Monthly Archives: August 2018

Fire Update Aug 31, 2018

There are NO fires currently threatening Yellow Pine.
Yesterday’s high was 81 degrees, increasing clouds during the day – overcast by evening – clearing early this morning. Overnight low of 46 degrees. Dry this morning, not much dew. Good air quality!
Yellow Pine Forecast

Stage 1 Fire Restrictions are in effect on the Boise NF, but will be lifted on the Payette NF August 31, 2018. Remember, Yellow Pine is on the border between the two forests, so know where you are when you light a campfire.

Air Quality in Yellow Pine = Green

Air Quality Index (AQI) McCall
observed at 9:00 MDT
10Good

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Land Management Agencies lift Stage 1 Fire Restrictions in all Zones, Except the Weiser River Zone of the Payette Fire Restriction Area

Date: August 29, 2018
Contact: Brian Harris, Payette National Forest, 208-634-6945

McCall, Idaho – With cooler temperatures and chances of precipitation increasing into next week, local land management agencies will lift Stage 1 Fire Restrictions in all zones except the Weiser River Zone beginning Friday, August 31, 2018, just after midnight at 0001 hours. The Fire Restrictions are rescinded by agencies managing state, private and public lands in the area, including the United States Forest Service (USFS), United State Bureau of Land Management (BLM), Southern Idaho Timber Protective Association (SITPA), and the Idaho Department of Lands (IDL). Restrictions in the Weiser River Zone will remain in effect until further notice. See map for the location of the Weiser River Zone.

The restrictions were put into effect on August 3 when fire danger and burning conditions were unusually high. Recent storms have brought moisture with much cooler temperatures to the area, and with the days getting shorter, fire conditions have moderated. Forest visitors are reminded that vegetation is still dry, and to be careful with all use of fire in the outdoors. The accidental start of a wildfire can still be devastating.

Be alert and be aware. Follow these tips to help prevent wildfire:

* NEVER leave a camp fire unattended
* Keep water, dirt and a shovel near your fire at all times
* Make sure your fire is dead out and cold to the touch before you leave it
* Fireworks are never allowed on National Forest and State lands, and are prohibited on BLM lands during closed fire season (May 10 through October 20).
* Exploding targets or tracer rounds are prohibited on all public lands.

Area closures due to active wildfires are still in effect on some public lands, including the areas affected by the Rattlesnake Creek and Mesa wildfires on the Payette National Forest. Contact the land management agency for your area of interest for specific information regarding fire closures.

Fire restrictions are being lifted, but burn bans may still be in place in some areas. Fire

Restrictions and burn bans address different types of activities. Burn bans pertain to controlled burning activities such as debris burning, slash burning, or agricultural burning, for which a fire safety burn permit from IDL is required. Visit http://burnpermits.idaho.gov/ for more information.
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Area Closures that may affect you this Labor Day weekend

Lowman, Idaho, Aug 30, 2018 – Area closures related to the Wapiti and Bible Back Fires may affect visitors to the Sawtooth and Boise National Forests this Labor Day weekend. While many locations on the forests are open for recreationists, there are some closures that provide for firefighter and public safety.

Wapiti Fire in the Grandjean Area- Developed campgrounds at Stanley Lake and access to Stanley Lake will be open. Dispersed camping in the Stanley Lake area is currently not allowed. Trap Creek, Sheep Trail, Elk Creek Campgrounds along Hwy 21 are also open.

Redfish Lake, Redfish Lake Inlet Trailhead including access to Baron Lakes, and all lakes and trailheads in the southern Sawtooth Wilderness are open. Closed areas are: Alpine and Sawtooth Lakes and Grandjean, Stanley Lake, Elk Meadow, and Elk Mountain Trailheads.

Bible Back Fire in the southern White Cloud Mountains- Fourth of July Road (FR #209) is open but access to these trails and lakes is closed: Fourth of July Lake and Washington Lake, Phyllis Lake, and Champion Lakes.

Upper Pole Creek Road (FR #197) is closed beyond the Grand Prize Trailhead, although Grand Prize Trailhead is open. Access to the following trailheads and destinations is closed: Champion Creek Cut-Off Trailhead and access to Champion Lakes; Washington Creek and Washington Basin Trailheads and access to Washington Peak, Washington Lake and Chamberlain Basin; Three Cabins Creek Trailhead and access to Germania Creek and Chamberlain Basin.

For additional information please visit:
Sawtooth NF Area Closures: https://www.fs.usda.gov/alerts/sawtooth/alerts-notices
Facebook: U.S. Forest Service – Sawtooth National Forest
Facebook: U.S. Forest Service – Boise National Forest
Boise NF Twitter: @BoiseNF
Boise NF Website: https://www.fs.usda.gov/boise
Fire Restrictions: https://www.idahofireinfo.com/p/fire-restrictions.html
InciWeb – Wapiti Fire: https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6176/
Hunting information: https://idfg.idaho.gov/hunt
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Caton Fire

Payette National Forest
Cause Lightning
Date of Origin Friday August 24th, 2018 approx. 11:30 AM
Location The fire is located 7 miles southwest of the Village of Yellow Pine near Indian Point and has been moving east into the Caton Creek drainage.
Total Personnel 6
Size 400 Acres
Estimated Containment Date Monday October 15th, 2018 approx. 12:00 AM

Caton Fire Aug 27 Map

(good topo map you can zoom in on)

20180831CatonKiwahfires-a
Aug 31, 2018 Thermal Map Caton and Kiwah Fires (no growth)

InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6177/
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Johnson Fire – Contained 8-23

Boise National Forest
Location – The fire is above Johnson Creek between Coffee and Halfway creeks, just a short distance above the Ditch Creek road.
Fire Discovery Date/Time: 8/20/2018, 4:36:26 PM
Cause – Lightning
Acreage: 6.3 [total]
Contained – August 23, 2018
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Kiwah Fire

Meadow Creek Road is Open
8-24 Update: With the decrease in fire activity on the Kiwah fire, we have terminated the closure of Meadow Creek road. While the safety risks to the public are currently reduced, people in the fire area should be aware that hazards do still exist such as; unexpected fire movement, falling trees, ash pits, and debris slides.
We will maintain a public safety awareness posting in the location of our previous closure signs.

