Monthly Archives: April 2018

April 29, 2018 The Yellow Pine Times

April 29, 2018 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Village News:

“Bald Hill” [Van Meter Hill] Rx Burn

Wednesday morning (April 25) we could see and hear a helicopter flying over the village. By early afternoon we could see smoke to the north, the helicopter was still flying around over the south side of Van Meter Hill. By late afternoon the smoke was thicker and coming from the lower south west side of the mountain. Have reports they burned right up to private property lines in the upper part of the village. Just as it was getting dark you could see pockets of fire glowing through the thick smoke. After dark the smoke was settling down into the valley and you could see “zillions” of little “camp fires” dotting the whole south side of Van Meter Hill and gusty breezes. After midnight we could hear trees cracking and falling, but the fires seemed to be settling down, calmer breezes, but very smoky and poor air quality.

Thursday morning we had thick smoke, could barely see the top of Van Meter, loud crack of a tree falling. By lunch time the smoke was thinning as the day warmed up. By mid-afternoon we could see individual columns of smoke rising from spots all over the mountain but the air quality was somewhat better. Towards evening thick smoke came rolling down the river corridor and rising up to obscure Van Meter Hill. After dark you could see dozens of fires still burning on the hillside and quite breezy.

Friday morning it was quite smoky to the north, semi-crappy air quality. As the day warmed up we could see smoke columns rising from pockets of heavy fuel, light breezes and very warm. By early evening the smoke was settling along the river again. Thicker smoke at sundown. After dark some of the bigger fires were quite noticeable. Gusty erratic breezes.

Saturday morning light smoke to the north. As the day warmed up smoke columns rising from fewer places on Van Meter Hill. By late afternoon the air quality was better, pockets of heavy fuel continue to burn on. Gusty evening breezes and could see some of the larger fires burning. After dark there appeared to be less little fires, but a couple of larger ones were still going.

This morning low clouds obscured the mountains, a good little shower o rain an hail then sprinkles on and off. By early afternoon clouds had lifted partway up the flanks of Van Meter Hill, and we could see a few areas of smoke rising from the lower hillside, much better air quality. Cool and damp afternoon but there are still areas of smoke rising. All in all this burn went as planned from the reports received.

FS Video report (FB) on Wednesday:

Photo April 25th at 2pm
000_1892-20060807FireStart

Photo April 25 provided by the Yellow Pine Tavern (FB)

From the Payette NF:

“We are planning on burning the block of the Bald Hill Project that is directly to the north of Yellow Pine this spring. This block starts to the west of Boulder creek and ends on the ridge past Quartz creek. It comes down to the FS boundary on the south near Yellow Pine and this time of year we will most likely be using snow as the northern boundary.”

Map:

Some Van Meter Fire History

May 8th, 2004 the Rx burn on Van Meter Hill was part of the Parks-Eiguren Hazardous Fuels Reduction Project

August 7, 2006 lightning strike on Van Meter Hill, became part of the “South Fork Complex” fires, the fire on Van Meter burned until it snowed September 16th.
20060807-000_1892-a

BNF Fire History Map 1900-2015
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Tick Season!

Getting reports of people finding very active ticks. Please check your pets too.
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Be Predator Aware

Bears are out of hibernation. A report that a coyote was stalking pets right downtown last week. Please don’t leave pet food outdoors.
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Yellow Pine Tavern

Open 9am to 8pm (or later on game nights.) Jukebox is up and going.
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The Corner

Saturday, May 26. Happy to say that Willie and the Single Wides will be bringing live music to The Corner for Memorial Day weekend. We can’t wait to see them again!

The Corner is open for Breakfast and Dinner with prior arrangements. Typically breakfast is served between 5 and 6 am with dinner between 6 and 7 pm.

The Corner Store is open as well, just call for grocery needs, fresh produce, eggs, meat etc.
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YPFD News:

April 26 – The ambulance is back in service.

Starting in May, the siren(s) will be tested the first of the month at noon and training will resume on Sundays at 11:00 when Jeff’s in town and/or as otherwise posted or requested.

Cascade Fire/EMS has offered to do a CPR training/certification class in Yellow Pine this summer and we would like to get an idea of how many people would be interested in attending. Once we have an idea of #’s we will post possible dates. Please contact Jeff or Ann Forster if interested.” aforsterrn @ aol.com or call (208) 633-1010

There are YPFD T-shirts, as well as YPFD patches and stickers for sale at the Tavern now.
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4th of July Golf Tournament June 30th

Our 20th annual Yellow Pine Golf Tournament will take place on June 30th 2018. The proceeds will go towards the Yellow Pine Medical Training and Supply Fund. By giving to this annual event, you’ll be supporting the village of Yellow Pine and our growing EMS service.

Thanks to Cascade Fire/EMS Fire Commissioners, Chief Steve Hull and the EMS Director Keri Donica, Yellow Pine is now a Cascade Fire/EMS Paramedic Ambulance Sub-station. This allows us to have equipment available in Yellow Pine to treat and care for patients in the field, not only First Aid but Advanced Life Support. Yellow Pine now has Nationally Registered: 4 EMR’s, 1 RN-EMT, and 1 Paramedic in Yellow Pine.

The cost for the event is $20/person or $50 will give you a sponsorship and pay for 2 players!

As a sponsor, your name will be put on a plaque, or you can provide your own sign for the event. This plaque will be posted on one of our 18 holes during the tournament.

To reserve a place in the tournament please contact Jeff or Ann Forster @ aforsterrn@aol.com or call (208) 633-1010.

You can mail your payments to: P.O. Box 38 Yellow Pine, ID. 83677.

Please make checks payable to “Cascade Fire EMS” attn: YP Golf Tournament.

Thanks in advance for your consideration.

Sincerely,
Jeff Forster – Paramedic & Ann Forster – BS, RN, EMT
Event Coordinators
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2018 H-Fest

Next meeting will be May 17th.

The 2018 festival T-shirt contest is now open! All entries must include the year (2018) and the festival name “Yellow Pine Festival” in the design Entries must be received by Friday, May 18th, 2018. The prize for the winning design is $100! Multiple designs by the same artist can be sent in.

Hint: these shirts are screen prints, simpler designs stand out better. Submit your entry by email to Marj Fields at fieldsmarjie @ yahoo.com
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VYPA News:

Next meeting June 2018
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Local Propane Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
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Diamond Fuel & Feed (208) 382-4430

Our local birds love black oil sunflower seeds. Diamond has 40 pound bags of sunflower seeds for $22.59 (plus tax) and Arnold’s charges 5 cents a pound to haul it to Yellow Pine.
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (Apr 23) overnight low of 30 degrees, almost clear sky this morning and a little breezy. Lots of birds calling: swallows, robins and cassins finches. Red and white-breasted nuthatches, clarks nutcracker and jays visiting. Seeing more colombian ground squirrels out of hibernation (a very sleepy one blinking its eyes this morning and moving slow.) Clouds moving in and breezy mid-day. Male downy woodpecker and juncos visiting after lunch. Buds breaking open on the lilac bush, daffodil leaves up about 6 inches. Mostly cloudy and breezy mid-afternoon, then partly cloudy by sundown, high of 58 degrees. Almost clear at dark, half a moon shining overhead.

Tuesday (Apr 24) overnight low of 26 degrees, clear sky and light breezes this morning. Lots of birds! Male and female cassins finches, swallows, robins and juncos filling the air with bird song. Female hairy woodpecker and collared Eurasian dove and a few red-breasted nuthatches visiting. More colombian ground squirrels out of hibernation. Breezy warm sunny afternoon, high of 67 degrees. Eurasian collared dove hanging with the chickens and a little male downy woodpecker visited, large flock of cassins finches gobbling down sunflower seeds. Clear and calm at dark.

Wednesday (Apr 25) overnight low of 28 degrees, clear sky this morning. FS helicopter flying over to start the Rx Burn. Lots of swallows and cassins finches, several juncos, a female hairy woodpecker and a Eurasian collared dove, a few red-breasted nuthatches visiting. Daffodils are making flower buds, and tiny leaves breaking out on the lilac bush. High clouds moved in by lunch time. Starting to see smoke to the north of the village in the early afternoon, the helicopter was circling over the burn area dropping fire on the south side of VanMeter Hill. A sooty looking male downy woodpecker, 2 Eurasian collared doves, juncos, robins and finches visited this afternoon. Warm day, high of 70 degrees. Thicker smoke in the late afternoon, they have fired off the mountain directly north of main street. Later smoke rising to the northwest down by the river. At dark, you could see pockets of fire glowing on the hill through the thick smoke. Smoke settling into the valley after dark, zillions of little “campfires” dotting VanMeter. After midnight calmer breezes, could hear trees falling, the fires seem to be dying down on the hill and quite smoky.

Thursday (Apr 26) overnight low of 29 degrees, clear sky above thick smoke this morning, can barely see the top of VanMeter, loud crack of a tree falling. Lots of swallows, not many other birds (probably a hawk hanging out.) Ground squirrels chirping. By lunch time the smoke was thinner and lots of finches visiting. By mid-afternoon individual columns of smoke rising from various fires on VanMeter, air quality not too bad, breezes pushing the smoke away. Male downy and hairy woodpeckers visiting. Very large bird (hawk/eagle/buzzard?) circling high over the village. Warm sunny day, high of 77 degrees. By evening thick smoke rolling down river and rising up to obscure VanMeter. After dark you could see dozens of fires still burning on the hillside and quite breezy. Fat moon high in the sky.

Friday (Apr 27) overnight low of 30 degrees, clear sky, smoky to the north. Lots of swallows swooping around, but not many other birds, could hear jays in the neighborhood. The finches showed up by lunch time and later both male and female brewer’s blackbirds had arrived, also a female hairy woodpecker, an E-dove and a chickadee. Increasing traffic, the main road is getting dusty in front of the monument. Early afternoon smoke columns rising from holdover fires on VanMeter, light breezes and very warm, high of 81 degrees. Smoke settling along the river early evening. Shooting to the west of the village 715pm for about half an hour. Thicker smoke at sundown, robins calling, small herd of elk in a tight bunch by the road. After dark some of the bigger fires were quite noticeable, one looked like it was growing. Gusty erratic breezes.

Saturday (Apr 28) overnight low of 39 degrees, mostly cloudy sky and light smoke to the north. Lots of swallows and finches, a couple of steller jays, small flock of brewer’s blackbirds, and robins calling. Heavy equipment on the back Stibnite road. Two female hairy woodpeckers and first sighting of a male evening grosbeak. Mostly cloudy afternoon, cooler and very light breezes, high of 64 degrees. Air quality has improved, but smoke is still coming from various spots on VanMeter Hill. New bird, small like a pine siskin, blue/gray back with black/white wings, too quick to identify. Better air quality by late afternoon, pockets of heavy fuel continue to burn on VanMeter. Partly cloudy by evening and gusty breezes. A few spots of red glowing on the mountain after dark.

Sunday (Apr 29) overnight low of 38 degrees, low clouds sitting down on the ridges, rain started before 10am, then rain/hail mix for about 10 minutes, then light sprinkles for a few more. Female hairy woodpecker was the only visitor. Lots of birds showed up about 1045am, cassins finches, a couple of jays, a few juncos and red-breasted nuthatches. No swallows around. Daffodils blooming, 1/4″ leaves on the lilac bushes. Female evening grosbeak arrived around lunch time, lots of finches mobbing the feeders. Brewer’s blackbirds (M/F), robins and a few juncos in the yard. Sprinkles of rain at lunch time. Three E-doves and a small flock of brown headed cowbirds joined the feeding frenzy early afternoon, no sign of tree swallows. By early afternoon the clouds had lifted partway up the flanks of VanMeter Hill, a few smokes still poofing from the lower hillside. Cool and damp afternoon, a few showers on and off, high of 46 degrees. Late afternoon the clouds were still sitting on top of VanMeter, smoke rising up from the lower flanks, pretty good air quality.
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RIP:

Daniel Shane Embree

October 9, 1968 to April 14, 2018

Grand Master Daniel Shane Embree was called home to be one of God’s warrior angels on April 14th, 2018.

Dan was born in Boise Idaho on October 9, 1968. He is preceded in death by his father, Henry Allen Embree, his mother, Patricia Lee (Key) Embree, and his older brother Jerry Allen Embree. He leaves behind his beloved wife Heather (Barclay) Embree, his son, Brandon Embree, his sister and brother, Stacie Williams and Michael Fisher. He will be dearly missed by all who knew and loved him.

On Dan’s 8th birthday his father took him to a karate master and signed him up for lessons. When asked, on that day, how far he felt he could go with karate he looked at the colored levels of belts and pointed to the 4th degree black belt. He achieved that goal and much more. Dan dedicated his life to the Martial Arts and helping people. He studied multiple styles throughout his life and earned black belts in American Kempo (2nd Degree), Hapkido (2nd Degree), Tang Soo Do (2nd Degree), Aikido (1st Degree), and Ryukyu Kempo. He was awarded his 9th Degree black belt in Ryukyu Kempo in October, 2017.

Master Dan was awarded a Humanitarian Award from the United States Martial Arts Hall of Fame in 2005 for his Kid’s S.A.F.E. Karate program. He loved teaching children and adults and watching them grow in self-confidence as they learned how to defend themselves from predators. In 2006 he was inducted into the World Karate Hall of Fame as the Instructor of the Year. The awards were special to him, but they paled in comparison to the success of the students he taught. Physical or mental handicaps meant nothing to him as a teacher, he worked with everyone from those who almost drowned, burn victims, even a class of students who were hard of hearing. He always said he would never get rich teaching self-defense but he would be rich in spirit.

Dan’s desire to help others went far beyond the classroom. He was always looking out for others, from helping women haul heavy water bottles to their cars, to keeping an eye on the church across the street from his home when anything looked unusual. He worked with bullied children across the Treasure Valley, teaching them the skills they needed to stand up and walk tall. He conducted seminars for women to help them recognize dangerous situations and protect themselves from rape and assault. He took any opportunity to educate others in practical self-defense tactics.

Dan met and married his soulmate, Heather, later in life. They had six wonderful years together. He battled multiple illnesses and injuries during those years. He survived an acute attack of HIV/AIDS in 2013, and multiple surgeries in 2017 to repair ruptured disks in his neck and a detached retina in his left eye. He was gaining strength again and was planning to start a new business, Elite S.A.F.E. Training, to continue teaching self-defense. He remained dedicated to helping bullied children and teaching women to protect themselves up to the last days of his life.

