Monthly Archives: June 2018

Updated Road Report June 27

Yellow Pine: Yellow Pine Ave (main street) graded and dust abated. Some local streets have fresh dust abatement, others are getting dusty. Click for Local Forecast.
Yellow Pine Webcam:

Johnson Creek Stream Gauge:
https://waterdata.usgs.gov/id/nwis/uv?13313000

Warm Lake Highway: Chip sealing on Warm Lake Highway currently between Landmark and Warm Lake today, expect some delays.

South Fork Road: (June 26) Road is in good shape. Lots of traffic, kayakers and people fishing.
Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
South Fork Stream Gauge:
https://waterdata.usgs.gov/id/nwis/uv?13310700

EFSF Road: (June 26) Road is in good shape. No word on if dust abatement has been applied yet.

Johnson Creek Road: Open. (June 27) Correction, the road had not been graded all the way out, but the county road crew is currently working near the VO ranch today, should be finished soon.
The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet
Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam:
http://www.ruralnetwork.net/~yellowpinecm/

Lick Creek: Probably Open. Last update (June 11) Had reports that folks are able to make it in over Lick Creek summit. This doesn’t mean the road is “good” tho.
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: No current report, not quite open yet. Old report (June 16) One skinny track is open over the summit, narrow vehicles only. No trucks or trailers.
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.
Big Creek Webcam:

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open. Old report Friday (May 11) that it’s rough in some places, some wash boards starting, and still fairly smooth in other places.

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Open. (June 23) “Road is in good shape. Both sides of Monumental Summit are snow-free. There is an abandoned vehicle halfway down the back side of Monumental Summit. It is partially blocking the road and would be difficult to get around pulling a trailer.” – SA
(Note: truck owner has been notified the road is open and planning to come get it on the weekend.)
link to FB photo:

Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Closed.
Update 6/27 from the Yellow Pine Tavern:WARNING! ! ! Folks hoping to Travel the loop from Yellow Pine to Warren by way of Big Creek by motorcycle or UTV or car please wait a bit. These Boys went over yesterday, they met up with a previous group of 4 and it took 5 to haul their bikes over the snow drifts on a Vertical area. Furthermore a Subaru tried going to Big Creek from Warren and Avalanched into a tree, walked to Big Creek got a ride for 10 miles then continued walking over Profile into Yellow Pine last night and spent all morning trying to get a tow truck to go back there.”
link to FB photo:

Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.
(May 21) Warren Wagon Road is open to Secesh and Warren.
(May 23) Secesh Summit (McCall to Warren). Valley County plowed the road open this week.
(May 23) Warren Summit (Warren to the South Fork of the Salmon River) is open with caution as Valley County has not surveyed the roadway for damage yet – travelers may run into road issues.

Deadwood Summit: Open. Report from Deadwood Outfitters (June 5) “Deadwood Summit is open and in good shape.”
Note: The approx elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
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June 24, 2018 The Yellow Pine Times

June 24, 2018 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Community Calendar:

May 10 Burn Permits required
May 15 Firewood Season Starts – permits at The Corner
June 25 Dust Abatement Application. Please have your vehicles off the street that morning.
June 29-30 Live Music at The Corner
June 30 Golf Tournament
July 4 Parade 2pm
July 4 (after Parade) Ice Cream Sundaes
July 4 Fireworks at dusk
July 4 Live Music at The Corner
July 6-7 Live Music at The Corner
July 7 Community Hall Yard Sale 9am to Noon
July 7 YPWUA meeting 2pm, Community Hall
July 14 at 2pm, Community Hall, Village of Yellow Pine Association meeting
July 19 Noxious Weed Day
July 21 10am CPR Class at the Fire Station
July 26 Festival planning meeting
July 28 Ride to Roosevelt
August 3, 4, 5 Music and Harmonica Festival
August 11 at 2pm Community Hall, Village of Yellow Pine Association meeting
September 8 at 10am Community Hall YP Fire Budget Hearing
September 8 at 2pm Community Hall, Village of Yellow Pine Association meeting

(details below)
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Village News:

12th Annual Yellow Pine Vet Clinic

20180620DrRubelShadow-b
(photo by Local Color Photography)

Dr. Keith Ruble and crew from Cascade Vet Clinic were in Yellow Pine on Wednesday June 20th. (They were a little late due to an emergency in Cascade.) Several locals brought their cats and dogs down to see the Vet, receive a thorough examination and get up to date on vaccinations (along with a few cookies.) A total of 8 cats and 7 dogs were seen at the Pioneer Street location, then the crew headed up to Main Street to see 6 more dogs and another cat up at the Post Office.

Many thanks to Dr. Ruble and Jenny for making the yearly journey to the little village of Yellow Pine and for taking such good care of our critters.
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Community Hall Clean Up update

Thanks goes to Dan Stiff for helping Terry with the grass cutting. Thanks to Deb Filler for the help with cleaning windows. Also thanks to Deb and Cindy Holford for help with cleaning the first refrigerator. Also a big thanks to Terry Hall for the repair, sanding, and painting of all 8 picnic tables. We still have more weed whipping to be done as grass grows.

– KH
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Community Hall Ice Cream Sundae Sale

20180623-IceCream-a

The Ice Cream sale during the Highland Games [June 23] was good. Our gross were sales $196.00..

We will be reviewing all input prior to the sale on the 4th of July. Thanks to Ronda Rogers, Deb Filler and Joan Brockett for all your help.

– KH
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Highland Games June 23

20180623HighlandGames-a

It was a day of “Throwing Rocks, Sticks, & Hammers”.

There was more than just skirts flying as the kilted competitors put their muscles to the test at the Highland Games in Yellow Pine.

In their original form many centuries ago, Highland Games revolved around athletic and sports competitions. Though other activities were always a part of the festivities, many today still consider Highland athletics to be what the games are all about — in short, that the athletics are the Games, and all the other activities are just entertainment. Regardless, it remains true today that the athletic competitions are at least an integral part of the events and one — the caber toss — has come to almost symbolize the Highland games.

Thanks to Steve & Sue Holloway for organizing this event to benefit the Helispot for Yellow Pine.

Thanks to the Village of Yellow Pine for cooking the breakfasts, being gracious hosts and spectators to the athletes, their family, and friends.

– AF
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Dust Abatement Application June 25

Dust Abatement is Monday, June 25th. Please have your vehicles off the street that morning.
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Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Please do not dump household appliances at our transfer station, it is for household trash only and must be placed in the dumpsters.

However, there is a burn pile for woody debris only. “Bring it, Don’t Burn it.”
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Pests

Reports that ticks are still active, mosquitoes and no-see-ums are out. Pine pollen is not as bad the last few days. Remember to secure your trash, bears are hungry.
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Local Events:

4th of July Golf Tournament June 30th

Our 20th annual Yellow Pine Golf Tournament will take place on June 30th 2018. The proceeds will go towards the Yellow Pine Medical Training and Supply Fund. By giving to this annual event, you’ll be supporting the village of Yellow Pine and our growing EMS service.

Thanks to Cascade Fire/EMS Fire Commissioners, Chief Steve Hull and the EMS Director Keri Donica, Yellow Pine is now a Cascade Fire/EMS Paramedic Ambulance Sub-station. This allows us to have equipment available in Yellow Pine to treat and care for patients in the field, not only First Aid but Advanced Life Support. Yellow Pine now has Nationally Registered: 4 EMR’s, 1 RN-EMT, and 1 Paramedic in Yellow Pine.

The cost for the event is $20/person or $50 will give you a sponsorship and pay for 2 players!

As a sponsor, your name will be put on a plaque, or you can provide your own sign for the event. This plaque will be posted on one of our 18 holes during the tournament.

To reserve a place in the tournament please contact Jeff or Ann Forster @ aforsterrn@aol.com or call (208) 633-1010.

You can mail your payments to: P.O. Box 38 Yellow Pine, ID. 83677.

Please make checks payable to “Cascade Fire EMS” attn: YP Golf Tournament.

Thanks in advance for your consideration.

Sincerely,
Jeff Forster – Paramedic & Ann Forster – BS, RN, EMT
Event Coordinators
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Weekend of June 30th

Live Music at The Corner – Folk Family Revival
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4th of July

Parade at 2pm

Independence Day Parade will be Wednesday, July 4th at 2pm.

If you want to be in the parade, meet near the Fire House at 1:30pm. All family-friendly entries are welcome.

If you need decorations for your pet, bike, ATV, trailer, car, whatever, they will be available near the Fire House at noon.

After the parade, Ice Cream Sundaes will be for sale. $3 for one scoop; $4 for two scoop; your choice of toppings. Proceeds support the Community Hall.

Fireworks at Dusk

Live Music at The Corner – Folk Family Revival
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Yard Sale – Saturday, July 7 from 9am-Noon

The garage sale is July 7th from 9-noon. Everyone can bring their items anytime to the community hall. I will have a space marked for the items.

Please remember this is a Donation and Everything Must Work.

If you want your items back if they don’t sell you must pick them up at 12:30 on July 7th.

The proceeds of the Garage Sale will go to the maintenance of the Community Hall.

If you have questions please call Kathy Hall at 208 633 6270 or text to 630 915 1544

Thank you everyone for your support of the Yellow Pine Community Hall.

– KH
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Weekend July 7th

Live Music at The Corner – Willie and the Singlewides
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July 19 (free) Noxious Weed Day

Steve has scheduled his visit to Yellow Pine for Thursday July 19th. The staging area will be the Fire Department. He will bring up the Chemicals and spray equipment. Backpack sprayers, pump up sprayers, ATV tanks and he needs to know how many of these we need. He will leave everything there for the weekend and pick it all up Monday. Please call Kathy Hall 208 633-6270 for forms and information.

link to form:
Steve Anderson from Valley County Weed Control
Office: (208)382-7199
e-mail: SAnderson @ co.valley.id.us
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Jul 28, 2018 Ride to Roosevelt

$20.00/vehicle

The ride will leave from the Yellow Pine Community Hall at 10 am. After leaving town, riders will head up Stibnite Road. Approximately 45 minutes later there will be a short pause at the “Glory Hole” in Stibnite; with information provided by Midas Gold Idaho. The ride continues up and over Monumental Summit (NF-375) – there is a monument at the summit with information about the area. Over Monumental Summit, the ride heads for the Roosevelt Trail Head. Lunch will be served at the trail head. The riders will return to Yellow Pine via the same route.

There are opportunities to see old mine sites (along the route); the town site of Roosevelt (after a short hike); side trails; and wildlife.

This out-and-back ride is expected to take about 6 hours.
https://www.ypescapade.org/atv-utv-events
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Local Groups:

YPWUA News:

Shareholder’s meeting July 7 at 2pm in the Community Hall.

Please remember, no outside watering on weekends or holidays.
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VYPA News:

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting June 9, 2018

Officers in Attendance: Deb Filler Chairman, Lorinne Munn Secretary, Joel Fields Treasurer, Kathy Hall Member at Large. Lynne Imel Vice Chair was absent. Also in Attendance 13 other members of the community and Belinda Provancher from Midas Gold.

Meeting was called to order at 2PM by Deb Filler Chairman.

Minutes of the September 9th 2017 meeting were approved as posted by Lorinne Munn.

Joel Fields gave the Treasurer’s report as follows:

a. As of May 31, 2018, Total Community Funds $30,934.47
b. General Village Fund $3,743.15
c. Cemetery Fund $5,432.38
d. Harmonica Fund $14,130.53
e. Community Hall Fund $327.65
f. Restroom Fund $7,300.76
g. $3,000.00 or so of Harmonica money has recently been spent on various supplies, Harmonica posters and Harmonica Festival hats.

Cemetery report by Willie Sullivan: He has repaired the fence and trimmed trees and will mow the lawn tomorrow. He is ordering signs that say, No Camping, as there has been a problem with this. The plot realignment is in the final stages. He will be placing stakes with a ring on each numbering each stake and lettering each row. The new board he is replacing will express the realignment numbers and letters. A headstone is in the works for a recent double burial. The Parks family has installed a Monument Bench in the corner above the Welch plot. The cemetery road will soon be graded by the county. Elections for Cemetery Commissioners is coming up. Willie and Candy Sullivan are declining a vote next month to continue as commissioners. They are letting Deb know so that can be reflected on the ballot.

Willie Sullivan also mentioned this is the Sullivan’s last year for running the Yellow Pine Fireworks. Someone is needed to collect monies to run the fireworks. Working with the Heck Family from Rocky Mountain Fur and Fireworks to purchase insurance for the event. Purchasing the fireworks, of which the Heck Family has always donated a portion of the fireworks. Picking up the fireworks, and also setting up and lighting the fireworks while working with our Fire Department to do so. Matt Huber expressed an interest in knowing more about the program.

Kathy Hall gave the Community Hall report: A Community Hall cleanup is scheduled for June 12. Help is needed with washing windows, cutting grass and painting the picnic tables which Terry Hall has repaired and sanded. The inventory reflects 3 or 4 tables short of the white folding tables. Please let us know where they might be. The chili contest this last winter brought in $60.00, The recent Rally brought in $500.00 after $100.00 in prize money was deducted. The Rally also connected Yellow Pine with a different group of folks that are now interested in Yellow Pine. This has led to scheduling a ride to Roosevelt “The Yellow Pine Escapades” scheduled for July 28. This ride is to get folks acquainted with the area. They will leave Yellow Pine at 10Am on to Stibnite where Midas Gold will speak at the Glory Hole, then on to Roosevelt. At the trailhead Lynn Imel will speak about history of the area, and a lunch will be served, provided for by Midas Gold. Invitations to this ride are being sent out to the Rally folks, who are also involved in the ATV, UTV Clubs of Idaho. The Ride is on the website ypescapade.org. Other fundraising plans are to cook the breakfasts for the Highland Games on June 23 and 24, and to sell Ice Cream Sundays at the 4th of July Celebration. A Community Yard Sale is also being planned for July 7 please bring your items to the Community Hall, and also please come to the Yard Sale. The monies from all of these efforts now over $700.00 will be used to paint the Community Hall once the bathrooms are in place. To install linoleum in the kitchen near the grilling area. To purchase some more of the white folding tables, and maybe have a better heater installed.

Lorinne Munn gave the Harmonica Festival Report: Lorinne Munn is running the Stage and scheduling the Performers along with help from Deb Filler who is still running the Web Site. Deb has also agreed to continue with the Harmonica Workshop and the Parade. Dawn Brown is Co-Leading with Lorinne and focusing on the Booths. Thank You Deb, for continuing on, advising both Lorinne and Dawn. Things appear to be going on schedule with the folks from the last few years still running the various parts of festival activities. Marj Fields is continuing with the T Shirts, please sign up to help with a shift at the souvenir booth. Joel Fields is still our Treasurer and helping with our charging system. Bill and Lorraine McIntosh are continuing with running the Pulled Pork Dinner at the School House, and collecting items for the Auction please see them for your donations. Sherry Gordon is still running the Auction. Heather and Matt will continue running the Huff and Puff Race. Lynn Imel is still scheduled for Bingo at the Community Hall. We still have no one to head up the Harmonica Breakfast as we have sadly lost Cinda DeBoise, we are so grateful to her years of service. I do have several helpers signed up just looking for a leader. Something new this year is a planned Children’s area up at Cindy Fortin’s Huckleberry area.

Deb Filler brought up Dust Abatement. It will be provided the week of June 25th. It is now $1.58 per gallon up 2 cents from last year. See Deb 208 633-6945 to be put on the list for Abatement.

This was the 3rd and final reading of the motion to change the By Laws so the offices of Harmonica and Chairperson of the Village of Yellow Pine Association cannot be held concurrently by the same Officer. This would be added to section 7.3. The vote will be taken in August.

Old Business

Deb Filler covered the ditch situation. During the fall it was discussed to continue funding for the ditch treatment that was engineered a few years ago. Ditches further up hill had been dug out at that time. Dave McClintock was given $600.00 to finish up the section behind the Community Hall, the area bordering the Kuenzli place and the ditch along Sarge’s place. Dan Stiff pointed out that now access to his property has been blocked off by the dirt left from the ditch digging. Deb Filler said it was so late in the year when the digging was done that the dirt wasn’t removed. She also suggested it was now on Dan’s property and was his responsibility to remove the dirt. Which Dan says the ditch is not on his property, it is in the Right of Way Access to his property. Ann Forster said why can’t we work as a community to solve this problem. Willie Sullivan said he has a culvert that might work. Candy Sullivan said she needs dirt for fill in her yard. Matt Huber suggested there is a lack of oversight on maintenance of the ditches. Willie Sullivan made a motion for the council to form an ad hoc committee to explore the cost to repair the public access on Pioneer Street and report back, Ann Forster seconded the motion, motion was passed. Matt Huber, Tim Rogers and Dan Stiff volunteered to be on the ad hoc committee. Matt Huber and Cecil Dallman gave ideas as to how to work together removing the dirt and getting gravel for over the culvert at Dan Stiff’s property. Joel Fields suggested we create a Road and Ditch Maintenance fund. Willie Sullivan made a motion that we create a Road and Ditch Maintenance fund and Dan Stiff seconded the motion, the motion was passed. Joel Fields suggested the council look at the general fund and determine where excess money can be placed to use for the Road and Ditch fund, looking at this at the September meeting. Willie Sullivan suggested we set up the guidelines and document where the money can be used.

Willie Sullivan reported on progress towards building of the bathrooms at the Community Hall. He said the plans have just been submitted to the county. There was an issue with the snow load that is being addressed. Construction will begin as soon as there is approval from the county.

New Business

Ann Forster volunteered to head up the Nominating Committee to select candidates for the offices of Vice Chairman and Secretary, the terms that are up this year. The voting for these offices will be held at the July meeting.

Kathy Hall introduced the Noxious Weed Program to the group. She said the County will drop off the chemicals and equipment on Thursday July 19 and pick up the equipment on the following Monday July 23. Please contact Kathy 208 633-6270 if you are interested in controlling the noxious weeds on your property.

Willie Sullivan, Cecil Dallman and Lorinne Munn gave a presentation on the proposed Alternative Routes around the Stibnite Gold Project. Lynn Imel also on the committee was absent. Midas Gold and our Yellow Pine committee have presented 2 alternate routes to be added to The Midas Gold proposal to the Forest Service. So far this addition to their proposal seems positive. The 2 routes are to the west of the proposed pit. Midas Gold has asked our committee to present to the Yellow Pine residents their desire to form a Community Partnership Program which would include communities in Valley County as well as a few in Adams and Idaho County. This group would have one representative from each community which seems positive to be represented on an equal basis. This group would be the liaison between Midas Gold and the respective communities. An added proposal is the formation of a Midas Gold Foundation which would be an avenue in which monies are dispersed to the communities for projects Midas can support. An additional or the same representative would be chosen by the communities involved. Midas Gold is asking for letters of support for the Midas Gold Project from the signatories of these programs. Midas Gold will be making a presentation to the Yellow Pine Community on these proposals on July 14th in Yellow Pine, at our Association meeting.

Meeting was adjourned at 3:44PM by Deb Filler.

Next meeting is July 14, 2018.

Submitted by Lorinne N. Munn,
Secretary Yellow Pine Association

VYPA Summer Meeting Schedule:

July 14, 2pm, Community Hall, Village of Yellow Pine Association meeting
August 11, 2pm, Community Hall, Village of Yellow Pine Association meeting
September 8, 2pm, Community Hall, Village of Yellow Pine Association meeting
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YPFD News:

CPR Training Class

CPR class coming to YP July 21st 10am at the Fire Station (includes AED). If interested please notify Jeff or Ann.

Bring it, Don’t Burn it

For us in Yellow Pine, Jake Strohmeyer, Dist. Ranger with the Boise NF said we can use the area at our transfer station for yard debris and the FS will burn it once a year. Please no furniture, mattresses, construction debris, metal objects, tires or personnel junk. Please only woody yard debris. When using the pile please be mindful of where you place the debris as it should be contained to a manageable burnable area and kept as clean as possible. – JF

Burn Permits Needed After May 10

A reminder that May 10 is beginning of fire season where burning permits for open burning are required throughout most Fire Districts. Since the YPFD doesn’t issue actual “Burn Permits” per say, notification of a large pile burn would be appreciated. The notification makes the fire officials aware of those who have a planned burn. Seeing smoke can easily raise concerns. When neighbors call in seeing smoke, we can reduce their anxiety by knowing that there was a notification by a property owner. This elevates the response to smoke investigations.