Salmon-Challis National Forest
Location eight (8) miles northwest of Indian Creek Guard Station on the south side of the Indian Creek drainage in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness
Cause Lightning
Date of Origin Wednesday July 18th, 2018 approx. 05:30 PM
Current as of 8/31/2018, 7:40:39 AM
Total Personnel 1
Size 14,603 Acres
Percent of Perimeter Contained 1%
Estimated Containment Date Monday October 01st, 2018 approx. 12:00 AM

Significant Events: Minimal fire behavior with creeping and smoldering. Due to moisture received over the fire area and cooler temperature, there is minimal fire activity.

Weather Concerns: Winds gusty at times this afternoon, but with cooler temperatures and higher humidity. A gradual warming and drying trend begins Saturday.

Kiwah Fire InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/5995/
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Wapiti Fire

Boise National Forest
Date of Origin Saturday August 25th, 2018 approx. 12:00 AM
Cause Under Investigation
Location 13 miles SW of Stanley, Idaho
Current as of 8/31/2018, 11:45:02 AM
Total Personnel 391
Size 4,550 Acres
Percent of Perimeter Contained 33%
Estimated Containment Date Monday October 01st, 2018 approx. 12:00 AM

8-31-2018 Wapiti Fire Update

Phone: 844-692-5335

Current Status: The burned area continued to cool with fewer hot spots and smoke plumes observed during the day, despite the effects of the wind, low relative humidity, and the continued drying of fuels. Overall, things were looking very favorable. The acreage of the fire remained stable throughout the day.

“The weather Thursday was a good test for us,” said Ken Rodgers, fire behavior analyst for Great Basin Incident Management Team #3. “Winds gusted above 20 mph during the afternoon without any flareups. Things are continuing to look cooler on the ground, with fewer smokes, and that is great for us,” he added.

Crews continued to construct containment line on the perimeter, cold trailing at least 100 feet into the burned area to ensure there were no hot spots in close proximity to unburned areas, raising containment to 33 percent. They also continued the work on contingency lines outside the perimeter and continued to work on mitigating snags (standing dead trees).

Friday will be another day of testing on the fire with high winds returning again in the afternoon. Crews will again be watching closely to see if fire activity continues to diminish and they will be ready to respond if needed. There are still areas of potential concern and they will be monitored closely.

There have been no injuries thus far during the incident, a testament to the skill and alertness of the firefighters. They have been working in steep and rocky terrain where crews have to very conscious of footing and hazards. (Rolling rocks and unstable soil, etc.)

Since the situation here has stabilized, incident command has started to release resources for redeployment to other fires. There are currently 96 uncontrolled large fires across the United States, most of which could use additional resources on scene.

Evacuations in the vicinity of Grandjean and area closures in the Boise National Forest and Sawtooth National Recreation Area remain in effect. For more information, visit their websites or call the Lowman Ranger District at 208-259-3361.

Resources: 10 Crews, 14 Engines, 5 Helicopters, 4 Water Tenders.

Please check the Wapiti Fire on Inciweb or the Boise National Forest and Sawtooth National Forest Facebook pages for updated information, along with the latest maps and photos.

8-31-2018 Wapiti Public Vicinity Map

Wapiti Fire InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6176/
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Snake Fire

Salmon-Challis National Forest
Cause Lightning
Date of Origin Saturday August 18th, 2018 approx. 08:30 AM
Location 36 miles east of Yellow Pine, Idaho in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness, northwest of the confluence of Big Creek and the Middle Fork Salmon River.
Current as of 8/31/2018, 7:23:04 AM
Total Personnel 1
Size 1 Acres
Estimated Containment Date Monday October 15th, 2018 approx. 12:00 AM

The Snake Fire is located in steep, inaccessible terrain in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness, northwest of the confluence of Big Creek and the Middle Fork Salmon River.

The lightning caused Snake Fire, was detected on August 17 at approximately 10:30 p.m. is 0.6 acres in size and is burning in Ponderosa Pine with a grass understory. The fire is on the ridgetop which divides the Salmon-Challis National Forest and the Payette National Forests. No activity has been observed on the fire since August 24.

The Fuse Fire is located in steep, inaccessible terrain on the Middle Fork Ranger District in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness, approximately 2.5 miles west of Trail Creek.

The lightning caused Fuse Fire, was detected on August 17 at approximately 3:00 p.m. is 2 acres in size and is burning in timber and rock scree. No activity has been observed on the fire since August 24.

The Snake and Fuse fires are being allowed to play, as nearly as possible, its natural ecological role in the environment while providing for firefighter and public safety. The fires will continue to be monitored by lookouts and by agency aircraft.

The Central Idaho Dispatch Zone is at HIGH Fire Danger.

Snake Fire InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6159/
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Rattlesnake Creek Fire

Nez Perce – Clearwater National Forests
Location West side of Highway 95 near mile marker 184; near Pollock
Cause Human
Date of Origin Monday July 23rd, 2018 approx. 12:00 PM
Current as of 8/30/2018, 8:23:06 PM
otal Personnel 329
Size 8,207 Acres
Percent of Perimeter Contained 55%

No Perimeter Growth Expected Today

Friday, August 31, 2018 9:00 a.m.

Summary: Firefighters used direct and indirect methods to contain hot spots along the south and east sides of the fire. Suppression repair and removal of equipment continued on the north side of the fire. Fire behavior was low with small pockets of fuels burning within the fire’s perimeter.