A celebration of life will be held for those Dan left behind on Friday, April 27th, 2018, at 2:00 pm at the Sojourn Church of Boise, 3967 W. Pershing Dr. Boise, ID 83705. The church is on the corner of Pershing and Custer drive, one block north and west of Latah and Overland. Donations can be made to the SNAP program to help those living with HIV and AIDS. Checks should be made out to SNAP and sent to the Family Medicine Health Center, Attn: Jamie Strain, 6565 W. Emerald Street, Boise, ID 83704.

Published in Idaho Statesman on Apr. 24, 2018
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Letter to Share:

Proposed access document from Midas Gold

Alternative Access Between Yellow Pine and Monumental Summit

Recommendations

Upon hearing community concerns about access from Yellow Pine to Monumental Summit during operations of the Stibnite Gold Project, Midas Gold reviewed nine additional alternative public access routes to provide continued direct Yellow Pine to Monumental Summit access. Several of these alternatives were removed from consideration because they still resulted in long travel distances, limited the range of vehicles that could utilize the route, represented health and safety hazards to travelers, traversed environmentally sensitive areas, or required access of areas currently administratively closed to entry by the USFS.

Midas Gold presented two of the alternative routes we evaluated to the U.S. Forest Service as potentially feasible alternative access routes; both are accessible from Yellow Pine via Stibnite Road, pass through the Stibnite Gold Project mine operations site, and provide access to Monumental Summit over a similar distance as the existing route (Stibnite Road/Forest Service Road 412).

Alternative A: Through Yellow Pine pit below Haul Road. This route traverses a widened bench of the expanded Yellow Pine Pit and continues southward through the mine site along the EFSFSR on the partially reclaimed historical Bradley haul road. Toward the southern end of the mine site, this route passes by the mine ore processing area and exits the southern portion of the site on Thunder Mountain Road. (See figure 1 below).

Alternative B: West of Yellow Pine pit below Haul Road. This route circumnavigates the west side of the expanded Yellow Pine Pit by way of a new road. South of the expanded mine pit, the route is similar to Alternative A. (See figure 1 below).

Restrictions

The public access routes evaluated by Midas Gold would all be subject to intermittent closures depending on season, road conditions, mining activity and project phases. Anticipated closures along the proposed public access route due to seasonality, construction and mine operations are provided on figure 2 below. When inaccessible, optional Monumental Summit access would be provided by Burntlog Road.

Periodic access restrictions or constraints are expected on a seasonal basis and in the construction and operations phases, are unavoidable. Communicating periods of restricted access at points of entry to the project area will be the responsibility of Midas Gold Idaho and will be communicated in advance whenever possible.

Limitations

Any proposed alternative to the Plan of Restoration and Operation must be evaluated and accepted by the U.S. Forest Service for consideration in the environmental impact analysis process. To be carried forward to implementation, the U.S Forest Service must identify the option as a “preferred alternative” and incorporate its selection into their Record of Decision (ROD) document.

Additionally, while feasible in concept, the preferred routes listed here have not gone through an exhaustive engineering, public safety, permitting and environmental impact analysis.

FIGURE1PotentialAccessRoutes-a
(click image for larger size)
Figure 1 Potential Access Routes. Route A is red and yellow and Route B is orange and yellow.

FIGURE2PotentialAccessLimitations-a
(click image for full size)
Figure 2 Potential Access Limitations: The table includes the approximate status of public access via Stibnite Road and Burntlog Roads during the summer and winter seasons based upon the projected phases of the project.

[Document dated March 9, 2018, received from Belinda at Midas Gold Idaho.]
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Idaho News:

California man arrested for robbing bank in Cascade

by KBOI News Staff Monday, April 23rd 2018

The Valley County Sheriff’s Office says they have arrested a 47-year-old California man after he robbed a bank in Cascade Monday afternoon.

Deputies say the bank’s silent alarm notified them of the robbery at the Umpqua Bank at 1:01 South Main Street around 2:30 p.m.

Witnesses told them that a man wearing a bright orange sweatshirt and gray sweatpants, carrying a bag with a beach towel sticking out had entered the bank and demanded money.

When deputies arrived at the bank, they say they saw the suspect running from the area and were able to take him into custody.

continued:
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Teenage girl killed in crash into Salmon River

Katelyn J. Thayer of McCall died in the wreck.

KTVB April 23, 2018

Riggins, Idaho — A 17-year-old girl was killed and another teen was injured after their vehicle plunged into the Salmon River Saturday night.

According to the Idaho County Sheriff, dispatchers learned at about 9 p.m. that the vehicle had crashed 2.4 miles up the Salmon River Road, and was upside down in the river.

Katelyn J. Thayer of McCall died in the wreck. Another girl, 17-year-old Alaska Frandsen of Malad, was thrown from the vehicle as it crashed. Witnesses drove her away from the wreckage and met Riggins Ambulance, which was responding to the crash site.

continued:
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Body found in burning car on Gold Fork Road

By Tom Grote for The Star-News April 26, 2018

The body of an adult male was found inside a burning car on Tuesday on Gold Fork Road east of Donnelly, Valley County Coroner Scott Carver said.

An autopsy was scheduled for today that may help identify the victim, Carver said.

Firefighters from the Donnelly Rural Fire Protection District were called to a grass fire about 4:05 p.m. Tuesday on Gold Fork Road, a news release from the district said.

While responding firefighters learned a vehicle was engulfed in flames at the location. Donnelly firefighters, with assistance from McCall Fire & EMS and the Southern Idaho Timber Protective Association, quickly extinguished the fire.

continued:
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Small wildfire in Boise Co. sparks concern of larger fires to come

by Abigail Taylor Friday, April 27th 2018

Boise County, Idaho (KBOI) — Firefighters in Idaho are worried we could be in for a busy fire season.

A small fire in Boise County Friday evening was the first of the season — and firefighters say it could be a sign of what’s to come.

It burned less than an acre of land. They say despite high winds, the fire moved slow because the ground is still moist from winter. However, that’s not expected to last for long.

continued:
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Idaho hit hard by E. coli outbreak

The Centers for Disease Control now tells consumers to avoid all types of romaine lettuce, not just chopped, coming from Yuma, Ariz.

Natalie Shaver April 24, 2018 KTVB

Boise – The Centers for Disease Control is now expanding its warning about the E. coli outbreak connected to romaine lettuce.

The agency is now telling consumers to avoid all types of romaine, not just chopped, coming from Yuma, Ariz.

The CDC says the E. coli outbreak is spanning 16 states, including Idaho. So far, they say 53 people have become ill – and 10 of them are from the Gem State.

continued:
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Eight Idahoans sick with Salmonella after consuming kratom products

by KBOI News Staff Monday, April 23rd 2018

Nampa, Idaho (KBOI) — Idaho state health officials are warning residents to avoid consuming products that contain kratom because they could be contaminated with Salmonella.

The state says eight people in Idaho have been poisoned with Salmonella. No deaths have been reported.

Kratom is a plant consumed for its stimulant effects and is also used as an opioid substitute. Kratom is known as Thang, Kakuam, Thom, Ketom and Biak. Ill individuals have reported consuming kratom as pills, powder, and in tea.

continued:
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Scam Alert:

Fraudulent direct mass mailings menace consumers, hurt charities

By Craig Nigrelli Apr 26, 2018 KIVI TV

Della Lee, 88, of Bellevue, Nebraska, rattles off the pitches from various organizations.

There are veterans groups, serious diseases, and starving animals, “and there’s hunger, a lot of hunger, and there’s many of those, too.” She has the mail sorted in piles on her dining room table.

“From all parts of the country, concerning all charities,” she said. “I’ve never had this many letters in my life.”

… Jim Hegarty, head of the Better Business Bureau, said he’s not surprised by Lee’s deluge of mail from supposed charity groups urging her to donate.

“It’s ferocious,” he said. “I am not surprised by somebody getting that volume of mail.”

It’s why the BBB has an entire division devoted to shady organizations, Hegarty said.

full story:
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Public Lands:

Big Creek Yellow Pine South Fork Collaborative Meeting

Payette National Forest March 22, 2018

Meeting Minutes

link: BC-YP Meeting March 22, 2018.docx
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Fuelwood Permit Cost Reduced – Available May 15 at Southwest Idaho National Forests

Date: April 23, 2017
Contact: Brian Harris (208) 634-0784 cell: (208) 634-6945

McCall, Idaho – Personal use fuelwood permits for the Payette, Sawtooth and Boise National Forests are changing to reflect new minimum permit requirements as well as a cost reduction.

Fuelwood permits have been reduced from $12.50 to $6.25 per cord with a 4-cord minimum and a 10-cord maximum per household. Two reasons are driving the change; aligning the overall price of the fuelwood to be closer with other Idaho forests and to help remove the fuel load since woodcutting is limited to dead trees.

Permits will be available at USDA Forest Service Ranger District offices, and private vendors (see attached list). Please note that we can no longer can sell permits of only 2 cords. If you want all ten cords, permit purchases will need to be purchased 5 cords and 5 cords, or 4 cords and 6 cord, or all 10 cords at once.

The 2018 fuelwood season is May 15, through Nov. 30, 2018.

The Payette National Forest has two free-use areas, which are located in the Steamboat Summit/Warren Summit area and Big Creek area. A free-use permit is required for these areas and can be obtained at the McCall Ranger District office along with specific location information and permit use requirements. Free-use fuelwood counts as personal use toward the 10-cord maximum per household.

Cutting fuelwood within a closure area is prohibited. Check on the Alerts & Notices pages of Forest websites for closure information.

Check this year’s fuelwood brochure and current Motor Vehicle Use Maps to make sure you are cutting in an area open to fuelwood gathering, and pay special attention to closed areas and roads with restoration activities. Regulations prohibit the cutting of dead or living Whitebark pine trees due to that species decline, and they are critically important to several wildlife species.

Fuelwood permits are valid within the Boise, Payette and Sawtooth Forests. All motorized travel related to fuelwood gathering must be in full accordance with Forest Service travel regulations for the area as shown in the Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM), unless specifically exempted in the fuelwood permit.

Permit holders are encouraged to cut fuelwood early in the year because fire restrictions may impact the cutting season later in the summer. Early season fuelwood cutters are asked to use caution to avoid wet muddy roads, where travel may cause resource damage. Fuelwood cutting is not allowed within riparian areas (adjacent to creeks and rivers).

Regulations are available when permits are issued. For additional information, contact the local Ranger District offices, or Forest websites. Check with forest vendors for weekend hours.

Payette National Forest Vendors:

Jay’s Sinclair, Cambridge 208-257-5000
Ridley’s Food & Drug, Weiser 208-549-1332
Farmer’s Supply Co-op, Council 208-253-4266
C & M Lumber, New Meadows 208-347-3648
Albertsons, McCall 208-634-8166
The Corner, Yellow Pine 208-633-3325

Payette NF Ranger District Offices:

Weiser RD 208-549-4200
Council RD 208-253-0100
McCall RD 208-634-0400
New Meadows RD 208-347-0300

Brian Harris
Public Affairs Officer
Payette National Forest
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Boise National Forest Vendors:

Seasons, Idaho City – 208-392-9777
Donna’s Place, Placerville – 208-392-9666
Idaho City Grocery, Idaho City – 208-392-4426
Tom’s Service/Sinclair, Idaho City – 208-392-4900
B&W Fuels, Emmett – 208-392-4900
Valley View Chevron – 208-793-4321
Ray’s Corner Market, Horseshoe Bend – 208-793-2391
East Cleveland Beverage, Caldwell – 208-459-6442
Garden Valley Chevron, Garden Valley – 208-462-3869
D & B Supply, Emmett – 208 365-2955

Boise NF Ranger District Offices:
Interagency Visitor Center – 208-373-4007
Mountain Home RD – 208-587-7961
Idaho City RD – 208-392-6681
Cascade RD – 208-382-7400
Lowman RD – 208-259-3361
Emmett RD – 208-365-7000
Emmett RD/ Garden Valley Work Center – 208-462-3241
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Sawtooth National Forest Vendors:

Rock Creek General Store, Hansen – 208-423-5659
Hansen Quick Stop & Go, Hansen – 208-423-9900
Camas Creek Country Store, Fairfield – 208-764-2211
NAF Store, Malta – 208-824-5780

Sawtooth NF Ranger District Offices:

Minidoka RD – 208-678-0430
Ketchum RD – 208-622-5371
Fairfield RD – 208-764-3202
Sawtooth National Recreation Area – 208-727-5013
Stanley RD – 208-774-3000
Sawtooth Supervisor’s Office – 208-423-7500

link:
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Management plans advance for central Idaho wilderness areas

By Keith Ridler – 4/26/18 AP

Boise, Idaho — Three new central Idaho wilderness areas could have management plans in place this year.

Federal officials released the Jim McClure-Jerry Peak Wilderness Management Plan covering 183 square miles (474 square kilometers) earlier this month and are taking comments from those who previously participated in the process through June 4.

Officials say they chose a middle-ground approach for restrictions on human visitors while still preserving the natural setting.

continued:
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Forest Service Intermountain Region Newsletter

Volume 2 Issue 8 April 25, 2018

link:
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Letters to Share:

Mystic Farm Annual Pork Raffle!

April 26, 2018

Greetings from Mystic Farm!

It’s back! The annual fundraiser for Mystic Farm Wildlife Rescue, Inc. Once again, we are offering tickets for purchase to win a half hog of locally grown gourmet pork. This was a big hit last year! Your chance to win “melt in your mouth” Maker’s Long Acres pork like none other you have ever tasted!

Mystic Farm Wildlife Rescue, Inc. is a non-profit 501 (c) 3. We receive no state or federal funding and there is no paid staff. Help support the rescue. The fawns thank you!

*If you are local and would like to volunteer to help sell tickets, please let me know.

*Winner is responsible for picking up pork or meeting at a reasonable location.

Thank you for your continued support – none of this could be done without you.

Flyer from FB:

Sincerely,
Dory and all…
Mystic Farm Wildlife Rescue, Inc.
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Baby Pheasant Chicks Are Ready

April 26, 2018

“The first batch of chicks coming May 1st is spoken for. Next batch of chicks out May 8th and every Tuesday after that. I already have some orders for some of those chicks. If you want some get your order in early as some times they go fast. It is first on the list gets the birds.”