Contact Fire Chief Jeff at 633-1010 or email j4star1911@ gmail.com

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Updates:

YP Fire Budget Hearing: September 8, 2018 – 10am Community Hall

Fire Department Training on Sunday’s at 11:00 all are welcome

Special Use Permit for Fire Station and Helispot:

The Boise National Forest has granted a “Special Use Permit” to the Yellow Pine Fire Protection District for the Fire Station lot and the Helispot. The Helispot is a new addition and the Fire Station lot was a renewal. This permit will expire 12/31/2037 (20 years) and will need to be rewed again at that time. Thanks to Jake Strohmeyer, District Ranger and Chris (Kit) Woras, Special Use Permit Administrator of the Boise Forest for spending a lot of time and correspondence to get this permit completed.

Helispot / Life Flight:

The Helispot needs a lot of work and a base needs to be put down before officially being used. I’m currently in discussion with some folks to help with the ground prep and to put the base down. Life Flight and other agencies will need to do an inspection as well before using the helispot.

Anyone needing a Smoke/CO detector or fire extinguisher please let Jeff, Cecil or Dan know.

Jeff F.

There are YPFD T-shirts, as well as YPFD patches and stickers for sale at the Tavern now.
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2018 Festival:

June 22 4pm Festival meeting Community Hall
The last planning meeting will be July 26

August 3, 4, 5 Music and Harmonica Festival
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Biz Listings:

Yellow Pine Lodge

Now open for summer (208) 633-3377
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Yellow Pine Tavern

Summer Hours: 8am to close, 7 days a week.

Daily Menu: full Breakfast served also Burgers and Pizza for Afternoon and Evening. Good selection of Beer and Wine.
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The Corner 633-3325

Live music for Independence Day, both weekends. Folk Family Revival will be here the weekend before and on the actual fourth. Willie and the Singlewides will be the weekend after the fourth.

Our hours for this week: Monday-Friday 4pm-8pm, Saturday and Sunday 11am-close

We will also be cooking most of the week for private events so if anyone wants something outside of those hours just call and we can usually accommodate.

The Corner Store is open as well, just call for grocery needs, fresh produce, eggs, meat etc.
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Local Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
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Diamond Fuel & Feed (208) 382-4430

We have a great price on wild bird seed. $19.99 for a 50 lb bag. 12.99 for a 25 lb bag. We also sell suet blocks (peanut crunch, and cherry) for $1.99 per block. Niger Thistle seed $13.25 for 5 lbs.
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Elkhorn Heating & Cooling (208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho
Will service Yellow Pine
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (June 18) rain last night, overnight low of 43 degrees, overcast this morning. Finches, robins and a clarks nutcracker calling. Low rough sounding airplane at 939am. Cloudy cool morning and early afternoon, high of 67 degrees. Cassins finches, pine siskins, little woodpecker, red-breasted nuthatch, jays and hummingbirds visiting today. Two babies (and 4 eggs) in the swallow nest, both parents feeding, cleaning and keeping them warm. Very windy after 4pm, rain showers late afternoon, then again in the early evening. Mourning dove calling to the east around sundown. Light rain showers late evening. Robins chirping just before full dark.

Tuesday (June 19) rain early this morning, overnight low of 49 degrees, low overcast sitting down on the ridges. Flock of finches at the feeders, mourning dove visiting, red-naped sapsucker drumming on the power pole, swallows swooping for feathers and bringing bugs to the hatchlings. Third swallow egg hatched this morning in the nest we are watching. Jays joined the finches at the feeders after lunch, hummingbirds are active (finch trying to drink sugar water!) Little buck with velvety nubbins visiting yards in the neighborhood. Rain shower after 2pm, high of 68 degrees. Cool cloudy evening. Robins and swallows calling at dusk.

Wednesday (June 20) overnight low of 50 degrees, clear sky this morning. County road grader on main street early and airplanes buzzing about. Finches, pine siskins and evening grosbeaks visiting, swallows flying low, bringing bugs to the hatchlings. Three babies and 3 unhatched eggs in the nest this morning. Very low (gray) airplane circled over just after 1020am. Dark clouds building from the south. Red-naped sapsucker drumming on the power pole, Eurasian collared dove hanging out with the chickens and a female yellow-headed blackbird joined the finches and grosbeaks at the feeders. Doe on the edge of the forest, browsing down west side of the road. The Vet Clinic was successful, 8 cats and 7 dogs were examined and received vaccinations at the first stop, then the crew headed ‘up town’ to see more pets. Cloudy and humid mid-day, almost felt drops of rain, high of 75 degrees. Cool pleasant evening, robins sound happy.

Thursday (June 21) overnight low of 49 degrees. Thunderstorm 7am-9am, very loud thunder at 822am. Robins calling, red-naped sapsucker drumming on the power pole. Finches, pine siskins and grosbeaks visiting. Three chicks and three unhatched eggs in the swallow nest, the biggest is getting stripes of down feathers. Flickers are feeding babies in their nest box and a female hairy woodpecker enjoying the beef suet. Jays and a golden mantel squirrel also raiding the seed feeders. Eurasian collared dove hanging out with the chickens. Loud shooting to the west started at 155pm, sounded like it was on the west edge of the golf course. Gusty winds after 2pm and mostly cloudy, high of 74 degrees. Rough sounding airplane at 247pm (windy.) Shooting to the west started up again at 254pm. Rain showers and thunder rumbling in the afternoon and more rain early evening.

Friday (June 22) overnight low of 47 degrees, almost clear sky this morning. Rough sounding low flying airplane circled over around 930am. Red-breasted nuthatches and finches visiting, red-naped sapsucker drumming on the power pole, swallows swooping low hunting feathers (and bugs.) Warm, cloudy and muggy mid-day, high of 78 degrees. Afternoon wind storm brought a little rain before 6pm (and a report of a tree down blocking the EFSF road, it had been drug out of the road that evening.) Partly clear and mild at sunset, robins calling.

Saturday (June 23) overnight low of 42 degrees, mostly cloudy sky this morning. Several loud airplanes over the village, increasing traffic on the ground. Swallows swooping for feathers, chicks in the nest growing fast, parents bringing big bugs. A few finches and a red-breasted nuthatch at the feeders, colombian and golden mantel ground squirrels running about. Lots of people in town this weekend, Highland Games uptown. Shooting to the west around 245pm. Cool breezes and partly cloudy evening, high of 72 degrees. Robins calling at dusk. Moon in conjunction with Jupiter at 10pm.

Sunday (June 24) overnight low of 43 degrees, partly clear sky this morning and warming up quickly. A few loud airplanes flying over, several more parked at the airstrip. Finches and robins calling this morning, pine siskins and jays at the feeders, swallows swooping low for feathers (the babies in the nest are growing fast), looks like the flicker chicks are getting ready to fledge (large male chick poking his head out of the nest hole), red-naped sapsucker drumming on the power pole. Warm afternoon, mostly blue sky with a few clouds, high of 82 degrees. Airplanes going over during the heat of the day, streets drying out and getting a little dusty from the traffic. A few finches calling and red-breasted nuthatches tapping. Female hummer buzzing about this evening.
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Idaho News:

Yellow Pine to host full schedule of holiday events

The Star-News June 21, 2018

The tiny community of Yellow Pine east of McCall will host a full slate of Independence Day events.

The annual Fourth of July Parade will begin at 2 p.m. Wednesday, July 4 and the day will end with fireworks at dusk.

The 20th annual Yellow Pine Golf Tournament will take place on Saturday, June 30 with proceeds to go towards the Yellow Pine Medical Training and Supply Fund.

The cost for the event is $20 per person or $50 will buy a sponsorship and play for two players.

To reserve a place in the tournament please contact Jeff or Ann Forster at aforsterrn@aol.com or call 208-633-1010.

The Corner in Yellow Pine will host live music by the band Folk Family Revival on three nights. The band will perform starting at 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday, June 29-30, and Wednesday, July 4, after the fireworks.

source:
Note: There will be Ice Cream Sundaes after the Parade to support the Community Hall.
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Two Payette Lake lots lessees lose homes in auction

Two others had to bid far above minimum to hold onto homes

By Ben Fletcher for The Star-News June 21, 2018

Tears welled-up in Donna Day’s eyes on Friday when multiple groups submitted competing bids and she realized her long-time McCall vacation home was gone.

The half-acre lot at 997 Chipmunk Trail eventually sold for $220,000, or $124,000 above the required minimum bid.

But Day and her son, Andrew Jacobs, had already left the room.

“It was above what an old Idaho family can afford,” Jacobs said.

The scene took place at the Stueckle Sky Center at Bronco Stadium at Boise State University, where nine state-leased cottage sites on Payette Lake were sold at a public auction by the Idaho Department of Lands.

A second state lessee lost out to a competing bid and two other lessees had to spend tens of thousands of dollars more than the appraised value of the lots in order to hold onto them.

Jacobs said the Boise family had occupied the lot since 1912.

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Hawkins to serve 30 days in jail for auto death of wife, son

Investigators say car was moving at least 89 mph when crash occurred

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News June 21, 2018

A McCall man on Tuesday was sentenced to 30 days in jail and 600 hours of community service stemming from an auto accident last August that left his wife and child dead.

Devin Hawkins pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor vehicular manslaughter charge on Tuesday in Valley County Magistrate Court.

Valley County Magistrate Lamont Berecz sentenced Hawkins to 90 days in jail, but gave Hawkins 10 hours of community service for each of the 60 days of the sentence.

He is required to serve the 30 remaining days in jail within 120 days.

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30-year-old Nampa woman killed in Highway 55 crash near Banks

by KBOI News Staff Wednesday, June 20th 2018


Idaho State Troopers and Boise County Sheriff’s deputies responded to a multi-vehicle crash in Banks at the intersection of State Highway 55 and County Highway 17.

Banks, Idaho (KBOI) — A 30-year-old Nampa woman died on Wednesday after a multiple vehicle crash along Highway 55.

Idaho State Police says Kristine Stapleton was stopped at the intersection of Highway 17 (Banks-Lowman) when she failed to yield to traffic as she turned onto Highway 55. She was struck by a Ford passenger van towing a trailer.

Stapleton died at the scene of the crash.

Twelve children were in the van that were part of an out-of-state group going to McCall on a rafting trip. Six of those children were taken to St. Alphonsus with minor injuries.

source:
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Intersection along Idaho 55 has deadly history

Some believe more safety measures should be installed at the intersection of Banks-Lowman Road and Idaho 55.

Gretchen Parsons KTVB June 21, 2018

Banks, Idaho – The latest deadly car crash at a notoriously dangerous intersection in Boise County has a lot of people agreeing it’s time to make the crossing safer.

It’s the intersection right where Banks-Lowman Road meets Idaho 55 about 30 miles north of Boise.

“People speed through here, it’s incredible,” says Linda Bayliss who works at the cafe nearby the intersection.

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Be Careful Out There!

Give full attention to driving and speed limits. Hwy 55 is very busy during the summer.

Incident: Daily Ops 2018

Details: There was a one vehicle accident at MM 55 on Hwy 55 this morning between 6 and 7 am. The vehicle rolled and was upside down for about an hour. The IC (Jason Gifford with HSB fire) said there was about 10 gallons of diesel and oil combined spilled next to the roadway. Vehicle was headed southbound but ended up on the northbound side. HSB fire applied material to soak up what they could and ACT towing cleaned that up. Contact POC if more information is needed.

CO 6B Emergency Coordinator – bob.showalter at 09:22:08 on 06/21/2018

source: Boise County Connection
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Burglar strikes businesses in New Meadows, Riggins

The Star-News June 21, 2018


(Idaho County Sheriff)

Police are looking for a Florida man who is a suspect in the burglaries of the Kahili Club in New Meadows and four businesses in Riggins.

Joseph Coleman Hodge, 55, of Jacksonville, Fla., is a “person of interest” in the burglaries, the Idaho County Sheriff’s Office said.

Hodge is believed to be driving a Honda Odyssey van displaying a Florida license plate. The van appears to have been home spray painted dark blue or black, the sheriff’s office said.

Hodge is a suspect in the June 13 burglary at the Kahili Club where entry was made by breaking a door, the Adams County Sheriff’s Office said.

The Idaho Lottery dispenser in the club was broken into, along with the tavern’s till, the sheriff’s office said. The amount of money taken was not disclosed.

The break-in was estimated to have occurred between midnight and 9 a.m.

Earlier on June 13, River Adventures, River Rock Café, Canyon Creamery, and Wilderness Eatery in Riggins all reported break-ins and money taken from cash drawers and in money bags, the Idaho County sheriff said.

Anyone with information on Hodge should call the Idaho County Sheriff’s Office at 208-983-1100.

source:
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Valley County accepts unwanted pesticides by appointment

The Star-News June 21, 2018

Valley County residents can properly dispose of old, unwanted pesticides by taking them to the Valley County Weed and Pest Control Offices near Cascade.

Residents must call and make an appointment to hand over their items, such as rat, weed and bug killers. Pesticides must be in their original, labeled containers.

The offices are located at 55 Gold Dust Road south of Cascade. To make an appointment, call 208-315-0368 or 208-382-7199 or write to Sanderson@co.valley.id.us

source:
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Central Idaho city eyes avalanche-zone rental homes

6/23/18 AP

Ketchum, Idaho — Officials in the central Idaho town of Ketchum have approved doing an inventory of homes within avalanche zones not engineered to withstand avalanches and discussing the appropriate restrictions as rentals.

The Idaho Mountain Express reports that the Ketchum City Council on Monday approved the inventory work by city workers.

City officials say they’ve identified 132 single-family homes in avalanche zones.

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Health Advisory issued at Little Camas Reservoir due to blue-green algae

by KBOI News Staff Saturday, June 23rd 2018

Mountain Home, Idaho (KBOI) — If you had plans heading to the Little Camas Reservoir in the near future, you might want to think again.

The Central District Health Department said Saturday the Elmore County reservoir is now under a health advisory due to blue-green algae. The toxic-producing organisms can make people and animals sick.

Little Camas is located northeast of Mountain Home off Highway 20. People are encouraged to avoid recreating in or near the water.

If folks do decide to head to the reservoir they’re encouraged to avoid swallowing or inhaling water and avoid direct contact with water containing visible algae. Drinking water from the reservoir is especially dangerous and the toxins cannot be removed by boiling or filtering the water. Children and pets are particularly susceptible to illness related to blue-green algae. If people choose to eat fish from the reservoir, it is recommended that they remove all fat, skin and organs before cooking since toxins are more likely to collect in those tissues.

Blue-green algae blooms occur in water with high levels of nutrients such as phosphorus and nitrogen, often during warmer weather months. The blooms are generally green or blue-green in color, and may form thick mats along shorelines. They may look like surface scum, resembling pea soup and can have an unpleasant odor.

source:
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Idaho family sues US after child sprayed by cyanide trap

By Keith Ridler – 6/19/18 AP

Boise, Idaho — An Idaho couple has sued the U.S. government, saying their teenage son still suffers headaches after a predator-killing trap that federal workers mistakenly placed near their home doused him with cyanide.

Mark and Theresa Mansfield of Pocatello filed the lawsuit Monday in U.S. District Court in Idaho seeking more than $75,000 in economic damages and more than $75,000 for pain and suffering.

Their son, Canyon Mansfield, then 14, was playing with his dog last year when he triggered the trap that the U.S. Department of Agriculture placed to kill coyotes. The dog named Casey started convulsing and then died.

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Idaho becoming anti-vaccination hot spot

Michelle Edmonds Jun 20, 2018 KIVI TV

Boise, Idaho – Idaho is being labeled as an anti-vaccination hot spot. That’s according to PLOS Medicine, a peer-reviewed journal.

A study, published in the journal, shows eight Idaho counties rank in the nation’s top 10 for kindergartners opting out of vaccinations.

State law allows parents to not have their children vaccinated for medical, religious or philosophical reasons. The number-one opt-out county in the nation is Camas County where 26.7 percent of students coming into school are not immunized.

Valley and Boise counties also checked in, ranking third and seventh nationally. In Idaho, schools have no say over the issue of vaccinations until there is an outbreak.

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Mining News:

Ask Midas: Is Midas Gold Really Different Than Other Mining Companies?

June 13

Midas Gold Idaho wants to keep the community informed about the work we are doing at the Stibnite Gold Project site. The Ask Midas blog series gives the experts in our company a chance to answer some of the community’s most frequently asked questions and help clear up any misconceptions around the project.

Mining has a long history in Idaho. The Stibnite Mining District alone has seen more than 100 years of activity. When many people think of the Stibnite Gold Project, they try to draw connections to historic operations such as Butte, Montana, the Silver Valley area of the northern Idaho Panhandle and Grouse Creek in south central Idaho, specifically in the Yankee Fork drainage basin. But the Stibnite Gold Project will be very different.

Is the Stibnite Gold Project Going to Be Like Other Mining Projects We’ve Seen Come Before It?

The simplest answer is no. There are multiple reasons, but the primary one relates to changes in perceptions around protecting the environment and the resulting strengthening of regulations for modern mining operations.

Prior to 1970, there were no significant state or federal regulations for environmental protection and reclamation at metallic mines. Pre-modern era mines were designed, built and operated to maximize production and minimize cost. Government and industrial managers did not see environmental pollution as a problem at this time or they simply did not have regulatory authority to do anything about it. For example, many tailings facilities from the pre-regulatory mining era were often designed to release the tailings directly into rivers and streams. Historically, Stibnite was no exception – tailings from former operations at our site were directly deposited in drainages from the early 1920s until 1952.

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Fire Season:

One Less Spark


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Fire in central Oregon doubles in size

The smaller fire burning near Culver triggered the mandatory evacuation of about 100 homes.

Associated Press, KGW Staff June 23, 2018

Maupin, Ore. (AP) – Wildfire season in Oregon is underway after a lightning storm sparked at least two major fires that are now burning in the central part of the state.

The smaller of the two fires, called the Graham Fire, burning near Culver, has triggered the evacuation of about 100 homes.

The fire has burned two homes and five other structures, but many were saved by firefighters, the Oregon State Fire Marshal said on Saturday.

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Public Lands:

BCYPSR Collaborative Meeting Agenda June 28th

6/22/2018

The Big Creek Yellow Pine Salmon River Collaborative will meet next week, Thursday June 28th, from 10:00 am to 3:00 pm at the E.O.C in Cascade.

Attached to the email is an agenda which includes links from the google drive to documents for the meeting.

Josie Greenwood
STEAM and Environmental Educator
UI Valley County Extension Office
501 Kelly’s Parkway Cascade, ID 83611
208-382-7190 | cell 509-939-6562

link: 6-28-18 Agenda.pdf
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Cove Recreation Site upgrades potable water supply

Date: June 20, 2018
Contact: Dave Walsh, 208-384-3393

Grand View, Idaho – The Bureau of Land Management announced today that water system improvements to the Cove Recreation Site campground are expected to begin July 9. The campground, located on the south shore of C.J. Strike Reservoir and southeast of Grand View, Idaho, will be upgraded with new freshwater supply lines throughout the recreation site.

The construction work is expected to continue past Labor Day weekend.

During construction, BLM campground managers will make every effort to keep campsites accessible to visitors and minimize construction impacts wherever they can.

“We anticipate that most of the Cove’s campsites will be available this season. But we recommend that visitors contact the BLM office at (208) 384-3300 for updated information,” said Amanda Hoffman, Morley Nelson Snake River Birds of Prey National Conservation Area manager.

The Cove Recreation Site campground has 38 campsites.
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Craters national park push stalls

June 20, 2018 By Nathan Brown – Post Register

A push to get Craters of the Moon National Monument and Preserve designated as a national park is on hold, and the idea’s backers aren’t optimistic that it will go anywhere anytime soon given the political situation.

“We kind of had to take a step back for a while,” said Rose Bernal, a Butte County Commissioner who has been helping lead the push for the designation for the past few years.

One reason, she said, is because this is an election year, always a more difficult time to get anything passed. Another, she said, is the political climate in Washington D.C. The Trump administration has been looking to reduce the size and scope of national monuments. While the U.S. Department of the Interior didn’t recommend any changes to Craters after a review late last year, Bernal said now might not be the right time to try to create a new national park.

