Monthly Archives: July 2018

Fire Updates July 31

Fire Updates July 31

Note: There are NO fires currently threatening Yellow Pine. This morning we have Yellow Air quality, moderate smoke in the air. Please be very careful with fire, we have not had a drop of rain the entire month of July! Hwy 55 is open, watch for fire equipment and rocks/logs rolling down into the road.
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Mile Marker 73 / Highway 55 Fire

Location: 4. Miles N. of Horseshoe Bend, Idaho
Cause Under Investigation
Date of Origin Wednesday July 25th, 2018 approx. 04:00 PM
Current fire size: 4,634 acres.
Containment: 100%
Resources on the fire: Four engines, three crews, one Type 2 helicopter
Total personnel: 105

The Type 1 Great Basin Incident Management Team reached 100% containment of the Mile Marker 73 Highway 55 Fire at 9 PM on July 29, 2018.

Management of the fire changed to a local interagency Type 3 Team on July 30, 2018. Fire crews will continue to monitor the fire’s perimeter and extinguish hotspots along the fire’s edge. The number of fire resources will reduce to meet the needs of monitoring and mop-up.

As resources begin fire line repair and removing equipment from secured areas of the fire, motorists may encounter higher numbers of fire vehicles and people working on or near the highway. Use extra caution and reduce speeds if you encounter them. Drivers should be aware of rocks and debris on the highway. Rocks and vegetation on the steep slopes have become unstable due to fire activity and may roll down slope. When mop-up is complete, management of the fire will go back to the local Idaho Department of Lands office.

July 29, 2018 Perimeter map

Mile Marker 73 / Highway 55 Fire InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6037/

Highway 55 fire now 100 percent contained

by CBS 2 News Staff Monday, July 30th 2018


(Boise National Forest Fire Prevention Technician Jessica Kearney-Reeves)

Gardena, Idaho (CBS 2) — A wildfire that scorched more than 4,000 acres along Highway 55 and disrupted highway travel is now 100 percent contained.

The Idaho Department of Lands said Monday the Mile Marker 73 Highway 55 Fire reached the containment marker on Sunday.

It’s burned a total of 4,634 acres.

Fire crews are still on the ground monitoring the fire’s perimeter and extinguishing hot spots along the fire’s edge. Though the highway opened up for weekend travel, officials encouraged drivers to use Highway 95 and 21.

Horeshoe Bend’s fire chief told CBS 2 News that the fire was started by a vehicle with safety chains that caused a spark.

source:
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Mesa Fire

Location 4 miles south of Council, Idaho
Cause Human
Date of Origin Thursday July 26th, 2018 approx. 08:00 PM

Mesa Fire Update July 30, 2018

Current Size: 27,099 acres
Containment: 5%
Resources on Fire: There are currently 264 personnel on this incident.

Firefighters assisted by aerial resources and engines continue to suppress the Mesa Fire

FIRE UPDATE – Strong winds and high temperatures will affect the fire area today. North winds caused the fire to move further up the Middle Fork of the Weiser River, Fall Creek, and the North Fork of Grays to the east and southeast.

Additional growth occurred on the southern flank, south of Grays Creek Road. On the northern flank, the fire continued to progress up the Cottonwood drainage to the north.

There was little growth on the western flank of the fire where fuels are lighter and fire lines held. Firefighters assisted by aerial resources and engines will continue to build fire line. When needed, they will use burn out operations when it will assist in stopping or containing the fire.

Various pieces of firefighting equipment will be staged at the ITD yard south of COuncil. As needed on the fire, equipment will be ready and prepared to deploy from that area.

Structure Protection will continue by the Council Fire District and Indian Valley Rural Department.

Fuel moistures are very low and the fire has been pushed by winds and steep terrain. The weather continues to be very hot and dry and will remain a challenge for firefighting efforts.

EVACUATIONS – There are no mandatory evacuations at this time. North Grays Creek remains at a Level 2, pre-evacuation status.

CLOSURES – There is a Forest Closure Order in effect (#0412-522) for areas within and surrounding the Mesa Fire.

Mesa Fire Update July 31, 2018

Current Size: 29,885 acres
Containment: 16%
Resources on Fire: There are currently 382 personnel on this incident.

FIRE UPDATE – The fire area saw moderate wind yesterday which subdued the fire activity. Smoke will be heavy today due to the fires in Oregon and California. For up to date information regarding smoke you can go to this website: Idaho Satellite Smoke Analysis https://arcg.is/1zfeqH. This site also has information on health warnings and other information.

Weather, terrain and fuel are major factors for the Mesa Fire. Temperatures will reach 90 degrees today, but the threat of thunderstorms potentially producing gusty erratic winds will be more of a concern. Steep terrain exists on the most active areas of the fire. Hazards for firefighters include snags and rolling materials.

The fire continues to see active torching, running, flanking and backing, and continues to remain active at night. We have a swing shift that works into the night and are actively suppressing the fire during that shift. The fire is continuing to spread up the Middle Fork of the Weiser River to the east, and up both Fall Creek and the North Fork of Grays Creek to the southeast. The northern flank continues to move up the Cottonwood drainage to the northeast. Containment lines on the western flank are holding with no additional growth along the highway 95 corridor.

Due to the amount of fires nationwide resources are spread thin. Where we have resources, fire managers are placing them on the fire for the best utilization. Resources are being staged at the ITD yard and when needed are being sent to areas on the fire that are needing them. You may see pieces of equipment in the staging area and wonder why they are not out on the fire. The reason could be that we have sufficient amount of equipment for the specific operation being conducted. Staged resources are on stand by and are mobilized throughout the day. Please be assured, all resources are being utilized on the Mesa Fire.

EVACUATIONS – There are no mandatory evacuations at this time. North Grays Creek remains at a Level 2, pre-evacuation status. Level 2 Evacuations indicate be set, you may be contacted and will need to leave immediately if it is deemed necessary to go to Level 3.

CLOSURES – There is a Forest Closure Order in effect (#0412-522) for areas within and surrounding the Mesa Fire. For more information – https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/article/6041/44562/

Mesa Fire Infared Map July 31

Mesa Fire, July 29 From the Council RD

Mesa Fire InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6041/
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Keithly Fire

Location 4 miles west of Midvale, ID
Cause Lightning
Date of Origin Wednesday July 25th, 2018 approx. 11:45 AM
Current as of 7/31/2018, 8:21:14 AM
Total Personnel 181
Size 17,600 Acres
Percent of Perimeter Contained 97%
Estimated Containment Date Friday August 03rd, 2018 approx. 12:00 AM

Keithly Creek Fire Information 7/30

Fire Information Line: (208) 414-0044 8a.m. – 8p.m.
Email address: 2018.keithly@firenet.gov
Inciweb: https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6038/
Twitter: @Idahofireinfo

This is the final update for the Keithly Fire unless significant activity occurs. As of Tuesday July 31, please direct questions about the Keithly Fire to the Payette National Forest Information Line at 208-634-0820.

Summary: Several days of hard work by firefighters have increased containment to 84%. The fire has not grown in three days. It remains 17,600 acres with most of the fire area cold.

The northeastern corner of the fire in Keithly Creek remains uncontained. Three handcrews are working to cold trail the area to ensure there is no remaining heat in the fire area. A resource adviser has spent several days with firefighters identifying fences and dozer lines to repair. There is extensive repair work in Keithly Creek area that requires additional shifts for heavy equipment to repair. As they complete this work, containment will increase with full containment expected by the end of the week.

Outlook: Operations staff are diverting resources to the Mesa Fire on the Council Ranger District and other area fires in greater need of equipment and supplies. The remaining resources assigned to the Keithly Fire will focus on repairing containment lines, repairing fences and monitoring the fire to ensure dust devils do not reignite the fire.

Due to the decrease in operational tempo and resource demands, a transfer of command from Great Basin Incident Management Team 5 to a smaller incident management organization will occur Tuesday, July 31. This organization will manage the repair work necessary to complete repair work. Tuesday, the Incident Command Post in Weiser will break down, freeing resources and supplies for other area fires.

The Team extends our appreciation to the community for their hospitality and support the past four days while working from the Weiser High School.

Weather: Incident meteorologists are forecasting hot, dry conditions through the week. There is a slight chance of thunderstorms Monday evening that may bring erratic winds. If new fire starts occur, these conditions will promote very aggressive fire growth.

National Forest Closure: Recreation opportunities at Mann Creek Reservoir have reopened today; however the Forest land beyond the reservoir is still under a closure Order. For public safety and protection from hazards associated with wildfire, the Payette National Forest issued a forest closure in the area of Mann’s Creek and Keithly Creek. The following roads entering the area are closed at the National Forest Boundary: White Pine Creek, Keithly Creek, Mann’s Creek, and Jenkins Creek on the East and South boundaries; Dennett Creek on the West boundary; Middle Fork and Brownlee on the north boundary. The closure includes all roads and trails within the area. For a full description and map of the closure, go to the Keithly Fire on Inciweb: https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6038/

Closure Area Map 27 July 2018

Keithly Fire Inciweb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6038/
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Trestle Fire

Location 4.5 miles north of Smith’s Ferry
Cause Under Investigation
Date of Origin Monday July 23rd, 2018 approx. 05:00 PM
Size 129 Acres
Percent of Perimeter Contained 100%

July 29, 2018

The 129 acre Trestle Creek Fire is 100% contained. Fire crews will rehabilitate fire lines by installing waterbars to prevent erosion and will continue to monitor the fire’s perimeter and extinguish hotspots along the fire’s edge.

Fire resources will be traveling along the river corridor and motorists are asked to use caution when driving HWY55. The Cabarton Road boat launch is open and boaters along the river should not stop in the burned area.

Management of this fire is changing from the Type 3 Team to the Southern Idaho Timber Protective Association (SITPA) at 6 AM, Tuesday, July 31, 2018. The number of resources will be reduced to meet the needs of monitoring and mop-up.

SITPA, the Idaho Department of Lands and the U.S. Forest Service worked together to contain the fire.

The fire was reported on Monday, July 23, just before 5 P.M. It started about four and a half miles north of Smith’s Ferry on the bank of the North Fork of the Payette River.

For safety, traffic along the highway and boaters on the river should not stop to look at the fire.

The Cabarton Road boat launch is open.

Trestle Creek Fire Map July 28, 2018

Click to access 2018_07_28-11.38.17.609-CDT.pdf

Trestle Fire InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6017/
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Rattlesnake Creek Fire

Location West side of Highway 95 near mile marker 184; near Pollock
Cause Under Investigation
Date of Origin Monday July 23rd, 2018 approx. 12:00 PM
Current as of 7/30/2018, 10:34:22 PM
Total Personnel 534
Size 3,620 Acres
Percent of Perimeter Contained 25%

7/30/2018 Daily Update

Fire Information Line: 208-495-6934

The Rattlesnake Creek Fire was first reported Monday, July 23rd and is a potential threat to numerous structures in the vicinity of Pollock, Idaho. Mike Almas’ Type 2 Incident Management Team is currently managing the fire.

Sunday, crews made good progress constructing direct line around the southern flank of the fire, connecting dozer line with new handline. Burnout operations along the fire’s northwestern perimeter Saturday were successful, and crews began mopping up in the area. Hand line along the northern flank continued to hold as crews patrolled and mopped up. Firefighters on the southwestern flank began constructing indirect line, as managers assessed possible locations to engage the fire. Crews continued to patrol the Highway 95 corridor and were completing structure protection assessments on residences to the north and south.

Crews hope to secure the line on the fire’s northern flank on Monday and will then begin transitioning resources to efforts along the southwestern flank of the fire. Mop up will continue on the northwest and southern flanks until the direct hand lines are secure. Crews on the southwestern flank will continue constructing indirect line as the Lockwood Point area is not safe for firefighters to engage until other containment lines are secure. Managers will be in the area Monday to continue assessing for the most effective ways to engage the fire.

Resources Threatened: Private property and structures in the Pollock, Pinehurst and Whitewater Wilderness Ranch Estates areas remain threatened, as well as threats to state and federal infrastructure (Highway 95) and natural resources.

Evacuations and Closures: Residents in the North Pollock, Whitewater Wilderness Ranch Estates, and Pinehurst areas remain in pre-evacuation status (“Be Set”). Some road and area closures remain in effect, to provide for public safety.Residents in the general vicinity should remain vigilant and refer to the Sheriff’s Office Facebook pages for any status updates. Both Idaho and Adams counties use AlertSense for emergency alerts. For Adams Co., visit http://co.adams.id.us/departments/sheriff/ to sign up. In Idaho Co., call the Sheriff’s Department @ 208-983-1100 to enroll.

Additionally, the Nez Perce-Clearwater and Payette National Forests have area closures in effect, including portions of the Hells Canyon National Recreation Area (NRA); see http://www.fs.usda.gov/alerts/nezperceclearwater/alerts-notices or the closures tab on Inciweb for more details.

Weather & Fuel Conditions: An excessive heat watch is in effect from noon today through 9pm Tuesday with relative humidities under 10%. Dry fuels, such as grasses and pine litter, will continue to fuel fire spread, driven by light northwest and terrain-influenced winds. Smoke will settle in the valleys with nightly inversions and will persist until mid-day.

Temporary Flight Restrictions: Temporary flight restrictions (TFR) are in effect around the entire fire area. Remember, that temporary flight restrictions also apply to unmanned aircraft systems (drones), so if you fly, we can’t!

Announcements: Smoke and traffic congestion will continue to be potential hazards along the Highway 95 corridor. For public and firefighter safety, please adhere to all safety signage and speed reductions and do not stop along the highway corridor near the fire. For road conditions and closures, check out Idaho 511 (website, app, or dial 511).

For smoke monitoring information, see Idaho Department of Environmental Quality

http://www.deq.idaho.gov/air-quality/burning/current-wildfire-smoke-info/ OR https://www.airnow.gov/index.cfm?action=topics.smoke_wildfires

Chinook at Work. Photo Credit: Manbee Mignerey 7/28

07/31/2018 Rattlesnake Fire Perimeter Map

Click to access 2018_07_31-10.23.40.932-CDT.pdf

Rattlesnake Creek Fire InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/5999/
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Lodgepole Fire

Location 16 miles NE of Garden Valley, ID
Cause Human
Date of Origin Tuesday April 24th, 2018 approx. 12:00 AM
Current as of 7/30/2018, 11:34:05 AM
Total Personnel 48
Size 1,616 Acres
Percent of Perimeter Contained 80%
Estimated Containment Date Monday August 20th, 2018 approx. 12:00 AM

Lodgepole Fire management team ramping down

Emmett, Idaho, July 30, 2018 — As firefighting crews successfully mop-up remaining hot spots and secure containment lines around the Lodgepole Fire, located about 14 miles north of Crouch, resources are being scaled back. On July 26, a local Type 4 Incident Management Team took over fire suppression efforts and are currently overseeing 36 firefighters being supported by one helicopter and two engines.

The fire remains at 1,616 acres and is 80 percent contained. Full containment expected around Aug. 20.

An area closure remains in place for public and firefighter safety. The road to Silver Creek Plunge remains open, as does the Plunge itself and area Forest Service campgrounds.

“Firefighters are feeling good about the progress made and that the fire will remain in the box we have around it, but predicted temperature increases and winds associated with passing storm cells will test our containment lines,” said Emmett District Ranger Richard Newton. “Although resources have been reduced to match our progress, fire personnel will continue to patrol and monitor the fireline. I anticipate that we will be monitoring this incident until we receive enough moisture to completely extinguish the fire.”

The Lodgepole Fire originally was a prescribed fire ignited April 24. Pockets of smoldering heat in heavy fuels, combined with hot and dry weather, resulted in a creeping fire causing smoke to settle into nearby Crouch and threatened to grow outside the project boundary. It was declared a wildfire July 14.

To view closure area maps online, visit https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/5929/

For more information contact Mike Williamson, Acting Public Affairs Officer, 208-373-4105.

7-30-2018 Infared Map of Lodgepole Fire

Lodgepole Fire InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/5929/
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Kiwah Fire

Location eight (8) miles northwest of Indian Creek Guard Station on the south side of the Indian Creek drainage in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness
Cause Lightning
Date of Origin Wednesday July 18th, 2018 approx. 05:30 PM
Current as of 7/31/2018, 8:01:04 AM
Size 295 Acres

July 30, 2018 Fire Update

The lightning caused Kiwah Fire, detected at approximately 5:30 p.m. on July 17, 2018, is estimated at 295 acres, burning in fir, lodgepole, and spruce. The fire is located eight (8) miles northwest of Indian Creek Guard Station on the south side of the Indian Creek drainage in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness, in steep, inaccessible terrain. The fire continues to grow to the northeast towards Indian Creek and east down Papoose Creek. Staffing includes four (4) firefighters and monitoring continues by area lookouts and air patrols. The fire is currently in monitor status and is being allowed to play, as nearly as possible, its natural ecological role in the environment while providing for firefighter and public safety.

The lightning caused Mayfield Fire, estimated at 0.1 acres, burning in dead and down timber. The fire is not staffed and is located four (4) miles southeast of Upper Loon Airstrip in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness, in steep, inaccessible terrain. There is no smoke showing on the fire and acreage has not increased. Fire managers continue to monitor the fire, while providing for firefighter and public safety.

The Sawlog Fire was detected yesterday afternoon and is estimated at five (5) acres. The fire is burning in lodgepole pine and fir, located near Castle Rock Peak, and Furnace and Camas Creeks, approximately 40 miles southwest of Salmon. Currently there are two (2) helicopters, one (1) engine and 20 firefighters assigned, with additional resources on order. Cause of the fire is currently under investigation.

Currently, there are 48 uncontained large fires in the west, which are filtering smoke into the valleys surrounding Salmon and Challis. The Mesa Fire on the Payette National Forest, near Council, Idaho and the Sharps Fire on Eastern Idaho Area,Idaho Department of Lands, six miles east of Bellevue, Idaho, to our west as well as other fires in Idaho, California, Oregon, Nevada, as sometimes the fires in Canada are filtering smoke into the valleys. You can find information about these fires on Inicweb at https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/. Further information on smoke can be found at http://airquality.deq.idaho.gov/ and http://idsmoke.blogspot.com/.

A ridge will expand across the central mountains, bringing warmer and dry conditions Monday. The potential for thunderstorms increases later Tuesday and continues Wednesday, including overnight hours. Storms initially will be dry Tuesday, eventually mixing with wet storms Wednesday.

Updates and information will be provided as significant changes occur. The Central Idaho Dispatch Zone is at HIGH Fire Danger.

Visit the Salmon-Challis National Forest website: http://www.fs.usda.gov/main/scnf/home, and check out News & Events, ‘Like Us’ on https://www.facebook.com/salmonchallisnf, and ‘Follow Us’ on https://twitter.com/SalmonChallisNF for further information.

Kiwah Fire July 29, 2018

Kiwah Fire InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/5995/
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Sharps Fire

Location 6 miles east of Bellevue Idaho
Cause Human
Date of Origin Sunday July 29th, 2018 approx. 11:15 AM
Current as of 7/30/2018, 2:30:39 PM
Total Personnel 105
Size: estimated 27,000 acres
Cause: exploding target

Sharps Fire Update 7/30

PRE-EVACUATION NOTICE: Fish Creek Road is under a pre-evacuation notice. This fire is active and running. Residents should prepare to leave at a moment’s notice. Gather critical documents, medications, children, and pets and be ready to go.

MANDATORY EVACUATIONS:

The Blaine County Sheriff has ordered the immediate mandatory evacuation of the Little Wood Recreation Area campground and all residences on Little Wood Reservoir Road and Flat Top Road north of the reservoir.

CLOSURES: Muldoon Road is closed from EE-DA-HO Ranch to Hunt Road. The public is asked to stay out of these areas to allow for fire fighter and public safety. Both Little Wood River Reservoir and High Five Recreation sites recreation are evacuated and closed to the public.

Fire behavior remained extreme today with the fire growing to the northeast. Crews worked to improve roads and containment lines along the west side of the fire to create an anchor point. Firefighters continue to battle challenging conditions throughout the day with difficult terrain, gusty winds, high temperatures and low humidity. So far, over 142,000 gallons of water and retardant have been dropped on the fire.

The Great Basin National Incident Management Team One in-briefed with Twin Falls fire management this evening, the team will assume control of the fire beginning at 6 a.m., July 31.

For More Information: Kelsey Brizendine, Fire Information and Prevention Officer, kbrizendine@blm.gov 208-308-5991

For information for Idaho Fires visit: http://www.idahofireinfo.com

For information regarding the Sharps Fire visit: https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6055/

Overhead view 7/29

Sharps Aerial Map 7/30

Sharps Fire InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6055/
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Grassy Ridge Fire

Location 15 miles northwest of St. Anthony, Idaho
Cause Lightning
Date of Origin Thursday July 26th, 2018 approx. 04:00 PM
Current as of 7/30/2018, 8:13:59 PM
Total Personnel 273
Size 103,935 Acres
Percent of Perimeter Contained 88%
Estimated Containment Date Friday August 03rd, 2018 approx. 12:00 AM

Update 7-31-18, Grassy Ridge Fire

The focus for fire resources today is to continue to reinforce containment lines around the perimeter of the fire and also around the many large unburned vegetative islands within the fire perimeter. The goal will be to reach 100 % containment. The weather will be hot and dry today with an increasing chance of thunderstorms later this evening and into Wednesday.

Another task today will be to map the dozer line and assess the suppression repair work. The intent of suppression repair is to return the area disturbed during suppression actions to a more natural condition. Constructing water diversion structures to prevent erosion of the fireline is one common item involved in the repair, as is pulling berms over the line.

The A-2 and the Red Roads are now open for traffic. Please drive slowly and cautiously if traveling on these roads, as fire crews are still working along the roads.

Air Quality: For information on wildfire smoke the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality has a fact sheet that can be found at: http://www.deq.idaho.gov/air-quality/burning/wildland-fires/

Resources: Crews 5, Engines 22, Dozers 8, Water Tenders 7, Helicopters 3 and Total Personnel 273.

Searchin’ for cattle, Sunday July 29, 2018

Fire Progression Map 7/31

Click to access 2018_07_31-10.04.32.279-CDT.pdf

Grassy Ridge Fire InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6047/
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July wildfire wrap: Sharps, Mesa fires grow, crews make progress on other area blazes

by Deni Hawkins Tuesday, July 31st 2018


The Mesa fire has burned 27,000 acres south of Council

Boise, Idaho (KBOI) — Idaho fire crews still have their hands full battling several wildfires in our state, but good progress is being made on a number of those as July wraps up.

Here’s the breakdown:

continued:
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Fire Update July 30, 2018

Fire Update July 30, 2018

Note: There are NO fires threatening Yellow Pine. Slight haze of smoke in the air this morning.
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Mesa Fire

Location 4 miles south of Council, Idaho
Cause Human
Date of Origin Thursday July 26th, 2018 approx. 08:00 PM
Total Personnel 264
Size 27,099 Acres
Percent of Perimeter Contained 5%

Mesa Fire July 30 Update

Firefighters assisted by aerial resources and engines continue to suppress the Mesa Fire

FIRE UPDATE – Strong winds and high temperatures will affect the fire area today. North winds caused the fire to move further up the Middle Fork of the Weiser River, Fall Creek, and the North Fork of Grays to the east and southeast. Additional growth occurred on the southern flank, south of Grays Creek Road. On the northern flank the fire continued to progress up the Cottonwood drainage to the north. The good news is that there was little growth on the western flank where fuels are lighter and lines held. Firefighters assisted by aerial resources and engines will continue to build line. When needed, they will be using firing operations when it will assist in stopping or containing the fire. The public will see various pieces of equipment at the ITD yard. Equipment is being staged there. That means as needed on the fire equipment will be ready and prepared to go from that area. Structure Protection will continue by the Council Fire District and Indian Valley Rural Department.

