955, and then attended BJC (now BSU). In high school and while at BJC, Dad held several part-time & summer employments at Riverside Grocery, Vanderford’s (36th & State), and Schubach Jewelers. He also served on an engine crew with the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), wildland firefighting. During the school year, Dad was a “pick up firefighter” and would go out on call when he was available. He was the head cook on a fire in Adams County when a retardant plane crashed, just missing the firecamp.

Dad was hired by Idaho First National Bank on March 1, 1957, which began his long career with the bank. His initial assignments were in the bookkeeping department and the teller windows of the Head Office at 10th & Idaho Streets. Dad and Mom were married on June 15, 1957, and his introduction to the Basque culture began in earnest. Between Inez’s mother’s Basque cuisine and her father’s tales of his emigration from the Basque Country and his early life in the U.S. as a sheepherder in the Idaho mountains, Dad felt he was going to fit in very well. The young family began to grow in August of 1958, with the birth of their daughter, Tammie.

Dad also served in the Army Reserve from 1958 through 1962. His basic training was at Fort Ord in Monterey, California, and he served in the 755th Engineer Company in Boise. In December of 1960, Dad was placed in the bank’s trainee program, and transferred to the Parma office. At the time, the Parma branch was known as one of the bank’s training offices because of the experience and expertise of then VP & Branch Manager, Clarence J. Kniefel. Clarence proved to be a good mentor for Dad, who quickly received promotions and additional responsibility. In 1964, the Colburn family grew with the addition of their son, Richard (Ric). By 1965, Dad became Assistant Manager of the Parma office. With Clarence Kniefel’s tutelage and a good staff, the office saw excellent growth through the late 60’s. In October of 1969, Clarence Kniefel retired and Dad was promoted to Branch Manager. He was blessed with extraordinary Assistant Managers and Loan Officers, a steady flow of trainees, a stable staff and effective marketing, allowing the Parma branch to expand its customer base and continue its exceptional growth through the 70’s. During his 23 years in Parma, Dad had a profound sense of pride and gratitude in being able to serve the community and assisting the businesses and farms in the area. He took great pride in the employees at the bank, many of whom went on to manage their own branches, become executives, and run their own companies. Dad was active in community affairs and organizations including the Jaycees, Chamber of Commerce, Parma Industrial Corp., Parma Lions Club and served a seven-year term as a trustee of the Parma School District.

In 1972, Dad and Mom purchased property at Cascade Reservoir, building a cabin in 1974 that would become the center of our family’s activities, including fishing, hunting, wood gathering, snowmobiling, cook-outs, card games and singing around the camp fire. The cabin became Mom and Dad’s full-time home, where they live today. Our family also took numerous trips in the camper over the years to fish for steelhead on the Salmon River and help with spring roundup at the Alzola Ranch, south of Grasmere. Never one to pass up a chance to teach a life lesson, in 1973, on a family road trip to California, we stopped at a diner/casino for lunch in Winnemucca. Seeing us kids enamored with the lights and sounds, after lunch he said, “Come here, I’m going to teach you kids something.” He pulled some dimes from his pocket and started playing one of the slot machines. He plugged in the first dime and said, “See? The machine just eats your money.” With the second dime he said, “See? You just waste your money when you gamble.”On the third pull, he hit a $20 jackpot and the lights and bells started going off. Dad turned to us and said, “Get in the car, lesson over.” Mom quickly took us out to the car to wait for Dad. We snickered in the back seat all the way to California and we never let him forget that lesson.

In 1975, the family hosted Heather Gemmell, the American Field Service (AFS) exchange student at Parma that year. Heather and her family have been close extended family ever since with mutual trips to and from Idaho and South Africa over the years. During Tammie’s college years, her roommate, Lynn Miller, became an extended part of the family, coming home with Tammie on school breaks, and eventually living with Mom and Dad, while she did her student teaching in Middleton. More recently, another friend, Chickie Schroeder, was “adopted” into the family, sharing in our common Basque heritage. Chickie, Lynn, and Lynn’s husband, Tom Kelly, recently traveled with all of us for a big family trip to Alaska. Dad always considered Lynn, Tom, and Chickie as part of the family.

In the early 80’s, Dad faced a medical challenge, causing him to request a sabbatical from the branch environment. The bank granted him the transfer, appointing him as a Training Officer in the Training & Development section of Human Resources in the Administrative Office in Boise. In time, the medical challenge stabilized and was controlled. In 1985, he requested the bank’s consideration for another branch assignment. In mid-1985, Dad was appointed to the McCall office as Branch Manager. Dad and Mom quickly became immersed in the community. Dad loved serving in both a professional and personal capacity. He was active in Rotary and served on the airport and hospital boards. He was one of the founding board members of the Shepherds Home Foundation, which provides a home for neglected children in McCall. Dad considered coming to McCall a homecoming, given his roots in Stibnite. Dad retired from the Bank after exactly 40 years on February 28, 1997.

In the winter of 1997-98 they decided to go “off grid” and were the winter caretakers for the Shepp Ranch on the Salmon River. While it was an “experience of a lifetime”, Dad said he had never worked so hard and could “check that one off the list.” Always wanting to see and experience more, Dad made several trips into the back country with the aviation service that carried the mail to the ranches along the Salmon River.

For several years the folks lived the “snowbird” life and commuted to the Parker Dam area in Arizona, with their 5th wheel trailer, visiting family and making friends along the way. Mom and Dad traveled to Euskadi (the Basque Country) to see Mom’s ancestral home and the house of her father. Dad had quite a knack for the eating and drinking part of the Basque culture. The relatives affectionately called him “Gorka”, and had him tending bar at a couple family events, though he knew only a few words in Basque. On one trip to see Richard, Rosa and the grandkids at their home in Euskadi, the family also traveled to Rome, toured the city and Vatican and saw Pope Benedict in his weekly audience with the people. On Easter Sunday, 2017, we saw Dad baptized in the Catholic Church in Cascade. It was a major moment in his spiritual life, and we were so proud of him.

The entire family took a trip this summer, to celebrate Dad’s and Mom’s 80th birthdays and 60th wedding anniversary. We spent two jam-packed weeks beginning in Fairbanks. We visited Denali National Park, and rode the Alaskan Railroad all the way to Anchorage. We had a family dinner in Anchorage with our Alaskan cousins, toasting Mom and Dad. The trip concluded with a 7-day cruise from Alaska, through the Inside Passage to Vancouver, BC. Dad reveled in his first sighting of a grizzly bear, and constantly marveled at the scenery.

Gordon is survived by his loving wife and 60-year soulmate, Inez; his children, Tammie Colburn and Richard (Rosa Mari) Colburn; his grandchildren, Nekane and Josu Colburn; his aunts, Mary Bishop and Loreta Himes; his sisters, Monette (Clare) Baldwin and Shirley (John) Elicker, and his brother-in-law George Traughber; numerous cousins, nieces and nephews, and their families. Gordon was preceded in death by his parents, Ralph and Beulah; his brother, Phil; and his sister, Sharon. A Rosary Vigil will be held on Tuesday, October 24, at 12 Noon, at St. John’s Cathedral, downtown Boise, 775 N 8th St, Boise. A Funeral Mass will be held on Tuesday, October 24 at 1pm, at St. John’s Cathedral, downtown Boise, 775 N 8th St, Boise. Immediately following the funeral, a reception will be held at the Basque Center, 601 W Grove St, Boise, ID 83702. All are welcome to come share their stories of Dad and meet with the family. In lieu of flowers the family asks that memorials be made to any of the following: Euskaldunak, The Basque Museum and Cultural Center, or the Shepherd’s Home Foundation, PO Box 2011, McCall, ID 83638. Services are under the direction of Summers Funeral Home at 1205 W. Bannock St., Boise, ID 83702.

source:
[h/t SMc]
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Idaho News:

Idaho Geological Survey Celebrates National Geologic Map Day with Stibnite Area Map

October 13, 2017 UofI

The Idaho Geological Survey (IGS) is celebrating National Geologic Map Day today, Oct. 13, by highlighting its recent geologic map of central Idaho’s historic Stibnite Mining District.

IGS, a public service and research arm of the University of Idaho, produced the map in print and digital forms to create a detailed geologic depiction of the Stibnite mining area. It includes geologic cross-sections and a regional geologic map and is available digitally or in print form through IGS and at http://www.idahogeology.org.

Reed Lewis, an IGS geologist who co-authored the map, said it emphasizes the complex rock layers in this part of Idaho, as well as the ancient faults along which mineralizing fluids flowed. The historic Stibnite Mining District east of McCall produced gold, tungsten and antimony beginning in the early 1900s. Both tungsten and antimony were extracted during and immediately after World War II.

The map was funded in part by a grant from Midas Gold Inc. and was a multi-year project that involved traversing steep terrain and collecting rock samples for age determinations. Once thought to be largely Precambrian, some of the strata were found to be Ordovician in age, several hundred million years younger than expected.

continued:
[h/t Midas Gold]
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Member sought for Valley County Planning & Zoning Commission

The Star-News October 19, 2017

The Valley County Board of Commissioners is seeking to fill a vacancy on the five-member Planning and Zoning Commission beginning in January.

