Monthly Archives: November 2017

Road Report Nov 29

Note: Winter road conditions change quickly. Be prepared for snow at high elevations and rocks/trees falling in the road. Please share road reports.

Yellow Pine: We had 2.5″ of snow fall last night, local streets are snow covered. Click for Local Forecast.

Warm Lake Highway: Nov 29, mail truck driver said the highway had been plowed, however there is snow on the road and it is a bit slippery.
Big Creek Summit snowtel shows 28″ of snow.
Big Creek Summit SNOTEL station 6580′

South Fork Road: Nov 29, mail truck driver said there is snow on the road until you get down to the lower 4 or 5 miles. “Plenty of rocks.”

EFSF Road: Nov 29, mail truck driver reports the EFSF road snow free on the lower part for a few miles, then snow cover the rest of the way to Yellow Pine. “Plenty of rocks. The snow hides the pot holes.”

Johnson Creek Road: Upper end closed at Landmark to wheeled vehicles for the winter. Lower Johnson Creek road has been reported to be “terrible” with pot holes and snow.
Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam:
http://www.ruralnetwork.net/~yellowpinecm/
The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Closed for winter to wheeled vehicles.
Old report from Saturday (Nov 4) “Lick Creek summit was not passable today. Already 16 inches of snow on the flat before reaching the pass.” – J&N B

Note: Lick Creek Summit has an elevation of 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Closed for winter to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.
Big Creek Webcam:

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: (Nov 21) Open, chains advised.

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Closed at Stibnite with snow. Truck reported to be stuck for the winter on the other side of Monumental.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Closed. (This is the road that goes from Big Creek/Edwardsburg up over Elk Summer, down to the South Fork of the Salmon River by Trails End Subdivision, then over to Warrens.)
Note: Elk Summit is at an elevation of nearly 9000 feet.

Report from Burgdorf Hot Springs Thurs (Nov 23) “Although we are currently closed while the road gets more & more snow and turns into a snowmobile trail, we will be reopening Dec 21st for the winter season. Until then, we wish you the very best holiday cheer and hibernation joy!”

Deadwood Summit: No current report. Deadwood snotel showing 35″ of snow.
Note: The Approx Elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet (2,098 m)
Deadwood Summit SNOTEL station 6860′

Golden Gate Road: Closed.

Sugar Creek Road: Closed.
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Nov 26, 2017 The Yellow Pine Times

Nov 26, 2017 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Note: Thank you for your 2018 Yellow Pine Calendar orders. Folks will be notified when they are mailed.

Village News:

Thanksgiving in Yellow Pine

The annual Thanksgiving Day pot-luck was held at The Corner this year.
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Yellow Pine Tavern

Watch all of your favorite sports on our Big Screen TV at the Yellow Pine Tavern.

Featuring Football

Open 9am to 8pm (or later on game nights)

Christmas potluck will be at the Tavern. Look for further updates on the time and what the Tavern will be providing.

– L
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The Corner

The Corner is closed for the season. Stop by if you need wood permits. We will reopen after we have the baby.

– H
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Hunter’s Missing Rope

Looking for a 5/8th inch climbing rope that is white with a green stripe that was stretched across the river from the Yellow Pine Campground by the concrete bridge to the other side. of the river. It was removed while we were hunting on the far side. If you or someone know of it’s whereabouts, please leave it at the Yellow Pine Tavern for us. Thank You.
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Diamond (Kennedy) Fuel & Feed

208-382-4430

Did you know you can order pet food from Diamond Fuel & Feed and have it delivered to Yellow Pine via Arnolds? Give them a call.
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Bear Aware

It is probably safe to put bird feeders back out. Bears in our area usually hibernate by Halloween per our local F&G office.
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YPFD News:

There are YPFD T-shirts, as well as YPFD patches and stickers for sale at the Tavern now.

Training will resume in the spring.
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VYPA News:

Next meeting June 2018
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Fall Rx Burns planned

BNF:
Cascade Ranger District: Slash piles will be ignited in the following locations: Warm Lake, Yellow pine, Landmark and Crawford. It will be pile burning for two days.

PNF:
The Krassel Ranger District plans to ignite 1,600 acres in the Fourmile drainage, and 2,000 acres in the Bald Hill project area.
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook
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Local Observations:

Monday (Nov 20) rain by daylight, overcast and above freezing. Still have about 1.5″ of old snow on the ground this morning and bare patches under trees are growing. Fresh fox tracks in the neighborhood. Rain/snow mix then all snow then back to rain mid-day, clouds so low it looks foggy. No birds or wild critters around, very quiet day, high of 37 degrees. Drizzled all afternoon and evening, still sprinkling at dark. Foggy like the clouds were right down on us after 1030pm.

Tuesday (Nov 21) overnight low of 30 degrees, overcast and light fog along the river this morning. Rather low airplane went over at 1030am. Fog thickening and light rain after lunch. Misty droplets and thicker fog later in the afternoon, high of 40 degrees. Misting and foggy at dark. Probably rained all night.

Wednesday (Nov 22) it warmed up during the night to 40 degrees, fog and light misty rain this morning. The snow is going away again except in the shady spots where it’s icy. Spied a stellar jay flying over the neighborhood. Fog and misty drizzle until lunch time. Mail truck was a little late, moving rocks on the South Fork road. Break in the rain early afternoon, cracks in the clouds, high of 48 degrees. Cloudy and foggy this evening. Heard a pileated call just before dark. Around midnight the fog was “sweating” droplets of moisture (not exactly rain) and there was a clear spot overhead with Orion’s Belt twinkling.

Thursday (Nov 23) early morning passing shower, stayed above freezing overnight, low of 34 degrees. Mostly cloudy this morning, rising sun peeking thru breaks in the clouds, light fog along the river and belts of fog drifting across the flanks of the mountains. Mostly cloudy, breezy and warm for this time of year, “snow eater” winds gusty at times, high of 55 degrees. Started sprinkling late in the afternoon, hard rain after dark. Rained all night.

Friday (Nov 24) stayed above freezing, overnight low of 36 degrees. Most of our old snow is gone except in the shade. Wet month, so far over 5″ of water. Nice weather today, partly sunny and mild with very light breezes, high of 48 degrees. Clearing and temps dropping with the sun.

Saturday (Nov 25) overnight low of 22 degrees, frosty and mostly cloudy this morning. Heard a hairy woodpecker cheeping. Some traffic today including an airplane around 1030am. Overcast, damp and a chilly breeze this afternoon, high of 40 degrees. Quiet, cool, cloudy evening. Warm breezy night.

Sunday (Nov 26) warmed up during the night, cloudy and stayed above freezing. A few sprinkles on and off before and after lunch time and blustery. Steady rain this afternoon and a bit breezy, high of 56 degrees. Still raining after dark and above freezing.
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Weather Notes:

Boise set a record high temperature for Thanksgiving this year. Here is the Yellow Pine water data to see how we compared to past Thanksgivings.

YP Thanksgiving Day High/Low Temps

11-25 2010 25F / 6F
11-24 2011 41F / 29F
11-22 2012 38F / 19F
11-28 2013 41F / 17F
11-27 2014 41F / 34F
11-26 2015 33F / -2F
11-24 2016 38F / 26F
11-23 2017 55F / 36F
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Idaho News:

Cascade’s beloved ‘pie lady’ passes away

Dean Johnson, KTVB November 21, 2017


Dorothy Jean Grimaud was nicknamed the pie lady of Cascade. She was well-known for her pies. (Photo: KTVB)

Valley County has lost a legend. She was known around the state as the “pie lady,” but around Cascade, Mrs. G was known for decades as a neighbor who cared about her community and those who live there. Mrs. G passed away Monday morning from natural causes.

Whether it was reading at the local school or just being the stand-in grandma, Mrs. G did everything to support Valley County.

“She’s touched a lot of people’s hearts,” Yvette Davis, one of Mrs. G’s closest friends said.

The “pie lady” even had her own parking spot at the local American Legion Post; every week she would make a pie that would be auctioned off on Friday at the post with the proceeds going to the Coats for Kids campaign.

continued:
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Valley County sends lake rules back to drawing board

Changes on speed, age limits draws protests

By Max Silverson for The Star-News November 22, 2017

A once-approved ordinance revamping boating laws on Valley County lakes was sent back to the drawing board on Monday by Valley County commissioners.

Commissioners took no action on the proposed ordinance following a public hearing on proposed changes that would remove rules governing speed limits, operator age restrictions and protections for swimmers and kayakers on Payette Lake.

More than 15 people spoke on Monday in opposition to the proposed changes. A total of 76 emails and letters in opposition also were received, Valley County Clerk Doug Miller said.

continued:
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Two wrecks on Idaho 55 send four to hospital

The Star-News November 22, 2017

Two auto accidents in the same area of U.S. 95 west of New Meadows last week sent four people to the hospital.

Last Thursday about 3:07 p.m., a one-vehicle accident was reported about two miles south of the Evergreen Forest sawmill on U.S. 95. No other details of the accident were available.

Taken by ambulance to St. Luke’s McCall were Preston Hall, 44; Bobby Angel, 23; and Bobby and Roger Cole, 29, all of New Meadows.

Hall was transferred to St. Alphonsus Regional Medical Center in Boise, where he was released on Monday, a hospital spokesperson said.

Angel and Cole were treated at the McCall hospital and released, a hospital spokesperson said.

Last Friday at about 11:21 a.m., a car rolled over at about the same location, the sheriff’s office said.

Jessica Cason, 19, of Meridian, was taken by ambulance to St. Luke’s McCall, where she was treated and released.

No other details of the accident were available.

source:
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Update On Fatality Crash On U.S. Highway 95 South of Council

11/23/2017 Idaho State Police News Release

On Wednesday, November 22, 2017, at approximately 8:10 p.m., the Idaho State Police investigated a three-vehicle fatality crash on U.S. Highway 95 at milepost 126.2, south of Council.

A 2014 Dodge Ram 2500 was driving northbound on U.S. Highway 95 when it went to pass a vehicle in front of it. The driver sideswiped a vehicle traveling southbound, a 2006 GMC Yukon with a utility trailer, sending it off the off the west shoulder of the road about 30 feet. All five occupants of the Yukon were uninjured.

The driver of the Dodge Ram 2500 continued traveling northbound, collide head-on with a pickup that was headed southbound. The pickup caught on fire upon impact. The driver of the Dodge Ram 2500 and the two occupants of the pickup succumbed to their injuries on scene.

No names are being released at this time due to next of kin notifications are still in progress. U.S. Highway 95 was blocked in both directions for approximately 7 hours.

source:
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Whooping Cough outbreak in Ada County, health care providers on alert

Stephanie Hale-Lopez Nov 21, 2017

Boise, ID – Within the last 90 days, 14 cases of Pertussis — or Whooping Cough — have been reported in Ada County, prompting the Central District Health Department (CDHD) to issue an alert.

“Whooping cough is out there,” said Sarah Correll, epidemiologist with CDHD. “It’s having a little uptick, and we want to make sure that cases don’t get missed.”

To date, the number of whooping cough cases in Ada County is more than double compared to the same time last year.

St. Luke’s Pediatrician, Dr. Mark Uranga, says if you have a dry, lingering cough, get checked.

continued:
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Study: Idaho’s taxes the lowest in the region

by Associated Press Saturday, November 25th 2017

Boise, Idaho (AP) – A new state study shows Idaho’s overall taxes are the lowest in the region and rank 48th in the nation.

The Spokesman-Review reports the annual Tax Burden Study, which the Idaho State Tax Commission has prepared each year since the 1970s, shows that Idaho’s total state and local tax burden per person ranks 48th among the 50 states plus the District of Columbia, and falls 29.6 percent below the U.S. average. It’s the lowest among 11 Western states.

The state’s tax burden relative to income – an important difference because Idaho incomes are much lower than most states -l ranks 37th nationally and 10th among the 11 Western states. It comes in 11 percent below the national average.

Idaho politicians, including Gov. Butch Otter and all three of the leading GOP candidates to succeed him in next year’s election, are calling for cutting Idaho’s personal and corporate income tax rates.

source:
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Hack Alert:

Hackers may be watching your home cameras

How to keep prying eyes away from your family

Nov 22, 2017 KIVI TV

Home video monitors are in almost every home these days.

We have baby cams, nanny cams and video doorbells to catch those holiday package thieves.

… but experts say an unsecured camera can make you more vulnerable.

… “With an unsecured video camera, someone half a world away can watch whatever you are doing in your home, such as grabbing a beer out of your fridge, or even worse,” Garcia said.

Garcia said thieves can target it locally by hacking into your Wi-Fi signal if you live in an apartment building, or via the cloud if your camera system sends a live image to your smartphone.

full story:
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Letter to Share:

Sen Risch Letter to USDA Sec Perdue Re: Wilderness Airstrips

Nov 16, 2017

link to PDF file:
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Public Lands:

Lowman Ranger District temporarily closes Clear Creek Road for public Safety

Contact: Venetia Gempler (208) 373-4105
Date: 11/24/2017

Boise, Idaho, November 24, 2017–The Clear Creek road [National Forest System (NFS) road 582] will be closed for public safety while roadside hazard trees are removed. The road closure begins at Idaho State Highway 21 and continues to the junction of NFS road 510 from Dec. 1, 2017, through March 31, 2018, unless rescinded earlier by the Forest Supervisor.

Local landowners and their guests, who want to access their private property along Clear Creek are exempt from this order. For specific information about this order, follow the link below and scroll down to the Lowman Ranger District.

All motorists are reminded to drive defensively since they may encounter increased traffic from logging trucks in the area and along the Banks to Lowman road (Forest Highway 17).

Forest visitors should be prepared since weather conditions this time of the year can be very unpredictable. Carry extra provisions and let someone know about your travel plans.

Before venturing into a burned area, look for posted warning signs or current closure orders and be aware of your surroundings.

A detailed description of the closure is attached. For this, and all Boise National Forest area closures visit: https://www.fs.usda.gov/alerts/boise/alerts-notices

Road Closure Map:
Closure Order:
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State attorneys general bash plan to hike national park fees

AP Nov 22, 2017

A group of state attorneys general is urging the National Park Service to scrap its proposed entrance fee hike at 17 popular national parks.

The top government lawyers from 10 states and the District of Columbia sent a letter Wednesday saying they don’t want national parks to be “places only for the wealthy.” All the signers are Democrats except for Arizona’s Mark Brnovich.

The Park Service is accepting public comments on the plan, which would more than double the fee to $70 per vehicle at some of the most-visited parks. They include Grand Canyon, Yosemite, Yellowstone, Acadia and Shenandoah.

You can submit comments HERE.