– Jim

Hi all, the baby pheasant chicks are coming! Once again, IDFG is helping us out and is paying for the chicks. However, they have indicated that this year everyone needs a release permit filled out with name, address, and phone number. The Gamebird Foundation has acquired the permits and has an assigned number available, so just fill out the copy when you pick up or order your birds from us. Just a reminder that everyone raising chicks through the Gamebird Foundation will need to be a current member to utilize our permit. Annual membership is $20/family and you can update your membership anytime, including when you pick up or order your chicks. This money helps us pay for feed, brooders, and sponsorship of youth hunts. Going through us avoids you having to pay Little Canyon for the chicks, means you don’t have to get your own release permit, and allows you to get feed at a greatly reduced discount, all of which would cost much more than the annual membership.

I don’t have a cost on the feed yet but you should use the feed that we get, or the feed from Little Canyon. This feed is medicated and has the minerals needed for the chicks. The feed you buy at the feed store has no medication and two years ago we lost a couple 1000 chicks because of the no medication and the chicks got coccidiosis. If you feel paying for the feed means you can’t raise birds, talk to us – we have a program to help!

We have 2 brooders with electric heaters and auto feeders and water systems available. They are currently located in Deary and belong to the Foundation. These brooders will handle 100 to 150 birds each until they are 3 weeks old. Let us know if you’d like one, they go quick.

This first hatch from the brooder is a big one and will have around a 1000 chicks for us. If you need a place to raise chicks, the Gamebird Foundation can help with ideas. You can reach me at 208-883-3423 or email at jhag1008 @ gmail.com. Contact me as soon as possible to get your order in for the chicks.

Take care and great chick raising.

Jim Hagedorn
Executive Director
The Gamebird Foundation
thegamebirdfoundation.org
——————————–

Critter News:

Mountain Home men busted for elk poaching in Valley County

by KBOI News Staff Wednesday, April 25th 2018


(Idaho Fish and Game)

Yellow Pine, Idaho (KBOI) — Two Mountain Home men have been sentenced for their roles into elk poaching in Valley County.

The Idaho Department of Fish and Game says in September 2016, Jonathan Blaschka, 36, and Charles McCall, 41, gunned down two bull elk during an archery only season near Yellow Pine. The men only had archery elk tags for the area, fish and game says.

Blaschka also returned to the area the following year and used a rifle to poach a large bull elk and cow elk during the archery only season.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

KWVR Oregon Wolf Education weekly Wolf Report

April (?) 2018
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Wolf Education International

April 27, 2018 Newsletter

What to know about the growing wolf population debate in Germany
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

US won’t restore Yellowstone grizzly bear protections

4/27/18 AP

Billings, Mont. — U.S. officials say they will not restore federal protections for Yellowstone-area grizzly bears despite a court ruling that called into question the government’s rationale for placing the animals under state management.

Friday’s announcement follows a months-long review of a decision last year to lift the protections for about 700 bears in and around Yellowstone National Park.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Nez Perce give Mother Nature a helping hand

105,000 young salmon released into Johnson Creek

By Andrew Weeks for The Star-News April 26, 2018

The Nez Perce Tribe recently released 105,000 young salmon in Johnson Creek. But the release was nothing new.

It has been something the tribe been doing every year for the past two decades to supplement the chinook population of the South Fork of the Salmon River.

About 105,000 salmon were released by the , tribe’s Department of Fisheries Resources, said John Gebhards, fish project manager for the department’s McCall office.

Partnering with the Idaho Department of Fish and Game’s McCall Fish Hatchery, the tribe raises some 100,000 salmon every year.

The salmon grow for about 18 months until they reach around 4 to 5 inches – or about 23 fish per pound – before they are taken by truck on a 100-plus mile journey to Johnson Creek, located about 40 miles east of McCall.

Once the tribe’s fish are released into Johnson Creek, a tributary of the South Fork of the Salmon River, Mother Nature takes over.

Fish that survive the challenges of river life swim about 700 miles to the Pacific Ocean, where they continue to mature and encounter new challenges. At some point they head back to the creek to spawn – though not all of the fish make the taxing trip upriver.

The salmon that do return lay eggs, which biologists then gather and take to the hatchery where the fish are hatched and raised. Eventually the young salmon – called “smolt” by the time they’re ready to travel to the Pacific Ocean – are returned to the river and the process is repeated.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Howdy’s Fishing Derby to be held on Lake Cascade

The Star-News April 26, 2018

Anglers of all ages can cast in a line in search of the big one during the 24th annual Fishing Derby on Saturday and Sunday on Lake Cascade.

There will be $900 in cash prizes and lots of giveaways. The final weigh-in will be Sunday at 3 p.m.

Registration is free for ages 13 years and under. Cost is $8 for adults. For more information, call 208-382-6712 or visit Howdy’s in Cascade or Old Town Market in McCall.

source:
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

The Columbia Basin Bulletin

Weekly Fish and Wildlife News
http://www.cbbulletin.com
April 27, 2018
Issue No. 870
Table of Contents

* Scientists Express Skepticism About Stopping Lake Roosevelt Northern Pike From Spreading Downstream
http://www.cbbulletin.com/440613.aspx

* Corps Releases Season’s First Bonneville Dam Sea Lion Report: Low Chinook Passage, Low Sea Lion Abundance
http://www.cbbulletin.com/440612.aspx

* Just Like Last Year, Sea Lions At Willamette Falls Hammering Wild Winter Steelhead Run
http://www.cbbulletin.com/440611.aspx

* States Set Summer, Fall Chinook Seasons; Below Average Forecasts Means Less Fishing, Bag Limit Changes
http://www.cbbulletin.com/440610.aspx

* Spring Chinook Fishing Opens Saturday In Idaho Though Few Fish Have Crossed Lower Granite
http://www.cbbulletin.com/440609.aspx

* State Department Holds Spokane Town Hall On Negotiations With Canada For Modernized Columbia River Treaty
http://www.cbbulletin.com/440608.aspx

* House Passes Bill Requiring Columbia/Snake Federal Hydro System To Operate Under 2014 BiOp Until 2022
http://www.cbbulletin.com/440607.aspx

* Montana Stops Boat From Ohio Loaded With Invasive Zebra Mussels; Was Headed To Puget Sound
http://www.cbbulletin.com/440606.aspx

* 15-Year-Old Lawsuit Against Forest Service Over Bull Trout In Southeast Oregon Dismissed
http://www.cbbulletin.com/440605.aspx

* Canadian Audit Finds Salmon Farms Not Being Managed Adequately To Protect Wild Fish
http://www.cbbulletin.com/440604.aspx

* OSU Submits Draft License For Nation’s First Full-Scale, Utility Connected Wave Energy Test Site
http://www.cbbulletin.com/440603.aspx

* Study Raises New Questions About Whether Inbreeding Contributing To Decline In Washington Killer Whales
http://www.cbbulletin.com/440602.aspx
————————————

Fish & Game News:

Register for Hunter Education Combo Class

Idaho Fish and Game Southwest Region

Valley County area, Instructor Brett Mayes has a Hunter Education class scheduled in Cascade 5/18 – 5/20. Starts Fri evening thru Sun afternoon. This is a combo Hunter/Bowhunter Education course.

Register for Hunter Education Combo Class to sign up.
https://register-ed.com/events/view/121342

Brett will also be doing a Field Day on 5/19 for anyone who needs to complete an online course.

Register for Field Day Class
https://register-ed.com/events/view/121344
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Trapper Education class

Idaho Fish and Game Southwest Region

Trapper Education class is scheduled for McCall on Saturday May 5, 2018. Class is a one day class and will be held at the Fish & Game office in McCall.

Mandatory Trapper Education goes into affect July 1, 2018.

Exceptions: Any Trapper that possesses a trapping license that is dated June 30, 2011 and older are exempt, all others Must Take Trapper Education.

Next scheduled Trapping class in the South West Region is not scheduled until July 21, 2018 in Nampa.
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

F&G: Spring Chinook fishing season opens Saturday

The Star-News April 26, 2018

Chinook fishing on the Clearwater, Snake, Salmon and Little Salmon rivers opens Saturday and will run until closed by the Idaho Department of Fish and Game.

Fisheries managers are forecasting a run of 66,000 spring Chinook, roughly double last year’s return and slightly above the 10-year average of 62,000, a news release said.

Currently few fish have crossed the dams and only six had crossed Lower Granite Dam near Lewiston as of Saturday.

With so few in Idaho, there’s no reason to postpone the opener, and “if the fish don’t materialize, we have options,” F&G Anadromous Fish Manager Lance Hebdon said.

Included in the forecast are 53,000 hatchery Chinook and 13,000 wild Chinook. The 2017 return was 30,000 and 4,000.

Rules include open fishing Thursdays through Sundays in the Clearwater drainage and seven days per week in the Salmon, Little Salmon and Snake rivers.

Daily bag limits will be four per day with no more than one being an adult (24-inches or longer) in the Clearwater River system and four per day with no more than two being adults in the Salmon, Little Salmon and Snake rivers.

source:
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F&G News Releases

https://idfg.idaho.gov/press
———————————-

Fun Critter Stuff:

Young giraffe makes brief escape at Indiana zoo

by Associated Press Tuesday, April 24th 2018

Fort Wayne, Ind. (AP) — Workers at an Indiana zoo needed a couple of hours to corral a young giraffe that escaped from her enclosure.

The 7-month-old female got loose Monday from the African Journey exhibit at the Fort Wayne Children’s Zoo. Zoo spokeswoman Bonnie Kemp says the giraffe, Thabisa, never left the property.

It wasn’t immediately clear how the youngest in the zoo’s herd of nine giraffes escaped.

Staffers were able to trap the giraffe in a fenced parking lot in a non-public area of the zoo. Zookeepers calmed her down before returning her to the enclosure.

source:
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Tips & Advice:

Safety tips for heading out onto the rivers, lakes and reservoirs in Idaho

River safety tips during early season

By Steve Dent Apr 26, 2018 KIVI TV

Boise – Idaho rivers are running high and fast, officials are warning the public that the water this time of year is dangerously cold.

“This time of year it is absolutely critical for all boaters to wear a life jacket,” said David Dahm of the Idaho Parks and Recreation Department. “The rivers, lakes and reservoirs are absolutely frigid and if you fall in the water without a life jacket there is a really good chance you will be in trouble.”

A man is still missing after falling out of his canoe on the Snake River on Saturday, he was not wearing a life jacket.

continued:
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Seasonal Humor:

SpringBear2-a

SpringWeatherCold-a
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Idaho History April 29, 2018

Richard “Beaver Dick” Leigh, Sr

The Man Called Beaver Dick

BeaverDick-a

Richard Leigh (pronounced “Lee”) was born January 9, 1831, in Manchester, England. While still very young, he travelled to America to seek out his fortune. Upon his arrival, he began working for the Hudson Bay Fur Company, trapping animals for their pelts. At only 17 years old, Leigh joined American forces and fought in the Mexican War.

At the conclusion of his time as a soldier, Leigh travelled north through Utah where he met none other than Brigham Young in the Salt Lake area. While there’s no official record as to the sure origin of Richard Leigh’s nickname, it’s most commonly believed that Brigham Young was the first to call him “Beaver Dick,” on account of his love and skill for beaver trapping.

Conflicting stories claim the name was given to him due to his beaver-like front teeth, or that it was native Americans who first started using the moniker. Whatever the truth may be, Leigh came to be known much more widely as Richard “Beaver Dick” Leigh.

While the beaver fur trade boom had fizzled by 1840, Beaver Dick continued trapping, but this time he created trapping lines through the Teton region. He became fluent in both the Bannock and Shoshone languages, and eventually married a Native American woman named Jenny. He became the first non-native American man to settle permanently in the Upper Snake River Valley of Idaho.

Beaver Dick and Jenny had six children together. He provided by spending most of his time hunting and trapping along his lines, and selling the pelts at several small trading posts in the area. The man was tough, to say the least. Braving the rough conditions of an unsettled area, most often alone, his life was filled with many dangerous and exciting experiences.

Of Beaver Dick, Ken Hughes of Native Unity Digest wrote, “Beaver Dick was the man of influence in the Fire-hole [Yellowstone Park] and Jackson Hole Wyoming and west of the Tetons in Idaho… His knowledge of the Teton country was unmatched by any man White or Indian; what he didn’t know his wife, Jenny, and her people did.”

In 1876 tragedy struck the home of Beaver Dick and his wife Jenny. The family took in a starving widow and child who’s path they happened to cross. Only after they had nursed them back to health did they learn that widow’s husband was killed by the smallpox virus. The widow soon contracted the disease and died.

Rather than sending the child away in fear of the spread of the virus, the family showed great compassion and took the girl in. It was an act of love that soon cost Leigh the lives his wife and six children. In December of 1876, shortly after his wife had given birth to their sixth child, his entire family as well as the orphaned girl died at the hand of the then-deadly virus.

Beaver Dick himself also contracted the disease, but with the help and care from a friend, Tom Lavering, he managed to survive. He recorded in his journal, however, that he was never quite the same after contracting the illness.

In 1863, well before the death of his family, Beaver Dick passed by an isolated camp of a Bannock Indian couple while the wife was struggling in labor. At once he offered his help, and with his help the woman named Tadpole gave birth to a healthy daughter.

The couple was so happy and thankful for his help that they promised their new daughter, Susan, to Beaver Dick in marriage when she came of age. At that time, a happily married 35-year-old, he thanked them but did not accept.

However, in 1878, now a lonely widower, Beaver found himself at For Hall, Idaho, amid a time of tension between Bannock tribes and the US Military. He was serving as a scout and hunter for the military. Coincidentally, John and Tadpole, the couple whose daughter Beaver had helped deliver 16 years prior, were also at the fort.

In 1979, Leigh did accept the gift he’d been offered years before, and married Susan Tadpole. They had three children together, and lived out their lives together happily. There are still descendants of the couple in the area.

After his second marriage, Beaver Dick continued hunting and trapping, and occasionally acted as a guide as well. He even led an expedition for Theodore Roosevelt himself. Even into his old age, he remained a man of the mountains.