Fuel moistures are very low and the fire has been pushed by winds and steep terrain. The weather continues to be very hot and dry and will remain a challenge for firefighting efforts.

EVACUATIONS – There are no mandatory evacuations at this time. North Grays Creek remains at a Level 2, pre-evacuation status.

CLOSURES – There is a Forest Closure Order in effect (#0412-522) for areas within and surrounding the Mesa Fire. For more information – https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/article/6041/44562/

Mesa Fire IR Map July 29

Mesa Fire InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6041/
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Keithly Fire

Location 4 miles west of Midvale, ID
Cause Lightning
Date of Origin Wednesday July 25th, 2018 approx. 11:45 AM
Total Personnel 259
Size 17,600 Acres
Percent of Perimeter Contained 84%
Estimated Containment Date Friday August 03rd, 2018 approx. 12:00 AM

Keithly Fire Update Jully 30 – Final Update

Several days of hard work by firefighters have increased containment to 84% July 30. The fire has not grown in three days. It remains 17,600 acres with most of the fire area cold.

The northeastern corner of the fire in Keithly Creek remains uncontained. Three handcrews are working to cold trail the area to ensure there is no remaining heat in the fire area. A resource advisor has spent several days with firefighters identifying fences and dozer lines to repair. There is extensive repair work in Keithly Creek area that requires a couple more shifts for heavy equipment to repair. As they complete this work, containment will increase with full containment expected by the end of the week.

This is the final update for the Keithly Fire unless significant activity occurs. As of Tuesday July 31, please direct questions about the Keithly Fire to the Payette National Forest Information Line at 208-634-0820.

Outlook: Operations staff are diverting resources to the Mesa and other area fires in greater need of equipment and supplies. The remaining resources assigned to the Keithly Fire will focus on repairing containment lines, repairing fences and monitoring the fire to ensure dust devils do not reignite the fire.

Due to the decrease in operational tempo and resource demands, a transfer of command from Great Basin Incident Management Team 5 to a smaller incident management organization will occur Tuesday, July 31. This organization will manage the repair work necessary to complete repair work. Tuesday, the Incident Command Post in Weiser will break down, freeing resources and other supplies for other area fires. The Team extends our appreciation to the community for their hospitality and support the past four days while working from the Weiser High School.

Weather: Incident meteorologists are forecasting hot, dry conditions through the week. There is a slight chance of thunderstorms Monday evening that may bring erratic winds. If new fire starts occur, these conditions will promote very aggressive fire growth.

National Forest Closure: For public safety and protection from hazards associated with wildfire, the Payette National Forest issued a forest closure in the area of Mann’s Creek and Keithly Creek. The following roads entering the area are closed at the National Forest Boundary: White Pine Creek, Keithly Creek, Mann’s Creek, and Jenkins Creek on the East and South boundaries; Dennett Creek on the West boundary; Middle Fork and Brownlee on the north boundary. The closure includes all roads and trails within the area. For a full description and map of the closure, go to the Keithly Fire on Inciweb: https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6038/

Closure Area Map 27 July 2018

Keithly Creek July 30

Keithly Fire Inciweb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6038/
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Mile Marker 73 / Highway 55 Fire

Location 25 miles north of Boise, Idaho.
Cause Under Investigation
Date of Origin Wednesday July 25th, 2018 approx. 04:00 PM
Total Personnel 316
Size 4,653 Acres
Percent of Perimeter Contained 80%
Estimated Containment Date Tuesday August 07th, 2018 approx. 12:00 AM

Mile Marker 73 / Highway 55 Fire InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6037/
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Trestle Fire

Location 4.5 miles north of Smith’s Ferry
Cause Under Investigation
Date of Origin Monday July 23rd, 2018 approx. 05:00 PM
Total Personnel 101
Size 129 Acres
Percent of Perimeter Contained 100%

Trestle Fire InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6017/
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Rattlesnake Creek Fire

Location West side of Highway 95 near mile marker 184; near Pollock
Cause Under Investigation
Date of Origin Monday July 23rd, 2018 approx. 12:00 PM
Total Personnel 528
Size 3,509 Acres
Percent of Perimeter Contained 18%

7/30/2018 Daily Update

Fire Information Line: 208-495-6934

The Rattlesnake Creek Fire was first reported Monday, July 23rd and is a potential threat to numerous structures in the vicinity of Pollock, Idaho. Mike Almas’ Type 2 Incident Management Team is currently managing the fire.

Sunday, crews made good progress constructing direct line around the southern flank of the fire, connecting dozer line with new handline. Burnout operations along the fire’s northwestern perimeter Saturday were successful, and crews began mopping up in the area. Hand line along the northern flank continued to hold as crews patrolled and mopped up. Firefighters on the southwestern flank began constructing indirect line, as managers assessed possible locations to engage the fire. Crews continued to patrol the Highway 95 corridor and were completing structure protection assessments on residences to the north and south.

Crews hope to secure the line on the fire’s northern flank on Monday and will then begin transitioning resources to efforts along the southwestern flank of the fire. Mop up will continue on the northwest and southern flanks until the direct hand lines are secure. Crews on the southwestern flank will continue constructing indirect line as the Lockwood Point area is not safe for firefighters to engage until other containment lines are secure. Managers will be in the area Monday to continue assessing for the most effective ways to engage the fire.

Resources Threatened: Private property and structures in the Pollock, Pinehurst and Whitewater Wilderness Ranch Estates areas remain threatened, as well as threats to state and federal infrastructure (Highway 95) and natural resources.

Evacuations and Closures: Residents in the North Pollock, Whitewater Wilderness Ranch Estates, and Pinehurst areas remain in pre-evacuation status (“Be Set”). Some road and area closures remain in effect, to provide for public safety.Residents in the general vicinity should remain vigilant and refer to the Sheriff’s Office Facebook pages for any status updates. Both Idaho and Adams counties use AlertSense for emergency alerts. For Adams Co., visit http://co.adams.id.us/departments/sheriff/ to sign up. In Idaho Co., call the Sheriff’s Department @ 208-983-1100 to enroll.

Additionally, the Nez Perce-Clearwater and Payette National Forests have area closures in effect, including portions of the Hells Canyon National Recreation Area (NRA); see http://www.fs.usda.gov/alerts/nezperceclearwater/alerts-notices or the closures tab on Inciweb for more details.

Weather & Fuel Conditions: An excessive heat watch is in effect from noon today through 9pm Tuesday with relative humidities under 10%. Dry fuels, such as grasses and pine litter, will continue to fuel fire spread, driven by light northwest and terrain-influenced winds. Smoke will settle in the valleys with nightly inversions and will persist until mid-day.

Temporary Flight Restrictions: Temporary flight restrictions (TFR) are in effect around the entire fire area. Remember, that temporary flight restrictions also apply to unmanned aircraft systems (drones), so if you fly, we can’t!

Announcements: Smoke and traffic congestion will continue to be potential hazards along the Highway 95 corridor. For public and firefighter safety, please adhere to all safety signage and speed reductions and do not stop along the highway corridor near the fire. For road conditions and closures, check out Idaho 511 (website, app, or dial 511).

For smoke monitoring information, see Idaho Department of Environmental Quality

http://www.deq.idaho.gov/air-quality/burning/current-wildfire-smoke-info/ OR https://www.airnow.gov/index.cfm?action=topics.smoke_wildfires

07/29/2018- Rattlesnake Creek Fire Perimeter Map

Click to access 2018_07_29-10.24.15.959-CDT.pdf

Rattlesnake Creek Fire InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/5999/
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Lodgepole Fire

Location 16 miles NE of Garden Valley, ID
Cause Human
Date of Origin Tuesday April 24th, 2018 approx. 12:00 AM
Total Personnel 75
Size 1,616 Acres
Percent of Perimeter Contained 75%

Lodgepole Fire InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/5929/
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Kiwah Fire

Location eight (8) miles northwest of Indian Creek Guard Station on the south side of the Indian Creek drainage in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness
Cause Lightning
Date of Origin Wednesday July 18th, 2018 approx. 05:30 PM
Size 280 Acres

Kiwah Fire July 29, 2018

Kiwah Fire InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/5995/
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Sharps Fire

Location 6 miles east of Bellevue Idaho
Cause exploding target
Date of Origin Sunday July 29th, 2018 approx. 11:15 AM
Size 15,000 Acres
Resources: nine engines, two water tenders, two dozers, Bellevue Rural Fire Department, Wood River Rural Fire Department, Hailey Rural Fire Department, Carey Rural Fire Department, Sawtooth National Forest

Sharps Fire Update 7/30

Twin Falls District BLM Fire Update

PRE-EVACUATION NOTICE: Fish Creek Road is under a pre-evacuation notice. This fire is active and running. Residents should prepare to leave at a moment’s notice. Gather critical documents, medications, children, and pets and be ready to go.

MANDATORY EVACUATIONS: The Blaine County Sheriff has ordered the immediate mandatory evacuation of the Little Wood Recreation Area campground and all residences on Little Wood Reservoir Road and Flat Top Road north of the reservoir.

CLOSURES: Muldoon Road is closed from EE-DA-HO Ranch to Hunt Road. The public is asked to stay out of these areas to allow for fire fighter and public safety. Both Little Wood River Reservoir and High Five Recreation sites recreation are evacuated and closed to the public.

Firefighters battled difficult conditions through the night and they expect little relief today. Difficult terrain, gusty winds, high temperatures and low humidity are expected again, causing an extreme safety concern for firefighters on the ground. So far, over 100,000 gallons of water and retardant have been dropped on the fire.

Great Basin Team One, Beth Lund, has been ordered. The Team will in-brief with Twin Falls District Fire Management staff tonight at 6 p.m. in Shoshone.

For More Information-

Kelsey Brizendine, Fire Information and Prevention Officer, kbrizendine@blm.gov 208-308-5991

For information for Idaho Fires visit: http://www.idahofireinfo.com

For information regarding the Sharps Fire visit: https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6055/

Active fire on Sharps Fire 7/29

Sharps Fire InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6055/

Mandatory evacuations ordered for homes near Sharps Fire

The Bureau of Land Management says firefighters are contending with “extreme fire behavior.”

KTVB Staff 10:44 AM MDT July 30, 2018

Bellevue, Idaho — The Blaine County Sheriff’s Office has issued mandatory evacuations as the 15,000-acre Sharps Fire continues to burn in Blaine County.

Evacuations are in place for all residences on Little Wood Reservoir Road and Flat Top Road north of the reservoir, as well as the Little Wood Recreation Area campground.

In addition, residents on Fish Creek Road have been placed on on pre-evacuation notice Sunday night, although no residential evacuation orders are currently in place. Those who live in the pre-evacuation area are urged to gather their important documents, medicine, children, pets and supplies and be ready to leave at a moment’s notice.

continued:
https://www.ktvb.com/article/news/local/mandatory-evacuations-ordered-for-homes-near-sharps-fire/277-578525456
— — — — — — — — — —

Island Bar Fire

Update on wildfires on the Payette National Forest 11pm 7/27

Island Bar Fire: 140 acres – Reported July 27 and located on the Salmon River. Initial attacked by smokejumpers and reinforced with hand crews.
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Grassy Ridge Fire

Location 15 miles northwest of St. Anthony, Idaho
Cause Lightning
Date of Origin Thursday July 26th, 2018 approx. 04:00 PM
Total Personnel 191
Acres: 103,935
Percent of Perimeter Contained 20%

Grassy Ridge Morning Update Monday, 7-30-18 8 a.m.

Current Fire Information: 970-316-0000 E-Mail address: gbimt3rohrer@gmail.com

What happened last night: Yesterday afternoon into early evening fire crews completed firing/burning operations and completion of containment lines in the northwest section of the fire. Fire crews continued to secure and patrol the lines until midnight. A contingent of engines remained the rest of the night to patrol the lines to ensure they were holding.

Along the rest of the fire, crews walked and “cold-trailed” many miles of containment line and the numerous active fingers of fire activity. Cold-Trailing is where fire fighters physically walk the containment lines and search for pockets of heat and put them out for a depth towards the interior of the fire to ensure that it is cold and black in depth to ensure that no errant sparks can be fanned to life by the wind and tossed across containment lines to start a new fire.

Last night, about 150 people attended a public meeting in Dubois, ID regarding the Grassy Ridge Fire. Team 3 Operations Chief Mike Friend provided an overview of the current fire situation and short term plans for continued suppression activities. Agency Administrator Jeremy Casterson (BLM), Incident Commander Taiga Rohrer, and Clark County Sheriff May addressed the group. A 30-minute Q & A was provided. Questions ranged from thanking agencies for the their efforts to concerns on how suppression efforts were being implemented. Overall the community was supportive of all efforts to manage the incident. It was evident that the local community was very involved in preparing for fire season but still needed to improve coordination in the community.

Air Quality: For information on wildfire smoke the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality has a fact sheet that can be found at: http://www.deq.idaho.gov/air-quality/burning/wildland-fires/

What’s in store for today: The weather picture for today and tomorrow can be summed up in three words, “hotter and drier”. Temperatures are forecast to be five to six degrees warmer today with humidity down to 10%. This may result in a little stronger than normal afternoon winds out of the south at 10-12 mph. The impact on the light, flashy fuels may result in numerous flareups and the appearance of interior smoke columns as islands of unburnt fuels are consumed.

These “islands” are one of the priorities as efforts to secure and “cold-trail” fire containment lines continue. As the containment lines are ensured firefighters will be turning their efforts towards construction of containment lines and cold-trailing them around the multiple islands or pockets of unburnt fuels which are not only existing portions of the cattle allotments as well as habitat for Sage Grouse and winter forage/habitat for big game.

SAFETY: Drivers, please help in assuring that “Every firefighter goes home” by slowing down when driving by fire crews and engines. Especially on the A2 & Red Roads. Thank you.

PIO map for Grassy Ridge Fire for Sunday 7-28-19

Grassy Ridge Fire InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6047/
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NIFC

July 30, 2018

On July 27th two firefighters were fatally injured, one with the Redding Fire Department and one on contract with Cal Fire, while suppressing the Carr fire in Redding, California. And, on July 29th an Arrowhead Interagency Hotshot Crew firefighter was fatally injured while suppressing the Ferguson fire near Mariposa, California. The firefighting community extends condolences to the family and friends of those who lost their lives.

Large fire activity continues across most of the West, Florida and Alaska, where 98 large fires have burned 1.2 million acres. More than 26,000 firefighters are assigned to these incidents. Another day of very hot temperatures and possible thunderstorms will continue to challenge suppression efforts.

Idaho Fires: 9 Acres:
150,595
New: 2 Contained: 2
Grassy Ridge Idaho Falls District BLM 97,000 20 15 miles northwest of St. Anthony 970-316-0000
Jim Sage Twin Falls District BLM 1,934 50 4 miles southeast of Elba
Keithly Payette National Forest FS 17,600 84 4 miles northwest of Midvale 208-414-0044
Kiwah Salmon-Challis National Forest FS 259 0 49 miles northwest of Challis 208-756-7853
Lodgepole Boise National Forest FS 1,616 80 16 miles northeast of Garden Valley 208-373-4105
Mesa Payette National Forest FS 25,577 5 4 miles south of Council 775-403-2144
* Sharps Eastern Idaho, Dept of Lands ST 2,750 0 6 miles east of Bellevue 208-308-5991
* Spaulding Bridge Nez Perce Tribe BIA 350 20 10 miles east of Lewiston
Rattlesnake Creek Nez Perce-Clearwater National Forest FS 3,509 18 5 miles southwest of Riggins 208-495-6934
Cat Boise District BLM 25,633 100 18 miles northeast of Owyhee
MM73 Hwy 55 Southwest Area, Idaho Dept of Lands ST 4,634 100 25 miles north of Boise 208-334-0233

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July 29, 2018 The Yellow Pine Times

July 29, 2018 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Community Calendar:

May 10 Burn Permits required
May 15 Firewood Season Starts – permits at The Corner
August 3, 4, 5 Music and Harmonica Festival
August 6 YPFD Commissioners meeting 10am at the Community Hall
August 11 at 2pm Community Hall, Village of Yellow Pine Association meeting
August 15 Fields b-day at the Tavern 4pm-7pm, bring snacks
September 8 at 10am Community Hall YP Fire Budget Hearing
September 8 at 2pm Community Hall, Village of Yellow Pine Association meeting

(details below)
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Village News:

High Fire Danger

With the Music Festival starting soon, please pass the word to friends coming to visit to be careful with campfires. Check tire pressure and trailer tires and don’t let a dragging chain ruin our forest.

firefart
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Local Critters

20180729Grouse-a

We have a family of grouse in town. Photo by “Alex P.”

Please slow down and keep an eye out for orphaned twin fawns. Mother was killed uptown Thursday July 26th.

Lost Dog Found – The brown and white cattle dog “Annabelle” was reunited with her owner today! The dog made its way from Wapiti to town to the owner’s cabin in YP! – AF
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July 28th – Live Music in YP

Randy Priest and the Hat Band put on a great outdoor concert in Yellow Pine Saturday night July 28th. A good time was had by all.
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Big Creek Lodge July 28th Grand Opening

20180728BigCreekLodge-a
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YPFD Training

20180708YPFDTraining-a

Over the side training 07/08/18. Great training in 90+ degree heat, 3 hours, lots of sweat and many components to rescue “Randy” with a broken leg 75 feet over the edge. Great job by all.

FB photo gallery link:

20180722YPFDTraining-a

YPFD Training 07/22/18 new equipment orientation: Vehicle Stabilization Struts, Duel Battery Extrication Spreaders, Thermal imaging Camera, Radio Repeater, Saws All, Windshield cutters, etc plus a quick trauma scenario with “Randy” falling 15 foot resulting in a pelvic fracture in the dark.

FB photo gallery link:
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Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Transfer Station emptied Thursday July 26th

Please do not dump household appliances at our transfer station, it is for household trash only and must be placed in the dumpsters.

However, there is a burn pile for woody debris only. “Bring it, Don’t Burn it.”
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Pests

Lots of mosquitoes and no-see-ums this year, long-legged wasps are out, grasshoppers are a little over an inch long. Be “Bear Aware” – Remember to secure your trash.
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Local Events:

August 15th B-Day Party

“70+70=140 You are invited to Joel and Marj Fields joint birthday on Wednesday, August 15th from 4-7 at the Tavern. The drinks are on us! Snacks are welcome, no gifts please.” – MF
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Local Groups:

YPWUA News:

July 24th Yellow Pine water update:

It is good to go back to the even/odd watering schedule. Even/odd means if your address is 315 Yellow Pine Avenue, you can water on odd days such as the 1st, 3rd, 5th etc. And if your address is 316, water in even numbered days. The only request is that watering be done between 6 am and 1 PM. Also please limit to one sprinkler at a time.

Also it is requested that no lawn watering be done August 1st through the 6th to be able to withstand the draw from Harmonica.

Our second sand filter will be on line soon and give us more capacity. Thank you everyone for your patience during the high water demand time. – SH

There was a YPWUA Annual Shareholder’s meeting Saturday July 7 at 3pm in the Community Hall, no minutes yet.
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VYPA News:

There was a Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting on July 14, 2018 2pm at the Community Hall, no minutes yet.

VYPA Summer Meeting Schedule:

August 11, 2pm, Community Hall, Village of Yellow Pine Association meeting
September 8, 2pm, Community Hall, Village of Yellow Pine Association meeting
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YPFD News:

*Correction* There was a YP Fire Commissioner Meeting June 9, no minutes yet.

Bring it, Don’t Burn it

For us in Yellow Pine, Jake Strohmeyer, Dist. Ranger with the Boise NF said we can use the area at our transfer station for yard debris and the FS will burn it once a year. Please no furniture, mattresses, construction debris, metal objects, tires or personnel junk. Please only woody yard debris. When using the pile please be mindful of where you place the debris as it should be contained to a manageable burnable area and kept as clean as possible. – JF

Burn Permits Needed After May 10

A reminder that May 10 is beginning of fire season where burning permits for open burning are required throughout most Fire Districts. Since the YPFD doesn’t issue actual “Burn Permits” per say, notification of a large pile burn would be appreciated. The notification makes the fire officials aware of those who have a planned burn. Seeing smoke can easily raise concerns. When neighbors call in seeing smoke, we can reduce their anxiety by knowing that there was a notification by a property owner. This elevates the response to smoke investigations.

Contact Fire Chief Jeff at 633-1010 or email j4star1911@ gmail.com

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Updates:

YPFD Commissioners meeting on August 6th at 10am at the community hall.
YP Fire Budget Hearing: September 8, 2018 – 10am Community Hall

Fire Department Training on Sunday’s at 11:00 all are welcome

Special Use Permit for Fire Station and Helispot:

The Boise National Forest has granted a “Special Use Permit” to the Yellow Pine Fire Protection District for the Fire Station lot and the Helispot. The Helispot is a new addition and the Fire Station lot was a renewal. This permit will expire 12/31/2037 (20 years) and will need to be rewed again at that time. Thanks to Jake Strohmeyer, District Ranger and Chris (Kit) Woras, Special Use Permit Administrator of the Boise Forest for spending a lot of time and correspondence to get this permit completed.

Helispot / Life Flight:

The Helispot needs a lot of work and a base needs to be put down before officially being used. I’m currently in discussion with some folks to help with the ground prep and to put the base down. Life Flight and other agencies will need to do an inspection as well before using the helispot.

Anyone needing a Smoke/CO detector or fire extinguisher please let Jeff, Cecil or Dan know.

Jeff F.

There are YPFD T-shirts, as well as YPFD patches and stickers for sale at the Tavern now.
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2018 Festival:

August 3, 4, 5 Music and Harmonica Festival

Your well-controlled, LEASHED, domestic pets are welcome in Yellow Pine. There is a leash law within all USFS boundaries (which includes all nearby campsites). Animals should not be left in vehicles during the day as the heat builds quickly in the vehicles at this elevation and time of year. The safety of all pets is important in Yellow Pine.

Please remember all state and forest laws and regulations apply while you are at the festival. Law enforcement will be present.

link to online store:
https://www.yellowpinefestival.org/online-store
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Biz Listings:

Yellow Pine Lodge

Now open for summer (208) 633-3377
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Yellow Pine Tavern

Summer Hours: 8am to close 7 days a week.

Daily Menu: full Breakfast served also Burgers and Pizza for Afternoon and Evening. Good selection of Beer and Wine.
— — — —

The Corner 633-3325

Our hours for this week: Monday-Friday 4pm-8pm, Saturday and Sunday 11am-close

We will also be cooking most of the week for private events so if anyone wants something outside of those hours just call and we can usually accommodate.

