Monthly Archives: January 2018

Road Report Jan 31

Note: Winter road conditions change quickly. Be prepared for icy roads, snow at high elevations and rocks/trees falling in the road. Please share road reports.

Yellow Pine: Warmed up and some rain yesterday, average 10″ of snow on the flat. Local streets are snow covered and icy in several places. Click for Local Forecast.

Warm Lake Highway: (Jan 31) mail truck driver reports Warm Lake Highway is “in good shape”.
Big Creek Summit SNOTEL station 6580′

South Fork Road: (Jan 31) mail truck driver said the South Fork road was very icy and slick after the recent warm weather and rain.
Tea Pot Weather Station (5175′)

EFSF Road: (Jan 31) mail truck driver said 3/4″ of the EFSF road is solid ice, very slick.

Lower Johnson Creek Road: No current report. (Jan 24) a report that Cecil plowed lower Johnson Creek road out to Wapiti Meadow, road is smooth and snow floor has good traction.
Upper Johnson Creek Road: closed at Landmark to wheeled vehicles for the winter.
The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet
Snowmobile Trail Report: Per County Groomer report – “Johnson Cr Rd – Landmark to Wapiti Meadows 1/11/18”
Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam:
http://www.ruralnetwork.net/~yellowpinecm/

Lick Creek: Closed for winter to wheeled vehicles.
Trail Report: Have a report (Jan 20) that trail has been packed from Yellow Pine to Lick Creek for skiing.
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Closed for winter to wheeled vehicles.
Trail report: Have a report (Jan 20) that the trail has been packed from Yellow Pine to Profile Summit for skiing.
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.
Big Creek Webcam:

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Last report Dec 13: Open, chains advised, icy.

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Closed at Stibnite with snow. Truck reported to be stuck for the winter on the other side of Monumental.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Closed.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: No current report.
Note: The approx elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
Deadwood Summit SNOTEL station 6860′
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Jan 28, 2018 The Yellow Pine Times

Jan 28, 2018 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Village News:

Chili Contest Jan 27

What a perfect day!

Snow, chili, rum and lots of laughter with our Yellow Pine friends.

Thanks to our judges Clint, Tim, and Lynn for the great job judging our chili contest.

Congratulations to the winners!
First place: Nicki
Second place: Teri
Third place: Deb

2018YPChiliContest-a

A great big thanks to everyone who came.

Total donations to the Community Hall was $60. The money will be used towards maintenance of the Community Hall.

Thank you so much, Kathy Hall and Deb Filler
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Yellow Pine Tavern

Up coming events: February 4th Superbowl Sunday Party. February 17th Pie Contest.

Watch all of your favorite sports on our Big Screen TV at the Yellow Pine Tavern. Featuring Football. Open 9am to 8pm (or later on game nights.) Juke box is up and going!
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The Corner

The Corner is closed for the season.
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Winter Water Advice

To help prevent frozen water, avoid parking over buried water lines, allow the natural snow cover to insulate the ground. Driving over the lines will also push the frost deeper and can result in frozen pipes. Also, don’t plow the snow over where water lines are buried, and avoid covering up water shut off valves.

Water Bills are due January 31st.
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Be Predator Aware

Recent (Jan 28) reports of fox activity and tracks in and around the village. Apparently there are 2 habituated foxes hanging around, one is red and the other gray. Also a report of a small cougar leaving tracks around the upper end of the village a couple weeks ago. Keep an eye on small dogs and cats and please don’t leave pet food outdoors.
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2018 Fest

The 2018 festival T-shirt contest is now open! All entries must include the year (2018) and the festival name “Yellow Pine Festival” in the design Entries must be received by Friday, May 18th, 2018. The prize for the winning design is $100! Multiple designs by the same artist can be sent in.

Hint: these shirts are screen prints, simpler designs stand out better. Submit your entry by email to Marj Fields at fieldsmarjie @ yahoo.com
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YPFD News:

Winter Fire Safety Tips

Keep your chimney clean to prevent flue fires. Make sure your smoke detector is working. Never leave a portable electric heater unattended. Fire extinguishers should be charged, visible and easily accessible.

There are YPFD T-shirts, as well as YPFD patches and stickers for sale at the Tavern now.

Training will resume in the spring.
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VYPA News:

Next meeting June 2018
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Winter Propane Tips

Keep the snow cleared around propane lines and pipes leading from your tank to the house. The weight of snow sliding off roofs can cause leaks that can result in fire. Make sure you have a CO detector with working batteries.

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
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Diamond (Kennedy) Fuel & Feed

Diamond Fuel & Feed carries ice melt. “We sell 50# bags [of ice melt] for $8.99.” 208-382-4430
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook
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Local Observations:

Monday (Jan 22) light snow all night, 2″ new snow this morning, average 10″ of snow on the ground. Low clouds sitting down on the mountains, steady light snow continues. Fresh fox tracks all over the neighborhood. Lots of small birds visiting. Snowfall ended after lunch time, thinner clouds, trees dumping snow. Short snow flurry, then partly clear early afternoon, warmed up, high of 38 degrees, melted the trace of new snow. Partly cloudy at sunset. Flaking snow before midnight.

Tuesday (Jan 23) overnight low of 15 degrees, mostly clear sky with high haze, a few snowflakes on the deck from last night. Measured 9″ of old snow. Little birds at the feeders. Lots of fresh fox tracks this morning. Filtered sunshine (high haze) during the day, gusty breezy by early afternoon. Thicker clouds and overcast afternoon, gusty breezes, high of 39 degrees. A tiny skiff of snow fell early evening. Thinner clouds and hazy moon-set around 1030pm.

Wednesday (Jan 24) high hazy clouds this morning and breezy, measured an average of 9″ of old snow. Fresh fox tracks again from last night. Small birds, woodpecker and 2 pine squirrels visiting. Warm gusty afternoon breezes, snow on roofs melting and dripping, overcast. Warmer than normal day, high of 44 degrees, cloudy and breezy. Lighter breezes after sundown. Pretty windy last night, storm came in before 2am with rain then snow.

Thursday (Jan 25) overnight low of 29 degrees, an inch of new snow and 9″ average on the ground. Cloudy this morning, snow flurry before lunch time. Lots of little birds and the woodpecker visited. Another snow flurry put down a trace early in the afternoon, then clouds breaking up and bits of sunshine, chilly breezes. Back to cloudy and scattered snow showers the rest of the afternoon, gusty breezes at times, high of 38 degrees. Snow showers after dark. Snowed about 2″ by 1230am.

Friday (Jan 26) overnight low of 22 degrees, snowed 2″ during the night, still snowing lightly this morning, measured 11″ of snow on the ground. Several nuthatches, 2 woodpeckers and a bunch of chickadees visiting, and later a pine squirrel. Light snow all morning and into the early afternoon, scant 1/4″ accumulation. Cloudy afternoon and light breezes, high of 31 degrees. Thinner clouds and temps dropping before midnight, fat waxing moon with a large halo.

Saturday (Jan 27) started snowing after 5am, overnight low of 18 degrees, overcast and snowing this morning. Fresh fox tracks. Small birds, hairy woodpecker and pine squirrel visiting. A male downy woodpecker visited – first sighting in over 10 years! Light snow falling all afternoon, about an inch before dark, high of 32 degrees. Another couple of inches of snow before midnight and breezy. Snowed all night until around 7am and warming up.

Sunday (Jan 28) overnight low of 26 degrees, snowed most of the night, warmed up by morning. We probably got around 6″ of new snow, but it squished down to 4.5″ by morning, average 14″ of snow on the ground. Fresh fox tracks. Trees dumping snow loads before lunch time. Nuthatches, chickadees and hairy woodpecker visiting. High of 41 degrees by early afternoon, thinner clouds some filtered sun at times. Cloudy and getting a little foggy just before dark.
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Idaho News:

2018 McCall Winter Carnival Sculpture Winners Announced

Star-News Bulletin January 26, 2018

Here is the list of winners of this year’s snow sculpting competition just announced by the McCall Area Chamber of Commerce.

1st Place: Ruby’s Kitchen, “Come Gee! Come Haw!,” 324 W. Lake St. (25)

2nd Place: Albertsons, “Home in McCall,” 132 E. Lake St. (39)

3rd Place: Best Western PLUS, “Warm Winter Wishes,” 211 S. 3rd St. (5)

4th Place: Brundage Mountain Resort /Payette Lakes Ski Patrol, “Polar Ice,” On top of Brundage Mountain. (7)

5th Place: Holiday Inn Express, “Racking Up Time In The Rockies,” 210 N. 3rd St. (11)

6th Place: Salmon River Brewery, “Ice Bar,” 411 Railroad Ave. (26)

7th Place: Krahn’s Home Furnishings, “Home Sweet Home,” 211 E. Lake St. (14)

8th Place: Frontier Communications, “Home Place like Snow,” 1st and Lenora Sts. (9)

9th Place: Payette National Forest, “Smokey Bear at Home” East Lake and Mission Sts. (22)

10th Place: Lardo Grill, “Sharlie at the Races,” 600 W. Lake St. (15).
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Award winning ice sculpture vandalized at the McCall Winter Carnival

by Brian Morrin Sunday, January 28th 2018 KBOI

McCall, Idaho — An ice sculpture was vandalized at the McCall Winter Carnival Saturday overnight in front of Ruby’s Kitchen.

The sculpture won first place in the sculpting competition and featured a dog sled team.

Christopher Braden, the owner of Ruby’s Kitchen said he drove into work Sunday morning to see pieces of the sculpture all over the ground. He said it’s very disheartening to see this happen, especially on the first weekend, because people won’t be able to see it in its full glory.