In 1899, struck by serious illness and a stroke, Richard “Beaver Dick” Leigh passed away. He was buried near Rexburg on a hill that overlooks his second homestead.

source: Explore Rexburg
— — — — — — — — — —

Beaver Dick Leigh’s Families

BeaverDickFamily1-a
(click image for larger size)
Beaver Dick Leigh, 1872, with his first wife, Jenny, a Shoshone of Washakie’s band, and their children, l. to r., John; Anne Jane; William on Jenny’s lap; Richard, Jr., on the burro. William Henry Jackson photo, Jackson Hole Historical Society and Museum collection. Jenny, these four children and their fifth child, Elizabeth, all died of smallpox in December 1876.

BeaverDickFamily2-a
Beaver Dick Leigh and his second wife, Susan Tadpole, a Shoshone, were married in 1879. Here, they pose in the mid 1890s with their three children, l. to r., William Bradhurst, b. 1886; Rose, b. 1891; and Emma, b. 1881. Jackson Hole Historical Society and Museum.

source w/good story: Beaver Dick Leigh, Mountain Man of the Tetons
All photos are courtesy of the Jackson Hole Historical Society and Museum
— — — — — — — — — —

Beaver Dick

History doesn’t always stay within the tidy borders of a state. At least, that’s the excuse I’ve come up with today to tell you a story that took place in Wyoming.

Richard Leigh was a blue-eyed, red-headed man who spoke with a Cockney accent, dropping his H’s as you would expect someone from Manchester, England to do. He was born there in 1831. He had fought in a war and worked for the Hudson Bay Company before setting out on his own and settling in the Teton Valley on the Idaho side of those mountains.

I could tell a lot of stories about Richard Leigh, and probably will in future postings. Known as “Beaver Dick” because of his proficiency in catching the creatures, he was a well-known figure in early Idaho. A few bullet points:

— He served as a guide to the Hayden Expedition to Yellowstone in 1872.

— He may be the only historical figure to have two Idaho highway historical markers, one in Boise and one near Rexburg.

Beaver Dick
This park is named for “Beaver Dick, “ a mountain man of late fur trade days, who lived on in this locality until 1899.  He was born in England, and his real name was Richard Leigh. He came west as a trapper, but the real fur trade was already over. So he married a Shoshoni woman and stayed hereabouts. A popular early outfitter and guide, he served the famous Hayden surveying party in 1872. Leigh Lake in Grand Teton National Park is named for him, and Jenny Lake for his wife. A picturesque character, he was widely known and liked. (source)

— Leigh Lake in Grand Teton National Park is named after him. Nearby Jenny Lake is named for his first wife.

— Beaver Dick lost his entire first family, wife Jenny and four kids, to smallpox.

— Leigh helped a Shoshoni woman give birth to a daughter, Susan, who was promised to become Beaver Dick’s wife. He didn’t think it would ever happen, but they did marry 16 years later after Leigh lost his first family.

But this story is about Beaver Dick’s daughter Emma, from that second family.

The mountain man and his family were camped at Two Oceans Pass in 1891 when the story took place. Two Oceans Pass is in Wyoming, where Two Oceans Creek splits into two streams, Atlantic Creek dropping off the Continental Divide to end up eventually in the Gulf of Mexico and Pacific Creek going West to find its way to the mouth of the Columbia.

The Leigh family was camped alone, at first, but their peace was interrupted by the sound of a robust voice coming into the clearing that would soon prove to be that of Theodore Roosevelt. This was ten years before Roosevelt would become president. Beaver Dick and Teddy hit it off and spent a pleasant evening swapping hunting stories in Roosevelt’s tent. Ten-year-old Emma hovered around the story-telling and began to make herself a pest.

Emma wrote about the memory in later years:

“At last, father got so provoked he stood up and pointed to the tent flap and ordered me to “pike away!’ I knew what that meant. But as I rushed past Mr. Roosevelt who was a short man and sat with his boots outstretched, I stumbled over his boots and fell on all fours. Before I could get back on my feet, Roosevelt reached down and pulled me across his lap, and then with his opened hand he gave a good spanking on my bottom side up.”

Emma felt bad about it, but apparently, Roosevelt did, too. The next day he asked her to show him how well she could shoot. With a rifle he handed her, Emma hit the bullseye on a target.

Emma said, “I heard Mr. Roosevelt shout ‘Bravo!’ It was the first time I’d heard that word but I knew it meant something good. And the best was yet to come. Mr. Roosevelt called me by name. ‘Emma,’ he said, ‘I hereby present you with this rifle and hope it will ease some of the pain I caused you last night.”

I’d heard this story from an elderly family member of mine but wondered about its veracity. Emma was named after my great-grandmother, Emma Thompson Just. I thought it might just have been a good spin on a lesser story passed down through the years. The story seems to be true, though, and is mentioned in many accounts of Beaver Dick’s life, the most authoritative of which may be the 1982 book Beaver Dick, The Honor and the Heartbreak, by his great-grandson William Leigh Thompson and his wife Edith M. Shultz Thompson. The quotes from Emma were found in that book.

source: Rick Just, Speaking of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

Richard “Beaver Dick” Leigh, Sr

HeadstoneBeaverDick-a
Added by April Fausett
(click image for source size)

Birth: 9 Jan 1831 Manchester, Metropolitan Borough of Manchester, Greater Manchester, England
Death: 29 Mar 1899 Wilford, Fremont County, Idaho
Burial: Richard Leigh Burial Site Wilford, Fremont County, Idaho. Plot: Privately owned field.

Beaver Dick fought in the Mexican War and searched for gold in the Salmon River before establishing a ferry across the Boise River to supply Idaho City prospectors. As a soldier, trapper, prospector, rancher, ferryboatman and guide for eastern hunters, he facilitated the West’s shift from territory to settled area to tourist attraction.

BeaverDickSonBill-a
(click image for larger size)
Richard “Beaver Dick” Leigh with his son William ” Bill ” Leigh. Richard was married to ” Sue ” Susan Tadpole (Bannock tribe) with whom he had three children, William Bradhurst, Rose and Emma.
photo courtesy of Michael Hague – “Richard was a friend of my Great Grandfather William A. Hague b. 1854 d. 1916”

Family Members:

Spouses

Jenny Leigh 1849–1876
Susan Tadpole Leigh 1862–1927

Children

Richard Leigh 1868–1876
John Leigh 1868–1876
Ann Jane Leigh 1870–1876
William Leigh 1872–1876
Elizabeth Leigh 1874–1876
Infant Leigh 1876–1876
Emma Jane Leigh Thompson 1879 (or 1881)–1940
William Bradhurst, b. 1886
Rose (Coops), b. 1891

source: (w/family info): Find A Grave
— — — — — — — — — —

A History about Beaver Dick

By Vera Baldwin October 21, 1970

Oral interview conducted by Harold Forbush, Transcribed by Devon Robb October 2004, Brigham Young University – Idaho

Harold Forbush – The Upper Snake River Valley Historical Society located on North Center Rexburg, Idaho is pleased to place on a C-90 cassette a live tape recording which was done originally on reel to reel tape and now it is been referred to as the Beaver Dick or Richard Lee family tape and now is being transferred on to the cassette this the 23rd day April 1984.

continued:
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Road Report April 29

Note: Spring road conditions change quickly. Be prepared for rocks and trees falling in the road. Please share road reports.

Yellow Pine: It has been dry all week, until this morning (a little rain so far) local streets were drying out and starting to get a bit dusty up on main street. Watch for pot holes. (Report that it is snowing in McCall this morning.)
Click for Local Forecast.

Warm Lake Highway: Last report from Friday (Apr 27) road is good. Might be a little snow up high this morning.
Big Creek Summit SNOTEL station 6580′

South Fork Salmon River Road Load Restrictions until until June 1 or earlier if conditions warrant and the signage is removed.
Map:
Notice:
South Fork Road: (April 27) Some rocks and trees down along side the road, nothing in the road. Snow free all the way.
Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′

EFSF Road: (April 27) Several reports that the EFSF road is rough, especially between the Eiguren Ranch and Yellow Pine.

Lower Johnson Creek Road: Last report Apr 25, normal rough road between YP and the dump.
Upper Johnson Creek Road: Closed at Landmark for winter to full sized vehicles.
The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet
Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam:
http://www.ruralnetwork.net/~yellowpinecm/

Lick Creek: Closed for winter to full sized vehicles. Open between Yellow Pine and Zena Creek Ranch.
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Closed for winter to full sized vehicles.
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.
Big Creek Webcam:

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open. No current report, conditions have changed.

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Not advised to go beyond Stibnite, snow in the high elevations.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.
Trail Report: (Apr 14) 4-wheelers made it half way to the summit.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Closed.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: No current report.
Note: The approx elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
Deadwood Summit SNOTEL station 6860′
——————————-

Weather Reports April 22-28

Apr 22 Weather:

At 10am it was 44 degrees and mostly clear. At 245pm it was 61 degrees and mostly cloudy. At 815pm it was 53 degrees, breezy and mostly cloudy, thin spots in the haze. Clearing during the night/early morning.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time April 23, 2018 at 10:00AM
Mostly clear, breezy
Max temperature 64 degrees F
Min temperature 30 degrees F
At observation 46 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

Apr 23 Weather:

At 10am it was 46 degrees, breezy and almost clear. At 3pm it was 53 degrees, breezy and mostly cloudy. At 7pm it was 53 degrees, breezy and partly cloudy. Mostly clear at 9pm, half moon right overhead.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time April 24, 2018 at 10:00AM
Clear, light breeze
Max temperature 58 degrees F
Min temperature 26 degrees F
At observation 42 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

Apr 24 Weather:

At 10am it was 42 degrees, clear sky and light breeze. Clear and breezy at 1pm. At 3pm it was 64 degrees, clear and light breezes. At 9pm it was 51 degrees, clear and calm.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time April 25, 2018 at 10:00AM
Mostly clear
Max temperature 67 degrees F
Min temperature 28 degrees F
At observation 46 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

Apr 25 Weather:

At 10am it was 46 degrees and mostly clear. Bald Hill Rx Burn today. High wispy clouds by lunch time. At 3pm it was 68 degrees, mostly cloudy and light breezes. At 8pm it was 58 degrees, breezy and mostly smoky. At 1230am it was 41 degrees, calmer and very smoky.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time April 26, 2018 at 10:00AM
Clear above thick smoke
Max temperature 70 degrees F
Min temperature 29 degrees F
At observation 48 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

Apr 26 Weather:

At 10am it was 48 degrees, clear sky above thick smoke. At 230pm it was 74 degrees, clear and much less smoke. At 930pm it was 46 degrees, quite breezy and probably clear (thin ring around the moon.) Smoke settled in the valley along the river from the Rx burn.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time April 27, 2018 at 10:00AM
Clear above the smoke
Max temperature 77 degrees F
Min temperature 30 degrees F
At observation 51 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

Apr 27 Weather:

At 10am it was 51 degrees, clear sky, thick smoke to the north. At 245pm it was 79 degrees, almost clear and better air quality although smoke is still rising from fires on the mountain. At 830pm it was 64 degrees, mostly cloudy and breezy (smoky too.) At 9pm it was overcast and gusty breezes. Quite breezy just before 11pm, 55 degrees and mostly cloudy.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time April 28, 2018 at 10:00AM
Mostly cloudy
Max temperature 81 degrees F
Min temperature 39 degrees F
At observation 50 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

Apr 28 Weather:

At 10am it was 50 degrees, mostly cloudy and light smoke. At 3pm it was 63 degrees, mostly cloudy and light breezes. Gusty breezes and partly cloudy before 6pm. At 830pm it was 49 degrees, partly cloudy, light breeze and light smoke. Started raining at 949am.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time April 29, 2018 at 10:00AM
Low overcast, rain/hail mix falling
Max temperature 64 degrees F
Min temperature 38 degrees F
At observation 40 degrees F
Precipitation Trace
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
———————————

Road Report April 25

Note: Spring road conditions change quickly. Be prepared for rocks and trees falling in the road. Please share road reports.

Yellow Pine: Warm dry weather and high temps in the 60s the last few days in Yellow Pine. Local streets are bare and starting to dry out, watch for pot holes. Click for Local Forecast.

Warm Lake Highway: (April 25) mail truck driver (Robert) reports Warm Lake Highway is snow free over the summit, road is in good shape.
Big Creek Summit SNOTEL station 6580′

South Fork Salmon River Road Load Restrictions – A few weeks ago, the spring load restrictions were placed on the South Fork Salmon River Road. These restrictions will remain on the road until June 1 or earlier if conditions warrant and the signage is removed.
Map:  Notice:
South Fork Road: (April 25) mail truck driver reports bare pavement all the way in, no rocks to move.
Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′

EFSF Road: (April 25) mail truck driver reports the EFSF road is “rough”, trailer with broken hitch “stranded” on the side of the road. No rocks to move today.

Lower Johnson Creek Road: No current report, normal rough road between YP and the dump.
Upper Johnson Creek Road: Closed at Landmark for winter to full sized vehicles.
The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet
Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam:
http://www.ruralnetwork.net/~yellowpinecm/

Lick Creek: Closed for winter to full sized vehicles. Open between Yellow Pine and Zena Creek Ranch.
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Closed for winter to full sized vehicles.
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.
Big Creek Webcam:

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open. No current report, conditions have changed.

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Not advised to go beyond Stibnite, snow in the high elevations.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.
Trail Report: (Apr 14) 4-wheelers made it half way to the summit.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Closed.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: No current report.
Note: The approx elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
Deadwood Summit SNOTEL station 6860′
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April 22, 2018 The Yellow Pine Times

April 22, 2018 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Village News:

Long Island Iced Tea Party

Filler’s hosted their annual Long Island Iced Tea Party on Saturday, April 21st at 3pm.
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Bald Hill Rx Burn Scheduled for April 25

The Krassel Ranger District, Payette National Forest is planning on implementing the Bald Hill Prescribed Burn Wednesday April 25, 2018. Ignitions will take 1-2 days using both hand ignition (drip torches) and aerial ignition (helicopter). There may be residual smoke lasting for 2-3 days after ignitions. The highest level of smoke impact to Yellow Pine will most likely be in the evening and night after active ignition days. Firefighters will be in the area setting up equipment starting on Tuesday and some resources will be monitoring the burn for at least a day or two after or until fire behavior and weather determine it can be left. Specific dates will depend on the weather and available resources.