The AGs say the increase is inconsistent with the laws governing the park system. They also question the rationale, saying President Donald Trump has proposed reducing the service’s overall budget.

source:
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Jackson objects to national park fee hike

Nov 22, 2017 – Local News 8

Jackson, Wyo. (KIFI/KIDK) – The Jackson Town Council says it was caught by surprise when it got a look at the National Park Service plan to more than double entrance fees at Grand Teton and Yellowstone National Parks.

And, in a letter to Grand Teton National Park Superintendent David Vela, the council said the proposal came after no public process.

The council stated it opposed the proposed rate increase and the associated impacts it would have on the community and access to public lands.

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Mining News:

Yellowstone mining opponents press Gianforte to join cause

AP Nov 21, 2017

Billings, Mont. (AP) – Opponents of two gold mines proposed near Yellowstone National Park are pressing Montana U.S. Rep. Greg Gianforte to sponsor legislation that would withdraw public lands in the area from future mining.

A coalition of businesses and conservation groups on Tuesday said the Republican’s support was crucial to making permanent a temporary mining ban enacted last year on 47 square miles of land outside Yellowstone.

A Yellowstone-area mining ban bill sponsored by Democrat U.S. Sen. Jon Tester is stalled in the Senate in the face of Republican opposition.

Gianforte and Republican U.S. Sen. Steve Daines have said they support the concept of a permanent ban. But they say there needs to be something for the other side and have criticized lawsuits blocking mines in northwest Montana despite local support.

source:
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Photo and Link to Share:

Idaho Game Bird Foundation

11/21/2017

2017IGFphesant-a

“Take a look at this happy little girl. This is what it is all about and makes the time spent well worth it.”

“Whiskers”
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The Game Bird Foundation is now on Facebook
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Critter News:

Your Pet 2Day: Pets and cold weather

by Bryan Levin Friday, November 24th 2017

video:
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Abandoned pets found in Lake Lowell area

Gretchen Parsons, KTVB November 20, 2017

Boise – Animals, mostly cats, are being found in the Lake Lowell area.

Sadly, a resident who lives nearby says the area has become a increasingly popular disposal site for unwanted pets.

Melissa Blackmer moved to the Lake Lowell area two years ago. She began to notice an unusual amount of stray cats, many of them were surprisingly friendly.

“They are definitely people’s pets, they are friendly, they will often just walk up to you, they are hungry. Feral cats don’t tend to warm up to people,” Blackmer says.

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Canyon County family reunited with service dog

The family searched for Charlie for several days

Steve Bertel, Anna Silver Nov 22, 2017 KIVI TV

Canyon County – A special dog was found on Tuesday morning after the owners and community members searched for her in Canyon County since Friday.

Charlie is a service dog to Monique Ortuno’s special needs daughter who has autism and sometimes stops breathing at night.

The family recently moved to Idaho from California and were desperate to find her.

Nampa police, animal control, and dozens of volunteers helped look for the dog, even setting a non-lethal trap near the Centennial Golf Course in Nampa where she had been spotted.

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Trappers ask court to throw out lawsuit over US fur exports

By Matthew Brown – 11/23/17 AP

Billings, Mont. — Fur trappers are asking a federal judge to throw out a lawsuit from wildlife advocates who want to block the export of bobcat pelts from the United States.

Attorneys for trapping organizations said in recent court filings that the lawsuit against the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service infringes on the authority of state and tribal governments to manage their wildlife.

The plaintiffs in the case allege the government’s export program doesn’t protect against the accidental trapping of imperiled species such as Canada lynx.

More than 30,000 bobcat pelts were exported in 2015, the most recent year for which data was available, according to wildlife officials. The pelts typically are used to make fur garments and accessories. Russia, China, Canada and Greece are top destinations, according to a trapping industry representative and government reports.

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Wildlife Services urges ranchers to report all cattle deaths

11/20/17 AP

Sun Valley, Idaho — USDA Wildlife Services in Idaho is asking ranchers to report all cattle deaths and leave the carcass undisturbed in an effort to preserve evidence and help investigators confirm a wolf depredation.

The Capital Press reports Idaho State Director of USDA Wildlife Services Todd Grimm said during the Idaho Cattle Association’s annual convention that ranchers who come across a dead cow with no outward signs of cause of death shouldn’t assume the cause. The animal’s death could have been caused by a wolf.

Wildlife services has confirmed 750 wolf depredations in cattle in the past 22 years, affecting 400 producers in 32 counties in Idaho. But Grimm says the science indicates for every wolf killing confirmed, there are probably six or seven more.

source:
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KWVR Oregon Wolf Education weekly Wolf Report

Third Week of November 2017
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Wolves’ return to Oregon brings conflict and opportunity

By Gillian Flaccus – 11/23/17 AP

Portland, Ore. — Wolves were once so plentiful in the abundant forests that would become Oregon that the earliest settlers gathered from far and wide to discuss how to kill them.

Those “wolf meetings” in the 1840s, spawned by a common interest, eventually led to the formation of the Oregon territory, the precursor for statehood in 1859.

Today, Oregon’s statehood is secure, but the future of its wolf population once more hangs in the balance. Wolves have returned after decades, and this time, humans are having a much more contentious discussion about what to do with them.

It’s a political debate playing out against the backdrop of a rapidly growing wolf population, a jump in wolf poaching and demands from ranchers and hunters who say the predators are decimating herds and spooking big game.

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Wolf Education International

Newsletter 11/25/2017

Surge of wolf killings isn’t organized effort

Wolf cub hybrids face the chopping block in Germany

Germany’s wolf population on the rise, new data shows

The Language of Wolves
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NRA, hunting group say grizzly bear hunts needed for safety

By Matthew Brown – 11/25/17 AP

Billings, Mont. — The National Rifle Association and a sport hunting group want to ensure their members can hunt grizzly bears in the three-state region around Yellowstone National Park after the animals lost U.S. protections.

Idaho, Montana and Wyoming are considering limited trophy hunts for grizzlies outside the park in future years after the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service revoked the species’ threatened status in July.

Conservation groups have sued to restore protections, and now the NRA and Safari Club International have asked U.S. District Judge Dana Christensen to let them intervene in the case.

Several of the groups’ members said in affidavits submitted by their attorneys that hunting would help the region’s economy, allow states to better manage the animals and improve public safety.

continued:
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Black bears back in eastern Nevada after 80-year absence

By Scott Sonner – 11/26/17 AP

Reno, Nev. — More than 500 black bears have returned to parts of their historic range in the Great Basin of Nevada where the species disappeared about 80 years ago, scientists say.

A new study says genetic testing confirms the bears are making their way east from the Sierra ranges north and south of Lake Tahoe along the California line.

In some cases, recent generations have moved hundreds of miles to sites near the Utah line, marking a rare example of large mammals recolonizing areas where they’d been wiped out.

“The recovery of large carnivores is relatively rare globally,” said Jon Beckmann, a conservation scientist for the Wildlife Conservation Society in Bozeman, Montana, who co-authored the new study.

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Group tracks wildlife movement with cameras in Targhee Pass

11/24/17 AP

Idaho Falls, Idaho — An environmental group is documenting the movement of wildlife through the Targhee Pass on the Idaho-Montana border in an effort to push for the construction of safe wildlife passages.

The Post Register reports the group Yellowstone to Yukon has deployed 14 motion-activated wildlife cameras that have captured more than 5,000 photos of wildlife mostly near U.S. Highway 20.

Program director Kim Trotter says the group hopes to provide the information collected from the cameras to the Idaho Transportation Department in order to identify sites for wildlife overpasses.

Trotter says many different kinds of animals traverse the Targhee Pass area and many of the animals use the same pathways.

Trotter says the group was inspired by similar overpass projects in Wyoming that have reduced the number of car wrecks involving animals.

source:
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Researchers study the genetics of bighorn sheep

By Eric Barker – 11/25/17 AP

Lewiston, Idaho — Bighorn sheep living in decades past along Idaho’s Salmon River from Riggins to its East and Middle forks far upstream were more genetically diverse, and the different groups of sheep there were more connected with each other, compared to sheep populations of today.

A University of Idaho researcher made the determination by analyzing genetic samples taken from wild sheep skulls and horns that are part of the Carrey-Boggan Collection on display at the Jack O’Connor Hunting Heritage and Education Center at Lewiston.

Lisette Waits, a professor and researcher at the university’s College of Natural Resources at Moscow, led a team that compared the genetics of the sheep in the collection with samples taken from contemporary populations. They wanted to know how the genetic makeup of the sheep has changed over the years, particularly in response to severe population declines brought on by things like habitat degradation and disease introduced by domestic sheep.

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BLM reopens Boise Wild Horse Corral

Date: November 22, 2017
Contact: Michael Williamson 208-384-3393

Boise, Idaho – The Bureau of Land Management has reopened the Boise Wild Horse Corral for wild horse and burro adoptions and public visits. The corral had been temporarily closed since May due to an outbreak of strangles, an equine form of distemper.

About 75 percent of the facility’s horses became infected with the highly contagious condition, and all have fully recovered. The BLM has consulted with a local horse veterinarian and has determined that the appropriate wait time has elapsed since the last symptoms were detected, and it is now safe for the corral to reopen and adoptions to resume.

“Our priority was for the safety of our facility’s horses and to take all precautions to prevent the disease from being transmitted to privately-owned horses,” said Raul Trevino, BLM Boise corral manager. “We’ve worked closely with the veterinarian and we believe the disease has run its course. People interested in adopting a horse or burro are now encouraged to call for an appointment.”

For more information on adoptions and events, please contact Raul Trevino at (208) 896-5915 or rtrevino@blm.gov.

The BLM encourages interested individuals to visit BLM.gov to learn more about the program and providing a good home for an unadopted or unsold animal. To contact the Wild Horse and Burro information center, please call 866-4MUSTANGS (866-468-7826) or email wildhorse@blm.gov
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Federal court blocks sheep grazing in eastern Idaho

11/21/17 AP

Boise, Idaho — A federal court has blocked thousands of domestic sheep from being released to graze in eastern Idaho where environmental groups say they jeopardize a small herd of bighorn sheep with deadly viruses.

U.S. Magistrate Judge Candy Dale on Monday granted the temporary restraining order sought by Western Watersheds Project and WildEarth Guardians in a lawsuit filed last month against the U.S. Forest Service.

The groups contend the grazing of sheep owned by the University of Idaho via permits issued to the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Sheep Experiment Station risks transmitting diseases to bighorn sheep.

Dale in the 31-page ruling says the environmental groups established the likelihood of irreparable harm to the bighorns.

source:
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Forest Service weighs changes to protections for sage grouse

By Keith Ridler – 11/22/17 AP

Boise, Idaho — The U.S. Forest Service is rethinking protection plans for sage grouse in six Western states after a U.S. court agreed with mining companies that the agency illegally created some safeguards in Nevada.

The agency announced Tuesday that it’s working with the U.S. Bureau of Land Management, which also is reviewing its plans for the struggling bird following an order by Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke.

Forest Service spokesman John Shivik says the coordinated review makes sense two years after federal officials decided the chicken-sized bird shouldn’t receive endangered-species protections. But the government did impose restrictions on land use.

The agency is taking public comments in Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Utah, Colorado and Wyoming through Jan. 5. It says it will review the input before deciding if changes are needed to its plans.

source:
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Fish & Game News:

There’s still time left to buy a 2017 hunting license, and hunt with it

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Specialist
Wednesday, November 22, 2017

Buying will get you in Price Lock and give you plenty of hunting opportunities in December.

It’s late in the year, and if you haven’t bought your 2017 hunting license, you’re either among the world’s great procrastinators, or haven’t found time to hunt yet. While it might sound silly to buy a 12-month license with weeks left, it’s not as silly as you might think this year.

First, there’s Fish and Game’s Price Lock, which means if you buy any annual license in 2017, you’re locked into the same prices for all 2018 hunting, fishing and trapping licenses and permits. Otherwise, most resident license and tag prices will increase about 20 percent.

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Commission keeps rule for prepayment to apply for moose, sheep and goat tags

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Specialist
Monday, November 20, 2017

Commissioners also delay sale of nonresident Sawtooth Elk Zone tags

Idaho Fish and Game commissioners on Nov. 17 rescinded a proposed rule that would allow hunters to forego prepaying moose, bighorn sheep and mountain goat tags when applying for those controlled hunts in the spring.

Those hunts will remain under the existing rules, which means residents and nonresidents must pay the application fee and tag fee to apply, as well as have a valid hunting license.

Application fees for moose, bighorn sheep and mountain goats will increase in 2018 to $16.75 for residents and $41.75 for nonresidents, which was part of the legislation passed in 2017 that included hikes for nearly all resident hunting, fishing and trapping licenses, tags and permits.

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F&G News Releases

https://idfg.idaho.gov/press
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Fun Critter Stuff:

Bear steals unlucky Michigan hunter’s 6-point buck

Max White Nov 22, 2017

Alcona County, Mich. (WXYZ) – A Michigan hunter had just snagged a nice 6-point buck last week when his trophy was taken away by a bear.

John Wardynski, from Bay City, Michigan, posted the video of the bear taking the buck away on his Facebook page.

continued w/video:
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BearRetriever-a
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Seasonal Humor:

OldElkCar-a
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Idaho History November 26, 2017

1940’s Big Creek / Edwardsburg

Independence Mine 1940s

Independence-Mine-1940s-a(click image for larger size)

“The Independence cabin some time in the 1940s, not sure who the man in the pic is.”