Today, cooler temperatures are expected with breezy west to northwest winds. Fire behavior will be low with creeping and smoldering. Light smoke may be visible as unburned fuels are consumed. No perimeter growth is expected today. Firefighters will continue indirect tactics, strengthening the contingency line on the south side. Firefighters also continue to strengthen direct fireline in and around the areas of Pony Creek Trail, Pony Creek, and Squirrel Creek. On the north side of the fire, crews continue suppression repair and removing fire equipment no longer needed.

Resources Threatened: Private property and structures in the Pollock, Pinehurst, Hillman Basin and Elk Lake areas remain at risk, as well as state and federal infrastructure (Highway 95) and natural resources.

It is unsafe and illegal to fly drones near wildfires. Temporary flight restrictions (TFR) are in effect around the entire fire area. Unauthorized use of unmanned aircraft, also known as UAS, “drones,” or remote controlled model aircraft, in a fire area endangers the lives of pilots and firefighters. If you fly a drone over a fire, air operations could be suspended until the risk of a mid-air collision with a drone is resolved. Never fly unmanned aircraft over or near fires.

Adams County Road Information: Smokey Boulder Road to Railroad Saddle remains closed. For more information visit: https://www.facebook.com/ACSO911/

The Nez Perce-Clearwater and Payette National Forests have Rattlesnake Creek Fire area closures in effect including portions of the Hells Canyon National Recreation Area (NRA); see https://bit.ly/2ATSand, https://www.fs.usda.gov/payetteor Inciwebfor more details. Smokey Boulder Road (FS #074) is closed from the Forest Boundary to Railroad Saddle. Some people think that FS #098 is Smokey Boulder Road – this is incorrect. FS #098 is open, and can be accessed from Highway 95, Mud Creek Road or from Price Valley; but it cannot be accessed from the Smokey Boulder Road.

Fire map for hunters and anglers: https://bit.ly/2ziGO7A.

Today local land management agencies lifted Stage 1 Fire Restrictions in all zones except the Weiser River Zone of the Payette Fire Restriction Area. https://bit.ly/2ag2SUy.

For highway conditions and closures call 511 or visit http://511.idaho.gov/.

For smoke and air quality information: See https://bit.ly/2nooV2z or https://bit.ly/2tm1VG6.

Fire Information: (208) 495-6934 (7am-7pm)
InciWeb: https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/5999(maps, photos, links, etc.)
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/RattlesnakeCreekFire/ (daily updates & video updates)

August 31 Rattlesnake Creek Fire Map

Rattlesnake Creek Fire InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/5999/
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Rabbit Foot Fire

Salmon-Challis National Forest
Date of Origin Thursday August 02nd, 2018 approx. 12:30 PM
Location 14 Nautical Miles South West of Salmon, ID
Cause Lightning/natural
Current as of 8/31/2018, 6:42:36 AM
Total Personnel 267
Size 35,369 Acres
Percent of Perimeter Contained 14%
Estimated Containment Date Wednesday October 31st, 2018 approx. 12:00 AM

August 31, 2018 Daily Update for Rabbit Foot Fire

Contact Fire Information: 208.879.1243

Current Situation: Yesterday fire activity was slow with significant cloud cover keeping any spread potential and fire behavior low. Fire personnel monitored the western side of the fire perimeter for any change in conditions. Crews worked along the Hat Creek drainage to wrap and protect structures. The southern flank saw crews tying into the unburned pockets and putting indirect line connecting to the fire perimeter. Structure protection specialists continued to evaluate the Williams Lake area and worked to reduce vegetation around infrastructures. Air operations helped get over 26,000 gallons of water on the fire to help cool any heat sources of heavy fuel.

Saturday, the Morgan Creek Road (NFSR 055) may open for public use. Agency and Incident Management Team personnel will evaluate any further safety concerns prior to opening the road. Tentatively, Morgan Creek would open at 0600 with only through traffic driving, no stops allowed. Please confirm the status of the Morgan Creek Road and all other closure areas prior to travel for the Labor Day weekend.

Today firefighters will continue to monitor and patrol along the western edge of the fire perimeter. Crews will setup pumps and sprinklers around structures in the Panther Creek area. Along the eastern flank, crews will continue fuels reduction assessment in the Williams Lake area. Ground crews are working the southern piece of fireline to repair suppression actions where the perimeter is secured. Aviation resources continue to cool hotspots where heat is present with bucket drops of water.

Weather: Weather today will continue with a cooling trend temperatures, will be in the low 60s to high 70s depending on the elevation. Relative humidity levels are expected to be in the upper teens low twenties. Westerly wind speeds should have gusts in the mid-20s. Tomorrow and through the weekend will bring warming and drying as a high pressure will dominate western states. No precipitation or thunderstorms are expected in the coming days.

Evacuations: All pre-evacuation zones in both Custer and Lemhi counties are in Level 1 status, which is the lowest level of alert. Residents in these zones should maintain awareness of the potential for evacuations in the event of increased fire behavior. Make a plan for what to take and where to go if evacuations become necessary based on changes in fire activity. See a map depicting the current evacuations at https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6090/. In Lemhi County, contact the Sheriff’s Department at 208.756.8980 for questions regarding evacuations.