Please feel free to contact Justin Pappani with any questions at 208-634- 0623

Map:

Project Location:
“We are planning on burning the block of the Bald Hill Project that is directly to the north of Yellow Pine this spring. This block starts to the west of Boulder creek and ends on the ridge past Quartz creek. It comes down to the FS boundary on the south near Yellow Pine and this time of year we will most likely be using snow as the northern boundary.”
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Blow-down Update

On Wednesday afternoon, April 18, we received notice from the Cascade Ranger District that they would be burning 1 acre of debris piles located on the new helispot April 19th. Emails and social media posts went out to Yellow Pine residents.

On Thursday piles were ignited, some smoke was visible through the trees in the direction of the crossroads, however no haze or smoke came into the village during the warm breezy afternoon.

The Cascade Ranger District (BNF) is responsible for burning the slash piles from the blow-down cleanup. The golf course piles are scheduled for this Fall.
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Transfer Station

A report today (Sunday) that the dumpsters are about a quarter full. Rough road between YP and the Dump.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Tavern

Watch all of your favorite sports on our Big Screen TV at the Yellow Pine Tavern. Open 9am to 8pm (or later on game nights.) Jukebox is up and going.
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The Corner

The Corner is open for Breakfast and Dinner with prior arrangements. Typically breakfast is served between 5 and 6 am with dinner between 6 and 7 pm. The Corner Store is open as well, just call for grocery needs, fresh produce, eggs, meat etc.
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Be Predator Aware

Bears are coming out of hibernation. No recent reports of coyotes, foxes, raccoons, bobcats or cougars hanging around. The elk are close to homes, so wolves might be around. Please don’t leave pet food outdoors.
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YPFD News:

Starting in May, the siren(s) will be tested the first of the month at noon and training will resume on Sundays at 11:00 when Jeff’s in town and/or as otherwise posted or requested.

Cascade Fire/EMS has offered to do a CPR training/certification class in Yellow Pine this summer and we would like to get an idea of how many people would be interested in attending. Once we have an idea of #’s we will post possible dates. Please contact Jeff or Ann Forster if interested. aforsterrn @ aol.com or call (208) 633-1010

There are YPFD T-shirts, as well as YPFD patches and stickers for sale at the Tavern now.
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4th of July Golf Tournament June 30th

Our 20th annual Yellow Pine Golf Tournament will take place on June 30th 2018. The proceeds will go towards the Yellow Pine Medical Training and Supply Fund. By giving to this annual event, you’ll be supporting the village of Yellow Pine and our growing EMS service.

Thanks to Cascade Fire/EMS Fire Commissioners, Chief Steve Hull and the EMS Director Keri Donica, Yellow Pine is now a Cascade Fire/EMS Paramedic Ambulance Sub-station. This allows us to have equipment available in Yellow Pine to treat and care for patients in the field, not only First Aid but Advanced Life Support. Yellow Pine now has Nationally Registered: 4 EMR’s, 1 RN-EMT, and 1 Paramedic in Yellow Pine.

The cost for the event is $20/person or $50 will give you a sponsorship and pay for 2 players!

As a sponsor, your name will be put on a plaque, or you can provide your own sign for the event. This plaque will be posted on one of our 18 holes during the tournament.

To reserve a place in the tournament please contact Jeff or Ann Forster at aforsterrn @ aol.com or call (208) 633-1010.

You can mail your payments to: P.O. Box 38 Yellow Pine, ID. 83677.

Please make checks payable to “Cascade Fire EMS” attn: YP Golf Tournament.

Thanks in advance for your consideration.

Sincerely,
Jeff Forster – Paramedic & Ann Forster – BS, RN, EMT
Event Coordinators
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2018 H-Fest

Festival Meeting was April 19th 1pm at the Community Hall.

Next meeting will be May 17th.

The 2018 festival T-shirt contest is now open! All entries must include the year (2018) and the festival name “Yellow Pine Festival” in the design Entries must be received by Friday, May 18th, 2018. The prize for the winning design is $100! Multiple designs by the same artist can be sent in.

Hint: these shirts are screen prints, simpler designs stand out better. Submit your entry by email to Marj Fields at fieldsmarjie @ yahoo.com
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VYPA News:

Next meeting June 2018
— — — —

Local Propane Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
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Diamond Fuel & Feed (208) 382-4430

Our local birds love black oil sunflower seeds. Diamond has 40 pound bags of sunflower seeds for $22.59 (plus tax) and Arnold’s charges 5 cents a pound to haul it to Yellow Pine.
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (Apr 16) over half inch of rain fell overnight, low of 34 degrees, fresh snow on top of VanMeter. A few robins chirping, a chickadees calling and red-breasted nuthatches visiting this morning. After lunch a female hairy woodpecker and a white-breasted nuthatch joined the red-breasted visitors. Snow flurries on and off this afternoon, high of 46 degrees. Pine squirrel and nuthatches visiting this afternoon. Snowed and melted early evening. Partly cloudy at dark. Snowed during the night/early morning.

Tuesday (Apr 17) half inch of snow fell overnight, low of 23 degrees, partly clear this morning. Clarks nutcracker calling from the forest, juncos twittering and robins chirping, otherwise not many birds this morning, later a white-breasted nuthatch came by. Two fat colombian ground squirrels out running around. Just after 10am, large trucks going up the back Stibnite road, then just after 1pm, big trucks and trailers going out down Yellow Pine Ave (jake brakes in front of the Community Hall.) Cloudy afternoon, a few flakes of snow once in a while, high of 44 degrees. Lots of buttercups blooming down by the river. The evening elk herd has a spike bull with them (out by the crossroads.) Robin chirping right before dark.

Wednesday (Apr 18) overnight low of 22 degrees, mostly cloudy this morning. The ground is bare except small piles where it slid off north facing roofs, roads are clear (and pot holes.) A few swallows this morning, robins and red-breasted nuthatches calling, female hairy woodpecker visiting. Not many birds visiting during the afternoon. Warm mostly cloudy day, high of 52 degrees. Thin haze let a crescent moon shine through at dark. Robins chirping.

Thursday (Apr 19) overnight low of 28 degrees, almost clear sky this morning, a little haze to the east. A variety of birds this morning, although not many in numbers. Robins, lots of swallows, a couple of dark-eyed juncos, hairy woodpecker, steller jay, clarks nutcracker, red-breasted nuthatches and a male brewers blackbird. Pine squirrel and 2 colombian ground squirrels running around. Smoke visible (but not bad) from the Rx burn of slash piles at the new helispot after lunch. A few passing clouds in the afternoon and rather breezy and warm, high of 62 degrees. Increased traffic today, mostly FS trucks. Just before dark robins calling and two male brewers blackbirds visiting. Slim crescent moon in the western sky at dark.

Friday (Apr 20) overnight low of 26 degrees, almost clear sky this morning, a few tiny wisps. Lots of tree swallows swooping and calling, checking out nesting boxes. Woodpecker drumming, male brewer’s blackbirds, juncos, jays, red-breasted nuthatches, robins and a northern red-shafted flicker. Bigger leaves on the gooseberry bushes and daffodil leaves up a few inches. Warm sunny day, high of 65 degrees. Clarks nutcracker and male hairy woodpecker visited in the afternoon, a few juncos and a trio of male brewer’s blackbirds. A couple male cassins finches and a very “dirty” female hairy woodpecker showed up late afternoon. Robins chirping just before dark, crescent moon hanging in the western sky.

Saturday (Apr 21) overnight low of 30 degrees, mostly cloudy this morning. Several tree swallows, more brewer’s blackbirds (male and females), robins, jays and nutcrackers calling, an a few juncos. A flicker and red-breasted nuthatches visiting. Partly cloudy early afternoon, warm and light breezes, high of 66 degrees. Pileated woodpecker calling, then visited the ant pile. Two female hairy woodpeckers (one had a “dirty” front) stopped by late afternoon. Robins calling after sundown, juncos looking for seeds and swallows hunting bugs.

Sunday (Apr 22) overnight low of 27 degrees, mostly clear sky this morning, river sounds up. Lots of tree swallows calling and checking out nesting boxes, robins showing off their red breasts in the morning sun, a couple of juncos still around, a few red-breasted nuthatches visiting. Colombian ground squirrel sunning on the porch. Increasing traffic, trucks, 4-wheelers and an airplane. Increasing clouds during the day and a bit breezy later in the afternoon for a while, high of 63 degrees. A small flock of cassins finches and a female hairy woodpecker visited.
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RIP:

Cinda De Bois passed late Monday night or early Tuesday morning.

(Daughter of Don and Dottie Millen, wife of Darwin De Bois.)
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Idaho News:

South Fork Salmon River Road Load Restrictions

Payette National Forest April 17, 2018

A few weeks ago, the spring load restrictions were placed on the South Fork Salmon River Road. These restrictions will remain on the road until June 1 or earlier if conditions warrant and the signage is removed.

Will Perry, PE
Supervisory Civil Engineer
Payette National Forest, Supervisor’s Office

Map:
Notice:
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Valley commissioners OK 143ft-cellphone tower near McCall

By Max Silverson for The Star-News April 19, 2018

The construction of a 143-foot cellphone tower near McCall got the final seal of approval by Valley County Commissioners in their regular meeting at the Valley County Courthouse on Monday.

The tower, which will be built on a 300-acre parcel of land owned by the Donna Nokes Family Trust east of Aspen Ridge Subdivision northeast of McCall, will be disguised as a pine tree.

The tower will be 1,000 feet away from the nearest residence, Andy Cockell of Maverick Towers, LLC, of Boise told commissioners.

Initial carriers leasing space on the tower would be AT&T’s FirstNet, a nationwide network dedicated to first responders.

continued:
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Election forum scheduled April 30 at Idaho First Bank

The Star-News April 19, 2018

An election forum will be held in McCall on Monday, April 30, for voters to meet contested candidates running in the May 15 primary election.

The McCall forum, sponsored by The Star-News, will begin at 6:30 p.m. Monday, April 30, in the downstairs Community Room of Idaho First Bank, 475. E. Deinhard Lane.

Candidates in contested races in the May 15 primary have been invited to attend, including Valley County commissioner, Valley County treasurer and the Idaho Senate seat from District 8.

Candidates will present remarks, and written questions will be accepted from the audience.

Representatives of the City of McCall also have been invited to present information and answer questions on the reauthorization of the city’s 3 percent local-option tourism tax that will also be on the May 15 ballot in McCall.

source:
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Heavy spring runoff damages road in Blaine County

by KBOI News Staff Tuesday, April 17th 2018


Blain County Sheriff

Hailey, Idaho (KBOI) — Mother Nature isn’t being too kind to some roads in Blaine County.

The sheriff’s office says heavy spring runoff has damaged Martin Canyon Road about three miles east of Bellevue. The damaged road is a result of loss vegetation from the 2017 Martin Canyon Fire.

The road is impassible with ruts and eroded gullies more than six feet in some places.

“We are working on a path forward,” said Codie Martin, who manages the Shoshone Field Office. “We need to figure out how much of the road may still be useable and what it will cost to repair damaged sections. In the mean time, however, we want folks to know that getting this road back to a safe and driveable condition may require a continued closure.”

source:
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Deal approves $216 million for Idaho utility’s expenses

By Keith Ridler – 4/18/18 AP

Boise, Idaho — Idaho officials have approved an agreement allowing a utility company’s $216.5 million in relicensing expenses for a three-dam hydroelectric project on the Snake River on the Idaho-Oregon border.

The Idaho Public Utilities Commission issued the order on Friday that allows Boise-based Idaho Power to include the costs involving the Hells Canyon Complex in customer rates at a future time. That rate increase would take a separate request from Idaho Power.

continued:
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Northwest high-voltage transmission lines OK’d by officials

By Keith Ridler – 4/18/18 AP

Boise, Idaho — U.S. officials on Wednesday approved two high-voltage transmission line routes in southwestern Idaho aimed at modernizing and improving reliability of the Pacific Northwest’s energy grid.

The U.S. Department of the Interior’s approval is for the two final segments of the Gateway West project proposed a decade ago by the Idaho Power and Rocky Mountain Power utilities.

continued:
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How’s the snowpack looking? Just fine!

by Roland Steadham, Chief Meteorologist Thursday, April 19th 2018

If you look at the above graphic, you’ll note our snowpack levels are running just below average for this time of the year. With no additional snow making events on the horizon, one would think this could be a concern. However, that is not the case for right now.

Here’s the key; our reservoirs are running 80-90% full. This is without the aid of the spring runoff. The crazy winter we had last year kept feeding water into our reservoirs into the start of winter. As a result, lake levels remained higher than normal and stayed that way through much of this winter. So, the water storage is at a very comfortable level.

Once the spring runoff commences over the next week or so, the snow in the high country will start working its way down stream taking our reservoirs to even higher levels. So the bottom line is that we are still benefiting from the excess snowpack we had in the 2016/2017 winter and spring season.

source:
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Letter to Share:

Marv Hagedorn

Hi All, As most know Marv Hagedorn is Barb and our son, He is running for Lt. Governor for the State of Idaho. As many know, Marv is the only one of the group running for Lt Governor that has ever put on a uniform for the USA. Marv is a farm boy that grew up here and has roots here in Northern Idaho. He spent 20 years in the US Navy and received a Commissions while on active duty. Spent 23 years leading large and small international businesses. Spent over 10 years serving as an Idaho State Representative and Idaho Senator. Avid outdoor Sportsman, has hunting boots that are older than some of those running for this office.

You can only know who to vote for on May 15th if you know about the candidate.

Jim Hagedorn
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Scam Alerts:

“Tech Support” Scam

If you get a phone call telling you they are from “Windows” or “Microsoft” or “Tech Support” and say there is a problem with your computer, your license has expired, or some other weird thing, and they offer to “fix” it, hang up! It is a SCAM. This is how ransom-ware spreads. Never give a caller remote access to your computer, and never give out your credit card number. Microsoft will never call you.

Link to: Microsoft Protect yourself from tech support scams
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Pocatello police warn about dangerous scam going around

Police say appears very real; don’t fall for it.

By Misty Inglet April 21, 2018 Local News 8

Pocatello, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – Pocatello police are warning about a dangerous scam they say appears extremely realistic.

According to police, there are reports of a scam claiming to be Idaho Power and saying you are behind on your bills and they will shut off your power if not paid.

Police say they had a Pocatello business, Downard Funeral Home, come in and say they had received a strange voicemail on their answering service.