Applicants must be full-time residents of Valley County and have lived in the county for at least the past five years.

The selected applicant will replace current commissioner Rob Garrison, who has decided not to seek a new term.

Those who are interested may submit their resumes to Cynda Herrick at cherrick@co.valley.id.us or at the Planning and Zoning Office, 219 N. Main St. in Cascade, or mail it to P.O. Box 1350, Cascade, ID 83611.

For more information, call Herrick at 208-382-7115.

source:
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Preservation society to hold membership meeting Nov. 6

The Star-News October 19, 2017

The Long Valley Preservation Society will hold it annual membership meeting Monday, Nov. 6, at 6:30 p.m., at the Bulgin residence at 13033 Delayne Rd, Donnelly. All members are welcome to attend.

On the agenda will be nomination and election of officers, a discussion of the annual budget as well as new fundraising ideas, and a review of the foundation replacement project at the McDougal General Store.

Lucy Chronic will also report on the Idaho Heritage Conference 2017.

The society, founded in 1973, operates Historic Roseberry, a collection of relocated buildings in various stages of restoration one mile east of Donnelly.

The complex includes the McDougal General Store, the Roseberry Bandshell and The Barn at Roseberry, which is the site of the annual Summer Music Festival at Roseberry staged by the McCall Folklore Society.

source:
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Snow Causes Wreck

The Star-News October 19, 2017

20171014rollover-a
Photo courtesy Cascade Rural Fire Protection District

Cascade Fire & EMS rescuers work to extricate the occupants of a car that ran off Idaho 55 and rolled about two miles south of Smith Ferry about 9:19 a.m. Saturday. The driver, Brenna Albaugh, 19, of Grass Valley, Calif., and passengers Sarah Ethington, 19, of Carnation, Wash., and Kennadee Conner, 20, of Grangeville, escaped without serious injuries, the Valley County Sheriff’s Department said. The road was snow covered at the time of the crash, one of three reported on Idaho 55 on Saturday, the sheriff’s office said.

source:
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Authorities rescue man, girl on hunting trip after injury

10/18/17 AP

Boise, Idaho — Authorities rescued a man and his 15-year-old daughter on a hunting trip after an all-terrain vehicle rolled, injuring the man in a remote area of western Idaho.

KBOI-TV reports that authorities with the Washington County Sheriff’s Office say they received a report of a hunter who had broken his ankle near Dodson Pass on Sunday night.

Authorities mounted a search but it was called off that night because of the rugged terrain and the darkness. The man and the girl were located the next morning in a rocky ravine.

Authorities say the teenager was not injured, and she was taking care of her father. The man was transported by helicopter to the hospital.

source:
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Fire safety burn permits no longer required this year

October 19, 2017
contact: Emily Callihan, Public Information Officer208-334-0236

(Boise) – After October 20, a fire safety burn permit from the Idaho Department of Lands (IDL) is no longer required until next year for burning activities outside city limits.

The permits are required from May 10 to October 20 every year during “closed fire season” and can be obtained online at burnpermits.idaho.gov or in person at IDL offices statewide.

People still should check with the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality, tribal reservations if applicable, and local fire departments before burning for potential burning limitations and required permits.

Idaho law (38-115) requires any person who plans to burn anything outside city limits anywhere in Idaho – including crop residue burning and excluding recreational campfires – during closed fire season to obtain a fire safety burn permit.

Even though a fire safety burn permit is not required outside closed fire season, the permit may still be obtained year round.

The fire safety burn permit system informs fire managers where burning activities are occurring, reducing the number of false runs to fires and saving firefighting resources for instances in which they are truly needed. It also enables fire managers to respond more quickly to fires that escape, potentially reducing the liability of the burner if their fire escapes.

The fire safety burn permit is free of charge and good for 10 days after it is issued. Permits issued through the self-service web site are available seven days a week, issued immediately, and valid immediately.
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Local orchards still feeling effects of harsh winter

Alex Livingston, KTVB October 16, 2017

Weiser – From peaches, to nectarines, to apples, orchards like Ron Kelley’s are still feeling the impact of last winter.

“We had at least 20 below zero in January,” said Kelley. “We had about three feet of snow, so we were just thinking about snow removal.”

Once spring rolled around, the focus shifted and Kelley could really see the damage that was done to his peaches in particular.

“We saw in April that we didn’t have much of a crop,” Kelley said. “This year we only had 1 or 2 percent of a crop, we hardly had a peach out here. That’s at least a third of our income.”

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Uniquely Small-Town Idaho

Ever heard of Cream Can Junction.

Oct. 21, 2017 By Mychel Matthews, The Times-News

Twin Falls, Idaho (AP) — Ever heard of Cream Can Junction?

It’s too small to be a “real town,” but it’s on the map, in the far southeast corner of Blaine County.

How about Rogerson, Elba or Raft River?

These, like Cream Can Junction, are a few of the many unincorporated communities — towns that aren’t towns — in Magic Valley. Classified as “populated places,” the communities have neither a city government nor city limits, but are bound in spirit.

So what does it take to be a “real town?”

At some point in their history, real towns have filed incorporation papers with the state of Idaho authorizing the residents to organize and govern themselves.

continued:
[h/t SG]
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Health officials warn of places with the most germs

Kaitlin Loukides Oct 17, 2017

Pocatello, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – On Tuesday, the Centers for Disease Control is saying the biggest population of people who are skipping their flu shot, are the ones who likely need it the most.

Those between the ages of 65 and 74 are deciding to forego getting vaccinated, but that could be problematic – especially for those who live more sedentary lifestyles.

Southeastern Idaho Public Health epidemiologist Jeff Doerr explains why this age group is the most at risk when it comes to contracting respiratory viruses.

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Public Lands:

BC YP SR Collaborative

Next meeting October 26th in the commissioners room.

Melissa B. Hamilton
U of I Valley County Extension Educator
Community Development / Agriculture

BC-YP Meeting-June 2017meeting.docx

10-26-17 BC YP FC AGENDA.docx
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Field review of Wildland Urban Interface project

Release Date: Oct 17, 2017
Contact(s): Jim Bishop 208-382-7400

Cascade, Idaho, October 17, 2017 — The Cascade District of the Boise National Forest is beginning environmental review of a proposal to reduce fire risk and improve forest resiliency on national forest lands adjacent to private lands in a project area along the eastern slope of West Mountain and western side of Lake Cascade.

A public field review of the project area is scheduled for Thursday, Oct. 26, 2017. Field trip participants should RSVP to Jim Bishop, at jjbishop@fs.fed.us or by phone at 208-382-7400.

Participants plan to meet at 9 a.m. at the Emergency Operations Center (EOC) located at 107 West Spring Street, Cascade and return to the EOC by 4 p.m. Please be prepared for cold weather, bring your own lunch, water and transportation. There may be car-pooling opportunities at the site. All roads are accessible and open to passenger cars.

The proposed French Hazard Wildland Urban Interface (WUI) Project includes, prescribed fire, thinning (both commercial and non-commercial), and mechanical chipping of small trees and brush. The proposed reduction of fuel loads, ladder fuels, and stand densities is intended to decrease the likelihood of crown fires and improve the resiliency of treated stands should a wildfire occur within the project area. For a more detailed description of the proposed project, please review the comprehensive proposed action report on the Project webpage: http://www.fs.usda.gov/project/?project=49636.

Consistent with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), the Forest Service will prepare an environmental assessment (EA). The first step in the NEPA process, called “scoping,” includes a comment period for the public, other stakeholders, and government entities to identify potential issues with the proposed action and suggest what should be analyzed in the EA. Scoping will begin later this month. To receive notice of the upcoming comment period, visit the project website and select “Subscribe to email Updates” under “Get Connected” in the right panel.
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French Hazard WUI Update

USDA Forest Service 10/19/2017

The Forest Service is seeking public input (scoping comments) for the proposed French Hazard Wildland Urban Interface (WUI) Project on lands managed by the Cascade Ranger District of the Boise National Forest.

Project Description

The French Hazard WUI project proposes to implement a suite of vegetation treatments: commercial thinning (thinning with product removal), noncommercial thinning (thinning with no product removal), prescribed fire, and mastication (mechanical chipping). Treatment activities would be used alone, or in combination, to meet the needs for hazardous fuel reduction and vegetation restoration to restore species composition and stand structure, reduce undesirable species and stand densities, while favoring retention of larger diameter more fire-resistant trees throughout the project area. Reducing fuel loads, ladder fuels, and stand densities would, decrease the opportunity of crown fire development and improve the resiliency of affected stands should a wildfire ignition occur. In addition, activities occurring within the WUI would create or enhance defensible space for suppression resources should a wildfire threaten adjacent private properties. Restoring vegetative conditions more reflective of the fire-adapted ecosystem, reducing hazardous fuels, and minimizing risks to public health and safety would allow for safe and effective management of wildfire in the urban environment and meet the intent of several goals identified in the National Fire Plan and the Comprehensive Strategy.