The Corner Store is open as well, just call for grocery needs, fresh produce, eggs, meat etc.
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Local Propane Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
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Diamond Fuel & Feed (208) 382-4430

We have a great price on wild bird seed. $19.99 for a 50 lb bag. 12.99 for a 25 lb bag. We also sell suet blocks (peanut crunch, and cherry) for $1.99 per block. Niger Thistle seed $13.25 for 5 lbs. Also black oil sunflower seeds in 40# bags.
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Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, Will service Yellow Pine
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (July 23) overnight low of 42 degrees, clear sky and slight haze of smoke this morning. A couple young jays, a few finches, a red-breasted nuthatch and a hummingbird visiting. Young chipmunks running about. Partly cloudy after lunch time and hot, high of 94 degrees. A few brown-headed cowbirds came by late afternoon, young chipmunks busy digging holes and burying sunflower seeds. Bigger than usual airplane banked low to the west around 830pm. Partly cloudy after sundown, lots of skeeters out. The moon was tinted smoky red after dark. Before midnight wispy pink clouds around the moon.

Tuesday (July 24) overnight low of 50 degrees, partly cloudy and hazy this morning (smoke and dust) yellow air quality. Gravel truck traffic on the back Stibnite Road headed up Johnson Creek. A few tree swallow still around, a few finches and a couple of juvenile jays hanging out. Hot breezes and bigger clouds after lunch time, dirty looking sky from smoke, high of 96 degrees. Less clouds and more smoke towards evening. Hazy pink nearly full moon after dark.

Wednesday (July 25) overnight low of 50 degrees, mostly clear sky with haze of smoke (and dust.) Gravel trucks running from the pit up Johnson Creek, moving right along. A few pine siskins this morning, olive-sided flycatcher calling from the forest. Hot breezes, partly cloudy and haze of smoke after lunch time, high of 95 degrees. Female calliope hummingbird visiting. Still pretty warm during the evening, mostly clear sky. Only a couple of tree swallows in the neighborhood and one juvenile pine siskin in the yard. Haze of smoke in the air as the moon rose.

Thursday (July 26) overnight low of 47 degrees, clear sky and light haze of smoke. A young pine siskin and one hummingbird visiting, Olive-sided flycatcher calling from the forest. Gravel trucks running from the gravel pit up Johnson Creek this morning. Rough sounding low airplane circling over the village at 1210pm. Young steller jays trying out their vocal repertoire around lunch time. Clear and hot afternoon, better air quality, high of 95 degrees. Male black-chinned and a few female (or juvenile) calliope hummers active after sundown. Warm evening, slow to cool off, slight haze of smoke. Loud “Kaboom” echoing thru the valley at 916pm. Almost full Moon in conjunction with bright red Mars after midnight.

Friday (July 27) overnight low of 47 degrees, clear sky and slight haze of smoke this morning. A few robins over in neighbor’s horse pasture where there is water. Doe with twin spotted bouncy fawns in the neighborhood before lunch. Black-chinned male hummer and several female calliope (and juveniles) at the feeder. Partly cloudy after lunch time and smoke rolling in, breezy and hot, high of 93 degrees. Late afternoon thicker smoke and red cast to the sunlight, very dry. Increasing air and road traffic. Warm and smoky evening. Loud “Kaboom” echoing across the village at 918pm.

Saturday (July 28) overnight low of 46 degrees, clear sky and smoky haze. A couple of finches and a hummer visiting, not many birds around. People and OHVs gathering at the Community Hall. Female (and juvenile) hummingbirds visiting the feeder after lunch. Hot by early afternoon, a few passing clouds, high of 92 degrees. Folks out playing golf. More campers on the golf course have arrived. Smoke building to the south by late afternoon. After sundown it was mostly clear and better air quality, not as much smoke. Randy Priest and the Hat Band outdoor concert on Main Street, sounded great. At 837pm a loud “Kaboom” echoed thru the canyon, sounded like it was near main street up town, another big boom at 1044pm and another at 1058pm, sounds a lot like M80s going off.

Sunday (July 29) overnight low of 47 degrees, clear sky, very dry and light haze of smoke. Olive-sided flycatcher calling from the forest. A couple of loud airplanes around 9am. Female and juvenile hummers visiting the feeders. Hot and dry by early afternoon, a few small clouds and light haze of smoke, high of 92 degrees. Water pressure dropping during the day, by late afternoon it was very low and had air bubbles. More smoke settling in along the river by evening.
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RIP:

We lost 2 Yellow Piners this week.

Tracy Jo Boyd

Tracy Jo Boyd went to join Rockslide around midnight last night. (7/27/2018)

TracyJoRIP20180727
— — — — — — — — — —

Chris Petersen

Chris Petersen passed away this morning (7/28/2018) in Yellow Pine.

ChrisPetersenRIP20180728
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Idaho News:

Yellow Pine music, harmonica festival slated for Aug. 3-5

The Star-News July 26, 2018

The backcountry hamlet of Yellow Pine will kick off its 29th annual three-day outdoor Music and Harmonica Festival on Friday, Aug. 3 and run through Sunday. Aug. 5.

Festivities will include a 6.5K run, harmonica workshop, live performances and activities and booths for children.

The 6.5K Great Harmonica Huff and Puff will be Saturday, Aug. 4, at 9 a.m. Early registration is available online for $20. Participants can register at the race for $25.

Taking the stage during the event will be Triple Crown, Mack Lantz, Gordon Hamilton, Dan Thomas, West of Ustick, Muddy Boots and the Porch Pounders, Willie and the Singlewides, Guess When, Hannah Cornforth, Fall Street String Band, Half Fast Hillbillies, Spike Coggins, Moody Jews and the Silverbacks.

Children’s activities, which include booths for face painting and pet rocks, will be on Friday and Saturday, Aug. 3 -4, from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday’s events will feature a Children’s Stage for pint-sized performers.

The festival will run until midnight Friday and Saturday and from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Sunday.

Proceeds will support the festival and the village of Yellow Pine. For more information or to register for events, visit http://yellowpinefestival.org

source:
— — — — — — — — — —

Watch Chief Meteorologist Roland Steadham explore the rebuilt Big Creek Lodge

by Roland Steadham Wednesday, July 25th 2018

It was ten years ago when a fire devastated a popular lodge located deep in the Idaho backcountry.

Big Creek Lodge was built in 1934 and is located about 50 miles northeast of McCall. Like a phoenix rising from the ashes, the lodge has been rebuilt and it’s set to open it’s doors to the public this weekend. And as you’ll see, it’s bigger and better than before.

No tax dollars were used to rebuild the lodge. All the money was raised by the Idaho Aviation Foundation. As far as lodges are concerned it really is a work of natural art.

source (no video):
Note: Found the video on their main page, you have to scroll to find it:
— — — — — — — — — —

Cellphone towers won’t meet McCall design standards

Poles will be painted brown rather than disguised as trees

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News July 26, 2018

Two cellphone towers will soon rise off Deinhard Lane and Lick Creek Road in McCall, but the City of McCall will have no control over how they look.

The cellphone towers are planned for parcels of state land managed by the Idaho Department of Lands, which is exempt from city planning and zoning laws.

The towers would have been required to be disguised as pine trees with cedar fencing at their bases if they had gone through the city’s review process, McCall Community Development Director Michelle Groenevelt said.

But that will not happen because state parcels are exempt from local zoning laws, IDL Public Information Officer Sharla Arledge said.

The land department manages state lands under a mandate in the Idaho Constitution to earn the most money possible from the use of the lands.

One cellphone site is located at 555 Deinhard Lane, near the McCall offices of the land department as well as the Idaho Department of Fish and Game and the Southern Idaho Timber Protective Association.

The second site is located along Lick Creek Road near Shady Lane.

The Deinhard Lane tower would stand 96-feet tall and the Lick Creek tower would stand 120-feet tall, according to plans provided by Horvath Communications of South Bend, Ind.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

34-year-old man drowns in Payette River

by CBS 2 News Friday, July 27th 2018

A 34-year-old man drowned Wednesday in the Payette River.

According to Mike Johnson, the Chief Deputy Coroner in Boise County, the incident happened around 2:30 near the South Fork Highway 17 at milepost 5.

The coroner identified the man as Jeffrey Murdock. CBS 2 News is working to find where he was from.

Why he was in the water is still being investigated. Johnson says he wasn’t rafting or kayaking. He says his car was found about a mile upriver from where his body was found.

source:
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Mining News:

Ask Midas: What Are Your Plans for Accessing the Site?

July 19

Midas Gold Idaho wants to keep the community informed about the work we are doing at the Stibnite Gold Project site. The Ask Midas blog series gives the experts in our company a chance to answer some of the community’s most frequently asked questions and help clear up any misconceptions around the project.

The Stibnite Gold Project is located 39 miles east of McCall and just outside the village of Yellow Pine. To get there today, you have to travel on narrow, winding dirt roads right alongside major fish-bearing creeks and rivers. When we were developing our plan for the redevelopment and restoration of the Stibnite site, we wanted to find the safest way for our employees to get to the site during mining while minimizing our impacts on, and risks to, the environment. Today, I want to give you more details about our plans to access the site during construction, operations and restoration.

What Your Plans for Traveling to and From the Site?

Under our plan, we propose to upgrade Burntlog Road starting at Landmark in order to access the site utilizing existing Forest Service roads wherever possible. This route will allow us to stay away from major fish-bearing creeks and rivers, avoid known avalanche sites in the winter and reduce potential conflicts with other folks who use the South Fork and Johnson Creek Roads. We believe it will take us one year to upgrade Burntlog Road and connect it to the existing Thunder Mountain Road, once our plan is approved. We would continue to use the South Fork, Johnson Creek and Stibnite roads until the upgrades are complete.

Our plans for travel to and from the project site were designed to prioritize the safety of our employees and Idahoans, given the frequent avalanches and rock falls that occur along the South Fork and Stibnite roads as well as the presence of local residents and road users. We know that continued access is a very important issue for many Idahoans, so our plan tries to maintain recreational access so that Idahoans can continue to safely hike, hunt, fish, snowmobile and explore the areas surrounding the site much as they do today. This is why, after hearing feedback from the public, we submitted an additional proposal for regulators to consider allowing public access to Thunder Mountain on Stibnite Road from Yellow Pine and through the site when it is safe and feasible, in addition to access along the improved Burntlog Road. Temporary closures would still occur seasonally, and when needed, because of activity at site. During construction and operations, we will be using very large equipment and, at times, we will need to us explosives to break ore and development rock. We don’t want to take any unnecessary risks that could jeopardize people’s safety, so would keep people clear at these times, usually once per day.

We know Thunder Mountain is an important place for Idahoans and, no matter what, the community will still be able to access the area during construction and operations of our project by using Trapper Flats Road and Landmark to Burntlog Road. We believe strongly in protecting public lands and maintaining Idahoans access to the backcountry.

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Midas Gold hopes for approval of Stibnite Gold project by early 2020

Study for public comment expected to be issued next February

By Tom Grote for The Star-News July 26, 2018

Approval of the Stibnite Gold Project near Yellow Pine in Valley County could come as soon as early 2020, according to the Payette National Forest.

A draft of the environmental study of the proposed mine is expected to be released in February of 2019, according to a new schedule released by the Payette.

Public comments would be taken on the draft study and a final environmental study could be issued by October 2019, under the new schedule.

If all goes well, a final decision to allow the project to proceed could be issued in March 2020, a news release from Midas Gold said.

“We appreciate the thorough and thoughtful review of the Stibnite Gold Project by the U.S. Forest Service and other agencies,” said Stephen Quin, President & CEO of Midas Gold Corp.

“Our collaboration with the U.S. Forest Service and the other agencies continues to put us one step closer to bringing the Stibnite Gold Project to life,” Quin said.

The Payette and 10 other federal, state and local agencies have been reviewing a plan of operation submitted by Midas Gold in 2016.

The Payette Forest hired AECOM, a worldwide consulting company based in Los Angeles, to assist with the forest’s review of the project.

Midas Gold will reimburse the Payette for the costs of AECOM as well as for some of the costs of Payette employees assigned to the project.

To date, Midas Gold has received 97 requests for additional information from the Payette’s Midas Gold study team, of which 91 have been responded to and the remaining six are expected to be complete by the end of July, the news release said.

The company needs to obtain 50 permits from 11 state and federal agencies as part of the project.

“The review process continues to move forward at a reassuring pace, said Laurel Sayer, CEO of Midas Gold Idaho, Inc., the project operator.

“The Stibnite Gold Project has the potential to bring hundreds of well-paying jobs to rural Idaho, hundreds of millions of dollars of investment into the state,” Sayer said.

The Stibnite Gold Project site is located 39 miles east of McCall and 14 miles from Yellow Pine.

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Fire Season:

Fire Update July 29th

link:

Note: There are no fires threatening Yellow Pine

Boise NF note July 29th: “I just wanted to let you know that I had one of our helicopters fly over the Riordan Lake area this morning, they did not detect any fires in the area other than the Kiwah Fire on the Salmon Challis NF.” – Jim B
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Highway 55-MM73 Fire: Crews closer to full containment

KTVB Staff July 28, 2018

Boise County, Idaho — The Highway 55-Mile Marker 73 Fire north of Horseshoe Bend is 80 percent contained, according to an update Saturday evening from the Idaho Department of Lands.

Idaho 55 remains open without restrictions, but travelers are urged to use “extreme caution” due to the potential for falling rocks and vegetation on steep slopes that have become unstable due to fire activity.

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Idaho wildfire forces evacuations, destroys 1 building

7/28/18 AP

Council, Idaho — A western Idaho wildfire near the border of Washington state and Oregon has forced area evacuations and destroyed one building.

The flames just north of Council, Idaho, first erupted Thursday and is believed to be caused by human action.

As of Saturday morning, the uncontained wildfire is now 23 square miles (60 square kilometers).

It spread overnight into Saturday, forcing evacuations in the Cottonwood Road, south Exeter Lane and Cool Creek Loop areas.

The U.S. Forest Service says one structure has been lost from wildfire damage but it’s not immediately known what type of building it was.

source:

Firefighters battle weather, terrain as Mesa Fire grows to nearly 26,000 acres

Hot, dry weather and steep terrain has been a challenge for crews battling the wind-driven blaze.

KTVB 5:11 PM MDT July 29, 2018

Boise — A wildfire burning along U.S. Highway 95 continued to grow on Sunday, as crews battle high temperatures, strong winds and steep terrain.

The 25,577-acre Mesa Fire was reported around 8 p.m. Thursday night about four miles south of Council. It is believed to be human-caused.

Firefighters spent the weekend building perimeter containment lines, and focusing on structure protection, officials said. Hot, dry weather and steep terrain has been a challenge for crews battling the wind-driven blaze.

As of Sunday afternoon, the fire is 5-percent contained.

continued:
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Highway 95 back open as crews battle wildfire near Midvale

Some residents were evacuated from their homes earlier Friday. The Keithly Fire has now burned about 15,434 acres. It is 10% contained.

KTVB Shirah Matsuzawa July 28, 2018

Boise — It’s been a long few days for fire crews and people living near the Keithly Fire.

An evacuation order was issued for residents living along Deer Creek Road as crews battled the fire burning near Midvale. As of Saturday morning, they are allowed to return home.

continued:

Hot, dry weather could cause Keithly Fire to grow

by CBS2 News Staff Saturday, July 28th 2018


(US Forest Service)

Midvale, Idaho (CBS2) — Fire crews will be holding a community meeting in the Weiser High School Gymnasium at 6 p.m. tonight to answer questions and provide updates on the Keithly Fire.

The fire has burned 15,434 acres of brush and grass northwest of Midvale and is 10% contained.

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Rattlesnake Creek Fire burning close to homes near Pollock

Some residents have been told they should be ready to evacuate their homes on a moment’s notice.

KTVB Staff July 28, 2018

Boise — About 10 miles south of Riggins, the Rattlesnake Creek Fire has burned 3,139 acres near the town of Pollock. The fire is zero percent contained and the cause remains under investigation.

Residents there are still on a pre-evacuation notice, which means they should be ready to evacuate at a moment’s notice. The affected areas are North Pollock, Pinehurst, and Whitewater Wilderness Ranch Estates.

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Eastern Idaho town evacuated due to grass fire

The Grassy Ridge Fire started Thursday, and grew to 76,000 acres Saturday in strong winds.

KTVB Staff July 28, 2018

Dubois, Idaho — The entire town of Dubois is being evacuated because of a large grass fire that started Thursday about 15 miles northwest of St. Anthony.

The Grassy Ridge Fire has burned nearly 76,000 acres of brush and short grass, and is about 20 percent contained. The fire was active and running with wind-driven pushes Saturday afternoon.

continued:

Fire officials lift evacuation order for Dubois, Idaho

by Associated Press Sunday, July 29th 2018


(Photo Courtesy BLM/Inciweb)

Dubois, Idaho (AP) – The evacuation order has been lifted for the town of Dubois, Idaho, which is threatened by a wildfire.

Officials lifted the evacuation order Sunday morning, and reported that the wildfire is 50 percent contained. The fire covers about 27.5 square miles (71 kilometers).

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Burning vehicle sparks hillside fire along Highway 95

KTVB Staff 5:32 PM MDT July 29, 2018


Photo: Idaho State Police

Spalding, Idaho – Fire crews are working to contain a fire burning on a hillside along U.S. Highway 95 Sunday afternoon.

Idaho State Police say the fire started at 12:30 p.m. near the town of Spalding, about 12 miles east of Lewiston. According to officials a motorhome was towing a Jeep when the Jeep lost its front driveline, causing sparks.

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Five wildfires caused by exploding targets

Idaho Falls, Idaho – BLM fire investigators have determined that shooters illegally using exploding targets caused the July 22 Badger Point Fire. BLM law enforcement has issued misdemeanors to the responsible parties and intends to pursue recovery of suppression costs.

“Exploding targets have caused five fires in eastern Idaho this month,” said Jeremy Casterson, Upper Snake Field Manager. “Three of the fires burned near Menan Butte. Firefighters have been able to suppress them quickly, but may not be so fortunate in the future. These fires affect ranchers, hunters and other public land users. ”

The Badger Point Fire, North Butte Fire and Cinder Butte Fire burned a combined 1,005 acres in the Menan Butte area. In July, the illegal use of exploding targets has caused 1,194 acres to burn.

If you are planning to shoot on public lands please take these precautions:

* Check weather conditions. Hot + Dry + Wind = Quick Spreading Wildfires
* Choose a shooting area that is clear of dry grass/vegetation and rocks.
* Always bring water, a fire extinguisher and a shovel.
* Discharging a firearm using incendiary, steel core or tracer ammunition is prohibited on BLM lands from May 10 to Oct. 20.
* Burning, igniting or causing to burn explosive material, including exploding targets, is prohibited on BLM lands from May 10 to Oct. 20.

Using exploding targets on BLM lands is against the law and is a misdemeanor. Violators could be held liable for costs associated with fire suppression, rehabilitation and property damage.

source:


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Vehicles the cause of 12 fires in Boise District this year

McKenna King Jul 27, 2018 KIVI TV

Eagle, ID – Currently, 89 large, active wildfires are burning across the United States, 12 in Idaho alone. And in any given year, around 90% of wildfires, nationwide, are human-caused.

Campfires, cigarettes, fireworks, all topping the list. And adding to it, vehicles.

July 8th’s Highway 55 fire is one of the many vehicle-started fires, among 11 others stared this year in the Boise District.

Now, fire officials are strongly urging people to perform all regularly scheduled maintenance on vehicles and trailers, before you head out.

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Mountaintop lookouts still crucial for spotting wildfires

By Keith Ridler – 7/24/18 AP

Boise, Idaho — Fire-lookout towers perched atop remote, craggy peaks across the U.S. West may seem like quaint reminders of an era before satellites, smartphones and jet-propelled air tankers.

Indeed, some of the structures are more than 100 years old. But with their lofty views and good old-fashioned human observation, fire lookouts play a crucial role in the nation’s front-line efforts to stop wildfires.

“The biggest piece of this puzzle is to keep fires small,” said Kassidy Kern, a U.S. Forest Service spokeswoman based in Oregon’s Deschutes National Forest. “And the way to do that is to have someone who is vigilant and scanning.”

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Fire preparedness raised to highest level due to high wildfire activity

by CBS 2 News Friday, July 27th 2018

Boise, Idaho (CBS2) — The National Multi-Agency Coordinating Group rose the National Fire Preparedness Level to its highest point Friday.

The preparedness level ranges from one to five, which signals very high activity.

NMAC consists of top federal and state fire managers, sets the national preparedness level. According to NMAC, the raised level reflects a high degree of wildfire activity, a major commitment of fire resources, and the probability that severe conditions will continue for at least a few days.

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Public Lands:

Big Creek Hazardous Fuel Reduction Update

Thu, 26 Jul 2018 USDA Forest Service

The Forest Service is seeking scoping comments for the proposed Big Creek Hazardous Fuels Reduction project on the Krassel Ranger District of the Payette National Forest. The scoping document and other project information is available on the project’s webpage at http://www.fs.usda.gov/project/?project=54260.

The Forest Service is contacting interested individuals, groups, and agencies to make them aware of the project and to gather pertinent feedback. To be most helpful, please submit your scoping comments by September 7, 2018, and make your comments as specific as possible. A public open-house style meeting regarding this project is scheduled for September 2 at the Big Creek Ranger Station near Edwardsburg from 11am – 12:30pm.

The project webpage provides you tools to engage this process as you wish. From “Get Connected” on the right hand side of the page, click on “Subscribe to Email Updates” if you wish to receive electronic communication about this project. Use the “Comment/Object on project” link to access a simple webform to submit your comments on this project. The “Public Comment/Objection Reading Room” are the published comments received on this project. Webform submission is preferred but written, facsimile, hand-delivered, verbal, and electronic comments concerning these projects will be accepted. Comments for the project may also be submitted to Ranger Botello at Krassel District Office 500 North Mission Building 1 McCall, Idaho 83638. Hand delivered comment letters may be delivered during regular business hours of 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday-Friday, excluding holidays.

Comments received in response to this request will be available for public inspection and will be released in their entirety if requested pursuant to the Freedom of Information Act. Comments received in response to this request will also be available for public inspection on the “Public Comment Reading Room” on the project webpage.

For further information on this project, please contact Fire Management Specialist Justin Pappani at 208.634.0623 or jpappani@fs.fed.us.

Sincerely,
Anthony Botello
Krassel District Ranger
Payette National Forest
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Public invited to celebrate Smokey’s 74th Birthday

Contact: Terry Carrico Phone: (208) 587-7862

Boise, Idaho, July 27, 2018 — Boise National Forest employees, along with partners and members of the Treasure Valley Fire Prevention and Safety Co-op, invite the public to join in the celebration of Smokey Bear’s 74th birthday.

The celebration begins at 11 a.m. Thursday, Aug. 9, at Julius M. Kleiner Memorial Park, located at 1900 N. Records Avenue in Meridian. The event will end at 1:30 p.m.

“The party is an honorary celebration of Smokey’s years of dedicated service in educating us about the importance of preventing human caused wildfires,” said Boise NF Fire Prevention Officer Terry Carrico.

Activities will be held at Shelter A1. (See attached map) additional directions can be found on the parks website: http://www.meridiancity.org/kleinerpark.aspx.