– photo courtesy Sandy McRae
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1940 Census Big Creek Edwardsburg Precinct

1940BigCreekCensus-a(click image for full size)

Name Sex Age Marital Status Relationship to Head of Household Birthplace Birth Year

Claude M Taylor Male 54 Married Head Colorado 1886
Elsie E Taylor Female 43 Married Wife Idaho 1897
Roland A Clark Male 29 Single Head North Carolina 1911
Willard V Wiles Male 24 Single Partner Iowa 1916
Thomas Brummett Male 60 Widowed Head Texas 1880
Orville Jackson Male 50 Single Head Washington 1890
Robert Rentahl Male 46 Single Partner Idaho 1894
Alfred O Ricksen Male 30 Married Head Norway 1910
Annabelle Ricksen Female 18 Married Wife Washington 1922
Annette Ricksen Female 0 Single Daughter Washington 1940
John Mclean Male 53 Widowed Lodger Scotland 1887
Jacob Janson [Jensen]Male 66 Single Head Finland 1874
Erik Janson [Jensen] Male 76 Single Brother Finland 1864
George H Mccoy Male 27 Married Head Idaho 1913
Marion Manis Male 29 Married Head Idaho 1911
Grace Manis Female 38 Married Wife Idaho 1902
Richard H Cowman Male 34 Married Head Canada Alberta 1906
Sophia M Cowman Female 30 Married Wife New Jersey 1910
Mary C Cowman Female 0 Single Daughter Idaho 1940
Miles Howard Male 67 Widowed Lodger Arkansas 1873
Wade M Justin Male 34 Married Head Iowa 1906
Helen Austin Female 29 Married Wife Colorado 1911
Eleanor Austin Female 5 Single Daughter Idaho 1935
Beverly Austin Female 3 Single Daughter Idaho 1937
Ronald Austin Male 1 Single Son Idaho 1939
Louis Butler Male 40 Married Head Nevada 1900
Letha Butler Female 25 Married Wife Oregon 1915
Delva Butler Female 4 Single Daughter Idaho 1936
Darla Jean Butler Female 4 Single Daughter Idaho 1936
Dan C McRae Male 63 Married Head Minnesota 1877
Grace McRae Female 54 Married Wife Idaho 1886
James E Collord Male 29 Married Son-in-law Idaho 1911
Mar Collord Female 28 Married Daughter Idaho 1912
Grace K Collord Female 2 Single Granddaughter Idaho 1938
William A Edwards Male 71 Widowed Head Georgia 1869
Napier Edwards Male 41 Single Son Maryland 1899
William Lotspeich Male 66 Single Head Mississippi 1874
Linsey Smith Male 35 Widowed Head Washington 1905
Joe Davis Male 70 Single Head Washington 1870

source: Family Search (requires sign-in)
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Big Creek (Gold)

Prospecting of the Salmon River mountains increased considerably after the Sheepeater War of 1879, and organization of Alton district on Big Creek, June 15, 1885, extended mining from Warren’s east into that region. Although there were a number of prospects on upper Big Creek, the main production was realized at the Snowshoe which yielded $400,000 between 1906 and 1942.

source: “Mining in Idaho 1860-1969” by Ernest Oberbillig, Idaho State Historical Society Number 9 1985
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Charlie with Danny and Wanda LeVan at Big Creek

Photo from “The Middle Fork and the Sheepeater War” by Johnny Carrey and Cort Conley – copyright 1977
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Snowshoe Mine

“The Snowshoe Mine Is The Most Important Mineral Property In The Ramey Ridge District. It Is In Snowshoe Gulch, On The North Side Of Crooked Creek, About 19 Miles By Rough Single-Lane Road From Big Creek Idaho. Workings Also Extends Into Valley County.”

source: Western Mining History
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Snowshoe Mine

by Fred Fred Bachich

(first trip 1926, this story from second trip)

… We went on down Monumental Creek and ran into packstrings down on Big Creek that were hauling supplies into the Snowshoe Mine, which had developed into quite a property at that time. It recalls the old Jensen boys who had sold this mine and our earlier trip through there.

from “Yellow Pine, Idaho” complied by Nancy G. Sumner Pg 64
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Blackie Wallace packing pipe to the Snowshoe Mine on Crooked Creek, tributary of Big Creek. The rig could carry two lengths of pipe.

Photo from “The Middle Fork and the Sheepeater War” by Johnny Carrey and Cort Conley – copyright 1977
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Jensen Brothers and The Snowshoe Mine

by Duane Petersen from information provided by Ron and Myrna Smith

When the gold rush hit the Salmon River Mountains in the 1800’s, the miners came from everywhere; the gold fields of California, Nevada and from about every country of the world to strike it rich. Two of these men, Eric and Jake Jensen, were more into following the booming camps for reasons other than mining. Both were professional gamblers earning their money from cards rather than a pick and shovel.

In 1889 they, along with their sister Olga, had migrated from Finland to the United States. Their sister didn’t like the idea of the rugged mining camps and decided to stay in Fort Bragg, California. The two young men ended up in Grangeville in the Idaho Territory. From there they followed the new gold strikes and camps, first to the Buffalo Hump area, then on into the Thunder Mountain District. Here they found the boom-town of Roosevelt in which to ply their trade. To say they only gambled wouldn’t be right. They did do a lot of prospecting, but the gambling supported them. It is said that somewhere in this area Eric was in a big poker game. In one pot he bet a bear hide and $100 against a quit claim deed for claims on Crooked Creek. Eric won, and that was the start of the Jensens living in Crooked Creek and the beginning of the Snowshoe Mine. The first winter the brothers trapped to help keep grub on the table and worked to get the mine ready to operate the following summer.

The Snowshoe mine is located about eighteen miles north east down Big Creek from what was then called Edwardsburg. It was later changed to Big Creek headquarters. The Snowshoe Mine was located along the route from Warren to the Thunder Mountain mining region. With a large enough open area, it was served not only by a trail, which later became a road. In later years, the mine also had air service.

In those first years Eric traveled south to California with his fiddle to spend the winter. Play his way south with the fiddle and cards, he would then try to save up a nest egg to buy supplies for the summer back on Crooked Creek. It was told by a good friend that one year things didn’t work out too well, so come spring Eric wired Jake for money to come home. When Jake got the message back at the mine, he wired his brother back: “You fiddled your way to California; you can fiddle your way back.” In the mean time, Jake was working alone to get the mine ready to operate. He was a master builder with almost any material. When Eric was at the mine, Eric did the cooking, house cleaning and mucking in the mine.

The brothers moved down to Crooked Creek where they first met and befriended John Routsen. John had a ranch about seven miles from the Snowshoe Mine. John was looked upon by neighbors as the country doctor of the area. He had very little formal training but was always ready and willing to help, sometimes at the risk of his own life. John noticed that many of his patients were people suffering from a tooth ache. So on one trip out Routsen consulted with a dentist in Weiser. The man was very helpful. He gave John two forceps, one for using on the smaller front teeth, and another one for the bigger teeth. Then the dentist spent time showing John how they should be used.

Once back in his mountain home it wasn’t long before word got around that John could pull teeth. Soon John had removed several teeth for local neighbors. Most of their teeth were almost gone before they ever came to have them removed. To ease the pain, John only had a jug of whiskey on hand that he freely gave out before the tooth was pulled.

Noel Routsen, a son of John’s, wrote stories in a newspaper about his dad. He said that whenever a person came to get a tooth pulled John always sent the kids away. Of course, like all kids they never got very far away. They usually hid somewhere close by where they could watch the show. Even with the whiskey beforehand, the squirming, screaming and shouting was a good show for the kids. The patient would be down on his back, usually out in the yard. Then, with John holding their arms with his knees, his left hand was placed on his or her forehead. The forceps were held in his right hand, and put in place deep down on the tooth. The dentist had shown him just how to twist to get the right leverage. Like everything else John did for the people of that region, he never charged a dime for his services.

Noel wrote that one patient was Eric (Spider) Jensen. He showed up one day with a badly ulcerated tooth and wanted John to pull it. After two water glasses of whiskey, Eric decided his tooth felt fine. He didn’t need it pulled, especially after he saw the forceps in his neighbor’s hand.

The Jensens were what the people called “Russian Finns”. They spoke with quite an accent. With a little whiskey, Eric’s speech usually got worse. Telling John his “toot” felt better, he added, “brutter Yake is a bleeder.” He said he might be the same and could bleed to “det”. He went back down the trail singing a Russian song.

A week later Eric showed up again complaining about his tooth. He begged John to pull it. Again, after a couple glasses of whiskey he tried to back out. This time John held strong, “all you want is to drink my whiskey we use for medicinal purposes. Now, this time the tooth is coming out.” Sure enough it did. Eric never did bleed to “det” either.

In December 1915 was another occasion the Routsens were awakened in the night by dogs outside raising all kinds of hell. When John opened the door Eric was calling as he ran towards the house, “John, John, John! Come quick, my ‘brudder’ Yake is dying.” Before John could find out more, Eric was heading back down the trail calling for John to hurry. John finally got him somewhat calmed down and, after much pleading, found out what was wrong with Jake. ‘Yake’ hadn’t had a bowel movement in two weeks. He was running a high fever and was out of his head. John packed up some supplies and tried to follow the little man back to the Snowshoe Mine. John was a good traveler on snow shoes after traveling this country for many years delivering mail, but this night he couldn’t keep up with the little miner. Eric raced ahead calling back for John to hurry. They made the seven-mile trip from Routsen’s to the Jensen cabin over the narrow, icy, steep trail in one and a half hours. John was able, with use of many a mountain home cure, to get Jake back on his feet.

In February of the [next] year the Routsen’s family saw something coming down the trail that was hard to figure out. When they figured it out, it was Eric in a harness pulling a queer looking sled. Following it was Jake steering the sled with handle bars. It turned out to be an old fashioned baby cradle. It would have made many a furniture maker jealous. John’s son, Noel said, “My mother was pregnant at the time. The cradle was Eric and Jake Jensen’s way of saying thank you to dad for his efforts in saving Jake’s life.”

When talking of the Jensen brothers you can’t leave out Eric and his fiddle. Whenever there was a party, Eric would show up with his violin in a case slung over his shoulder. To him he was without a doubt one of the best fiddlers of that time! As Noel said, “Eric and his fiddle to us kids meant some good entertainment was ahead. It wasn’t he played that good, it was just fun to watch him play.” He added, “at times the kids would sneak off to the bedroom to laugh so they wouldn’t hurt his feelings.” On one occasion Noel’s ten-year-old brother Emmit asked him to play Turkey in the Straw. Eric turned to the boy very indignant to say, “you nincompoop, I just got through playing that.” This brought down the place with laughter.

Over the next few years the Snowshoe Mine grew. It now had a water-powered mill, built by Jake with Eric’s help. The water wheels and belt pulley were hand built of wood. All joints were doweled, not a nail or bolt was used. The craftsmanship was almost unreal because of the tools they had to work with. Eric’s favorite statement when anyone was talking about Jake was, “My brudder, Yake, is a yeenus.”

By the 1920’s the mine was having good and bad years. Like most mines they had good ore and then would run into streaks of poor ore. About the time they were ready to give up they would hit a hot pocket of rich ore. Then things were great again. The ore at the Snowshoe usually was around $20 to $50 dollars a ton (gold was $35 an ounce). During this time, investors would buy and lease out the smaller mines. The Snowshoe wasn’t any different than the other mines. Payments would be missed and the mine repossessed, to be sold again to someone else.

A story in the Okanogan County Rancher in 1936 mentioned the Snowshoe Mine. It stated that, “H.T. Maib and Thomas W. Nevitt recently packed a stock of supplies into their gold mine, the Snowshoe, located 27 miles south of the Salmon River near the old Thunder Mountain camp. Nevitt is a resident of Clarkston and former superintendent of schools. Consulting Engineer E.J. Daily of Seattle recently completed a five-week inspection of the property and will submit his report soon. The Snowshoe Mine has been in operation for two years past, during which time from eight to forty-two men have been constantly employed. The average value of the ore is $32 per ton in gold. The mill on the property will start running about June 1st, when the number of employees will increase to twenty men. This is the property that gained a good deal of publicity last winter when food was dropped from a plane into the mine due to the camp being snowbound and short of supplies.”

The last buyer, in 1936, who paid the Jensens in full was Pierce Metals Development Company. They paid $50,000 for the mine. Between 1902 and 1942 the Snowshoe Mine produced somewhere around $400,000 in gold. It also produced Silver and Copper. The Jensens developed another mine not far from the Snowshoe Mine. They named it the Yellow Jacket. After possibly many other owners, this claim was sold to a Mr. Scott. In the 1980’s it was still being worked.

Noel Routsen and one of his brothers sold a mine they had started between the Yellow Jacket and the Snowshoe that they called the Buckhorn. They got $3000 for the claim.

Many people were neighbors and friends of the Jensens. Besides the Routsen family, there was Jess Root and the famous cougar hunter who was known as “Uncle” Dave Lewis. Lewis lived at the place on Big Creek now called the Taylor Ranch. It is currently owned by the University of Idaho.

In 1939 Lafe and Emma Cox came into the area as newlyweds. Lafe subcontracted the 45 mile mail route from Yellow Pine down to Cabin Creek. They lived at Mile High and when Lafe was busy Emma would deliver the mail. Her route was from Yellow Pine Post Office to the Post Office at Big Creek. The mail would be separated and sorted for delivery to all the mines and families on down Big Creek. By this time a road had been build from Edwardsburg to the Snowshoe Mine so when she could, Emma delivered the mail in their pickup truck. The road was very narrow and not much wider than the pickup. Emma wrote in her book about her and Lafe’s lives, that when they started a family she had a crib alongside her in the cab and her baby, Janet, went with her. On her trip to the mine she had to cross over two very narrow bridges with little or no railings. She dreaded crossing them whenever they were covered with snow or frost. People at the mine knew when she was to arrive, so they traveled the road accordingly.

Emma says she wishes now that she had written down many of the stories they [Jensen brothers] told her. From listening to Emma talk about Jake and Eric, I think the feelings were mutual about how they felt about each other. The mail route on down to Cabin Creek was either by horse-back or walking.

Several miners who worked at the Snowshoe Mine over the years have told stories and written about their lives there. One of these men was Loyal (Red) Rice. Red had been working in the Coulter Tunnel at Cornucopia, Oregon. The rock was hard to drill, and the tunnel was very wet. After losing a finger on his right hand, he decided the hole was “deep enough”, as the miners would say when they were ready to quit. He went to work at the Snowshoe Mine as the underground foreman in the late 1930’s.

During this same time Red talked of having bad teeth. Friends called a dentist in Cascade to fly in and pull all of his teeth. He worked the graveyard shift, then walked eighteen miles up to Big Creek Headquarters. The dentist pulled all twenty-six teeth at one time. Red spent the night then walked back to the mine the next day in time to go back on his graveyard shift. He wrote later, “It’s a wonder I didn’t land in the graveyard by trying to prove how tough I was!” Because of stories like these, we realize what life was like for men working in these remote mines.

Fred Bachich, a long time resident of Yellow Pine wrote an article about the Snowshoe Mine for Nancy Sumners’ Yellow Pine book. He talked about the craftsmanship of the Jensens in building the mill at the mine. He seems to have the brothers’ names and abilities sometimes mixed up.

Fred stated, “They had dug a ditch around the mountainside for at least a mile to get a head of water for the overshot waterwheel. This overshot waterwheel was about 12 feet in diameter and made of hand hewed lagging. Jake had hand hewed these boards about 2 inches thick. This wheel fitted together very beautifully and was doweled. There wasn’t a nail in it any place. This wheel had a small bull wheel on it and flat belt that drove the bull wheel and a one-stamp mill. A very symmetrical and beautiful job. That little one-stamp mill they had there, I have no idea where they got it. The only metal in the whole thing was the battery, the stamp and naturally the shoes, dies, camshaft and the amalgamating plate.”

excerpted from: Jensen Brothers and The Snowshoe Mine by Duane Petersen from information provided by Ron and Myrna Smith, “Pans, Picks & Shovels – Mining in Valley County, Idaho”, Valley County History Project. Pages 27-34
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Emma’s Mail Run (1940’s)

by Emma Cox
from “Idaho Mountains Our Home” by Lafe and Emma Cox – Copyright 1977 by V.O. Ranch Books pgs. 99-108

That spring [1942] Lafe subcontracted a mail contract. The mail was to be delivered from Yellow Pine to the Big Creek post office, then on down Big Creek to the Snowshoe Mine and on down a trail from there to Cabin Creek. The contract was for 45 miles, to be traveled by auto when accessible, in summer and early fall. In the winter mail was flown in by Penn Stohr from the airfield at Cascade to Big Creek, to be taken the rest of the way by horseback, dog team or team and sleigh.