Closures: An area closure remains in effect on Slamon-Challis National Forest lands. Silver Creek Road is open; however, the Morgan Creek Road remains closed between Rye Grass Pinnacle and Rooker Basin and NFSR108 road. The area closure does cover parts of hunting units 28 and 36B. The Cabin and Ringle Creek Roads and all spurs that connect to those roads remain closed by the Bureau of Land Management’s Salmon Field Office. For safety and travel planning, check the closure maps at https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/closures/6090/

August 31, 2018 Rabbit Foot Fire Map (pdf 1,342 kb)

Click to access pict20180731-102201-0.pdf

Rabbit Foot Fire InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6090/
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Stewart Creek Fire

Sawtooth National Forest
Cause Lightning/natural
Date of Origin Monday August 20th, 2018 approx. 02:30 PM
Location 18 miles northwest of Fairfield
Current as of 8/31/2018, 10:35:28 AM
Total Personnel 323
Size 1,657 Acres
Percent of Perimeter Contained 20%
Estimated Containment Date Monday October 15th, 2018 approx. 12:00 AM

Daily Update for August 31

YESTERDAY: The fire continued to produce visible smoke and move in an easterly direction. Firefighters made steady progress by continuing to complete fireline and lay nearly 2 miles of hose east of Lime Creek. The intent is to reinforce line as a contingency plan to prevent the fire from moving southwest. Air resources were active across the head of the fire, with continuous water drops by helicopters to slow the movement of the fire. To take advantage of cooler temperatures and higher humidity, a small area of successful strategic firing operations was completed late in the day along the north edge of the fire near Trail 055 with the intent to eliminate unburned fuel between the fire perimeter and the road.

TODAY: The Eastern Area Incident Management Team (EA IMT) will begin managing the Stewart Creek Fire today. The previous team and local Ranger District were instrumental in providing a smooth transition of command through their dedicated work and attention to detail. Several of the resources will stay to complete their assignments and transition with the new team.

A cold front will be moving through with increased northwest winds in the afternoon, followed by cooler temperatures and higher humidity. The favorable weather should allow for crews to continue patrol and monitor status on the west/southwest corner, improve line along the southern edge and continue helicopter bucket work to slow movement of the fire to the south and east. A small team of operational personnel will be flying the fire to assess the fire behavior, burn pattern and begin developing a plan for additional strategic firing operations in the future.

SUMMARY:The Stewart Creek Fire started on August 20, 2018 as a result of dry lightning, 18 miles Northwest of Fairfield, Idaho on the Sawtooth National Forest, Fairfield Ranger District. Weather conditions, dry fuels and rough terrain aided in fire spread, showing signs of up to ½ mile of spotting potential. Crews strategically stationed at various spike camps have been working tirelessly on this fire to build fireline where accessible to help impede fire spread and guide the fire to the east and north. Available air resources are being used in inaccessible and dangerous areas where firefighters are unable to safely operate due to extremely steep terrain or hazardous standing dead trees, also known as ‘snags.’ The fire is burning in standing timber, heavy down and dead understory with visible single tree and group torching.

Stewart Creek Fire InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6171/

BLM to initiate emergency closure for area near Stewart Creek Fire

Twin Falls District, Idaho
DATE: Aug. 30, 2018
CONTACT: Heather Tiel-Nelson, 208-736-2352

Fairfield, Idaho – Effective immediately, the BLM Shoshone Field Office is temporarily closing public lands in and around the Stewart Creek fire area in Camas County for public and firefighter safety. Approximately 3,840 acres of BLM-managed public lands are affected by this closure, which covers all BLM-managed lands located south of the National Forest (Fairfield Ranger District) boundary and generally north of State of Idaho Endowment lands within the “Chimney Creek” area north of Hill City. The main access into this area is the Chimney Creek Road, which is currently closed by Camas County.

This closure is in effect until rescinded by Shoshone Field Manager Codie Martin.

“As fire crews are working in this area, it is important that members of the public avoid this portion of public land for the time being,” said Shoshone Field Manager Codie Martin.

A map and a description of the emergency closure are available here: https://www.blm.gov/idaho and at http://www.idahofireinfo.com


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Fire Update Aug 30, 2018

There are NO fires currently threatening Yellow Pine.
Yesterday was dry and warmer, high of 81 degrees under sunny skies. By sundown a light haze of smoke came in. Overnight low of 40 degrees, mostly clear sky this morning and light haze of smoke.
Yellow Pine Forecast

Stage 1 Fire Restrictions are in effect on the Boise NF, but will be lifted on the Payette NF August 31, 2018. Remember, Yellow Pine is on the border between the two forests, so know where you are when you light a campfire.

Air Quality in Yellow Pine = Green (sligh haze)

Air Quality Index (AQI) McCall
observed at 9:00 MDT
33 Good

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Land Management Agencies lift Stage 1 Fire Restrictions in all Zones, Except the Weiser River Zone of the Payette Fire Restriction Area

Date: August 29, 2018
Contact: Brian Harris, Payette National Forest, 208-634-6945

McCall, Idaho – With cooler temperatures and chances of precipitation increasing into next week, local land management agencies will lift Stage 1 Fire Restrictions in all zones except the Weiser River Zone beginning Friday, August 31, 2018, just after midnight at 0001 hours. The Fire Restrictions are rescinded by agencies managing state, private and public lands in the area, including the United States Forest Service (USFS), United State Bureau of Land Management (BLM), Southern Idaho Timber Protective Association (SITPA), and the Idaho Department of Lands (IDL). Restrictions in the Weiser River Zone will remain in effect until further notice. See map for the location of the Weiser River Zone.

The restrictions were put into effect on August 3 when fire danger and burning conditions were unusually high. Recent storms have brought moisture with much cooler temperatures to the area, and with the days getting shorter, fire conditions have moderated. Forest visitors are reminded that vegetation is still dry, and to be careful with all use of fire in the outdoors. The accidental start of a wildfire can still be devastating.

Be alert and be aware. Follow these tips to help prevent wildfire:

* NEVER leave a camp fire unattended
* Keep water, dirt and a shovel near your fire at all times
* Make sure your fire is dead out and cold to the touch before you leave it
* Fireworks are never allowed on National Forest and State lands, and are prohibited on BLM lands during closed fire season (May 10 through October 20).
* Exploding targets or tracer rounds are prohibited on all public lands.

Area closures due to active wildfires are still in effect on some public lands, including the areas affected by the Rattlesnake Creek and Mesa wildfires on the Payette National Forest. Contact the land management agency for your area of interest for specific information regarding fire closures.