A Valley County dispatcher says the call came in at 5:27 a.m.

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Valley County sheriff puts out advisory on counterfeit money

By Max Silverson for The Star-News January 25, 2018

At least three cases involving counterfeit $20 and $100 bills have been uncovered by the Valley County Sheriff’s Office.

2018Counterfeit-a
Graphic courtesy Valley County Sheriffs Office. Image shows an example of the counterfeit money that has been passed at Valley County businesses. Arrow points to symbols that show the bills are bogus.

“These notes are of very high quality but lack the denomination band that is woven into the bill,” Lt. Jason Speer said.

The most recent case were bogus bills passed at the D-9 supermarket store in Cascade.

A warning put out by the U.S. Secret Service said that the counterfeit bills may have Chinese and Cyrillic writing printed on the front of the note. The bills also do not have a visible watermark when held up to the light.

“The notes we have seen have the red writing rubbed off,” Speer said.

The counterfeit bills were only noticeable by the lack of watermark and denomination band.

The Secret Service is asking anyone who witnesses the passing of counterfeit money or any other information on the case to call the agency’s San Francisco field office at 415-576-1210.

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School canceled in Cascade amid flu outbreak

“I’ve been at the school for 27 years and this is the first time we’ve had to close because of illness,” Superintendent Pal Satori said.

Katie Terhune January 25, 2018 KTVB

Cascade, Idaho — School has been canceled for the rest of the week in the Cascade School District after a severe flu outbreak sickened nearly one-third of students.

Superintendent Pal Satori said flu has been affecting staff and students for several weeks, but attendance took a nosedive this week. Classes were canceled for Thursday and Friday.

The superintendent said that about 23 percent of students were absent Wednesday, but the number of kids who were actually sick was higher – totaling more than 30 percent of the district’s approximately 230 students.

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46 flu-related deaths reported in Idaho so far this season

Jan 26, 2018 – Local News 8

Boise, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – Southeastern Idaho Public Health reports 46 influenza-associated deaths have occurred so far this season in Idaho.

Of those 46, four individuals were in southeast Idaho’s Health District 6, and according to officials, all four of those individuals were over the age of 50.

Last flu season, 72 people were reported to have died from flu-related illnesses in Idaho.

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Valley County pays $75,000 in employee’s wrongful termination claims

Joyce Wade says she suffered retaliation at detention center

By Tom Grote for The Star-News January 25, 2018

Valley County has paid $75,000 to settle the claim of a former county employee who said she was wrongly fired from her job in August 2016.

Joyce Wade of New Meadows had sought $500,000 from the county for what she said were a series of violations of her rights that culminated in her “retaliatory” firing, according to her claim.

Wade, 61, worked for Valley County for 20 years and was working as a detention officer at the Valley County Juvenile Detention Center in McCall when she was fired, the claim said.

… The settlement was the second in six months involving an employee of the county’s court services division.

In August, former county juvenile probation officer Christine Andersen was paid $36,000 and her attorney was paid $9,000 to settle a federal lawsuit.

The lawsuit claimed Andersen was illegally fired in 2014 after working 10 years for the county.

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Applications sought for $500 wildfire preparation grants

The Star-News January 25, 2018

Applications are now being accepted for local wildfire risk reduction projects as part of Wildfire Community Preparedness Day on May 5.

The $500 grants are funded by the National Fire Protection Association and State Farm..

Applicants should show how a $500 grant will reduce wildfire risk in their community.

Projects can include such activities a s community clean-up days, fire prevention workshops, and youth community service projects.

For project ideas and tips on creating a winning application, visit the Wildfire Community Preparedness Day website at wildfireprepday.org

For questions, contact McCall Fire & EMS Chief Mark Billmire at mark@mccallfire.com

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Snowmobiler urges caution after dangerous, deadly avalanches

Two people have died in the last two weeks after being trapped in avalanches in the Island Park area in eastern Idaho.

Morgan Boydston – KTVB January 22, 2018

Two people died in the last two weeks after being trapped in avalanches in the Island Park area in eastern Idaho.

The latest was a Montana man who was killed Saturday riding a motorized snow bike.

A Boise man was snowmobiling with friends in the same area, on the same day. Two of the people in his group got trapped in an avalanche, too, but they survived.

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Magnitude 4.3 Idaho earthquake felt in Utah, Wyoming

1/26/18 AP

Soda Springs, Idaho — A light but widely felt earthquake has shaken southern Idaho, northern Utah and western Wyoming.

The U.S. Geological Survey says the magnitude 4.3 quake at about 8:30 p.m. was centered about 8 miles (14 km) southeast of Soda Springs, Idaho, a town of about 3,000 people. It was felt 150 miles (240 km) to the south in Salt Lake City and in much of western Wyoming.

There are no reports of any damages or injuries.

Seismographers from the University of Utah say the quake is an aftershock of a 5.3 magnitude earthquake in the area in September. That quake brought a swarm of hundreds of aftershocks in the weeks that followed.

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Mining News:

Ask Midas: What Is Midas Gold Doing Today

January 24

Midas Gold Idaho wants to keep the community informed about the work we are doing at the Stibnite Gold Project site. The Ask Midas blog series gives the experts in our company a chance to answer some of the community’s most frequently asked questions and help clear up any misconceptions around the project.

Since Midas Gold is still in the permitting phase of our project, people often ask me what the company is working on right now. It is a question I enjoy answering because there is so much happening with our company.

What is Midas gold doing today?

We are officially in the permitting phase and planning for the future. We have completed much of our exploration work and, in 2016, we submitted our Plan of Restoration and Operations to the U.S. Forest Service. This plan explains how we would redevelop the site and, most importantly, how we will take care of the environment before, during and after mining. If you want to see the plan and take a look at what we have been working on, it is available for review on the U.S. Forest Service’s and our website.

Before we can begin operations at the project, we need to successfully earn more than 50 permits and licenses from the federal, state and local agencies. We are working on obtaining those permits now. Throughout this process, there will be many chances for the community to provide comments on the project. Keep an eye out for updates on our website for information on how you can get involved.

As we work through the permitting process, we are continuing to study the conditions at site. We regularly collect groundwater and surface water quality samples, monitor the aquatic life and study the geological conditions.

If you have a question you would like us to answer, please email it to community@midasgoldcorp.com.

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Collapsed mine shaft opens up in Silver City, creates 25-foot deep sinkhole

by KBOI News Staff Friday, January 26th 2018


 (BLM Photo)

Silver City, Idaho (KBOI) — A collapsed mine shaft that opened up, creating a 25-foot deep hole in Silver City, has been filled in by the Bureau of Land Management.

The BLM says the five-foot wide sinkhole was located near the community park and near a campground.

“We notified the BLM about the issue and their response was great,” said Jim Hawe, Chairman of the Silver City Homeowners Association. “We really appreciate the effort they made. It couldn’t have gone any better.”

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The EPA made a surprise move that could protect the world’s largest salmon fishery

Bristol Bay supplies half the world’s sockeye

By Drew Griffin, Scott Bronstein and Patricia Dicarlo CNN Jan 27, 2018 Local News 8

In a surprise reversal, the Environmental Protection Agency announced it is withdrawing its plan to suspend environmental protections for an area of Alaska that is home to the world’s most valuable wild salmon fishery.

The EPA proposed last year to “reverse clean water safeguards” for the Bristol Bay watershed, paving the way for a massive gold and copper mine to be built in the region.

The controversial proposal would have canceled an EPA protection put in place during the Obama administration. After years of study, the EPA found in 2014 that a mine “would result in complete loss of fish habitat” in some areas of the bay, and that “all of these losses would be irreversible.”

The Bristol Bay watershed is one of the most pristine ecosystems in the world, supplying about half of the world’s sockeye salmon.

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Public Lands:

Big Creek Yellow Pine South Fork Collaborative

1/22/2018

This month’s Big Creek-Yellow Pine-South Fork Collaborative meeting has been cancelled. We will meet Thursday February the 22nd as planned. Attached to this email is the draft of the meeting minutes from December 14th.

attachment: BC-YP Meeting-December 14, 2017.pdf
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Forestry Day at the Idaho Legislature

1/25/2018 PNF FB

Yesterday, Payette National Forest Supervisor, Keith Lannom presented at the annual Forestry Day at the Idaho Legislature. The event is sponsored by the Society of American Foresters with the assistance of many others, and gives our state legislatures an update of the timber industry in the State.

From our National Forest lands, these benefits are being received throughout the state:

175 million board feet of timber have been cut in 2017. This equates to nearly 39,000 logging truck loads. The removal of crowded trees from dense tree stands, helps to return our national forests to more healthy conditions.

In some cases, timber is being harvested using Stewardship Contracts that exchange goods for services. In this case, timber value is being exchanged for much needed forest health restoration work such as fish & wildlife habitat improvements, noxious weed removal, road and trail maintenance, non-commercial thinning, bio-mass production, and fuels reduction in and near the wildland urban interface.

The Forest Service contributed $800 million, and 4,500 private sector jobs to the state in 2017 through our timber harvest projects to promote forest health restoration.

Idaho National Forests are partnering with the Idaho Department of Lands under the Good Neighbor Authority to further reduce fuels loads on our public lands, and contribute to our local timber industries and community economies.

Collaborative efforts bring all the stake holders to the table. On the Payette, collaboration with the Payette Forest Coalition has cut the time required for planning projects from 3 – 4 years, to 2 years.

The Forest Service throughout the state is fully engaged in restoring the health to our natural ecosystems on your public lands, while working with all members of the public to contribute to our local economies. Get involved with collaboration! These are your public lands, and a seat at the table is waiting for you.