Birthday cookies, along with ice cream provided by the John William Jackson Fund and Meadow Gold Dairy will be served at noon.

Partners of the Treasure Valley Fire Prevention and Safety Co-op include employees from Bureau of Land Management, Idaho Department of Lands, Boise NF and City Fire Departments from Boise, Meridian and Nampa.

During this free event, there will be firewise safety information and kids’ activities. Smokey Bear will also be making an appearance!

Further information is available by calling Terry Carrico, at 208-587-7862 or the Boise National Forest Supervisor’s Office at 208-373-4100.
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Critter News:

Pet Talk – Snake bites in dogs

Jul 27, 2018 By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt – IME

Poisonous snakes cause serious illness or death in many dogs each year. The poison, or venom, affects the vascular and/or nervous system. Most snakebites in the United States are due to rattlesnakes, copperheads and coral snakes. Of the 120 species of snakes that live in the United States, only 25 are venomous. Alaska, Maine and Hawaii are the only states without venomous snakes. With the exception of the coral snake, all venomous snakes in the U.S. are pit vipers. Pit vipers include rattlesnakes, cottonmouths and copperheads.

The composition of snake venom varies by species, age of the snake, season of the year and time since the snake’s last bite. Venom is not injected in up to 25 percent of all pit-viper bites. Pit-viper venom kills cells at the site of the bite. It can also cause shock, destruction of red blood cells and abnormal bleeding. The neurotoxins in the venom will cause muscle weakness and respiratory paralysis.

Signs usually develop within 30 minutes after a pit-viper bite. Puncture wounds that ooze bloody fluid and pain and swelling at the puncture site are common. Severe tissue death around the bite may occur within 24 hours. Dogs may also exhibit signs of shock and generalized bleeding. Talk to your veterinarian about these serious signs of generalized weakness and toxicity. Secondary kidney failure may also occur.

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Wolf kills affect 113 Idaho livestock producers

July 24, 2018 Local News 8

Boise, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – The Idaho Rangeland Resources Commission (IRRC) has confirmed 61 head of domestic livestock have been killed by wolves so far this calendar year. Seven sheep were killed in three separate attacks in the Sawtooth National Recreation Area between July 9th and July 13th.

According to the commission, federal authorities have responded to a record 113 different sheep and cattle ranches where livestock kills were confirmed during fiscal year 2018. In total, federal officials investigated incidents on 217 properties.

This map depicts where most of Idaho’s wolf activity is located.

Click to access 2015%20Wolf%20Activity_1532451520707_12536111_ver1.0.pdf

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KWVR Oregon Wolf Education weekly Wolf Report

Fourth Week of July, 2018
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Wolf Education International

Newsletter July 23, 2018

Three wolves killed in central Idaho after sheep attacks

Norway’s wolf cull pits sheep farmers against conservationists

Washington’s wolf peacemaker ends her tenure

Wolf fatally shot, tied to weight and dumped in lake

Newsletter July 27, 2018

Idaho commission says wolf-livestock kills hit record in past year

When cattle go missing in wolf territory, who should pay the price?

An Open Letter About the Insanity of Wolf Protection Over Livelihoods
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Mountain lion spotted in east Boise

by CBS 2 News Staff Thursday, July 26th 2018

Boise, Idaho (CBS 2) — A mountain lion was spotted roaming an east Boise neighborhood early Thursday.

Boise Police says a witness who lives on the 3700 block of Sweet Pea Court says she spotted the cougar walk through her property and head east toward S. Adonis Way.

The mountain lion was not acting aggressively and no pets have been harmed or are reported missing.

Idaho Fish and Game and BPD is patrolling and monitoring the area.

source:
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Large grizzly that killed calf in eastern Idaho relocated

7/25/18 AP

Kilgore, Idaho — Authorities say a 530-pound (240-kilogram) male grizzly bear that killed a calf in eastern Idaho has been captured and relocated to a remote area.

The Idaho Department of Fish and Game in a news release Tuesday says the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Wildlife Services on Friday investigated the death of the domestic calf near Kilgore and determined a grizzly bear killed it.

Fish and Game says workers with the state agency and Wildlife Services set a culvert trap that day and captured the bear estimated to be 10 to 12 years old.

Officials say the bear was immobilized, given a health assessment, fitted with a GPS tracking collar and released in the Fish Creek drainage on U.S. Forest Service land.

Fish and Game says it will monitor the bear’s movements.

source:
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Family encounters grizzly bear

By Michaela Leung July 26, 2018 Local News 8

Island Park, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – Imagine being within feet of a grizzly bear. That was a reality for one family when they were camping at Mill Creek in Island Park. The Harrison family was there for their annual family reunion when they heard people yelling “bear.”

Then Kurt Harrison heard a noise at his tent.

“We heard a twig snap and then all of a sudden something hitting the tent. We didn’t know what it was, at first I thought it was my best friend getting up to go out. So I grabbed my phone to use it as a light and then I realized it wasn’t him,” says Harrison.

It was a sub-adult male grizzly bear. The bear had recently been relocated but made it’s way back and found himself at Kurt’s tent.

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Department of Agriculture confirms first equine West Nile case in Idaho this year

by CBS 2 News Staff Friday, July 27th 2018

Boise, Idaho (CBS2) — The first equine case of West Nile Virus has been confirmed in Idaho this year the Idaho State Department of Agriculture announced Friday.

The affected horse is under treatment by a veterinarian in Owyhee County.

According to the Department of Agriculture, the most common signs of West Nile in horses are fever and weakness, usually in the hindquarters which is sometimes seen as a widened stance, stumbling, leaning to one side and toe dragging. Mental conditions such as fearfulness, lip-smacking, chewing movements and fine muscle tremors may be noticed. In extreme cases of West Nile Virus infection, paralysis and inability to stand may follow.

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Rabid bat found in Pocatello

Local New 8 July 27, 2018

Pocatello, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – Southeastern Idaho Public Health (SIPH) has confirmed a bat has tested positive for rabies within Pocatello city limits.

This is the first bat to test positive for rabies in Idaho this year.

Last year, Idaho had 15 bats test positive for rabies.

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The Columbia Basin Bulletin

Weekly Fish and Wildlife News
http://www.cbbulletin.com
July 27, 2018
Issue No. 880
Table of Contents

* Fighting The Northern Pike Invasion Into Basin: Spokane Forum Calls Economic Impact Study A Priority
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441190.aspx

* Lead Columbia River Treaty Negotiators For U.S., Canada Hear Views In Spokane Forum From Both Sides Of Border
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441189.aspx

* Columbia River Fall Chinook Fishing Begins Wednesday With Run Forecasted At 50 Percent Of 10-Year Average
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441188.aspx

* Based On Priest Rapids Dam Passage, Washington Reopens Summer Chinook Fishing In Upper Columbia; Jack Count Dismal
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441187.aspx

* Court-Ordered Spill Completed In June; Corps Sends Judge Last Of Three Reports Detailing Operations
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441186.aspx

* River Managers Ponder Passage Gaps For Snake River Sockeye At Lower Snake Dams
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441185.aspx

* Tripped Generators At Idaho’s Dworshak Dam Temporarily Interrupts Water Releases Cooling Clearwater, Lower Snake
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441184.aspx

* After Damaging Dam Failure, Landowner Agrees To Multi-Million Restoration Of Stretch Of Grand Ronde River Tributary
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441183.aspx

* Invasion Of The Sea Pickles: Common In Warmer Waters, Now Adapting To Cooler Pacific Northwest
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441182.aspx

* USFWS, NOAA Fisheries Propose Revisions To Regulations Implementing Endangered Species Act
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441181.aspx

* Halfway Through Boating Season, Montana Has Intercepted 12 Boats With Invasive Mussels
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441180.aspx
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Fish & Game News:

Blue-Green Algae Discovered at Horsethief Reservoir

By Evin Oneale, Regional Conservation Educator
Tuesday, July 24, 2018

Warmer water temperatures resulting from southwest Idaho’s prolonged summer heat wave are likely to blame for a blue-green algae outbreak at Horsethief Reservoir near Cascade. While levels of the toxin-producing bacteria remain unknown, water samples taken from the reservoir on Tuesday confirmed the presence of blue-green algae.

Horsethief visitors are advised to take appropriate precautions.

Based on current samples, boating and fishing remain appropriate activities according to authorities at the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality. However, Horsethief visitors should refrain from drinking, swimming or otherwise entering the reservoir until further notice. Pets should also be kept away from the water as the algae can cause sickness and even death. Dogs are particularly susceptible to blue-green algae poisoning.

Water samples are currently being tested and additional information will be forthcoming.

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Aug. 1 deadline to buy controlled hunt tags is fast approaching

Hunters can check online or at vendors to see if they drew a tag

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Specialist
Tuesday, July 24, 2018

Hunters who applied for controlled hunt tags for deer, elk, pronghorn, black bear and turkey can check if they drew through Fish and Game’s licensing system at https://idfg.idaho.gov/buy-online if they already have an account.

Those without an online license system account can get step-by-step instructions on the Controlled Hunt Results web page. Hunter can also check their results and buy tags at Fish and Game offices, at any license vendors, or by calling (800) 554-8685.

continued:
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Controlled Hunt Results Information

Controlled hunt results can be found on Fish and Game’s new sales system. It’s a new process with new steps. Give it a try.

If you have problems and need help, find Fish and Game’s contact information below.

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F&G commission approves new rules to prevent chronic wasting disease from entering Idaho

The disease has never been found in Idaho

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Specialist
Friday, July 27, 2018

At its July 26 meeting in Idaho Falls, Fish and Game Commission approved several new rules to prevent chronic wasting disease from entering Idaho, or managing the disease if it ever is found in Idaho.

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First sockeye of 2018 arrives at Stanley

Sockeye run over Lower Granite Dam has already topped last year’s total

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Specialist
Thursday, July 26, 2018

The first sockeye of 2018 returned to the Redfish Lake Creek trap near Stanley on July 26. The first sockeye arrived on July 27 last year.

The fish is among the 233 sockeye that have so far crossed Lower Granite Dam near Lewiston (through July 26), which is the last dam the fish cross before reaching Idaho.

The 2018 sockeye run through Lower Granite has already topped last year’s total of 228 fish, which was the lowest return in a decade. Since 2008, sockeye returns over Lower Granite have averaged 1,115 fish with an annual range of 228 to a high of 2,786 in 2014.

continued:
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F&G News Releases

https://idfg.idaho.gov/press
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Fun Critter Stuff:

Oregon woman says she found mountain lion napping in her house

by KATU Wednesday, July 25th 2018


Screenshot of Lauren Taylor’s Facebook post

Ashland, Ore. — An Ashland woman says she came home to a strange and shocking sight several weeks ago: a cougar, taking a nap inside her home.

Lauren Taylor wrote on Facebook that the large cat likely got inside though on open back door after drinking from a pond in her backyard.

continued w/video:
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Seasonal Humor:

SummerFreedom-a

SummerCampsite-b
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Tips & Advice:

Heat exhaustion vs. heat stroke: What to watch for

Morgan Boydston KTVB July 23, 2018

… There are differences between heat exhaustion and heat stroke, and they’re important distinctions to make.

“Heat exhaustion isn’t necessarily a medical emergency. That can be taken care of at home,” Buckendorf added.

If you have heat exhaustion, experts say you could feel faint or dizzy, sweat a lot, have excessive thirst, feel nauseous or vomit, have muscle cramps, and have a rapid, weak pulse.

… You can tell someone has heat stroke when they aren’t sweating, they’re confused, their temperature is above 103 degrees and they have red, hot and dry skin, they’re nauseous or vomiting, and they have a rapid and strong pulse. The biggest tell-tale sign is if the person passes out and loses consciousness. That’s when medical experts say you should call 9-1-1 immediately and get that individual to the hospital.

full story:
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Fire Updates July 29, 2018

Fire Updates July 29, 2018

Note: There are no fires threatening Yellow Pine

Boise NF note July 29th: “I just wanted to let you know that I had one of our helicopters fly over the Riordan Lake area this morning, they did not detect any fires in the area other than the Kiwah Fire on the Salmon Challis NF.” – Jim B
— — — — — — — — — —

Mesa Fire

The Mesa Fire was detected on July 26th at 8 pm approximately 4 miles south of Council, Idaho. The fire is burning east of Hwy 95 in tall grass, brush and timber. Yesterday and today the fire burned actively into the evening and is currently at 20,233 acres and 5% contained. Yesterday’s growth was to the south across North Gray’s Creek and further east towards Council Mountain.

Today fire crews and engines will again focus on protecting structures and other values at risk in the fire area. A Great Basin Type 2 Management Team assumed command of the fire this morning.

Stage 3 Mandatory Evacuations have been ordered by the Adam’s County Sheriff for Cottonwood, South Exeter, Trail Lane, North Gray’s Creek and the Cool Creek areas. Visit the Adam’s County Sheriff’s Office Facebook page, or call (208)253-4227, for the most up-to-date evacuation information.

Highway 95 is currently open, however it has been intermittently closed due to this fire and the Keithly Fire. Check with Idaho Transportation Department for the latest information of road closures: https://hb.511.idaho.gov or 888-IDA-ROAD (432-7623).

A Forest Closure order is in effect in the areas immediately adjacent to the fire. A formal Forest Closure Order is forthcoming.

Cause Human
Date of Origin Thursday July 26th, 2018 approx. 08:00 PM
Location 4 miles south of Council, Idaho
Total Personnel 190
Size 25,577 Acres
Percent of Perimeter Contained 5%
Estimated Containment Date Wednesday August 15th, 2018 approx. 12:00 AM

July 29 Mesa Fire Update

Contact Fire Information: 775-403-2144 Hours: 7 a.m. – 8 p.m.

Great Basin Team 6 Assumed Command of the Mesa Fire Today, July 29, 2018.

COMMUNITY MEETING TONIGHT AT COUNCIL ELEMENTARY SCHOOL – 7:30PM

FIRE UPDATE – Great Basin Team 6 assumed command of the Mesa Fire today, July 29, 2018 at 0600, led by Incident Commander Brook Chadwick. Great Basin Team 6 is working cooperatively under Unified Command with the Council and the Indian Valley Rural Fire Departments. This is a full-suppression fire and the objective is 100% containment. The top priority for the Incident Management Team is the safety of fire personnel and the public. The Incident Command Post (ICP) is located at Adams County Fairgrounds in Council, Idaho.

Firefighters worked on building perimeter containment lines and structure protection yesterday. Firefighters are being supported with helicopters and Super Scoopers dropping water on hot spots and air tankers dropping retardant to slow fire progression. Fuel moistures are very low and the fire has been pushed by winds and steep terrain. The weather continues to be very hot and dry and will remain a challenge for firefighting efforts.

EVACUATIONS – There are no mandatory evacuations at this time. North Grays Creek remains at a Level 2, pre-evacuation status.

CLOSURES – There is a Forest Closure Order in effect (#0412-522) for areas within and surrounding the Mesa Fire. For more information – https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/article/6041/44562/ .

COMMUNITY MEETING – There will be a COMMUNITY MEETING this evening at the Council Elementary School at 7:30 PM. An update on the fire status and operations will be given by the Fire Management Team and local cooperators. The Council Elementary is located at 202 Michigan Ave.

Mesa Fire IR Map July 29

Click to access 2018_07_29-09.43.48.507-CDT.pdf

Looking northeast towards Cottonwood. 7/28/2018

Mesa Fire InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6041/
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Keithly Fire

A flight took place last night to map the Keithly Fire perimeter and detect heat. The fire is now 17,600 acres and 50% contained. As winds picked up Saturday afternoon, a small spot fire near Keithly Creek sparked, growing to a half acre before engine crews and dozer quickly caught and contained it. They will be working in the this area to construct handline and extinguish any new heat that may appear. The current and forecasted weather conditions are a concern as dust devils could occur, sparking new spot fires from wind-blown embers. If this occurs, new fires have the potential to grow very quickly. Firefighters remain vigilant to ensure no new spot fires occur.

As crews secure containment lines, they are also working with a resource advisor to assess and repair dozer and handline lines to minimize scarring and erosion. Resource advisors are specialists who understand the sensitive nature of the landscape. They work closely with firefighters to provide guidance and recommendations for suppression repair to minimize disturbance to the land. On the Keithly fire, they are identifying fences and dozer lines that need to be repaired.

Cause Lightning
Date of Origin Wednesday July 25th, 2018 approx. 11:45 AM
Location 4 miles west of Midvale, ID
Total Personnel 280
Size 17,612 Acres
Percent of Perimeter Contained 50%
Estimated Containment Date Friday August 03rd, 2018 approx. 12:00 AM

Keithly Fire Update July 29

Evacuations: The Washington County Sheriff’s office lifted the mandatory evacuation in Mann’s Creek area July 28 at 8:00 p.m. Both Mann’s Creek and Deer Creek areas are open to the general public. Fire traffic is still working in the area, so please drive carefully to allow them to work safely.

Summary: A flight took place last night to map the Keithly Fire perimeter and detect heat. The fire is now 17,600 acres and 50% contained. As winds picked up Saturday afternoon, a small spot fire near Keithly Creek sparked, growing to a half acre before engine crews and dozer quickly caught and contained it. They will be working in the this area to construct handline and extinguish any new heat that may appear. The current and forecasted weather conditions are a concern as dust devils could occur, sparking new spot fires from wind-blown embers. If this occurs, new fires have the potential to grow very quickly. Firefighters remain vigilant to ensure no new spot fires occur.

As crews secure containment lines, they are also working with a resource advisor to assess and repair dozer and handline lines to minimize scarring and erosion. Resource advisors are specialists who understand the sensitive nature of the landscape. They work closely with firefighters to provide guidance and recommendations for suppression repair to minimize disturbance to the land. On the Keithly fire, they are identifying fences and dozer lines that need to be repaired.

Today: Pockets of heat remain along Deer Creek north to Sage Creek and Keithly Creek. Firefighters are extinguishing heat around homes in the 1000 Springs area and looking for interior hotspots around the fire area.

Weather: Triple-digit heat, very dry air, with periodic erratic winds will persist over the fire area. Winds are terrain driven and may gust up to 20 mph which increases the chance of dust devils forming. A dust devil is a strong, well-formed, and relatively long-lived whirlwind, ranging from small to large which can move in any direction picking up embers along the way.

National Forest Closure: For public safety and protection from hazards associated with wildfire, the Payette National Forest issued a forest closure in the area of Mann’s Creek and Keithly Creek. The closed area begins at the SW corner of T14N, R6W, Section 25 and follows the Payette National Forest boundary East to the junction of the National Forest Boundary, Forest Road 25 (Adams Creek), then North and West to the junction of the boundary at Hwy 71. The closure includes all roads and trails within the area. The following roads entering the area are closed at the National Forest Boundary: White Pine Creek, Keithly Creek, Mann’s Creek, and Jenkins Creek on the East and South boundaries; Dennett Creek on the West boundary; Middle Fork and Brownlee on the north boundary. For a full description and map of the closure, go to the Keithly Fire on Inciweb: https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6038/

Closure Area Map 27 July 2018

Infrared Image – Keithlly Fire July 28

Keithly Fire Inciweb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6038/
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Mile Marker 73 / Highway 55 Fire

July 29, 2018 Morning Update

Strong work by all fire personnel increased the containment level to 80% on the Mile Marker 73 Highway 55. Today, crews will continue to cold trail and mop up the fire edge in order to prevent any further growth. Emphasis will be on the northeast perimeter where hazard trees are being removed and small hotspots are being located and lined to ensure they are out. An Initial Attack Group has been identified in order to rapidly address any new fires starting in and around the fire area.

As resources begin fireline repair and removing equipment from secured areas of the fire, motorists may encounter higher numbers of fire vehicles and people working on or near the highway. Please use extra caution and reduce speeds if you encounter them. Additionally, drivers should be aware of rocks and debris on the highway. The terrain is steep and rocky, and crews have reported that rocks and vegetation on the steep slopes have become unstable due to fire activity and may roll down slope.

Management of this fire is changing from the Type 1 Great Basin Incident Management Team to a local interagency Type 3 Team. This will bring the number of resources in line with the needs of the fire and provide cost effective fire suppression. The Type 3 team will inbrief with the current team today July 29, 2018 at 12:00 pm. The official transfer of command is planned for Monday morning July 30, 2018 at 6:00 am.

The fire weather forecast today continues to call for hot and dry conditions with temperatures in the upper 90s and single digit humidity, which will increase the potential for a fire activity. Any source of ignition can and will ignite a wildfire, so ensure trailer chains are not dragging to cause a spark and any hot material is disposed of properly.

The Boise County Sheriff’s Office is still anticipating opening the Jerusalem Road for travel today at 1800.

THIS WILL BE THE LAST UPDATE PRODUCED BY THE GREAT BASIN TYPE 1 INCIDENT MANAGEMENT TEAM

Cause Under Investigation
Date of Origin Wednesday July 25th, 2018 approx. 04:00 PM
Location: 4 Miles N. of Horseshoe Bend, Idaho
Total Personnel 316
Size 4,653 Acres
Percent of Perimeter Contained 80%
Estimated Containment Date Tuesday August 07th, 2018 approx. 12:00 AM

July 29, 2018 Infrared map

July 29, 2018 Perimeter map

Northern Fire Perimeter July 28

Mile Marker 73 / Highway 55 Fire InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6037/
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Trestle Fire

July 29, 2018

The 129 acre Trestle Creek Fire is 100% contained. Fire crews will rehabilitate fire lines by installing waterbars to prevent erosion and will continue to monitor the fire’s perimeter and extinguish hotspots along the fire’s edge.

Fire resources will be traveling along the river corridor and motorists are asked to use caution when driving HWY55. The Cabarton Road boat launch is open and boaters along the river should not stop in the burned area.

Management of this fire is changing from the Type 3 Team to the Southern Idaho Timber Protective Association (SITPA) at 6 AM, Tuesday, July 31, 2018. The number of resources will be reduced to meet the needs of monitoring and mop-up.

SITPA, the Idaho Department of Lands and the U.S. Forest Service worked together to contain the fire.

The fire was reported on Monday, July 23, just before 5 P.M. It started about four and a half miles north of Smith’s Ferry on the bank of the North Fork of the Payette River.

Fire information contact: 208-334-0233, fireinformation@idl.idaho.gov

Cause Under Investigation
Date of Origin Monday July 23rd, 2018 approx. 05:00 PM
Location 4.5 miles north of Smith’s Ferry
Total Personnel 101
Size 129 Acres
Percent of Perimeter Contained 100%

Trestle Creek Fire Map July 28, 2018

Click to access 2018_07_28-11.38.17.609-CDT.pdf

Cabarton Road Boat Lauch is Open

The Cabarton Road boat launch is open. Traffic on the highway and boaters on the river are asked not to stop or linger in the area.

Trestle Fire InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6017/
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Rattlesnake Creek Fire

07/28/2018- Daily Update

Location: Near mile marker 184 on Highway 95 Structures destroyed: 0

Total Personnel: 445, including 13 hand crews, 19 engines, 2 dozers, 7 water tenders, and 4 helicopters

The Rattlesnake Creek Fire was first reported Monday, July 23rd and is a potential threat to numerous structures in the vicinity of Pollock, Idaho. Mike Almas’ Type 2 Incident Management Team is currently managing the fire.