Fire restrictions are being lifted, but burn bans may still be in place in some areas. Fire

Restrictions and burn bans address different types of activities. Burn bans pertain to controlled burning activities such as debris burning, slash burning, or agricultural burning, for which a fire safety burn permit from IDL is required. Visit http://burnpermits.idaho.gov/ for more information.
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Caton Fire

Payette National Forest
Cause Lightning
Date of Origin Friday August 24th, 2018 approx. 11:30 AM
Location The fire is located 7 miles southwest of the Village of Yellow Pine near Indian Point and has been moving east into the Caton Creek drainage.
Total Personnel 6
Size 400 Acres
Estimated Containment Date Monday October 15th, 2018 approx. 12:00 AM

This fire was detected in heavy timber around noon on August 24 – a likely holdover from the lightning storm several days prior.

Due to the amount of precipitation and cooler temperatures, the fire has been relatively quiet for the past few days. The fire is holding at 400 acres, and has not grown. IR flights have shown very little heat in the fire. Firefighters are assigned to monitor the fire – additional fire resources will be assigned as needed. The fire is being managed under a confine/contain and point protection strategy.

No trail, road or area closures are in effect. The fire is not posing a threat to Yellowpine.

Initial attack on this fire was rigorously conducted by smokejumpers, helirappellers, and ground crews aided by helicopters, single-engine air tankers, a heavy air tanker and Very Large Air Tankers. The fire quickly grew in the hot, dry, windy conditions on August 24 and 25.

The fire is located 7 miles southwest of Yellowpine, near Indian Point and had been initially moving east into the Caton Creek drainage prior to the rain fall.

Caton Fire Aug 27 Map

(good topo map you can zoom in on)

20180830CatonKiwahFires-a
Thermal Map for Caton and Kiwah fires 8-30-2018

InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6177/
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Kiwah Fire

Meadow Creek Road is Open
8-24 Update: With the decrease in fire activity on the Kiwah fire, we have terminated the closure of Meadow Creek road. While the safety risks to the public are currently reduced, people in the fire area should be aware that hazards do still exist such as; unexpected fire movement, falling trees, ash pits, and debris slides.
We will maintain a public safety awareness posting in the location of our previous closure signs.

Salmon-Challis National Forest
Location eight (8) miles northwest of Indian Creek Guard Station on the south side of the Indian Creek drainage in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness
Cause Lightning
Date of Origin Wednesday July 18th, 2018 approx. 05:30 PM
Current as of 8/30/2018, 7:15:57 AM
Total Personnel 15
Size 14,603 Acres
Percent of Perimeter Contained 1%
Estimated Containment Date Monday October 01st, 2018 approx. 12:00 AM

Projected Incident Activity Winds will be from the SW and West with warming and drying. minimal (20-50) acre growth possible.

Remarks The fire is currently in monitor status and is being allowed to play, as nearly as possible, its natural ecological role in the environment while providing for firefighter and public safety.

Kiwah Fire InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/5995/
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Wapiti Fire

Boise National Forest
Date of Origin Saturday August 25th, 2018 approx. 12:00 AM
Cause Under Investigation
Location 13 miles SW of Stanley, Idaho
Acres: 4,550
Percent Contained: 18%
Total number of personnel: 366

Wapiti Fire Facts Sheet Update

Aug. 30, 2018 – 10 a.m.

Current Status: Cautious optimism is the prevailing sentiment in the Base Camp at the Wapiti Fire. Monday’s rainfall broke the fire’s momentum and allowed firecrews the opportunity to seize the initiative and make really significant progress against the fire.

Wednesday was expected to be the first indication as to whether the fire would rebound and regain its former intensity as temperatures rose, relative humidities decreased, and fuels began to dry significantly. Instead of beginning to regain its strength, the fire appeared to continue to lose heat. Fewer smoke plumes were seen on Wednesday than had been seen on Tuesday and fewer hot spots were noted.

Crews attacked the remaining hot spots they could reach. At one location near Grandjean, water tenders drew water from a small stream and transported it to a 6,000-gallon “pumpkin” portable water tank. Small pumps pulled water from the pumpkin and pushed it via a hose lay up the ridge to firefighters that were cooling hot spots several hundred feet above the valley floor.

Other suppression activities continued throughout the fire area. Crews again worked to construct containment line on the perimeter and continued the work on contingency lines. They also used a chipper to reduce fuels in a built-up area.

Campers and residents were escorted into the Grandjean area to retrieve personal property, including tents, camping trailers, perishables, and other items.

The size of the incident was further reduced to 4,550 acres through more precise GPS mapping.

Winds gusting to 30 mph are forecasted for Thursday afternoon. Those winds could fan any remaining hot spots and cause the fire to flame up again. Firefighters will be watching closely and ready to respond as the winds begin to rise.

Incident Commander Taiga Rohrer counseled caution. “We’re doing really well out there, but it takes only one subalpine fir tree to torch out, and we’re back to the races,” he said.

Evacuations in the vicinity of Grandjean and area closures in the Boise National Forest and Sawtooth National Recreation Area remain in effect. For more information, visit their websites or call the Lowman Ranger District at 208-259-3361.

Resources: 10 Crews, 13 Engines, 5 Helicopters, 4 Water Tenders.

Please check the Wapiti Fire on Inciweb or the Boise National Forest and Sawtooth National Forest Facebook pages for updated information, along with the latest maps and photos.

Wapiti Fire Map 8-29

Wapiti Fire InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6176/
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Snake Fire

Salmon-Challis National Forest
Cause Lightning
Date of Origin Saturday August 18th, 2018 approx. 08:30 AM
Location 36 miles east of Yellow Pine, Idaho in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness, northwest of the confluence of Big Creek and the Middle Fork Salmon River.
Current as of 8/30/2018, 7:14:14 AM
Total Personnel 1
Size 1 Acres
Estimated Containment Date Monday October 15th, 2018 approx. 12:00 AM

The Snake Fire is located in steep, inaccessible terrain in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness, northwest of the confluence of Big Creek and the Middle Fork Salmon River.