For a more detailed description of the proposed project, please review the comprehensive proposed action report on the Project webpage: http://www.fs.usda.gov/project/?project=49636.

How to Comment

The Forest Service is contacting interested persons, groups, and agencies to make them aware of the project and to gather pertinent feedback for the environmental assessment. To be most useful, please make your comments as specific as possible. Your comments will help us identify and address issues. Comments may be submitted in the following ways:

Through the French Hazard WUI Project webpage .Select “Comment on Project” under “Get Connected” on the right panel.

Via email to comments-intermtn-boise-cascade@fs.fed.us. Please put “French Hazard WUI Project” in the subject line of e-mail comments. Email comments must be submitted in a format such as an email message, plain text (.txt), rich text format (.rtf), Adobe (.pdf), and Word (.doc).

Hand deliver to Boise National Forest, Cascade District, 540 North Main Street, Cascade, ID 83615 Attention: Jim Bishop. Office hours for submitting hand-delivered comments are 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, excluding holidays.

By fax at 208-382-7480.

Comments received in response to this request will be available for public inspection in the Public Comment Reading Room on the project webpage and will be released in their entirety, if requested, pursuant to the Freedom of Information Act.

When to Comment

To be most helpful, please submit your scoping comments by November 17, 2017 and make your comments as specific as possible.

Healthy Forest Restoration Act

This project is authorized under the Healthy Forest Restoration Act and thus is subject to requirements at 36 CFR 218.7 parts (a) and (c). There will be an objection process before the final decision is made (36 CFR 218). In order to be eligible to file an objection, specific written comments related to the project must be submitted during the designated comment period identified above or other designated public comment period specifically requested per requirements at 36 CFR 218.5 during the environmental analysis process. Individual members of organizations must have submitted their own comments to meet the requirements of eligibility as an individual. For more information on how the objection process works for projects and activities implementing land and resource management plans, please read the regulations under 36 CFR 218 Subparts A and B on the National Forest Service web site at https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title36-vol2/pdf/CFR-2013-title36-vol2-part218.pdf

For further information on the project, please contact Jim Bishop, Team Leader, at jjbishop@fs.fed.us or by phone at 208-382-7400.
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Goose Lake Road from Highway 55 to Brundage Ski Resort

The Council Education Resource Crew (CERC) teamed up with the Payette NF Watershed Restoration Crew to plant approximately 6,000 native shrubs and trees along the newly constructed and disturbed road cut and road fills along the Goose Lake Road from Highway 55 to Brundage Ski Resort.

CERC members are high school students attending Council High School.

photos

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Rainbow Bridge in October

Thanks for the photo share David Steinhaus. (via BNF FB)
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Century Link SUP Decision is now Available

USDA Forest Service 10/17/2017

The Decision Memo for the CenturyLink Mores Creek Rim Road ROW Project on the Mountain Home Ranger District is now available on the Project webpage: https://www.fs.usda.gov/project/?project=50749.

The purpose of this project is to authorize a 30-year special use permit for Century Link to install and maintain a new telecommunications line and associated infrastructure along National Forest System Road 237.

Forest Supervisor Seesholtz has determined that this action falls within categorical exclusion, 36 CFR 220.6 (e)(3). The project was reviewed in accordance with the categorical exclusion guidelines at FSH 1909.15(30), updated May 28, 2014. Following review of the resource conditions identified at 36 CFR 220.6(b), Forest Supervisor Seesholtz has determined no extraordinary circumstances exist. In addition, the interdisciplinary team’s analysis did not identify any other unusual circumstances or uncertainties about environmental effects associated with the action that would preclude use of a categorical exclusion.

Section 431 of the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2014 (Pub. L. No. 113-76) directed that the 1992 and 2012 legislation establishing the 36 CFR215 (post-decisional appeals) and 36 CFR 218 (pre-decisional objections) processes “shall not apply to any project or activity implementing a land and resource management plan … that is categorically excluded … under the National Environmental Policy Act.” Section 8006 of the Agricultural Act of 2014 (Farm Bill) (Pub. L. No. 113-79) repealed the Appeals Reform Act (ARA) (Pub. L. No. 102-381) implemented by 36 CFR 215. The Farm Bill also directs that the pre-decisional objection process established in the Consolidated Appropriation Act of 2014 shall not be applicable to categorically excluded projects or activities. As a result of these two statutes, the Forest Service no longer offers notice, comment and appeal opportunities pursuant to 36 CPR 215 for categorically excluded projects.

The decision may be implemented five business days from the decision date and after the special use permit has been issued. Implementation is anticipated to begin in the fall of 2017.

If you have questions concerning this project decision, please contact Stephaney Kerley, Mountain Home District Ranger, at 208-587-7961 or skerley@fs.fed.us.

Sincerely,
Melissa Yenko
Forest Environmental Coordinator
Boise National Forest
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Henry Clay Mineral Project Decision is Now Available

USDA Forest Service 10/17/2017

The Decision Memo for the Henry Clay Mineral Exploration Project on the Mountain Home Ranger District is available on the Project web page: https://www.fs.usda.gov/project/?project=39633.

As identified in my attached decision, the purpose of this project is to approve a Plan of Operations to explore for locatable minerals, as required by Forest Service mining regulations published in the Code of Federal Regulations (36 CFR 228A). This action is needed because the Forest Service is required to conduct the appropriate level of environmental analysis to approve the operator’s Plan of Operations (36CF 228.4(f)).

Ranger Kerley has determined that this action falls within categorical exclusion 36 CFR 220.6 (e) (8). The Henry Clay Minerals Exploration Project was reviewed in accordance with the categorical exclusion guidelines at FSH 1909.15(30), as updated May 28, 2014. Following review of the resource conditions identified at 36 CFR 220.6(b), Ranger Kerley has determined that no extraordinary circumstances exist. In addition, the interdisciplinary team’s analysis did not identify any other unusual circumstances or uncertainties about environmental effects associated with the action that would preclude use of a categorical exclusion.

On January 17, 2014, the President signed into law the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2014 (Pub. L. No. 113-76). Section 431 of that Act directs that the 1992 and 2012 legislation establishing the 36 CFR215 (post-decisional appeals) and 36 CFR 218 (pre-decisional objections) processes “shall not apply to any project or activity implementing a land and resource management plan … that is categorically excluded … under the National Environmental Policy Act [NEPA].” On February 7, 2014, the President signed into law the Agricultural Act of2014 (Farm Bill) (Pub. L. No. 113-79). Section 8006 of the 2014 Farm Bill repealed the Appeals Reform Act (ARA) (Pub. L. No. 102-381). The ARA’s implementing regulation was 36 CFR 215. The 2014 Farm Bill also directs that the pre-decisional objection process established in the Consolidated Appropriation Act of 2012 shall not be applicable to categorically excluded projects or activities. As a result of these two statutes, the Forest Service no longer offers notice, comment and appeal opportunities pursuant to 36 CPR 215 for categorically excluded projects.

The decision may be implemented five business days from the decision date, after finalization of the signed Plan of Operations, and the posting of a bond by the operator. Implementation is anticipated to begin in May 2018 and all ground disturbing activities will be completed within one year (365 days).

For additional information about this project, please contact Rick Wells, Forest Geologist, by phone at 208-373-4136 or email at rickywells@fs.fed.us.

Sincerely,
Melissa Yenko
Forest Environmental Coordinator
Boise National Forest
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BLM to conduct prescribed burn near Crouch

Date: October 18, 2017
Contact: Jared Jablonski, jjablonski@blm.gov, (208) 384-3210

Boise, Idaho – The Bureau of Land Management will be conducting the Garden Mountain Prescribed Burn, located approximately two miles northwest of Crouch, Idaho. The burn will occur between Oct. 23 and Jan. 1, depending on weather, fuel and ground conditions. Once initiated, burning operations are expected to last up to one week and have the potential for smoke to be visible from large distances.

The burn’s objective is to reduce hazardous fuels along roads and adjacent to subdivisions by burning up to 200 slash piles located on 286 acres of BLM land. While no closures are planned, the public is asked to be mindful of fire personnel and equipment in the area.

These slash piles were the result of a 2016 timber sale that occurred within the project site.

For more information, contact the BLM Boise District Fire Information Line at (208) 384-3378.
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BLM to host tour of Soda Fire rehabilitation areas

Date: October 19, 2017
Contact: Michael Williamson, mwilliamson@blm.gov, (208) 384-3393

Boise, Idaho – The Bureau of Land Management will conduct two public tours of Soda Fire rehabilitation treatments. The tours will take place on Nov. 3 and Nov. 14, and will take approximately five hours. Departures will be at 9 a.m. from the BLM Owyhee Field Office, 20 1st Avenue West, Marsing, Idaho.