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BLM Advisory Council meeting moved to February

Date: January 24, 2018
Contact: Michael Williamson mwilliamson@blm.gov (208) 384-3393

Boise, Idaho – The Bureau of Land Management is moving the previously announced January meeting of the Boise District Resource Advisory Council to Feb. 22, 2018 at 3948 Development Ave., Boise, ID, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. The change is due to a scheduling conflict.

Resource Advisory Councils demonstrate that partnerships and inclusion are vital to managing sustainable, working public lands.

Planned agenda items at the meeting will be the Four Rivers Field Office Resource Management Plan scoping comments review, Wild Horse and Burro program, travel management planning, Soda Fire rehabilitation, Tri-State fuel break project and other field office updates.

“The RAC represents diverse public interests and provides invaluable input for managing our public lands,” said District Manager Lara Douglas. “Their feedback helps us make more informed decisions, resulting in better projects on the ground.”

A half-hour comment period, during which the public may address the RAC, will begin at 11 a.m. Depending on the number of people wishing to comment and time available, the amount of time for individual oral comments may be limited.

Resource Advisory Councils are critical in assisting the BLM in continuing to be a good neighbor in the communities we serve. The 15-member RAC provides advice and recommendations to the BLM on resource and land management issues within the BLM Boise District.

For more information about the upcoming RAC meeting, please contact Mike Williamson at (208) 384-3393 or mwilliamson@blm.gov
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Critter News:

Protecting your dog from canine influenza

By Michaela Leung Jan 25, 2018 Local News 8

Idaho Falls, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – It’s not just people that get the flu. There is also Canine Influenza that dogs can get from each other.

It’s different from the human flu, so they can’t get it from you or vice versa. Most dogs recover, but sometimes it can be deadly. There haven’t been any reported cases in Idaho, but that doesn’t mean it can’t happen. The dog flu has been found in Oregon, Washington and Montana. Even though it’s not in our area, you shouldn’t wait until is to get your dogs vaccinated.

“It can even possibly pass from dog to dog by a person petting one animal and petting another,” says Dr. Leslie Stone, Northgate Veterinary Hospital in Idaho Falls.

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Pet Talk – Bladder stones in dogs and cats

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt Jan 26, 2018 – IME

Bladder stones are physical aggregations of mineral substances in the bladder. They can occur in both dogs and cats. They may rub and irritate the lining of the bladder, increase the risk of bladder infections or lodge in the urethra (the tube that carries urine from the bladder to outside the body), causing an obstruction.

Several types of bladder stones occur in dogs. Struvite stones occur in the presence of bladder infections. Female dogs are predisposed to struvite stones. Calcium oxalate stones occur in certain breeds, as urate stones, which commonly occur in dogs with liver abnormalities.

Signs of bladder stones include frequent urination and urgency to urinate. There may be pain urinating and, often, blood may be seen in the urine. Bladder stones may lodge in the urethra, especially in male dogs, causing an obstruction and inability to urinate. Urinary obstruction is an emergency situation.

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Dogs on Deployment takes care of pets while their owners are serving overseas

By Ariel Min 1/22/2018

Wifi is a 4-year-old pit bull who loves belly rubs and attention. Her owner, who currently serves in the U.S. Air Force, has been deployed since last year – and she was able to quickly find a temporary home, thanks to Dogs on Deployment.

“[Her owner] was concerned that he wasn’t going to be able to find someone to watch her in the quick turnaround, but when we met her, we completely fell in love with her, and now we have her for a few months,” said Carla Mead, who is now a three-time boarder and a Los Angeles coordinator for Dogs on Deployment. For Mead and her husband Jon, this was the perfect way to support military service members while fulfilling dreams of fostering and caring for animals.

Dogs on Deployment is a volunteer-based nonprofit that helps military members find a temporary home for their pets while they are away. Since it started in 2011, more than 1,100 pets (despite the name, the service is not restricted to dogs) have been taken care of. Founders Shawn and Alisa Johnson, who served in the U.S. Navy and the U.S. Marine Corp respectively, saw the need firsthand and eventually set out to find a more practical solution for military members.

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Elmore County sheriff after dogs found dead: ‘Watch after your pets’

Four missing dogs were found dead in the same area right outside Mountain Home Monday.

Gretchen Parsons January 24, 2018 KTVB

Mountain Home residents are being told to keep a close eye on their pets after four missing dogs were found dead earlier this week.

The Elmore County Sheriff’s Office is still trying to determine exactly how the animals died, but it’s definitely causing concern for pet owners in the area.

On Monday afternoon, Elmore County sheriff’s deputies responded to the area near old Highway 30, a few miles outside Mountain Home.

They found two dead dogs that were reported missing by their owners.

Several hours later, two more dogs were found, also dead.

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Wolf control board has big balance, wants more $$, removal of 5-year expiration

Betsy Z. Russell The Spokesman-Review Jan 26, 2018

A state board charged with contracting to have problem wolves killed asked state lawmakers for another $400,000 on Friday, though the board has received that amount from the state each of the past four years and currently has $1.4 million in the bank; (you can read my full story here at spokesman.com)

Carl Rey, a member of the Idaho Wolf Control Depredation Board, said the annual $400,000 payments from the state general fund are part of deal struck with livestock industry and sportsmen, who also are contributing up to $110,000 each year to the fund. “We have found that we have carry-overs, obviously,” Rey told the Legislature’s Joint Finance-Appropriations Committee. “We’re only asking now that we complete the five-year cycle that was originally intended.”

The board’s mission expires in June of 2019, but Gov. Butch Otter and the board plan to propose legislation this year to remove the expiration and make it a permanent, ongoing state expense, possibly at a lower annual level, reportedly around $220,000 a year. Rey said with the proposed legislation, lawmakers will get a chance to weigh in on that.

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KWVR Oregon Wolf Education weekly Wolf Report

Fourth week of January 2018
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Wyoming releases wolf hunting kill numbers

KIVI TV, Jan 26, 2018

Cheyenne, Wyo. (AP) – Seventy-six wolves were killed by hunters and others in Wyoming last year when the state took over management of the animals.

Ken Mills of the Wyoming Game and Fish Department says 43 wolves were legally hunted and one illegally hunted in the state during a licensed hunting season from October through December. That met the state’s hunting quota of 44 set by game managers.

About 2,500 hunting licenses were issued.

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Washington state man fined $8,000 for killing wolves

1/27/18 AP

Newport, Wash. — An eastern Washington state man who killed two wolves has been fined more than $8,000.

Fifty-five-year-old Terry Leroy Fowler of Liberty Lake received the fine Thursday in Pend Oreille County District Court after pleading guilty to two counts of unlawful taking of endangered wildlife.

Authorities say they began investigating the wolf deaths in Pend Oreille County in early 2016 and ultimately searched Fowler’s cabin and home.

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Mountain lion on runway delays flight at Idaho airport

1/24/18 AP

Ketchum, Idaho — An airplane approaching a rural Idaho airport had to abort its initial landing after a mountain lion was spotted on the runway.

The Idaho Mountain Express reports the Delta flight from Salt Lake City to Friedman Memorial Airport in Hailey on Saturday night was delayed about 20 minutes due to the mountain lion.

Airport manager Chris Pomeroy says airport personnel attempted to corral the cougar, and its tracks later indicated it had been roaming outside the perimeter fence for a couple days.

Idaho Department of Fish and Game officials say a conservation officer shot the lion in order to protect the public.

Officials say the officer did not have access to a tranquilizer gun, and there was no way to safely trap the juvenile cougar in a timely manner.

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Idaho won’t have to alter trap rules to protect Canada lynx

By Keith Ridler – 1/25/18 AP

Boise, Idaho — Idaho doesn’t need to change trapping regulations where federally protected Canada lynx are likely to be caught in traps set for bobcats, a federal court said in a decision that reversed its earlier ruling.

U.S. District Court Judge B. Lynn Winmill on Wednesday said he was reconsidering his prior decision based on new evidence put forward by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service making clear the agency allows the incidental capture of lynx that are released unharmed.

The federal agency exempting lynx caught by licensed trappers targeting bobcats, Winmill wrote, “makes it far less likely that illegal takes will occur in the future.”

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70 bison killed so far this year by Montana hunters

1/25/18 AP

Billings, Mont. — Montana wildlife officials say 70 bison have been shot by hunters so far this year.

The Billings Gazette reported Thursday that 59 of those bison were killed on the west side near West Yellowstone, while 11 were killed in the Gardiner area.

The Confederated Salish Kootenai Tribes killed 39 bison, while 24 were killed by state hunters.

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Deer ‘too tired to move’ rescued from frozen reservoir in Colorado

by Oscar Contreras Jan 21, 2018 Scripps Media, Inc.

Lakewood, Colo. – A deer that was “too tired to move” was rescued from a frozen reservoir in Lakewood, Colorado on Sunday afternoon – and it was all caught on camera.

West Metro Fire Rescue responded to Main Reservoir in Lakewood sometime Sunday afternoon after getting a call from Lakewood Animal Control about a deer in trouble.

The deer was actually standing in the water, according to West Metro Fire Rescue officials, but was “too tired to move.”

Rescuers broke a path through the ice, grabbed onto an antler and then brought the deer back to shore, where he was warmed up inside an animal control van belonging to the Lakewood Police Department.

continued w/video of rescue:
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Goose hunting season finds its way into Meridian subdivision

Hunters are firing off guns just yards away from some Meridian homes, landing unwelcome rewards in people’s property.

Morgan Boydston January 27, 2018 KTVB

Hunters are shooting geese out in the suburbs on the Meridian border and recently, it’s cause for concern.

It’s a tale as old as time as cities in once rural Idaho get built out. But is hunting right near homes and development legal?