The lightning caused Snake Fire, was detected on August 17 at approximately 10:30 p.m. is 0.6 acres in size and is burning in Ponderosa Pine with a grass understory. The fire is on the ridgetop which divides the Salmon-Challis National Forest and the Payette National Forests. Fire activity remains minimal.

The Fuse Fire is located in steep, inaccessible terrain on the Middle Fork Ranger District in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness, approximately 2.5 miles west of Trail Creek.

The lightning caused Fuse Fire, was detected on August 17 at approximately 3:00 p.m. is 2 acres in size and is burning in timber and rock scree. Fire activity remains minimal.

The Snake and Fuse fires are being allowed to play, as nearly as possible, its natural ecological role in the environment while providing for firefighter and public safety. The fires will continue to be monitored by lookouts and by agency aircraft.

The Central Idaho Dispatch Zone is at HIGH Fire Danger.

Snake Fire InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6159/
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Rattlesnake Creek Fire

Nez Perce – Clearwater National Forests
Location West side of Highway 95 near mile marker 184; near Pollock
Cause Human
Date of Origin Monday July 23rd, 2018 approx. 12:00 PM
Current as of 8/30/2018, 11:34:02 AM
Total Personnel 377
Size 8,201 Acres
Percent of Perimeter Contained 55%

Rattlesnake Creek Fire Is Now 55% Contained

Thursday, August 30, 2018 9:00 a.m.

Summary: Containment has increased on the western perimeter of the fire on White Bird Ridge. Yesterday, firefighters continued creating fireline on the southern and eastern perimeters of the fire using handline and heavy machinery. On the north side of the fire, crews were doing suppression repair and removing fire equipment no longer needed. Fire activity was minimal due to Monday’s rainfall.

Today, a weak cold front is moving over the fire area and this will bring breezy winds, cloud cover, higher humidity and lower temperatures. Fire behavior will be minimal. Using indirect tactics, firefighters will continue to strengthen the contingency line on the south side and using direct tactics create fireline in and around the areas of Pony Creek Trail, Pony Creek, and Squirrel Creek. Firefighters are widening the Pony Creek Trail to use as a fireline if needed.

Due to reduced fire activity, the area closures for Rattlesnake Creek Fire on the Payette and Nez Perce – Clearwater National Forests have been reduced. For more information, visit the Payette National Forest: https://www.fs.usda.gov/alerts/payette/alerts-notices and Nez Perce – Clearwater National Forest: https://www.fs.usda.gov/detail/nezperceclearwater/home

Resources Threatened: Private property and structures in the Pollock, Pinehurst, Hillman Basin and Elk Lake areas remain at risk, as well as state and federal infrastructure (Highway 95) and natural resources.

Adams County Road Information: Smokey Boulder Road to Railroad Saddle remains closed. For more information visit: https://www.facebook.com/ACSO911/

The Nez Perce-Clearwater and Payette National Forests have Rattlesnake Creek Fire area closures in effect including portions of the Hells Canyon National Recreation Area (NRA); see https://bit.ly/2ATSand, https://www.fs.usda.gov/payetteor Inciwebfor more details. Smokey Boulder Road (FS #074) is closed from the Forest Boundary to Railroad Saddle. Some people think that FS #098 is Smokey Boulder Road – this is incorrect. FS #098 is open, and can be accessed from Highway 95, Mud Creek Road or from Price Valley; but it cannot be accessed from the Smokey Boulder Road.

Fire map for hunters and anglers: https://bit.ly/2ziGO7A.

Temporary Flight Restrictions: Temporary flight restrictions (TFR) are in effect around the entire fire area.

Remember, that temporary flight restrictions also apply to unmanned aircraft systems (drones), so if you fly, we can’t!

Stage 1 Fire Restrictions are in effect: https://bit.ly/2ag2SUy Please adhere to all safety signage and speed reductions.

For road conditions and closures call 511 or visit http://511.idaho.gov/.

For smoke and air quality information: See https://bit.ly/2nooV2z or https://bit.ly/2tm1VG6.

Fire Information: (208) 495-6934 (7am-7pm)

InciWeb: https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/5999(maps, photos, links, etc.)

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/RattlesnakeCreekFire/ (daily updates & video updates)

8/30/18 Rattlesnake Creek Fire Map

Rattlesnake Creek Fire InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/5999/
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Rabbit Foot Fire

Salmon-Challis National Forest
Date of Origin Thursday August 02nd, 2018 approx. 12:30 PM
Location 14 Nautical Miles South West of Salmon, ID
Cause Lightning/natural
Current as of 8/30/2018, 7:26:45 AM
Total Personnel 290
Size 35,323 Acres
Percent of Perimeter Contained 14%
Estimated Containment Date Wednesday October 31st, 2018 approx. 12:00 AM

August 30, 2018 Daily Update for Rabbit Foot Fire

Contact Fire Information: 208.879.1243

Current Situation: Fire activity increased yesterday due to warmer temperatures and less cloud cover. Some torching and surface fuel spread was observed in isolated portions of the fire perimeter. Winds and higher temperatures will likely increase fire activity this weekend, and potential for measurable surface spread exists. Crews engaged in a variety of activities yesterday including checking for heat on the south end of the fire perimeter near containment lines, conducting repairs to bulldozer lines, preparing structure protection plans, and chipping vegetation along strategic roads. Aerial and ground resources successfully established a spike camp for firefighters near Iron Mountain. This will allow firefighters to engage directly on the fire perimeter with reduced drive time each day to fire camp. These crews will conduct strategic checking actions along the fire’s edge from Iron Mountain south toward Wards Butte to cool hotspots and limit the chance for major potential growth in the area.Today firefighters will continue to assess and protect values near the fire perimeter to the west, north, and east of the fire and will identify areas for contingency lines in the west in order to protect values at risk and prevent the fire from entering pockets of heavy fuels. Aircraft will drop water on hot spots in less accessible areas to limit fire spread and support ground resources who will be working near the fire perimeter.