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USFS Releases Supplemental Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement

June 22, 2018

Ogden, Utah – The Forest Service published a Supplemental Notice of Intent (NOI) in the Federal Register this week to create a Draft Environmental Impact Statement, beginning a 30 day comment period. The Forest Service is proposing to amend the Forest Service land management plans that were amended in 2015 regarding greater sage-grouse conservation in the states of Colorado, Idaho, Nevada, Wyoming, and Utah. The NOI lists several categories of potential changes, but specific proposed adjustments to the text in the plans can be found for each state at: https://www.fs.usda.gov/detail/r4/home/?cid=stelprd3843381. Commenters are encouraged to comment on the textual edits that are being considered.

The purpose of proposed changes are to improve the clarity, efficiency, and implementation of greater sage-grouse plans, including better alignment with Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and state plans, in order to benefit greater sage-grouse conservation on the landscape scale. The agency will use lessons learned from new science, scoping and implementing during the last three years to make revised plans more efficient. Proposed actions are intended to improve sage-grouse conservation and although some management areas, such as Sagebrush Focal Areas may change in name designation, limits to development and other protections will remain.

After reviewing comments to the June 20 NOI, the Forest Service plans to continue the planning process with multi-regional draft and final Environmental Impact Statements, and have plan amendments finalized in the spring of 2019.

To read and comment on the Supplemental NOI, visit:

Click to access 2018-13260.pdf

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Pollinator Week June 18-24, 2018

USFS Regional Intermountain Newsletter Special Issue June 20, 2018

Happy Pollinator Week!

The Forest Service is eager to educate the public about the importance of pollinators and pollinated plants. Worldwide, more than 1,000 plant grown food, beverages, fibers, spices and medicines need to be pollinated by animals and insects. A misconception about pollinators is that they are only bees. They are a large contributor but other pollinators include ants, bats, beetles, birds, butterflies, flies, moths, wasps, and other small animals. Pollinators are also responsible for assisting 80 percent of the world’s flowering plants. Without them, humans and wildlife would not have much to eat, beautiful scenery to look at, or important materials to use.

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Critter News:

Pet Talk – Urinary incontinence in dogs

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt June 22, 2018 IME

Urinary incontinence is the involuntary release of urine from the bladder. Incontinence is not the same as urinary accidents. Accidents are when the dog is aware it is urinating, squats to urinate, but may be unable to wait for an appropriate time or place to urinate. Incontinence arises when the bladder sphincter muscle becomes weak, or lax, allowing urine to leak from the bladder. The sphincter muscle is the muscle that keeps the bladder closed. Urinary incontinence is very uncommon in cats.

The main cause of urinary incontinence in dogs is the lack of estrogen. Estrogen is produced by the ovaries. When your veterinarian performs an ovarian hysterectomy or “spay,” the ovaries are removed. If they aren’t, the dog continues to go into “heat” every six months, which is undesirable. The ovaries are the primary source of estrogen in dogs. Incontinence that occurs in spayed dogs is called estrogen-deficient incontinence or spay incontinence. In this condition, the bladder sphincter muscle is weak due to the lack of estrogen.

Urine may dribble constantly, but usually only when the dog is relaxed while sleeping or laying down. With estrogen-deficiency incontinence, other signs of bladder disease, like straining to urinate, are absent. If other signs of bladder disease, such as urgency or bloody urine, a secondary cause of incontinence is more likely.

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Dog refuses to leave owner’s body, survives a week in N. Idaho wilderness

When crews came across Anderson’s body, they also found his dog Kiera by his side. The 10-year-old Jack Russell terrier had survived in the wilderness for a week.

Taylor Viydo June 21, 2018 KTVB

Coeur D’ Alene, Idaho– A North Idaho family mourning the loss of a family member is taking some comfort knowing that the man’s beloved dog never left his side during his death.

Over the weekend, the Kootenai County Sheriff’s Office reported that search and rescue crews had located the body of Lyle Anderson, 86, in the Coeur d’Alene National Forest. Anderson, who had been reported missing on June 10th, was found over a mile away from his car in the Hayden Creek area. Family members said it was common for Anderson, who lived in Hayden, to take drives through the forest.

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Reports of coyote scuffling with dogs, following hikers in Boise Foothills

by KBOI News Staff Wednesday, June 20th 2018

Boise, Idaho (KBOI) — A protective mamma coyote isn’t messing around in the Boise Foothills.

Ridge to Rivers said Wednesday that it’s received two reports of a coyote following hikers and tussling with dogs along Crestline Trail in the Boise Foothills trail system.

“Idaho Fish and Game suspects that there is likely a den nearby and that the response from the coyote is a result of that,” Ridge to Rivers said on social media.

Officials are encouraging to keep dogs on a leash in the area or avoid Crestline.

source:
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KWVR Oregon Wolf Education weekly Wolf Report

Mid-June 2018
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Oregon allows rancher to kill a wolf after calves attacked

6/21/18 AP

Enterprise, Ore. — Oregon wildlife managers have issued a permit that allows a rancher in Eastern Oregon to kill a wolf after three of his calves were injured by the predators last week.

The Department of Fish and Wildlife said Thursday they confirmed that the calves were hurt by wolves over three days in Wallowa County.

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8 pups being fostered by surrogate wild wolf parents

6/21/18 AP

Albuquerque, N.M. — Eight Mexican gray wolf pups are being raised by surrogate parents in the wild as federal biologists look to improve the genetic diversity of the wild population in Arizona and New Mexico.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service says four pups were placed into wild dens in late April — two in Arizona and two in New Mexico. Four more pups were placed with a New Mexico pack in May.

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Deputy frees trapped bear from car

Jun 21, 2018 LAKANA

A California police officer freed a trapped bear from a woman’s Subaru by breaking the car’s window.

Deputy Dave Lade responded after police received the call about a bear in a car in Lake Tahoe. Lade carefully broke out one of the car’s windows and ran as the bear escaped. The car’s interior was damaged, but officials say there were no injuries.

Police say bears have learned how to open car doors in search of food, but they aren’t as good at getting themselves out.

source:

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Wisconsin game warden helps cub escape basement with ladder

6/20/18 AP

Eagle River, Wis. — A Wisconsin game warden was smarter than the average bear.

Department of Natural Resources warden Dave Walz was called to an Eagle River home in northern Wisconsin early Wednesday to help rescue a bear cub trapped in a newly built open basement.

Walz and the homeowner decided to use a ladder to rescue the crying cub. Video shot by Walz shows the animal climbing the ladder to freedom with some off-camera coaching.

The cub’s mother was watching from a distance. After scaling the ladder, the cub ran off.

source:

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Poaching contributing to bird population decline in Idaho

by Associated Press Wednesday, June 20th 2018

Boise, Idaho (AP) — The long-billed curlew bird population is declining in southwestern Idaho because of poachers, researchers said.

One of the birds was poached in the Morley Nelson Snake River Birds of Prey National Conservation Area southwest of Boise on June 1, Boise State University researchers said.

Of the 16 birds fitted with transmitters, it’s the seventh that has been killed by suspected poachers since 2013, the Idaho Statesman reported.

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Forest Service proposes changes to sage grouse protections

by Keith Ridler, Associated Press Wednesday, June 20th 2018

Boise, Idaho (AP) — The U.S. Forest Service proposed changes Wednesday to sage grouse protections in six Western states that call for eliminating special designations for crucial habitat as well as keeping areas open for mining.

The agency also said restrictions on water development for livestock will be removed as will other requirements that could limit some livestock grazing.

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With warmer weather, rattlesnakes emerge

Dog in southern valley dies from snakebite

Tony Evans Jun 20, 2018 IME

Numerous sightings of rattlesnakes have been reported in the southern Wood River Valley this spring. One dog was recently killed by a rattlesnake bite, prompting pet owners to take warning in certain areas.

“There have been tons of sightings but only one actual bite reported here,” said Kimberly Berry, a veterinary technician at the Sawtooth Animal Center in Bellevue.

Berry said “a very large dog” was brought to the clinic with a mysterious illness that was later shown to be the result of a rattlesnake bite. It later died.

“We have been doing a lot of snake-venom vaccines the last month or so,” said Berry, who, along with other veterinarians in the valley, offers a $19 injection to protect against snakebites.

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Fish & Game News:

Chinook seasons for South Fork Salmon, Upper Salmon and Lochsa rivers open June 23

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Specialist
Friday, June 15, 2018 – 2:10 PM MDT

Fishing will be open seven days per week, but harvest share could be caught fast

Chinook fishing seasons on the South Fork of the Salmon, Upper Salmon and Lochsa rivers to open June 23 and rules include:

* Fishing open seven days per week.
* Bag limits for South Fork of Salmon and Upper Salmon, four per day, of which only two may be adults, and 12 in possession of which six may be adults.

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F&G to begin gill netting in Payette Lake for lake trout

The Star-News June 21, 2018

Idaho Department of Fish and Game biologists will begin some test gill netting in Payette Lake in the next few weeks.

Biologists will be targeting lake trout to test different sizes of gillnets in their effectiveness. The department is considering using gillnets to capture and remove lake trout from the lake, F&G Regional Fishery Manager Dale Allen said.

F&G is considering removal of lake trout in response to high angler interest in restoring a kokanee fishery. Lake trout are a major predator of kokanee.

The lake trout also have out-paced their available food supply and are in poor body condition, Allen said.

Biologists will document catch rates using the gillnets and look at all areas of the lake to see if a removal project is feasible, Allen said.

The only visible change will be orange plastic buoys showing up around the lake, he said.

“The nets are well out of the way of boating activities because they are sitting on the bottom of the lake,” he said. Call 208-634-8137 for questions.

source:
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F&G News Releases

https://idfg.idaho.gov/press
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Funny Critter Stuff:

Woodchucks to blame for missing veterans’ flags

June 19, 2018 AP

Adams, Mass. (AP) — Authorities say furry critters, not vandals, are likely to blame for American flags that disappeared from veterans’ graves in Massachusetts.

The flags at Bellevue Cemetery, in Adams, were first reported missing earlier this month. Residents volunteered to replace the flags by hand, but then those went missing, too.

Police were called to investigate, and Chief Richard Tarsa told The Boston Globe on Monday that officers found evidence that a woodchuck is likely using the flags in its burrow.

Tarsa says a similar incident happened in New York in 2012, where police linked a woodchuck to about 75 flags that disappeared from Cedar Park Cemetery.

source:
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Zsa Zsa, the English bulldog, wins World’s Ugliest Dog title

by The Associated Press Sunday, June 24th 2018


(AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)

Petaluma, Calif. (AP) — A 9-year-old English bulldog was named the winner of the 2018 World’s Ugliest Dog contest in the San Francisco Bay Area.

Zsa Zsa won the title Saturday night at the Sonoma-Marin Sonoma-Marin Fairgrounds in Petaluma.

The dog’s owner Megan Brainard of Anoka, Minnesota, will receive $1,500 for Zsa Zsa’s win. Brainard found Zsa Zsa on a pet-finding site, according to the contest bio.

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Seasonal Humor:

VetClinicSurvey-a
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Tips & Advice:

How to build a butterfly and pollinator garden in seven steps

Monarch butterflies and pollinators are in trouble. You can help by planting a pollinator garden! You can plant a garden anywhere – your yard, school, church, business or even in a pot for your front steps.

A simple, native flower garden will attract beautiful butterflies to your yard and help pollinators stay healthy. In addition to nectar from flowers, monarch butterflies need milkweed to survive, so if you notice the leaves on your milkweed have been chomped, don’t worry, it’s a great sign!

Gather your supplies and research what varieties of milkweed and wildflowers are native to your area. You can also look up pollinator-friendly plant lists for your region. If you’re starting from seeds, find a local seed supplier.

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Idaho History June 24, 2018

Secesh (Part 1)

Secesh Meadows Pioneer Cemetery

SeceshPioneerCemetery-a
(click image for original)
Photo added by Kelly Walters
Source: Find a Grave
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Murders, Poisonings and Executions in Idaho County

from Area Newspaper Articles compiled by Penny Bennett Casey

Four Victims of Poisoning

Idaho County Free Press July 14, 1904

Four victims are dead and a fifth is suffering acutely as the supposed result of eating food impregnated with poison.

The fatalities occurred at Larson’s camp on Ruby Creek, near Resort, formerly Miller’s camp. Andrew Larson, L.C. Driggs, and his son, Chas.. Driggs, Mr. Mason and Mr. Syshsers were at work on Larson’s mine. Mr. Syshers was taken ill about three weeks ago, appearing to be suffering from a peculiar malady, aid was secured but the patient continued to grow worse and died in great agony.

Meanwhile Andrew Larson was stricken. His symptoms were similar to Syhsers’ and everything possible was done to relieve his without avail. His death occured June 20.

While Andrew Larson was battling with death the mysterious ailment fastened upon the elder Driggs, who was prostrated in precisely the same manner as Syhsers and Larson. He lingered a few days and followed his companions to the grave. During the period when L.C. Driggs lay on his death bed, his son, Charles betrayed symptoms of the fatal malady. Young Driggs expired with 48 hours of his father’s death.

When Mason was taken ill his friends were greatly alarmed, fearing he too, would succumb to the inexplicable visitation. He was taken to Hot Springs where he rallied and is now greatly improved though still suffering.

Dr. Blake, a physician who is interested in mining properties in the district, examining the food which the victims had partaken and expressed the belief that it contained poison obtained from a South American plant. How it came to be in the food is a mystery.

The stomach of the elder Driggs was removed and sent to Boise for chemical analysis, together with a quantity of food taken from the camp supply. It was found that the necessary tests could not be made in Boise. Neither can they be made in Moscow, and it is now intended that a chemist in Portland, or some other city shall make the analysis.

Mystery Cleared Up

Idaho County Free Press August 18, 1904

The mystery of the poisoning of the miners in Ruby meadows, near Resort, has been cleared up by the chemical analysis of the stomach contents of L.C. Driggs, one of the victims. The result showed traces of copper, tin and zinc with an abundance of ptomaine alkaloids; death is attributed to the ptomaine poisoning. Scientists differ on the origin of the poison and various causes are advanced for its presence in canned meats and vegetables.

Great interest was aroused in the camp by the appearance of a clairvoyant, a Mrs.. J. C. Stafford, who was a friend of A.L. Larson, the first victim of the mysterious poisoning. Mrs.. Stafford prevailed upon the miners to exhume the remains of her friend and in a trance she claimed to have conversed with his soul.

Copyright Notice: All materials contained on these pages are furnished for the free use of those engaged in researching their family origins. Any commercial use or distribution, without the consent of the host/author of these pages is prohibited. All images used on these pages were obtained from sources permitting free distribution, or generated by the author, and are subject to the same restrictions/permissions. All persons contributing material for posting on these pages do so in recognition of their free, non-commercial distribution, and further, is responsible to assure that no copyright is violated by their submission.
source: Idaho County GenWeb, compiled by Penny Bennett Casey
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Ptomaine

ptomaine-a
(click image for original)
source: Rumsford Book on Household Management, Hannah Wing
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Miller’s Camp [Secesh] (Gold)

Secesh River placers were noticed not long after the discovery of nearby Warren’s, and Miller’s Camp seems to have been active from 1863 on, with about fifty people there. Activity at Ruby Meadows [the site of Miller’s Camp]. Burgdorf, the Golden Rule, and Secesh Meadows continued through the depression, and a $500,000 production may have resulted.

source: Pg 14 Mining in Idaho Number 9 1985
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Secesh Area Geology

MapEastPNFplacer-a

Maps of placer workings and placer sample locations in the Warren and Secesh areas were presented by Buehler and others (1993). They concluded that the largest placer deposits in those areas have been mined, but that smaller occurrences remain that may be suitable for small yardage operators and recreational placer miners.

Marshall Lake and Resort districts:

Many gold-bearing glacio-fluvial, alluvial, and bench placers are present along streams that drain the Marshall Lake and Resort mining districts (Lorain and Metzger, 1938; Savage, 1961). Examples are present along California Creek, which drains north to the Salmon River, and along Lake Creek and its tributaries, Ruby Creek, Secesh Creek, Grouse Creek, and the Secesh River valley, which drain southeast to the South Fork of the Salmon River, which drains northward to the Salmon River.

Capps (1941) interpreted the Lake Creek, Grouse Creek, Secesh Creek, and Secesh River valleys as fault-controlled valleys, bounded by post-Miocene normal faults. The Burgdorf hot springs rise along one of the normal faults that bounds the Lake Creek valley. The valleys of Grouse Creek and Secesh Creek follow north-northwest striking faults that are up to the west, down to the east. The Secesh Meadows placers are localized in a halfgraben, which contains Tertiary sediments that dip about 25 [degrees] southwest. The Tertiary sediments and are bounded on the southwest by a northwest-striking normal fault, with granitic rocks in its up-thrown southwest block. That fault parallels the Lake Creek – Secesh River fault, which Capps (1941) interpreted as a normal fault, with its southwest block up-thrown relative to its northeast block.

Capps (1941) described placers in the following environments in the Secesh Basin:

(1) fluvial gravel in the fault-controlled valleys,
(2) Early Pleistocene glacial moraine (with highly weathered boulders),
(3) Early Pleistocene glacial outwash (with highly weathered boulders),
(4) Interglacial outwash (with moderately weathered boulders),
(5) Late Pleistocene moraine,
(6) present stream gravel.

(from page 145)

Placer mining has disturbed and redistributed alluvium in riparian zones of many drainages of the Warren – Secesh area. For example, the narrow bottom of Steamboat Creek is lined with piles of cobbles and loose sediment, and Warren Meadows is a field of dredge-waste cobble piles, interspersed with semi-disconnected streams and ponds.

(from page 147)

excerpted from: Potential Mineral Resources, Payette National Forest, Idaho: Description and Probabilistic Estimation, Open-File Report 98-219a 1998
By Arthur A. Bookstrom, Bruce R. Johnson, Theresa M. Cookro, Karen Lund, Kenneth C. Watts, Harley D. King, Merlin D. Kleinkopf, James A. Pitkin, J. David Sanchez, and J. Douglas Causey, Prepared in cooperation with the U.S. Forest Service
— — — — — — — — — —

“Secesh”

164. Politics.

The same half-decade which marked the beginnings of the gold-mining period in Idaho also embraced the tragic years of civil war for the nation. Although in February, 1864, Idaho’s first Territorial Legislature adopted strong anti-slavery resolutions, yet Southern sympathizers were in evidence in all the camps. Secession sentiment was especially strong in the Boise Basin on account of the inrush of pro-slavery immigrants from Missouri and other border States during the closing years of the war. The violent political prejudices that prevailed are reflected in the newspaper writings of those days. Republicans or Union Democrats often branded the followers of Jefferson Davis as “Secesh men” and “domestic traitors.” The proslavery men, not to be outdone, sometimes called the supporters of the federal government “Abe Lincoln Hirelings” or “Black Abolitionists.” The Missouri immigrants were occasionally described as “The Left Wing of Price’s Army.” One of these early partisan accounts refers to those immigrants as “the flankers of broken armies” and “an intolerable horde.”

There were, of course, some personal collisions and deeds of violence, but most of the miners were law-abiding and industrious. These roughly dressed men took an exceptionally keen and intelligent interest in public affairs and, in order to keep themselves well informed, paid exorbitant prices for newspapers. Many a learned mining-camp discussion belied its rude environment; and many a public address delivered in those mountain gulches would have done honor to any deliberative assembly.

source: “History of the State of Idaho” By C. J. Brosnan 1918 (18 meg)
——————————–

updated July 28, 2020

Road Report June 24

Yellow Pine: Rain showers late in the week keeping the dust down. County grader worked on main street last Wednesday. Click for Local Forecast.
Yellow Pine Webcam:

Johnson Creek Stream Gauge:
https://waterdata.usgs.gov/id/nwis/uv?13313000

Warm Lake Highway: Chip sealing on Warm Lake Highway, expect a slow drive with about 10-15 minute delay.