Participants are responsible for providing their own tour transportation and lunch. Due to rough terrain, high-clearance four-wheel drive vehicles are necessary.

The tours will feature post-fire herbicide and seeding treatments completed in both the Vale (Oregon) and Boise (Idaho) Districts. Areas visited will highlight the layering of rehabilitation treatments and adaptive management, as well as BLM’s considerations for the resumption of grazing. The tour will also include a site visit to planned future fuel breaks.

Those interested in participating in either tour must RSVP with Seth Flanigan, Assistant Project Manager, at 208-384-3450 or sflanigan@blm.gov, no later than October 30, 2017.
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Forest-thinning project saved homes but highlights obstacles

By Andrew Selsky – 10/16/17 AP

Sisters, Ore. — Lightning started a forest fire one August afternoon near this Oregon tourist town, and it was spreading fast. Residents in outlying areas evacuated as flames marched toward their homes.

Just a few months earlier, the U.S. Forest Service and a group of locals representing environmental, logging and recreational interests arranged to thin part of the overgrown forest, creating a buffer zone around Sisters.

Workers removed trees and brush with machines, then came through on foot to ignite prescribed burns. That effort saved homes, and perhaps the community of 2,500 on the eastern slopes of the Cascade Range, by slowing the fire’s progress and allowing firefighters to corral it.

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US, states struggle to pay spiraling cost of fighting fires

By Don Thompson and Dan Elliott – 10/15/17 AP

Sacramento, Calif. — The long and brutal 2017 wildfire season is stressing the state and federal agencies that have to pay for the army of ground crews and machinery required to fight them.

The federal government spent more than $2.7 billion on firefighting in its most recently finished budget year, a record that far surpassed the previous high point of $2.1 billion set just two years ago.

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USFS Regional Intermountain News

Newsletters
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Letter to Share:

Youth Pheasant Hunt

Idaho Gamebird Foundation Oct 22, 2017

2017Pheasant-a

This is the kind of birds that Little Canyon and Sonny and Andy brought to us to put out. Young man with his dad, dad not hunting. No dog. Young man missed 4 but got one. Still hunting. They seen a number of hens, that Mark Gottchalk raised.

I am as excited as the kid was and his dad is puffed.

“Whiskers”
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Critter News:

Pet Talk – What Is Lepto?

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt Oct 20, 2017 IME

Lepto is short for leptospirosis, a bacterial disease that is transferable from animal to animal, and animal to man. It occurs commonly in dogs and livestock, though rarely in cats. Many wild animals carry the bacteria in their urine, and those animals urinate in our streams and lakes. When our dogs drink that water, the potential for infection with lepto occurs. The wild animals that harbor lepto include mice, rats, raccoons, opossum, sheep and deer.

There are many strains of leptospirosis bacteria. These bacteria are shed in the urine of infected animals and put into the waters where we walk our dogs. When a dog consumes water that is infected with lepto bacteria, they enter the dog’s bloodstream and other tissues, especially the liver and kidneys. Disease outbreaks often occur during or immediately following periods of heavy rain or flooding, common in the Wood River Valley every spring.

Clinical signs that occur in dogs can be variable, but usually involve fever, shivering, decreased appetite, vomiting and dehydration. Decreased urine production due to acute renal failure is common. Jaundice due to liver damage is a common sign.

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KWVR Oregon Wolf Education weekly Wolf Report

Third week October 2017
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Wildlife managers track daughter of famous OR-7 wolf

By Mark Freeman – 10/15/17 AP

Medford, Ore. — State and federal wildlife managers will again be able to track gray wolf OR-7’s Rogue Pack now that one of his presumed offspring is sporting a new GPS collar.

In what was described as a “textbook” capture, biologists on the morning of Oct. 3 were able to trap, tranquilize and collar the newly named OR-54 in Klamath County’s Wood River Valley, the eastern portion of the pack’s normal range, according to the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife.

The roughly 80-pound female is about 1½ years old and is likely from OR-7’s 2016 litter, said John Stephenson, a wildlife biologist with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in Bend who tracks wolves here.

“It’s very helpful to have a member of the Rogue Pack collared to give us an idea of where they are,” Stephenson said. “It’s working well so far.”

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Wolf Education International

Third week of October 2017

Money for wolf issues

Italian wildlife group offers £21,000 reward for information leading to arrest of wolf killers in Tuscany

Wolves kill British professor
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Wyoming wildlife managers to hold grizzly management circuit

10/16/17 AP

Jackson, Wyo. — Wyoming wildlife managers are hosting a circuit of meetings around the state to talk about management of grizzly bears.

The Jackson Hole News & Guide reported Monday that the Wyoming Game and Fish Department recently gained authority over the state’s grizzlies.

The meetings aren’t designed to set policies, such as hunting regulations. They’ll simply be for members of the public to share their feelings on the state’s grizzly management.

continued:
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Wyoming wildlife officials search for grizzly shot by hunter

AP Oct 18, 2017

Cody, Wyo. (AP) – Wildlife officials are looking for a grizzly bear that was shot and wounded when a hunter said it charged him in northern Wyoming.

The Cody Enterprise reports that the bear charged Tev Kelley and his hunting partner Scott Smith Oct. 6 while they were field dressing an elk Smith had just shot.

Kelley first fired his .45 handgun at a log as a warning shot before shooting the bear.

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Let The Games Begin

Oct 20, 2017 – IME


Courtesy photo by Rosemary Wright

Two bull elk lock horns during a fight in a field near Bellevue earlier this month. During the elk mating season in the early fall, bulls compete to establish dominance and gain the loyalty of females, or cows, in the herd. Bulls become more aggressive during the autumn rut, but do not always resort to fighting, which depletes their energy and can cause injury. They often compete for cows by showing off their antlers, posturing and emitting a strong musk.

source:
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Commissioners consider Elk ordinance

Winter feeding rules discussed at county workshop

Mark Dee Oct 20, 2017 IME

With elk already beginning to graze along the valley floor, the Blaine County commissioners took their first step toward setting new regulations on a divisive topic: winter feeding.

On Tuesday, county attorney Tim Graves presented a draft of an ordinance that would revise the county’s policy on feeding big game animals, which is currently prohibited by plat notes governing some 70 subdivisions. Elsewhere in the county, there is no policy governing feeding.

Right now, those rules are only enforceable through civil litigation—which is why representatives from the Golden Eagle Ranch subdivision attended the workshop earlier this week.

For six weeks last winter, during the depths of February and on into March, residents of Golden Eagle fed dozens of elk that they say were trapped by snow in the mid-valley neighborhood. To enforce existing rules, the county sued; that lawsuit is still ongoing.

continued:
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Lawsuit: Eastern Idaho sheep grazing threatens bighorns

By Keith Ridler – 10/18/17 AP

Boise, Idaho — Environmental groups have filed a lawsuit contending the U.S. Forest Service is illegally jeopardizing bighorn sheep by allowing University of Idaho domestic sheep on two eastern Idaho grazing allotments as part of agricultural research activities.

Western Watersheds Project and WildEarth Guardians in the 18-page lawsuit filed Tuesday contend the grazing through permits issued to the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Sheep Experimental Station risks transmitting diseases to bighorn sheep.

The lawsuit filed by Advocates for the West challenges the Forest Service’s authorization of the grazing allotments in the Caribou-Targhee National Forest.

The lawsuit contends the federal agency is violating environmental laws by allowing the grazing this fall and winter before completing an environmental analysis.

source:
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Utah wildlife officials want to move mountain goat species

10/16/17 AP

Salt Lake City — Conservationists say mountain goats that were introduced by state wildlife officials in Utah’s La Sal Mountains are damaging Mount Peale’s fragile alpine ecosystems.

The Salt Lake Tribune reports wildlife officials are now developing proposals to establish goat herds in other Utah ranges where this big game species is not native.

Conservationists complain the state is sacrificing alpine landscapes just to provide more opportunities for big game hunting. Researchers say the La Sals are already showing signs where wallowing goats have exposed soils and left excrement and hair all around.

Big game specialist Rusty Robinson says officials with the state Division of Wildlife Resources are gathering data on alpine plant communities and will hold public meetings as they develop a Deep Creeks goat plan over the next year.

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Buck killed after goring helpers at fun run near Davenport

Rich Landers The Spokesman-Review Oct 18, 2017

A mule deer buck was killed on Saturday after being aggressive to runners and goring two helpers during the Half Ass Half Marathon north of Davenport [Washington].

The buck came onto the Porcupine Bay-area road used for the 13.1-mile course and began acting aggressively and chasing some of the runners, says Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Police Officer Curt Wood.

“Two men who were manning a water station tried to chase the buck away but it turned and began attacking them,” Wood reported.

continued:
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3 little pigs found wandering in Caldwell

KTVB October 18, 2017


Are these your three little pigs? (Photo: Caldwell Police)

Boise — Maybe their house blew down?

Police are looking for the owners of three piglets found running loose in Caldwell Tuesday.