Weather: Temperatures today are expected to be slightly cooler than yesterday, ranging from the 70s to low 80s. A weather system will bring cloud cover this morning, clearing in the afternoon. Relative humidity will likely be in the upper teens, and winds may shift in the afternoon from southwest to west-southwest with stronger sustained winds and gusts up to 38 miles per hour. Friday may bring cloud cover and cooler temperatures; however, a warming and drying trend will continue into the holiday weekend.

Evacuations: All pre-evacuation zones in both Custer and Lemhi counties are in Level 1 status, which is the lowest level of alert. Residents in these zones should maintain awareness of the potential for evacuations in the event of increased fire behavior. Residents should have a plan for what to take and where they will go if evacuations become necessary based on changes in fire activity. See a map depicting the current evacuations at https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6090/. In Lemhi County, contact the Sheriff’s Department at 208.756.8980 for questions regarding evacuations.

Closures: The Salmon-Challis National Forest has reduced the area closure due to the Rabbit Foot Fire. Areas west of Black Mountain ridge are now open to the public. Silver Creek Road is open; however, the Morgan Creek Road remains closed between Rye Grass Pinnacle and Rooker Basin and NF108 road. The area closure does cover parts of hunting units 28 and 36B. The Cabin and Ringle Creek Roads and all spurs that connect to those roads remain closed by the Bureau of Land Management’s Salmon Field Office. For safety and travel planning, check the closure maps at https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/closures/6090/

August 29, 2018 Closure Evacuation Map Rabbit Foot

Rabbit Foot Fire InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6090/
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Stewart Creek Fire

Sawtooth National Forest
Cause Lightning/natural
Date of Origin Monday August 20th, 2018 approx. 02:30 PM
Location 18 miles northwest of Fairfield
Current as of 8/30/2018, 9:34:02 AM
Total Personnel 323
Size 1,200 Acres
Percent of Perimeter Contained 20%
Estimated Containment Date Saturday September 15th, 2018 approx. 12:00 AM

Updated closure order for Stewart Fire, Aug. 30
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/article/6171/47139/

Stewart Creek Fire InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6171/
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Crews battle late-night barn fire in Nampa

The barn quickly became engulfed, putting off a huge column of smoke.

KTVB August 30, 2018

Nampa — A massive fire damaged a barn in south Nampa Wednesday night.

According to dispatchers, the fire started at about 11:45 p.m. near Southside Boulevard and Locust Lane. At least four fire trucks responded to the blaze.

The barn quickly became engulfed, putting off a huge column of smoke. Witness Colby Dillon told KTVB the fire was so intense he could feel the heat from the front porch of his home.

continued:
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NIFC

August 30, 2018

Initial attack was reported as light yesterday. No new large fires were reported and one was contained. The Stone Fire in California was contained at 39,387 acres burned.

Weather: The breezy, dry west-southwesterly flow will continue over the northern half of the CONUS, as a weak cold front moves across the Pacific Northwest toward the Northern Rockies by afternoon. The passing of the front will allow for some mixing of the upper level winds with lower level winds to create gusty winds in the afternoon. Fires along the eastern slopes of the Cascades will be most receptive, due to the fact they have not received wetting precipitation in quite some time. To the south, the strong high pressure ridge over Texas will expand and drift westward, producing hot and dry conditions west from the state and into California. In the East, a weak frontal boundary will provide enough lift to create scattered showers and thunderstorms from New England southwest into Tennessee. A weak sea breeze will allow for isolated storm development along the Gulf Coast and along the eastern coast of Florida.

Idaho Fires: 13 Acres: 145,498 New: 0 Contained: 0
Bible Back Sawtooth National Forest FS 1,500 1 21 miles southeast of Stanley
Caton Payette National Forest FS 400 0 24 miles east of McCall 208-634-0820
Copper Mountain Idaho Panhandle National Forest FS 474 24 4 miles east of Eastport 208-267-5561
Cougar Idaho Panhandle National Forest FS 7,608 50 5 miles east of East Hope 208-265-8058
Kiwah Salmon-Challis National Forest FS 14,603 1 49 miles northwest of Challis 208-756-7853
Rabbit Foot Salmon-Challis National Forest FS 35,271 14 14 miles southwest of Salmon+ 208-879-1243
Rampike Idaho Panhandle National Forest FS 2,750 0 23 miles northeast of Kellogg 208-557-8813
Rattlesnake Creek Nez Perce-Clearwater National Forest FS 8,201 46 5 miles southwest of Riggins 208-495-6934
Sharps Eastern Idaho, Dept of Lands ST 64,853 90 6 miles east of Bellevue 208-731-8604
Smith Creek Idaho Panhandle National Forest FS 951 0 19 miles west of Bonners Ferry 208-267-5561
Stewart Creek Sawtooth National Forest FS 1,200 20 18 miles northwest of Fairfield 702-498-8082
Surprise Creek Idaho Panhandle National Forest FS 3,137 50 18 miles east of Athol 208-265-8058
Wapiti Boise National Forest FS 4,550 18 13 miles southwest of Stanley 208-3734105

source:
https://www.nifc.gov/fireInfo/nfn.htm
——————————

Fire Update Aug 29, 2018

There are NO fires currently threatening Yellow Pine.
Yesterday after the clouds lifted, it was sunny and mild with light breezes. High of 74 degrees yesterday, overnight low of 36 degrees and clear this morning with a good amount of dew.
Yellow Pine Forecast

Stage 1 Fire Restrictions are in effect. Extreme Fire Danger!