South Fork Road: (June 22) Road is in good shape and very scenic. Lots of traffic, kayakers and people fishing.
Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
South Fork Stream Gauge:
https://waterdata.usgs.gov/id/nwis/uv?13310700

EFSF Road: a report from June 22 that a large tree was blocking the road late afternoon, but had been pulled to the side by that evening. Road is in pretty good shape.

Johnson Creek Road: Open. (June 22) Report that the road has been graded all the way from Yellow Pine to Landmark and in good shape.
The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet
Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam:
http://www.ruralnetwork.net/~yellowpinecm/

Lick Creek: Probably Open. Last update (June 11) Had reports that folks are able to make it in over Lick Creek summit. This doesn’t mean the road is “good” tho.
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Last report (June 16) One skinny track is open over the summit, narrow vehicles only. No trucks or trailers. Probably better by now.
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.
Big Creek Webcam:

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open. Old report Friday (May 11) that it’s rough in some places, some wash boards starting, and still fairly smooth in other places.

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Open. (June 23) “Road is in good shape. Both sides of Monumental Summit are snow-free. There is an abandoned vehicle halfway down the back side of Monumental Summit. It is partially blocking the road and would be difficult to get around pulling a trailer.” – SA
link to FB photo:

Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Closed.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.
(May 21) Warren Wagon Road is open to Secesh and Warren.
(May 23) Secesh Summit (McCall to Warren). Valley County plowed the road open this week.
(May 23) Warren Summit (Warren to the South Fork of the Salmon River) is open with caution as Valley County has not surveyed the roadway for damage yet – travelers may run into road issues.

Deadwood Summit: Open. Report from Deadwood Outfitters (June 5) “Deadwood Summit is open and in good shape.”
Note: The approx elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
——————————-

Weather Reports June 17-23

Johnson Creek Stream Gauge

20180624JohnsonCrkGauge-a

June 17 Weather:

At 9am it was 46 degrees, low overcast and light rainfall. Light rain all morning. At 1233pm raining bigger drops. Not raining at 1pm. Raining again at 110pm. At 2pm it was 50 degrees, low clouds and light rain still falling. Not raining at 320pm. Sprinkles on and off late afternoon. Sprinkling at 630pm. Breezy and light rain at 8pm. At 830pm it was 53 degrees, light rain and gusty breezes. At 10pm it was 51 degrees, breezy and occasional splatters of rain. Probably done raining after midnight.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time June 18, 2018 at 09:00AM
Overcast
Max temperature 55 degrees F
Min temperature 43 degrees F
At observation 49 degrees F
Precipitation 0.24 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

June 18 Weather:

At 9am it was 49 degrees and overcast. Thinner clouds and filtered sun mid-day. At 4pm it was 67 degrees and cloudy. Getting rather breezy after 4pm. Looks like it rained some time between 415pm and 615pm (tables are wet.) Light rain falling at 752pm. At 9pm it was 53 degrees, overcast and still raining lightly, almost calm. Occasional drops just before 10pm, cloudy. Looks like it may have rained around midnight and again around 4am.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time June 19, 2018 at 09:00AM
Low foggy overcast
Max temperature 67 degrees F
Min temperature 49 degrees F
At observation 52 degrees F
Precipitation 0.10 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

June 19 Weather:

At 9am it was 52 degrees, low foggy overcast sitting down on the mountains. At 2pm it was 63 degrees and overcast. Started raining at 213pm, lasted about half an hour. At 830pm it was 60 degrees and cloudy. At 10pm broken clouds.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time June 20, 2018 at 09:00AM
Mostly clear
Max temperature 68 degrees F
Min temperature 50 degrees F
At observation 58 degrees F
Precipitation 0.06 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

June 20 Weather:

At 9am it was 58 degrees and mostly clear. By 1020am dark clouds building to the south, partly clear. Overcast at lunch time, feels humid. At 945pm it was 58 degrees and mostly cloudy. Started raining at 7am, thunder rumbling. At 822am the loudest clap of thunder ever! Not raining at 855am and patch of blue sky.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time June 21, 2018 at 09:00AM
Mostly cloudy, low fog on the hills
Max temperature 75 degrees F
Min temperature 49 degrees F
At observation 51 degrees F
Precipitation 0.24 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

June 21 Weather:

At 9am it was 51 degrees and mostly cloudy, low fog on the hillsides. Partly clear at lunch time. Distant thunder just before 2pm. At 245pm it was 66 degrees, mostly cloudy and quite windy. Splatters of rain at 308pm, quit raining at 312pm and a rumble of thunder. Raining at 334pm and breezy, probably done before 5pm. Dark clouds and raining at 654pm. Stopped raining before 735pm. At 825pm it was 58 degrees, cracks in the overcast. Mostly cloudy at 10pm.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time June 22, 2018 at 09:00AM
Almost clear
Max temperature 74 degrees F
Min temperature 47 degrees F
At observation 57 degrees F
Precipitation 0.08 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

June 22 Weather:

At 9am it was 57 degrees and almost clear. Clouds building up before noon. At 130pm it was 77 degrees, mostly cloudy and humid. A few drops of rain fell at 236pm. Windy at 530pm, rain shower at 550pm, calm and not raining at 6pm, dark clouds. At 845pm it was 62 degrees and partly clear.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time June 23, 2018 at 09:00AM
Mostly cloudy
Max temperature 78 degrees F
Min temperature 42 degrees F
At observation 53 degrees F
Precipitation Trace
— — — — — — — — — — — —

June 23 Weather:

At 9am it was 53 degrees and mostly cloudy. At 145pm it was 66 degrees and mostly cloudy to partly clear. At 855pm it was 61 degrees and partly cloudy. At 10pm it was 59 degrees.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time June 24, 2018 at 09:00AM
Partly clear
Max temperature 72 degrees F
Min temperature 43 degrees F
At observation 54 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
————————————-

Road Report June 20

Johnson Creek Stream Gauge

20180620JohnsonCrkGauge-a

Yellow Pine: We have had rain showers for the past 3 days, local streets are damp. County road grader worked on main street for quite a while this morning, especially the hill in front of the Veterans Monument. Click for Local Forecast.
Yellow Pine Webcam:

Johnson Creek Stream Gauge:
https://waterdata.usgs.gov/id/nwis/uv?13313000

Warm Lake Highway: Chip sealing on Warm Lake Highway, expect a slow drive with about 10-15 minute delay.

South Fork Road: (June 20) Road is in good shape and very scenic.
Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
South Fork Stream Gauge:
https://waterdata.usgs.gov/id/nwis/uv?13310700

EFSF Road: (June 20) still in good shape.

Johnson Creek Road: Open. (June 20) Mail truck driver (Dean) reports the county crew had graded the upper end as far as Wapiti Meadow Ranch. The County Crew was grading the main road in Yellow Pine this morning, and will work their way south. Between Yellow Pine and Wapiti Meadow the road is really rough, watch for very deep pot holes near the Ice Hole area, lots of pot holes between the dump and the village too.
The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet
Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam:
http://www.ruralnetwork.net/~yellowpinecm/

Lick Creek: Probably Open. Last update (June 11) Had reports that folks are able to make it in over Lick Creek summit. This doesn’t mean the road is “good” tho.
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Last report (June 16) One skinny track is open over the summit, narrow vehicles only. No trucks or trailers. Cool weather and rain the last 3 days.
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.
Big Creek Webcam:

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open. Old report Friday (May 11) that it’s rough in some places, some wash boards starting, and still fairly smooth in other places.

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Closed. Old report (May 29) Not advised to go beyond Stibnite, snow line is below the Fern Cabin. (Probably higher by now.)
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Closed.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.
(May 21) Warren Wagon Road is open to Secesh and Warren.
(May 23) Secesh Summit (McCall to Warren). Valley County plowed the road open this week.
(May 23) Warren Summit (Warren to the South Fork of the Salmon River) is open with caution as Valley County has not surveyed the roadway for damage yet – travelers may run into road issues.

Deadwood Summit: Open. Report from Deadwood Outfitters (June 5) “Deadwood Summit is open and in good shape.”
Note: The approx elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
——————————-

June 17, 2018 The Yellow Pine Times

June 17, 2018 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Community Calendar:

May 10 Burn Permits required
May 15 Firewood Season Starts – permits at The Corner
June 20 Yellow Pine Vet Clinic call 208-382-4590 for appointment
June 22 4pm Festival meeting Community Hall
June 23 Highland Games, Ice Cream Sundaes 2pm-4pm
June 25 Dust Abatement Deadline
June 29-30 Live Music at The Corner
June 30 Golf Tournament
July 4 Parade 2pm
July 4 (after Parade) Ice Cream Sundaes
July 4 Fireworks at dusk
July 4 Live Music at The Corner
July 6-7 Live Music at The Corner
July 7 Community Hall Yard Sale 9am to Noon
July 14 at 2pm, Community Hall, Village of Yellow Pine Association meeting
July 19 Noxious Weed Day
July 21 10am CPR Class at the Fire Station
July 26 Festival planning meeting
August 3, 4, 5 Music and Harmonica Festival
August 11 at 2pm Community Hall, Village of Yellow Pine Association meeting
September 8 at 10am Community Hall YP Fire Budget Hearing
September 8 at 2pm Community Hall, Village of Yellow Pine Association meeting

(details below)
———-

Village News:

Dust Abatement Sign-up Deadline now June 25

It’s time to think dust abatement again.

Checks for dust abatement are due by June 25th. Please make them payable to North American Dust Control.

This year’s Dust Abatement cost is $.0702/sq. ft + tax. Contact me if you want dust abatement. I will need your payment by Saturday, June 25th. Deb Filler, fillerd2 @ live.com, 208-633-6945
— — — —

Looking for White Folding Tables

The Community Hall is missing some white folding tables. Please check your area and return the tables to the Community Hall.

Thank You – Kathleen Hall
— — — —

Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Thursday, June 7th, a report the dumpsters had been emptied and the Transfer Station was clean. The road was rough between Yellow Pine and the dump.

Please do not dump household appliances at our transfer station, it is for household trash only and must be placed in the dumpsters.

However, there is a burn pile for woody debris only. “Bring it, Don’t Burn it.”
— — — —

Pests

Reports that ticks are still active, mosquitoes and no-see-ums are out. Pine pollen is not quite as bad. Lots of ground squirrels this year. Remember to secure your trash, bears are hungry.
———-

Local Events:

Yellow Pine Vet Clinic June 20

Dr. Keith Ruble from Cascade Vet Clinic will be in Yellow Pine on Wednesday June 20th. You must sign up via the clinic by calling (208) 382-4590 (M-W-F) so they can bring charts and meds.

All dogs must be on leashes, thank you.
— — — —

June 23 Highland Games & Ice Cream Sundaes

Located behind the Yellow Pine Tavern, burly men in kilts that like to throw heavy stuff. Games to benefit the Yellow Pine LifeFlight Helipad

Ice Cream Sundaes will be for sale on Saturday near the Highland Games from 2pm to 4pm. $3 for one scoops; $4 for two scoops; your choice of toppings. Proceeds support the Community Hall.

FB link to Flyer:

— — — —

4th of July Golf Tournament June 30th

Our 20th annual Yellow Pine Golf Tournament will take place on June 30th 2018. The proceeds will go towards the Yellow Pine Medical Training and Supply Fund. By giving to this annual event, you’ll be supporting the village of Yellow Pine and our growing EMS service.

Thanks to Cascade Fire/EMS Fire Commissioners, Chief Steve Hull and the EMS Director Keri Donica, Yellow Pine is now a Cascade Fire/EMS Paramedic Ambulance Sub-station. This allows us to have equipment available in Yellow Pine to treat and care for patients in the field, not only First Aid but Advanced Life Support. Yellow Pine now has Nationally Registered: 4 EMR’s, 1 RN-EMT, and 1 Paramedic in Yellow Pine.

The cost for the event is $20/person or $50 will give you a sponsorship and pay for 2 players!

As a sponsor, your name will be put on a plaque, or you can provide your own sign for the event. This plaque will be posted on one of our 18 holes during the tournament.

To reserve a place in the tournament please contact Jeff or Ann Forster @ aforsterrn@aol.com or call (208) 633-1010.

You can mail your payments to: P.O. Box 38 Yellow Pine, ID. 83677.

Please make checks payable to “Cascade Fire EMS” attn: YP Golf Tournament.

Thanks in advance for your consideration.

Sincerely,
Jeff Forster – Paramedic & Ann Forster – BS, RN, EMT
Event Coordinators
— — — —

Weekend of June 30th

Live Music at The Corner – Folk Family Revival
— — — —

4th of July

Parade at 2pm

Independence Day Parade will be Wednesday, July 4th at 2pm.

If you want to be in the parade, meet near the Fire House at 1:30pm. All family-friendly entries are welcome.

If you need decorations for your pet, bike, ATV, trailer, car, whatever, they will be available near the Fire House at noon.

After the parade: Ice Cream Sundaes will be for sale. $3 for one scoop; $4 for two scoop; your choice of toppings. Proceeds support the Community Hall.

Fireworks at Dusk

Live Music at The Corner – Folk Family Revival
— — — —

Yard Sale – Saturday, July 7 9am-Noon

The garage sale is July 7th from 9-noon. Everyone can bring their items anytime to the community hall. I will have a space marked for the items.

Please remember this is a Donation and Everything Must Work.

If you want your items back if they don’t sell you must pick them up at 12:30 on July 7th.

The proceeds of the Garage Sale will go to the maintenance of the Community Hall.

If you have questions please call Kathy Hall at 208 633 6270 or text to 630 915 1544

Thank you everyone for your support of the Yellow Pine Community Hall
— — — —

Weekend July 7th

Live Music at The Corner – Willie and the Singlewides
— — — —

July 19 (free) Noxious Weed Day

Steve has scheduled his visit to Yellow Pine for Thursday July 19th. The staging area will be the Fire Department. He will bring up the Chemicals and spray equipment. Backpack sprayers, pump up sprayers, ATV tanks and he needs to know how many of these we need. He will leave everything there for the weekend and pick it all up Monday. Please call Kathy Hall 208 633-6270 for forms and information.

link to form:
Steve Anderson from Valley County Weed Control
Office: (208)382-7199
e-mail: SAnderson @ co.valley.id.us
———-

Local Groups:

VYPA News:

Summer Meeting Schedule:

July 14, 2pm, Community Hall, Village of Yellow Pine Association meeting
August 11, 2pm, Community Hall, Village of Yellow Pine Association meeting
September 8, 2pm, Community Hall, Village of Yellow Pine Association meeting
— — — —

YPFD News:

YPFD Fire Commissioner Meeting June 09, 2018 10:00

Yellow Pine Community Hall

Commissioners Present:
District 1: Cecil Dallman
District 2: Dan Stiff
District 3: Tom Richter
Fire Chief: Jeff Forster

Banking Balance:
Umpqua: $38,000
Mountain America: $18,840
Total: $56,840.49
Bills -0-
Petty Cash: $100.00

Discussion regarding closing the Mountain America Bank account and consolidating it in with the Umpqua bank account. We would have only one account. Decision to move to one bank, which will be Umpqua Bank.

Voted to do the consolidation and it was unanimously approved.
Approval of $10,000 in emergency reserve

Proposed Expenditures: 2018

– Extrication Tool – (Spreaders) (Battery Operated), $10,000
* Approved
– Struts $5,000 with Pickets and straps
* Approved
– Thermal Imager (TIC) $2,500
* Approved
– Windshield cutter and Dewalt drill $300.00
* Approved
– Sun Valley Trauma Conference for 4: $2,000
* Approved
– Portable repeater, $300.00
* Approved
– Printer – (Laser Color) Used Computer $1,500
* Approved
– Trailer $1,200
* Approved, along with approval to purchase two new tires and a Spare wheel mount with tire and cargo box for the trailer.
– Rope Rescue equipment. Various pullies and new (extra) Haul line $500.00
* Approved
– Harness $200.00
* Approved
– Bob Auth YPFD T-shirts Lic for $150.00
* Approved
Total: $23,650

Discussion Items: Priorities in order

– Helispot Cecil: Meral/Danny Saline LifeFlight/Krassel Helitack
* Cecil and Jeff gave a run down on the progress of the Helispot. We, Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Commissioners and Fire Chef, met with the Midas Gold Rep: Sam, Krassle Ranger District Flight safety Rep, Chris, Meral and Danny S. at the Helispot location to discuss layout and removal of the last few trees for helicopter for safer ingress and egress. Cecil has the lead on the construction of the Helispot. Jeff will continue to work with the Boise Natl. Forest for authorization of removal of existing trees.

– New Engine to replace Army Truck?
* We agreed to sell the Army Truck. Dan is responsible for listing the Fire Truck. We are in the process of purchasing a new engine that is better suited for our environment.

– New Bay?
* We agreed to look into the cost of building an additional bay on the North side of the current Fire Station.
* It was agreed to looking to the cost and then begin the process.

Other Discussion items:

– Grants?
* Willie S. agreed to help with Grant writing along with Jeff F.

– Use permit for Fire Station and Helispot (20 years)
* We are compliant with the Boise Natl. Forest with a 20 year Use Permit.

– Power of Attorney David K. (McCall)
* It was agreed that we continue to use our Power or Attorney to do our taxes.

– YP Repeater (PA bad) Thunderbolt Tower?
* Jeff explained what was wrong with or County Communication Tower and the proposed solution.

– Pumpkin 3,000 gallon from Larry K.
– Sam/Nate with Midas will begin Fire Orientation in the near future

– YPFD ditch and property owner burns
* If property owners ask for assistance in burning ditches on their property we will continue to provide that service if the weather and conditions exist to burn. Adjoining property owners will be notified of the burn when necessary.

– Siren Test
* We will continue to test the Emergency Siren May 1st until October 1st at 12:00 Noon on the 1st of each month and then suspend the test during the winter months.

New Business: None
Adjourn 11:20am
Dated: June 16, 2018

YPFD Training 06.17.18

Sunday’s fire training was a simulated critical trauma victim. The simulation training was to practice radio communications, patient assessment, treatment, immobilization, stabilization and transport by our Yellow Pine’s 1st responders. Randy the victim is a 160 pound manikin purchased for us by Cascade Fire/EMS.

20180617YPFDTraining-a
– JF

CPR Training Class

CPR class coming to YP July 21st 10am at the Fire Station (includes AED). If interested please notify Jeff or Ann.

Bring it, Don’t Burn it

For us in Yellow Pine, Jake Strohmeyer, Dist. Ranger with the Boise NF said we can use the area at our transfer station for yard debris and the FS will burn it once a year. Please no furniture, mattresses, construction debris, metal objects, tires or personnel junk. Please only woody yard debris. When using the pile please be mindful of where you place the debris as it should be contained to a manageable burnable area and kept as clean as possible. – JF

Burn Permits Needed After May 10

A reminder that May 10 is beginning of fire season where burning permits for open burning are required throughout most Fire Districts. Since the YPFD doesn’t issue actual “Burn Permits” per say, notification of a large pile burn would be appreciated. The notification makes the fire officials aware of those who have a planned burn. Seeing smoke can easily raise concerns. When neighbors call in seeing smoke, we can reduce their anxiety by knowing that there was a notification by a property owner. This elevates the response to smoke investigations.

Contact Fire Chief Jeff at 633-1010 or email j4star1911@ gmail.com

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Updates:

YP Fire Budget Hearing: September 8, 2018 – 10am Community Hall

Fire Department Training on Sunday’s at 11:00 all are welcome

Special Use Permit for Fire Station and Helispot:

The Boise National Forest has granted a “Special Use Permit” to the Yellow Pine Fire Protection District for the Fire Station lot and the Helispot. The Helispot is a new addition and the Fire Station lot was a renewal. This permit will expire 12/31/2037 (20 years) and will need to be rewed again at that time. Thanks to Jake Strohmeyer, District Ranger and Chris (Kit) Woras, Special Use Permit Administrator of the Boise Forest for spending a lot of time and correspondence to get this permit completed.

Helispot / Life Flight:

The Helispot needs a lot of work and a base needs to be put down before officially being used. I’m currently in discussion with some folks to help with the ground prep and to put the base down. Life Flight and other agencies will need to do an inspection as well before using the helispot.

Anyone needing a Smoke/CO detector or fire extinguisher please let Jeff, Cecil or Dan know.

Jeff F.