We purchased a pickup to deliver from Yellow Pine to the Snowshoe Mine. The baby and I rode along with Lafe so I could learn the route, as he had to deliver up a few side roads to places I had never seen. We knew I would have to be the substitute driver when hunting season opened.

That fall Lafe catered to his hunting parties and would be gone a week to ten days at a time. We had a tent house at Jake and Eric Jensen’s place on Crooked Creek neat the Snowshoe Mine. A book should have been written on these two fine Finlanders who had built their home and other outbuildings on their property. They were both skilled carpenters, log home builders, cooks — you name it. It was interesting to hear of their experiences and stories about the time they operated a saloon at Roosevelt. They were always very careful how they expressed themselves in front of me. They were such gentlemen!

When Lafe was hunting, I drove to Yellow Pine to pick up the mail, … I delivered mail and freight from the Yellow Pine post office to the Big Creek post office, where it was sorted and put in mail sacks for each of the individuals along the way, and for the 12 to 18 employees at the Snowshoe Mine.

The road was narrow. At one point, above the transfer camp, was an incline where you could not see over the hood of your pickup. You had to know which way the road turned. I also had to drive across two bridges, that I often think about today. The bridges had very little railing and the logs were laid crosswise. When the first frost came, this was dangerous. It was always bumpy — rough driving over. About the only time the baby was disturbed was when we crossed these two bridges, due to the roughness and noise. The stream at Big Creek was almost the size of some rivers. I always breathed a sigh of relief when I reached the other side.

The miners always knew when I was coming. If their trucks were coming out with loads, they always waited at a turnout for me.

The people at the mine were always glad to see me come. Perhaps they were concerned with my driving — I will never know. However, they really looked forward to their mail. Someone was always there to help me unload the mail and freight, as at that time everyone ordered through the Montgomery Ward and Sears, Roebuck and Co. catalogs. In the spring they ordered seed from the catalogues to plant in their gardens.

On mail days everyone at the mine gathered at the large dining room table, where the mail was sorted out. While this was going on, Mrs. Rodman, the cook, always had a cup of hot cocoa and a piece of pie or cake for me. I could also warm up the baby’s bottle on her stove.

The caretaker at Mile High met me at the mine to pick up the ongoing mail down Big Creek, which was only accessible by horses. He delivered to the Phil Beal ranch, Cabin Creek and Mile High, which at one time was a designated post office called Clover. In early days settlers came there for their mail. When we sold the ranch many years later, the post office pigeonhole cabinet was still hanging on the wall.

In the summer we delivered the mail every Tuesday and Friday; the rest of the time it was just once a week. Otherwise the baby and I stayed at Jensen’s place awaiting Lafe’s return from his hunting trips.

In November the snow on the summit got too deep for the pickup. Even though we had a compound gear, it was too hard on the vehicle.

Johnson’s Flying Service based in Cascade had the contract to fly the mail directly to Big Creek airfield. Penn Stohr did the flying. He was not only a great pilot, he was a wonderful person.

Before the snow got too deep …, Lafe picked up the mail by auto. On the way to the mine he had to make a stop at Copper Camp and Little Ramey cabin. The others who lived along the route had gone out for the winter.

It was typical snow country and each day we watched it pile up. Some days a real blizzard would blow. As the snow accumulated, we knew it was set in for the winter.

The next trip, Lafe got as far as Little Ramey, where he had to leave the sleigh. It would stay where he left it until spring, as there was too much snow. He loaded the outgoing mail onto one of the work horses and rode the other, continuing his trip to the Big Creek Post Office.

Soon it was time for Lafe to make another mail run. He started out by riding one of the work horses and packing the other, but after several tries, he could see he couldn’t make it. So he took the horses back to the mouth of Crooked Creek and started them back up the road to our cabin at the mine. He left the riding and pack saddles at the Little Ramey cabin to be picked up later. He put a pack sack with the outgoing mail on his back and webbed up to Big Creek. The trip took him two days. It was real arduous going with snow falling hard. In places the drifted snow was three to four feet deep.

From Copper Camp, Lafe phoned to tell me the team would be coming in sometime that night. I put hay and grain in their feed boxes in the barn, thinking they would go right in to the hay.

For Lafe’s next return trip back, he had rented three dogs and their harness from an old timer living near Big Creek. With so much snow, he needed a dog team to travel. He also called his dad, asking Clark to try to locate some good dogs with harness and have them flown in with the coming mail plane.

Clark sent a good lead dog and two others. With the dogs the old timer had given him, and his own dog, that gave Lafe seven dogs, which were what he needed for some of the loads that went to the mine.

On the crank Forest Service phone in our cabin, I could talk to Lafe in Big Creek. He called real often to check on the baby and me.

With lots of snow, Lafe made weekly trips by dog team. Sometimes the weather would warm up and cause snow slides. You had to keep an eye on the mountain above the trail in case a slide came in. That year there were several small slides and two or three large ones. The dogs all worked well together, and each knew their duty.

We continued to deliver mail all summer [1943], driving over Profile summit to Big Creek. The mail route went over many side roads, as the summer people were back, then on to the cabins that were occupied year round, and then to the Snowshoe Mine. It was the same route as in the winter, but now we were driving a vehicle.

Hopeless point – the mail run up Big Creek

Photo from “Idaho Mountains Our Home” by Lafe and Emma Cox – Copyright 1977 by V.O. Ranch Books
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Smith Children with Napier Edwards’ wagon, Edwardsburg 1948

The Lawrence and Paul Smith kids from Stibnite playing with Napier Edwards wagon at Edwardsburg. The Passengers are: (L to R) Patty, Karen, Lorene and Gary Smith. The two ‘critters’ doing the pulling are Ron on the left and cousin Tim on right -1948

“Nape Edward’s wagon is what they used to call a ‘Hack,’ a light, get-there-quick-type of wagon, sort of a poor man’s buggy.” – Ron Smith.
(photo courtesy of Ron Smith)

source Valley County, ID GenWeb Project
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Skis and Skiers

by Harry Withers

In the mining boom days, skiing as a sport in this part of the country wasn’t considered at all. At least, I have never heard any of the real “Old Timers” speak of it as such. Skiing was only a very necessary mode of travel. Some of those old timers were the real experts when it came to making arduous trips such as getting mail into the back country: Thunder Mountain, Warren, Florence, Dixie, Buffalo Hump, and others.

I know some of those old timers and heard some of their accounts of their experiences and never grew tired of listening to them. To name a few, there were All Hennessey, Charley Newell, Jake and Eric Jensen, Rufe Hughes, Ray Call, and Dan McRae. Big Dan was strictly a snowshoe man.

from “Yellow Pine, Idaho” complied by Nancy G. Sumner Pg 42
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page updated September 23, 2020

Road Report Nov 26

Note: Be prepared for winter driving this time of year, road conditions change quickly. Be prepared for snow at high elevations and rocks/trees falling in the road. Please share road reports.

Yellow Pine: Unusually warm temperatures, breezes and rain in the last few days has melted most of our old snow. The streets are mostly bare with patches of ice and slush in the shade. Click for Local Forecast

Warm Lake Highway: Big Creek Summit snowtel shows 24″ of snow. Report Nov 24: Warm Lake Highway has black ice, especially in the shade on the Cascade side of the summit.
Big Creek Summit SNOTEL station 6580′

South Fork Road: Report from Nov 24, black ice up high in the early morning and rocks all over the road.

EFSF Road: Report from Nov 24, bare road from So Fork to Eiguren Ranch, then snow/ice patches to Yellow Pine. Rocks coming down in the “bowling alley” (some large boulders moved last Monday). The pot holes are getting pretty bad on this upper end of the road.

Johnson Creek Road: Upper end closed at Landmark to wheeled vehicles for the winter. Lower Johnson Creek road was reported “terrible” with pot holes and snow.
Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam:
http://www.ruralnetwork.net/~yellowpinecm/
The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Closed for winter to wheeled vehicles. Old report from Saturday (Nov 4) “Lick Creek summit was not passable today. Already 16 inches of snow on the flat before reaching the pass.” – J&N B

Note: Lick Creek Summit has an elevation of 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Closed for winter to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.
Big Creek Webcam:

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: (Nov 21) Open, chains advised.

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Closed at Monumental summit with snow. Truck reported to be stuck for the winter on the other side.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Closed. (This is the road that goes from Big Creek/Edwardsburg up over Elk Summer, down to the South Fork of the Salmon River by Trails End Subdivision, then over to Warrens.)
Note: Elk Summit is at an elevation of nearly 9000 feet.

Report from Burgdorf Hot Springs Thurs (Nov 23) “Although we are currently closed while the road gets more & more snow and turns into a snowmobile trail, we will be reopening Dec 21st for the winter season. Until then, we wish you the very best holiday cheer and hibernation joy!”

Deadwood Summit: No current report. Deadwood snotel showing 35″ of snow.
Note: The Approx Elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet (2,098 m)
Deadwood Summit SNOTEL station 6860′

Golden Gate Road: Closed.

Sugar Creek Road: Closed.
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Weather Reports Nov 19-26

Nov 19 Weather:

At 1030am it was 21 degrees and almost clear, light chilly breeze. High hazy clouds arrived before lunch time. At 2pm it was 38 degrees and mostly cloudy (sky covered by high haze) the light breeze is very chilling. At 530pm it was 31 degrees and cloudy. Cloudy at 815pm. Did not appear to be raining at midnight. Probably started raining around 9am?

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time November 20, 2017 at 10:30AM
Overcast, light rain
Max temperature 40 degrees F
Min temperature 21 degrees F <– yesterday morning
At observation 34 degrees F
Precipitation 0.02 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 1.5 inch
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Nov 20 Weather:

At 1030am it was 34 degrees, overcast and light rain falling. Rain/snow mix by 1215pm, clouds so low it is kind of foggy. All snow by 1250pm. All rain at 120pm. At 2pm it was 34 degrees, light rain falling, clouds lifted a bit, appears snow line above 5000′. Still raining lightly at 4pm. At 520pm it was 35 degrees, overcast and light rain. At 840pm it was 34 degrees and raining. At 1030pm it was 33 degrees, not really raining, more like water condensing out of the fog.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time November 21, 2017 at 10:30AM
Overcast, foggy along the river
Max temperature 37 degrees F
Min temperature 30 degrees F
At observation 35 degrees F
Precipitation 0.40 inch
Snowfall Trace
Snow depth 3/4 inch
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Nov 21 Weather:

At 1030am it was 35 degrees, overcast and light fog along the river. Probably started drizzling around 1230pm, very light. At 2pm it was 37 degrees, low clouds, foggy and steady rain. Really foggy around 4pm, barely misting. At 530pm it was 36 degrees, a few drops of mist and foggy. At 830pm steady light rain and not so foggy. At 1130pm it was foggy again but not raining. Probably rained all night. Raining pretty hard at 7am.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time November 22, 2017 at 10:30AM
Overcast, foggy, light mist
Max temperature 40 degrees F <– this morning
Min temperature 35 degrees F <– yesterday morning
At observation 40 degrees F
Precipitation 0.46 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 1/2 inch
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Nov 22 Weather:

At 1030am it was 40 degrees, overcast, foggy and light mist falling. Not raining at noon, still foggy. A few breaks in the clouds at 1245pm, little bit of sunshine, then back to cloudy by 115pm. At 215pm it was 47 degrees and mostly cloudy. At 4pm light fog, not raining. At 515pm it was 42 degrees, cloudy, quite foggy but not raining. Looked foggy at 830pm. At 1245am it was 36 degrees, light fog ‘sweating’ water drops, but partly clear above (Orion twinkling.) Passing shower before 9am.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time November 23, 2017 at 10:30AM
Mostly cloudy
Max temperature 48 degrees F
Min temperature 34 degrees F
At observation 43 degrees F
Precipitation 0.01 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth Trace (0″ to 1/2″)
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Nov 23 Weather:

At 1030am it was 43 degrees and mostly cloudy. Half the ground is bare, about 1/2″ in shade. Breezy and mostly cloudy (a few cracks) at noon. At 2pm it was 53 degrees, cloudy and breezy. At 315pm some larger breaks in the clouds and breezy. At 450pm overcast and starting to sprinkle, pretty good shower at 5pm (50F) then by 515pm 49 degrees and light misty sprinkles. Not raining around 630pm. Raining pretty good at 750pm. Still raining hard at 830pm. At 1015pm it was 44 degrees and steady rain, puddles growing. At 115am it was sprinkling. Raining pretty good at 3am, (and 4am.) Probably done raining by 6am.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time November 24, 2017 at 10:30AM
Partly clear, light breeze, snow almost gone
Max temperature 55 degrees F
Min temperature 36 degrees F
At observation 39 degrees F
Precipitation 0.67 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth Trace
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Nov 24 Weather:

At 1030am it was 39 degrees, partly clear and light breeze, the old snow is almost gone. At 245pm it was 45 degrees, partly cloudy and light breezes. At 530pm it was 31 degrees and clear, a little light fog along the river. At 1230am it was 27 degrees and partly hazy.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time November 25, 2017 at 10:30AM
Mostly cloudy
Max temperature 48 degrees F
Min temperature 22 degrees F
At observation 28 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth Trace <– in the shade only
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Nov 25 Weather:

At 1030am it was 28 degrees, frosty and mostly cloudy. At 215pm it was 38 degrees, overcast, damp and chilly light breeze. At 515pm it was 35 degrees, overcast and light breeze. At 1030pm it was 33 degrees, no stars, damp and chilly. At 7am it was 33 degrees and cloudy.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time November 26, 2017 at 10:30AM
Cloudy and quite breezy
Max temperature 40 degrees F <– this morning
Min temperature 28 degrees F <– yesterday morning
At observation 40 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth Trace <– patches old snow in shade
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Road Report Nov 24

Note: Be prepared for winter driving this time of year, road conditions change quickly. Be prepared for snow at high elevations and rocks/trees falling in the road. Please share road reports.