Friday, crews completed hand line along the northern fire perimeter, meeting up with dozer line along the northwest flank. Aided by helicopter support, they began to run hose-lay from the ridgelines down, so they could begin the process of mopping up along the northern perimeter. Crews continued to monitor and secure the eastern flank of the fire, along the western edge of the Highway 95 corridor. Due to fuel conditions and resource limitations, firefighters began to construct direct hand line along the fire’s southeastern flank. Helicopters continued to support ground crews by cooling hot spots with water drops along the southern and northwestern flanks.

Crews will begin mop-up along hand line on the northern flank today and will continue to secure lines on the northwest corner of the fire. Crews working along the southeastern flank will continue constructing direct hand line, in an effort to secure the southeastern corner down to private land near Highway 95. Structure protection assessments will continue in the communities both to the north and south, with these crews also monitoring and engaging any fire activity along the Highway 95 corridor. Managers are assessing the most effective ways to engage the fire on the western flank, while giving special consideration to the historic Nez Perce Trail.

Resources Threatened: Private property and structures in the Pollock, Pinehurst and Whitewater Wilderness Ranch Estates areas remain threatened, as well as threats to state and federal infrastructure (Highway 95) and natural resources.

Evacuations and Closures: Residents in the North Pollock, Whitewater Wilderness Ranch Estates, and Pinehurst areas remain in pre-evacuation status (“Be Set”). Residents in the general vicinity should remain vigilant and refer to the Sheriff’s Office Facebook pages for any status updates. Some road and area closures remain in effect, to provide for public safety.

Additionally, the Nez Perce-Clearwater and Payette National Forests have area closures in effect, including portions of the Hells Canyon National Recreation Area (NRA); see http://www.fs.usda.gov/alerts/nezperceclearwater/alerts-notices or the closures tab on Inciweb for more details.

Weather & Fuel Conditions: Hot and dry weather conditions expected through the weekend, with slightly gusty conditions at times today. Dry fuels, such as grasses and pine litter, will continue to fuel fire spread, driven by light northwest and terrain-influenced winds.

Temporary Flight Restrictions: Temporary flight restrictions (TFR) are in effect around the entire fire area. Remember, that temporary flight restrictions also apply to unmanned aircraft systems (drones), so if you fly, we can’t!

Announcements: Smoke and traffic congestion will continue to be potential hazards along the Highway 95 corridor. Please adhere to all safety signage and do not stop along the highway corridor near the fire.

For smoke monitoring information, see Idaho Department of Environmental Quality

http://www.deq.idaho.gov/air-quality/burning/current-wildfire-smoke-info/ OR https://www.airnow.gov/index.cfm?action=topics.smoke_wildfires

Cause Under Investigation
Date of Origin Monday July 23rd, 2018 approx. 12:00 PM
Location West side of Highway 95 near mile marker 184; near Pollock
Total Personnel 487
Size 3,287 Acres
Percent of Perimeter Contained 15%

07/29/2018- Rattlesnake Creek Fire Perimeter Map

Click to access 2018_07_29-10.24.15.959-CDT.pdf

Chinook at Work. Photo Credit: Manbee Mignerey July 28

Rattlesnake Creek Fire InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/5999/
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Island Bar Fire

The Main Salmon Road is fully open to traffic from Riggins to the end of the road at Vinegar Creek.

The Island Bar fire is 140 acres, nearing full containment and not impacting the river.
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Lodgepole Fire

Lodgepole Fire near Crouch, ID

The Boise National Forest has declared Lodgepole prescribed burn, originally ignited April 24, as a wildfire in order to be more competitive for fire resources and allowing a wider variety of tactical options as they continue full suppression actions. The burn was declared a wildfire on July 14.

(7-28-2018) – The Lodgepole Fire is approximately 1,616 acres and 75 percent contained. It is located about 16 miles northeast of Garden Valley ID, along the National Forest System (NFS) road 671.

There is an area closure in effect for public safety, however campgrounds along east side of NFS road 671 including Silver Creek Plunge are open. The 671 and 698 roads are open for motorized travel and the trails along the west boundary of the closure are open.

Firefighters are being supported with helicopter water drops and operations continue with mop-up and patrol tactics.

“We regret the smoke impacts that citizens of Crouch and Garden Valley have had to deal with, it certainly was not our intent to have smoke lingering this long. We anticipate the smoke impacts to decrease in days to come.

For more information, contact Mike Williamson (208) 373-4105.

Cause Human
Date of Origin Tuesday April 24th, 2018 approx. 12:00 AM
Location 16 miles NE of Garden Valley, ID
Total Personnel 75
Size 1,616 Acres
Percent of Perimeter Contained 75%
Estimated Containment Date Monday August 20th, 2018 approx. 12:00 AM

7-27-2018 Infared Map of Lodgepole Fire

Lodgepole Fire InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/5929/
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Kiwah Fire

The lightning caused Kiwah Fire, was flown Thursday (7/26) afternoon and is estimated at 280 acres, burning in fir, lodgepole, and spruce. The fire is not staffed and is located eight (8) miles northwest of Indian Creek Guard Station on the south side of the Indian Creek drainage in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness, in steep, inaccessible terrain. The fire continues to grow to the northeast towards Indian Creek and east down Papoose Creek. The fire is currently in monitor status and is being allowed to play, as nearly as possible, its natural ecological role in the environment while providing for firefighter and public safety.

A low pressure trough positioned near the Canadian border will shear southeast through Montana today resulting in isolated thunderstorm activity near the continental divide and locally gusty winds. Dry and stable conditions are expected Sunday as the Great Basin ridge expands northward.

Updates and information will be provided as significant changes occur. The Central Idaho Dispatch Zone is at HIGH Fire Danger.

Cause Lightining
Date of Origin Wednesday July 18th, 2018 approx. 05:30 PM
Location 49 Nautical Miles NW from Challis, ID
Size 280 Acres

JULY 27 FIRE UPDATE Salmon-Challis National Forest

The lightning caused Kiwah Fire, was flown yesterday afternoon and is estimated at 280 acres, burning in fir, lodgepole, and spruce. The fire is not staffed and is located eight (8) miles northwest of Indian Creek Guard Station on the south side of the Indian Creek drainage in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness, in steep, inaccessible terrain. The fire continues to grow to the northeast towards Indian Creek and east down Papoose Creek. The fire is currently in monitor status and is being allowed to play, as nearly as possible, its natural ecological role in the environment while providing for firefighter and public safety.

The lightning caused Mayfield Fire, estimated at 0.1 acres, burning in dead and down timber. The fire is not staffed and is located four (4) miles southeast of Upper Loon Airstrip in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness, in steep, inaccessible terrain. There is no smoke showing on the fire and acreage has not increased. Fire managers continue to monitor the fire, while providing for firefighter and public safety.

There have been two other fires reported on the Forest this week. The Napoleon Fire, located on Napoleon Ridge, is currently staffed with two engines and their staff with an additional four firefighters, is ½ acre in size and contained at this time. The Boy Scout Camp Fire, located near Bradley Boy Scout Camp, was 0.1 acre in size and is out. Cause of both fires is currently under investigation.

The Reynolds Lake Fire on the Bitterroot National Forest is located on the border of the Bitterroot and Salmon-Challis National Forest near Reynolds Lake – approx. 10 miles southwest of Painted Rocks Lake. The fire has not grown and remains estimated at 1,068 acres with 60% containment. The Bitterroot National Forest has shared the final Fact Sheet for the Reynolds Lake Fire unless significant fire activity occurs. They will continue to update Inciweb until the fire is fully contained at https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/5954/.

A slight chance of afternoon thunderstorms are possible along the continental divide today and Saturday as a weak disturbance shears southeast through Montana. Hot and dry conditions will continue through Tuesday of next week.

Updates and information will be provided as significant changes occur. The Central Idaho Dispatch Zone is at HIGH Fire Danger.

Visit the Salmon-Challis National Forest website: http://www.fs.usda.gov/main/scnf/home, and check out News & Events, ‘Like Us’ on https://www.facebook.com/salmonchallisnf, and ‘Follow Us’ on https://twitter.com/SalmonChallisNF for further information.

July 24, 2018 Kiwah Fire Map

Click to access 2018_07_24-15.23.58.049-CDT.pdf

Kiwah Fire July 26

Kiwah Fire InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/5995/
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Grassy Ridge Fire Update

For Immediate Release: July 29, 2018 8 a.m.
Twitter: @BLMIdahoFire
Facebook: Idaho Fire Info
(#GrassyRidgeFire & #BLMIFDFire)

Start Date: 07/26/2018 at approximately 3 p.m.

Location and Jurisdiction: 15 miles northwest of St. Anthony near Red Road (BLM & State lands).

Cause: Lightning

Fire Size: estimated 100,000 acres

Percent Contained: 20%, no estimated containment

Fire Behavior: Fire laid down during the night, but is expected to pick back up today.

Structures Threatened: Structures are threatened.

Fuels and Terrain: Burning in grass and brush on flat ground.

Fire Crews/Resources: 21 engines (BLM, USFS, BIA, IDL), multiple county and rural fire departments are assisting, 1 handcrew and 5 dozers.

Evacuations: Evacuations have been lifted for Dubois. Direct questions to Clark County Dispatch (208)374-5403.

Closures: Red Road is closed from the sand dunes to the Kilgore Road. Grassy Ridge road is closed. Clark County has closed the A2 road to the junction of Red Road. You can still travel to Kilgore by taking the Spencer-Idmon Road.

Summary: The Grassy Ridge Fire grew through the night, testing firefighters. County, local and volunteer fire departments along with the Camas Creek Rural Fire Protection Association worked side by side with federal firefighters thru the night to successfully protect the town of Dubois. Evacuations for Dubois have been lifted. Firefighters did not have to burn out around the town of Dubois. Favorable winds lastnight allowed firefighters to directly attack the northeast head of the fire. Firefighters have successfully lined the entire fire perimeter. Today crews are working to hold, improve and secure those lines. Thundstorms are expected this afternoon, bringing erractic winds and the potential to stoke the fire. Taiga Rohrer’s Great Basin Incident Management Team #3 took over command of the fire at 6 a.m. today, 7/29/18.

Map:

Idaho Fire Info:
http://www.idahofireinfo.com/
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NIFC

National Preparedness Level 5 as of July 27 at 2 pm MDT (on a scale from 1 to 5)

July 29, 2018

Ninety large fires have burned nearly one million acres in 14 states. Large fire activity is reported in every Geographic Area, except Eastern Area, which is very unusual for July. Hot and dry weather conditions in several states caused extreme fire behavior on large fires in California, Nevada, Oregon and Idaho. Residents in many towns across the West have been evacuated from their homes.

Current Idaho Wildfires

Idaho Fires: 9 Acres: 146,582 New: 0 Contained: 2
Cat Boise District BLM 25,633 90 18 miles northeast of Owyhee
Grassy Ridge Idaho Falls District BLM 71,600 20 15 miles northwest of St. Anthony
Jim Sage Twin Falls District BLM 1,934 44 4 miles southeast of Elba
Keithly Payette National Forest FS 17,600 50 4 miles northwest of Midvale 208-634-6945
Kiwah Salmon-Challis National Forest FS 259 0 49 miles northwest of Challis 208-756-7853
Lodgepole Boise National Forest FS 1,616 75 16 miles northeast of Garden Valley 208-373-4105
Mesa Payette National Forest FS 20,000 5 4 miles south of Council 208-634-6945
MM73 Hwy 55 Southwest Area, Idaho Dept of Lands ST 4,653 80 25 miles north of Boise 208-334-0233
Rattlesnake Creek Nez Perce-Clearwater National Forest FS 3,287 15 5 miles southwest of Riggins 208-495-6934
Bruneau Twin Falls District BLM 61,691 100 12 miles northwest of Murphy Hot Springs
Trestle Idaho Department of Lands PRI 129 100 4 miles northeast of Smiths Ferry 208-334-0233

source:
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Idaho History July 29, 2018

Moose Creek

Idaho County, Idaho

Moose Creek is in the vicinity of Grangeville, Idaho, was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1990.

It is located at the confluence of the Selway River and Moose Creek in the Selway-Bitteroot Wilderness. The listing included nine contributing buildings and one other contributing structure.

source: Wikipedia
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Justifiable Homicide – the Moose Creek Tragedy

A Duel to the Death in a Lonely Miners’ Cabin

Idaho County Free Press – July 4, 1890

On Saturday morning, June 28, about one o’clock a.m. Mike L. Murray and P. McEntee arrived at Grangeville bringing the news that on the preceding day Murray had, in self defense, killed P.M. Russell, one of his mining partners.

Coroner Bibby, in company with J.D. Holton started for the scene of the tragedy, while Murray went to Mt. Idaho and gave himself up to the sheriff to await the result of the official inquiry

The coroner reached Moose creek at three o’clock Saturday afternoon, and immediately impaneling a jury proceeded to investigate the matter. In the cabin was presented a dreadful sight. Near the center lay the dead body of Russell in a pool of blood and brains, while the surroundings gave evidence of the deadly struggle between the two men. The jury after viewing the body and examining the premises adjourned to meet at Mt. Idaho on Monday the 28th to take testimony, which consisted of the statement of Mr. Murray himself. The jury found that the deceased was Patrick M. Russell, aged 27 years; that he came to his death on or about the 27th day of June 1890 from a gunshot would in the brain, such shot being fired by Michael P. Murray while defending himself from a deadly assault, and that such killing was justifiable.

On July 1st an examination was held before Judge Case. Following we give a brief resume of the testimony. Dr. Bibby testified as to the finding of the body and gave a description of the room where it lay. Three gunshot wounds were found on the body, one passing through and breaking the bone of the right wrist, the second entering the chest below the right nipple and emerging below the point of the right shoulder. The shot which caused death entering on the right side of the head, tearing away a large portion of the parietal bone. About eight inches from the right hand lay the revolver of the deceased, a 45 caliber Colt, with one chamber discharged and one without a shell in it.

For the defense Patrick Flynn, Wm. Tracy and J.D. Holton were called, who testified as to threats which Russell had made against the life of Murray. Mr. Murray then took the stand and narrated the circumstances, in substance as follows:

“On the evening of the 26th of June, 1890, Mr. McEntee and myself agreed that we would lift some hose to lay in the ground sluice and place it where it would dry, so as to stow them away to be used next season. The next day Mr. McEntee concluded to go on to Mt. Idaho and have Mr. Tracy help me put away the hose. Before Mr. McEntee left Mr. Tracy went to the cabin of Jas. Burns about a mile away. Mr. McEntee and a young man named Givens started for Mt. Idaho, leaving me alone with Russell in the camp. I came out of the cabin and sat down on the bench in front of the door. Russell sat on the bench close to the door. When we had been sitting there a few minutes I asked Russell how Johnny Crooks was doing on the next claim. He said he was doing well, that they took out $1500 or $2,000 this season. If it hadn’t been for McEntee, the dumb son-of a bitch, that money would belong to us, as the ground belonged to us and he gave it to them. I told him we had better ground than they had and that if the claim belonged to us we would never work it, that it wasn’t right to call McEntee a son of a bitch behind his back, that he would not do so to his face. He said he would call him that to his face or behind his back and that I could take up the fight if I wanted to. I told him I didn’t want to take up McEntee’s fight or anybody else’s; that if there had been less fighting on the ground last spring there would be more money in the crowd; that I didn’t want any fight and would not have any that he had oilered me more than fifty insults since last fall. About that time he said “I can make any son of a bitch on the works jump over the fence.” I looked at him and saw him look toward his breast and saw the point of a large caliber pistol sticking from under his shirt. During all this time I had been smoking a pipe. I knocked the ashes out of the pipe and picking up some tobacco from the bench asked him for a knife to cut some tobacco. He said he had no knife but I would find one inside on the table, so I stepped into the cabin, got the knife and cut some tobacco. Russell followed me into the cabin and stood with his back to the fireplace. I was standing near the middle of the room. He asked me if I was going to stop or work on the Moose Creek diggings. I said “no” I am not going to stop here, but am going to do some work yet,” He asked me what I was going to do. I told him I was going to raise that hose out of the ground sluice so they would dry and not rot. He said “you or nobody else can raise that hose until I get ready; no damn man can touch the hose or do a bit of working the claim unless I am satisfied;” that he would kill the first man that laid a hand on them. I told him Bill Tracy and I would raise the hose and if he wanted to kill me, to get to work as hard as he wanted to; that I did not intend to let what belonged to me rot where it would do nobody any good. Just at this time he said, “Jesus Christ! I don’t have to take this from no g— damn man living, nor I won’t”. At that same time I saw him move toward me and draw his pistol out of his breast. As he struck me I grabbed the pistol and the blow struck me on the left eye and temple. I hollered and asked him if he wanted to murder me. He said’ yes, you son of a bitch”. As I caught him by the arm he struck me again, an upper cut on the mouth. At that time I reached up over my head into the man hole and got hold of my revolver, which I had put there in the morning. As I got my revolver he jumped away from me, grabbed hold of his gun with both hands and shot at me. I struck the barrel of the pistol and the bullet went off to one side. He raised the gun again and shoved it into my face and pulled on the trigger but the gun did not go off. At that time I pushed him away with my left hand and shoved him into the fireplace. Just at that instant I got hold of my gun by the handle got it cocked and fired at him. At the time I fired he jumped right at me with both hands hold of his revolver and hollered. “Oh~ you son of a bitch”, I raised the hammer of my gun as quick as possible and shot again. Before I got the gun cocked the third time he got up to me. I pushed him and struck at him with the gun at the same time. I tried to strike him over the head with the gun. As I struck he dodged, and the point of the pistol struck him and at the same time went off and he fell. I put my hands to my face and found it all over blood and thought I had been shot. I ran and looked in the glass and found I was bleeding on the inside of my mouth. I then came to give myself up.”

The judge after hearing the evidence, discharged the prisoner, deciding that the evidence did not show any crime had been committed, Murray having acted in self defense.

The body of Russell was brought to Grangeville and interred in the cemetery here on Sunday afternoon.

We understand that the deceased had a wife at present in Philadelphia, Pa. and some friends in the Coeur d’Alene country.

Copyright Notice: All materials contained on these pages are furnished for the free use of those engaged in researching their family origins. Any commercial use or distribution, without the consent of the host/author of these pages is prohibited. All images used on these pages were obtained from sources permitting free distribution, or generated by the author, and are subject to the same restrictions/permissions. All persons contributing material for posting on these pages do so in recognition of their free, non-commercial distribution, and further, is responsible to assure that no copyright is violated by their submission.
source: Murders, Poisonings and Executions in Idaho County,from Area Newspaper Articles compiled by Penny Bennett Casey, Idaho County GenWeb
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P. M. Russell

Birth: unknown
Death: 27 Jun 1890, Idaho County, Idaho, USA
Burial: Prairie View Cemetery. Grangeville, Idaho County, Idaho, USA
Plot: unmarked

source: Find a Grave
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Moose Creek – Mining

Gold was discovered on Moose Creek in 1862 by wandering prospectors up the headwaters of the North Fork of the Clearwater River several miles northeast of Pierce.

The second rush to that area brought about Moose City. They worked that region for twelve to fifteen years.

A day’s work on his claim a man could make up to twenty-five dollars or about two ounces of gold.

source: Clearwater Museum
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1985 Moose Creek Mining Report

Idaho State Historical Society Reference Series

Moose Creek

Number 828 – 1985

Placers along Moose Creek — a Clearwater tributary near Montana — attracted prospectors periodically after their discovery in 1864. About 70 miles from Pierce, they could be supplied by Lolo Trail packers who could descend to Kelly Creek and continue north up Moose Creek. A Lewiston correspondent, September 16, 1864, reported their discovery to a Walla Walla paper in a brief notice:

“New mines have also been discovered on the Lolo Fork of Sweetwater [Clearwater], in a north-easterly direction from Oro Fino, distant about 70 miles. Specimens received from the party indicate the gold to be coarse, not unlike the Kootenai. In both the above localities 20 cents to nearly as many dollars per pan of dirt is spoken of as the result of prospecting. Several parties are preparing to visit these localities, upon whose return more reliable intelligence may be had to communicate.”
(Washington Statesman, 16 September 1864, p. 1, c. 5)

Too limited in value and extent to detain miners in 1864–when large and rewarding gold discoveries at Helena and other highly profitable mining camps discouraged fortune hunters from wasting time in less promising areas–they soon were forgotten and ignored. But by 1866 other camps had declined and rich new placers were needed. So Moose Creek had another chance. Nimrod Poston of Missoula noted renewed interest in Moose Creek placers that summer:

Squire Poston also reports several discoveries on, or near, the headwaters of the Clearwater. The discoverers had visited Missoula City and obtained rockers. But little information could be obtained from these men–their motive for silence being, evidently to return, and secure their claims before an excitement and subsequent “rush.” These are what are termed bardiggings. Of course we can only conjecture as to the locality; but, being near the head of the Clearwater, and near the Lo-lo Fork trail, they cannot be more than seventy-five miles from Missoula City, nor over half that distance from Fort Owen. We would recommend Western friends, who intend returning this fall to Oregon or California to go by the way of this trail, prepared for prospecting. Though much more rugged than the Mullan route, it is said to be the shortest course by a hundred miles from points in Montana to Walla Walla or Lewiston.
(Rocky Mountain Gazette, 11 August 1866, Montana Post [Virginia City], 18 August, p. 3, c. 4)

But at that time, Moose Creek could not compete with Leesburg and possibilities of mining there were soon forgotten. Additional prospecting north of Pierce toward Moose Creek two years later led to a modest gold discovery closer to Pierce than to Moose Creek. Stanford Capps, a prominent miner from Pierce, reported that find, September 11, 1868:

Friend Slater, — You will probably hear distorted of the “new and rich diggings” struck within thirty miles of this place. We have actually found a creek that will pay very well on the north slope of the Bald Mountains if there was sufficient water to work the same. I have been on the ground for the last week. There is scarcely a rocker head.

Out of 500 buckets (or pans) of dirt we got $27.25. The ground is nearly all taken up. It will take three or four thousand dollars to bring water into the gulch. The water right is located by Capps. Boyd & Co. The creek or gulch is called “Gold Creek.”

We have discovered and have located very god [sic] diggings, but as to their extent no man knoweth.

The creek is situated about twenty miles in a northerly direction from Pierce city.
(Idaho Statesman, 22 September 1868, p. 2, c. 3)

Although a number of scattered properties attracted some attention in that general area over many years, Gold Creek (somewhere around Orogrande Creek) did not gain any great prominence.

Finally in 1868 and 1869, renewed Moose Creek excitements led to serious efforts to mine there. New gold camps were needed even more than in 1866, and until Loon Creek came into prominence, Moose Creek began to flourish. Lewiston and Pierce provided reports of renewed excitement there:

The Discovery of new mines beyond Lewiston, has created quite an excitement, and arrested all the travel this way. King, the stage driver, had stocked the road, looking for a large influx of passengers this way, but instead of being crowded his coaches come down empty.