There are YPFD T-shirts, as well as YPFD patches and stickers for sale at the Tavern now.
— — — —

2018 Festival:

June 22 4pm Festival meeting Community Hall
The last planning meeting will be July 26

August 3, 4, 5 Music and Harmonica Festival
——–

Biz Listings:

Yellow Pine Lodge

Now open for summer (208) 633-3377
— — — —

Yellow Pine Tavern

Summer Hours: 8am to close 7 days a week.

Daily Menu: full Breakfast served also Burgers and Pizza for Afternoon and Evening. Good selection of Beer and Wine.
— — — —

The Corner 633-3325

Live music for Independence Day, both weekends. Folk Family Revival will be here the weekend before and on the actual fourth. Willie and the Singlewides will be the weekend after the fourth.

Our hours for this week: Monday-Friday 4pm-8pm, Saturday and Sunday 11am-close

We will also be cooking most of the week for private events so if anyone wants something outside of those hours just call and we can usually accommodate.

The Corner Store is open as well, just call for grocery needs, fresh produce, eggs, meat etc.
— — — —

Local Propane Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
— — — —

Diamond Fuel & Feed (208) 382-4430

We have a great price on wild bird seed. $19.99 for a 50 lb bag. 12.99 for a 25 lb bag. We also sell suet blocks (peanut crunch, and cherry) for $1.99 per block. Niger Thistle seed $13.25 for 5 lbs.
— — — —

Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
———————–

Local Observations:

Monday (June 11) rain during the night/early morning, overnight low of 37 degrees, low dark overcast w/foggy belts on the mountains and new snow above 6000′. No sign of the male tree swallows, females stuck on the nests. Robins and finches calling. The male swallows showed up late in the morning. The flicker house is emitting a lot of little “cheeping” noises. Red-naped Sapsucker drumming on the power pole. Breaks in the clouds and scattered sunshine in the afternoon, high of 61 degrees. Rufous humming birds (male and female), jays and a red-breasted nuthatch visited along with the cassins finches today. Clear sky in the evening, temperature dropping quickly at sundown.

Tuesday (June 12) overnight low of 29 degrees, ice on the water pans this morning and clear sky. Loud airplanes. Swallows mobbing for feathers early. Amerigas tech checking tanks this morning in Yellow Pine and Stibnite. Swallows, finches and robins calling. Male Rufous hummer guarding the feeder. Cowbirds joined the chickens after it warmed up a little. Really blue sky at noon. Warm and sunny day, light pleasant breezes, high of 77 degrees. Pine siskins joined the finches at the feeders in the afternoon. Swallows active (and taking feathers to the nests.) Several hummingbirds visiting during the afternoon, good to see them back. Red-breasted nuthatch likes the new suet (from Diamond) and a few cow birds hanging out with the chickens. High haze and wispy clouds before dark.

Wednesday (June 13) overnight low of 36 degrees, clear sky this morning. Increasing air traffic. Red-breasted nuthatches, finches and pine siskins visiting, jays calling and hopping around in the trees. Sunny, hot and windy mid-day, high of 83 degrees. Cowbirds and jays joined the finches at the feeders this afternoon. High hazy clouds, then mostly clear by sundown. Still a bit of light at 10pm, longer days.

Thursday (June 14) overnight low of 45 degrees, partly cloudy this morning. Lots of airplanes flying over the village. Jays, finches, cowbirds and nuthatches visiting. Swallows mugging for more feathers to carry to the nests, females setting on eggs. Some afternoon clouds, a little breezy at times and very pleasant, high of 74 degrees. Several jays stopped by this afternoon and finished off the store-bought suet cake, then jumped around on the roof making a lot of noise. Mostly cloudy after sunset, robins chirping and swallows flying low.

Friday (June 15) overnight low of 41 degrees, clear sky this morning. Several loud airplanes flew over the village. Swallows flying low and mobbing for feathers, rowdy jays and finches calling. Increasing clouds and light breezes late morning. Loud gunshot at noon. A couple more shots after 1pm. Cloudy afternoon, mild temperatures, high of 71 degrees. Late afternoon rain showers. Gentle rain before sunset – sun setting after 8pm now. Red and white-breasted nuthatches, finches and a little swarm of hummingbirds this evening. Robins cheerfully chirping after sundown.

Saturday (June 16) overnight low of 36 degrees, partly clear and slight breeze this morning. Early (loud) air traffic. Red-naped sapsucker drumming on the power pole, swallows mobbing for feathers, finches and jays calling. Really loud low airplane circling at 114pm. Calliope hummers (mostly females) at the feeders while the Rufous was absent. Watched a pine squirrel chase a golden mantel squirrel off a bird feeder while a ground squirrel was waiting below for dropped seeds. Shots fired around 550pm, sounded like it was up near main street. First swallow egg hatched this afternoon. Female hairy woodpecker visited. Mostly clear at sundown, high of 70 degrees, robins calling at dusk.

Sunday (June 17) overnight low of 41 degrees, early morning rain, low clouds draped across the mountains. Second swallow egg hatched, both parents keeping the little squiggles warm, clean and fed. Some finches, a few pine siskins, a red-breasted nuthatch and a couple of jays visiting. Loud airplanes over the village at 935am. Light gentle rain all morning. Cowbirds joined the finches and pine siskins at the feeders after lunch time, male rufous hummer chasing calliopes away from the feeder in the rain. Dark clouds, cool and sprinkles on and off late afternoon, high of 55 degrees. A clarks nutcracker and steller jay were competing for the suet feeder. Hummingbirds feeding during the rain (Rufous and Calliope.) Quiet evening, windy and wet. Happy Father’s Day.
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RIP:

LauraBelle Cecelia Goodwin

September 16, 1929 ~ June 14, 2018 (Age 88)

LauraBelle Goodwin, 88, of Twin Falls [formerly of Yellow Pine], died Thursday, June 14, 2018 at St. Luke’s Magic Valley Medical Center, Twin Falls. A celebration of life will be held at 2:00p.m., Tuesday, June 26, 2018 at Serenity Funeral Chapel Life Celebration Center and Cremation Services of Idaho, 502 2nd Ave. North, Twin Falls, Idaho. Condolences may be shared at http://www.serenityfuneralchapel.com.

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Idaho News:

Wednesday is deadline to pay property taxes

The Star-News June 14, 2018

Wednesday at 5 p.m. is the deadline for property owners in Adams and Valley counties to pay the second half of their yearly property taxes.

Late charges and interest will begin on June 21, with interest retroactive from Jan. 1, 2018, so mailed payments should be correctly stamped by date.

The treasurers’ offices in both counties are open during the lunch hour Mondays through Fridays.

Valley County accepts credit card payments at http://co.valley.id.us or by calling 208-382-7110.

In Adams County, payments can be placed in the drop box at the main courthouse entrance in Council.

The office has credit card, debit card or echeck payment options online at http://co.adams.id.us or by calling 208- 253-4263 Ext. 6 for questions.

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Valley County accepts unwanted pesticides by appointment

The Star-News June 14, 2018

Valley County residents can properly dispose of old, unwanted pesticides by taking them to the Valley County Weed and Pest Control Offices near Cascade.

Residents must call and make an appointment to hand over their items, such as rat, weed and bug killers. Pesticides must be in their original, labeled containers.

The offices are located at 55 Gold Dust Road south of Cascade. To make an appointment, call 208-315-0368 or 208-382-7199 or write to Sanderson@co.valley.id.us

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Eighth auction of Payette Lake state-owned lots to set for Friday

Lessees have volunteered to compete in public bidding

By Tom Grote for The Star-News June 14, 2018

The eighth public auction in eight years for state-leased land around Payette Lake occupied by vacation homes will be held Friday in Boise.

The auction by the Idaho Department of Lands will begin at 1 p.m. Friday at the Stueckle Sky Center at Bronco Stadium at Boise State University.

The auction will feature nine properties, including three lakefront parcels.

Here is the list of properties to be offered along with their minimum bids:

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St. Luke’s McCall expansion site work to begin Monday

The Star-News June 14, 2018

After more than 10 years of planning and preparation, construction for the St. Luke’s McCall hospital expansion project is set to begin Monday, pending permit approval by the City of McCall.

Initial work will span three phases and includes property structure removals on and rerouting of Hewitt Street, road improvements and utility upgrades. The work is anticipated to continue through October.

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World’s best kayakers prepare for the North Fork Championship

by Natalie Hurst Thursday, June 14th 2018

Banks, Idaho (KBOI) – This weekend, the world’s best kayakers descend upon the North Fork of the Payette River for one of the world’s toughest whitewater races.

The North Fork Championship.

It’s grueling test – and even the local paddlers say it’s the biggest challenge they’ll ever face on the water.

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Boise man drowns in Lake Cascade near Donnelly

The Star-News June 14, 2018

A Boise man was found floating face down in Lake Cascade near Donnelly last week, the Valley County Sheriff’s Office said.

The body of Conrad Hansen, 25, was discovered floating in the lake near 12833 Dawn Drive about 4 p.m. June 6, sheriff’s office spokesperson Lt. Jason Speer said.

An autopsy found Hanson drowned, Valley County Coroner Scott Carver said. The cause of death was “accidental,” Carver said.

Responders from Donnelly Fire & EMS were called to the scene by Hansen’s grandmother, Speer said.

The grandmother said Hansen had been fishing on the dock at the Dawn Drive address. She went to check on him and found him floating on the water, unresponsive.

The grandmother removed Hansen from the water and responders began life-saving efforts without success, Speer said.

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Man dies after raft overturns in Central Idaho wilderness

The sheriff’s office says David J. Glenn, 53, of North Las Vegas, and his son were in a raft that overturned in rapids.

KTVB June 13, 2018

Cascade, ID – A Las Vegas man has died during a rafting accident in the central Idaho wilderness, the Valley County Sheriff’s Office said on Tuesday.

The accident happened on Saturday afternoon on the Middle Fork of the Salmon River in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness.

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Hunter’s body found weeks after crash into Selway River

The 22-year-old’s remains were found about 43 miles downriver from the spot where an SUV carrying six people plunged into the water last month.

KTVB June 14, 2018

Idaho County — The body of a 22-year-old hunter has been recovered from the Selway River, more than three weeks after his vehicle plunged into the fast-moving water.

The remains of Reece Rollins of Terrebone, Oregon were found Tuesday east near Cupboard Creek above Selway Falls. According to the Idaho County Sheriff’s Office, a hiker spotted the body and alerted a nearby U.S. Forest Service trail crew.

Rollins was one of four hunters who had been missing since their SUV went off the road and flipped into the river during the early morning hours of May 21. Two men in the SUV – identified as Jesse Gunin and Jason Lewis of Georgia – were able to escape.

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2nd body found after SUV with 6 hunters crashes into river

6/15/18 AP

Lowell, Idaho — Idaho authorities say a second body has been recovered after a vehicle carrying six hunters crashed into a fast-moving river last month.

The Idaho County Sheriff’s Office says crews recovered the body of 21-year-old Koby Clark of Bozeman, Montana, on Thursday about 6 miles (9.5 kilometers) east of the community of Lowell.

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Life Flight Network offers special deal for its 40th anniversary

By Brandon Stokes Jun 13, 2018 Local News 8

Life Flight Network the largest not-for-profit air medical transport service in the United States, is celebrating its 40th anniversary by offering $40 new memberships in Idaho, Oregon, and Washington.

The $40 annual memberships (for new members only) will be offered through Labor Day. Members of the network incur no out-of-pocket expense if flown for medically necessary emergent conditions by Life Flight Network or one of their reciprocal partners. Membership covers the primary membership holder, their spouse or domestic partner, and dependents claimed on their income tax return.

Elderly and disabled family members living in the same household can also be covered. Memberships are normally $65. To enroll, visit http://www.lifeflight.org/membership or call the Life Flight Network membership office at 800-982-9299.

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From July Fourth chaos to family fun in Idaho mountain town

Crouch is known for throwing one of the craziest free-for-all, Wild West fireworks frenzies on Independence Day. But the town is losing that reputation.

KTVB Morgan Boydston June 11, 2018

Crouch, Idaho – Believe it or not, the Fourth of July is just three and half weeks away!

One tiny mountain town in Idaho is known for throwing one of the craziest free-for-all, Wild West fireworks frenzies on Independence Day. But Crouch is losing that reputation.

Last year, they said enough is enough, and voted to ban all fireworks in certain areas of the city limits. Those same rules are in play this year.

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Pests to look out for outdoors

By Michaela Leung Jun 11, 2018 Local News 8

Idaho Falls, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – A lot of people are taking advantage of the warm weather we’ve been having. But you need to be sure you’re being safe.

Make sure you’re protecting yourself from ticks.

“They’re coming out from their winter dormancy and looking for that first blood meal. So make sure to cover up as best as you can. Stay away from brushing up against trees and bushes where ticks kind of hang out. And double check yourself when you’re finished with your day’s activities,” says Mike Taylor, Epidemiologist for Eastern Idaho Public Health.

Mosquitoes are also out…With some being carriers of the West Nile Virus. There are some precautions you can take.

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Mosquitoes test positive for West Nile near Parma

Warm weather and the onset of summer in the Treasure Valley means pool days, barbecues, camping – and the return of warnings about West Nile Virus.

KTVB June 12, 2018

Parma, ID — Warm weather and the onset of summer in the Treasure Valley means pool days, barbecues, camping – and the return of warnings about West Nile Virus.

Officials in Canyon County announced Tuesday that the mosquitoes collected near Parma have tested positive for the virus, the first such positive reading this year.

According to Canyon County Mosquito Abatement District Director Ed Burnett, the infected insects were collected Friday off of Hexon Road and Scott Pitt Road, near the Fort Boise Wildlife Management Area. The samples were sent to the Idaho Bureau of Laboratories, which confirmed the positive test Monday.

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Officials confirm Idaho’s first human plague case since 1992

6/13/18 AP

Boise, Idaho — An Idaho child was infected with the plague this week, the first human diagnosis in the state since 1992, health officials confirmed.

The child, from Elmore County, is recovering after receiving antibiotics, the Idaho Statesman Journal reported .

The disease is spread to humans through a bite from an infected flea, Central District Health Department epidemiologist Sarah Correll said.

Cases of plague in Idaho were diagnosed in squirrels as recently as 2016, though none have been found in southern Ada County or Elmore County this year. It is unknown whether the child was exposed to the disease in Idaho or during a recent trip to Oregon.

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Scam Alert:

BBB alerts customers of misleading mailings from a Boise company

by KBOI News Staff Monday, June 11th 2018

Boise, Idaho (KBOI) — The Better Business Bureau Northwest + Pacific is alerting people across the country of mailings from Senior Supplemental Referral Service from Boise.

The BBB says the advertising campaign has led to BBB Accreditation resignation and an agreement with the Iowa Attorney General.

Senior Supplemental Referral Service is also known as Need-A-Lead. According to the BBB, Direct Processing Center sends postcards to consumers across the country offering more information about “state-approved plans.”

Consumers say the postcards look like urgent official government notices regarding their insurance and the advertising failed to disclose that information collected from recipients will be sold to third-party insurance sales agents.

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Fire Season:

BLM: Target shooting is a major cause of fires

Three grass fires in the last month were sparked by target shooting, and now the BLM is asking the public to shoot smart.

KTVB Joe Parris June 13, 2018

Boise — It is a hot one Wednesday across the Treasure Valley; some places are seeing temperatures in the 90s!

Every year with the sizzling summer weather comes the risk of wildfires out on the dry landscape.

The Bureau of Land Management is now asking everyone to monitor target shooting behavior to help prevent grass and wildfires.

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Local fire crews take to the sky to survey Boise Front

Fire crews took to the skies in a helicopter to check out the Boise Front.

Morgan Boydston June 13, 2018 KTVB

Boise – With fire season expected to be above average this year in southwest Idaho, local fire departments say it’s key they get ahead of it.

The Bureau of Land Management (BLM), Eagle and Boise fire crews took to the skies today in a helicopter to scope out the Boise Front. They’re working to improve coordination and check out on-the-ground resources from a bird’s eye view.

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Small grass fire reported north of Hill Road in Boise Foothills

by KBOI News Staff Friday, June 15th 2018

Boise, Idaho (KBOI) — A small grass fire was reported early Friday morning in the Boise Foothills.

Dispatchers say the call came in for the small fire north of Hill Road and Lost Sage Lane at about 3:30 a.m.

No structures were damaged and no injuries were reported. No word yet on what sparked the fire.

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Coldwater Fire burns southwest of American Falls

Local News 8 June 14, 2018

American Falls, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – UPDATE 10:00 p.m.The Bureau of Land Management reports the Coldwater Fire has burned approximately 800 acres.

Officials said the fire started around 2:00 p.m. and is burning in grass, brush and juniper.

… The fire is burning about 5 miles southwest of the Rim Fire, which started on Friday.

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Grass fire scorches pickups, boat, sheds in Sand Hollow

A Caldwell Fire Dept. battalion chief says a controlled burn got out of control when the wind picked up.

KTVB June 16, 2018

Canyon County – Crews are mopping up after a grass fire that burned an estimated ten to 15 acres Saturday afternoon in the Sand Hollow area.

The fire started at about 3:45 p.m. Saturday in the area of Oasis and Labor Camp roads.

The Sand Hollow Rural Fire Department responded first, followed by crews from Caldwell, Middleton and Parma.

Caldwell Fire Dept. Battalion Chief Tim Scott says the fire started with a controlled burn, and grew as the wind picked up, carrying embers onto the grass and fanning the flames.

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Wildfires in Colorado, New Mexico and Arizona force closure of large chunks of forest

Rangers close large chunks of public forest in West as wildfires burn

Trevor Hughes, USA TODAY June 12, 2018


In this Saturday, June 9, 2018, photo, helicopter works the wildfire on the east side of Hermosa Cliffs near Hermosa, Colo. (Jerry McBride/The Durango Herald via AP)

Extreme fire danger in the southwest has prompted federal land managers to take the unusual step of indefinitely closing public access to an area of national forests larger than Connecticut.

Colorado, New Mexico and Arizona are struggling with an usually hot spring that came after a winter with little snowfall, priming the forests to burn. And rangers say campers are failing to extinguish their campfires, creating an untenable situation.

Multiple wildfires are already burning in the area, including the 23,000-acre 416 Fire near Durango, Colorado, and the 41,000-acre Buzzard Fire in west-central New Mexico.

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USFS Regional Intermountain Wildfire Newsletter

June 15, 2018

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Public Lands:

French Hazard WUI Project – Opportunity to Object

June 11, 2018

The Boise National Forest, Cascade Ranger District, has completed the Environmental Assessment (EA) and Draft Decision Notice/Finding of No Significant Impact (DN/FONSI) for the French Hazard WUI Project. The French Hazard project area is located approximately 7 miles west of Cascade, Idaho, in Valley County.

The EA and Draft DN/FONSI are available on the project website at http://www.fs.usda.gov/project/?project=49636. Hard copies of these documents are available upon request from Jim Bishop, Team Leader, at jjbishop@fs.fed.us or by phone at 208-382-7400.

The draft DN/FONSI identifies Alternative B as the selected alternative. Alternative B will conduct vegetation management treatments (commercial and noncommercial thinning, prescribed burning, and mastication) and associated road management activities on approximately 6,223 acres. All treatments with commercial product removal will be followed by noncommercial tree thinning and activity fuel abatement treatments. Transportation management activities will include constructing 2.4 miles of new NFS roads. These roads will be classified as Maintenance Level (ML) 2 roads (open to administrative use only; constructing 6.5 miles of temporary roads on new prism and 2.1 miles on existing road prisms. To facilitate commercial sawlog removal 49.4 miles of road maintenance activities will be conducted. In addition, 4.6 miles of NFS roads will be decommissioned. The Project will make no changes to the Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM). An estimated 47,391 CCF of wood products will be provided to local/regional processing facilities.

I am now informing you of the opportunity to object to this project pursuant to 36 CFR 218 Subpart B.

Eligibility to File Objection

Objections will be accepted only from those who have previously submitted specific written comments regarding the proposed project either during scoping or other designated opportunity for public comment in accordance with §218.5(a). Issues raised in objections must be based on previously submitted timely, specific, written comments regarding the proposed project unless they are based on new information arising after designated opportunities.