Yellow Pine: Unusually warm temperatures, breezes and lots of rain in the last 24 hours has melted most of our old snow. The streets are mostly bare with patches of ice and slush in the shade. Click for Local Forecast

Warm Lake Highway: Big Creek Summit snowtel shows 28″ of snow (looks like it rained above 6000′.) Report Nov 24: Warm Lake Highway has black ice, especially in the shade.
Big Creek Summit SNOTEL station 6580′

South Fork Road: Report Nov 24, black ice up high in the early morning and rocks all over the road.

EFSF Road: Report Nov 24, bare road from So Fork to Eiguren Ranch, then snow/ice patches to Yellow Pine. Rocks coming down in the “bowling alley” (some large boulders moved Monday). The pot holes are getting pretty bad on this upper end of the road.

Johnson Creek Road: Upper end closed at Landmark to wheeled vehicles for the winter. Lower Johnson Creek road was reported “terrible” with pot holes and snow.
Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam:
http://www.ruralnetwork.net/~yellowpinecm/
The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: More than likely closed for winter to wheeled vehicles. Guessing there is over 2 feet of snow now. A report from Saturday (Nov 4) “Lick Creek summit was not passable today. Already 16 inches of snow on the flat before reaching the pass.” – J&N B

Note: Lick Creek Summit has an elevation of 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Current condition unknown. More than likely closed for winter to wheeled vehicles. Probably over 2 feet of snow at the summit by now.
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.
Big Creek Webcam:

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: (Nov 21) Open, chains advised.

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Closed at Monumental summit with snow. Truck reported to be stuck for the winter on the other side.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Likely closed. This is the road that goes from Big Creek/Edwardsburg up over Elk Summer, down to the South Fork of the Salmon River by Trails End Subdivision, then over to Warrens. The current status on this road is unknown. Elk summit is probably snowed closed by now.
Note: Elk Summit is at an elevation of nearly 9000 feet.

Report from Burgdorf Hot Springs Thurs (Nov 23) “Although we are currently closed while the road gets more & more snow and turns into a snowmobile trail, we will be reopening Dec 21st for the winter season. Until then, we wish you the very best holiday cheer and hibernation joy!”

Deadwood Summit: No current report. Deadwood snotel showing 38″ of snow.
Note: The Approx Elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet (2,098 m)
Deadwood Summit SNOTEL station 6860′

Golden Gate Road: Closed.

Sugar Creek Road: Closed.
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Road Report Nov 22

Note: Be prepared for winter driving this time of year, road conditions change quickly. Be prepared for snow at high elevations and rocks/trees falling in the road. Please share road reports.

Yellow Pine: Our snow continues to melt with rainfall and warmer temps, average 1/2″ on the ground, but deeper in the shade, and bare ground under trees. Quite foggy at times in the last 24 hours. The streets are a mix of bare to ice and slush. Click for Local Forecast

Warm Lake Highway: Big Creek Summit snowtel shows 31″ of snow. Report Nov 22, Highway is mostly bare, some ice and snow on the Cascade side of the summit. Also icy in the shady spots.
Big Creek Summit SNOTEL station 6580′

South Fork Road: Report Nov 22, bare pavement, ice in shady spots up high, rocks coming down (had to stop 3x today to move rocks.)

EFSF Road: Report Nov 22, bare road from So Fork to Eiguren Ranch, then snow/ice floor to Yellow Pine. Rocks coming down (some large boulders moved Monday). The pot holes are getting pretty bad on this upper end of the road.

Johnson Creek Road: Upper end closed at Landmark to wheeled vehicles for the winter. Lower Johnson Creek road was reported “terrible” on Nov 15. Pot holes and snow.
Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam:
The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: More than likely closed for winter to wheeled vehicles. Guessing there is over 2 feet of snow now. A report from Saturday (Nov 4) “Lick Creek summit was not passable today. Already 16 inches of snow on the flat before reaching the pass.” – J&N B

Note: Lick Creek Summit has an elevation of 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Current condition unknown. More than likely closed for winter to wheeled vehicles. Probably over 2 feet of snow at the summit by now.
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: (Nov 21) Open, chains advised.

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Closed at Monumental summit with snow. Truck reported to be stuck for the winter on the other side.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Closed. This is the road that goes from Big Creek/Edwardsburg up over Elk Summer, down to the South Fork of the Salmon River by Trails End Subdivision, then over to Warrens. The current status on this road is unknown. Elk summit is snowed closed by now.
Note: Elk Summit is at an elevation of nearly 9000 feet.
Big Creek Webcam:

Report from Burgdorf Hot Springs Saturday (Nov 11) “Weekend Road Update: It’s a tough go up to the summit, according to the latest folks to make it up to Burgdorf. Since some folks have had to turn around because of the conditions, CHAINS or equivelant seem essential! A big thanks to everyone who have made the attempt to come up.”

Deadwood Summit: No current report. Deadwood snotel showing 43″ of snow.
Note: The Approx Elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet (2,098 m)
Deadwood Summit SNOTEL station 6860′

Golden Gate Road: Closed.

Sugar Creek Road: Closed.
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Nov 19, 2017 The Yellow Pine Times

Nov 19, 2017 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Note: Last chance to order the 2018 Calendar, deadline Monday November 20th 1159pm. Send email with “2018 Calendar” in the subject line, please include name, address and number wanted. We can mail gifts for you! Thanks for your support.
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Village News:

Reports from last Sunday

“Reports of a small cougar around [upper] side of town; locals out for a walk came across about thirty elk close to town.”

– LI
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Hunter’s Missing Rope

Looking for a 5/8th inch climbing rope that is white with a green stripe that was stretched across the river from the Yellow Pine Campground by the concrete bridge to the other side. of the river. It was removed while we were hunting on the far side. If you or someone know of it’s whereabouts, please leave it at the Yellow Pine Tavern for us. Thank You.
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Mail Days M-W-F

Starting November 1st, the mail is being delivered 3 days a week.
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The Corner

The Corner is closed for the season. Stop by if you need wood permits. We will reopen after we have the baby.

Thanksgiving potluck will be held at The Corner 4pm November 23rd. Please call Heather at the Corner 208 633-3325 for items to bring.

– H
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Yellow Pine Tavern

Winter hours currently will be: 9am to 8pm daily

Christmas potluck will be at the Tavern. Look for further updates on the time and what the Tavern will be providing.

– L
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Diamond (Kennedy) Fuel & Feed

208-382-4430

We will now be carrying wood pellets, so if you or someone you know up there burns pellets we will have some in stock by Thursday night. We will also order 1 ton pallets if there is an interest. No delivery to YP at this time, but folks can come pick up themselves.

Also, current price on the wood pellets are $5.99/ 50 lb. bag or $250 for a bulk order of 50 bags (1 ton). The brand is Purcell which is rated just as good if not better than the North Idaho Brand. It is made and sold by the same manufacture. Chris Gurney, the new owner here, said next summer he would be willing to deliver 1 ton bulk orders to YP if there are enough interested. Current prices may change by then of course.
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Bear Aware

It is probably safe to put bird feeders back out. Bears in our area usually hibernate by Halloween per our local F&G office.
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YPFD News:

There are YPFD T-shirts, as well as YPFD patches and stickers for sale at the Tavern now.

Training will resume in the spring.
— — — —

VYPA News:

Next meeting June 2018
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Fall Rx Burns planned

BNF:
Cascade Ranger District: Slash piles will be ignited in the following locations: Warm Lake, Yellow pine, Landmark and Crawford. It will be pile burning for two days.

PNF:
The Krassel Ranger District plans to ignite 1,600 acres in the Fourmile drainage, and 2,000 acres in the Bald Hill project area.
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook
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Local Observations:

Monday (Nov 13) overnight low of 25 degrees, frost melting with sunrise. About 2.5″ old snow on the ground, very hard and dense, patches of open ground under the trees. Heard a red-breasted nuthatch. Cloudy before lunch time. Cloudy and breezy early afternoon, “snow-eater” wind, high of 50 degrees. Started to sprinkle just before 5pm, showers on and off continued after dark. Raining pretty good around midnight.

Tuesday (Nov 14) skiff of snow fell early morning, overnight low of 32 degrees. Partly clear and light breeze this morning. Flock of pine-siskins showed up. Mostly cloudy during the day with outbreaks of sunshine once in a while, light chilly breeze, high of 42 degrees. A little bit of “human activity” today. Sky clearing just before dark and temperature dropping quickly.

Wednesday (Nov 15) overnight low of 20 degrees, high thin clouds. Mail truck made it in on time. Dark clouds came in from the south early afternoon and breezy, high of 46 degrees. Rain started just before 9pm and getting windy. Rain pounded down during the night and gusty wind.

Thursday (Nov 16) probably did not get below freezing overnight, rain melted a lot of the snow on the ground, patchy snow cover this morning and rain/snow mix falling for a while, then rain, sometimes snow, then rain, high of 35 degrees. Airplane flew over at 414pm in the storm. Misty drizzle at dark. Heavy snow during the night.

Friday (Nov 17) overnight low of 24 degrees, 4″ of new snow on the ground this morning, partly clear and light breeze. Trees dropping snow bombs out in the forest. Heard little birds calling (not sure if juncos or pine-siskins.) Internet and long distance phone out around 1115am, for less than 15 minutes. Couple of little snow flurries during the day, no accumulation, warm enough to melt some snow, high of 38 degrees. Clearing off at dark and temperature dropping, cold light breeze.

Saturday (Nov 18) overnight low of 14 degrees, 2″ of old snow on the ground this morning, high hazy clouds, filtered sun and slight cold breeze. Watched 2 stellar jays looking through old pine cones for seeds. Partly cloudy and warmed up enough to melt a little snow this afternoon, high of 40 degrees. Clear and temperature dropping fast just before dark.

Sunday (Nov 19) overnight low of 13 degrees, 1-2″ of old snow remaining with a few bare patches, nearly clear sky. Heard a stellar’s jay calling. Sunshine and bright snow, frost starting to melt from the strength of the sun even tho it is still below freezing. Internet connection a little “iffy” around 1230pm. High hazy clouds early afternoon and a very noticeable chilly light breeze, high of 40 degrees. Overcast at dark, dropping below freezing.
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RIP:

Jim Ed Biggers

Biggers, Jim Ed, 58, passed away Saturday, November 11, 2017 at a local hospital. Arrangements have been entrusted to All Valley Cremation, 1538 11th Avenue North in Nampa.

Published in Idaho Statesman on Nov. 14, 2017
[h/t L and B]
Note” “Little” Jimmy Biggers lived in Yellow Pine.
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Scam Alerts:

New Scam, Claiming to Be One of Our Deputies

The Valley County Sheriff’s Office dispatch has received two calls today from McCall citizens, claiming that they are Lt. Jason Speer and there is a warrant out for their arrest for failing to report for jury duty. THIS IS A SCAM!! They then want you to go to the store and get a visa gift card to pay them money. We understand that most people will know it’s a scam, unfortunately there are some that may fall prey to this type of call. It happens a lot.

PLEASE DO NOT SEND MONEY. Please contact the Valley County Sheriff’s Office dispatch at 208-382-5160 if you have any questions.

source: The Valley County Sheriff’s Office Facebook page
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Boise woman targeted by phone scam: ‘I want to get this story out’

by Alexis Goree Tuesday, November 14th 2017

Boise, Idaho (KBOI) — Loretta Reed believed she was careful when answering calls from strange numbers. But last week she got a call from someone claiming to be her grandson, Evan, and she fell for it.

“As I go back and think about it I said, oh Evan what is wrong, and then out came this story”

He told her he was sick and asked a friend to drive him to get medicine when they got stopped by police and drugs were found in the car. A so-called Sergeant Clark from the Nampa Police Department said she needed $4,000 to bail him out.

“I followed this so-called Sergeant Clark’s instructions to go to my bank, withdraw $4,000 and go to Target and buy eight $500 gift cards.”

continued:
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Idaho News:

School bus slides off road south of Cascade

KTVB November 16, 2017


(Photo: Cascade Fire Protection District)

Cascade, Idaho — Several children suffered minor injuries when their school bus slid off the road Thursday morning.

The incident happened on Thunder City Road in a rural area south of Cascade.

According to the Cascade Fire Protection District, the bus driver drifted too far onto the soft shoulder of the dirt road, causing the bus to slide off into a ditch. It was left tilted at an precarious angle, but did not completely roll.

Twelve children were on board the bus at the time, ranging from elementary-aged students to junior high. No one was seriously hurt, although several students suffered scrapes, scratches or bruises, according to first responders.

The bus was driving slowly when the slide-off occurred, according to the Cascade Fire Protection District. The district sent out a second bus to bring the children to school.

source:
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Three-car crash on Idaho 55 injures California man

The Star-News November 16, 2017

A California man was injured last Thursday in a three-vehicle accident on Idaho 55 near Fairbrother Lane south of McCall, the Idaho State Police reported.

Richard Scott, 69, of Sacramento, Calif., was taken by ambulance to St. Luke’s McCall after the accident, which happened about 8:09 p.m. last Thursday, the ISP reported. Scott’s condition was not available.

Scott was driving north when he lost control of his pickup, crossed the center line, and went into a broad slide.

Kathryn Thier, 35, of McCall, was driving her car south and drove off the left shoulder and into a ditch to avoid colliding with Scott’s vehicle.

Dean Neptune, 24, of Nampa, was driving a commercial box truck behind Thier and struck Scott’s pickup. All occupants were wearing seat belts, the ISP reported.

The section of Idaho 55 where the accident occurred was closed for about two hours until the scene could be cleared. The crash remained under investigation this week.

source:
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Cascade Legion post to host free Thanksgiving Day dinner

The Star-News November 16, 2017

The Cascade American Legion Post 60 and Auxiliary will host a traditional Turkey Day feast on Thanksgiving, Thursday, Nov. 23, at 1 p.m.

American Legion members will provide the turkey and the trimmings for the free community event, and local churches and other volunteers will bring assorted pies and desserts.

The dinner will be held at the Cascade American Legion hall, 105 E. Mill St.

continued:
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2018 Winter Carnival theme: There’s ‘Snow’ Place Like Home

The Star-News November 16, 2017

“There’s ‘Snow’ Place Like Home” is the theme of the 2018 McCall Winter Carnival, the McCall Area Chamber of Commerce and Visitors Bureau announced.

“In deciding this year’s theme we really wanted to capture what makes living in McCall so special,” carnival Chair McKenzie Kraemer said.

“Home means so many things to so many different people and we are excited to see what this theme inspires,” Kraemer said.

Plans for the 2018 carnival, to be held Jan. 26 through Feb. 4, include traditional events like fireworks, the Mardi Gras Parade and snow sculptures along with a few new events.

continued:
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$1,150 grant awarded for blinds at historic NM depot

The Star-News November 16, 2017

The Adams County Historical Society has been awarded a $1,150 matching grant from the Idaho State Historical Society.