All the loose men around Lewiston, and the various mining camps, have struck for the new diggings, preferring to risk wintering in the mountains rather than miss the chance of securing good claims.
(Walla Walla Statesman, 30 October 1868, p. 3, c. 1)

We have it from Expressman Fettis and Mr. J. Lowenberg and quite a number of other reliable gentlemen that the new mining district, to the north and east of Pierce city, known as Moose Creek, is extraordinarily rich and extensive. It is believed that this new camp will eclipse any that has been found within the last ten years, and will furnish ground enough for a thousand or more men to work. The prospects average on the hills from 10 to 12 cents to the pans, and in the gulches from 15 to 25 cents to the pan; which warrants the belief that this new camp will exceed Florence and equal California in ‘49. Water is abundant with plenty of fall — dump, and little or no stripping; and the gravel from five to six feet deep. Nearly all from Pierce city and thereabouts have gone there, and parties and pack trains are daily leaving here for there. Mr. Hawthorne & Co. leave here today for this camp with a train loaded with ten thousand pounds. There can be no doubt of the truth of this exciting news. We have given the above as a low estimate of the accounts given us, as we desire to be within bounds. Mr. Lowenberg has dust from there that we think will assay $17 per ounce. We have a reliable correspondent there and that will give us full particulars for our next issue.
(Idaho Statesman, 6 November 1868, p. 3, c. 2)

Winter activity at Moose Creek necessarily was somewhat limited in 1868-1869. Enough fairly rich placer gravel was available that some miners could make good wages even though water was not available for an efficient sluicing operation. A brief notice of successful production there reached Walla Walla:

Moose Creek Mine. — By way of Lewiston, favorable reports reach us from the Moose Creek mines, near the head of the Clearwater. Men who are wintering in there are making from $5 to $9 a day to the hand, using rockers.
(Walla Walla Statesman, 29 Jan 1969, p. 3, c. 1)

Prospecting continued along Moose Creek all winter with more than satisfactory results:

A party came in from Moose Creek the other day on snow shoes, having been seven days on the road. They report all well and prospecting. Many good claims have been found during the winter, and considerable money has been taken out with rockers and pans. There is no longer any doubt that they are good mines, both rich and extensive. A party will leave this place for that camp in about two weeks. I intend going as soon as I possible can.
(Idaho Statesman, 6 March 1869, p. 2, c. 2)

As soon as travel to Moose Creek became practical, interested miners got organized to go there from supply points such as Walla:

Moose Creek Mines.–In the early part of the week we noticed quite a large pack train fitting out for the Moose Creek mines. The train was owned by miners, who took with them provisions, tools, &c., to last them the summer.
(Walla Walla Statesman, 26 March 1869, p. 3, c. 1)

By Spring, a successful mining season got underway. In order to supply a more efficient sluicing operation, a system of ditches was dug early in 1869:

The express from Moose creek this week brings us good news. Claims that are opened are paying from one ounce to fifty dollars per day to the hand. About three hundred men in that district have acquired good claims. The great and indeed only drawback is the want of water for the approaching dry season. This will have to be brought in ditches which are now in the process of construction. The entire country between this place and Moose creek offers a very promising field for prospecting, and is almost untouched.

I. B. Cowen, Esq., our sheriff, has appointed Mr. John O’Meara as his deputy for the Moose region. So far this camp has yielded rather more than the average amount of dust. We feel confident that we have the best placed camp in the territory.
(Idaho Statesman, 8 June 1869, p. 1, c. 5)

Early in May, after spring runoff left most Moose Creek placers with no water for sluicing, production there largely ended for that season:

From the North. — A letter from our correspondent at Pierce City, I. T., dated the 15th, informs us that the Moose creek excitement has partially subsided; the cry there as elsewhere is water! water! The weather is excessively hot.
(Idaho Statesman, 29 June 1869, p. 3, c. 1)

By that time, miners at Moose City began to notice that their claims had a more limited potential than they had originally supposed. Working rich spots with rockers, they had flattering results. But when they began large scale production, they found their claims did not pay very well. This kind of experience was typical of many early operations in a new district: A. C. Wellman, a well-known Walla Walla valley resident writing from Pierce, June 2, explained what had gone wrong and discounted optimistic reports that continued to emanate from Moose Creek:

EDITOR STATESMAN: — Please allow me to correct a statement made by Mr. O’Neil in regard to the Moose Creek mines. He stated that he had been to Moose Creek, and found it to be a rich and extensive camp. This statement is false in very particular. Mr. O’NEIL never was there and knows nothing of the mines whatever. Moose Creek is not rich, neither is it extensive — the best claims are scarcely paying wages and the whole camp will not number over forty claims that pay anything at all, and even these cannot be worked but a short time longer on account of water. Ditches are being brought in, but it will take all summer to complete them. Before the claims were opened the prospects were very flattering; one, two, three, and even twenty dollars was got to the pan, but the leads, after working, have proven to be very narrow and spotted, and fall short of the expectations of every one. The basin is low, yet diggings are well up to the head of the gulches, making natural water scarce. The largest week’s work yet made was 48 ounces to two men, and the largest nugget $117. The distance from this place to Moose Creek is about forty miles, and from Moose Creek to Hellgate valley about the same. Provisions have been very scarce this spring, but when I left, a few days since, teams were coming in from both sides.
(Walla Walla Statesman, 18 June; Idaho World, 24 June 1869, p. 2, c. 3)

Discouraged miners from Moose Creek returned to Warren’s complaining about a similar experience. L. W. Bacon, an Idaho legislator who operated a Warren’s express, reported their dissatisfaction:

The Moose creek mines have already commenced to fail. Mr. [L. W.] Bacon says that for a few weeks before he left Warrens, miners were daily coming in from the Moose creek diggings, disgusted, flat broke, and anxious to obtain employment. Only a few had gone there from Warrens, but nearly all who had were back again, and with them came numbers who had rushed to Moose creek from British Columbia diggings, from Elk City and Oro Fino, and from the California, Nevada and Eastern Oregon mining districts. All of them pronounced the Moose Creek diggings comparatively a humbug. The area of mining ground is limited, and the richness of the best claims there has been greatly overrated. A few men who had gone there early and had the pick of all the ground, had succeeded pretty well in the mines, and the few traders who got in first with goods and provisions, had made money; but the diggings were no longer paying, except in rare instances; the camp was overstocked with goods of all kinds, and the rush from there during May was far beyond the rush to Moose creek. The excitement was over, the camp was fast simmering down to bed rock grade, and the “rich and extensive Moose creek gold fields” told of in the papers, will sustain no more than half the number who remained there in early May, if so many.
(Idaho World, 17 June 1869, p. 4, c. 2)

Moose Creek, like many other camps, soon became more attractive to Chinese than to other mines. Not having produced too much before it declined, Moose City offered only limited opportunities to Oriental miners. Eventually they ran into trouble too:

The old mining camp of this name is located in the eastern part of Shoshone county, Idaho. Rich deposits of gold were found there in 1867 and 1868, and for several years subsequent there was considerable mining done. For the past few years only a few Kanakas and Chinamen have been operating them. The camp is high up in the Bitter Root range of mountains, among the upper tributaries of the North Clearwater, and is about 200 miles northeast of Lewiston. Last Spring four Kanakas who had passed the preceding winter there were found dead in their cabins.

The Missoulian gives the following particulars of a similar horrible calamity which befell a party of Chinamen who remained there last Fall to spend the Winter:

On April the 15th a party of miners, consisting of John Bolen, Chas. Felton and Albert Peters started from Moose creek ferry to cross the range and go into the Moose mining district. Six miles out the party found it necessary to construct snow shoes and were six days in making the trip into the mines. There were sixteen Chinamen left in the diggings last year. Of this number six were found dead, but unburied; and all but one (the China merchant) of the remaining Chinamen very seriously ill with a very severe form of scurvy. It seems that these Chinamen, in order to live cheap, had caught and dried a large number of “bruised” salmon last fall, and this had been their main supply of food. The poor fellows were ignorant of the nature of their ailments, and superstitiously let the sick alone to take care of themselves. Dead men were found on the floor, and sick men on beds in the same room. The bodies were boxed and buried in the snow for the present, until later in the season. During the past Winter it has snowed nearly all the time in the camp, and the men have lived necessarily indoors to a great extent. It is very probably that the enforced inactivity for so long a period has had much to do with bringing on the scurvy.
(Yankee Fork Herald [Bonanza], 29 May 80, p. 4, c. 1)

Eventually a drag-line operation succeeded in handling a large amount of Moose Creek gravel that could not be sluiced profitably in earlier years. Most production there came from this twentieth-century mining effort.

source: Idaho State Historical Society Refrence Series Number 828 (1985) Publications–450 N. 4th Street, Boise, ID 83702–208-334-3428
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Homesteads of the Selway – Moose Creek

1933MooseCreekRangerWinter-a

Homesteader and Forest Service Ranger George Case on a winter game survey, upper Moose Creek in 1933.
George Case photo Dick Walker Collection

ThreeForksHomestead-a
Roy Randall and Dr. C.H. Bryan at the Three Forks Ranch Homestead

Moose Creek Ranches

1965MooseCreekRanch-a

1965 aerial photo – The Moose Creek Ranches, located at the three forks of Moose Creek, was a hunting lodge and dude ranch. Clientele included hunters, fisherman, trail riders and those seeking seclusion, relaxation, and it is also rumored—gambling. The ranch had its own dam for power and an airstrip. The ranch, consolidated between 1944 and 1962 from five homesteads into a 745 acre parcel, was purchased by the Forest Service in 1966.

continued (more stories and photos): Nez Perce National Forest – By Cindy L. Schacher, Archaeological Technician
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Moose Creek Ranger District

MooseCreekRangerStation-a

The Moose Creek Ranger District, headquartered at Fenn Ranger Station, contains approximately 870,000 acres within the 1.3 million acre Selway River sub-basin. The current Moose Creek Ranger District is a co-location of the former Moose Creek and Selway Ranger Districts. 560,000 acres are within the Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness; 275,000 acres are inventoried roadless; and approximately 35,000 acres are roaded.

The area is also rich in Forest Service heritage and tradition. The district maintains two historic ranger stations; Moose Creek Ranger Station, built in 1922, and Fenn Ranger Station, constructed by the CCC in 1939. Both of these Ranger Stations are listed on the National Register of Historic Places. There are several other historic cabins still in use on the district, including Shearer Guard Station (old Ranger Station @ Bear Creek), Meadow Creek Cabin (circa 1922), and Selway Falls Cabin (circa 1907). Through its wilderness and packing programs, Moose Creek Ranger District continues to carry the traditional Forest Service legacy into the future. Maintaining those traditional Forest Service skills and programs is an important component of the district. Moose Creek serves as a reminder of the history and traditions that made this organization what it is today. We are proud of our history and tradition.

The primary contribution from the Moose Creek Ranger District to the local economy is through dispersed and developed recreation. Local communities served primarily include the river communities of Lowell and Syringa. The small local businesses in these communities cater to the recreation use on the Lochsa, Middle Fork Clearwater, and Selway Rivers.

The district serves several communities of interest that includes wilderness advocates and users, whitewater enthusiasts, and motorized and nonmotorized trail user groups, among others.

source: USDA FS Moose Creek Ranger District
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Moose Creek Administrative Site

National Register of Historic Places

MooseCrkRangerStation1-a

The Moose Creek Ranger Station is situated at the confluence of the Selway River and Moose Creek in the Selway-Bitteroot Wilderness. While the Valley in which it sits has an elevation of 2400 feet, the steep ridges on both sides rise to over 5.000 feet. This rapid increase in elevation and the rugged terrain provide a spectacular setting for the Ranger Station. The Selway River was one of the original seven rivers recognized for outstanding qualities and beauty included in the 1968 Wild and Scenic River Act. Its treacherous white water, striking scenery and isolation make it a favorite with rafters and kayakers each spring. The wilderness is home to a large variety of animal life and its hunting and fishing draws many visitors to the area.

The area now included in the Moose Creek Ranger District was originally administered out of the Three Forks Ranger Station about three miles to the north up Moose Creek. It first appeared on the 1911 Selway Forest Map, but the two cabins which comprised it were actually built before the turn of the century by trappers and eventually abandoned. In 1920 when the Moose Creek Ranger District was created, Jack Parsell lived there for a year before he moved the District Headquarters to its present location which was more centrally located. The District was transferred to the Bitterroot National Forest in 193^ and to the Nez Perce National Forest in 1956.

The first building at the Moose Creek Ranger Station was constructed in 1921 and the rest of the buildings have been added at various times since. While several of the buildings were constructed according to USFS plans, they come very close to being vernacular as they were built by local workmen using native materials and traditional techniques to serve very functional purposes. They are basically of two types. One type is constructed of logs and the other is of a frame construction with board and batten siding. All of the buildings at the site have shake roofs. The logs came from the surrounding area and most of the boards were sawn on site. Because of the use of local materials, the buildings blend in very nicely into the heavily forest setting in which they sit. This compatibility with the natural environment has always been an important consideration in constructing buildings at Moose Creek.

Presently, the Moose Creek Ranger Station consists of a cookhouse/office with a nearby woodshed, two small bunkhouses, a bathhouse, warehouse/residence, warehouse, gas house, barn, saw filing shack, tack shed, Ranger’s residence and nearby washhouse, and two connected airstrips. In the complex, there are nine contributing buildings, one contributing structure, four noncontributing buildings, and one noncontributing structure as defined in the National Park Service Guidelines for Counting contributing and Noncontributing Resources for National Register Documentation (May 1985).

… Beginning in 1921 with mules and horses, Moose Creek advanced to air travel in 1931 with the construction of a runway. Back country flying was in its infancy during this time and Moose Creek Ranger Station served as a center of development. In the late 1930’s, the Forest Service began experimenting with parachuting firefighters and supplies into fires in remote areas (smoke jumping). One of the first smoke jumper bases was established at Moose Creek in 1940 and the first fire jump made by the Forest Service originated from the Station. From this early beginning, Forest Service smoke jumping has developed to a point where the organization is recognized as a leader in the deployment of airborne crews in remote areas.

link to full document and more info: National Register of Historic Places

link to more historical photos:
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Moose Creek Airport

MooseCreekAirport-a

(source: Google Maps)
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The Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness History Project

Wilderness Voices

Archive for the ‘Moose Creek’

(several podcasts, lots of photos)

link:
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page updated Aug 6, 2020

Road Report July 29

Note: Hwy 55 is open, watch for fire fighters and equipment, also watch for rolling rocks and fire debris coming down. Hwy 55 fire is 80% contained.

Yellow Pine: Please drive slow, kids, deer and dogs have the right-of-way (and it helps keep the dust down.) Click for Local Forecast.
Yellow Pine Webcam:

Johnson Creek Stream Gauge:
https://waterdata.usgs.gov/id/nwis/uv?13313000
Idaho Smoke Info:
https://idsmoke.blogspot.com/

Quartz Creek: (July 2) “Quartz Creek has a big wash out just before a switch back towards the top. Right now only motorcycles can get by but with work some atvs can make it. A shovel and a saw may be needed to widen the trail.” – DB
link to FB photo:

Golden Gate Road: Closed. Road to Golden Gate is only passable on foot due to large deep wash-out about 2/3rds of the way up. (2017)
link to FB photo:

Warm Lake Highway: Report road is really good, lines have been painted on the highway.

South Fork Road: Last report the road is in good shape.
Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
South Fork Stream Gauge:
https://waterdata.usgs.gov/id/nwis/uv?13310700

EFSF Road: Last report the road is still in good shape, dust abatement holding up.

Johnson Creek Road: Lower road from Yellow Pine to about Antimony Camp has been graveled and worked. Last report road is in good shape and dusty.
The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet
Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam:
http://www.ruralnetwork.net/~yellowpinecm/

Lick Creek: New report (July 27) “Lick Creek was good today. A little bumpy at the top but was overall a great trip in. Lots of bikers, campers so watch the corners.” – AP
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Report (July 22) “Profile is getting lots of pot holes and rough.” – BMc
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.
Big Creek Webcam:

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Last report (July 19) “It’s like a freeway.”

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Report (July 19) Yellow Pine to Roosevelt Lake: Road is in great shape (has not been graded.)
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Open to the adventurous.
Last report (July 13) folks made it over in a small pick up truck.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: Old report from Deadwood Outfitters (June 5) “Deadwood Summit is open and in good shape.” Report (July 3) via Stanley and Bear Valley, watch for pot holes and ruts.
Note: The approx elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
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Weather Reports July 22-28

Johnson Creek Stream Gauge

20180729JohnsonCrkGauge-a

July 22 Weather:

At 9am it was 53 degrees, clear sky and light haze of smoke, very dry. Hot sunny and dry all day. At 645pm it was 85 degrees. At 830pm it was 74 degrees and clear. At 940pm it was 64 degrees and clear.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time July 23, 2018 at 09:00AM
Clear, slight haze of smoke
Max temperature 91 degrees F
Min temperature 42 degrees F
At observation 54 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
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July 23 Weather:

At 9am it was 54 degrees, clear sky and slight haze of smoke. At 115pm it was 89 degrees, and partly cloudy. At 210pm it was 90 degrees and partly cloudy (hazy too.) At 9pm it was 75 degrees and partly cloudy. At 10pm it was 68 degrees, mostly clear and the moon was rather red. At 1140pm it was 67 degrees, high wispy thin clouds – hazy “pink” moon.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time July 24, 2018 at 09:00AM
Partly cloudy, hazy
Max temperature 94 degrees F
Min temperature 50 degrees F
At observation 61 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
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July 24 Weather:

At 9am it was 61 degrees, some high thin clouds, hazy (dust and smoke) yellow air quality. At 225pm it was 92 degrees (down from 95), haze of smoke, mostly cloudy (thicker bigger clouds) and hot breezes. At 9pm it was 77 degrees, mostly clear and smoky.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time July 25, 2018 at 09:00AM
Mostly clear, light haze of smoke
Max temperature 95 degrees F
Min temperature 50 degrees F
At observation 62 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
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July 25 Weather:

At 9am it was 62 degrees, mostly clear and light haze of smoke (and dust.) At 230pm it was 93 degrees, partly cloudy (haze of smoke) and gusty hot breezes. At 9pm it was 78 degrees, mostly clear, fairly calm and slight haze of smoke.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time July 26, 2018 at 09:00AM
Clear sky, light haze of smoke
Max temperature 95 degrees F
Min temperature 47 degrees F
At observation 59 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
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July 26 Weather:

At 9am it was 47 degrees, clear sky and light haze of smoke. At 130pm it was 92 degrees and clear. At 830pm it was 79 degrees and mostly clear, slight haze of smoke.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time July 27, 2018 at 09:00AM
Clear, light haze of smoke
Max temperature 95 degrees F
Min temperature 47 degrees F
At observation 59 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
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July 27 Weather:

At 9am it was 59 degrees, clear sky and light haze of smoke. At 2pm it was 91 degrees, a few clouds and getting smoky. At 9pm it was 72 degrees, quite smoky (hard to see the sky.)

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time July 28, 2018 at 09:00AM
Clear sky, haze of smoke
Max temperature 93 degrees F
Min temperature 46 degrees F
At observation 57 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
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July 28 Weather:

At 9am it was 57 degrees, clear sky and haze of smoke. A few clouds drifting in mid-day, high of 92 degrees. Smoke building to the south late afternoon. At 830pm it was 80 degrees and mostly clear, light smoke.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time July 29, 2018 at 09:00AM
Clear, light haze of smoke
Max temperature 92 degrees F
Min temperature 47 degrees F
At observation 58 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
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Fire Update July 28

Smoke 7/27/2018

link to FB video:

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Mesa Fire

7/27/2018, 11:36:34 AM

Size 1,500 Acres
Location 4 miles south of Council, Idaho

The Mesa fire was detected on July 26th at 8 pm approximately 4 miles south of Council, Idaho. The fire is approximately 1500 acres and is burning in grass and brush. Residents were evacuated from Fall Creek Road that evening. Current resources on the fire are 2 scoopers, 5 SEATS (single engine air tankers), 1 vlat (very large air tanker), 2 engines, 1 dozer, and more resources on order.

[7/27/2018] Valley County Sheriff FB update

Information on Smoke Coming From West Mountain Area.

Adams County is working an active fire between Mesa and Council on the Middle Fork Rd. It is moving North and moving up Council Mountain. We are experiencing a lot of smoke and ash in Valley County. We are not in any danger from this fire at this time. If things change we will keep you updated as best as we can. If you have any questions about the fire you can contact Adams County Sheriff at 208-253-4227

Update 3pm [7/27/2018] Adams County Sheriff

**due to an Active Fire Threat Level 3 Evacuation Has Been Issued for the Cottonwood Area and Level 2 for the South Exeter Area of Adams County. **

Local Update [7/27/2018]

A fellow flew in from McCall and told the pilots to leave the Johnson Creek airstrip due to visibility concerns from the Mesa fire…
http://www.ruralnetwork.net/~yellowpinecm/

Update on wildfires on the Payette National Forest 11pm 7/27

Mesa Fire: Estimated 8,000 acres – 0% Contained. Human caused. Started just south Council, Idaho. Actively burning to the east. Evacuations are in effect for Cottonwood, Exeter and Cool Creek areas by order of Adams County Sheriff’s Office. A Type 2 Incident Management Team will assume command of the fire.

The Mesa fire was detected on July 26th at 8 pm approximately 4 miles south of Council, Idaho. The fire is estimated at 8,000 acres as it burned actively throughout the day and into the evening.

A Stage 3 Mandatory Evacuation has been ordered by the Adam’s County Sheriff for Cottonwood, South Exeter, and the cool Creek areas. Visit the Adam’s County Sheriff’s Office Facebook page for the most up to date evacuation information.

Highway 95 has been intermittently closed due to this fire and the Keithly Creek Fire. Check with Idaho Transportation Department for the latest information of road closures.

A Forest Closure order is in effect in the areas immediately adjacent the fire. A formal Closure Order is forthcoming.

Cause Human
Date of Origin Thursday July 26th, 2018 approx. 08:00 PM
Location 4 miles south of Council, Idaho
Size 14,839 Acres

Meas Fire IR Map July 28

Mesa Fire as seen from McCall, afternoon of July 2

Mesa Fire InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6041/

Mesa Fire burning near Council and Highway 95 prompts evacuations

Residents living on Fall Creek Road have already been evacuated.

KTVB Staff 4:38 PM MDT July 27, 2018

Boise — New mandatory evacuations have been issued for the Cottonwood area and voluntary evacuations have been issued for the South Exeter area of Adams County due to the Mesa Fire, which is burning just off Highway 95 about four miles south of Council.

The 1,500-acre fire was reported around 8 p.m. Thursday night and is believed to be human-caused.

Residents living on Fall Creek Road have already been evacuated.

continued:
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Keithly Fire

5:12 p.m. Update – According to Idaho State Patrol, Hwy 95 is closed from Mann’s creek to Midvale.

The east flank of the #KeithlyCreekFire is looking good above Midvale. Handcrews and engines are currently along Hwy 95 to stop the fire at 1000 Springs Ranch.

Crews are reinforcing dozer lines and roads up Deer/Mann Creek areas with retardant and scoopers to slow the fire’s progression until crews can get in there to reinforce it. The priority for firefighters is still right to protect the Hwy 95 corridor.