Individual members of organizations must have submitted their own comments to meet the requirements of eligibility as an individual. Objections received on behalf of an organization are considered as those of the organization only. If an objection is submitted on behalf of a number of individuals or organizations, each individual or organization listed must meet the eligibility requirement of having previously submitted comments on the project (§ 218.7). Names and addresses of objectors will become part of the public record.

Content of an Objection

Incorporation of documents by reference in the objection is permitted only as provided for at §218.8(b). Minimum content requirements of an objection identified at §218.8(d) include:

* Objector’s name and address with a telephone number if available; with signature or other verification of authorship supplied upon request;
* Identification of the lead objector when multiple names are listed, along with verification upon request;
* Name of project, name and title of the responsible official, national forest/ranger district where project is located, and
* Sufficient narrative description of those aspects of the proposed project objected to, specific issues related to the project, how environmental law, regulation, or policy would be violated, and suggested remedies, which would resolve the objection.
* Statement demonstrating the connection between prior specific written comments on this project and the content of the objection, unless the objection issue arose after the designated opportunity for comment.

Filing an Objection

The Objection Reviewing Officer is the Intermountain (R4) Regional Forester. Written, facsimile, hand delivered, and electronic objections will be accepted. It is the responsibility of Objectors to ensure their objection is received in a timely manner (§ 218.9). Objections received in response to this request will be available for public inspection in the “Public Comment/Objection Reading Room” on the Project webpage

Send written objections, including any attachments, to: Objection Reviewing Officer, Intermountain Region, USFS, 324 25th Street, Ogden, Utah 84401; or fax to 801-625-5277; or by email to: objections-intermtn-regional- office@fs.fed.us, within 30 days following the publication date of the legal notice in the newspaper of record. The Ogden Utah office’s business hours for those submitting hand-delivered objections are: 8:00 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, excluding holidays. Email objections must be submitted in a format such as an email message, pdf, plain text (.txt), rich text format (.rtf), and Word (.doc or .docx). Objections may also be submitted through a web form on the French Hazard WUI Project webpage (http://www.fs.usda.gov/project/?project=49636). To submit comments using the web form select “Comment/Object on Project” under “Get Connected” on the right panel of the project’s webpage.

Objections, including attachments, must be filed with the appropriate reviewing officer within 30 days of the publication of the legal notice in the newspaper of record. The publication date of the legal notice is the exclusive means for calculating the time to file an objection to this project. The legal notice is scheduled to be published in the Idaho Statesman (Newspaper of Record) on June 12, 2018. The legal notice will be published on the project website (http://www.fs.usda.gov/project/?project=49636) within 4 calendar days of publication. Those wishing to object to this proposed project should not rely upon dates or timeframe information provided by any other source.

The Responsible Official for this project is Deputy Forest Supervisor Tawnya Brummett. Further information about this project may be obtained from Jim Bishop, Team Leader, at jjbishop@fs.fed.us or by phone at 208-382-7400.
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USDA Forest Service French Hazard WUI – CORRECTION of Opportunity to Object pursuant to 36 CFR 218, Subpart A and C Notification

June 14, 2018

You are receiving a second message regarding the opportunity to object pursuant to 36 CFR 218 subparts A and C on the French Hazard WUI Project due to incorrect citations to the 36 CFR 218 regulations in the original message. The citations have been corrected in the message below. In response to the incorrect citations, a corrected legal notice has been submitted to the Idaho Statesman (newspaper of record) and is anticipated to be published on June 18, 2018. Publication of the corrected legal notice will re-start the 30-day objection filing period for the French Hazard WUI Project. The corrected legal notice will be posted to the project website (http://www.fs.usda.gov/project/?project=49636) within 4 calendar days of publication (36 CFR 218.7 (d)). The publication date of the corrected legal notice is the exclusive means for calculating the 30-day objection filing period. Those wishing to object to this proposed project should not rely upon dates or timeframe information provided by any other source. It is the responsibility of objectors to ensure that objections are received in a timely manner (36 CFR 218.32 (a)).

Corrections of references to the 36 CFR 218 regulations have also been made in the Draft DN/FONSI and the document has been published to the project webpage: https://www.fs.usda.gov/project/?project=49636.

Please feel free to contact myself or Terre Pearson-Ramirez at 208-382-7457 with questions regarding the opportunity to object to this project.

Sincerely,
Melissa Yenko
Forest Environmental Coordinator
Boise National Forest
1249 South Vinnell Way, Suite 200
Boise, ID 83709
Phone: 208-373-4245
Email: myenko@fs.fed.us
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More groups oppose bikes in wilderness

Senate bill introduced in May

Greg Moore June 13, 2018 IME

Following the reintroduction of a bill in the U.S. Senate on May 17 to end the prohibition of mountain bikes in wilderness areas, 150 conservation groups have signed a letter opposing the measure.

The letter, dated June 6, is being sent to all the members of the Senate by Missoula, Mont.-based Wilderness Watch. It follows an earlier letter signed by 133 conservation groups sent in December to the members of a House of Representatives subcommittee following the reintroduction of a similar bill there.

HR 1349, reintroduced in the House by Rep. Tom McClintock, R-Calif., in March 2017, would amend the 1964 Wilderness Act to state that it does not prohibit the use of nonmotorized wheeled vehicles in wilderness areas. It was passed by the House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Federal Lands in December.

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Critter News:

Puppy dies after eating toxic mushroom in Idaho City

Just hours after ingesting a mushroom, a six-month-old puppy died and now her owners are sending out a warning to other pet owners.

Alex Livingston June 11, 2018 KTVB


A local expert says Amanita pantherina is one of the deadliest mushrooms in our area.

Boise, ID – When you bring a puppy into your home, you typically make sure you puppy-proof just about everything like making sure your cleaning supplies are safely out of reach. What you may not think about is keeping an eye out for mushrooms.

For one couple, a mushroom that most would have overlooked caused a six-month-old puppy named Logan to die.

“When they pop up, they pop up, and there isn’t much rhyme or reason to it,” said Mike Feiger, Logan’s owner. “I’ve been up there for 11 years and I’ve never seen that mushroom in my yard or in the vicinity.”

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Pet Talk

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt Jun 15, 2018 IME

Bone infections are called osteomyelitis. Osteomyelitis is bone inflammation caused by infection. Infection most commonly arises from external sources of contamination such as puncture wounds, shearing injuries over a bone from an animal being dragged by a car, or when a fracture is compounded, its bone fragments protruding through the skin. Osteomyelitis can also occur because of surgical contamination. Occasionally, infection can spread to bone via the bloodstream from other areas of the body.

Bacteria are the most common cause of osteomyelitis; these include staph, strep and E. Coli. Several fungal infections also occur, especially the cause of “valley fever,” coccidioidomycosis, very prevalent in dogs from central California and Arizona. The bone infected may be swollen, painful and hot to the touch. Usually, there is lameness, lethargy and poor appetite. Often, there is drainage of pus to the outside of the skin. This is called a draining tract.

Diagnosis of osteomyelitis requires X-rays, cultures of the bone or draining tracts, and a thorough history and physical exam. Sometimes surgical exploration of the site of infection is necessary to provide bone samples to the lab for appropriate tests.

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Dog missing after I-84 crash reunited with family

Huck the yellow Lab was thrown from the pickup he was riding in during a rollover wreck Friday.

KTVB June 12, 2018


Photo: Courtesy of Tracy King

Boise — A dog that was thrown from the pickup it was riding in during a rollover crash has been found.

Huck, a 3-year-old yellow lab, had been missing since the wreck happened Friday.

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Dogs suffer when people underestimate heat

People may endanger dogs without thinking

Craig Smith Jun 11, 2018 KIVI TV

When the weather’s this hot, people can hurt their pets without even knowing.

… Dogs have an especially tough time coping with heat. They can only shed heat through their tongues and the pads on their feet.

… Sometimes people will leave their dog in the yard in the morning, thinking the dog will have plenty of shade throughout the day but they failed to account for the way the sun angle will change as the day goes on so a dog that might have plenty of shade at one time of the day, could have little or no shade at the other part.

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N. Idaho neighbors complain about loud dogs then owners retaliate with donkeys, birds

Homeowners in Emida claimed that the breeders have more than 250 dogs on their land and that the animals would bark nonstop. According to court documents, the breeders retaliated by bringing even more animals on their land.

Taylor Viydo KTVB June 14, 2018

Emida, Idaho – Two North Idaho dog breeders were sued by their neighbors, who alleged the dog owners retaliated against them and caused them emotional distress.

Homeowners in Emida claimed that the breeders had more than 250 dogs on their land and that the animals would bark nonstop. According to court documents, the breeders retaliated by bringing even more animals on their land.

According to the complaint filed this week, the neighbors confronted the breeders in 2017 about the noise, but nothing improved.

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2 Mexican wolves found dead in Arizona last month

6/15/18 AP

Phoenix — Arizona wildlife managers say two endangered Mexican gray wolves died, bringing the statewide total of dead this year to six.

The Arizona Game and Fish Department said in a news release Friday that the animals were found dead in May. Authorities did not release any details about the circumstances or where the wolves were found.

Their deaths are under investigation.

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Arizona counties want more funds for Mexican wolf recovery

6/13/18 AP

Bisbee, Ariz. — The Cochise County Board of Supervisors is requesting more federal funding for Mexican wolf recovery efforts.

They’re sending a letter to Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke, asking him to consider a fairer compensation plan for the eastern Arizona communities hosting the recovery program and the state agencies managing it.

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Census suggests Michigan wolf population stable, thriving

6/14/18 AP

Lansing, Mich. — State biologists say Michigan’s gray wolf population appears to be leveling off after several decades of steady growth.

The Department of Natural Resources says a census this winter produced an estimate of 662 wolves in the Upper Peninsula. That’s up slightly from 618 in the previous count two years ago.

The survey found 139 packs — 15 more than in 2016. The average pack size was down slightly, to fewer than five wolves.

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Agency considers dropping wolf protections

By John Flesher – 6/14/18 AP

Traverse City, Mich. — The federal government is considering another attempt to drop legal protections for gray wolves across the lower 48 states, reopening a lengthy battle over the predator species.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service on Thursday told The Associated Press it has begun a science-based review of the status of the wolf, which presently is covered by the Endangered Species Act in most of the nation and cannot be killed unless threatening human life.

If the agency decides to begin the process of removing of the wolf from the endangered species list, it will publish a proposal by the end of the year.

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Wolf Education International

Newsletter June 16, 2018

Wölfe am Hochstand auf der Lauer (Wolf at the high stand in wait)

Large fenced reserves could reintroduce wolves in Scottish Highlands

As Oregon wolves rebound, tensions rise over livestock attacks

The Economic Effect of Wolf Predation on Ranching Families and Rural Communities
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Grizzly bear dies after eating pesticides in garage

6/13/18 AP

Great Falls, Mont. — A grizzly bear died after eating pesticides in an open garage between Great Falls and Fort Benton in north-central Montana.

Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks officials say the sub-adult female and a sibling were seen in the area about 11 miles northwest of Carter in recent days. The 143-pound grizzly died Monday within hours of ingesting the chemicals.

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Idaho F&G officials relocate two young ‘maverick moose’ from downtown Burley

by Betsy, Idaho Press Jun 11, 2018


Doug Meyer/Idaho Fish & Game

A young moose was spotted in Burley on June 3, and the Cassia County Sheriff’s office notified Idaho Fish & Game; conservation officers and wildlife staff responded, and the out-of-place moose was tranquilized near a Maverik gas station on east Main Street around 5 p.m.

Then, just hours later, another moose was reported in the same area. About 10:30 the next morning, officers darted a second moose there.

“The two animals were of a similar age class and found in a similar location, suggesting that they could be siblings or just good friends,” Idaho Fish & Game reported in a news release. “They were released in a similar location and reunited in a less population portion of Unit 55.”

source:
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Deer with leash found dead near Pocatello

By Brandon Stokes Jun 15, 2018 Local News 8

Pocatello, Idaho – The Idaho Department of Fish and Game is investigating after a deer was found dead with a leash around its neck in the Gibson Jack area south of Pocatello.

Fish and Game say the leash had been intentionally strapped around the yearling buck’s neck either in an attempt to make it a pet or to harass the animal causing the deer to experience a long slow death.

Fish and Game officers responded to multiple calls about the deer in March but each time they showed up the deer was either gone, or it could not be caught due to other conditions.

It is against the law to keep wildlife as pets or to harass a deer like this one was.

Fish and Game asks anyone with information about this case to call the Pocatello office at (208) 232-4703 or Citizens Against Poaching at 1-800-632-5999. Callers can remain anonymous.

source:
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BLM releases 26 wild horses in Idaho following 2015 fire

6/14/18 AP

Nampa, Idaho — The Bureau of Land Management has released 26 wild horses into the Sands Basin Herd Management Area in southwestern Idaho.

The Idaho Press reported Wednesday that this marks the first time BLM-managed wild horses will roam in the area in three years following a 2015 wildfire.

The BLM says nearly all the Sands Basin Herd Management Area was burned by the fire that swept through southeast Oregon and southwest Idaho.

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The Columbia Basin Bulletin

Weekly Fish and Wildlife News
http://www.cbbulletin.com
June 15, 2018
Issue No. 876
Table of Contents

* Council Approves $4.5 Million For Five-Year Program To Suppress, Monitor Invasive Pike In Lake Roosevelt
http://www.cbbulletin.com/440951.aspx

* New Water Chemistry Strategies By IDFG Increase Survival Of Snake River Sockeye Smolts
http://www.cbbulletin.com/440950.aspx

* Study Identifies Ocean Distribution Of Fall Chinook; Should Help Managers In Targeting Or Avoiding Certain Stocks
http://www.cbbulletin.com/440949.aspx

* Tie Vote In U.S. Supreme Court Upholds Lower Court Rulings In Washington State Fish Culverts Case
http://www.cbbulletin.com/440948.aspx

* Bonneville Power Looking At Spending Reductions In Columbia Basin Fish/Wildlife Spending
http://www.cbbulletin.com/440947.aspx

* Pacific Lamprey Return To Umatilla River In Record Numbers; From Functionally Extinct To Over 2600 Returning Fish
http://www.cbbulletin.com/440946.aspx

* Fish/River Managers Have Differing Interpretations On What ‘Spill To The Gas Cap’ Looks Like
http://www.cbbulletin.com/440945.aspx

* Judge Rejects Dismissal Of Deschutes River Clean Water Case, Says Tribes Should Also Be Defendant
http://www.cbbulletin.com/440944.aspx

* IDFG Biologists Seek Help From Anglers In Researching Land-Locked Chinook Salmon
http://www.cbbulletin.com/440943.aspx

* Ocean’s Wild Forage Fish Populations Under Pressure As Key Food Source For Farmed Fish
http://www.cbbulletin.com/440942.aspx

* Study Says International Fisheries Agreements Outpaced By Movement Of Fish Species Due To Climate Change
http://www.cbbulletin.com/440941.aspx

* Oregon State Receives $88 Million To Lead Construction Of Second Ship For Nation’s Academic Research Fleet
http://www.cbbulletin.com/440940.aspx
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Don’t Touch! These little caterpillars roaming Idaho woods can leave nasty rash

by KBOI News Staff Friday, June 15th 2018


The U.S. Department of Agriculture is warning folks who venture out into the woods of Idaho, to avoid the Douglas-fir Tussock Moth caterpillars. (File Photo + USDA)

McCall, Idaho (KBOI) — Here’s a good (very good) example of looks can be deceiving.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture is warning folks who venture out into the woods of Idaho, to avoid the Douglas-fir Tussock Moth caterpillars.

Officials say Idaho’s currently seeing an outbreak of the native species, which is typical every three to four years.

If you do happen to touch, people can experience itching, rashes, welts, blisters, watery eyes, runny noise, cough, and sometimes even shortness of breath, wheezing and chest tightness.

The USDA says huckleberry pickers, especially should wear long sleeved shirts and gloves.

source:
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Bumblebee blues: Pacific Northwest pollinator in trouble

By Keith Ridler – 6/17/18 AP

Boise, Idaho — Hundreds of citizen scientists have begun buzzing through locations across the Pacific Northwest seeking a better understanding about nearly 30 bumblebee species.

Bumblebees, experts say, are important pollinators for both wild and agricultural plants, but some species have disappeared from places where they were once common, possibly because of the same factors that have been killing honeybees.

“It’s really important for us as humans to study these species systems for animals that are the little guys that make the world go around,” said Ann Potter of the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, one of the entities in three states — Oregon and Idaho are the others — participating in the three-year Pacific Northwest Bumble Bee Atlas project.

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Fish & Game News:

F&G to begin gill netting in Payette Lake for lake trout

Idaho Department of Fish and Game biologists will begin some test gill netting in Payette Lake in the next few weeks.

Biologists will be targeting lake trout to test different sizes of gillnets in their effectiveness. The department is considering using gillnets to capture and remove lake trout from the lake, F&G Regional Fishery Manager Dale Allen said.

F&G is considering removal of lake trout in response to high angler interest in restoring a kokanee fishery. Lake trout are a major predator of kokanee.

The lake trout also have out-paced their available food supply and are in poor body condition, Allen said.

Biologists will document catch rates using the gillnets and look at all areas of the lake to see if a removal project is feasible, Allen said.

The only visible change will be orange plastic buoys showing up around the lake, he said.

“The nets are well out of the way of boating activities because they are sitting on the bottom of the lake,” he said. Call 208-634-8137 for questions.

source: The Star-News June 14, 2018
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Chinook seasons for South Fork Salmon, Upper Salmon and Lochsa rivers

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Specialist
Monday, June 4, 2018

Season to open June 23 and open seven days per week, but harvest share could be caught fast

Idaho Fish and Game Commission on June 6 set the Chinook fishing seasons on the South Fork of the Salmon, Upper Salmon and Lochsa rivers to open June 23.

Upper Salmon River, South Fork of the Salmon River and Lochsa River seasons and rules include:

* Opening date June 23, closing date as ordered by Director of Fish and Game.
* Fishing open seven days per week.
* Bag limits for South Fork of Salmon and Upper Salmon, four per day, of which only two may be adults, and 12 in possession of which six may be adults.

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Anglers are needed to catch Chinook for research

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Specialist
Monday, June 11, 2018


c. Joseph R. Tomelleri

Biologists need samples from fish caught in three SW Idaho reservoirs and a north Idaho lake

Many anglers look forward to fishing for Chinook in Idaho rivers, but there are other places to fish for them. They’re not Chinook that come from the ocean, Fish and Game stocks land-locked Chinook in lakes and reservoirs, and biologists are asking anglers to help them learn more about these fish in Anderson Ranch, Lucky Peak and Deadwood reservoirs in southwest Idaho and Spirit Lake in North Idaho.

Biologists are installing signs and drop boxes at those locations and want anglers who catch a Chinook to leave a small tissue sample from the fish for research.

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Idaho resident hunters can apply for grizzly bear hunt June 15 through July 15

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Specialist
Thursday, June 14, 2018

One tag will be issued for a hunt in a portion of Eastern Idaho, drawing expected in early August

Fish and Game will accept applications for a 2018 grizzly bear tag starting June 15, and the deadline to apply is July 15. The drawing is limited to Idaho residents with a valid Idaho hunting license.

Hunters can apply at any Fish and Game license vendor, at Fish and Game regional offices, online at idfg.huntfishidaho.net, or by mail. All mailed applications must be postmarked no later than July 15.

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F&G News Releases

https://idfg.idaho.gov/press
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Fun Critter Stuff:

Cow on the loose: Cow escapes cattle sale, trots about Lewiston neighborhoods

by Shannon Moudy, KLEW Thursday, June 14th 2018

Lewiston, Idaho (KLEW) — Early Wednesday, a cow escaped and ran all throughout the city of Lewiston for several hours causing a frenzy for police and animal control.

KLEW News reports how all of the “cow-motion” started.

“I was sitting at my table in my house with the front door open and I see this big brown object going by out front, course I have to get up and check it out,” said Shirley Womack who witnessed the animal.