Nearby residents – who live in Meridian city limits – tell KTVB hunters have been shooting geese out on an expansive field next to their homes on Chinden Boulevard and Linder Road for years without any issues. But recently,they say shotgun pellets have been peppering people’s roofs and geese have been landing in yards in the Paramount subdivision in the City of Meridian, including in the front yard of the Badigians.

continued:
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City of Nampa uses new methods to discourage crows from gathering in Downtown area

by KBOI News Staff Tuesday, January 23rd 2018

Nampa, Idaho (KBOI) — The City of Nampa has been trying methods to discourage crows from settling in downtown areas by creating loud noises and using “Bird be Gone” products.

The crows are gathering in large numbers because of a migration process that occurs every six and seven years, lasting several months.

According to the City of Nampa, the crows are causing damage to tree limbs, and produce excessive droppings on the ground.

continued:
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The Columbia Basin Bulletin

Weekly Fish and Wildlife News
http://www.cbbulletin.com
January 26, 2018
Issue No. 860
Table of Contents

* Preliminary Data Shows Steelhead Mortality From Gillnetting May Be Lower Than Thought
http://www.cbbulletin.com/440140.aspx

* Draft Report: Corps/States Effort To Prohibit Invasive Mussels Saw 25 Percent Increase In Watercraft Interceptions
http://www.cbbulletin.com/440139.aspx

* Coho Smolts Rescued From Gorge Hatchery During Fire Soon Headed To Lostine River As Part Of Reintroduction
http://www.cbbulletin.com/440138.aspx

* Salmon BiOp Challengers Argue New 2018 BiOp Due End Of Year Would Be Illegal Without EIS Foundation
http://www.cbbulletin.com/440137.aspx

* Draft $24 Million Albeni Falls Dam Wildlife Habitat Agreement Between Idaho, BPA Out For Comment
http://www.cbbulletin.com/440136.aspx

* Central Oregon’s Crooked River To Get Fish Ladder At Opal Springs, Freeing Up 120 Miles Of Habitat For Steelhead
http://www.cbbulletin.com/440135.aspx

* Puget Sound Chinook Plan: WDFW Commission Advises Fish Managers To Strike Better Conservation/Harvest Balance
http://www.cbbulletin.com/440134.aspx

* Organizations Working To Clean Up Oil Spill In Columbia River Estuary Near Astoria
http://www.cbbulletin.com/440133.aspx

* Washington Department Fish and Wildlife Director Unsworth Announces Resignation
http://www.cbbulletin.com/440132.aspx

* USFWS Initiates 5-Year ESA Status Review Of Kootenai River Sturgeon, Columbia Basin Pygmy Rabbit, Snake River Snail
http://www.cbbulletin.com/440131.aspx

* Study Indicates Vaccines Not Protecting Farmed Fish From Disease
http://www.cbbulletin.com/440130.aspx
—————————-

Fish & Game News:

Ice fishing event at Horsethief Reservoir draws hundreds of anglers

Annual event is geared toward getting kids and families interested in ice fishing

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Specialist
Monday, January 22, 2018

Ice anglers of all ages spent a day fishing at Horsethief Reservoir during the Ninth Annual Youth Ice Fishing Day on Jan. 20. The event was hosted by the nonprofit group, Idaho Youth Outdoors, to provide the families, especially youth, with a chance to enjoy Idaho and the many exciting adventures the great outdoors provides. Idaho Fish and Game, among many others, is a partner in the event.

“It’s a family friendly event, and we take care of all their needs to get them started fishing,” organizer Sean Cluff said.

The event is held annually, typically around the second weekend in January, Cluff said. People can get details at the Youth Outdoors website.

continued:
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F&G News Releases

https://idfg.idaho.gov/press
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Fun Critter Stuff:

California officers save chickens from road

by The Associated Press Tuesday, January 2nd 2018


(CHP Officer C.Lillie/California Highway Patrol via AP)

Los Angeles (AP) — It was a race against the cluck as California Highway Patrol officers scrambled to rescue nearly 20 chickens that ran through highway lanes near Los Angeles.

The agency says the birds blocked a portion of Interstate 605 in the Norwalk area Tuesday morning after their cage fell from the back of a truck.

The agency tweeted photos and video of the chickens on the highway and a motorcycle officer collecting them.

Officers managed to rescue 17 birds. Two died.

One tweet asked: “why DID the chickens cross the road? Because they obviously did not want to become ‘fast food’ on an LA area freeway, of course!”

source:
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ChickenRoadWrong-a
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Seasonal Humor:

Creative Firewood Stacking

WinterFirewoodStack3-a
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Idaho History January 28, 2018

Big Creek Ranger Station

WantedForestRangers-a
source: Payette NF
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Big Creek Ranger Station History

The Payette National Forest has undergone a series of boundary changes, decreasing and increasing in acreage. On July 1,1908 the Idaho National Forest was created from the northern part of the Payette National Forest, but rejoined the Payette again on April 1,1944. The Big Creek Ranger Station was constructed as one of the many administrative sites of the then remote backcountry.

This site represents one of the “log cabin era” buildings built by the Forest Service. The early use of local materials – lodgepole pine and Douglas fir shakes – denotes the ingenuity required of Forest Service personnel in the establishment of these early administrative sites. The remoteness of the site precluded the use of milled lumber and manufactured materials to a great degree.

The 1911,1912, and 1919 maps of the Idaho and Payette National Forests show vast, unsurveyed mountainous areas with very little definition of forest service activity besides some trails. Today, it requires three and one-half-hours to drive from McCall, Idaho to the Big Creek Commissary. In 1924, it took approximately the whole day to travel the same distance. Julian Rothery who was Supervisor on the Forest from 1910-1912 expressed it this way.

In the early days, the Idaho [National Forest] was the last frontier, a rocky snow-buried land,.. Perhaps the most significant development in my time was the awakening to the necessity of roads, trails and telephone lines. The fires of 1910 generally were so remote and inaccessible that no substantial effort could be made to control them; and in some cases were never discovered and only the next year would a Ranger find the old scar.

If one has not visited this area of central Idaho, the remoteness of this rugged country now, and then, can only be imagined and be somewhat envisioned by comparing the development on the forest through historic maps. Specifically, the 1920 Payette National Forest map shows the road from the west deadending at the town of Edwardsburg (see map). Only the major drainages and mountain peaks were designated.

1920 Payette National Forest Map

1920PNFmap-a(click image for much larger size)

By 1924, however, numerous roads, trails, and administrative sites had developed. As an administrative site, the 1924 Payette National Forest map indicates the forest service site was called “Big Ck Hdqts” (see map). This map indicates telephone lines leading to other ranger stations and surrounding lookouts.

1924 Payette National Forest Map

1924PNFmap-a(click image for much larger size)

By 1936, the Idaho National Forest Map indicates the landing strip had been developed. The next Idaho National Forest map in 1938 shows the Big Creek Ranger Station had been designated as a District Office.

1938 Payette National Forest Map

1940BigCreekMap-a(click image for much larger size)

Historic Function

The vicinity of the Big Creek site was first used in the early 1920s as ranger headquarters. Fred Williams tells of his experience.

The next season, 1922, headquarters was established in a set of old mining cabins on Smith Creek [two miles north of the present site] – the Station headquarters had been moved from Ramey Ridge – said cabin had been used as a barn, no floor or windows – it was quite a classy place. That fall we moved to Edwardsburg [one half mile south of the present site]…. In 1923 we established headquarters at what is now Big Creek headquarters – the Ranger Station was a 7′ x 9′ tent, the warehouse and office consisted of two 14′ x 20′ tents and the cook shack was made of whatever old canvas we could find.

Development of the Big Creek Ranger Station complex occurred over the next two years. The Commissary was first used in 1926 as an administrative building with multiple functions. It has three separate rooms on the ground level and two rooms on the second level. On the ground level, the west room was the commissary, which contained canned and dried foods, and other domestic supplies.

1940BigCreekRangerStation-a(click image for larger size)

The middle section was the office where the Ranger had the use of a telephone switchboard for dispatching duties. As a District Office, this main telephone switchboard operated the backcountry telephone lines. The system was phased out in the late 1940s and early 50s with the advent of the 2-way radio. Above this room were the sleeping quarters for USDA Forest Service personnel.

caption: Big Creek Ranger Station Switchboard (Kellogg Switchboard)
[h/t CG]

The eastern end of the building was used for the storage of livestock tack. Above this tack room was where the fire fighting tools were stored. This multifunctional building was unique to the administration of the former Idaho National Forest, and for the management of the former Idaho Primitive Area.

These early administrative sites would have had a ranger stationed at the site. As the site map, drawn in 1996 indicates, other structures were associated with the complex, including a dwelling, woodshed, outhouse, and tent platforms.

In the early 1940s the complex was upgraded and new buildings were constructed across the road and west of the airfield. At this time the functions of the commissary changed. The switchboard operations and ranger’s office moved to the newer facility. The commissary building continued to be used for storage of livestock feed and repair of tack.

source: National Register of Historic Places
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Big Creek Commissary

Summary

The Big Creek Commissary was constructed in 1924 – 25 during the initial development of the Big Creek Ranger Station. Of the original complex of buildings only the commissary remains. This structure is unique in its construction and represents one of the few remaining log cabin” era buildings on the Payette National Forest.

General Characteristics

The Big Creek Commissary is situated at 5,710 feet above mean sea level one half mile from the western border of the Frank Church – River of No Return Wilderness in Valley County, Idaho. The site is located thirty-eight air miles from McCall, Idaho, the headquarters for the Payette National Forest. The historic townsite of Edwardsburg is less than one-half mile to the south.