The voicemail said they were Idaho Power, the company was behind in payments, and if they didn’t call back and take care of it, their power would be shut off. According to police, the number given to call back goes to what sounds like Idaho Power’s actual answering service.

continued:
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Mining News:

Why the Arts Matter to Midas

April 17

The arts play a very important role in our personal lives and the life of our company. I know some people may read this and think it is strange for a mining company to care so much about the arts but to us it makes perfect sense. The arts help all of us to think bigger, communicate creatively and imagine a better future.

When Midas Gold was asked to speak on the impact art can have on business success at the National Assembly of the State Arts Agencies’ Creative Industry Briefing in Washington, D.C., I jumped at the opportunity. After serving on the Idaho State Art Commission for 14 years and chairing a local arts council, I’ve seen firsthand how creative industries affect American companies, including Midas Gold, and I was honored to share my experience with policymakers on Capitol Hill.

At Midas Gold, we believe an investment in the arts is an investment in our community and our employees which helps fuel our success as a business. Recently, we became a sponsor of the Idaho Shakespeare Festival. We saw this as an opportunity to help get our name and story out to a larger audience. Each year, more than 70,000 people buy tickets to come see the world-class performances put on Idaho Shakespeare Festival. This cultural event is a great experience, and one that some don’t expect for a community of Boise’s size. While we remain committed to hiring Idahoans first, if we ever do need to look for talent outside of the Gem State, our partnership with Idaho Shakespeare Festival can become a great tool for recruitment.

But my favorite reason for partnering with Idaho Shakespeare Festival is their school outreach programs. Through our sponsorship, we now get to play a very small role in exposing students to the value of arts and help broaden young minds. This fosters children’s curiosity and helps them see the world in a different light.

At Midas Gold, we have a bold vision – we believe we can use modern mining as a tool to restore an area damaged by more than 100 years of industrial activity. To bring our vision to life we need our future (and current) employees to think bigger, communicate creatively and imagine a better future and the arts helps make that happen.

If you’d like to learn more about the impact art is having across the nation or the National Assembly of State Arts Agencies, I encourage you to visit https://nasaa-arts.org

source:
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Letter to Share:

Interested in measuring precipitation? Join the CoCoRaHS observing network

Join CoCoRaHS Today!

CoCoRaHS is a practical, enjoyable and useful activity. If you have an interest in weather and would like to help your local community, as well as scientists and others interested in precipitation, then CoCoRaHS is for you. It only takes a few minutes a day and gives you the chance to participate in real hands-on science. You’ll be amazed at what you learn as you become more aware of the variable weather that impacts you, your neighbors, your state and our entire country.

Data on the web

Volunteers submit their observations using the CoCoRaHS website or apps. Observations are immediately available to the public via maps and data analysis tools, and to data users via the CoCoRaHS Web API. Data users such as scientists, resource manages, decision makers and others have come to rely on the high density, high quality measurements provided by CoCoRaHS observers.

2018CoCoRaHS

CoCoRaHS is Educational

CoCoRaHS offers learning opportunities too. In addition to training materials, newsletters and the ‘Message of the Day’, members also enjoy opportunities to attend Webinars featuring experts in weather, climatology and other pertinent disciplines. CoCoRaHS offers classroom resources for K-12 teachers. Students get to collect and submit real scientific data – all while meeting State and National Standards in science, math, geography and more!

What is CoCoRaHS?

The Community Collaborative Rain, Hail and Snow Network, is a non-profit, community based, network of volunteers who measure and report rain, hail and snow in their backyards.

A brief History

CoCoRaHS came about as a result of a devastating flash flood that hit Fort Collins, Colorado in July 1997. A very localized storm dumped over a foot of rain in several hours while other portions of the city had only modest rainfall. The ensuing flood caught many by surprise, caused $200 million in damages, and resulted in five deaths. CoCoRaHS was born in 1998 with the intent of doing a better job of mapping and reporting intense storms. CoCoRaHS became a nationwide volunteer network in 2010 and is now international with observers helping provide critical precipitation observations, benefiting their country’s needs.

Volunteers of all ages welcome!

Individuals and family volunteers of all ages and all walks of life are the foundation of the CoCoRaHS network, Anyone can help. It only takes a few minutes to check the rain gauge and report your observations.

Training: “the Key to our success”

It is important that all CoCoRaHS precipitation reports be accurate and consistant. Training is provided on how to install gauges, properly measure precipitation and transmit reports. CoCoRaHS precipitation reports are accurate and very useful.

Why is there so much interest in rain, hail and snow?

Precipitation is essential for life. It varies greatly with topography, storm type and season. It really is true that it may pour on one side of the street and be dry on the other. A portion of a field may be pounded by hail while others nearby receive no damage. Snowfall may pile up in one neighborhood and only dust another. Rain, hail and snow are fairly easy to measure, and the data collected are very important. Meteorologists, hydrologists, engineers, builders, farmers . . . you name it, everyone seems to care about rain, hail and snow. That’s why we ask, “How much fell in your backyard?”

There are limited observations across southwest Idaho and southeast Oregon, compared to the rest of the country, so we would love to have your observations. To learn more about the CoCoRaHS program and to see where your fellow observers have recorded rain amounts, visit http://www.cocorahs.org/.

Invite your neighbors, relatives and friends by sending them this “Join” link:
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Public Lands:

BCYPSR April 26th Meeting Agenda

The April meeting is next week, Thursday the 26th, at the E.O.C in Cascade from 10:00 to 3:00. We will continue working on the matrix and finalize a couple other action items from the March meeting. If you cannot make it to the meeting in person please join us by zoom, the webinar conference option at https://uidaho.zoom.us/j/428822775 or call the conference call number. Let me know by Wednesday morning if you will join by zoom so I can make sure to set up the equipment before the meeting.

link: Agenda 4-26-18.pdf
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500 volunteers clean up Snake River

Maleeha Kamal Apr 21, 2018 KIVI TV

Boise, ID – Saturday the Bureau of Land Management held a large-scale trash cleanup of the Morley Nelson Snake River Birds of Prey National Conservation Area. At Least five hundred volunteers participated in the cleanup efforts.

This event was all for the 25th anniversary of Morley Nelson Snake River Birds of Prey National Conservation Area. Event organizer, Amanda Hoffman said this was one of the most extensive trash cleanups in Idaho.

continued:
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USFS Regional Intermountain Wildfire Updates

April 17, 2018

Much of the Intermountain Region went into hibernation mode during the winter months, but some people continued to clean up hazardous fuels using prescribed burns and mechanical fuel treatments as conditions allowed, removing excess fuels from the ecosystem. Spring has sprung now and new sprouts begin peaking through the last of the snow and trees begin to bud and blossom while the bees begin to buzz again, it is once again time to start thinking about what impacts the new growth, combined with excess old growth, will have during the summer months.

Prescribed fire is an important component of natural resource management and part of the comprehensive fire management program on National Forests. It is intended to create fire-adapted communities, reduce risk to firefighters responding to wildland fires, improve the ability to manage wildland fires, restore or enhance wildlife habitat, improve forest and grassland resiliency, increase seral tree species, improve water carrying capacity in our soils and recycle nutrients. Fire is the greatest change agent in our forest and grassland systems. These systems have evolved with fire and must have fire to remain resilient and productive.

Fire managers strive to minimize impacts from prescribed fire to local communities. However, smoke is an unavoidable byproduct of these crucial efforts. Forests need the frequent, low-intensity fires to remove accumulated smaller fuels and recycle nutrients into the soils to promote healthy vegetation and wildlife habitat. During the planning process, fire managers work closely with state Airshed Groups, the National Weather Service, and the Department of Environmental Quality to preserve air quality. Plans for prescribed burns contain a set of parameters that define the desired weather and fuel conditions under which a prescribed fire may be ignited. These conditions are continuously monitored by fire personnel through the treatment process.

Inciweb Redesign

USDA Forest Service Fire and Aviation Management Program Information Technology, in partnership with USDA Enterprise Application Services and U.S. Forest Service Fire and Aviation Management Program External Affairs, is pleased to announce the launch of the new modernized, mobile-enabled InciWeb public website.

This is the first major redesign for the website since it was developed. InciWeb is available at https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/ (the InciWeb URL did not change).

The new site features:

* a new color scheme and logo
* an interactive map showing various information layers
* a map locator feature for users to view incidents near their location
* mobile-enabled capability to format to smartphone, tablet or iPad devices
* integrates and syncs with the InciWeb administrative site (back-end where users upload information – this site has not changed)
* 508 compliant

You can watch a short video highlighting the new website and how to navigate it at

continued:
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Critter News:

AmeriGas to give away propane to aid MCPAWS

The Star-News April 19, 2018

AmeriGas and MCPAWS animal shelter are joining paws for a “Donate to Win” raffle, with winners drawn at Bark in the Park on Saturday, June 16.

Three winners will receive 500 gallons of propane from AmeriGas. For each $10 donated to MCPAWS by Friday, June 1, participants will be entered into the drawing.

For more information or to donate, visit MCPAWS Regional Animal Shelter, the MCPAWS Thrift Store or the McCall AmeriGas office.

source:
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Oregon officials kill 2 wolves in effort to save cattle

By Andrew Selsky – 4/18/18 AP

Salem, Ore. — Oregon wildlife officials shot and killed two wolves from a helicopter Wednesday in an attempt to reduce killings of cattle by the predators.

The killings have reignited a debate between the state, ranchers and environmentalists about how to manage wolves, which were hunted down for 100 years until they disappeared in 1947.

Another young female wolf was shot and killed by a state wildlife official on April 10 on private land where previous depredations occurred. All three wolves belong to the Pine Creek Pack, which roams in eastern Oregon’s Baker County, and has killed four calves and injured six others in recent days, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife said.

continued:
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KWVR Oregon Wolf Education weekly Wolf Report

3rd Week of April, 2018
— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

Wolf Education International

April 16, 2018 & April 22, 2018

Oregon is home to 124 wolves, up 11 percent in annual report

Oregon rancher approved to kill 2 wolves from pack that’s been attacking calves

Wolf Pack Kills in California

Olympics provide suitable reintroduction site for gray wolves, study finds

Compensation to ranchers small part of Washington’s wolf budget

Bundestag committee debates wolves’ protected status in Germany

What to know about the growing wolf population debate in Germany

Wolves attack calf on different pasture

Oregon wildlife officials kill wolves in effort to save cattle

Minnesota congressman’s effort de-list wolves stuck in Congress

Horrific wolf attack in Chinese village leaves six people disfigured
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Tribes object to grizzly hunting proposal

Apr 22, 2018 Local News 8

Ft. Hall, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – The Shoshone-Bannock Tribes are re-asserting objections to a proposed U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service rule that would delist the Yellowstone Grizzly Bear from the Endangered Species Act. Government agencies currently estimate there are 718 bears in the region.

The tribes also object to a trophy grizzly bear hunt being proposed by the Idaho Fish and Game Department. The department outlined its proposals for a grizzly bear hunt next fall during public meetings this week

“No grizzly bears will ever be hunted on Shoshone-Bannock lands and my Tribe will oppose any attempts to hunt grizzlies in our recognized ancestral homelands,” said Shoshone-Bannock Chairman Nathan Small.

continued:
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Threatened ground squirrel could halt Idaho dam expansion

4/19/18 AP

Officials say a threatened squirrel species could halt plans to expand a dam in western Idaho.

The Capital Press reports the Idaho Water Resource Board has approved spending up to $30,000 to study mitigation options for the effects of the Lost Valley Dam expansion project on the northern Idaho ground squirrel.

Lost Valley Reservoir Co. board member Doug McAlvain says the dam project could be stalled if population surveys and a related analysis don’t result in viable mitigation steps.

continued:
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Twin Falls approves measure allowing residents to keep hens

The city council approved an ordinance Monday to amend its animal code.

Associated Press April 17, 2018

Twin Falls – Twin Falls officials are allowing residents to own up to four chickens without a permit but roosters are banned.

The Times-News reports the city council approved an ordinance Monday to amend its animal code to make it easier for people to keep hens on their property.

continued:
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Howdy’s Fishing Derby to be held April 28-29

The Star-News April 19, 2018

Anglers of all ages can throw in their poles in search of the big one during the 24th annual Fishing Derby on Saturday and Sunday, April 28-29, on Lake Cascade.

There will be $900 in cash prizes and lots of giveaways. The final weigh-in will be Sunday, April 29, at 3 p.m.

Registration is free for ages 13 years and under. Cost is $8 for adults. For more information, call 208-382-6712 or visit Howdy’s in Cascade or Old Town Market in McCall.

source:
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The Columbia Basin Bulletin

Weekly Fish and Wildlife News
http://www.cbbulletin.com
April 20, 2018
Issue No. 869
Table of Contents

* U.S. Supreme Court Hears Oral Arguments In Washington State Salmon Passage/Culvert Case
http://www.cbbulletin.com/440568.aspx

* Judge Lifts Requirement For Feds To Produce New Basin Salmon/Steelhead BiOp In 2018; Offers Flexibility
http://www.cbbulletin.com/440567.aspx

* Corps Asks NOAA To Open Reconsultation On Willamette River Basin Fish BiOp; 13 Dams
http://www.cbbulletin.com/440566.aspx

* Lower Columbia River White Sturgeon Numbers Decent; Some Upriver Populations Show Abundance Decline
http://www.cbbulletin.com/440565.aspx

* Council Readies Letter Asking For Recommendations On Amending Basin Fish And Wildlife Program
http://www.cbbulletin.com/440564.aspx

* Study Shows Repeat-Spawning Steelhead Have More Reproductive Success Than Single Spawners
http://www.cbbulletin.com/440563.aspx

* In WSU Stormwater Runoff Research, Coho Salmon Die Quickly, Chum Survive
http://www.cbbulletin.com/440562.aspx

* Northwest Boat Inspection Stations Opening For Invasive Species Check; Both Motorized, Non-Motorized
http://www.cbbulletin.com/440561.aspx

* Report Reviews Columbia Habitat And Monitoring Program, ‘CHaMP,’ Required By BiOp
http://www.cbbulletin.com/440560.aspx

* Extensive Analysis Looks At How Large Wildfires Bring Increases In Stream Flows For Years
http://www.cbbulletin.com/440559.aspx
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Fish & Game News:

Proposed grizzly bear season and information meetings; link to comment page

Meetings will be an open house format where people can comment

By Staff Writer Monday, April 16, 2018

With the grizzly bear population in eastern Idaho fully recovered and removed from federal protection, Idaho Fish and Game will host meetings in Idaho Falls and Boise regarding a proposed fall hunting season.