Strolling through alleys, moseying across lawns, with animal control not far behind, a cow was loose in a Lewiston neighborhood.

continued w/video:
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Seasonal Humor:

Fatherdrivethru-a

SpringBirdNest-a
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Tips & Advice

A Word about Food

June 12, 2018 by Lisa Marie Krysiak

Summer is here, so this means that many of us will plan outdoor festivities with food and drinks. Grocery shopping becomes a little challenging when we know that the food will be exposed to air for a period of time, so beginning with storing the food properly after it’s purchased is important. I’ll share some tips I’ve learned and some of which surprised me.

Starting with meat, people usually store it in the freezer the minute they get home, but it doesn’t necessarily mean its freezer ready. Average meat wrappers found in your local grocers let in airflow, which means that the exposure can produce bacteria, lowering the quality of your meat. You should always rewrap your meat with freezer paper, forcing out any additional air before freezing it.

Fresh vegetables should be blanched before you freeze them. The boiling water will help stop enzymatic action, which usually strip the flavor and freshness from your vegetables. If you do this prior to any outdoor activity…it will help keep them fresher vs just washing and storing them in your refrigerator. Crisp is best.

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To Rinse Or Not To Rinse: How Washing Some Foods Can Help You Avoid Illness

June 13, 2018 by Jill Neimark – NPR

This spring, millions of Americans worried that salad was no longer safe to eat: The U.S. was hit by the largest E. coli outbreak in a decade, with 172 people in 32 states sickened by contaminated romaine lettuce. Eighty-nine of those individuals were hospitalized, and at least five died.

Would rinsing lettuce have prevented the outbreak? Likely not, because the E. coli organism that caused the outbreak is so hardy that only a few bacteria are necessary to cause illness. And E. coli can survive in frozen or refrigerated temperatures. It is only destroyed through cooking or pasteurization, according to Colorado State University.

Rinsing does help prevent other illnesses associated with food. But it can sometimes cause more problems by splashing bacteria onto sinks and countertops. As summer and outdoor eating events beckon, here are some tips on what foods to rinse, how to rinse, and why.

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Idaho History June 17, 2018

Yellow Pine, Idaho 1900-1930

(Valley County in 1917)

1905 First Post Office

(link to larger size)

“Mr. Merritt says that A. C. Behne, the deputy recorder at Morrison is putting up a good sized building to be used as a recorders office, postoffice and store. Mr. Behne aims to carry a good stock of goods which will be a great accommodation to that part of the country.” – Thunder Mountain News May 13, 1905

Yellow Pine Basin, Idaho. First post office; probably burned 1909.
This is probably at Morrison (later known at the Bryant Ranch)

Copyright Idaho State Historical Society Earl Willson Collection
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“Mr. Behne and Mrs. Abstein were instrumental in getting a post office by writing letters – to prove the need for a post office. Mr. Behne established the post office in 1905.”

source: “Idaho Mountains Our Home” by Lafe and Emma Cox – Copyright 1977 by V.O. Ranch Books
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Gold Stampede at Thunder Mountain Brought New Life to Yellow Pine Area

by Earl Willson The Idaho Statesman, December 26, 1962

Yellow Pine – This story is about Yellow Pine and its site that took root among giant ponderosa trees in a meadow filled with quaking aspens and clumps of willows.

A remote settlement, it actually came into existence just after the well known Thunder Mountain gold excitement, but was little importance even as a tiny village, until the advent of the Bradley Mining Company operations, and subsequent establishment of Stibnite at the Yellow Pine mine near the headwaters of the east fork of the south fork of the Salmon River.

At the time of the Thunder Mountain gold stampede into the Monumental Creek area, Yellow Pine was practically an uninhabited “basin” only a very few miles above “Dead Man’s” Bar and Regan cabins on the east fork where isolated placer mining operations were carried on by the sluice box and the gold pan. Today, these cabins are a tumbled down decayed pile of logs, among which a crude sign was found a few years ago and is now on display over the door at the Yellow Pine mercantile store. The very skillfully cut lettering showed that the cabins were built in 1876, and occupied the winter of 1885 and 1886. Later the structure known as the Buckhorn cabin on Regan Flat, was apparently occupied by a prospector known as Fox.

AlbertCBehnePostmasterJP-aa

Albert C. Behne – Postmaster, Justice of the Peace – Yellow Pine Idaho. Courtesy Sandy McRae

Three Cabins Built

When this correspondent first entered Yellow Pine in 1907, accompanied by his father, the late “Profile Sam,” there were only three cabins – the first to be built in the area was unoccupied, and the other two were inhabited by the late Theodore Van-Meter and the late Albert C. Behne who finally became the postmaster, mining recorder, justice of the peace and the founder of Yellow Pine.

Contrary to some people who connect Yellow Pine and its later business and social activities with the Thunder Mountain era, may we set the record straight by saying that it was many years later before a few scattered log cabin homes were erected, or any places of business opened up in Yellow Pine – in fact not until the Bradley mining operations at the Yellow Pine Mine seemed permanent, that the hamlet even reached the proportion of a village. Then its fatherly founder, Mr. Behne, who had applied for a post office in 1905, carried his own mail from the, Johnson Creek bridge (now known as ‘Twin Bridges’) for at least once a week until finally the Roosevelt-Thunder Mountain route was abandoned and in turn rerouted to Yellow Pine about the year 1909.

The site of Yellow Pine, more commonly referred to in the old days as Yellow Pine Basin by the few scattered patrons of the post office just proceeding the turn of the century, was only considered a very beautiful meadow nestling among the surrounding ponderosa forests, and inhabited by denizens of the adjacent areas–a place too, where the few scattered sourdoughs might drop into from the high, snow blanketed areas during the early spring months and somewhat relieve themselves of bad cases of “cabin fever” contracted by all too much isolation.

Homemade Brew

“Cabin fever” could be arrested, at least temporarily, by drowning it in’ the contents of Mr. Van-Meters open barrel of home brew he called “old hen.” Actually a mixture of raisins and other assorted fruits and juices that made up a concoction so highly impregnated with sugar that one tin cup full of the alcoholic beverage would either take one blissfully out of this world or loosen the tongue at both ends. Incidentally too, perhaps “Old Van” had the only tomcat in Idaho that could catch enough mink during the winter months to keep him in tobacco from the proceeds derived from the mink pelts – at least that’s the way the story goes.

The Yellow Pine of today is not just an attraction for the surrounding “hillbillies” and the, outside tourist, hunter or fisherman. Denizens of the surrounding yellow pine forests, after which the settlement was named, still wander through and around the town even as their predecessors did in the ancient meadow, perhaps even in pre-historic, times. Even the bear, whose ancestors came down out of hibernation from the high elevations early in the spring to feed on Mr. Behne’s garbage dump, seemingly are just as curious as to man’s recent endeavors in the village. And no doubt attracted by the scent of food lingering around the homes, these clownish animals have actually disturbed ladies’ privacy by looking in windows — unusual “peeping toms” that after being driven off, we are wondering whether perhaps bruin did not return for another look, so undeniably human are their many antics.

1920YP1stSchool-a
The first school to be held in Yellow Pine was conducted in a tent in the year 1920 by a teacher identified as Miss Smith, and who taught a total of eight children. They were identified as George McCoy, Doris Edwards, Leslie McCoy, Verna McCoy, Ted Abstein, Helen Trinler, Myron McCoy and Gil McCoy. A photograph of this group submitted by this writer, also shows the first log school house and the teacher’s cottage (now owned by William Schlerding of Yellow Pine). These structures were built in 1922, and the village showed little growth up to that time.

Somehow the Yellow Pine of today seems headed in the direction of making a modern hamlet that could well be likened unto the fictitious Shang-ri-la of the far away Tibetan mountains, so vividly portrayed in the book “Lost Horizon,” the similarity being in the isolation of both places. The real and the fictitious, the entrance covered over and then through the blizzard-swept mountain routes, until the final entrance into snow-free areas entirely surrounded by mountain pinnacles that tower above a basin where comparatively long summer seasons, and the greenery of a typical farming community, the likes of which are comparable to the Cox Dude Ranch on the adjoining Johnson Creek, and the Fred Holcomb place on the East Fork.

Comparable to Cascade and Long Valley in elevation, but much more protected from the rigorous winter blasts; Yellow Pine’s present population of “Johnny Come Latelys” are profiting by the small number of early pioneers who blazed the trails and constructed the first pack bridges to span the streams.

Packed in Supplies

These first few settlers from the high surrounding areas were kept busy packing in the supplies needed to last through the eight months of closed trails and the constantly drifting snow. Then the silence broken only by the snow-laden wind and the cry of an occasional tallow hawk.

This was pioneering that those now interred in Yellow Pine pioneer cemetery are but a part of the small group who scattered to the far flung areas of what is now known as the primitive wilderness.

Where in those days such pioneer ventures as the old Werdenhof and the Sunday Mine at Edwardsburg were in operation, and only a winding trail down Big Creek reached the Copper Camp and the Jensen brothers Snow Shoe Mine. These and many other small operations from Profile, Quartz Creek and clear to the Ramey Ridge, were the reason that held those men snow-bound and isolated in regions where only the melting snows of spring could free the trails and again make transportation by pack or saddle animal possible. This was indeed pioneering the hard way.

source: Valley County GenWeb
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Early Yellow Pine District Settlers Battled Hardships in Mountains

Early-Yellow-Pine-Settlers-Idaho-Statesman_4-a

By Earl Willson Idaho Statesman September 2, 1963

Yellow Pine – This writer, who has frequently been referred to both sarcastically and humorously as: “Long Line” Willson, or preferably just as “Gabby” Willson, has returned to his retreat atop Profile Summit and the adjacent areas after nearly a months siege in the Boise Veterans hospital.

There successful efforts were made to arrest a badly hemorrhaging stomach ulcer that held him in that wonderful institution completely cut off from his regular line of research into the lives of those early day pioneers and their primitive way of life.

In this area, a road of sorts now winds its way up to this cabin’s steps where a salt lick belongs exclusively to our antlered friends, and occasionally even a mother ventures near with her two last season’s “two-heads” — albeit a little alert but nevertheless content to get her share of the mineral that even the brightly colored birds seem to have a monopoly on during the midday hours.

Early-Yellow-Pine-Settlers-Idaho-Statesman_2-aShadows Descend

And now, the deepening shadows descend on this domain from which we have such a magnificent view of Coin Mountain being tipped by the setting sun, even as this promontory is the first pinnacle over which that celestial body rises to again bathe us and our surroundings with the blessed light of long sweetly scented days and short nights.

As we reminisce further in retrospect, hack to the turn of this century, we can see where the western slope of Coin Mountain is covered with the stark remains of dead and charred lodge pole pines that tower grotesquely above a new stand of young seedlings and increased highland grazing made possible by increased light.

Even the eastern slope below where our original cabin stood, presented the same picture where now a thick stand of balsam, pinon pine and an occasional black pine towers into the heavens and obscures our former view down below where Profile Creek meanders in a southerly direction toward the east fork of the Salmon River and Yellow Pine Basin.

Early Traveler

This is remindful too, of the late Pringle Smith – that eccentric character, and native born southerner, who each season made his regular pilgrimage into the back country with his pack string. He refused to cross any mountain stream over any newly constructed pack bridge, because, as he said, he believed in traveling the bridge that had carried him safely across during all the past years.

Few pack bridges there were though, in those early days, and the fording of swollen mountain streams was often difficult and hazardous in the rugged terrain adjacent to the Copper Camp on lower Big Creek, and up toward Fern Creek and the quick silver mining prospects then owned by Pringle and his associates, then later taken over by the late John Oberbillig and successfully operated by that pioneer under difficult conditions for many years.

Those were the days too, when the late Albert C. Hennecy [sic] owned what later became the Yellow Pine Mine and the thriving inland town of Stibnite, owned and operated by the Bradleys.

Early-Yellow-Pine-Settlers-Idaho-Statesman_3-aTrip Recalled

Reminiscing further into the past, this correspondent can recall a stormy ski trip across this then “no mans land,” and an overnight stop with Hennecy [sic] before continuing the trip into the upper reaches of Profile. That, incidentally, was the rugged Irishman who, among other exploits, had the grueling task that many times forced old Hennecy [sic] to take shelter in the lee of a certain huge rock and an improvised lean-to. Here he would subsist entirely on his usual ration of chocolate and raisins until the storm permitted him to continue the trip on his long skis. In later years, “Old Al,” was equally proficient so they say, in the manufacturing of a special brand of “mountain dew,” often referred to as “squirrel whiskey.”

Those were troublesome times in the wilderness areas, when such characters as those depicted in the accompanying photographs lived that way and loved it. Those were the days too, when the mountaineer might he overtaken by “cabin fever,” to the point where he and his partner had violent quarrels or even came to blows before spring. However, there was that element of closely knit ties that immediately took over when an associate or any far flung neighbor needed assistance. In this hour of need, all differences were forgotten and the only concern was to render succor to a stricken partner.

Early-Yellow-Pine-Settlers-Idaho-Statesman_1-a

No Communication

Often this assistance was difficult in those early days because of the primitive areas vast extent, and the settlers often lived isolated in these far-flung areas where no line of communication was available and contact with a fellow man sometimes extended into weeks or even months.

Then when death overtook any unfortunate mountaineer, no undertaker nor minister of the gospel presided over the remains. Usually a rough lumber casket was the individual’s last resting place, but very often not even a wooden box was available but the remains were swathed in a blanket before being lowered into a hastily dug grave.

Today many of these graves dot the terrain all over the back country, most of them unmarked, but mute evidence of the high cost of pioneering in any isolated areas. Some of the more fortunate, however, are resting in a pioneer cemetery like the one in Yellow Pine where community civic pride and mutual interest provides an enclosure and the facilities necessary to beautify the permanent pioneer shrine.

story and images credit Sandy McRae, courtesy Scott Amos, personal correspondence. Note: correct spelling “Hennessey”.
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Yellow Pine Pioneer Cemetery

110525YP-Cemetery-Sign-a
(2011 personal photo)
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Skis and Skiers

by Harry Withers

In the mining boom days, skiing as a sport in this part of the country wasn’t considered at all. At least, I have never heard any of the real “Old Timers” speak of it as such. Skiing was only a very necessary mode of travel. Some of those old timers were the real experts when it came to making ardous trips such as getting mail into the back country: Thunder Mountain, Warren, Florence, Dixie, Buffalo Hump, and others.

I know some of those old timers and heard some of their accounts of their experiences and never grew tired of listening to them. To name a few, there were Al Hennessey, Charley Newell, Jake and Eric Jensen, Rufe Hughes, Ray Call, and Dan McRae. Big Dan was strictly a snowshoe man.

from “Yellow Pine, Idaho” complied by Nancy G. Sumner Pg 42
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Albert Behne, Founder of Yellow Pine


photo of Yellow Pine’s first postmaster, Albert Behne, at the facility he built. To the right of him is his sometime mining partner Ray Call.

source: Yellow Pine Museum
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Yellow Pine Basin

The Town of Yellow Pine takes its name from the Yellow Pine Basin. Early prospectors covered nearly every square mile of the central Idaho mountains after gold was discovered on Orofino Creek in 1860. Published accounts recall prospecting in the basin as early at 1881. Later, in 1897, a rich gold discovery was made at Thunder Mountain, 20 miles to the north east. By 1902, thousands of miners and prospectors had flooded the region, and a permanent settlement was established at Yellow Pine. The production of gold at Yellow Pine was negligible, although prospecting for gold let to the discovery of antimony which would become important later.

During this period Yellow Pine remained a small supply center and wintering place. Yellow Pine’s historical significance derives from its role as a supply and social center for miners in the area following the 1902 “Thunder Mountain Gold Rush”. It was not until 1930 that a plat was filed on the townsite by Albert C. Behne. A number of the structures which currently exist in Yellow Pine were moved to the site from Stibnite after the collapse of the tungsten market caused by the end of the Korean War. Perhaps a quarter of the town is made up of Stibnite houses built between 1940 and 1945, and moved to Yellow Pine in the 1960’s.

Yellow Pine has been identified as a potential historic district, but will not be clearly eligible for the National Register until the majority of its structures are 50 years old.

Source: Draft Environmental Impact Statement, Stibnite Project Gold Mine and Mill, Valley County, Idaho. By the Payette National Forest 1981, pgs 54-55
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Albert C. Behne

source: “Idaho Mountains Our Home” by Lafe and Emma Cox – Copyright 1977 by V.O. Ranch Books
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1910 – U.S. Census, Roosevelt Precinct

Idaho County [now mainly Valley County] (Clement Hanson, census taker)

Johnson Creek Trail:

Jacob Camp, age 51, prospector
Clement G. Hanson, age 46, miner
Ida B. Hanson, age 43, (wife)
Albert Hennessey, age 32, miner

Yellow Pine Trail:

Albert C. Behne, age 52, prospector
Oscar Ray Call, (partner), age 32, prospector
Theodore VanMeter, age 58, prospector
Lex(?) VanMeter, (brother), age 46, prospector

Profile Trail:

Samuel Wilson, age 45, prospector;
Samuel Jr. Wilson, (son), age 18, miner;
Charles Ellison, (partner), age 58, miner;

Big Creek Wagon Road:

Eric Jenson, age 40, miner;
Jacob Jenson, (brother), age 36, miner.
Benjamin F. Goldman, age 36, miner

excerpted from: the USGenWeb Project by Sharon McConnel November, 2005
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1912 Second Post office

(link to larger size)

Yellow Pine 2nd post office 1912 with Ray Call, (?) Smith, Theodore VanMeter and Albert C. Behne, postmaster and founder.

source: Copyright Idaho State Historical Society Earl Willson Collection
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Yellow Pine Basin

The Stibnite area was prospected during the Thunder Mountain rush (1902-1905) but developed slowly. Some likely outcrops of antimony were uncovered, as were some veins that showed brick-red streaks of cinnabar, the commercial ore of mercury. Many claims were staked; but the severity of the terrain, the tough, snow-swept, below-zero winters, and the long, roadless distance to a source of necessary camp supplies discouraged most people. Pringle Smith and Albert Hennessey were among the few that stayed and worked the area. During World War I, when mercury for the munitions industry was at a premium, Stibnite came to life again briefly. Some mining was done; some flasks of mercury were shipped and marketed. But it was impossible to get needed mining machinery into the mountains and almost impossible to get the mercury out.

J. J. Oberbillig envisioned development at Stibnite. He spent the years between 1921 and 1927 consolidating the small individual claims, sampling, testing, and blocking out ore that would prove the extent and validity of the veins. He interested Fred W. Bradley in the project, and Bradley took over in 1927. Only hand tools had been used for the exploratory work. There was one small cabin on the property and there were only two trails in. One, the Johnson Creek Trail, crossed high mountains and then a bad stretch known as No Man’s Land, and came down Meadow Creek twelve miles to the single cabin. The other trail followed the East Fork of the South Fork of the Salmon River. Neither was easy to travel.

Bradley installed a mountain telephone line to Yellow Pine. During the summer of 1928, packers brought in 385 tons of machinery and equipment with mules, and they were using 75 head in the packing operation by fall. They could make one round trip between Yellow Pine and Stibnite in a day, and they packed in everything: mining equipment, construction equipment, food. In 1928, the Forest Service started building the road from Yellow Pine and got as far as the East Fork bridge. Bradley started building at Stibnite and reached Salt Creek. Meanwhile, George Stonebreaker, a contractor, hauled 85 tons around on the old Thunder Mountain road. Two steam boilers, one for the sawmill and one for the mine air compressor, were hauled by truck to Twin Bridges and then, with trucks pushing and pulling and aided by four mules, up the Thunder Mountain road to Riordan. There they were unloaded, put on skids, and dragged down the mountain to Stibnite. The load had to be anchored at times to keep it from getting away, and much of the lowering had to be accomplished by the use of block and tackle and snubbing lines thrown around tree trunks.

By 1929 motor trucks were replacing the old pack trains, and by 1930 a hydroelectric plant had been installed and mining machinery was switched over to electric power. A small landing field was cleared. Stonebreaker, who held the government mail contract, retired his dogteam winter postal service to Yellow Pine in favor of a new airplane. The dogs had required three days for the trip from Cascade. The plane was handy for carrying both passengers and light freight in and out of the mountains.