Site

The site is accessed via Forest Service Road 340 which follows the Big Creek drainage northward. The Commissary is located within the minor drainage of Logon Creek which joins Big Creek one mile north. The mile-long meadow parallels Hogback Ridge which divides the Big Creek drainage from the minor drainage. The surrounding environment consists of a lodgepole pine forest interspersed with open, wet, grassy areas. The site was selected because of the abundance of straight, tall lodgepole pine trees that were used in the construction of the commissary and other structures.

The historic setting of the Big Creek Commissary has remained essentially unchanged since the completion of the building in 1925. The commissary is accessible by Forest Service road 371, pack trail, and the grass-covered airfield, constructed in circa 1935. A corral to the north of the commissary is used for the containment of horses and mules. Irrigation water for these pastures is derived from water lines extending from Logon Creek. The pastures provide for the grazing of horses and mules used for transporting people and equipment into and out of the wilderness.

Big Creek Commissary

BigCreekCommissary-a

Exterior

The construction of the Commissary occurred in 1924 – 25, during the development of the Big Creek Ranger Station. Of the original complex of buildings and features, only the commissary and a non-historic corral immediately to the north remains. Other fence lines around the site are also non-historic.
The commissary building measures 56 feet east to west by 24 feet north to south with a six-foot overhang at the south. The structure is one-and-a-half stories in height. The foundation consists of a combination of formed concrete footings and concrete piers. The continuous concrete footing, located under the west half of the building, appears to have been added later as the sill log is completely enveloped. The east half is supported by concrete piers. The pier at the northeast corner is inscribed with the following information.
“Sept. 7,1930, Emmit Routson, Walter Hinkley, and Don Park.”

Log Construction

A sill log spans the irregularly placed piers at the east end and extends beyond the north and south walls. Exterior walls are composed of logs 10″ – 14″ in diameter. Logs used in the superstructure are smaller, averaging 7″ – 10″ in diameter. The primary daubing consists of tree lichen covered with concrete and the chinking is small poles of 2″ – 3″ in diameter. The exterior of the building has been stained a reddish-brown.
The log walls have been left in their natural round profile. The ends have been hewn and square notched. The intersection of the two interior log partitions is visible at the north and south elevations. Again the logs are square notched at these junctures creating a neat seam of hewn log ends. The overall effect is very uniform in materials and craftsmanship.
At the south elevation the roof extends over the south wall and is supported by five log posts. This deep overhang provides a sheltered area for the transfer of equipment and supplies. At the west end of the south wall is a sliding door which accesses the commissary space. At the center of the south wall is a single passage door of slab construction with one light that leads to an office space. At the east end of the south wall is a pair of doors of slab construction with one light each that open into the tack room. There are no windows on the south elevation.
The east elevation features a triple set of six-pane fixed windows that is offset to the north. The opening is finished with painted casings. Centered in the gable end above is another triple set of six-pane fixed windows. The shakes overlap the window frame and no casing was installed.
The north elevation features a modern sliding door accessing the tack room. At the center of the north wall is another triple set of six-pane fixed windows with painted casings. At the west end of the north wall is a pair of doors of slab construction opening into the commissary.
The west elevation features a triple set of six-pane fixed windows that is offset to the north. The opening is finished with painted casings. Centered in the gable end above is another triple set of six-pane fixed windows. The shakes overlap the window frame and no casing was installed.
The steep-pitched gable roof was originally finished with shakes. It is now covered with corrugated metal roofing. The ridge pole and purlins extend beyond the end walls creating a deep shadow. The gable ends are finished with six rows of hand-split Douglas fir shakes.

Big Creek Commissary

BCCommissary-a

Interior

The interior of the building is divided into three bays separated by log partitions. At the first floor is the commissary at the west, tack room at the east, and office at the center.
The commissary space is open to the roof structure. Walls are logs with pole chinking. Flooring is composed of wood planks 6″ – 8″ in width.
The office space at the center of the building is finished with painted plywood paneling. Butt joints at panels are covered with battens, flooring is composed of wood planks 6″ – 8″ in width with wide baseboards. The old telephone switchboard remains in this space.
The tack room walls are logs with pole chinking. The flooring and ceiling are composed of wood planks. Workbenches and equipment for repairing tack are present.
At the east wall of the tack room is a stairway leading to the second level. This second level spans the office and tack room areas. This area historically served as sleeping quarters for crews and was used for storage. Flooring is composed of wood planks 6″ – 8″ in width.
There are no trusses supporting the roof of this massive log building. Three structural diaphragms, each constructed of sixteen horizontal logs spanning from north to south, support the purlins. This diaphragm system stiffens and strengthens the roof structure. USDA Forest Service engineers no longer use this structural feature; trusses are used in contemporary construction.
The history of the Big Creek Commissary as associated with the Big Creek Ranger Station forms an important link with the early development of Forest Service administrative sites in the back country.

… This property reflects the establishment of the United States Forest Service in 1905 and the reliance upon early Forest Service craftsmanship in constructing vernacular “log cabin” style buildings using local materials. This building period predates the creation of the Civilian Conservation Corps in 1933 which initiated a major building boom for the Forest Service. Standardization of building plans ended the “log cabin” era of Forest Service rustic architecture. The 1935 Building Construction Manual for Region Four of the Forest Service does not illustrate log construction as found at Big Creek Commissary. Plans in this handbook are wood frame construction with logs used only for site features – benches, signposts, and fences. This verifies that by the mid 1930s the Forest Service had abandoned the use of logs in construction of their buildings. …

Seasonal Use Today

The Idaho Primitive Area, established in 1931, was renamed the River of No Return Wilderness in 1980. The name was legislatively changed to the Frank Church – River of No Return Wilderness in 1984. The historic commissary building remains a part of the Big Creek Ranger Station today as a livestock facility serving the wilderness area. It’s continued use is maintained through Forest Service facilities funding. The fencing and corrals have been replaced over the years. Evidence of earlier fence posts can be observed in the ground dose to the alignment of the existing fence. The ranger’s dwelling burned down in 1986. The woodshed was removed in 1990 after Section 106 review. It is unknown when the other structures were removed.

The Big Creek Commissary represents the oldest and largest, multi-room, multi-functional, log building related to wilderness management on the Payette National Forest today. This building and associated corrals are seasonally used today by livestock packers. Livestock tack, feed, and maintenance tools are stored in this building.

Architectural Context

Architecturally, the Big Creek Commissary exhibits a continuity of design, materials, construction techniques, color, and details. The use of locally available lodgepole pine, and Douglas fir trees for the building reveals the resourceful abilities of the USDA Idaho National Forest personnel. A circa 1929 photograph reveals that there was an adequate supply of tall, straight timber for the construction of the Commissary. Logs were carefully chosen in the forest for the construction of the buildings. Logs were selected for diameter, length, and straightness. All the logs used in the commissary building were peeled. It is likely that the logs were cut and left to dry prior to construction. The trees were felled with crosscut saws and axe. Mules were used to drag the logs to the building site. Many weeks, days, and hours were spent in preparation of the logs, Bark on each log had to be removed with drawknives. Logs were cut to length and shaped with adzes, and handsaws.

What is unusual about the Big Creek Commissary is the size of the log building, and the internal supporting horizontal log diaphragm system used to strengthen and stiffen the roof. The internal log diaphragm is a feature no longer used in construction of USDA Forest Service buildings. This type of log construction originated with the Scandinavian design tradition.

The origin of the plan for the commissary is unknown. The rustic design was used out of necessity, based upon the availability of materials, skilled craftsman, and the isolation of the setting from towns with sawmills. Logs were the only available building material and the construction techniques were known to the builders and acceptable by the agency directed to manage the forest resources.

The Big Creek Commissary is representative of the “log cabin era” of construction. USDA Forest Service personnel no longer construct buildings of logs. Inventories of other administrative sites on the Payette National Forest and on other forests south of the Salmon River yield on other log building of this scale or design. Only two other sites on the Payette have structures of this era; a log cabin at Cold Meadows Guard Station, circa 1925, and a cabin at Hays Ranger Station built in 1913. The last log structure built on the Payette National Forest was at Krassel Work Center in the early 1970s.

source: National Register of Historic Places
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Photos: Interior of the Forest Service Big Creek Commissary built in 1924-25, and first used in 1926.

link to photo gallery on Payette NF Facebook:

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1969 Big Creek Ranger’s House

1969BCRangerHouse-a
(click image for larger size)
“The Ranger’s Cabin where I lived at Big Creek – 1969.” – Earl Dodds
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Billy Owens and His Banty Hen

One of the more time-consuming parts of my job as the Big Creek Ranger was that of providing for the everyday needs of the district employees. At the peak of the summer season there were about 25 employees working on the district. All of these people lived full-time on the district, and the Forest Service had to provide quarters and see that they received groceries and mail on a regular basis. If there were problems with any of these needs, they often became my problems. This situation was not entirely unique to the Big Creek District, as the old Krassel and Warren Districts on the Payette National Forest were faced with similar situations and I’m sure that there were other backcountry districts throughout the Forest Service that had similar concerns. In many ways, these situations are throwbacks to earlier days in the Forest Service when such arrangements were normal throughout most of the national forests in the West. …

The area of greatest concern I had with the needs of the district personnel was making sure that the employees manning the lookout stations had enough food supplies to last for about a month when they initially went to their stations. For a season or two, there were eight manned lookouts on the district, all of them remote from roads and somewhat difficult to access. Some of the young people that we hired as lookouts had little idea as to what they were in for in being so far from the grocery store. In my first year as ranger, I had experienced trouble with employees going up on lookout duty with an insufficient supply of food. I remember one young lad in particular who was just hired and told to go down to the local supermarket, open an account and assemble enough food to last for a month or so. When we picked up his supplies, they consisted of a bag of potato chips, a loaf of bread, a few cans of this and that and a half dozen boxes of instant-pudding mix – as if he were going on a picnic for the weekend. The instant-pudding mix was about the extent of his cooking skills and experience in preparing anything to eat.