An animal control officer for the Caldwell Police Department caught the trio after they were spotted in the area of Laster Lane and War Eagle Road.

The piglets are being cared for at the West Valley Humane Society until their owner is found. The shelter can be reached at 208-455-5920.

source:
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Public meetings set in Idaho to amend sage grouse plan

10/18/17 AP

Boise, Idaho — Federal officials have announced public meetings in Idaho to amend the 2015 sage grouse conservation plan.

The U.S. Bureau of Land Management in a news release Wednesday says meetings are set for Nov. 2 in Twin Falls, Nov. 6 in Idaho Falls, and Nov. 7 in Marsing.

The Interior Department last week announced plans to amend the 2015 sage grouse plan that has been unpopular with Idaho officials.

continued:
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Trumpeter swan hunting proposal alarms birders

Rich Landers The Spokesman-Review Oct 20, 2017

A federal plan to let hunters shoot trumpeter swans has drawn fire from some of the people who toiled to bring the majestic white birds back from the brink of extinction.

Here’s the story from the Associated Press out of Minnesota:

Trumpeter swans, North America’s largest waterfowl species, have made a comeback in recent decades thanks to efforts to reintroduce them to their former breeding range. Now the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is working on a plan that would let hunters shoot them in several states that allow the hunting of tundra swans, a more numerous species.

continued:
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Bill would void court order on salmon recovery

Congressmen want to reassert authority over dam operations

Greg Moore 10/18/2017 IME

Legislation being considered by the U.S. House of Representatives would nullify two federal court rulings regarding the operation of dams on the Columbia and Snake rivers to benefit endangered salmon and steelhead, some of which swim upstream for 900 miles from the ocean to spawn in the upper Salmon River and Redfish Lake.

In May 2016, the U.S. District Court for the District of Oregon invalidated the federal government’s operations plan for 14 dams in the Columbia Basin. Judge Michael Simon ruled that the 2014 Columbia Basin salmon biological opinion, drawn up by NOAA Fisheries, violated the Endangered Species Act and the National Environmental Policy Act. The judge ordered a new biological opinion and full NEPA analysis, adding that he doubted such a document could be written without considering removal of eight dams on the lower Snake River in Washington.

Federal courts have declared five successive Columbia Basin salmon plans, dating to 2003, to be illegal.

In March 2017, Simon also ruled that starting in 2018, federal dam operators must increase spring water releases over spillways at the eight dams to improve survival rates for juvenile salmon migrating to the ocean.

continued:
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The Columbia Basin Bulletin

Weekly Fish and Wildlife News
http://www.cbbulletin.com
October 20, 2017
Issue No. 848
Table of Contents

* NOAA Still Predicting La Nina Could Shape Coming Winter; Unrelated To Big Rain Hitting This Weekend
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439753.aspx

* Briefs Filed Opposing Irrigators’ Request For Juvenile Salmon Transportation/Spill Hearing In Federal Court
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439752.aspx

* Idaho Opens Rivers For Hatchery Steelhead Fishing With Restrictions; Says Rules Will Protect Wild Fish
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439751.aspx

* Tribes’ Moving Forward On Long-Term Plan To Reduce Lake Trout In Flathead Lake; Spawns Tribal Fish Business
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439750.aspx

* Council Hears About Success Of Montana’s South Fork Flathead Westslope Cutthroat Conservation Project
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439749.aspx

* South Fork Flathead Westslope Cutthroat Project Receives Award Of Excellence
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439748.aspx

* Study Links Salmon Spawning To Geological Change, Effects On Stream Beds Have Long-Term Consequences
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439747.aspx

* Montana Wildlife Mitigation (Libby, Hungry Horse Dams) Program Halfway Through 60 Years; Mitigating Operational Losses Next
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439746.aspx

* After Review, Council Approves 29 Basin Wildlife Projects Costing Over $12 Million In 2018
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439745.aspx

* New House Bill Would Move Anadromous Fish ESA Listings From Commerce Dept. To Interior
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439744.aspx

* Invasive New Zealand Mudsnails Found in California’s Carmel River, Threat To Trout, Steelhead
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439743.aspx

* Interior Secretary Zinke Names New Director Of Bureau Of Indian Affairs
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439741.aspx

* Washington Draft Plan Addresses Impact Of New Projects Off Pacific Coast; Protecting Fisheries A Goal
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439740.aspx

* Idaho Climate Summit To Explore Climate Change Effects On Idaho; Live-Stream Nov. 16-17
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439739.aspx

* EPA Awards $32 Million For Tribal Environment Programs In Northwest, Alaska
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439738.aspx

* EPA Names New Administrator For Region 10 Covering Alaska, Northwest States
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439737.aspx
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Fish & Game News:

F&G: Fewer yearlings challenge area deer hunters this season

By Andrew Weeks for The Star-News October 19, 2017

Hunters who haven’t harvested a deer yet this season should find solace that their ill luck might not have anything to do with their skill in the field. It just might be that there aren’t as many animals this year.

The general deer season hunt, which opened Oct. 10, started slow, said Regan Berkley, regional wildlife manager with the McCall office of the Idaho Department of Fish and Game. That was expected for a mid-week opener, Berkley said.

Something that might frustrate hunters is that there are fewer yearlings this year.

“We did have a winter that was tough on mule deer in the winter ranges, especially the fawn component, which was hit pretty hard,” she said. “I don’t think we’ll see as many yearlings harvested this year.”

General deer hunts run until Tuesday and Oct. 31 depending on the zone. Several other hunts are on the calendar, including a number of elk seasons “that are all over the map,” Berkley said.

continued:
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Idaho Fish and Game – Elk History

(Courtesy photo, Idaho Department of Fish and Game)

Fish and Game “Import elk from Yellowstone 1915. In 1915 Idaho Fish and Game began importing elk into Idaho from Yellowstone National Park.”

[h/t SMc]
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F&G News Releases

https://idfg.idaho.gov/press
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Fun Critter Stuff:

Hungry donkey takes bite out of pricey McLaren

Friday, 29 September 2017


Donkey’s owners ordered to pony up $9000 for sports car chomp.

The owners of a hungry donkey must cough up almost $9000 to the driver of a McLaren sports car, after the animal chomped on the rear of the vehicle.

Police said that Vitus the donkey may have mistaken the orange McLaren parked next to his enclosure as a giant carrot when he bit the back, damaging the paint and a carbon-fiber piece, in Germany.

The car owner was forced to take the matter to court when the donkey owner refused reimbursement for the incident last September.

At the time, local media reported the owner of the donkey refused to pay for the damage, telling the McLaren owner he should have picked a better parking place.

continued:
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These baby horses are so Restless


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Seasonal Humor:

Woodin-a

StumpTable-a
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Tips and Advice:

Going hunting? Don’t forget to pack survival gear

by KBOI Staff Monday, October 16th 2017

Boise, Idaho (KBOI) — Hunting is generally safe, but every year hunters find themselves deeper in the woods and stay out longer than planned.

What’s more, hunting in the fall in Idaho means the temperatures can swing from the 70’s to below freezing within hours. Add snow and rain to the mix in rugged, remote locations and you have the potential for a life-threatening situation.

That’s why survival gear is just smart. Here’s what Idaho Fish and Game suggests:

Lighters – They’re cheap, light and don’t take up much space, so get a bunch of them. Carry one in your pocket, another in your day pack, and have spares in your vehicle. Remember inexpensive lighters that get saturated won’t ignite, so stash them in a waterproof container.

Fire starter – Don’t expect to always find dry wood. Buy some fire starter or make your own. This is not just for emergencies.

continued:
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Idaho History October 22, 2017

1879 – 1911 Big Creek / Edwardsburg

1879 The First Map Ever Made of Country Between Big Creek and Salmon River

1879FirstMapBigCreekTrails-alink to low quality larger map size:
Click source link for high quality zoomable very large map

The First Map Ever Made of Country Between Big Creek and Salmon River, I.T. (1926)
Creator Brown, W. C. (William Carey), 1854-1939.
Date Original 1926
Publisher [Boise, Id. : Syms-York Company]
Description 1 map: 15 x 22 cm. Scale: 1 inch = 7 miles. A handwritten note by the author is in red pencil on the left. W.C. Brown was a second Lieutenant in the U.S. Cavalry during the Indian Wars of the late 1870s. These maps come from a book by him, published in 1926 after his retirement, about the Sheepeater Campaign. …
source: Manuscripts, Archives, and Special Collections, Washington State University Libraries
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Sketch Map of Middle Idaho Showing Trails Made by Troops in Sheepeater Campaign 1879

1879MiddleIdaho-alink to low quality larger map size:
Click source link for high quality zoomable very large map

Sketch Map of Middle Idaho Showing Trails Made by Troops in Sheepeater Campaign 1879. (1926)
Creator Brown, W. C. (William Carey), 1854-1939.
Date Original 1926
Publisher [Boise, Id. : Syms-York Company]
Description 1 map: 29 x 22 cm. Scale: 1 inch = 15 miles. Trails and marches of campaign drawn on map. W.C. Brown was a second Lieutenant in the U.S. Cavalry during the Indian Wars of the late 1870s. These maps come from a book by him, published in 1926 after his retirement, about the Sheepeater Campaign. …
source: Manuscripts, Archives, and Special Collections, Washington State University Libraries
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Alton Mining District 1885

Prospecting of the Salmon River mountains increased considerably after the Sheepeater War of 1879, and organization of Alton district on Big Creek, June 15, 1885, extended mining from Warren’s east into that region. Although there were a number of prospects on upper Big Creek, the main production was realized at the Snowshoe which yielded 400,000 between 1906 and 1942.

source: Idaho State Historic Society and Genealogy Trails
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Early Big Creek Mines

BigCreekMinesMap

Big Creek

Mineral discoveries near Elk Summit high on a ridge between Big Creek and the south fork of the Salmon River came a decade before prospecting on Monumental Creek expanded Big Creek mining possibilities into an even-more remote area around Thunder Mountain. Deep canyons and rough country delayed development of mining anywhere on Big Creek, but an early twentieth-century gold rush finally brought a horde of prospectors into Idaho’s Salmon River mountain wilderness west of Leesburg and north of Stanley and Deadwood.