In 1931, the sawmill turned out more than a million feet of lumber for mine and building work; the powerplant was enlarged and rebuilt; a public school was started; and an assay office was completed, as were a post office, numerous warehouses, and new cook and bunk shacks. At the mine, a new record for speed in mine-tunnel driving was established: during the month of August, the Monday tunnel was advanced 663.6 feet. The tunnel, in hard granite, was six by eight feet in the clear where no timber was used and seven by nine feet where timber was required. Three shifts of six men each made the record drive, using two machine drills mounted on crossbars.

Yellow Pine had been a mountain wilderness in 1927; by the end of 1931, it was a modern, busy mining community.

Yellow Pine 1931

… And in 1936, Arthur Campbell, Idaho State Inspector of Mines, was able to write in his annual report: “This property led the State in the production of gold for 1936….Supplies are trucked in from Cascade and concentrates are shipped from that point. In winter, transportation is by airplane. The ore is antimony-gold….

Another wartime mercury shortage, during World War II, helped to make the Stibnite area the second largest producer in the United States in 1943. Important tungsten deposits came into production in 1944, and during the war Stibnite was the leading tungsten producer in the United States. Total yields for the active period, 1932-1952, amounted to $24,000,000 in antimony, $21,000,000 in tungsten $4,000,000 in gold, $3,000,000 in mercury, and $1,000,000 in silver.

source: pgs 14-15, History of the Boise National Forest 1905 1976, by Elizabeth M. Smith. Idaho State Historical Society, 1983
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Yellow Pine Pioneers


Left back: Charles Ellison, Red Metals Mine owner; Fred Holcomb, ranch owner; Henry Abstien, Mining man/horticulturist; Earl Willson, son of Profile Sam.
Left front: Albert Behne, founder of Yellow Pine; Albert Hennessy, miner; Sam (“Profile Sam”) Willson, miner; Bert McCoy, packer; Jimmie Edwards.
Photo courtesy of Long Valley Preservation Society, via Ron Smith
source: Valley County GenWeb
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1920 Census Yellow Pine Precinct

Compiled by: Wesley W. Craig, Ph.D. & Bea Snyder

Abstein, Ednah U. 35 Female Wife
Abstein, H. T. 41 Male Head
Abstein, Henry T. 4 Male Son
Behne, Albert C. 65 Male Head
Call, Oscar R 41 Male Head
Ellison Charles 67 Male Head
Hansen C. G. 56 Male Head
Hansen Ida B. 54 Female Wife
Hennessey, Albert 40 Male Head
Lewis David 75 Male Head
Routson Adelia 22 Female Daughter
Routson Edna 15 Female Daughter
Routson Emmett 12 Male Son
Routson Grant 3 Male Son
Routson John 46 Male Head
Routson John 18 Male Son
Routson Letty 32 Female Wife
Routson Noel 10 Male Son

excerpted from: the USGenWeb Project and the IDGenWeb Project Archives, Wesley W. Craig, Ph.D. & Bea Snyder, January 9, 1997
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1900 Yellow Pine Basin

1900-Idaho-zoomYPBasin-a
(cropped from 1900 Idaho Map)
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Yellow Pine Area Timeline

1903 – Al Hennessey filed his homestead on the 160 acres on Johnson Creek that he called Morrison; he later sold it to Bryants (E. Oberbillig in Sumner, p. 19)

August 1906 – H. T. Abstein, president of the Federal Developing Co. came out from the company’s properties in the Profile & Big creek mining districts. They are developing the Crown King mine and assays on some of the ore shows a value of $5,000 per ton. He goes to Lewiston and will return in ten days. (WT)

October 1906 – Albert Behne established the first post office in Yellow Pine and the first mail service, (at age of 52) (Sumner, p. ) “Behne ran a general store for several years. Yellow Pine basin had been an old station on the trail from Warrens to Boise basin.” (Fuller, p. 225)
Hennessey built 3 miles of road from Twin Bridges toward his ranch (E. Oberbillig in Sumner, p. 19)

June 21, 1906 – The board of county commissioners recently received a communication from forest supervisor F. A. Fenn, of Boise, in which attention is called to the law restricting the sale of liquor within a forest reserve. This affects the saloons in Roosevelt, Knox and along the Boise-Roosevelt State Wagon Road. (WT)

November 22, 1906 – The votes counted in our local precincts as such: Warren 46, Roosevelt 78, Yellow Pine 7, Big Creek 6, Sunnyside 21, Warm Lake 4. (WT)

January 17, 1907 – The mail service at Roosevelt is very irregular. The mail arrived twice last week and was taken in with a dog team. The paper mail arrived twice in about sixteen days brought in on a rawhide with a horse on snowshoes. There was eight feet of snow at Cabin Creek summit and the last snow added four more feet. Roosevelt is quieter this winter than before. (WT)

1907 – Yellow Pine consisted of 3 cabins (Jerri Montgomery in Sumner) Yellow Pine residents consisted of Albert Behne, Theodore VanMeter, Sam Wilson & Earl Wilson (anon, in Sumner, p 73) (Earl was 18 yrs at time of 1910 census)

July 11, 1907 – News came out from Thunder Mountain this week that the town of Roosevelt has sustained a severe fire on July 2nd. Several buildings were burnt to the ground and it was good luck that results were no more serious. (WT)

September 3, 1908 – Deputy Van DeVenter stopped in Warren on his return trip from Roosevelt. That section has been visited by many severe electrical storms and he thinks Thunder Mountain is properly named. Much work has been done on the roads. Hay is selling at 7 cents per pound and oats the same figure. While you can get good accommodations for man at $2 a day, it costs $3 to keep a horse. (Idaho County Free Press, quoted in WT)

April 15, 1909 – The name of the post office on Big Creek is to be changed from Logan to Edwardsburg. (WT)

June 1909 – Sam Wilson is in Warren. He reports 5 ft. snow still at his cabin on Profile. (WT)

June 3, 1909 – A large mudslide began May 30 above Roosevelt & is slowly moving toward the town. (WT)

September 16, 1909 – “Notices are up calling for bids on the Warren-Roosevelt mail route. This is special and contract will be let for only one year. Heretofore the Roosevelt mail has gone by way of Thunder City. Bids are also asked for on a new route running from Edwardsburg to Yellow Pine.” (WT)

1910 – 1915 (circa) – bad fire year, Yellow Pine residents petition into national forest (personal comm. – Glenn Blickenstaff)

October 26,1911 – Theodore VanMeter, Curley & George Brewer, etal, sold Ramey ridge copper camp for $100,000 to back-east investors (Warren Times)

1912 – Henry T. Abstein and Edna Lister Abstein spend honeymoon in cabin he built on Big Creek just across from Profile Gap. (Ted Abstein in Sumner, p. 15)

1913 – Bryants arrive on Johnson Creek. (E. Bryant in Sumner, p. )

1914 – Gold and Antimony claims filed in Stibnite. (Wells, p 157)

March 14, 1918 – For the first time in the history of the state, a small production of quicksilver was made from the Fern Quicksilver Mining Co. about 18 miles SE of Yellow Pine PO. This is a recent discovery made less than 2 years ago by A.E. Van Meter. (WT)

1919 – Hennessey received patent on his Johnson Creek Ranch (E. Oberbillig in Sumner)

1920 – First Yellow Pine School held, in tent (Jerri Montgomery in Sumner)
First School in tent, with 8 students. (Cox p 31)
First teacher was Letha Smith (Fuller, p. 225) – (Willson)

1921 – Hennessey sold his 5 Meadow Creek claims in Stibnite to United Mercury Mines

1922 – A log school house and teacherage built in “town proper” [Yellow Pine] (Cox p 31) (Willson)

April 10, 1922 Henry Abstein receives patent on 160 acres which now is known as Abstein Subdivision. (Valley County Records, Book 3, p. 101)

August, 1922 – $114,000 to be spent in building Cascade-Knox Rd & road from Knox to Johnson Creek; $90,000 to be spent on road from Johnson Crk to Y.P. & S. to Deadwood (WT)

1923 – Johnson Creek Guard Station built, replacing earlier guard station which was east of the present day “Rec Hall”. That building was a storage building, similar in construction to those built by the CC’s in the ’30’s. (p.c., Glenn Blickenstaff, BNFS)

September 27, 1923 – Oscar Ray Call receives patent on the SE 1/4 of the SW 1/4 of Section 21. (public record) (In the 1910 US census Call was 32 years old and living with Albert Behne; he was listed as Behne’s partner). Ray & Roy Call had a mine on Ramey Creek.

Hennessey located Hennessey 1, 2, 3 claims on the Stibnite Pit area and formed the Great Northern Mines Co. with J. L. Niday (Oberbilling in Sumner, p 20)

September 9, 1924 – Albert Behne receives patent on the 47.5 acres that he later plats as Yellow Pine townsite. (SW 1/4 of the SW 1/4 of Section 21, and the northerly portion of NW 1/4 of the NW 1/4 of Section 28) (Valley County Records, Book 3, p. 62)

1926 – Harry Withers, age 28, arrives in Yellow Pine, to work at Stibnite. (Sumner, p. 3)

1927 – F. W. Bradley acquired Stibnite mines. (Wells, p. 157)

Clark & Beulah Cox buy Alec Forstrum ranch on Johnson Creek. Lafe 12 years old at the time. (Cox, p)

June 16, 1930 Albert Behne plats Yellow Pine townsite. (public record) (at age of 76)

August 11, 1931 – “Yellow Pine residents caught on booze charges and in jail at Cascade are Roy Elliott, Charles Carwater, Bert McCoy, Mike Smith, Morris Corbett, Wayne Shapply and Mrs. Shapply, Rose Pigg and LeRoy Parker.” (WT)

1932 – Stibnite production of gold & antimony begins. (Wells, p 157)

1933 – J. J. Oberbilling purchased the Great Northern claims from Hennessey and Niday for $15,000 (E. Oberbilling in Sumner, p. 20)

prior to fall of 1933 – Dan MacAskill worked in Stibnite; crew pulled out as result of forest fires, fires had already run them out of Boise Basin (p.c., CMcC)

excerpt from “Yellow Pine Timeline” – compiled by Sharon McConnel (personal correspondence)
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1930’s Yellow Pine

YP1930szoom-a
(click on image for original)
[Photo taken the year Fay Kissinger built The Corner Bar. Albert Behne’s cabin with vehicle and people out front. The date was before Murph’s Yellow Pine Tavern was built in 1940 and after 1932 when the YP Lodge only had one story. Zoom in for sharp details.]
source: Idaho Transportation Photo Collection
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1930 Yellow Pine Area Census

(sheet 1)

Name Gender Age Marital Status Birth Year

Clark Cox Male 46 Married Head 1884
Beulah Cox Female 40 Married Wife 1890
Lafe E Cox Male 15 Single Son 1915
H B Paxton Male 74 Widowed Head 1856
Willam H Basye Male 58 Widowed Head 1872
Albert C Behne Male 69 Widowed Head 1861
Homer Levander Male 52 Married Head 1878
Sarah H Levander Female 49 Married Wife 1881
John H Levander Male 21 Single Son 1909
C B White Male 62 Widowed Brother-in-law 1868
Albert Hennessy Male 56 Single Head 1874
George M Hennessy Male 57 Single Brother
Robert Beattie Male 53 Single Boarder 1877
Crosby Brewer Male 68 Married Boarder 1862
Leslie McCoy Male 22 Single Head 1908
George H McCoy Male 16 Single Brother 1914
Myron McCoy Male 14 Single Brother 1916
Ray S White Male 21 Single Boarder 1909
Frank F Foster Male 49 Married Head 1881
E M Hussey Male 48 Single Boarder 1882
Fannie B Farsher Female 38 Widowed Head 1892
Worth Farsher Male 14 Single Son 1916
Dorothy Farsher Female 5 Single Daughter 1925
H T Breen Male 48 Single Head 1882 Oregon
Michial K Pofovich Male 58 Widowed Head 1872
Dugen Swain Male 48 Single Boarder 1882
Joseph Powell Male 36 Married Head 1894
William Newell Male 35 Married Lodger 1895
John Hauntz Male 23 Married Lodger 1907
Earl Smead Male 37 Single Lodger 1893
Charles Heim Male 62 Single Lodger 1868
James Carpenter Male 50 Widowed Lodger 1880
Samuel Wilson Male 66 Widowed Head 1864
Wm Lutsfiesh Male 55 Widowed Head 1875
Geo Stonebraker Male 36 Married Head 1894
Louis E Cloff Male 20 Single Lodger 1910
Ralph Handley Male 28 Married Lodger 1902
Jack Ritter Male 29 Single Lodge 1901
Henry Abstein Male 52 Married Lodger 1878
Geo B Kennedy Male 61 Married Lodger 1869
James Thompson Male 53 Married Lodger 1877
Oscar Shatluck [Shattuck] Male 60 Married Lodger 1870
H W Power Male 48 Married Lodger 1882
Peter Hillman Male 36 Single Lodger 1894

source: Family Search

1930sVantrease-a
Leonard and Eva Vantrease in roughly 1930

(1930 Census sheet 2)

Name Gender Age Marital Status Birth Year

Leonard Vantrease 27 Married Head 1903
Eva Vantrease 24 Married Wife 1906
Jean Vantrease 3 Single Daughter 1927
Norman Vantrease 2 Single Son 1928
Mildred Young 17 Single Sister In Law 1913
Wayne Wright 31 Married Head 1899
Mary Wright 23 Married Wife 1907
Howard Wright 38 Brother 1892
Coral Wright 46 Married Head 1884
Zelma Wright 41 Married Wife 1889
John Wright 18 Single Son 1912
Gail Wright 14 Single Son 1916
Francis Wright 10 Single Son 1920
Dorris A. Wright 8 Single Daughter 1922
Charles D. Wright 6 Single Son 1924
Pauline Wright 2 Single Daughter 1928
Wirt Jackson 28 Married Head 1902
Edna Jackson 27 Married Wife 1903
Ralph Jackson 5 Single Son 1925
Virgil Jackson 3 Single Son 1927
Thomas OHern 47 Single Head 1883
Frank Lord 54 Single Head 1876
Alice Lord 79 Widowed Mother 1851
Butler Wells 66 Widowed Head 1864
Perry NethRen 45 Married Head 1885
Pierce Wannemaker 70 Single Boarder 1860
Elmar Taylor 41 Married Head 1889
Eva Taylor 28 Married Wife 1902
Roy Murdick 42 Single Brother In Law 1888
Earl Wells 26 Married Head 1904
Bessie Wells 23 Married Wife 1907
Autoissi Jorajuria 44 Single Head 1886

courtesy: Richard Vantrease (personal correspondence)
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1930 Plat Map of Yellow Pine

1930YPplatBk1p62-aSigned by Albert C. Behne
(click for original)
source: Back County History Project
[h/t SMc]
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Related Articles:

Link: Albert C. Behne
Link: Yellow Pine Area Historical Photos 1928
Link: Yellow Pine History Index Page
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Updated October 23, 2020

Road Reports June 17

Yellow Pine: We are having a little rain this weekend, local streets are damp, watch for deep pot holes near the Fire Hall. Click for Local Forecast.
Yellow Pine Webcam:

Johnson Creek Stream Gauge:
https://waterdata.usgs.gov/id/nwis/uv?13313000

Warm Lake Highway: Chip sealing has started on Warm Lake Highway. A report from Thursday (June 14) the chip sealing work is near Cascade, one lane closed with flagger, about 5 minute delay.

South Fork Road: Last report (June 14) Road is in good shape, watch for trees sticking out in the road.
Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
South Fork Stream Gauge:
https://waterdata.usgs.gov/id/nwis/uv?13310700

EFSF Road: Last report (June 13) Mail truck driver (Robert) reports the EFSF road is still in good shape.

Johnson Creek Road: Open.  Last report (June 13) mail truck driver reported the county crew had graded the upper end and was approaching Wapiti Meadow Ranch. The lower end near Yellow Pine was reported to be really rough, watch for very deep pot holes near the Ice Hole area, lots of pot holes between the dump and the village too.
The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet
Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam:

Lick Creek: Probably Open. Last update (June 11) Had reports that folks were able to make it in over Lick Creek summit. This doesn’t mean the road is “good” tho.
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: (June 16) One skinny track is open over the summit, narrow vehicles only. No trucks or trailers.
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.
Big Creek Webcam:

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open. Old report Friday (May 11) report that it’s rough in some places, some wash boards starting, and still fairly smooth in other places.

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Closed. Old report (May 29) Not advised to go beyond Stibnite, snow line is below the Fern Cabin. (Probably higher by now.)
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Closed.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.
(May 21) Warren Wagon Road is open to Secesh and Warren.
(May 23) Secesh Summit (McCall to Warren). Valley County plowed the road open this week.
(May 23) Warren Summit (Warren to the South Fork of the Salmon River) is open with caution as Valley County has not surveyed the roadway for damage yet – travelers may run into road issues.

Deadwood Summit: Open. Report from Deadwood Outfitters (June 5) “Deadwood Summit is open and in good shape.”
Note: The approx elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
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Weather Reports June 10-16

Johnson Creek Stream Gauge

20180617JohnsonCrkGauge-a

June 10 Weather:

At 9am it was 39 degrees and mostly cloudy to partly clear. At 4pm it was 50 degrees, mostly cloudy / partly clear and breezy. At 845pm it was 47 degrees and mostly cloudy. At 1025pm it was 43 degrees. Breeze gusting up around 1245am (wind chimes clanged a little.) Sharp gusts just before 120am. Light rain falling at 125am.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time June 11, 2018 at 09:00AM
Low overcast, new snow above 6000′
Max temperature 55 degrees F
Min temperature 37 degrees F
At observation 39 degrees F
Precipitation 0.10 inch
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June 11 Weather:

At 9am it was 39 degrees, low overcast, foggy belts and new snow above 6000′. Breaks in the clouds, scattered sunshine and cool early afternoon. At 830pm it was 48 degees and clear. At 10pm it was 41 degrees.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time June 12, 2018 at 09:00AM
Clear, light breeze
Max temperature 61 degrees F
Min temperature 29 degrees F
At observation 43 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
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June 12 Weather:

At 9am it was 43 degrees, clear and ice on the water pan. At 3pm it was 71 degrees, clear and very light breeze. At 840pm it was 61 degrees, mostly cloudy (very thin high haze and wispy mare’s tails.)

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time June 13, 2018 at 09:00AM
Clear
Max temperature 77 degrees F
Min temperature 36 degrees F
At observation 51 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
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June 13 Weather:

At 9am it was 51 degrees and clear. Wind gusting up around lunch time. At 215pm it was 81 degrees, clear and windy. High hazy clouds by 445pm. At 830pm it was 70 degrees, much calmer and mostly clear.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time June 14, 2018 at 09:00AM
Partly cloudy, light breezes
Max temperature 83 degrees F
Min temperature 45 degrees F
At observation 60 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
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June 14 Weather:

At 9am it was 60 degrees, partly cloudy and light breezes. At 2pm it was 70 degrees. At 3pm it was 69 degrees, mostly cloudy and a bit breezy. At 830pm it was 62 degrees, mostly cloudy and very light breezes.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time June 15, 2018 at 09:00AM
Clear
Max temperature 74 degrees F
Min temperature 41 degrees F
At observation 53 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
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June 15 Weather:

At 9am it was 53 degrees and clear. Cloudy by late morning, light breezes. At 2pm it was 69 degrees, mostly cloudy and mild breezes. Dark clouds and sprinkles on and off after 4pm. Steady light rain at 455pm for about 30 minutes. Light gentle shower at 8pm. At 815pm it was 54 degrees, mostly overcast (sun setting in a sucker hole) and not raining.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time June 16, 2018 at 09:00AM
Partly clear, slight breeze
Max temperature 71 degrees F
Min temperature 36 degrees F
At observation 45 degrees F
Precipitation 0.01 inch
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June 16 Weather:

At 9am it was 45 degrees, partly clear and slight breeze. Drops of rain falling at 2pm, lasted about 5 minutes, not enough to get wet. At 315pm it was 65 degrees, mostly cloudy and light variable breezes. A light sprinke of rain started around 530pm, lasted about 30 minutes. At 830pm it was 56 degrees, mostly clear and light cool breezes. Looked like it had rained a little before 7am. Raining again before 9am.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time June 17, 2018 at 09:00AM
Low overcast, light rainfall
Max temperature 70 degrees F
Min temperature 41 degrees F
At observation 46 degrees F
Precipitation 0.05 inch
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