The grant funds will be used to purchase UV protection blinds to be installed in the President’s Room of the Pacific and Idaho Northern Railway Depot in New Meadows.

The blinds will help protect photos, documents and woodwork in the room from damaging sunlight while items are being documented cataloged and inventoried.

The same type of blind was previously installed in the Lobby, Ticket Agent’s Office and Ladies Waiting Room for the same reasons. The historical society will match the grant with volunteer time by professionals.

source:
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Idaho History:

Idaho Pen Turkey Flock 1924

Source: Original 1924 Nature Magazine from JTR Collection
courtesy John T. Richards – Idaho History 1860s to 1960s
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Public Lands:

National forests to start selling Christmas tree permits Saturday

The Star-News November 16, 2017

Boise and Payette National Forest vendors will begin selling Christmas tree permits on Saturday.

This year, fourth-graders can receive a free permit through the “Every Kid in a Park” program.

Fourth-graders will receive a voucher for one free Christmas tree permit when they register for the “Every Kid in a Park” initiative at http://EveryKidinaPark.gov.

The fourth-graders and a parent must redeem the voucher at a Forest Service office, as commercial vendors will not accept the vouchers. Free Christmas tree permits cannot be sent electronically or through the mail.

Permits for sale to the general public will be available at the Boise and Payette National Forest offices starting Monday. Cost is $10 and valid until Dec. 25.

Each permit allows one tree to be cut, and there is a limit of three per family. The maximum height of a permitted tree is 12 feet. Permits are valid for use on both forests and are for personal use only.

Christmas tree permits are available at these locations:

• New Meadows Ranger District Office, 3674 Highway 95, New Meadows. 208-347-0300.

• McCall Ranger District Office, 102 W. Lake St., McCall. 208-634-0400.

• Albertsons, 132 E. Lake St., McCall. 208-634-8166.

• C&M Lumber, 3625 Walker Lane, New Meadows. 208-347-3648.

• Cascade Ranger District, 540 N. Main St., Cascade. 208-382-7400.

source:
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Making A Break

Forest Service project near Lake Cascade would help separate wildfires, homes

By Max Silverson For The Star-News November 16, 2017

Wendy Green doesn’t mind that the Forest Service is thinking about cutting trees and shrubs near her home. It would be a small price to pay to save her home in a wildfire.

Green was among those who recently toured an area on the west side of Lake Cascade where work is planned to slow down future wildfires.

The French-Hazard Wildland Urban Interface Project would take place on more than 6,000 acres of the Boise National Forest on the eastern slope of West Mountain between Hurd Creek and Moores Creek along West Mountain Road.

The project would also thin stands throughout the area that have become overgrown with brush and fast-growing fir species, Project Leader Jim Bishop of the Cascade Ranger District said.

The project contains 3,661 acres slated for commercial logging, 1,369 acres scheduled for thinning, 3,800 acres planned for controlled burns and 950 acres where equipment will chew up dense vegetation that could help a wildfire spread.

continued:
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BC YP SR Collaborative meeting December 14th

11/15/2017

The next meeting for the collaborative will be held on December 14th at the EOC 10:00 am to 3:00 pm.

Melissa B. Hamilton
U of I Valley County Extension Educator
Community Development / Agriculture
208-382-7190
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Pioneer Fire Recovery & Restoration Update

11/16/2017

After a busy summer field season on the Boise National Forest, work continues on the Pioneer Fire area to recover and restore the landscape.

Improving Aquatic Habitat for Bull trout

Two Aquatic Organism Passages (AOPs) have been placed on the Lowman Ranger District’s Clear Creek Road (National Forest System road 582). These AOPs are replacing small culverts on Pole and Big Spruce Creek, opening up more than 3 miles of upstream habitat for bull trout and other aquatic species within the Clear Creek watershed.

Opening access to bull trout spawning habitat provides refuge for small fish to escape predators and protect them from being swept downstream from high flows and/or increased sediment from the burned landscape.

The AOPs, which look like large culverts, are multipurpose bottomless arches with two concrete footer walls sunk below the scour depth of the stream, engineered to replicate natural stream conditions. The structures are designed to safeguard the popular road from damaging debris flows blocking stream flows and minimize the risk from water overflowing on to the road bed.

These AOPs are vitally important for the Boise National Forest’s long term recovery efforts which are part of the Pioneer Fire’s Burned Area Emergency Response (BAER) assessment and supports the U.S. Fish and Wildlife’s bull trout recovery plan. Learn more about AOPs by watching the video:

Salvage Timber and Roadside Hazard Sales Status

Twelve salvage timber sales sold to reduce hazard trees in heavily used recreation areas are in various stages of operation from beginning to completion.

* Whoopum up and Upper Rock Salvage and Sunset Ski Roadside Hazard sales: completed.

* Upper Rock Creek Salvage and Pikes Fork Roadside Hazard sales: are expect completion mid-November.

* Crooked and Kempner Salvage and Banner Roadside Hazard sales: expected completion this winter barring extreme weather conditions.

* Upper Beaver and Lamar Salvage sales: just started with completion expected in the summer and fall 2018, respectively.

* Clear Creek Roadside Hazard sale: expected to begin mid-November with completion expected in 2018.

Two additional sales were advertised for bid Nov. 3, 2017:

* 393 Roadside Hazard and the Gold Fork West Salvage sales bid openings were scheduled for Nov. 15.

* 393 Roadside Hazard had an oral auction and Gold Fork West had a sealed bid.
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Barber Flat Bridge Open to Full-Size Vehicles

Boise, Idaho, November 17, 2017 Boise National Forest News Release

The Barber Flat Bridge located on the Idaho City Ranger District, National Forest System (NFS) Road 327 is now open to full size vehicles but will have load restrictions.

Recent improvements to the bridge have mitigated concerns, allowing the Forest to open the bridge to full-size vehicles. Load restrictions are posted and may impact heavy loads including logging and gravel transporting vehicles. Brett Barry, Boise National Forest civil engineer said “The structural improvements completed and future instream structure work will ensure the bridge functions for years to come.”

The Barber Flat bridge improvements have been classified into two phases. Phase one, which concluded this fall included new hardware, abutment improvements and additional monitoring. Phase two will begin during the fall of 2018, projected treatments include adding instream structures that divert channel flows which prevent future damage to abutments.

Recreationists are urged to use caution when traveling on NFS Road 376 from Alexander Flats to NFS Road 327. The road is a single lane road with turnouts that is maintained for high clearance vehicles. Winter weather may further impact road conditions in this area.
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2017 CuMo Exploration Project Supplemental Information Report is Now Available

11/17/2017

Dear Interested Party,

This email is to inform you that the recently completed CuMo Exploration Project Supplemental Information Report (SIR) is now available on the New 2018 CuMo Exploration Project webpage (https://www.fs.usda.gov/project/?project=52875) under the Assessment Tab.

The new 2018 CuMo Exploration Project webpage will replace the original CuMo webpage. Key documents from the original webpage are being relocated to the new webpage under the Supporting Tab. The original webpage is still available at https://www.fs.usda.gov/project/?project=21302 but due to this site being unstable most documents have been unpublished and are being relocated.

For additional information regarding the SIR, please contact Rick Wells, Forest Geologist, at 208-373-4136. For questions regarding the project webpages, please contact me directly. Thank you for your continued interest in this project.

Sincerely,
Melissa Yenko
Forest Environmental Coordinator
Boise National Forest
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Idaho Trails Association on a roll; seeks new members to keep momentum

Rich Landers The Spokesman-Review Nov 126, 2017

A statewide non-profit outdoor service group is looking for more members to achieve its simple goal of keeping Idaho’s nonmotorized trails open and usable.

The Idaho Trails Association is looking for more members to join trail building and maintenance projects next season, said North Idaho resident and long-distance hiker Tom Dabrowski.

Founded in 2010, ITA volunteers have completed 21 projects in 12 parts of the state, he said. A total of 215 volunteers contributed more than 5,175 hours of field work time on 103 miles of trail, sawing more than 1,000 logs off the trails, fixing water bars, cutting back brush and repairing trail treads, he said.

The volunteers coordinate with government trails crews to spread out the work and cover more trails, he said.

continued:
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Last Chance to Comment on National Parks Massive Fee Increase

Western Slope No Fee Coalition 11/17/2017

In late October we alerted you to the National Park Service’s proposal to move to “surge pricing” during the most popular season at 17 popular parks. At those parks, the entrance fee during the most desirable time of year will at least double and nearly triple at some, to $70 per vehicle for a single visit.

Public comments are being taken only until November 23. Before you sit down with your family to give thanks this year, show your support for National Parks that are accessible to everyone by adding your voice to those of your fellow citizens!

Details here.
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USFS Regional Intermountain News

November 16, 2017

link:
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Critter News:

Pet Talk – Lipomas in Dogs

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt Nov. 17, 2017 – IME

Lipomas are benign tumors that originate from fat cells. “Lip” in Latin stands for fat and “oma” stands for tumor. They are the most common tumor seen in dogs and are most common in overweight, middle-age to older dogs. The exact cause of the formation of these tumors is unknown. They are common in all breeds, but especially in Labrador retrievers.

Lipomas are well-defined, oval or round growths that exist and can be easily felt under the skin, or the subcutaneous area of the body. They usually feel soft and smooth, and can be easily moved around under the skin. Most occur on the trunk of the dog, especially under the chest. They can also occur on the legs and neck. They start off small, but can grow as large as an orange. Most lipomas do not cause any clinical signs. They are removed surgically for cosmetic reasons or if they occur in the joints of the dog and are causing gait abnormalities. In rare instances, lipomas can develop in the abdomen, chest or behind the eye. These lipomas can cause serious problems and must be removed surgically.

Lipomas can mimic other, more malignant tumors. Your vet will almost always want to stick a needle into the lipoma, aspirate a sample of cells and confirm that only fat cells are noted under the microscope. Biopsy of the tumor (taking a small sample of the tumor surgically) will also show that the tumor is benign.

continued:
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Want to live longer? Get a dog

Findings also suggest increased social well-being

Victoria Larned – CNN Nov 17, 2017

The benefits that come with owning a dog are clear– physical activity, support, companionship — but owning a dog could literally be saving your life

Dog ownership is associated with a reduced risk for cardiovascular disease and death, finds a new Swedish study published Friday in the journal Scientific Reports.

For people living alone, owning a dog can decrease their risk of death by 33% and their risk of cardiovascular related death by 36%, when compared to single individuals without a pet, according to the study. Chances of a heart attack were also found to be 11% lower.

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KWVR Oregon Wolf Education weekly Wolf Report

Second week of November 2017
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Environmental group sues for records of wolf killings

By Nicholas K. Geranios – 11/15/17 AP

Spokane, Wash. — An environmental group is suing the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife over its failure to release some public records on wolf deaths in the state.

The Center for Biological Diversity is seeking records about the killing of a wolf from the Smackout Pack this summer and the killing of nearly the entire Profanity Peak pack in 2016.

The lawsuit was filed Tuesday in Thurston County Superior Court.

Bruce Botka, a spokesman for the WDFW in Olympia, says the agency does not comment on the filing of legal complaints and had not reviewed the lawsuit yet with attorneys.

Wolves are listed as endangered by the state in the eastern third of Washington, where they are relatively abundant. They have federal endangered species protection in the western two-thirds of the state.

source:
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Pro-wolf group from out-of-state hounds Washington with lawsuits

Rich Landers The Spokesman-Review Nov 16, 2017

An Arizona-based environmental group is suing the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife for access to some public records on wolf deaths in the state.

The Center for Biological Diversity is seeking records about the killing of a wolf from the Smackout Pack this summer and the killing of several animals in the Profanity Peak pack in 2016.

Lethal removal of some wolves was authorized by the agency director in those cases after preventative measures didn’t stop multiple wolf attacks on livestock. The attacks generally stopped after a few wolves were killed.

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Online quiz: Can you distinguish wolf from coyote?

Rich Landers The Spokesman-Review Nov 15, 2017

Oregon has posted an online quiz to help people – especially hunters – bone up on telling the difference between wolves and coyotes.

The quiz found at the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife website shows photos of the animals at various ages. As users are quizzed on their knowledge, the website offers tips on how to differentiate wolves from coyotes.

More than 16,000 people had taken the quiz in the first week after it was released this fall.

Wolves are still protected in both Oregon and Washington by state or federal rules. Coyotes are not protected and can be hunted.

source:
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Wyoming game managers take public comment on grizzly bears

11/17/17 AP

Jackson, Wyo. — A Wyoming Game and Fish Department public meeting on how to manage grizzly bears in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem drew comments and ideas from hunting guides who perceive there are too many grizzly bears and environmentalists insistent that Jackson Hole should remain a hunting-free sanctuary.

About 100 people attended the meeting Wednesday night when they were asked their thoughts on population monitoring, research, conflict management, information and education and grizzly bear hunting.

The comments and ideas voiced included prohibiting grizzly bear hunting until the Yellowstone region’s bears are connected with the grizzly bear population in northwest Montana; requiring wildlife managers to tell the public where tracked grizzlies are in real time when the bears venture into well-used areas; and requiring that meat from a hunted grizzly bear can’t be wasted, the Jackson Hole News & Guide reported.

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Landowner uses tractor to ‘totally’ disable elk poacher’s pickup

Rich Landers The Spokesman-Review Nov 14, 2017


A landowner used a tractor to “disable” a pickup belonging to elk poachers trespassing on his property in Pierce County on Nov. 11, 2017. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife)

Public sentiment is clearly behind the landowner who used his tractor to, shall we say, immobilize the pickup of elk poachers who were trespassing.

Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife police are hesitant to say that’s the proper way to respond. There could be consequences.

But for now, the WDFW report on Facebook is chalking up a lot of fans for the Pierce County man who went out into the night to make sure the poachers didn’t get away.

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Spokane man, brother cited for trophy elk poaching in Montana

Rich Landers The Spokesman-Review Nov 16, 2017

A Spokane man and his twin brother have been charged with 16 crimes involved with the illegal killing of eight bull elk in what Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks officials describe as years of poaching activity on a Fergus County ranch.

James Stephen Page, of Garneill, Mont., and William Thomas Page, of Spokane, Wash., both 32, are accused of illegally harvesting eight bull elk over several years on the 3 Bar Ranch, which is on the west side of the Snowy Mountains, southwest of Lewistown, agency spokesman Bruce Auchly reports today.

The case involves eight felony charges. If convicted, the brothers could lose for life their hunting and fishing privileges in Montana, and possibly other states, and face thousands of dollars in fines.

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Bald eagles’ annual gathering begins at Lake Coeur d’Alene

Rich Landers The Spokesman-Review Nov 16, 2017


A bald eagle snatches a spawning kokanee from the Wolf Lodge Bay area of Lake Coeur d’Alene. (Jerry Rolwes)

Kokanee are spawning and dying in North Idaho’s two largest lakes and bald eagles have begun congregating for the annual feast.