(Idaho Fire Info)

Update on wildfires on the Payette National Forest 11pm 7/27

Keithly Creek Fire: 13,000 acres – 10% contained. Southeast of Cambridge. Moderate burn intensity on Friday. Highway 95 has been closed for firefighter and public safety intermittently. Contact Idaho Department of Transportation for latest highway information. Evacuations are in effect for the Mann Creek Corridor and Deer Creek by order of the Washington County Sheriff’s Office. The fire is being managed by a Type 2 Incident Management Team.

Keithly Fire Update Friday, July 27, 2018 9 p.m.

Fire Information Line: (208) 414-0044 8a.m. – 8p.m.
Email address: 2018.keithly@firenet.gov
Inciweb: https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6038/
Twitter: @Idahofireinfo

Start Date 7/25/18
Cause Lightning
Size (ac.) ~13,000
Containment 10%
Helicopters 1
Engines 10
Crews 5
Personnel 184

Evacuations/Closures: Evacuations remain in place for the area of Mann’s Creek, including campgrounds. The Washington County Sheriff’s office lifted the mandatory evacuation in Deer Creek for residents only this afternoon, but remains closed to the general public. An evacuation center for residents is set up at Weiser Vendome Events Center, located at 309 State Street, Weiser, ID.

Road Closure: The Idaho Highway Patrol is working with firefighters to manage traffic along the Hwy 95 corridor. When safe to allow traffic through, the highway will be open to one lane traffic with a pilot car between Mann’s Creek Road and Midvale. For firefighter and public safety, please use caution when driving as firefighters are working along the highway. People are also encouraged to check the Idaho Transportation Department’s 511 road closure website prior to traveling on Hwy 95: https://511.idaho.gov/.

Summary: Firefighters estimate the fire size to be 13,000 acres and approximately 10% contained. Firefighters are using dozers and handcrews to construct containment lines on the west flank of the fire to Hwy 95 up to Keithly Creek Road. Fire crews burned out sections from the highway from 1000 Springs Road past Midvale Hill Rest Area. Burning out is a firefighting tactic used to remove unburned vegetation between the active fireline and established control lines. They are focusing suppression efforts to protect the communities of Midvale, Mann’s Creek and Deer Creek as well as the main Hwy 95 corridor between Weiser and Midvale.

Firefighters will stay on the fire overnight to patrol the fire along Keithly Creek Road, Deer Creek Road and Hwy 95. Where safe to do so, they will extinguish hot spots and ensure the Hwy 95 corridor is protected.

Great Basin Incident Management Team 5, led by Evans Kuo, took command of the fire tonight at 6:00 p.m. and will continue to work with Midvale and Weiser Fire Departments. The larger incident management organization brings with them additional resources to support the excellent work the local firefighters have done.

At 6:00 p.m. Saturday, July 28 Team 5 will host a community meeting at the Weiser High School Gymnasium located at 690 W. Indianhead Road. They will provide an update on the fire and answer questions from the community.

An infrared flight took place last night, showing fire’s footprint to be 15,434 acres. Heat is concentrated in the Deer and Sage Creek areas where firefighters will be focusing their containment efforts today. The fire still holds the potential to grow given windy conditions forecasted for today and tomorrow.

Several burning operations have taken place since the start of the fire to protect the Hwy 95 corridor, particularly from the highway from 1000 Springs Road past Midvale Hill Rest Area where long sections of black are visible from the road. This tactic was successful, allowing Hwy 95 to be open in both directions July 28.

Cause Lightning
Date of Origin Wednesday July 25th, 2018 approx. 11:45 AM
Location 4 miles west of Midvale, ID
Total Personnel 184
Size 15,434 Acres
Percent of Perimeter Contained 10%

Significant Events

Hwy 95 is open in both directions.

An aerial flight took place last night to determine the fire’s footprint and size. Areas of heat in Sage and Deer Creeks remain a concern for firefighters where they will focus their work today.

Firefighters put out two hot spots last night along Hwy 95 that caused drivers to stop and watch the fire. If driving along the highway, please drive slowly and carefully keeping watch out for fire crews that are still patrolling the fire area.

A community meeting will take place at the Weiser High School Auditorium at 6p.m. tonight. The Incident Management Team will provide a fire update and answer questions the public may have.

Evacuations remain in place for the area of Mann’s Creek, including campgrounds. Evacuations in Deer Creek have been lifted for residents only, but remains closed to the general public. An evacuation center for residents is set up at Weiser Vendome Events Center, located at 309 State Street, Weiser, ID.

For public safety and protection from hazards associated with wildfire, the Payette National Forest issued a forest closure in the area of Mann’s Creek and Keithly Creek. The closed area begins at the SW corner of T14N, R6W, Section 25 and follows the Payette National Forest boundary East to the junction of the National Forest Boundary, Forest Road 25 (Adams Creek), then North and West to the junction of the boundary at Hwy 71. The closure includes all roads and trails within the area. The following roads entering the area are closed at the National Forest Boundary: White Pine Creek, Keithly Creek, Mann’s Creek, and Jenkins Creek on the East and South boundaries; Dennett Creek on the West boundary; Middle Fork and Brownlee on the north boundary. For a full description and map of the closure, go to the Keithly Fire on Inciweb:

July 27

Keithly Fire Inciweb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6038/
— — — — — — — — — —

Mile Marker 73 / Highway 55 Fire

Crews continuing to fight Highway 55 fire ahead of busy weekend

by CBS 2 News Staff Friday, July 27th 2018


(photo courtesy InciWeb)

Boise, Idaho (CBS 2) — Firefighters across southern Idaho are continuing to attack numerous wildfires that have started this week.

The most notable fires in the area, the Highway 55 Fire near Gardena, has grown to 3,500 acres since it started earlier this week.

Highway 55 is open in both directions, however, drivers are warned that crews and apparatus will to continue to work along the highway 55 corridor throughout the day assisted by helicopters which may use the Payette River for water dipping to cool the fire perimeter.

The Idaho Department of Lands says the wildfire showed little movement overnight due to cooler temperatures and higher humidity levels near the Payette River.

continued:

Update 830pm 7/27/2018 from Idaho Fire Info

The Mile Marker 73 Highway 55 Fire, N. of Horseshoe Bend, ID, is now 60% contained and has burned 4,480 acres.

MM73 HWY 55 Fire AM Update – July 28th

Today, fire crews will continue their efforts on increasing containment along the fire’s edge. Good progress has been made utilizing support from aerial resources and containment is currently 60%. The northeastern flank of the fire has the most potential for growth, and this is where resources will focus their attention. Crews will continue strengthening the fireline by utilizing burnout operations to remove fuel from the fire’s path. This will slow and stop the fire’s movement to the east into Jerusalem Valley.

Fire resources, both crews and vehicles, will continue to be visible along Highway 55 today.

The terrain is steep and rocky, and crews have reported that rocks and vegetation on the steep slopes have become unstable due to fire activity. These loose rocks have the potential to roll down onto the highway below. It is imperative for the safety of our firefighters and the public traveling on Highway 55 near the fire area to proceed with extreme caution as rocks and debris may be found on or near the roadway.

Aviation resources will also continue to be utilized to support firefighters on the ground for the Mile Marker 73 Highway 55 Fire. Helicopters assigned to the fire will be using the Cascade Airport as a temporary base and will be utilizing the Payette River to fill their buckets in order to support firefighters on the ground. Traffic on the highway corridor may want to stop and view the aerial operations but are reminded that stopping along the roadway is prohibited and poses a direct threat to public safety. Please keep moving, and do not stop to view the helicopters working.

The fire weather forecast today continues to call for hot and dry conditions with temperatures in the upper 90s and single digit humidity, which will increase the potential for a fire activity.

(Idaho Fire Info)


Mile Marker 73 / Highway 55 Fire InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6037/
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Trestle Fire

Trestle Fire Update – July 27th

(Boise) – Crews made significant progress building line around the Trestle Creek Fire. The Cabarton Road boat launch will be open tomorrow morning, July 28, 2018 at 7:00 a.m. Firefighters will be working along this stretch of river and boaters are asked not to stop or linger in the area.

Current fire size: 129 acres. Updated maps noted a reduction in acres from previous reports.
Current containment: 80%
Cause: under investigation
Resources on the fire: three engines, one dozer, and four crews. Aircraft were released to assist other fires in the area.
Total personnel: 101

The Southern Idaho Timber Protective Association (SITPA), Idaho Department of Lands Type 3 Team, and the U.S. Forest Service are working together to contain the fire. Crews will continue to secure the fire line and clean hotspots. The fire is located on private and Boise National Forest land.

There are no evacuations, road or trail closures ordered at this time and no threat to structures. The fire was reported on Monday, July 23, just before 5 P.M. It started about four and a half miles north of Smith’s Ferry on the bank of the North Fork of the Payette River.

Trestle Fire Update July 28, 2018

Media contact: Mary Fritz, 208-334-0233, fireinformation@idl.idaho.gov

Crews made significant progress building line around the Trestle Creek Fire. The Cabarton Road boat launch will open tomorrow morning, July 28, 2018 at 7:00 a.m. Firefighters will be working along this stretch of river and boaters are asked not to stop or linger in the area.

Current fire size: 129 acres. Updated maps noted a reduction in acres from previous reports.
Current containment: 80%
Cause: under investigation
Resources on the fire: three engines, one dozer, and four crews. Aircraft were released to assist other fires in the area.
Total personnel: 101

The Southern Idaho Timber Protective Association (SITPA), Idaho Department of Lands Type 3 Team, and the U.S. Forest Service are working together to contain the fire. Crews will continue to secure the fire line and clean hotspots.

The fire is located on private and Boise National Forest land. There are no evacuations, road or trail closures ordered at this time and no threat to structures.

The fire was reported on Monday, July 23, just before 5 P.M. It started about four and a half miles north of Smith’s Ferry on the bank of the North Fork of the Payette River.

Trestle Fire InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6017/
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Rattlesnake Creek Fire

Update on wildfires on the Payette National Forest 11pm 7/27

Rattlesnake Creek Fire: 3,139 acres – 0% Contained. Located southwest of Riggins, Idaho. Managed by the Nez Perce – Clearwater National Forest as the fire started on that Forest and spread south to the Payette National Forest. The fire is being managed by a Type 2 Incident Management Team.

Kamiah, Idaho (July 27, 2018) – Critical aerial operations on the Rattlesnake Creek fire were halted on Monday, July 23, due to an Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS) or Drone intrusion. Although this did not contribute to the growth of the fire, it had the potential to do so and put firefighter and the public at risk.
(Source Idaho Fire Info)

Rattlesnake Creek Fire burning close to homes near Pollock

Some residents have been told they should be ready to evacuate their homes on a moment’s notice.

KTVB Staff 4:45 PM MDT July 27, 2018

Boise — About 10 miles south of Riggins, the Rattlesnake Creek Fire has burned over 3,100 acres near the town of Pollock. The fire is zero percent contained and the cause remains under investigation.

Residents there are still on a pre-evacuation notice, which means they should be ready to evacuate at a moment’s notice. The affected areas are North Pollock, Pinehurst, and Whitewater Wilderness Ranch Estates.

Highway 95 is open in that area but traffic control measures are in place. Smoke and traffic congestion will continue to pose hazards for people traveling in the area. Motorists should not stop along the highway near the fire.

continued:

The Rattlesnake Creek fire, located on the west side of highway 95 near Pollock on the Nez Perce-Clearwater and Payette National Forests, was reported at 12:02 p.m. on July 23, 2018. The cause is unknown and currently under investigation. The fire is actively burning in timber and grass.

Mike Almas’ Northern Rockies Type 2 Incident Management Team began managing the fire at 6:00 a.m., Wednesday, July 25, 2018.

The Idaho Transportation Department and local Sheriff’s offices have traffic control measures in place along Highway 95 for public and firefighter safety. Please avoid the area if possible and do not stop along the roadway. Travelers may experience limited visibility due to smoke in the canyon corridor.

Cause Under Investigation
Date of Origin Monday July 23rd, 2018 approx. 12:00 PM
Location West side of Highway 95 near mile marker 184; near Pollock
Total Personnel 445
Size 3,139 Acres

July 27, 2018 Map

Click to access 2018_07_27-10.01.21.887-CDT.pdf

Rattlesnake Creek Fire InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/5999/
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Island Bar Fire

Update on wildfires on the Payette National Forest 11pm 7/27

Island Bar Fire: 140 acres – 0% Contained. Reported July 27 and located on the Salmon River. Initial attacked by smokejumpers and reinforced with hand crews.
— — — — — — — — — —

Lodgepole Fire

Lodgepole Fire near Crouch, ID

The Boise National Forest has declared Lodgepole prescribed burn, originally ignited April 24, as a wildfire in order to be more competitive for fire resources and allowing a wider variety of tactical options as they continue full suppression actions. The burn was declared a wildfire on July 14.

(7-28-2018) – The Lodgepole Fire is approximately 1,616 acres and 75 percent contained. It is located about 16 miles northeast of Garden Valley ID, along the National Forest System (NFS) road 671.

There is an area closure in effect for public safety, however campgrounds along east side of NFS road 671 including Silver Creek Plunge are open. The 671 and 698 roads are open for motorized travel and the trails along the west boundary of the closure are open.

Firefighters are being supported with helicopter water drops and operations continue with mop-up and patrol tactics.

“We regret the smoke impacts that citizens of Crouch and Garden Valley have had to deal with, it certainly was not our intent to have smoke lingering this long. We anticipate the smoke impacts to decrease in days to come.

For more information, contact Mike Williamson (208) 373-4105.

Size 1,616 Acres
Cause Human
Date of Origin Tuesday April 24th, 2018 approx. 12:00 AM
Location 16 miles NE of Garden Valley, ID
Size 1,616 Acres
Percent of Perimeter Contained 75%

Lodgepole Fire InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/5929/
— — — — — — — — — —

Kiwah Fire

The lightning caused Kiwah Fire, was flown Thursday (7/26) afternoon and is estimated at 280 acres, burning in fir, lodgepole, and spruce. The fire is not staffed and is located eight (8) miles northwest of Indian Creek Guard Station on the south side of the Indian Creek drainage in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness, in steep, inaccessible terrain. The fire continues to grow to the northeast towards Indian Creek and east down Papoose Creek. The fire is currently in monitor status and is being allowed to play, as nearly as possible, its natural ecological role in the environment while providing for firefighter and public safety.

A low pressure trough positioned near the Canadian border will shear southeast through Montana today resulting in isolated thunderstorm activity near the continental divide and locally gusty winds. Dry and stable conditions are expected Sunday as the Great Basin ridge expands northward.

Updates and information will be provided as significant changes occur. The Central Idaho Dispatch Zone is at HIGH Fire Danger.

Size 280 Acres
Location 49 Nautical Miles NW from Challis, ID
Date of Origin Wednesday July 18th, 2018 approx. 05:30 PM
Salmon-Challis National Forest

Kiwah Fire InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/5995/
— — — — — — — — — —

Update – Boise BLM responds to multiple lightning wildfires

For Immediate Release: July 27, 2018, 10:30 am
Contact: Boise District Fire Information Line (208) 384-3378
Twitter: @BLMIdahoFire

The Boise BLM responded to five lightning ignited wildfires on July 24 and July 25, 2018 across the southern portion of the district.

Cat Fire
* Located approximately 13 miles east of Duck Valley Indian Reservation, ID
* Estimated at 26,522 acres
* Cause – Lightning
* Fire resources –9 engines, 2 hand crews, 1 water tender and 4 dozers
* Air attack and air resources are being shared with the Bruneau Fire
* No estimated containment time, No estimated control time

Cow Fire
* Located approximately 10 miles northeast of Jordan Valley, OR
* Estimated at 759 acres
* Cause – Lightning
* Fire resources – 3 engines, 1 water tender and 4 dozers
* Contained – 7/26/2018 at 1800, Estimated control – 7/27/2018 at 1800

Beav Fire
* Located approximately 7 miles southeast of Juniper Mountain, ID
* Estimated at 550 acres
* Cause – Lightning
* Contained – 7/25/2018 at 2030, Controlled – 7/26/2018 at 1200

Big Point Fire
* Located approximately 8 miles southeast of Juniper Mountain, ID
* Estimated at 10 acres
* Cause – Lightning
* Contained – 7/26/2018 at 1400, Controlled – 7/26/2018 at 2000

For More Information,
Jared Jablonski, Fire Information and Prevention Office, 208 384-3210
Idaho Wildfires visit http://www.IdahoFireInfo.com
— — — — — — — — — —

Grassy Ridge Fire Update

For Immediate Release: July 27, 2018 9:30 p.m.
Contact: Kelsey Griffee, kgriffee@blm.gov, 208-521-8709
Twitter: @BLMIdahoFire
Facebook: Idaho Fire Info
(#GrassyRidgeFire & #BLMIFDFire)

Start Date: 07/26/2018

Location and Jurisdiction: 15 miles northwest of St. Anthony near Red Road (BLM & State lands). Burning east of the old Red Road Fire.

Cause: Lightning

Fire Size: estimated 15,360 acres

Percent Contained: 20%, no estimated containment

Fire Behavior: Running and very active.

Structures Threatened: No immediate threat to structures.

Fuels and Terrain: Burning in grass and brush on flat ground.

Fire Crews/Resources: 10 engines (BLM, USFS, BIA, IDL), multiple county and rural fire departments are assisting, 1 handcrew and 4 dozers. Multiple retardant drops were made by very large air tankers and single engine air tankers.

Evacuations: None in effect.

Closures: Red Road is closed from the sand dunes to the Kilgore Road.

Summary: The Grassy Ridge Fire started on 7/26/18 at approximately 3 p.m. off the Red Road. The fire is burning very actively to the north and continues to shift depending on wind direction. Dozers worked in tandem with air resources and engines to line the fire. Firefighters conducted burn out operations in the evening to slow the fire’s progress. Firefighters will continue to work to keep the fire west of Red Road and secure the fire perimeter.

Photos taken by: Kelsey Griffee BLM Fire Information Officer

— — — — — — — — — —

Twin Falls District BLM Fire Update Jim Sage

For Immediate Release: July 27, 2018
Contact: Kelsey Brizendine, 208-732-7315
Facebook: Idaho Fire Info
Twitter: @BLMIdahoFire
(#BLMTFDFire)

Jim Sage

* Location: approximately five miles southeast of Elba
* Size: estimated 2,000 acres
* Contain: unknown
* Control: unknown
* Resources: 10 engines, three dozers, two water tender, camp crew, two hand crews
* Fuel type: grass, brush and juniper
* Fire behavior: running, creeping and smoldering
* Structures threatened: structures are secure at this time
* Cause: lightning

Today, aircraft along with ground crews gained the upper hand on the Jim Sage fire. Most of the forward progression has slowed and crews continue to work their way around the fire perimeter. Passing thunderstorms are cause for concern, however fire fighters remain optimistic that retardant and containments lines will hold. Structures near the fire remain secure at this time.

For More Information-
Kelsey Brizendine, Fire Information and Prevention Officer, kbrizendine@blm.gov
208-308-5991
Idaho Wildfires visit http://www.IdahoFireInfo.com
— — — — — — — — — —

Twin Falls District BLM Fire Update Bruneau Fire

For Immediate Release: July 27, 2018
Contact: Kelsey Brizendine, 208-732-7315
Facebook: Idaho Fire Info
Twitter: @BLMIdahoFire
(#BLMTFDFire)

Bruneau Fire

* Location: five miles northwest of Murphy Hot Springs
* Size: estimated 61,000 acres
* Contain: unknown
* Control: unknown
* Resources: three dozers, 13 engines, one fuel truck, one camp crew, Three Creek Rangeland Fire Protection Association (RFPA), three water tenders
* Fuel type: grass and brush
* Fire behavior: smoldering and creeping
* Structures threatened: structures in the area are not immediately threatened
* Cause: lightning

Fire behavior remained calm throughout the day. Crews continued to improve containment lines and mop up hotspots. Minimal fire growth. Structures near the fire remain secure at this time. Due to the remote location of the fire, updates may be delayed.

For More Information-
Kelsey Brizendine, Fire Information and Prevention Officer, kbrizendine@blm.gov
208-308-5991
Idaho Wildfires visit http://www.IdahoFireInfo.com
——————————-

Updated Fire Report July 27

NEW:

Mesa Fire

Information on Smoke Coming From West Mountain Area. [Note: It is VERY smoky in Yellow Pine this afternoon.]

Adams County is working an active fire between Mesa and Council on the Middle Fork Rd. It is moving North and moving up Council Mountain. We are experiencing a lot of smoke and ash in Valley County. We are not in any danger from this fire at this time. If things change we will keep you updated as best as we can. If you have any questions about the fire you can contact Adams County Sheriff at 208-253-4227

Update 3pm Adams County Sheriff

**Due to an Active Fire Threat Level 3 Evacuation Has Been Issued for the Cottonwood Area and Level 2 for the South Exeter Area of Adams County. **

All planes have been told to leave the [Johnson Creek] airstrip due to visibility concerns from the Mesa fire…
http://www.ruralnetwork.net/~yellowpinecm/

7/27/2018, 11:36:34 AM

Size 1,500 Acres
Location 4 miles south of Council, Idaho

The Mesa fire was detected on July 26th at 8 pm approximately 4 miles south of Council, Idaho. The fire is approximately 1500 acres and is burning in grass and brush. Residents were evacuated from Fall Creek Road that evening. Current resources on the fire are 2 scoopers, 5 SEATS (single engine air tankers), 1 vlat (very large air tanker), 2 engines, 1 dozer, and more resources on order.

Mesa Fire InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6041/
— — — — — — — — — —

Keithly Fire

Highway 95 closed again, brush fire burning near Midvale

A 12-mile stretch of the highway is closed from Mann Creek to Midvale.

KTVB 9:47 AM MDT July 27, 2018

Midvale, ID — A stretch of Highway 95 that was closed down Thursday due to a wildfire burning northwest of Midvale was reopened Friday morning but closed again a short time later.

The Idaho Transportation Department posted the latest closure on its website this morning.

The fire grew dramatically on Thursday, shutting down a stretch of U.S. 95, as crews scrambled to build a fire line around it.

A 12-mile stretch of the highway is closed from Mann Creek to Midvale (mileposts 93-105).

The Washington County Sheriff’s Office posted on its Facebook page Friday morning that incident command has issued a mandatory evacuation order for Deer Creek. If you live on the road you should leave.

continued:

ITD US 95: Road closed.

Between Jackson Road (8 miles north of the Weiser area) and Canary Street (Midvale). The road is closed. Look out for a brush fire.

Web Comment: Closed Milepost 93 to Milepost 105, Mann Creek to Midvale.

Last updated today at 8:43am MDT

7/26/2018

Size 7,500 Acres

The Keithly Fire, started by lightning, was detected on July 25, 2018 around 11:40 am. It’s burning 4 miles northwest of Midvale, Idaho on BLM land and private property. It has burned approximately 7,500 acres in brush and grass. A Great Basin Type 2 Incident Management Team has been ordered and will take control of the fire tomorrow morning.

The fire is being driven by terrain influenced winds, and due to the smoke impacts, the Midvale Rest Stop has been closed. The fire is burning in some steep, rocky terrain. The fire has multiple air support with 2 Scoopers, 2 Firebosses (modified SEATS that can scoop water), multiple SEATS, Helicopters, a hand crew, 6 Engines, and multiple smoke jumpers. More resources are on order.