Antimony had been noticed in that country years before anyone succeeded in identifying commercial gold and silver there.

A Thunder Mountain lode which no one could develop and some Chamberlain Basin placers had been investigated as early as 1866 or 1867. Nothing came from that activity. Finally James Reardon and L. M. Johnson brought a small discovery party to Big Creek as early as they could prospect in 1884. In June, they found an eleven-hundred foot outcrop of a system of parallel veins about sixty feet wide. A year later, on June 15, 1885, they organized the Alton mining district, and that summer a hundred and fifty miners located about a hundred claims. They found silver ore described by Norman B. Willey as “refractory, but not base.” In 1886, prospect cuts had reached a depth of fifty feet. A. L. Simondi, a Weiser assayer, created a lot of interest when he reported a 2,000-ounce silver sample in August. A ton of ore from these exploratory holes, packed out to a railroad at a cost of eight dollars, provided a favorable test yield of 267 ounces of silver later in 1886. Since an eighty-five mile wagon road would have to be constructed at an estimated expense of $20,000 to reach their district, miners at Alton faced a severe obstacle.

Their ore, distributed in small stringers through a broad zone or lode, could yield flattering assays from selected samples, but averaged only a dollar or two a ton. A large low-grade lode of that kind eventually could be worked profitably by twentieth-century methods where good transportation was available. Elk Summit offered no such attraction.

Gradual expansion of mining possibilities around Alton — both in the immediate vicinity as well as around Big Creek — came during two decades or more of prospecting there. Following some preliminary work by John Osborn in 1880, a modest excitement attracted interest on Sugar Creek in 1887. Then James Hand located a Beaver Creek claim on August 18, 1893, which he retained for half a century. A more promising find brought more miners to Smith and Government creeks near Alton in 1898. A Topeka firm acquired this property in 1902 and eventually drove about 2,000 feet of development tunnels in a lode two hundred feet wide. Returning to Beaver Creek in the spring of 1899, James Hand “discovered and located the most extraordinary ledge on the North American continent. It is an enormous porphyry dyke of free milling quartz that stands out boldly like a huge cathedral. Measurements taken show the ledge to be 300 feet at the widest and 60 feet at the narrowest part. The ledge can be easily traced for over three mile.

Assays of the croppings of this ledge made by Mr. Tillson, of the Iola mine, show values “ranging from $18.50 to $186.60.” Another nearby discovery of Charles Crown, came on Logan and Fall creeks in 1899. Crown went on to find “some remarkably rich locations in Thunder mountain” that season. But his Logan and Fall creeks prospects proved disappointing. By 1902, about 200 feet of development tunnels demonstrated an absence of ore (as evaluated in such a remote area), but after some additional effort at development, George Lauffer and Joe Davis relocated this abandoned property in 1908. Nothing but negative information came from all that effort.

North of Big Creek, Richard Hunter reported an unexpectedly successful 1899 placer operation:

In the Chamberlain basin, strikes showing phenomenal values have been made by the Briggs brothers, of Ohio, and a quartet of lucky prospectors from Utah. The Ohio boys located a placer claim on the top of a mountain and worked like Trojans for two weeks to the intense glee of the old rock smashers. The boys succeeded in getting a 12 hour run of water and washed out $1,876 in coarse gold. In the clean-up nuggets worth $10 were found. The hilarity of the “way-backs’ ended suddenly.

Copper also created excitement in 1899.

Mike Nevins, the genial, big hearted proprietor of Nevin’s cosy ranch, at the mouth of Elk creek, has located a colossal ledge of copper near the fork of Elk and Smith creeks. As the ledge towers upward to a height of over 600 feet the reader can form a slight idea of the magnitude of Nevin’s discovery. A representative of Marcus Daly has gone to examine Nevin’s discovery.

A somewhat more successful effort attended another nearby discovery of 1903. Four years later a small 300-pound prospect mill turned out $173 in a seventeen-day run. A five-stamp mill, brought there in 1911, produced a six or seven thousand dollar yield by 1916. In addition, a fourth Alton lode discovery on Government and Logan creeks filled in some mining territory between the 1898 and 1899 segments. Also in 1911, D. C. MacRae and E. F. Goldman located claims along a ridge between Government and Logan creeks, but they had low grade ore at best. Some may have gone as high as four dollar a ton higher up and two dollars at greater depth, but their average ran lower. Development of this series of four mining areas along a single northeast and southwest mineral zone showed that a large lode extended close to four miles in length and one to three hundred feet in width. Yet almost no production could be managed at such a difficult location. During the Thunder Mountain rush, some of these properties acquired an unenviable reputation by reason of unwarranted wildcatting operations of that period, but not a single instance of intelligent mining development was then recorded, and as a matter of fact 90% of the money raised from the sale of stock based on Big Creek properties during that period was used for promotion purposes and never reached Idaho.

Farther down Big Creek, other lodes had more of a chance for development. W. A. Edward’s property on a ridge between Logan and Government creeks (below D. C. MacRae’s later 1911 discovery), located in 1904, justified importation of a stamp mill. Logan City (later Edwardsburg) began with a saloon, store, butcher shop, and a house on Big Creek flat that summer, and a four-stamp mill arrived in 1906. Milling finally began five years later, with a production of $1,200 in 1911. Sulphide ores, requiring a cyanide process, continued to present a problem which accounted for so long a delay and such a small production. Edwards also held additional claims twelve miles farther down Big Creek, where a 2,500-foot lode was developed. Most of Big Creek’s production came from the Snowshoe mine in that area, with a yield of about $400,000 between 1906 and 1942.

source: Idaho State Historical Society Reference Series Number 563 1980 Publications–450 N. 4th Street, Boise, ID 83702–208-334-3428
(broken link)
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Big Creek Mines 1906

BigCreekMines-aIdaho County Free Press July 12, 1906

Mr. I.H. Friar, superintendent for the Pueblo Mining company, with properties in the Big Creek district, was in Meadows the latter part of last week on his return from a conference with the president of his company at Salt Lake city. Mr. Friar stated that a mill had been purchased and would be installed this summer, and that another mill would be put in as soon as the road into the district was completed.

Mr. Friar has the bridge across the south fork of the Salmon almost ready for the steel work. He states that they are having the same trouble in the upper country that is being experienced all over Idaho, and that is the difficulty in getting men to do the work.
— Meadows Eagle.
—–

A crew of men are said to have again commenced work on the Warren-Big Creek road and expect to have it completed at an early date. This road means much to that promising mining district and its completion will no doubt be followed by substantial improvement on several rich properties.

from Idaho County Free Press., July 12, 1906
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1910 Frank Goldman at the Gold King

GoldmanGoldKing1910-alink to large image:
Back of photo: “B. F. Goldman”
from Sandy McRae: “Frank Goldman on the Tunnel Dump.”
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Mines In and Around Big Creek

by Robin McRae

The Independence Group is located between the head of Smith Creek and Government Creek. The claim was filed in 1898 by Dan McRae. The claims were sold to a Topeka, Kansas company, which dug 20,000 feet of tunnel. Eleven claims are patented. The last work was exploratory drilling in 1992 by Freeport. Fair gold values were verified.

The Moore Property, also known as Moscow, consists of patented and un-patented claims. A five stamp mill and a tram line constructed to bring ore to the mill are evident. The mine was brought by E. Moore in 1905. At least two adits and a glory hole remain. Last work was done by Bradley Mining Company in the 1940s and a drilling program began by Kennecott in the early 1990s.

The Eagle Mining Company also known as the Sunday Mine consists of 114 acres of patented land. It was developed by William Edwards and is located three fourths of a mile from Edwardsburg. A mill was constructed in 1910-1911. The mill contained four power stamps, two concentrating tables and a cyanide circuit. In 1938 Dan and Bob McRae leased the property and installed a three stamp mill. It operated until war regulations shut down all gold mines.