Dozens of eagles are congregating at Granite Creek and in the Bayview shoreline area to take advantage of revived kokanee fisheries in Lake Pend Oreille.

Lake Coeur d’Alene is more accessible and better known for the eagles that congregate from November into January to feast on the kokanee — land-locked sockeye salmon — spawning in Wolf Lodge Bay.

The number of eagles varies from year to year, with 31 adult (white-headed) eagles and 6 immatures counted today in the first weekly survey of the eagle season by Carrie Hugo, U.S. Bureau of Land Management wildlife biologist.

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Sage grouse policy moving back to square one as decade of collaboration questioned

Rich Landers The Spokesman-Review Nov 13, 2017

Federal scientists and land managers who’ve been crafting strategies to protect a ground-dwelling bird’s habitat across the American West for nearly two decades are going back to the drawing board under a new Trump administration edict to reassess existing plans condemned by ranchers, miners and energy developers.

Here’s more in a report from Associated Press reporter Scott Sonner, who’s covered some of the public meetings related to the review.

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Idaho Man Lands Near-Record Fish And An Even Better Story From The Boise River

By James Dawson Nov 17, 2017 Boise State Public Radio

It’s a near-miss lunker. Jason Waidelich had the catch of a lifetime on the Boise River this month when he hooked a rainbow trout that weighed a whopping 19.25 pounds.

“My adrenaline was pumping, I couldn’t breathe. It was pure shock,” Waidelich told KTVB. “The only time I’ve ever seen a trout that big is in the aquariums at Cabela’s.”

The 32-inch long monster was just shy of the state record held by Michelle Larsen-Williams, set in 2009. She hooked her 20-pound, 34.25-inch long rainbow on the Snake River in 2009.

Idaho Fish and Game biologist John Cassinelli agrees. “That’s pretty insane from the Boise River.”

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The Columbia Basin Bulletin

Weekly Fish and Wildlife News
http://www.cbbulletin.com
November 17, 2017
Issue No. 852
Table of Contents

* IDFG Making Progress On Fixing Water Chemistry Issues Impacting Snake River Sockeye Hatchery Smolt Survival
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439869.aspx

* Colder, Wetter, Snowier Now Forecasted For Upcoming Winter; La Nina Conditions May Hang Around Until April
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439868.aspx

* Council Hears Presentation On How California’s Booming Renewables Affecting BPA Revenues
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439866.aspx

* Council Directs Cost Efficiency Savings To More Funds For Hatchery, Fish Diversion Improvements
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439866.aspx

* Corps Seeks Comment On Willamette Valley Reservoir Storage Reallocation Draft Study
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439865.aspx

* Corps Awards $6.2 Million Contract To ODFW To Operate Bonneville Fish Hatchery
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439864.aspx

* Western Governors Seek Clarification On Interior’s Plans To Prevent Spread Of Invasive Mussels
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439863.aspx

* Montana Supreme Court Upholds Salish-Kootenai Tribes Water Rights Compact
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439861.aspx

* Federal Climate Science Report For U.S. Released, Projects Trends In Temperature, Precipitation, Sea-Level Rise
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439862.aspx

* Petty Nominated For Interior Assistant Secretary Overseeing Bureau Of Reclamation, USGS
http://www.cbbulletin.com/439858.aspx
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Fish & Game News:

Don’t improperly dump your big game carcasses

By Phil Cooper, Wildlife Conservation Educator
Tuesday, November 14, 2017

Proper disposal keeps you out of trouble and eliminates problems for others

When you’re done butchering a big-game animal, there’s usually bones, hide and other inedible parts that should be double-bagged, securely tied, and put out with your household waste for garbage collection.

Hunters are required to remove and care for all of the edible meat from hindquarters as far down as the hock, the shoulders as far down as the knee, and meat along the backbone. There is also a lot of meat in the neck and covering the ribs that make good ground or stew meat.

When you take your harvested animal to a professional meat processor, you can deliver the clean carcass and your work is done. Perhaps the best part of paying a professional meat processor is the shop disposes of the bones for you.

When hunters do the processing themselves, there is a pile of bones, hide, and a head that need to be disposed of. If you’re quartering the animal in the field and in a remote area, these will be cleaned up by scavengers in short order.

If you bring an animal out whole and need to dispose of the inedible remains, a transfer station will accept animal carcasses for no charge from residents who live within that county who pay the solid waste disposal fee.

When disposing of game animals, hunters should consider the consequences of their actions. It only takes one improperly dumped and highly visible carcass to generate strong negative reactions from the public.

Unwanted big game carcasses that end up on the side of the road or other visible areas become eyesores and public health issues. They can even be hazardous because they attract dogs and scavengers, which become dangers to drivers who swerve to avoid hitting them.

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Biologists think they’ve found answers to low survival of sockeye salmon

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Specialist
Thursday, November 16, 2017

Sockeye runs have improved since the 1990s, but biologists want better survival of young fish and more returning adults

Idaho Fish and Game’s sockeye recovery program has overcome many challenges in preserving the species, and scientists are continuing to learn and improve as they transition from staving off extinction to growing Idaho’s sockeye population.

Fish and Game’s Assistant Fisheries Chief Paul Kline said F&G biologists think they’ve answered a nagging question about its relatively new sockeye hatchery in Springfield. The hatchery succeeded in raising lots of young sockeye, but the fish have survived poorly after being released to migrate to the Pacific.

Biologists found differences in water hardness between Springfield Hatchery in Southeast Idaho where the fish are raised from eggs and Redfish Lake Creek near Stanley where they’re released. Differences in water chemistry between the two waters may be adding stress to fish that are already stressed from “smoltification” – a period when they migrate downstream and their bodies transition from freshwater to saltwater.

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International Effort Slows Invasive Bullfrogs

By Michael Lucid, Wildlife Regional Biologist
Wednesday, November 8, 2017

Northern leopard frog numbers have declined dramatically in the northern portion of their range to the point there is only a single known natural population left in all of British Columbia or northern Idaho.

An international team of biologists has been working hard to prevent the northward movement of invasive bullfrogs toward British Columbia’s Creston Wildlife Management Area where that last leopard frog colony resides. Biologists on both sides of the border are using a promising new technique called ‘electrofrogging’ to remove, then euthanize, bullfrogs from small ponds.

Bullfrogs spread disease, outcompete native amphibians, and eat most anything in their path. Working together to slow the spread of bullfrogs is not only protecting the Creston leopard frog colony but helping prepare Idaho’s Boundary-Smith Creek Wildlife Management Area for a major climate adaptation restoration project which will benefit six climate sensitive Species of Greatest Conservation Need.

continued w/video:
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Idaho agency denies sex discrimination lawsuit allegations

By Keith Ridler – 11/14/17 AP

Boise, Idaho — The Idaho Department of Fish and Game is asking that a federal sex discrimination lawsuit be dismissed and that any recordings made by the former employee not be allowed as evidence.

The 8-page document filed Monday also asks that Fish and Game receive attorney fees.

The lawsuit filed last month in U.S. District Court seeking $100,000 in damages includes an allegation that a male supervisor threatened to strangle the female employee with an extension cord.

Fish and Game denies that ever took place.

The lawsuit also says the woman made recordings to back up some of her claims.

Fish and Game contends those recordings are illegal and should not be allowed as evidence, and the woman’s claim barred as a matter of public policy.

A ruling is pending.

source:
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F&G News Releases

https://idfg.idaho.gov/press
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Fun Critter Stuff:

Badger discovered asleep in cat bed in Linlithgow

BBC News Oct 19, 2017

A sleepy badger was caught napping in a cat bed in a house in Linlithgow.

The badger entered the kitchen through a cat flap and filled up on cat food before going to sleep in the soft bed.

The Scottish SPCA was called to the house at Beecraigs Country Park on Wednesday and an officer was able to persuade the badger to leave of its own accord.

The charity said it was unusual behaviour for badgers, which are usually shy animals, to enter a home.

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Badger-a
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Seasonal Humor:

ThanksgivingCard-a
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Tips & Advice:

Space heater safety

Tristan Lewis Nov 03, 2017 Local News 8

Idaho Falls, Idaho – As temperatures begin to drop, many of us are starting to bring out our space heaters.

Home heating fires account for 16% of structure fires in America.

Space heaters are rated for indoor use and should only be operated according to the owner’s manual, and be UL listed with tip-over shut off protection. Use of space heaters should only be temporary and are unsafe for prolonged periods.

All heat sources require at least 3 feet of clear space around them. Keep children, animals and any combustible materials away from heat sources.

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Idaho History November 19, 2017

1930’s Big Creek / Edwardsburg

1930 Mules at the Werdenhoff property

1930WerdenhoffStonebraker-a(click image for larger size)
Date: 1930
A corral of mules congregate near a log cabin on the Werdenhoff property. A man stands near them.
William Allen Stonebraker Photographs

source: Stonebraker Photograph Collection, University of Idaho Library Digital Initiatives
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1930 Census

(Marked as “Edwardsburg Mining District”, crossed off, then “Warrens Precinct” written in then crossed off and finally “South Fork Precinct” written in. Probably includes part of South Fork and Main Salmon River. This is from sheets 2, 3 and 4 of the South Fork Precinct 1930 Idaho Census.)

1930SoFkCensus3-a(click image for full size)

Name Gender Age Marital Status Relationship to Head Birth Year Birthplace

Claude M Taylor Male 43 Married Head 1887 Colorado
Elsie L Taylor Female 34 Married Wife 1896 Idaho
Robert B Joy Male 36 Widowed Head 1894 Texas
Zona V Joy Female 13 Single Daughter 1917 Idaho
Sidney R Joy Male 10 Single Son 1920 Idaho
Faith D Joy Female 8 Single Daughter 1922 Idaho
Frank Adair Male 71 Divorced Lodger 1859 Illinois
David Lewis Male 86 Single Head 1844 Illinois
Charles L Myers Male 70 Single Head 1860 Pennsylvania
Allan Stonebraker Male 48 Married Head 1882 California
Golda M Stonebraker Female 30 Married Wife 1900 Missouri
Adolph Stonebraker Male 13 Single Stepson 1917 Missouri
James Stanley Male 38 Single Head 1892 Tennessee
Mack C Musgrove Male 54 Married Head 1876 Missouri
Mary L Musgrove Female 49 Married Wife 1881 Missouri
Thomas Coski Male 32 Single Head 1898 Idaho
Samuel Hoppin Male 70 Single Head 1860 Oklahoma
Granville F Eyerman Male 34 Married Head 1896 Colorado
Clair K Eyerman Female 34 Married Wife 1896 Colorado
Chester R Eyerman Male 15 Single Son 1915 California
Albert H Vaux Male 30 Single Head 1900 Pennsylvania
Theodore Manersberger Male 54 Single Head 1876 Germany
William C Cooper Male 59 Single Head 1871 Oregon
John Becker Male 50 Single Head 1880 Pennsylvania
Earl K Parrott Male 63 Single Head 1867 Vermont
Ella Irwin Female 64 Married Head 1866 Missouri
Arline B Bunnell Female 12 Single Servant 1918 Michigan
Patrick H Irwin Male 27 Married Head 1903 Nebraska
Catherine V Irwin Female 21 Married Wife 1909 New Jersey
Patricia V Irwin Female 0 Single Daughter 1930 Idaho
William Berden Male 67 Single Head 1863 Ohio
Ruben J Lehman Male 36 Single Head 1894 Sweden
Charles H Custis Male 56 Divorced Employee 1874 Oklahoma
Lewis A Thompson Male 54 Married Head 1876 Missouri
Glenn Thompson Male 21 Single Son 1909 Idaho
William P Wilson Male 63 Single Employee 1867 Missouri
Joseph Parks Male 52 Single Head 1878 North Carolina
William J Newman Male 49 Married Head 1881 Iowa
Grace Newman Female 42 Married Wife 1888 Idaho
Arthur W Newman Male 18 Single Son 1912 Idaho
Adrian Carlson Male 66 Single Head 1864 Sweden
Roy C Romine Male 38 Married Head 1892 Montana
Irene Romine Female 26 Married Wife 1904 Washington
Albert Romine Male 2 Single Son 1928 Idaho
Margaret Romine Female 0 Single Daughter 1930 Idaho
Frank Williams Male 69 Single Head 1861 Missouri
Ellis C Winchester Male 64 Divorced Head 1866 Pennsylvania
Polly Berris [Bemis] Female 77 Widowed Head 1853 China
Thaddius Adams Male 51 Divorced Head 1879 Colorado
Harold Adams Male 19 Single Son 1911 Idaho
John M Condon Male 55 Widowed Head 1875 New York

from page 2 South Fork Precinct

William A Edwards Male 60 Married Head 1870 Georgia
Annie N Edwards Female 58 Married Wife 1872 Alabama
Napier A Edwards Male 31 Single Head 1899 Maryland
Anthony L Ladwick [Ludwig?] Male 78 Widowed Head 1852 Germany
Frank Lobear Male 45 Married Head 1885 Minnesota
Myrtle I Lobear Female 31 Married Wife 1899 Illinois
Leslie F Lobear Male 4 Single Son 1926 Washington
Joseph Davis Male 60 Single Head 1870 Washington
Harold Vassar Male 30 Single Head 1900 Idaho
Edward White Male 36 Married Head 1894 Iowa
Erik Janson [Jensen] Male 66 Single Head 1864 Finland
Jacob Janson [Jensen] Male 56 Single Brother 1874 Finland
Ernest E Elliott Male 39 Single Head 1891 Idaho
Oliver Pierce Male 42 Divorced Head 1888 Idaho
Charles Ekler Male 68 Single Boarder 1862 Germany
Theodore Taylor Male 28 Married Head 1902 Idaho
Eva Taylor Female 22 Married Wife 1908 Idaho
Walter A Estep Male 41 Single Head 1889 Pennsylvania
Charles Mahan Male 71 Divorced Head 1859 Iowa

source: Family Search
(link no longer working)
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Dan LeVan on Elk Summit
Photo thanks to Jim McCoy
(see more McCoy family photos here)
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Transportation

You could not drive a vehicle to Big Creek until the Thirties, and even then you had to come in over Elk Summit, down Smith Creek then up the wagon road to Big Creek. There was no road between Big Creek and Edwardsburg until the 1930’s. The road between Yellow Pine and Edwardsburg was built in 1933.

source: CG (personal correspondence)
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Dog team hauling mail to the Big Creek country in 1929

Photo courtesy of Margaret and Ken Twiliger
Photo from “The Middle Fork and the Sheepeater War” by Johnny Carrey and Cort Conley – copyright 1977
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Valley County Fault Map

(click image for larger size)

source: Digital Atlas of Idaho
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Big Creek / Edwardsburg 1936

excerpted from: Geology and Ore Deposits Near Edwardsburg and Thunder Mountain, Idaho by Shenon, P.J. and C.P. Ross, 1936, Idaho Bureau Mines and Geology Pamphlet 44

Introduction

This report embodies preliminary results of detailed studies carried on in the Thunder Mountain district and in the general vicinity of Edwardsburg in 1933 and 1934 by PJ Shenon, assisted by G.D. Emigh, together with data obtained by C.P. Ross in a brief visit to the Thunder Mountain district in 1926 and a month’s reconnaissance in the eastern division of the Idaho National Forest in 1929. …

Acknowledgments

All of the mining people who were met in the course of the field work gave information and assistance freely. Messrs. W.A. Edwards, Henry Abstein, F.C. Innes, A.F. Richards, James Hornberger, Walter Estep, A.C. Behne, Sam Wilson, Tony Ludwig, and N.G. Bush, of the Edwardsburg district, and D.C McRae, Robert McRae, C.W. Neff, William Timm, Samuel Hancock, and J.J. Oberbillig, of the Thunder Mountain district, spent considerable time and energy in assisting the writers.