In subsequent years we got on top of this problem and made up a suggested list of groceries and furnished each lookout with a copy of the Forest Service Lookout Cookbook that has special allowances for cooking at high altitude. It takes longer to do such things as boil spuds and cook beans on a lookout. In addition to this, I also developed a standard little talk that I gave to the employees who were going up on lookout at the time they were hired in an attempt to impress upon them how isolated and far removed from the grocery store they would be. Also, I emphasized that it was best to take the majority of their summer supplies with them when they initially went up rather than relying on someone at the grocery store to select their resupplies. …

Back in those days, the late 1950s, the ranger districts did their own hiring, usually from the pool of people who came to the winter office seeking summer employment. Most of us tried to hire local, or at least Idaho people, where possible, as we felt that they had had some contact with the Forest Service and had some idea of what they would be in for in working for the outfit. …

One spring, a nice, clean-cut young fellow named Billy Owens came into the office in McCall seeking a job as a fire lookout. He was a native of Riggins, Idaho, and impressed me as being a little on the serious side and likely to do a good job. So I hired him for summer employment … Billy had a rural background, and his mother must have helped him with his groceries. When he reported for work toward the end of June he had a large pile of stuff that included jars of home-canned fruits and vegetables and a live little banty hen in a special little homemade box, sort of like a bird cage. Billy was considerably smarter than the average bear and intended to have fresh eggs for the summer. …

The Payette National Forest had a helicopter on contract for fire control purposes – chiefly for retrieving smokejumpers from remote hard-to-get-to locations. The staff officer in the Supervisor’s Office, who was in charge of fire control activities on the forest, had previous experience in the backcountry and knew how much of a task it would be to man eight lookouts using horses and mules. He sent the helicopter out to the Big Creek District with instructions that this would be a one-day-only thing and that we should get all the stuff going to each lookout organized so that there was little down time for the chopper.

Four of the lookouts were to be flown up from the Chamberlain side of the district and four from the Big Creek side. At Big Creek, we carted everything out on the airfield and made four well- separated piles with the idea that the chopper could land right beside each pile to facilitate loading. The largest pile belonged to Billy Owen and was headed for the Rush Creek Point Lookout. Right on top of this pile was the homemade chicken cage with Billy’s little banty hen in it.

Things went pretty well with the first lookout, Acorn Butte, and then it was Rush Creek’s turn. The chopper made a neat landing right beside the pile of supplies, only the blast from rotor blades blew the chicken cage off the top of the pile. When it hit the ground, the cage popped open and out flew the little banty hen. For all the world, it looked like she went right through the whirling rotor blades but probably not. But for sure, she took off down the airfield at a fast clip – a lot like the Roadrunner in the comic strip. And the entire complement of the Big Creek Ranger Station, including the chopper pilot, dropped what they were doing and took off after her. It took quite some time with a lot of running around and hollering before someone was able to throw his shirt over the poor bird and we got her back in the cage and on her way to Rush Creek.

Most of us laughed about this for the rest of the day and even Jack Higby, who often was a little shy in the sense of humor department, managed a little grin and said “I hope no one took a picture of that!”

“The Rest of the Story” is that Billy Owens reported that the poor little chicken was so scared that it was weeks before she laid any eggs.

RushCrkLOMap
excerpted from: “Tales from the Last of the Big Creek Rangers Payette National Forest, Idaho” by Earl Dodds, pages 27-29 (33 megs)
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Lookout Cookbook

[This is probably the same cookbook Mr. Dodds mentions in his story.]

link to: LookoutCookbook.pdf
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page updated October 6, 2020

Road Reports Jan 28

No current reports.

Note: Winter road conditions change quickly. Be prepared for snow at high elevations and rocks/trees falling in the road. Please share road reports!!

Yellow Pine: We received 4.5″ of new snow in the last 24 hours, 14″ of snow on the flat. Local streets were plowed before the storm, snow covered.
Click for Local Forecast.

Warm Lake Highway: No current report, looks like 6″ new and 71″ total at the SNOTEL station. (Jan 24 report) mail truck driver reported Warm Lake highway going over Big Creek summit was in good shape, snow floor.
Big Creek Summit SNOTEL station 6580′

South Fork Road: No current report. (Jan 24 report) mail truck driver said the South Fork road had been plowed all the way to Zena Creek, but plow truck broke down at Krassel and was being towed out.
Tea Pot Weather Station (5175′)

EFSF Road: No current report. (Jan 24 report) mail truck driver said the road didn’t get plowed but was in pretty good shape, rolled a few big rocks off the road that morning.

Lower Johnson Creek Road: No current report. (Jan 24) a report that Cecil plowed lower Johnson Creek road out to Wapiti Meadow, road is smooth and snow floor has good traction.
Upper Johnson Creek Road: closed at Landmark to wheeled vehicles for the winter.
The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet
Snowmobile Trail Report: Per County Groomer report – “Johnson Cr Rd – Landmark to Wapiti Meadows 1/11/18”
Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam:
http://www.ruralnetwork.net/~yellowpinecm/

Lick Creek: Closed for winter to wheeled vehicles.
Trail Report: Have a report (Jan 20) that trail has been packed from Yellow Pine to Lick Creek for skiing.
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Closed for winter to wheeled vehicles.
Trail report: Have a report (Jan 20) that the trail has been packed from Yellow Pine to Profile Summit for skiing.
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.
Big Creek Webcam:

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Last report Dec 13: Open, chains advised, icy.

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Closed at Stibnite with snow. Truck reported to be stuck for the winter on the other side of Monumental.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Closed.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: No current report.
Note: The approx elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
Deadwood Summit SNOTEL station 6860′
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Weather Reports Jan 21-27

Jan 21 Weather:

At 1030am it was 17 degrees and almost clear. At 130pm it was 32 degrees and mostly clear, a few wispy clouds. Mostly cloudy by 240pm. At 530pm it was 27 degrees and overcast. At 630pm it was 27 degrees and cloudy. At 1030pm it was 28 degrees and cloudy. Snowing at 130am (probably started after 1am.) Looks like it may have snowed all night.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time January 22, 2018 at 10:30AM
Low overcast, light steady snow
Max temperature 36 degrees F
Min temperature 17 degrees F <– yesterday morning
At observation 29 degrees F
Precipitation 0.11 inch
Snowfall 2.0 inch
Snow depth 10 inch
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Jan 22 Weather:

At 1030am it was 29 degrees, low overcast, ridges socked in, light steady snow still falling. Just flaking lightly at noon. Not snowing at 1pm, trace accumulation, breaks in the clouds. Snowing again at 135pm, for 10-15 minutes. Breaks in the clouds at 2pm. At 3pm it was 35 degrees and partly clear. At 530pm it was partly cloudy. At 11pm it was 26 degrees, cloudy and 2 flakes of snow fell. Accumulation by morning looked like “freckles” on the porch.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time January 23, 2018 at 10:30AM
Mostly clear, high haze
Max temperature 38 degrees F
Min temperature 15 degrees F
At observation 23 degrees F
Precipitation Trace
Snowfall Trace
Snow depth 9 inch
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Jan 23 Weather:

At 1030am it was 23 degrees, mostly clear but some high haze. At 230pm it was 38 degrees, high haze, filtered sun, gusty breezes. Increasing clouds at 3pm. Overcast at 5pm. At 530pm lighter breezes and overcast, above freezing. At 630pm it was 33 degrees, gusty winds and snowing lightly. At 8pm it was 30 degrees, overcast, not snowing, slight trace. At 1030pm it was 31 degrees, light breezes, thinner clouds (some fuzzy stars) big first quarter moon setting to the west.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time January 24, 2018 at 10:30AM
Mostly cloudy (high haze) and breezy
Max temperature 39 degrees F
Min temperature 23 degrees F <– yesterday morning
At observation 32 degrees F
Precipitation Trace
Snowfall Trace
Snow depth 9 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

Jan 24 Weather:

At 1030am it was 32 degrees, mostly cloudy (high haze) filtered sun and breezy. Overcast by noon, windy, trees dumping snow. At 215pm it was 40 degrees, lighter breezes and overcast. At 6pm it was 34 degrees, overcast and light chilly breezes. At 8pm cloudy and breezy. At 1030pm it was 41 degrees, overcast and wind gusting up. Looks like it rained, then snowing at 2am. Break in the snow around 6am. Snowing at 930am, stopped snowing a little after 10am.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time January 25, 2018 at 10:30AM
Overcast
Max temperature 44 degrees F
Min temperature 29 degrees F
At observation 30 degrees F
Precipitation 0.15 inch
Snowfall 1.0 inch
Snow depth 9 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

Jan 25 Weather:

At 1030am it was 30 degrees and overcast. Flaking snow 1115am to 1140am. Another snow flurry early afternoon put down a scant trace. At 2pm it was 34 degrees, partly cloudy – partly clear, light chilly breeze. Snowing around 315pm. Overcast at 430pm. Flaking snow at 444pm. Snowing and blowing at 450pm, trace of little snowballs. Back to flaking snow at 5pm. Not snowing at 520pm. At 6pm it was 28 degrees and cloudy. At 1015pm it was 26 degrees, low clouds, snowing, scant 1/4″ so far. At 1230am it was 23 degrees, still snowing (about 2″ so far.) Light snow falling at 9am.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time January 26, 2018 at 10:30AM
Overcast, light snow falling
Max temperature 38 degrees F
Min temperature 22 degrees F
At observation 27 degrees F
Precipitation 0.10 inch
Snowfall 2.0 inch
Snow depth 11 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