… The current proposal is to offer a single tag for one grizzly bear for the fall season of 2018. The meetings will be held to discuss the proposal and gather public input. They will involve a presentation and then an open house format to gather information and take comment. Comments will be gathered at the meeting, and is now online at https://idfg.idaho.gov/comment through May 3, 2018.

Hunting is part of the grizzly bear conservation strategy and consistent with the management of bears in the greater Yellowstone area outside of the park and in eastern Idaho. Grizzlies in north Idaho remain under federal protection.

full story:
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F&G News Releases

https://idfg.idaho.gov/press
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Fun Critter Stuff:

Las Vegas family needs help after bunnies multiply again and again


Copyright 2018 Scripps Media, Inc.

Gina Lazara Apr 19, 2018 KTNV

A Las Vegas family is dealing with a bunny multiplying nightmare.

There are so many bunnies they have to divvy them up and block them off in different rooms of their house to stop them from reproducing.

Kerryann Curtin and her family got Thumper, the male bunny, a couple years ago. More recently, they were gifted what they thought was another boy bunny.

“They swore it was a boy, the breeder said it was a boy!” said Kerryann’s sister Kathleen Curtin-Coble.

continued:
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Tips & Advice:

Aging gracefully: Preventing falls

Falls have serious impacts for seniors

By Dr. Melina Jampolis Apr 19, 2018 Local News 8

Falls, for older people, are serious. They can significantly impair mobility and independence. They may lead to hospitalization and subsequent placement in a long-term care facility or nursing home. And as you get older, recovery is slower.

Falls are the leading cause of traumatic injury and death in older people, according to geriatric specialist Dr. Becky Powers. Older women are more often injured as a result of falls, but men are more likely to die as the result of a fall. According to the American Geriatrics Society, up to one-third of adults over the age of 65 living at home experience a fall, and nearly two-thirds will fall again.

Preventing falls, which requires a multifaceted approach, is one of the key components of not just living longer but living better. Here are five important considerations.

continued:
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Seasonal Humor:

SpringFirstRobin-a

SpringEnough-a
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Idaho History April 22, 2018

Diamondfield Jack

DiamondfieldJackcirca1904-a

Jackson Lee “Diamondfield Jack” Davis (1864–1949) was pardoned for the 1896 Deep Creek Murders in Idaho and would later strike it rich in Nevada, where he established several mining towns, one named after his nickname “Diamondfield”.

Davis got his nickname when he came out west to Silver City, Idaho on the rumor of a diamond strike. The rumor led to nothing but after talking so much about it he got the nickname Diamondfield Jack.

After the failed prospecting attempt Jack was hired by Spark-Harrell cattle company on the Idaho-Nevada border. Davis’ job was to keep sheepherders off the cattle’s land and after a confrontation that led to wounding of a sheepherder named Bill Tolman; Davis was on the run.

He began working for the cattle company again the next year and almost immediately as he came back to work two sheepherders were killed in the area were he was working. Davis became the prime suspect for the killings. A magazine was found in the sheepwagon with a diamond drawn in blood by one of the victims. The sheepmen were killed with .44 caliber bullets shot out of a .45 caliber gun. Diamond field jack was known to have bought .44 caliber cartridges when the correct ones were not available.

As he was heading towards Mexico Jack was picked up be authorities in Arizona Territory. He was transported back up to Idaho and sentenced to hang on June 4, 1897. The day before his execution date he was reprieved due to the confessions of two other men to the murders. In February 1899 Davis was transferred to the Idaho State Penitentiary where he stayed until December of that year. Davis was then transferred back to a cell in the Cassia County jail.

After Davis had exhausted his appeals another execution date was scheduled for July 3, 1901. By the time public opinion had shifted in Jack’s favor mostly due to the confessions of James Bower and Jeff Gray and also to the easing of tension between sheep and cattle herders. The Board of Pardons extended the execution date to the July 17, much to the outrage of state prosecutor and future Idaho Senator William Borah. Three hours before Davis’ scheduled execution, word arrived to the Cassia County sheriff that his sentence had been changed to life imprisonment. Davis was moved back to the Idaho State Penitentiary in Boise, Idaho until he was finally pardoned on December 17, 1902 by Idaho Gov. Frank W. Hunt.

Upon his release Jack moved down to Nevada where he finally stuck it rich and established several mining camps in Nevada. In 1949 Diamondfield Jack was killed by a taxi cab as he was walking in Las Vegas, Nevada.

source: Wikipedia
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The Owyhee Diamonds

… [Caleb] Lyon was reappointed governor in the autumn of 1865, and he returned to Idaho. J. S. Butler, a local historian of the time, said of Lyon: “He was a conceited, peculiar man. and made many enemies and misappropriated much public funds.” Lyon, indeed, Bancroft adds, accepted his reappointment in the hope of gain. While in New York, pending his confirmation, he was approached by one Davis, who had in his possession a number of small stones which he declared to be Idaho diamonds, found in Owyhee county.

The secret was to be kept until they met in Idaho. Lyon arrived first, and after waiting for some time, having become convinced that Davis was drowned on the Brother Jonathan, went to Owyhee and imparted his secret to D. H. Fogus, to whom he presented one of his diamonds, receiving in return a silver bar worth five hundred dollars. One evening the governor and the miner stole away over the hills toward the diamond fields, as described by Davis, in order to make a prospect. But the sharp eyes of other miners detected the movement and they were followed by a large number of treasure-seekers who aided in the search. “The result,” says Maize, “of two days’ hunting was several barrels full of bright quartz and shiny pebbles. Lyon was greatly disappointed and showed us the specimens, on one of which the carbon was not completely crystallized.” Along the beach line of the ancient sea, bordering the Snake river valley, there are a number of stones described in mineralogical works as allied to the diamond.

Lyon, who was once described by a newspaper correspondent as “a revolving light on the coast of scampdom,” found himself in such disgrace that at the end of six months he abandoned his post, leaving the administration of public affairs in the hands of the territorial secretary, S. R. Howlett, who acted until June, 1866, when David W. Ballard, of Yamhill county, Oregon, was appointed governor. The latter reappointed Howlett secretary.

source: pages 106-107, “An Illustrated History of Idaho” 1899 (58 meg)
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Caleb Lyon 2nd Governor of Idaho Territory 1864-1865

Appointed by President Abraham Lincoln in 1864, as Governor of Idaho Territory, Lyon proved to be extremely unpopular. One journalist wrote he was “a conceited, peculiar man, who made many enemies and misappropriated much of the public funds.” During Lyon’s administration, the territorial capital was moved from Lewiston to Boise, reputedly because Lyon thought it was better to have the capital in a larger city.

Lyon started a diamond-prospecting frenzy when he claimed that a prospector had found a diamond near Ruby City, Idaho. Although hundreds of men staked claims, no genuine diamonds were found as a result.

In 1866, an audit showed that Lyon had embezzled $46,418 in federal funds which were intended for the Nez Perce people. He was never convicted on any charges.

source: Wikipedia
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Idaho Diamond Fields; the Gems Which Have Been Brought From the District. Expert Testimony to Their Discovery in Owyhee County — One Professor Says They Are Not of the First Water — Rules Which Were Formulated Years Ago.

Jan. 3, 1893 New York Times

Boise City, Idaho, Dec. 26. — All doubts as to the existence of diamonds in Owyhee County, on the south side of the Snake River, about thirty miles from this city, seem to have been dispelled.

source: NYTimes archives (pay wall)
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Diamond Gulch

DiamondGulch-a

In December, 1865, Idaho’s governor — Caleb Lyon of Lyonsdale—set off a wild rush to Diamond Gulch, visible a few miles west of here, with a story that was too good to be true.

He told miners in Sliver City that a prospector had given him some priceless diamonds from that area. Enough gems of interest to rock hounds were found there to maintain a diamond frenzy that winter. A similar escitement followed in 1892, but no actual diamonds ever were recovered in Diamond Gulch.

source: Idaho Untraveled Road
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The “Diamondfield Jack” Tragedy

At that time, Cassia County was one of the most important range sections of the State for both cattle and sheep. The cattle men had claimed that the sheepmen were trespassing on the range which belonged to them and much unfriendly feeling had been aroused. On February 16, 1896, two sheepherders were discovered dead in their wagon, at a point on the : range known as Shoshone Basin, in Cassia County. Both victims had evidently been shot a number of days before. Their emaciated sheep-dogs were found tied to the wagon and their sheep were scattered about on the range.

Jack Davis, who was commonly known as “Diamondfield Jack,” was suspected and put on trial for the murder. He was in the employ of a large cattle company and had been riding the range looking after the interests of his employers. The State could not produce any witness who had actually seen the shots fired, but it was shown that at the time Jack Davis had been in the vicinity where the murder was committed and that he had made a number of threats to kill sheepmen. These and other facts and circumstances were sufficient to cause the jury to convict him of murder, for which he was sentenced to be hanged. This sentence, however, was not carried out, but the defendant was, instead, sent to the penitentiary and later pardoned. The case aroused intense feeling among the stockmen of the State, the cattlemen favoring the acquittal of the accused man, while the sheepmen desired his conviction.

source: page 160, “History of the State of Idaho” By C. J. Brosnan 1918 (18 meg)
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The South Fork Companion has more stories about the Murders and Trial

link: to home page, then search for the headlines.

Sheepmen John Wilson and Daniel Cummings Found Dead

Cattleman Bower Describes “Self-Defense” Shooting of Sheepmen Wilson and Cummings

Unjustly-Convicted “Diamondfield Jack” Davis Finally Released from Prison
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The Meridian times. (Meridian, Idaho), 28 Feb. 1919.

19190228MT2
source: Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Diamondfield Jack

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Little is known about Diamondfield Jack’s early life. He was born about 1879 somewhere in the East.

By 1892, he was working in the Black Jack mine in the Silver City district of Owyhee County. He left the Black Jack to follow rumors of a diamond strike in the nearby hills. He failed to find any diamonds, but talked so much of the diamond field that he earned the nickname “Diamondfield Jack.”

In 1895, Diamondfield Jack began working for the Sparks-Harrell cattle company of southern Idaho and northern Nevada. He was paid $50 a month to keep sheepherders off of what was considered cattle territory. The company instructed him to “…keep the sheep back. Don’t kill but shoot to wound if necessary. Use what measures you think best. If you have to kill, the company will stand behind you – regardless what happens.”

After “shooting up” several sheep camps, and wounding a sheepman named Bill Tolman, Diamondfield Jack headed south into Nevada to stay out of sight. He realized he might hang if Tolman died. While in Nevada, he bragged about his activities and said he was paid $150 a month in Idaho to kill sheepherders.

He came out of hiding in 1896 and continued working for Sparks-Harrell. In February of that year, two sheepherders, John Wilson and Daniel Cummings, were shot and killed at a sheep camp in the Shoshone basin area of Twin Falls county. Because he had been in the area at the time of the killings, and because he often bragged about shooting up sheepherders, Diamondfield Jack was the prime suspect in the murder case.

He headed south again, and was eventually captured in the Arizona territory, where he was serving time in the Arizona Territorial Prison for a shooting incident. He was tried in the courthouse in Albion, Idaho, found guilty, and sentenced to hang on June 4, 1897.

Diamondfield Jack was confined to the Cassia County jail in Albion, Idaho, where the day of his scheduled execution date drew closer. He made hair ropes and other trinkets for children who visited the jail. The week before his execution date, he watched the gallows being built and tested, declaring them “capable of doing the job.”

In the mean time, two other men, James Bower and Jeff Gray, confessed to the murders. Although they were tried and acquitted by a jury, their stories raised doubt, and Diamondfield Jack was granted a reprieve the day before he was scheduled to die.

On February 24, 1899, the Idaho Legislature approved an act which ruled all executions must take place at the Idaho State Penitentiary. Because he was still under sentence of death, Diamondfield Jack was moved to the prison in Boise.

At 1:30 a.m. on the morning of February 27, 1899, Diamondfield Jack arrived at the Boise Depot. The Warden’s Report for that day states, “The Warden, with guards, met the party at the depot and took charge of the prisoner, who was, without delay, taken to the Penitentiary, where he arrived without mishap.” He was placed in the new cell house and watched by special guards. On December 24, 1899, the Idaho Supreme Court ruled that Diamondfield Jack must go back to the Cassia County Jail as a county prisoner. He was taken back on December 28, 1899.

By 1900, Diamondfield Jack had exhausted all of his appeals. He was again scheduled for execution, this time on July 3, 1901. The public was opposed to this and believed Diamondfield Jack to be innocent. Aware of public support from some very influential citizens, the Board of Pardons extended the execution date to July 17. Word arrived in Cassia County three hours before the sheriff would have carried out the execution. On July 16, 1901, the Board of Pardons commuted Diamondfield Jack’s death sentence to that of life imprisonment. He was again moved to the Idaho State Penitentiary to serve his time. On December 17, 1902, the Board of Pardons granted Diamondfield Jack a pardon. He moved to Nevada and made a fortune in the Tonopah mining district. He later lost his fortune and was killed in 1949 when he was struck by a taxi cab in Las Vegas, Nevada.

source: Albion Historical Society
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Jackson Lee Davis A.K.A.: “Diamondfield Jack”, Inmate #820

InmateNo820-a

source: Max Black
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Cassia County jail in Albion, Idaho

CassiaCountyJailAlbionIdaho-a
(click image for larger size)
Jail House and Sheriff’s office on the “Public Square”, today the City Park.

source: Albion, Idaho History
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Lucky Judge.

The Prospector and Thunder Mountain News February 4, 1905

“Diamondfield Jack” Davis gives $10,000 worth of Goldfield stock to Salt Lake Judge who once secured his conviction for murder and drew up his death warrant.

“Diamondfield Jack” Davis, the central figure in one of the most remarkable criminal cases on record, has given the man who drew his death warrant at Albion, Idaho, six years ago, mining stock valued at $10,000, says the Salt Lake Herald. Judge O. W. Powers, of Salt Lake, is the recipient of the gift. In 1898, Judge Powers, with W. A. Borah of Idaho, assisted the state in prosecuting Diamondfield Jack for murder, secured a conviction and by order of Judge Stoskslager, drew Davis’s death warrant.