Accessibility

Much of the area described in this report is relatively inaccessible, largely because of its ruggedness and severe winter climate. However, in recent years new roads have improved transportation facilities greatly.

A serviceable road now connects a branch of the Oregon Short Line Railroad at Cascade with Yellow Pine and Stibnite, respectively 70 and 84 miles distant. Until 1935(?) the only road into the Edwardsburg district was that from McCall by way of Warren. This road, which crosses several very high summits and deep canyons, is 84 miles long and is usually closed by snow from some time in October to about the middle of July. In 1933 a road was completed from Yellow Pine to Edwardsburg, which much facilitated access and lowered the freight costs considerably. In 1934 the Forest Service began building a road down Big Creek. This is to connect with another road started from Stibnite, which was completed as far as the head of Monumental Creek in 1934 and presumably will be continued down Monumental Creek through the Thunder Mountain district in the near future. A road down the Salmon River is also under construction and appears to promise the best all-year outlet for several of the mining districts when branch roads are built up the larger tributaries.

In recent years airplanes have been used to a considerable extent for winter travel and for carrying mail. There are now landing fields at Yellow Pine, Stibnite, Edwardsburg, Chamberlain Basin, and Soldier Bar.

1936MapIdahoEdwardsburg-a(click image for very large size)

Gold deposits of the Edwardsburg district

Trigold

The Trigold property is across Big Creek and about 1 1/2 miles north west of Profile Gap and is reached by a trail that gains over 1,200 feet in altitude between the crossing at Big Creek and the mine workings. The hillside up which the trail passes has a slope of 30 to 40 degrees. The property was located in the seventies, but, so far as known, little or no ore has been shipped from it. In 1933 it was being prospected by the Lori Syndicate of San Francisco.

Moscow (Moore) mine

The Moscow group of claims, including those of Tony Ludwig, embraces 16 or more claims on the east slope of Moores Creek, 5 miles southwest of Edwardsburg … The first claims were located in 1902 by Si Boyles, who sold them to E. Moore in 1903. Moore constructed a 1-stamp mill in 1903 and for several years ran ore through it which he mined from a glory hole. Later Seeley B. Mudd and associates purchased the property, but in 1934 it was under option to the Lori Syndicate of San Francisco. The production of the property, about $9,000, came almost entirely from the small 1-stamp mill operated by Moore.

Golden Way Up

The Golden Way Up claims are on the ridge between Fall Creek and the North Fork of Logan Creek. Most of the workings are on the North Fork slope. The property is about 6 miles by road and trail west of Edwardsburg. The trail, which gains an altitude of 1,500 feet in about 2 miles, joins the Edwardsburg road at the mouth of the North Fork, near Tony Ludwig’s cabin.

The Golden Way Up was first located by Charles Crown in 1899. John Campion, C.S. McKenzie, and others, did considerable development work after 1908, but the property was later abandoned. It was relocated by George Laufer and Joe Davis in 1908 and is now owned by Davis. The development work consists of several tunnels, probably 1,000 feet or more in total length. They range from 30 to over 300 feet in length and are nearly all accessible.

Dixie

The Dixie group (formerly the Goldman & McRae property) adjoins the Golden Way Up on the north. The claims extend across the divide between Logan and Government creeks. They are owned by the Copper Camp Mining Company, Inc.

Independence

The Independence property comprises ten patented claims on upper Smith Creek a short distance east of Elk Summit. The road from Edwardsburg to Warren crosses the property. …

Dan McRae located the Independence in 1898 and sold it to the Kansas and Texas Oil & Mining Company in 1901. The property is now owned by the Independence Mines & Power Company with offices in Topeka, Kansas.

Werdenhoff and Pueblo

The Werdenhoff property is on Smith Creek about 5 miles from its junction with Big Creek. A poor road 6 1/2 miles long connects the mine with the Warrens road near Elk Summit. A road was constructed up Smith Creek from Big Creek in 1933, so that the mine can now be reached from Yellow Pine by way of Edwardsburg and the Big Creek ranger station.

According to the 34th Annual Report of the Inspector of Mines for Idaho, 1932, the Werdenhoff group comprises 21 unpatented claims, which include part of the old Pueblo group. In 1933, the Werdenhoff property was not operating, although a well-constructed camp was maintained as a convenience to facilitate the road work and for handling supplies on the way to the Golden Hand mine, 2 miles north-east. Nothing appears to have been done at the Pueblo mine for years, and the tunnels seen are so caved that little was learned regarding it.

The Werdenhoff property was first located by Prindle [Pringle?] Smith, but was relocated during the Thunder Mountain boom by Mr. Werdenhoff. Most of the work was done on the property by the Keystone Mines Company after 1927. In 1933, the property was under the management of the Golden Hand, Inc.

Golden Hand, Inc.

The group owned by the Golden Hand, Inc., including the Old Neversweat, contains 26 unpatented claims. The property is near the head of Cache Creek, 6 miles by road north east of the Werdenhoff. The road is very steep in places and crosses a divide at an altitude of about 8,300 feet. A good camp has been constructed at the mine, and in 1933 a small Straub mill with a daily capacity of 6 tons was being operated.

Gold Deposits near Ramey Ridge

Ramey Ridge, on the north side of Big Creek between Ramey and Beaver creeks, is one of the widely mineralized areas in the region. It contains many prospects, but, although most of the deposits have long been known, there has been little development and almost no production, in part because of difficulty of transportation. Until 1934 the deposits were nearly a day’s trip by pack train beyond the end of the road. … The Arrastre (Mildred) group of five claims at the head of the east fork of Mulligan Creek, formerly owned by the late Walter Estep, is the best developed property on Ramey Ridge. … The Mahan property, on Mulligan Creek, has an old 5-stamp mill in dis-repair, a new hand-made, 1-stamp mill, and a few scattered short tunnels. The old mill is reported to have been operated for a short time on float ore picked up from the hillside below the Apex workings.

Arrastre (Mildred)

The Arrastre property is on Mulligan Creek, a tributary of Beaver Creek. In 1933, it was about 12 miles by trail from the nearest road at Big Creek headquarters, but in 1934 a road was under construction down Big Creek, which, when completed to the mouth of Beaver Creek, will shorten trail travel to about 3 miles. T.G. Thomas discovered the deposit in 1906, and it was known as the Mildred until after his death, when Walter Estep relocated it.

Jensen Group

The Jensen group of claims is on the north side of Crooked Creek about 5 miles above its confluence with Big Creek. It was located and has been developed up to the present time by two Jensen brothers, who came here during the Thunder Mountain boom. In the summer of 1929, equipment and supplies were brought to the property by pack train preparatory to an active campaign of development; in 1930, the mine was idle, but in 1933 and 1934 considerable development work was under taken.

When the property was visited in July, 1929, the new work had not yet started. There was a small, ingeniously constructed mill close to Crooked Creek and several short tunnels at intervals for several hundred feet vertically up the slope to the north. The principal working, high on this slope, was connected with a loading station in the gulch above the mill by a gravity tram.

Jensen Brothers Cabin
JensenBrothers

Copper Camp

The property, which for many years has been known as Copper Camp, was located in 1888. It is on the north side of Big Creek about 9 miles from the Big Creek ranger station. The Copper Camp property, which comprises 18 quartz and 2 placer claims, is held by the Copper Camp Mining Company.

Placers

The placer deposits are all more or less related to glacial and interglacial streams, although re-sorting and additional concentration have taken place up to the present time. The deposits are largely in or near the Edwardsburg district.

Two properties, those of the Big Creek Gold Mines, Inc., and the Smith Creek Hydraulic Company, are the principal placer prospects of the region. In addition, some preliminary test-drilling has been done in the Chamberlain Basin, and numerous small-scale panning and sluicing operations have been undertaken along the beds and on numerous terraces of a number of streams.

The Big Creek Gold Mines, Inc., controls 480 acres of ground in the meadows of Big Creek south of Edwardsburg. In 1929, this ground was tested with the intention of installing a dredge if results warranted.

The Smith Creek deposit is on Smith Creek above its confluence with Big Creek. It comprises 19 placer claims, but until 1934 had been worked only to a very slight extent, because of the difficulties entailed in handling the many large boulders in the deposit. For part o the summer of 1934 C.E. Dinamore and associates worked the property with drag lines and trucks, but they also had difficulty in handling the boulders.

Economic Considerations

Parts of the extremely large and continuous mineralized zone in the Edwardsburg district have already been mined on a small scale, and it seems likely that as more information is obtained on the gold content further mining will be done, either by selective, small-scale mining methods or by large-scale, low-cost operations. … At the present time, more adequate sampling is needed along the mineralized zone. No deep testing has been done, and possibly drilling at certain favorable places would be the most effective manner to make preliminary tests.
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1937 Big Creek

Big Creek in 1937. Right to left: pool hall-bar, store, hotel, and house. The hotel, built by Dick Cowman, did a thriving business at the time because of extensive mining activity.
Photo from “The Middle Fork and the Sheepeater War” by Johnny Carrey and Cort Conley – copyright 1977
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Big Creek, Idaho in 1939

Photo from “Idaho Mountains Our Home” by Lafe and Emma Cox – Copyright 1977 by V.O. Ranch Books

by Emma Cox
EmmaCox-young-a“We arrived at Big Creek headquarters [March 1939] where Dick and Sophia Cowman operated a store, post office and hotel. I saw the ranger station and a Forest Service commissary building. We weighed our dogs, sled and ourselves with our load, which weighed 947 pounds for seven dogs.”

“The Cowmans had a milk cow and chickens, so they always had fresh milk and eggs to serve their customers. It was such good food. We all enjoyed our overnight stay there after our 32 mile [dogsled] ride.”
pgs. 71-72

“After hunting season, [1939] we all made a trip to Boise with the two pickups for our supplies for six months: groceries, stock salt, grain and horseshoes. We had to buy a lot of flour, as we baked our own bread and pastries. Returning from Boise, we hauled the load as far as the Snowshoe Mine. From there everything had to be packed in by mules the six miles to Mile High.

“We ordered two truckloads of hay from Cascade to be delivered at Big Creek headquarters. But a big snowstorm came in, so the truck driver unloaded on top of the summit. It was snowing so hard he could not see to drive any farther. He went back for a second load.

“The next day the driver came in with the second load. It had snowed all night. He got as far up Profile as Camp Creek, where he spun out and slid off the road. He hurried to cut the ropes on the hay to keep the truck from turning over, but most of the hay landed in the creek. He did save his truck from going in or doing any damage.

“The storm continued, and some people were about to be snowed in. Stibnite Mine had a crew working on the head of Smith Creek on Dan McRae’s claims. They were all snowed in, so the mining company got their cat to open the road from Smith Creek to Big Creek and on over Profile Summit. There were 17 vehicles that needed to get back to Stibnite.

“We were behind with our team and bobsled, going on over the top after a load of the hay. Lafe had to use the team to help get some of the vehicles over the top.”
pgs. 79-80

from “Idaho Mountains Our Home” by Lafe and Emma Cox – Copyright 1977 by V.O. Ranch Books
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1937 Big Creek Topo Map

topo-id-big_creek-1937-a(click on map for full size image)

source: Topography by CA Stonesifar, Adolph Frankhauser, and RH McConnel Surveyed in 1935-1937
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Updated September 22, 2020

Road Report Nov 19

Note: Be prepared for winter driving this time of year, road conditions can change quickly. Be prepared for snow at high elevations and rocks/trees falling in the road. Please share road reports.

Yellow Pine: Our snow has melted some, now 1-2″ on the ground. Local streets are snow covered, icy in spots, and some bare spots. Click for Local Forecast

Warm Lake Highway: Big Creek Summit snowtel shows 31″ of snow. Probably has snow especially on the Cascade side of Big Creek summit.
Big Creek Summit SNOTEL station 6580′

Johnson Creek Road: Upper end closed at Landmark to wheeled vehicles for the winter. Lower Johnson Creek road was reported “terrible” on Nov 15. Pot holes and snow.
Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam:
The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

South Fork Road: No current report. Probably some snow at the upper end. Watch for rocks coming down.

EFSF Road: No current report. Probably has some snow. Watch for rocks coming down with the freeze thaw. Watch for pot holes.

Lick Creek: More than likely closed for winter to wheeled vehicles. Guessing there is over 2 feet of snow now. A report from Saturday (Nov 4) “Lick Creek summit was not passable today. Already 16 inches of snow on the flat before reaching the pass.” – J&N B

Note: Lick Creek Summit has an elevation of 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Current condition unknown. More than likely closed for winter to wheeled vehicles. Probably over 2 feet of snow at the summit by now.
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open? (no current report.)

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Closed at Monumental summit with snow. Truck reported to be stuck for the winter on the other side.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Closed. This is the road that goes from Big Creek/Edwardsburg up over Elk Summer, down to the South Fork of the Salmon River by Trails End Subdivision, then over to Warrens. The current status on this road is unknown. Elk summit is probably snowed closed by now.
Note: Elk Summit is at an elevation of nearly 9000 feet.
Big Creek Webcam:

Report from Burgdorf Hot Springs Saturday (Nov 11) “Weekend Road Update: It’s a tough go up to the summit, according to the latest folks to make it up to Burgdorf. Since some folks have had to turn around because of the conditions, CHAINS or equivelant seem essential! A big thanks to everyone who have made the attempt to come up.”

Deadwood Summit: No current report. Deadwood snotel showing 43″ of snow.
Note: The Approx Elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet (2,098 m)
Deadwood Summit SNOTEL station 6860′

Golden Gate Road: Closed.

Sugar Creek Road: Closed.
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