Jan 26 Weather:

At 1030am it was 27 degrees, overcast and light snow falling. Snowing harder just after 1pm. Light snow falling at 145pm. At 2pm just a couple of flakes. At 230pm it was 29 degrees, overcast and occasional flake falling, scant 1/4″ new, and about done snowing. At 6pm it was 26 degrees and cloudy. At 1030pm it was 18 degrees, thinner clouds, a few fuzzy stars, hazy moon with large ‘halo’. Thicker clouds at 230am. Light snow started falling some time after 5am, still snowing lightly at 930am.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time January 27, 2018 at 10:30AM
Overcast, light snow falling
Max temperature 31 degrees F
Min temperature 18 degrees F
At observation 26 degrees F
Precipitation 0.03 inch
Snowfall 0.3 inch
Snow depth 10 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

Jan 27 Weather:

At 1030am it was 26 degrees, overcast and light snow falling. Quit snowing around 12pm. Snowing again at 2pm, slight trace by 230pm and 32 degrees. Almost an inch by 5pm. At 6pm it was 30 degrees, overcast, light snow – big flakes, bit more than an inch new. At 10pm it was 30 degrees, steady snow, approx 3″ new since 6pm, gusty breezes. Still snowing at 2am. Still snowing at 445am. Snowing at 6am, quit by 7am.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time January 28, 2018 at 10:30AM
Overcast
Max temperature 34 degrees F <– this morning
Min temperature 26 degrees F
At observation 34 degrees F
Precipitation 0.30 inch
Snowfall 4.5 inch
Snow depth 14 inch
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Avalanche Advisory January 28, 2018

Bottom Line

The Avalanche Hazard is Considerable today above 7,000 feet where new snow and gusty winds have created new wind slabs near ridges and on exposed terrain. Pay attention to changing conditions with the added wind and snow and warming temperatures today, and a possibility of rain on snow in the lower elevations. Below 7,000 feet the avalanche hazard is Moderate.

Avalanche Problem #1: Storm Slab

Loose, unconsolidated snow has been the trend for over a week creating a soft and unconsolidated upper snowpack with a firm and strong slab below it. In our pit tests Friday, we saw several of these individual storm layers that were only partially bonded to the layers below creating moderate failures in compression but lacking propagation or the energy to spread out over large areas.

Over the last 24 hours, temperatures have been on the rise along with new snow which will have likely made the storm slab that much denser than the snow below it. You could trigger a weakness in one of these layers on steep terrain resulting in a slab a foot deep or more today. Worth noting and watching is a subtle crust created by a freezing mist event that occurred mid morning on Monday. It is buried around 12 inches down in the snowpack. This was one of the layers that is failing in compression and may become more reactive now that we have added new, heavier snow on top.

Avalanche Problem #2: Wind Slab

Recent winds and new snow have created wind slabs in leeward terrain. Winds have been gusty throughout the week and mostly out of the S and SW. North and South Valley areas have both seen the same weather this week with cornices slowly growing and wind loading occurring on mostly E, NE, N and NW facing slopes. We observed active wind loading and scouring on a SW aspect just south of Granite Mountain Friday with loading occurring on the NE throughout the day. These slabs have gotten denser with the added new snow, and increasing temperatures.

Recent Observations

See the photos below for a comparison of the difference in the snowpack on a SW facing slope at 7100 feet and a NNE slope at 7600 feet on Granite mountain from Friday. Notice the layering in the SW pit and the depth of the freezing mist crust and new snow between the two pits.

Please let us know what you are seeing in the West Central Mountains. Take the time to submit an observation or send us an email. It’s easy and may save a life. If you are having trouble adding photos to your observation, send us the photo at our email address and we will add it to your observation. Click on the observation tab on the advisory page or email us at: forecast@payetteavalanche.org

https://payetteavalanche.org/fri-01262018-1445-granite-ene

Weather

Area Forecast Discussion…CORRECTED
National Weather Service Boise ID
305 AM MST Sun Jan 28 2018

…ADDED INFORMATION ABOUT FOG IN SHORT TERM SECTION…

.SHORT TERM…Today through Monday…Will hold on to the Winter
Weather Advisory through 5 am MST due to continuing snow in the
mountains. McCall has picked up around 5 inches so far, and
Brundage around 7 inches. Fog is becoming widespread as some
clearing occurs in mid and high clouds. The fog is even dense in
patches. Will add this to the forecast and keep a close eye in
case a dense fog advisory becomes warranted. As upper level
ridging builds in from the west, moisture remaining over the
northern mountains will be pushed away to the northeast. Today, we
will still have snow showers there, but by this evening they
should be gone. This ridge will then keep us dry and around 10
degrees above normal for Sunday night and Monday. The ridge axis
will move through early Monday, allowing southwest flow aloft to
return. This will bring an increase in mid and high clouds from
west to east through the day. Southeast winds 10-15 mph will
develop Monday afternoon in the western Magic Valley westward
through the Mountain Home area. Otherwise, winds will be less than
10 mph through the period.

.LONG TERM…Monday night through Sunday…Moist westerly flow
aloft will bring mountain snow and valley rain to our northern
zones Monday night and Tuesday. Tuesday night and Wednesday the
flow will shift into the northwest as an upper level high pressure
ridge builds off the west coast. This pattern change will bring
cooler air, but temperatures are expected to stay a few degrees
above normal. Weak disturbances embedded in the flow will continue
the chance of mountain snow and valley rain, mainly for Baker
County Oregon and central Idaho.

.AVIATION…Areas of snow with IFR and local LIFR conditions will
continue this morning over the mountains of Baker County Oregon
and central Idaho. Snow will decrease in coverage this afternoon
and end by 00z Monday. Expect VFR conditions tonight except for
patchy valley fog and stratus after 06z. Surface winds will be
variable mainly less than 10 kts. Winds aloft at 10k ft MSL will
be northwest 25-35 kts.

Disclaimer

This avalanche advisory is provided through a partnership between the Payette National Forest and the Payette Avalanche Center. This advisory covers the West Central Mountains between Hard Butte on the north and Council Mountain on the south. This advisory applies only to backcountry areas outside established ski area boundaries. This advisory describes general avalanche conditions and local variations always occur. This advisory expires at midnight on the posted day unless otherwise noted. The information in this advisory is provided by the USDA Forest Service who is solely responsible for its content.

source:
—————————–

Avalanche Advisory January 26, 2018

Bottom Line

The Avalanche Hazard is Moderate today above 7000 feet where new snow and gusty winds have created new windslabs near ridges and on exposed, upper elevation, northerly terrain. In addition, local mountains received 10 and 15 inches of new snow over the last week, watch for shallow instabilities on steeper slopes in the layers created this week. A warmer and wetter storm will enter the area tonight, expect rising hazard and rapidly changing conditions over the next 24 hours.

Avalanche Problem #1: Wind Slab

This week produced another round of snow with accumulations in the 10-15 inch range above 6500 feet. Winds have been gusty throughout the week and mostly out of the S and SW. North and South Valley areas have both seen the same weather this week with cornices slowly growing and wind loading occurring on mostly E, NE, N and NW facing slopes. Yesterday’s touring conditions and ski conditions were perfect with light density snow on all aspects. We observed active wind loading and wind slab formation throughout our tour that was mostly confined to the Northerly aspects near Secesh Summit. These slabs ranged from a few inches thick to over a foot and were just becoming sensitive to the weight of a skier by mid afternoon.

A cold front is still dominating the weather throughout the West Central area but will begin to give way to a warm front as a major storm enters the area tonight. Expect gusty winds with this next front and a warming trend for tomorrow. Also, expect the avalanche hazard to increase tonight and through the day tomorrow as 10-15 inches of warmer, higher density snow is added to the new snow total for the week.

Avalanche Problem #2: Storm Slab

The snow that fell throughout the week this week came in small increments of light density snow that did not have a major effect on stability. Loose, unconsolidated snow has been the trend for over a week creating a soft and unconsolidated upper snowpack. In our pit tests yesterday we saw several of these individual storm layers that were only partially bonded to the layers below creating moderate failures in compression but lacking propagation or the energy to spread out over large areas. It is possible that you could trigger a weakness in one of these layers on steep terrain resulting in a shallow slab in the 3 to 12 inch range today. Worth noting and watching over the next 24 hours is a subtle crust that was created mid morning on Monday that is between 6 and 10 inches down in the snowpack. It is starting to disintegrate but has the potential to create a weakness with the addition of our next storm’s new snow and additional weight. We found this layer to be fairly widespread yesterday in the mid to upper elevations and had reports of it from the South Valley area as well.

Sluffing or loose, dry avalanche activity is also possible on steep slopes because of the light density snow right now. If you are skiing in steep, committing terrain, especially in confined terrain or above obstacles, be aware of the potential for sluffing and plan a route to avoid letting it push you where you don’t want to go.

Advisory Discussion

Please let us know what you are seeing in the West Central Mountains. Take the time to submit an observation or send us an email. It’s easy and may save a life. If you are having trouble adding photos to your observation, send us the photo at our email address and we will add it to your observation. Click on the observation tab on the advisory page or email us at: forecast@payetteavalanche.org

Recent Observations

Yesterday we were able to see a lot of terrain and multiple aspects, no recent avalanche activity was observed and none has been reported this week. The biggest factor affecting the snowpack was the wind yesterday. Gusts in the 20+ range were common throughout the day. These were actively transporting snow into the northern aspects and affecting the snowpack on exposed ridges and slopes.