Afterwards, having become convinced of Davis’s innocence, Judge Powers appeared before the Idaho board of pardons to urge that Davis be released. This was done and about two years ago Davis came to Salt Lake penniless. Judge Powers loaned him money enough to get to Tonopah, Nev., and Davis departed with the promise that he would repay the money. As one of the original locators of the famous claims at Goldfield and Diamondfield, he secured large holdings in the camps, changed his way of living and is said to be a leader of the law and ordor [sic] element in the mining section where he resides.

Recently Judge Powers received a letter from the secretary of the Diamondfield Gold Mining Company, enclosing 2,500 shares of stock with the statement that it was the personal gift of Davis.

The shooting for which Davis was thrice sentenced to death was a double killing, committed in Cassia county, Idaho, in 1896. The legal proceedings ran through six years. The case at one time reached the supreme court of the United States and almost attained the proportions of a political issue in Idaho.
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Will You Follow Him in Wonder?
Diamondfield Jack Davis
(The Man Without a Failure)

DiamondfieldJackDavisPress-a
(no larger size)

source: More stories at Murderpedia
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Jack “Diamond Field” Davis

JackDiamondFieldDavis-a
Added by Miracle Mile Tim
Birth: 1864
Death: 1949 (aged 84–85)
Burial: Woodlawn Cemetery Las Vegas, Clark County, Nevada
JackDiamondFieldDavisHeadstone-a
Added by Miracle Mile Tim

source: Find a Grave
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Jackson Lee “Diamondfield Jack” Davis

by Sharon Hall Dec 3, 2014

No one seems to have a definitive history of Jackson Lee “Diamondfield Jack” Davis’ early life. Even the date and place of his birth appears to be a mystery. A cursory internet search will yield results spanning the years between 1864 and 1879 as his purported birth year. His place of birth is uncertain, but the name “Jackson Lee” would suggest Southern roots like perhaps Virginia or West Virginia.

Most historians consider him a gunslinger, famous for wearing his rifle slung across his back and carrying pistols, as many as three, either holstered or in his coat pocket and a Bowie knife strapped to his leg – he was armed to the teeth at all times. He made a name for himself in the mining camps of the west and later as an “enforcer” of sorts, working for cattlemen who were constantly battling for grassland with the sheep ranchers, a familiar saga of the 1800’s West.

Some have written about Davis as if he was an all-out hired gun, his only mission in life to shoot and kill sheep herders. If that was indeed true, then it’s easy to see how he was mistakenly accused and convicted of killing two sheep herders in 1896. That miscarriage of justice would become the most remarkable and memorable of his storied life.

How did he come by the nickname “Diamondfield Jack”? In the summer of 1892 Davis worked in a Silver City, Idaho silver mine. Not long afterwards, Idaho had a diamond rush and he later claimed to have discovered a diamond mine. He was known to have been a big talker, regularly embellishing his stories. After taking a job with the Sparks-Harrell Cattle Ranch and bragging about his adventures as a diamond miner, someone gave him the nickname “Diamondfield Jack” and it stuck.

In 1895 Davis was hired by James E. Bower, general superintendent of the ranch, ostensibly to bully and intimidate sheep herders in the area who were thought to be intruders on the cattlemen’s grassland. His reputation for carrying all those weapons was no doubt meant to intimidate and from time to time he included threats to kill someone.

In fact, he did carry out one of those threats by wounding Bill Tolman in the shoulder. Davis left the area for awhile until things cooled off, drifting into Nevada to avoid an warrant for his arrest for attempted murder. In late January of 1896 he ventured back into southern Idaho, later testifying that he was on his way back to turn himself into the sheriff for Tolman’s shooting.

Along the way he joined up with Fred Gleason, another cowboy employed by the Sparks-Harrell Ranch. Together they seemed to have meandered along, not in any real hurry, looking for horses. On the evening of February 2 the two were riding after dark near a sheep camp. Davis stopped and fired off a few rounds in the direction of the camp and then the two men continued on their way back to the Brown Ranch where they were staying.

The following day Davis and Gleason hung around the ranch and shoed their horses. The following morning they decided to leave and head up the river to the Middle Stack Ranch. They continued to meander their way through, again, in no particular hurry. On February 6 they met with James Bower at the H.D. Ranch and Bower rode with them to Wells, Nevada. Witnesses later testified that Davis and Gleason remained there for several days – drinking and talking too much.

Meanwhile, the bodies of sheep herders Daniel Cummings and John Wilson had been found, a grisly discovery made by a sheepherder named Ted Severe at Deep Creek. The crime scene was littered with .44 caliber bullets shot from a .45 caliber gun. It was known that Davis had a reputation for using .44 caliber bullets when he couldn’t find the exact caliber for his weapons of choice. Thus, he became the prime suspect in the murders.

Another cowboy with the Sparks-Harrell operation later testified that Davis had decided to leave the country and head south – his friend Gleason was drunk all the time and threatening to kill sheep herders in Deep Creek. Until he was arrested in March of 1897 in Yuma, Arizona for his alleged crime, no one knew of his whereabouts. Because Davis and Gleason had been in the area of the killings and Davis had the reputation of bullying and intimidation, the locals just assumed Davis was guilty.

Adding to the assumption of his guilt, Davis was arrested while jailed in the Yuma Arizona Territorial Prison. Gleason had been found in Deer Lodge, Montana. By mid-March the two were brought to Albion, Idaho to stand trial. The sheep herders and their supporters, including the Wool Growers Association, mounted an all-out effort to see them convicted. Davis and Gleason, however, had the cattlemen on their side. John Sparks and Andrew Harrell, former employers, put up most of the funds for their defense.

Davis and Gleason had the best defense lawyers money could buy and testimony and evidence was carefully and methodically presented. The prosecutors were also well-qualified and able to establish that the two men had at least been in the area of the crime on that day. When it came time to decide Davis’ fate, the jury took only two hours to find him guilty of first degree murder. He was sentenced to hang on June 4, 1897. Gleason’s trial, however, had a different result – he was acquitted.

The next five years of Jack Davis’ life turned out to be most harrowing. Appeals were mounted by his attorneys and several times his execution was stayed. At one point he was transferred to the Idaho State Penitentiary, only be to returned to the Cassia County Jail where he had first been imprisoned during and following his trial.

Following another series of appeals, another execution date was set for July 3, 1901. This must have been frustrating for Davis and his attorneys, for you see two other men, James Bower and Jeff Gray had finally confessed to the killings, claiming self-defense. Davis received a short reprieve from the Board of Pardons with a new date of execution scheduled for July 17. His attorneys had been unable to convince the Board of his total innocence, even with the knowledge of Bower and Gray’s confession.

Three hours before his scheduled execution on the 17th, his sentence was changed to life imprisonment – no exoneration yet, but Davis would be allowed to live out his life in the Idaho State Penitentiary. After another round of legal wrangling and appeals, Jackson Lee “Diamondfield Jack” Davis was finally pardoned by Idaho Governor Frank Hunt on December 17, 1902.

His case had been covered by newspapers all around the country. When released, Davis unsurprisingly left Idaho and moved to Nevada. He kept his name and reputation in the papers over the ensuing decades, striking it rich in the mining camps of Nevada. He later wrangled with the Industrial Workers of the World and continued to carry four guns with him at all times. When asked why he did that, Davis replied, “Well, if I ever get into a mix-up and don’t have my guns and got killed, I’d never forgive myself as long as I lived.”

By the late 1930’s Davis, then in his seventies, was still seeking more fortune. He made his way to Las Vegas and for several years afterwards alternated between residences in Los Angeles and Las Vegas. The man who seemed to have nine lives (or more), finally met his end not in a spectacular fashion befitting his gunslinger image, but in an accident with a taxi cab after stepping off a curb in Las Vegas on December 28, 1948.

While on the way to the hospital, he told a friend that he intended to live to the age of one hundred. Jack Davis lingered for a few days but passed away on the morning of January 2, 1949. One obituary printed in a Salt Lake City newspaper was full of misstatements about his life, and was probably picked up by other papers across the country.

But, that was the story of his life apparently, largely misunderstood and misreported. As Max Black pointed out in his book entitled Diamondfield, the irony of the incorrect obituary was perhaps fitting, for Davis himself was known to be an exaggerator of the truth.

Diamondfield Jack was definitely a “Wild West” character and a part of Idaho folklore and history. A National Forest campground is named in his honor, as well as a restaurant in Twin Falls, Idaho.

If you’re interested in learning more details about Diamondfield Jack and his legal entanglements and woes, followed by his successful business career, Max Black’s book was written to finally tell the truth about what really happened. The book is available on Amazon for $3.99, and if you have Kindle Unlimited, it is free to borrow.

source: © Sharon Hall (History Depot), 2014.
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page updated Dec 19, 2020

Road Reports April 22

Note: Spring road conditions change quickly. It is “Rock Migration” season! Be prepared for spring snow at high elevations and rocks/trees falling in the road. Please share road reports.

Yellow Pine: We have had dry warm weather in Yellow Pine over the last 3 days. Local streets are snow free, lots of pot holes. Click for Local Forecast.

Warm Lake Highway: (April 18) mail truck driver (Robert) reports Warm Lake Highway is snow free over the summit, road is in good shape.
Big Creek Summit SNOTEL station 6580′

* South Fork Salmon River Road Load Restrictions – A few weeks ago, the spring load restrictions were placed on the South Fork Salmon River Road. These restrictions will remain on the road until June 1 or earlier if conditions warrant and the signage is removed.
MapNotice:
South Fork Road: (April 18) mail truck driver reports bare pavement all the way in, no rocks to move. Lots of snow in the high elevations.
Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′

EFSF Road: (April 18) mail truck driver said he didn’t have to move any rocks this morning, but there are smaller rocks to dodge. The road is roughest (pot holes) between Eiguren Ranch and Yellow Pine.

Lower Johnson Creek Road: Old report to watch for rocks coming down on the road this side of the airport bridge.
Upper Johnson Creek Road: Closed at Landmark for winter to full sized vehicles.
The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet
Snowmobile Trail Report: No current report, conditions have changed.
Last groomed by county Jan 11th: “Johnson Cr Rd – Landmark to Wapiti Meadows”
Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam:
http://www.ruralnetwork.net/~yellowpinecm/

Lick Creek: Closed for winter to full sized vehicles. Open between Yellow Pine and Zena Creek Ranch.
Trail Report: No current report, conditions have changed.
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Closed for winter to full sized vehicles.
Trail report: No current report, conditions have changed.
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.
Big Creek Webcam:

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open. No current report, conditions have changed.

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Closed at Stibnite with snow. Truck reported to be stuck for the winter on the other side of Monumental.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.
Trail Report: (Apr 14) 4-wheelers made it half way to the summit.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Closed.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: No current report.
Trail Report: Groomed by county Landmark to Deadwood Summit 3/26/18
Note: The approx elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
Deadwood Summit SNOTEL station 6860′
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Weather Reports April 15-21

Johnson Creek at Yellow Pine

20180422JohnsonCreek-a.jpg

Apr 15 Weather:

At 10am it was 33 degrees, low overcast and light rain. Not raining at 11am and a little brighter. Thinner clouds and filtered sun after lunch time. At 3pm it was 56 degrees, mostly cloudy and breezy. A few drops of rain before 8pm (on and off.) At 830pm it was 49 degrees, overcast and an occasional drop of rain. Raining pretty good at 1030pm. Steady rain at 1am. Raining hard at 2am. Steady rain at 3am. Still raining lightly at 7am. Sprinkles at 8am, probably quit raining shortly after. Not raining at 9am.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time April 16, 2018 at 10:00AM
Overcast
Max temperature 59 degrees F
Min temperature 34 degrees F
At observation 37 degrees F
Precipitation 0.55 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
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Apr 16 Weather:

At 10am it was 37 degrees and overcast. A few snow flakes fell around 1020am. Thinner clouds and filtered sunshine at 1130am. Light snowfall/graupel and a little breezy at 1240pm, clouds down to the valley floor. Tapered off around 1pm, cloudy and breezy at 125pm. At 2pm graupel falling until 250pm (ground almost white) and melted, 39 degrees and a couple of sucker holes in the clouds. Snowballs/graupel for about 15 minutes after 3pm. Snow 5pm-530pm turned the ground almost white and melted. Snowing 613pm to 643pm, sticking a little then melted. At 815pm it was 33 degrees and partly clear. At 9pm it was 32 degrees and almost full dark.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time April 17, 2018 at 10:00AM
Mostly cloudy
Max temperature 46 degrees F
Min temperature 23 degrees F
At observation 32 degrees F
Precipitation 0.06 inch
Snowfall 0.5 inch
Snow depth Trace
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Apr 17 Weather:

At 10am it was 32 degrees and mostly cloudy. Flaking snow at 1214pm, probably lasted less than 30 minutes. Occasional flakes of snow started around 245pm, mostly cloudy. At 340pm it was 41 degrees and a flake or two. At 8pm it was 38 degrees and mostly cloudy.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time April 18, 2018 at 10:00AM
Mostly cloudy
Max temperature 44 degrees F
Min temperature 22 degrees F
At observation 30 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall Flakes
Snow depth 0 inch
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Apr 18 Weather:

At 10am it was 30 degrees and mostly cloudy. Mostly cloudy all day and mild temps. At 830pm it was 44 degrees and thin clouds.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time April 19, 2018 at 10:00AM
Almost clear
Max temperature 52 degrees F
Min temperature 28 degrees F
At observation 41 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
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Apr 19 Weather:

At 10am it was 41 degrees and almost clear (a bit of haze to the east.) At 230pm it was 60 degrees, partly cloudy and breezy. At 825pm it was 49 degrees and mostly clear.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time April 20, 2018 at 10:00AM
Almost clear
Max temperature 62 degrees F
Min temperature 26 degrees F
At observation 42 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
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Apr 20 Weather:

At 10am it was 42 degrees and almost clear. At 3pm it was 63 degrees and clear. At 830pm it was 49 degrees and clear.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time April 21, 2018 at 10:00AM
Mostly cloudy
Max temperature 65 degrees F
Min temperature 30 degrees F
At observation 45 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
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Apr 21 Weather:

At 10am it was 45 degrees and mostly cloudy. At 315pm it was 65 degrees, partly cloudy and light breezes. Gusty breezes after 3pm. At 8pm it was 53 degrees and clear, almost calm, river sounds up.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time April 22, 2018 at 10:00AM
Mostly clear
Max temperature 66 degrees F
Min temperature 27 degrees F
At observation 44 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
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