Copper Camp mine is 12 miles below Edwardsburg, between Ramey and Crooked Creek. The property was owned by William Edwards and later by a group of stock holders. A number of adits have values of silver, gold and copper. The copper is three percent. The last values of sliver, gold and copper. The last work was done by a North Idaho Company. In 1967 Highland Surprise flew an Air Tract diamond drill to the property. They verified a copper resource. Due to the mine’s isolation it was deemed uneconomical.

In 1960 Wilbur Wiles staked claims in the Thunder Mountain area called Yellow Gem. Wiles found a deposit of Yellow Opal which could be traced to the surface for a quarter of a mile or more. He mined the gems and packed them out on his back to Edwardsburg a total of fifteen miles. He later patented three claims with the help of Jim Collord and Bill Davis. The Bureau of Mines estimated the claims could contain 40,000 pounds of opal and moss agate. The property is now owned by Jim Collord Jr. and Carrie Pitts.

The McRae Tungsten Property was located in 1951 by R. J. McRae. It consisted of two unpatented claims. A reduction mill was constructed by Martin Company. The mill operated from 1953 through 1957, producing Scheelite 20% and Huebnerite 80%. Five to six men were employed year round at an elevation of 8,200 feet with eight feet to teen feet of snow in the winter. The underground mine had 1,100 feet of workings below Elk Summit.

The Werdenhoff Mine property was discovered by Pringle Smith who also found the Cinnabar Mine. The discovery occurred during the Thunder Mountain gold rush. Some high grade veins were drifted on but none showed much width. A state road was built from Warren, Idaho over Elk Summit to bring in equipment to the property. The Routson family located the claims and ran more tunnel. In the early 1930s Keystone Gold Mines operated the mine. The mine has since been worked by the Routson family and a small amount of gold has been produced of the last twenty years.

Robin (Sandy) McRae grew up around Big Creek, Thunder Mountain and Stibnite. The family mined at Big Creek and Thunder Mountain from 1914 through 1990. Currently retired eye doctor and on the Board of Directors of Thunder Mountain Gold.

excerpted from: “Picks, Pans & Shovels – Mining in Valley County, Idaho”, Valley County History Project, Mines In and Around Big Creek, by Robin McRae, pages 14-16
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Sunday Mine

SundayMine-a
Click image for larger size
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Post Office History

Logan Post Office

Established August 17, 1904, William E. Edwards
Renamed Edwardsburg February 25, 1909
Location: 6 miles SW of Big Springs NW Sec. 9, T20N, R9E

Edwardsburg Post Offices

Established August 17, 1904, as Logan, William F. Edwards
Renamed Edwardsburg February 25, 1909
Discontinued January 14, 1918, mail to Warren.

Postcard from Edwardsburg, Idaho, March 26, 1912
EdwardsCabin1912-a(click image for larger size)
Contributed by Marvin Housworth
photo source: Valley County GenWeb

Letter on the back:
“A picture of the cabin as it was in the early days when Napier was a little boy – I suppose you met him when he was South – Father wrote me of your sorrow and I have thought of you but as my days are full of work at night I have so much writing for Mr. Edwards I don’t have much time for myself – The (ore ?) at (ditch?)* is fine & at last things are coming our way. Write when you feel inclined- give my Love to the girls – especially Elizabeth.”
– Annie Napier Edwards

“That is the first pictures of the old house before anything added and that is Napier in the front. Looks like he is about 6 or 7. they lived there in a tent while building it and she went South during some of it.”
– C. Gillihan (personal correspondence)

Catherine Gillihan, backcountry historian, writes:

The Routsons, “Boston” Brown and Dan McRae carried most of the mail from the 1900’s to the 1918’s. After the Edwardsburg post office closed the mail went down Big Creek River to Clover/Garden Creek, Werdenhoff Mine and Smith Creek mines. About the 1923’s when it was taken to Big Creek via Smith Creek to Cowman’s Lodge, this mail came through Warrens. Mail came from Crawford, later Cascade, to Yellow Pine and to Profile to Sam Wilson’s. The Edwards went to Profile for their mail. The first and only road into the Big Creek area went over Elk Summit, splitting at the top, one fork going down to the Edwards and Moscow Mine on Logan Creek and the second fork went down Smith Creek to the mines. There was only a trail from Smith Creek up to Big Creek; the forest service using Smith Creek for a while as headquarters and then building at Big Creek, about 1923. This station burned down. In the 30’s, the CCC built the road from Yellow Pine past Edwardsburg to Big Creek and on down to Smith Creek, connecting all of these places, and the mail then was hauled in by vehicle and flown into the airport when the road was closed. Carl Whitmore and Johnson’s Flying Service had these early contracts.

Helmers included the following account:

Joe Davis has contracted to pack the post office at Edwardsburg out to Warren. He had the horses tailed together, no halters, just ropes around their necks. When he was coming around the grade from Elk Creek, high on the hillside, one horse pulled back. That started the whole string to pull back and the third horse from the rear broke loose and went over the bank end over end, all three rolling until they came to a tree and wrapped around that. Joe went to Tom Carrey’s place on the river for help. One horse was dead, choked, and U. S. Post Office was scattered all over the hillside. They gathered what they could and Joe said the Department in Washington could come get the rest.

Big Creek Post Office

Established May 13, 1936, Richard H. Cowman
Walter A. Weymouth, November 5, 1946
Marie A. Weymouth, December 31, 1949
Discontinued December 31, 1951, mail to Yellow Pine
Location: On Big Creek, 27 m. SE of Warren, 23 m. NE of Yellow Pine, center Sec. 35, T21N, R9E.

1937 Big Creek

1937BigCreek-a

Post Office History source: Valley County GenWeb
[h/t SMc]
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1910 Big Creek Census

1910 – U.S. Census, Roosevelt Precinct: Idaho County [now mainly Valley County] Clement Hanson, census taker

Big Creek Trail (Twp 21 WR 12 E):

George Yardley, age 38, farmer;
Orrin Goodrich, (partner), age 27, prospector.

Arther E. Gardew [Garden], age 44, farmer;
Viola M. Gardew [Garden], (wife), age 42;
Issac W. Ripper, (boarder), age 42, farm hand;
Jacob Galrino, (boarder), age 62, packer.

John Couyers [Conyers], age 51, stock raiser;
May Couyers [Conyers], (wife), age 41;
Florence Smith (sister-in-law), age 44.

Francis Stump, age 63, farmer;
Francis Stump Jr., (son), age 36, farmer.
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Big Creek Wagon Road:

William A. Edwards, age 40, general manager, mining company;
Annie N. Edwards, (wife), age 39, dep’t recorder, mining district;
Napier Edwards, (son), age 11;

Franz K. Lamb, age 34, superintendent,
Joseph Davis, (partner), age 41, miner;
Steve Winchester, (partner), age 53, miner;
James MacCilla, (partner), age 63, miner;
William Michell, (partner), age 40, miner.

Eric Janson, age 40, miner;
Jacob Janson, (brother), age 36, miner.

Benjamin F. Goldman, age 36, miner

William Bonner, age 45, miner
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File contributed for use in USGenWeb Archives by: Sharon McConnel November, 2005
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Names of Mines around Big Creek

Edwardsburg District

Dixie Mine (Goldman and Mc Crea), Edwardsburg District, Valley Co.
Golden Way Up Mine (Ludwig; Nevitt; Last Chance; Laufer & Davis), Edwardsburg District, Valley Co.
Moscow Mine (Moore), Edwardsburg District, Valley Co.
Red Bluff Mine, Smith Creek, Edwardsburg District, Valley Co.
Snowbird Mine (McRay Mine; McCrae; Red Bluffs), Edwardsburg District, Valley Co.
Blue Bluff Prospect, Edwardsburg District, Valley Co.
Golden Cup Mine (Golden Coin Mine), Idaho Primitive Area, Smith Creek, Edwardsburg District, Valley Co.
Rocket Prospect (White Bluff), Idaho Primitive Area, Edwardsburg District, Valley Co.
Wilson Group, Edwardsburg District, Valley Co.
Profile – Yellow Pine Company Occurrence, Edwardsburg District, Valley Co.
Red Metal Mine (Allison; Ellison), Edwardsburg District, Valley Co.
Blue Stone Prospect (Werdenhoff Group), Idaho Primitive Area, Edwardsburg District, Valley Co.
Black Swan Prospect (Werdenhoff Mine), Edwardsburg District, Valley Co.
Ryan Creek Group, Edwardsburg District, Valley Co.
Werdenhoff Prospect (Coveny; Pueblo; Red Bluff), Edwardsburg District, Idaho Co.
Lost Packer Prospect, Idaho Primitive Area, Edwardsburg District, Idaho Co.
Pueblo Group (Columbia), Idaho Primitive Area, Edwardsburg District, Idaho Co.
Copper Cliff Deposit (Missouri Creek Group; Missouri Ridge), Edwardsburg District, Valley Co.
Missouri Creek Group, Edwardsburg District, Valley Co.
Golden Hand Mine (Old Neversweat; Golden Antler; Penn-Idaho) Primitive Area, Edwardsburg District, Idaho Co.