The snowpack gained both strength and depth throughout the last week. We found just over 8 feet of snow around 8000 feet yesterday on a North facing slope and just under 6 feet of snow at 7500 feet in a protected basin yesterday. Basin wide snowpack surveys are showing a return to normal or above normal conditons across the mid and northern portions of Idaho. Snowpack tests are showing increasing stability and that our persistent weak layer is now getting enough weight to compress it and insulate it from the effects of skiers and riders in the McCall/ Valley County area. However, it is still present iin the snowpack and could still be a problem given the right combination of snowpack depth and additional loading. You should still be wary of slopes with a shallow snowpack where the layer is closer to the surface. and you are more likely to trigger the weak layer. This layer is also still active and producing avalanches in the mountains adjacent to the PAC advisory area.

https://payetteavalanche.org/tue-01232018-1214-snow-pit-lone-tree

Weather

.SHORT TERM…Today through Saturday…Snow showers will continue
today and this evening, mainly in the higher elevations. Later
tonight, a major snowstorm will move into the region. This one
comes in the form of a warm front, but temperatures will initially
be cold enough for snow at almost all elevations. Precip will move
into eastern Oregon around midnight and rapidly spread east into
southwest Idaho. Winter Weather Warnings and Advisories have been
determined (see below) and will be issued shortly. Snow totals
will range from 5 to 15 inches in the mountains and 2 to 6 inches
in the valleys. Only the lowest elevations of the Snake Plain may
have enough rain mixed with the snow to limit accumulations to
under an inch. Snow levels will rise Saturday afternoon as the
warm front passes, turning snow to rain at elevations below 3500
feet. However, the West-Central and Boise Mountains will continue
with a significant snowfall into the evening hours. High temps
today will be slightly above normal for most areas, with highs
tomorrow above normal south and west of a line from Burns to the
Owyhees to south of Twin Falls, where the warm front will allow
warmer air to mix down to the surface during the afternoon. North
and east of that line, temps will be held down to near or below
normal due to snowfall. In the Boise area, we expect snow to begin
around 6 am and continue into mid-afternoon before changing to
rain and ending. A snowfall accumulation forecast map will be put
out on social media soon.

.LONG TERM…Saturday night through Friday…The active weather
pattern will continue as westerly flow aloft brings a series of
Pacific weather systems across our area. The upper level flow will
shift into the northwest on Wednesday, lowering temperatures to
near normal for the remainder of the week. Valley rain and
mountain snow Saturday night will end by Sunday evening as and
upper level high pressure ridge builds over the Intermountain
Region. We can expect dry weather through Monday, but
precipitation will spread into our northern zones Monday night as
the next Pacific weather system approaches. Precipitation will be
mainly confined to the mountains of Baker County Oregon and
central Idaho Tuesday through Friday as weak disturbances embedded
in northwest flow aloft cross our area.

Disclaimer

This avalanche advisory is provided through a partnership between the Payette National Forest and the Payette Avalanche Center. This advisory covers the West Central Mountains between Hard Butte on the north and Council Mountain on the south. This advisory applies only to backcountry areas outside established ski area boundaries. This advisory describes general avalanche conditions and local variations always occur. This advisory expires at midnight on the posted day unless otherwise noted. The information in this advisory is provided by the USDA Forest Service who is solely responsible for its content.

source:
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Road Report Jan 26

Note: Winter road conditions change quickly. Be prepared for snow at high elevations and rocks/trees falling in the road. Please share road reports.

Yellow Pine: (Jan 26) Snowed 2″ overnight, we have an average of 11″ of snow on the flat, local streets are snow covered. The main street had been plowed from the crossroads to the post office before the last storms brought another 3″, nice and wide. Thanks Cecil.
Click for Local Forecast.

Warm Lake Highway: No current report. (Jan 24) mail truck driver Warm Lake highway going over Big Creek summit is in good shape, snow floor.
Big Creek Summit SNOTEL station 6580′

South Fork Road: No current report. (Jan 24) mail truck driver said the South Fork road has recently been plowed (all the way to Zena Creek) but broke down at Krassel and was being towed out.
Tea Pot Weather Station (5175′)

EFSF Road: No current report. (Jan 24) mail truck driver said the road didn’t get plowed but is in pretty good shape, rolled a few big rocks off the road this morning.

Lower Johnson Creek Road: No current report. (Jan 24) a report that Cecil plowed lower Johnson Creek road out to Wapiti Meadow, road is smooth and snow floor has good traction.
Upper Johnson Creek Road: closed at Landmark to wheeled vehicles for the winter.
The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet
Snowmobile Trail Report: Per County Groomer report – “Johnson Cr Rd – Landmark to Wapiti Meadows 1/11/18”
Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam:
http://www.ruralnetwork.net/~yellowpinecm/

Lick Creek: Closed for winter to wheeled vehicles.
Trail Report: Have a report (Jan 20) that trail has been packed from Yellow Pine to Lick Creek for skiing.
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Closed for winter to wheeled vehicles.
Trail report: Have a report (Jan 20) that the trail has been packed from Yellow Pine to Profile Summit for skiing.
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.
Big Creek Webcam:

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Last report Dec 13: Open, chains advised, icy.

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Closed at Stibnite with snow. Truck reported to be stuck for the winter on the other side of Monumental.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Closed.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: No current report.
Note: The approx elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
Deadwood Summit SNOTEL station 6860′
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Winter Weather Advisory Jan 27, 5am to Jan 27, 11pm

Yellow Pine Forecast

Today Snow, mainly before 11am. High near 30. West southwest wind 7 to 9 mph. Chance of precipitation is 80%. Total daytime snow accumulation of 1 to 2 inches possible.

Tonight A 40 percent chance of snow. Cloudy, with a low around 22. West southwest wind around 6 mph becoming calm in the evening. New snow accumulation of less than one inch possible.

Saturday Snow. High near 32. South southwest wind 5 to 8 mph. Chance of precipitation is 90%. New snow accumulation of 1 to 2 inches possible.

Saturday Night Snow before 11pm, then rain and snow likely. Low around 29. Southwest wind 5 to 7 mph. Chance of precipitation is 80%. New snow accumulation of 1 to 2 inches possible.

Sunday Rain likely, mainly before 11am. Cloudy, with a high near 40. Light southwest wind. Chance of precipitation is 60%.

Winter Weather Advisory

URGENT - WINTER WEATHER MESSAGE
National Weather Service Boise ID
352 AM MST Fri Jan 26 2018

...SIGNIFICANT SNOW HEADED TO THE AREA TONIGHT INTO SATURDAY
EVENING...

.A warm front will bring moderate to heavy snow to the area
tonight into Saturday evening. Snow will begin before midnight in
eastern Oregon, and spread rapidly east into southwest Idaho. As
the warm front moves northeast over the area, snow levels will
increase Saturday and snow will change to rain below around
3500 feet Saturday afternoon. Heavy snow will taper off to
showers Saturday night in the mountains, bringing a end to the
event.

West Central Mountains-Boise Mountains-
352 AM MST Fri Jan 26 2018

...WINTER WEATHER ADVISORY REMAINS IN EFFECT FROM 5 AM TO 11 PM
MST SATURDAY...

* WHAT...Snow expected. Plan on slippery road conditions. Total
  snow accumulations of 3 to 6 inches, with localized amounts up
  to 15 inches above 7000 feet, are expected.

* WHERE...West Central Mountains and Boise Mountains zones.

* WHEN...From 5 AM to 11 PM MST Saturday.

* ADDITIONAL DETAILS...Be prepared for reduced visibilities at
  times.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...

A Winter Weather Advisory for snow means periods of snow will
cause primarily travel difficulties. Be prepared for snow covered
roads and limited visibilities, and use caution while driving.
The latest road conditions can be obtained by calling 5 1 1.

 

Road Report Jan 24

Note: Winter road conditions change quickly. Be prepared for snow at high elevations and rocks/trees falling in the road. Please share road reports.

Yellow Pine: We currently have an average of 9″ of snow on the flat, local streets are snow covered. Warm and windy today. The main street has been plowed from the crossroads to the post office, nice and wide. Thanks Cecil.
Click for Local Forecast.

Warm Lake Highway: (Jan 24) mail truck driver Warm Lake highway going over Big Creek summit is in good shape, snow floor.
Big Creek Summit SNOTEL station 6580′

South Fork Road: (Jan 24) mail truck driver said the South Fork road has recently been plowed (all the way to Zena Creek) but broke down at Krassel and is being towed out.
Tea Pot Weather Station (5175′)

EFSF Road: (Jan 24) mail truck driver said the road didn’t get plowed but is in pretty good shape, rolled a few big rocks off the road this morning.

Lower Johnson Creek Road: (Jan 24) a report that Cecil plowed lower Johnson Creek road out to Wapiti Meadow, road is smooth and snow floor has good traction.
Upper Johnson Creek Road: closed at Landmark to wheeled vehicles for the winter.
The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet
Snowmobile Trail Report: Per County Groomer report – “Johnson Cr Rd – Landmark to Wapiti Meadows 1/11/18”
Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam:
http://www.ruralnetwork.net/~yellowpinecm/

Lick Creek: Closed for winter to wheeled vehicles.
Trail Report: Have a report (Jan 20) that trail has been packed from Yellow Pine to Lick Creek for skiing.
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Closed for winter to wheeled vehicles.
Trail report: Have a report (Jan 20) that the trail has been packed from Yellow Pine to Profile Summit for skiing. Report of around 6′ of snow at the summit.
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.
Big Creek Webcam:

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Last report Dec 13: Open, chains advised, icy.

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Closed at Stibnite with snow. Truck reported to be stuck for the winter on the other side of Monumental.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Closed.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: No current report.
Note: The approx elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
Deadwood Summit SNOTEL station 6860′
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