Keithly Fire Inciweb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6038/
— — — — — — — — — —

Mile Marker 73 / Highway 55 Fire

Highway 55 reopens as crews continue to battle brush fire

Idaho 55 north of Horseshoe Bend has reopened this after being down to one lane most of the day due to a wildfire.

KTVB 8:54 AM MDT July 27, 2018

Horseshoe Bend, ID — Highway 55 north of Horseshoe Bend reopened Thursday night after being down to one lane most of the day due to a wildfire.

One lane had reopened to traffic Thursday morning with a pilot car in operation, according to the Idaho Transportation Department. With weekend traffic, long delays of over 60 minutes are expected through the weekend.

A 15-mile stretch of Idaho 55 was closed down Wednesday afternoon while crews battled a brush fire burning next to the highway. Both lanes were shut down between Gardena and Smiths Ferry.

The Idaho Department of Lands said the Mile Marker 73 & Highway 55 Fire was reported at about 4 p.m. Wednesday and started along the highway at milepost 73 north of Gardena.

The fire also knocked out power to about 2,700 Idaho Power customers in the communities of Gardena, Banks, Crouch, Garden Valley and Lowman.

An Idaho Power spokeswoman says 12 power poles were damaged by the fire and had to be replaced. Electricity was fully restored to the area by 12:30 a.m.

continued:

MM73 HWY55 Fire Update – July 27th

The Mile Marker 73 Highway 55 Fire near Gardena showed little movement to the east overnight due to cooler overnight temperatures and higher humidities found along the Payette River Corridor. Crews continued to work through the night constructing fire line along the eastern perimeter while mopping up the southern area along Highway 55. Today, crews will continue to construct fire line to the east with support from water dropping helicopters which will continue to take advantage of the main Payette River and its close proximity to the fire area.

At 6:00 am this morning, Great Basin Incident Management Team #2 (DeMasters) will assume command of the Mile Marker 73 Highway 55. The addition of the incident management team to the fire will secure additional personnel and equipment which will allow local resources to be released for other initial attack activity in their local response area.

Highway 55 is reopened with a pilot car leading traffic, alternating directions using one lane. With weekend traffic, long delays of over 60 minutes are expected throughout the weekend. The public is also reminded that numerous hazards exist along Highway 55 including fire personnel, helicopters dipping water from the river and the possibility of falling rock and debris loosened by the fire. Drivers need to be aware of the possible hazards and drive with caution.

The fire was reported Wednesday, July 25th, at approximately 4 P.M. The cause is under investigation.


7/27/2018, 7:39:56 AM

The Mile Marker 73 Highway 55 Fire near Gardena showed little movement to the east overnight due to cooler overnight temperatures and higher humidities. Crews continued to work through the night constructing fire line along the eastern perimeter while mopping up the southern area along Highway 55.

Total Personnel 160
Size 3,500 Acres

Mile Marker 73 / Highway 55 Fire InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6037/
— — — — — — — — — —

Trestle Fire Update – July 26, 2018, p.m.

Media contact: Randall Phelps, 208-334-0233, fireinformation@idl.idaho.gov

The Trestle Fire had no significant growth overnight or today. The Southern Idaho Timber Protective Association (SITPA), Idaho Department of Lands Type 3 Team, and U.S. Forest Service fire crews are engaged and continue making steady progress. The fire has remained approximately 220 acres and is located mainly on private and some Boise National Forest land.

Resources today include the Idaho Department of Lands Type 3 Team, two SITPA engines, one forest service engine, a dozer, a 20-person hotshot crew, five 20-person hand crews, and one 10-person hand crew working the fire.

The Cabarton Road boat launch remains closed and boating prohibited below the ramp at this time due to firefighting activity. There are no evacuations, road or trail closures ordered at this time. There is no threat to structures.

The fire was reported Monday, July 23, just before 5 p.m. It started about four and a half miles north of Smith’s Ferry on the bank of the North Fork of the Payette River. The cause of the fire is under investigation.

Containment is anticipated by July 30.

Location 4.5 miles north of Smith’s Ferry

Trestle Fire InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6017/
— — — — — — — — — —

Rattlesnake Creek fire Wildfire

07/26/2018- Daily Update
News – 23 hrs. ago
Fire Information Line: 208-495-6934
Inciweb: https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/5999

Follow Emergency Evacuation Information on: Idaho County Sheriff’s Office Facebook Page or the

Adams County Sheriff’s Office Facebook Page

Incident Commander: Mike Almas, Northern Rockies Incident Management Team

Size: estimated 3,043 acres Containment: 0% Cause: Under Investigation

Location: Near mile marker 184 on Highway 95 Structures destroyed: 0

Total Personnel: 423, including 14 hand crews, 14 engines, 2 dozers, 3 water tenders, and 4 helicopters

A public meeting will be held Friday, July 27 at 6:00 p.m. MDT/ 5:00p.m. PDT at the Salmon River High School in Riggins.

The Rattlesnake Creek was first reported Monday, July 23rd and is a potential threat to numerous structures in the vicinity of Pollock, Idaho. Mike Almas’ Type 2 Incident Management Team began managing the fire at 6:00 a.m. Wednesday, July 25.

The fire continued to grow throughout the day on Wednesday, primarily on the south flank, on the west side of Highway 95. Hand crews worked through the day and made significant headway constructing direct hand line along the fire’s northeastern and southern flanks with continued support from the helicopters to cool hot spots. Crews were faced with challenging conditions on the north flank with numerous rollouts in the steep terrain resulting in some slop-over across the hand line.

Crews are looking to tie in direct hand line on the north flank with dozer line on the northwest flank. They will assess the slop-over along the northern flank of the fire and continue efforts to contain it. Helicopters will continue to support and aid crews by cooling hot spots. Managers are continuing to assess the most effective locations to engage the fire, as well as future structure protection needs. The fire will likely spread primarily to the south (pushed by northwest and terrain-driven winds), so crews will continue to perform structure protection and work to keep the fire west of Highway 95.

Resources Threatened: Private property and structures in the Pollock, Idaho and Whitewater Wilderness Ranch Estates areas remain threatened, as well as threats to state and federal infrastructure (Highway 95) and natural resources.

Evacuations and Closures: The Idaho County and Adams County Sheriff’s Offices have issued pre-evacuation notices (“Be Set”) to residents in the North Pollock, Whitewater Wilderness Ranch Estates, and Pinehurst areas. Residents in the general vicinity should remain vigilant and refer to the Sheriff’s Office Facebook pages. The Sheriff’s Office has also set up some road and area closures in those areas, to provide for public safety.

Additionally, the Nez Perce-Clearwater and Payette National Forests have area closures in effect, including portions of the Hells Canyon National Recreation Area (NRA); see http://www.fs.usda.gov/alerts/nezperceclearwater/alerts-notices or the closures tab on Inciweb for more details.

Weather & Fuel Conditions: Hot and dry conditions will continue today with relative humidity in the low teens. Dry fuels (especially grasses and fine fuels) will continue to fuel fire spread, driven by light northwest and terrain-influenced winds.

Temporary Flight Restrictions: Temporary flight restrictions (TFR) are in effect around the entire fire area. Remember, that temporary flight restrictions also apply to unmanned aircraft systems (drones), so if you fly, we can’t!

Announcements: Smoke will continue to be a problem along the Highway 95 corridor. Please adhere to all safety signage, including all speed limit signs and traffic reader boards. Speeding, stopping or slowing unexpectedly, unauthorized use of pull-outs, as well as fire-related traffic congestion could create a safety hazard for public and firefighters. So, please do not stop along the highway corridor near the fire! For smoke monitoring information, see Idaho Department of Environmental Quality http://www.deq.idaho.gov/air-quality/burning/current-wildfire-smoke-info/ or https://tools.airfire.org/monitoring/v4/#!/?category=PM2.5_nowcast&centerlat=42&centerlon=-95&zoom=4

Point protection efforts around homes

Map:

Click to access 2018_07_27-10.01.21.887-CDT.pdf

Rattlesnake Creek InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/5999/
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Lodgepole Fire near Crouch, ID

The Boise National Forest has declared Lodgepole prescribed burn, originally ignited April 24, as a wildfire in order to be more competitive for fire resources and allowing a wider variety of tactical options as they continue full suppression actions. The burn was declared a wildfire on July 14.

(7-26-2018) – The Lodgepole Fire is approximately 1,616 acres and 75 percent contained. It is located about 16 miles northeast of Garden Valley ID, along the National Forest System (NFS) road 671.

There is an area closure in effect for public safety, however campgrounds along east side of NFS road 671 including Silver Creek Plunge are open. The 671 and 698 roads are open for motorized travel and the trails along the west boundary of the closure are open.

Firefighters are being supported with helicopter water drops and operations continue with mop-up and patrol tactics.

“We regret the smoke impacts that citizens of Crouch and Garden Valley have had to deal with, it certainly was not our intent to have smoke lingering this long. We anticipate the smoke impacts to decrease in days to come.

For more information, contact Mike Williamson (208) 373-4105.

Map:

Lodgepole Fire InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/5929/
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The Jim Sage fire

For Immediate Release: July 27, 2018
Contact: Kelsey Brizendine, 208-732-7315

Twin Falls District BLM Fire Update
Facebook: Idaho Fire Info
Twitter: @BLMIdahoFire
(#BLMTFDFire)

Jim Sage
* Location: approximately five miles southeast of Elba
* Size: estimated 1,900 acres
* Contain: unknown
* Control: unknown
* Resources: 10 engines, three dozers, one water tender
* Fuel type: grass, brush and juniper
* Fire behavior: running, crowning, torching and spotting
* Structures threatened: structures are secure at this time
* Cause: lightning

The Jim Sage fire is burning in heavy juniper, grass and brush. Fire fighters are experiencing extreme fire behavior with running, torching and spotting. The fire is currently pushing north and south, reaching the ridge top on the northern flank. Additional resources have been ordered and air craft are on scene assisting ground units. The fire area is expecting gusty winds this afternoon. Structures near the fire are secure at this time.

For More Information-
* Kelsey Brizendine, Fire Information and Prevention Officer, kbrizendine@blm.gov
* 208-308-5991
* Idaho Wildfires visit http://www.IdahoFireInfo.com
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Bruneau Fire

For Immediate Release: July 27, 2018
Contact: Kelsey Brizendine, 208-732-7315

Twin Falls District BLM Fire Update
Facebook: Idaho Fire Info
Twitter: @BLMIdahoFire
(#BLMTFDFire)

Bruneau Fire
* Location: five miles northwest of Murphy Hot Springs
* Size: estimated 61,000 acres
* Contain: unknown
* Control: unknown
* Resources: three dozers, 13 engines, one fuel truck, one camp crew, Three Creek Rangeland Fire Protection Association (RFPA), three water tenders
* Fuel type: grass and brush
* Fire behavior: smoldering and creeping
* Structures threatened: structures in the area are not immediately threatened
* Cause: lightning

Crews are focusing on the northwest and southwest corners today, where most of the active fire remains. Firefighters experienced moderate fire behavior last night and this morning. Fire behavior is expected to remain moderate to calm throughout the day. Structures near the fire remain secure at this time. Due to the remoted location of the fire, updates may be delayed.

For More Information-
Kelsey Brizendine, Fire Information and Prevention Officer, kbrizendine@blm.gov
208-308-5991
Idaho Wildfires visit http://www.IdahoFireInfo.com
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Grassy Ridge Fire 7/27/18 AM Update

For Immediate Release: July 27, 2018 8:30 a.m.
Contact: Kelsey Griffee, kgriffee@blm.gov, 208-521-8709

Grassy Ridge Fire Update
Twitter: @BLMIdahoFire
Facebook: Idaho Fire Info
(#GrassyRidgeFire & #BLMIFDFire)

Start Date: 07/26/2018
Location and Jurisdiction: 15 miles northwest of St. Anthony near Red Road (BLM & State lands). Burning east of the old Red Road Fire.
Cause: Lightning
Fire Size: estimated 4,400 acres
Percent Contained: 30%, no estimated containment
Fire Behavior: Running and very active.
Structures Threatened: No immediate threat to structures.
Fuels and Terrain: Burning in grass and brush on flat ground.
Fire Crews/Resources: 9 engines (BLM, USFS, BIA) and 3 dozers.
Evacuations: None in effect.
Closures: None in effect.

Summary: The Grassy Ridge Fire started on 7/26/18 at approximately 3 p.m. off the Red Road. The southwest side of the fire burned into the old Red Road Fire yesterday evening. Dozers and firefighters worked into the early morning hours, but were unable to knock down the fire. The fire is still very active and running to the northwest and east. Crews will continue working to achieve containment.


Photos taken by: BLM Engine Captain Bastian of burn out operations yesterday night and a distance shot of the fire this morning.
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Updated Fire Reports July 26

New:

Brush fire near Midvale shuts down Highway 95

The lightning-caused Keithly Fire was first detected Wednesday morning about four miles northwest of Midvale

KTVB July 26, 2018

Midvale, ID — A wildfire burning northwest of Midvale grew dramatically on Thursday, shutting down a stretch of U.S. 95, as crews scramble to build a fire line around it.

A 12-mile stretch of the highway is closed between Canary Street in Midvale and Jackson Road, about eight miles north of Weiser. Drivers are encouraged to find an alternate route.

continued:
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Fire Season Update:

Tracking 4 fires. The Rattlesnake Creek Fire is south of Riggins, the Lodgepole Fire north east of Crouch, the Trestle Fire in the Smith’s Ferry area and the MM73 Hwy 55 Fire.
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Smoke Outlook

July 25, 2018

Smoke impacts in Salmon, McCall, Idaho City, Garden Valley, Weiser, Nampa are likely to continue today. Air quality is forecast to remain in the Good (Green) category for most of the state today with areas such as McCall, Garden Valley, Weiser, seeing higher smoke levels into the Moderate (Yellow) category. Nampa and Meridian are likely to reach the Moderate category again as well.

Smoke impacts today are expected to remain localized in and around Garden Valley and near McCall due to the proximity of the Rattlesnake Creek Fire. Expect occasional patchy or hazy smoke aloft over southern Idaho from fires burning to the west in Oregon. The northern Panhandle may see light smoke aloft from fires burning in southern British Columbia, Canada. On Thursday, smoke impacts are expected to shift slightly with the shifting wind pattern. Expect impacts to be focused from within Idaho with the Rattlesnake Creek fire producing smoke that will impact southwest Idaho from Riggins to the north and south to Mountain Home. Widespread, lofted smoke is expected to range across the Central Idaho Mountains with some entrainment into the Snake River Plain later in the day. Continue to expect smoke aloft from fires in Oregon to generate hazy conditions over southern Idaho.


This image indicates smoke near the surface that is forecast to occur around noon on Wednesday. Limited increased smoke is expected across the entire state with higher impacts in south-central Idaho.

continued:
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Active Burning Continues on the Rattlesnake Creek Fire

Kamiah, Idaho (July 24, 2018) – The Rattlesnake Creek fire, located on the west side of highway 95 near mile marker 184 near Pollock on the Nez Perce-Clearwater and Payette National Forests, was reported at 12:02 p.m. yesterday. The cause of the fire is currently under investigation.

As of 8:00 p.m. yesterday the fire was mapped and estimated to be 2,100+ acres and continues to actively burn in timber and grass. Firefighting resources focused efforts yesterday on Point Protection, actions to stop the forward progression of the fire towards primary residences. No structures have been lost at this time. Firefighters will be identifying a location to the north of the fire for fire line construction. The location and focus of the work today will continue to be point protection on the north side of the fire.

There are currently no evacuations associated with the fire. Multiple structures are threatened. Local residents are encouraged to monitor the Idaho and Adams County Sheriff’s Facebook pages.

continued:

Pollock residents given pre-evacuation notice due to Rattlesnake Creek fire

by Deni Hawkins & CBS 2 News Staff Tuesday, July 24th 2018

link:

Map of Rattlesnake Creek Fire and surrounding area.

FB link:

Rattlesnake Creek InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/5999/
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Lodgepole Fire containment increases

Contact: Mike Williamson (208) 373-4105
Email: mcwilliamson@fs.fed.us

Emmett, Idaho, July 24, 2018 — Firefighting crews continue to make progress on the Lodgepole Fire burning about 14 miles north of Crouch along National Forest System (NFS) road 671. The fire now stands at 1,616 acres and is 45 percent contained.

An area closure remains in place for public and firefighter safety. The road to Silver Creek Plunge remains open, as does the Plunge itself and area Forest Service campgrounds.

“The fire hasn’t really grown over the last several days. A few spot fires have been found, but were quickly caught by the crews,” said Emmett District Ranger Richard Newton. “There are interior pockets of fuel that continue to burn in the understory with this hot and dry weather. Containment lines are in place and crews are patrolling and mopping-up the perimeter.”

There are approximately 96 firefighters on the ground and are receiving support from one helicopter and four engines.

The Lodgepole Fire originally was a prescribed fire ignited April 24. Pockets of smoldering heat in heavy fuels, combined with hot and dry weather, resulted in a creeping fire causing smoke to settle into nearby Crouch and threatened to grow outside the project boundary. It was declared a wildfire on July 14.

To view closure area maps online, visit https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/5929/

For more information contact Mike Williamson, Acting Public Affairs Officer, (208) 373-4105.

Lodgepole Fire InciWeb:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/5929/
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The Trestle Fire located 4 miles north of Rainbow Bridge on the bank of the North Fork Payette River.

July 24, 2018 – Trestle Fire
Media contact: Randall Phelps, 208-334-0233, fireinformation@idl.idaho.gov

(Boise) – Southern Idaho Timber Protective Association (SITPA) together with the U.S. Forest Service are battling a fire that started about 4 miles north of the Rainbow Bridge on the bank of the North Fork of the Payette River. The fire is now burning uphill and to the west and is estimated to be about 70 acres.

It is mainly on private and some Forest Service land and is estimated to be five to 10 percent contained at this time. The Cabarton Road boat launch is closed at this time due to firefighting activity. There are no evacuations, road or trail closures ordered at this time. The fire was reported Monday, July 23, just before 5 p.m.

Two helicopters, two Single Engine Air Tankers, two SITPA engines and three Forest Service hand crews fought the fire yesterday. The helicopter, engines, and hand crews are still on the scene and an additional hand crew will arrive later today.

The cause of the fire is under investigation. Containment is expected by July 30.

Cabarton Road boat launch closed due to wildfire burning in Valley County

by CBS 2 News Staff Tuesday, July 24th 2018

link:

Trestle Fire InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6017/
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Mile Marker 73 & Highway 55 Fire Update, July 26, 6:55am.

Idaho Department of Lands (IDL) together with the U.S. Forest Service, Garden Valley, and Horseshoe Bend Fire Departments continue to fight the fire that started on Highway 55 at Mile Marker 73 north of Gardena. Highway 55 remains closed in both directions from Gardena to Smith’s Ferry due to ongoing fire activities and is expected to remain closed until later today.

The fire continues to burn uphill and to the east, and was estimated at 1,000 plus acres and growing last night. The fire was reported Wednesday, July 25th, at approximately 4 P.M. A Type 1 Team has been ordered.

One helicopter, Three Single Engine Air Tankers, one Very Large Air Tanker (VLAT), one IDL engine, four Forest Service engines, several BLM engine resources, Garden Valley and Horseshoe Bend Rural Fire Departments are on scene. The Type 1 Team, two dozers and two additional crews have been ordered and will arrive today.

The cause is under investigation.

Pilot car to guide single lane of traffic on Highway 55 due to 1,000-acre fire

by CBS 2 News Staff Wednesday, July 25th 2018

Horseshoe Bend, Idaho (CBS 2) — A closed section of Highway 55 north of Horseshoe Bend will open back up with a pilot car after a fast-moving fire.

The Idaho Transportation Department says the stretch from Gardena to Smith’s Ferry will be back open — albeit just a single lane of traffic. The pilot car will alternate directions of traffic.

The Mile Marker 73 fire has burned approximately 1,000 acres, and was still growing as of late Wednesday night. It was first reported Wednesday around 4 p.m.

continued:

View from Gardenia at 1020pm July 25th

FB link:

7-26-2018 – a.m. Mile Marker 73 & Highway 55 Fire Update

Media contact: Randall Phelps, 208-334-0233, fireinformation@idl.idaho.gov

The Mile Marker 73 & Highway 55 Fire near Gardena is now estimated to be 2,000 acres and growing. Idaho Department of Lands (IDL) together with the U.S. Forest Service, Garden Valley and Horseshoe Bend Fire Departments continue to jointly battle the fire that continues to burn uphill and to the east. A Type 1 Team will take over fire operations on Friday morning.

Drivers are asked to avoid Highway 55. Those driving north to McCall or above are asked to take Highway 95. Those going toward Stanley are asked to take Highway 21 or go through Sun Valley. For those who must take Highway 55, it is reopened with a pilot car leading traffic, alternating directions using one lane with long delays are expected. There is the possibility of falling rock and drivers need to be aware of the possible hazard and drive with caution.

Idaho Power has shut off power to Garden Valley while they replace damaged power poles. There is no estimated time for power restoration.

One helicopter, three Single Engine Air Tankers (SEATs), one Very Large Air Tanker (VLAT), one IDL engine, four Forest Service engines, several BLM engine resources, Garden Valley and Horseshoe Bend Rural Fire Departments are on scene. Two dozers and two additional crews have been ordered and will arrive today.

The fire was reported Wednesday, July 25th, at approximately 4 P.M. The cause is under investigation.

Photos taken by Boise National Forest Fire Prevention Technician Jessica Kearney-Reeves.

link to FB photo gallery:

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Update – Boise BLM responds to multiple lightning wildfires

For Immediate Release: July 25, 2018, 4:30 pm
Contact: Boise District Fire Information Line (208) 384-3378
Twitter: @BLMIdahoFire

The Boise BLM responded to four lightning ignited wildfires on July 24, 2018 across the southern portion of the district.

Cat Fire
* Located approximately 13 miles east of Duck Valley Indian Reservation, ID
* Estimated at 15,750 acres
* Cause – Lightning
* Fire resources –1 helicopter, 10 engines, 2 hand crews, 1 water tender and 3 dozers
* Air attack and air tankers are being shared with the Bruneau Fire
* No estimated contain or control time

Cow Fire
* Located approximately 10 miles northeast of Jordan Valley, OR
* Estimated at 759 acres
* Cause – Lightning
* Fire resources – 1 helicopter, 1 hand crew, 9 engines, 1 water tender and 5 dozers
* No estimated contain or control time

Beav Fire
* Located approximately 7 miles southeast of Juniper Mountain, ID
* Estimated at 550 acres
* Cause – Lightning
* Fire resources – 3 engines, 1 dozer and 1 water tender
* Estimated contain – 7/25/2018 at 2000, Estimated control – 7/26/2018 at 1800

Nipntuck Fire
* Located approximately 11 miles northwest of Juniper Mountain, ID
* Estimated at 1/4 acre
* Cause – Lightning
* Contained – 7/24/2018 at 2200, Controlled – 7/25/2018 at 1400

For More Information,
* Jared Jablonski, Fire Information and Prevention Office, 208 384-3210
* Idaho Wildfires visit http://www.IdahoFireInfo.com
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