Big Creek District

Ludwig Deposit (Laufer and Davis; Nevitt; Last Chance Prospect; Golden Way Up), Big Creek District, Valley Co.
Logan Copper Hill Prospect (Faulkenburg; Red Garnet; Copper Hill Prospect; Lady Garnet), Big Creek District, Valley Co.
Antimony Rainbow Group Mine (Dokka; Yellow Jacket; Northern Crown; Empress; Logan; Dixie; Goldman & McRae; New Year; Gold King; Golden West; Palo Alto), Big Creek District, Valley Co.
Independence Mine, Big Creek, Big Creek District, Valley Co.
B and B No. 4 Claim, Big Creek District, Valley Co.

Profile District

Profile Gap Deposit (Wilson Group; Profile Gap Prospect; Syringa; Wallace-Mitchell Claims; Wilson Mine; Syringa; Sam Wilson Tunnel), Profile District, Valley Co.

Ramey Ridge District

Pharmacist Prospect, Idaho Primitive Area, Ramey Ridge District, Idaho Co.
Mulligan Group Prospect (Deer Lodge Group), Idaho Primitive Area, Ramey Ridge District, Valley Co.
Beaver Ridge Prospect (Aniti; Mother Lode), Idaho Primitive Area, Ramey Ridge District, Idaho Co.
Wild West Group Prospect, Idaho Primitive Area, Ramey Ridge District, Idaho Co.
Little Green Gem No. 7 Mine, Idaho Primitive Area, Ramey Ridge District, Idaho Co.
Estep Cabin occurrence (Gold Crown group), Ramey Ridge District, Idaho Co.
Orofino Group (Estep; Mildred; Arrastre), Ramey Ridge District, Idaho Co.
Florence A Group, Ramey Ridge District, Idaho Co.
Gold Bug Cabin Prospect (Old Lobear Cabin Prospect), Ramey Ridge District, Idaho Co.
B. J. Prospect, Idaho Primitive Area, Ramey Ridge District, Idaho Co.
Schley No. 3 group (Includes Original Gold Crown group), Idaho Primitive Area, Ramey Ridge District, Idaho Co.

References: U.S. Geological Survey, 2005, Mineral Resources Data System: U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, Virginia.
source: Mindat.org
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Note: Patented mining property is Private Property. Please have respect, take only photos and leave no trace.
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page updated September 19, 2020

Road Report Oct 22

Note: This time of year road conditions can change quickly. Be prepared for snow at high elevations and rocks/trees falling in the road. Please share road reports!

Yellow Pine: Raining this morning in Yellow Pine. Forecast for more rain today, then dry early this week.

Johnson Creek Road: Big Creek summit snowtel currently snowing 10″ of snow. Johnson Creek road report: “terrible with pot holes.”
Big Creek Summit SNOTEL station 6580′

South Fork / EFSF Road: No current report. Last report roads are in good shape. Watch for ice early morning in the shade. EFSF road is holding up well.

Lick Creek: No current report, probably snow up high. Rough road near the summit on both sides. EFSF road from Zena Creek to YP is in good shape.
Note: Lick Creek Summit has an elevation of 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Report from Thursday (Oct 19) “Re Profile, there was probably half a foot packed in the ruts right before this storm, we slipped a little in 4wd on the BC side; it’ll be worse now and ice up in the evening. “P” used chains to get the stock out same day, Thursday, in two half loads. We figure this storm might put enough new snow up there to be a pain so we left. On into Big Creek is awful rough w potholes, and slick deep mud in a few spots. It bounced us around pretty good, so much fire traffic plus hunting parties beat it up.” – CEP
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Probably closed with snow. No current report.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: This is the road beyond Warren down to the South Fork of the Salmon River near Trails End Subdivision. [Then up to Elk Summit and over to Big Creek/Edwardsburg.]
Report that the road was closed Monday Oct 2 for repairs, and will probably be closed for most of October. Elk summit is probably snowed closed by now. No current report.
Note: Elk Summit is at an elevation of nearly 9000 feet.
map:

Deadwood Summit: No current report. Deadwood snotel showing 15″ of snow.
Note: The Approx Elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet (2,098 m)
Deadwood Summit SNOTEL station 6860′

Golden Gate Road: Large deep wash-out about 2/3rds of the way up.
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Weather Reports Oct 15-21

Oct 15 Weather:

At 10am it was 23 degrees, clear sky, not much frost and light cold breeze. At 230pm it was 56 degrees and mostly clear (some high wispy clouds), slight breeze. At 645pm it was 45 degrees and mostly cloudy (high thin haze and mare’s tails.) Stars out at 130am.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time October 16, 2017 at 10:00AM
Clear
Max temperature 60 degrees F
Min temperature 23 degrees F
At observation 25 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
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Oct 16 Weather:

At 10am it was 25 degrees and clear sky, skiff of snow remains in the shade. At 3pm it was 65 degres and clear. At 730pm it was 43 degrees and mostly clear. At 1230am it was 27 degrees and partly cloudy.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time October 17, 2017 at 10:00AM
High thin hazy clouds
Max temperature 67 degrees F
Min temperature 25 degrees F
At observation 28 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
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Oct 17 Weather:

At 10am it was 28 degrees, high thin hazy clouds – partly clear. At 230pm it was 67 degrees and mostly cloudy (thin). At 5pm it was 63 degrees. and overcast. At 730pm it was 49 degrees and partly clear. At 1230am it was 34 degrees, clouds.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time October 18, 2017 at 10:00AM
Mostly cloudy, melted frost
Max temperature 69 degrees F
Min temperature 27 degrees F
At observation 33 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Multi-day Accumulation No
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
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Oct 18 Weather:

At 10am it was 33 degrees, and mostly cloudy, roofs wet with melted frost and dew. At 230pm it was 63 degrees, partly clear and quite blustery. at 5pm it was 61 degrees and cloudy, not so windy. At 7pm it was 53 degrees and mostly cloudy, almost calm. At midnight it was 38 degrees and mostly cloudy. At 1am it was 36 degrees, a few hazy stars.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time October 19, 2017 at 10:00AM
High thin haze
Max temperature 65 degrees F
Min temperature 30 degrees F
At observation 34 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
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Oct 19 Weather:

At 10am it was 34 degrees, sky mostly covered with high thin haze, a few clouds, not much dew. Gusty winds around 2pm. At 245pm it was 63 degrees, mostly cloudy and windy. Blustery at 5pm. At 7pm it was 47 degrees and partly clear, much calmer. At 2am cloudy and breezy. Raining pretty good at 5am. Rain/snow mix at 950am.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time October 20, 2017 at 10:00AM
Rain turned to snow, low clouds, socked in
Max temperature 67 degrees F
Min temperature 34 degrees F
At observation 34 degrees F
Precipitation 0.23 inch
Snowfall Trace
Snow depth 0 inch
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Oct 20 Weather:

At 10am it was 34 degrees, low clouds, socked in, rain turning to snow. All snow by 1015am and starting to stick. Light snow falling at 11am. Not snowing at noon, clouds lifting. At 215pm it was 40 degrees, overcast, just the top of VanMeter in the clouds. Moderate rain from 5pm to 525pm, dark clouds. Light snow (rain?) at 540pm. Steady snowfall at 6pm and sticking. At 630pm it was 33 degrees, large snowflakes, over 1/4″ on the snow board. Slacked off to small flakes, snowing lightly at 650pm. Steady snow at 7pm. Light snow at 815pm. At 840pm it was 32 degrees, light snow. At 1245am it was 32 degrees, and steady snow. Probably stopped snowing before 2am. Not snowing at 330am. Not snowing at 630am.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time October 21, 2017 at 10:00AM
Overcast
Max temperature 43 degrees F
Min temperature 30 degrees F
At observation 31 degrees F
Precipitation 0.28 inch
Snowfall 5/8 inch
Snow depth 1/2 inch
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Oct 21 Weather:

At 10am it was 31 degrees and overcast, 5/8″ snow on board, patchy snow on ground. Getting a little breezy before 1130am, knocking snow out of the trees. Light snow falling at 1pm, not as breezy. At 2pm it was 36 degrees, overcast, light cold breeze and very light snow (tiny flakes.) Probably stopped around 3pm. Light rain started about 545pm, low clouds. Misting at 6pm. At 645pm it was 34 degrees, low clouds and light misty rain. Probably stopped raining by 9pm or so. At midnight it was 35 degrees and steady rain.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time October 22, 2017 at 10:00AM
Low overcast, light rain
Max temperature 41 degrees F
Min temperature 31 degrees F <– yesterday morning
At observation 41 degrees F
Precipitation 0.35 inch
Snowfall Trace
Snow depth 0 inch
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