P1000417-20180804BNF

Air Quality in Yellow Pine = Green

Air Quality Index (AQI) McCall
observed at 9:00 MDT
27 Good

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Caton Fire

Payette National Forest
Cause Lightning
Date of Origin Friday August 24th, 2018 approx. 11:30 AM
Location The fire is located 7 miles southwest of the Village of Yellow Pine near Indian Point and has been moving east into the Caton Creek drainage.
Total Personnel 6
Size 400 Acres
Estimated Containment Date Monday October 15th, 2018 approx. 12:00 AM

Caton Fire Aug 27 Map

(good topo map you can zoom in on)

Caton Fire Update

As you can see the fire is only showing a few hot spots, and by the photo looks like minimal fire activity. There are no trail or area closures, but we are posting notification on trailheads for people to make an informed decision and take precautions if going into the fire area.

Anthony B. Botello
District Ranger

August 29, 2018 9:57 AM

As one would have expected, due to the amount of precipitation and cooler temps, the Caton Fire has been relatively quiet for the past few days. The IR map from two nights ago (attached) was rather unimpressive.

The two additional fire area maps (also attached) have been displayed, in conjunction with backcountry travelers warning signs, at the following trailheads:

* Indian Ridge
* Four Mile Creek
* Camp Creek
* Caton Lake (BOF)

Fire area maps have also been posted at Yellow Pine and near the South Fork/East Fork confluence.

Also attached is a photo taken from the north side of the East Fork on 8/28.

Trent Vonderheit
Fire Operations Specialist

20180828catonfirephoto-a
August 28 Caton Fire

20180828CatonIRMap-a
IR Heat Caton Fire Aug 28

CatonFireTrails.pdf
Caton Fire Trails Map

InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6177/
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Johnson Fire – Contained

Boise National Forest
Location – The fire is above Johnson Creek between Coffee and Halfway creeks, just a short distance above the Ditch Creek road.
Lat / Long: 44.768583, -115.654
Fire Discovery Date/Time: 8/20/2018, 4:36:26 PM
Incident ID: 2018-IDBOF-000923
Cause – Lightning
Acreage: 6.3 [total]
Strategy: Full Suppression
Resources – 65 people and 3 helicopters
Contained – August 23, 2018

8-23-2018 Update: It was declared contained today. Most resources will be off the fire by Saturday. Folks may still see some smoke from time to time as there are numerous snags in the interior of the fire that make it too dangerous to completely mop it up. Our folks will continue to monitor the fire until the rains or snows come.
– Jake Strohmeyer, Cascade Ranger
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Kiwah Fire

Meadow Creek Road is Open
8-24 Update: With the decrease in fire activity on the Kiwah fire, we have terminated the closure of Meadow Creek road. While the safety risks to the public are currently reduced, people in the fire area should be aware that hazards do still exist such as; unexpected fire movement, falling trees, ash pits, and debris slides.
We will maintain a public safety awareness posting in the location of our previous closure signs.

Salmon-Challis National Forest
Location eight (8) miles northwest of Indian Creek Guard Station on the south side of the Indian Creek drainage in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness
Cause Lightning
Date of Origin Wednesday July 18th, 2018 approx. 05:30 PM
Current as of 8/29/2018, 7:14:32 AM
Total Personnel 15
Size 14,603 Acres
Percent of Perimeter Contained 1%
Estimated Containment Date Monday October 01st, 2018 approx. 12:00 AM

20180829KiwahCatonFires-a
Aug 29 Thermal Map Kiwah and Caton Fires

Snow on the Kiwah Fire Aug 28
20180828KiwahSnow-a

Weather Concerns …Breezy on Thursday… Mostly sunny and warmer today. Winds will gust to around 20 mph this afternoon with humidity in the 15 to 18 percent range. Wind gusts up to 30 mph are expected Thursday, but with humidity around 2 percent higher.

Kiwah Fire InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/5995/
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Wapiti Fire

Boise National Forest
Date of Origin Saturday August 25th, 2018 approx. 12:00 AM
Cause Under Investigation
Location 13 miles SW of Stanley, Idaho
Acres: 5,490
Percent Contained: 13 percent
Total number of personnel: 295

Wapiti Fire Facts Sheet Update

Aug. 29, 2018 – 10 a.m.

Current Status: Fire behavior was minimal Tuesday, following Monday’s rainfall. A survey of the fire area showed isolated plumes of smoke rising from burning stumps and downed logs. There was also surface smoldering in duff in a number of locations.

Crews spent the day constructing containment line on the perimeter of the fire, constructing contingency lines, mitigating dangerous snags (standing dead trees or standing fire damaged trees), and breaking up smoldering stumps and logs. Helicopters were busy carrying crews to otherwise inaccessible locations, performing aerial reconnaissance, transporting cargo, setting up radio repeater sites, and doing bucket work on hot spots, particularly on two spot fires separate from the main body of the fire.

To increase efficiency, one crew was airlifted to a remote location where it established a “spike” camp from which to fight the fire. Additional crews will be establishing spike camps today.

“We are taking advantage of the moderated fire behavior to get as much done as possible before the fuels dry out and fire behavior increases again; and it will increase, it is just a matter of time,” said Incident Commander Taiga Rohrer.

In addition to fuels drying over the next few days, winds are expected to increase Thursday and Friday, leading to increased fire behavior, including torching of trees and spot fires.

The size of the incident was reduced to 5,490 acres following a mapping overflight by an aircraft equipped with infrared sensors. Additionally, the number of destroyed structures was reduced to three cabins and one outbuilding.

Evacuations in the vicinity of Grandjean and area closures in the Boise National Forest and Sawtooth National Recreation Area remain in effect. For more information visit their websites, the Sawtooth National Forest Facebook page or call the Lowman Ranger District at 208-259-3361. A brief opportunity will be provided today for campers to retrieve their tents and camping trailers from the Grandjean area.

Resources: 7 Crews, 11 Engines, 6 Helicopters, and 1 Water Tender

Please check the Wapiti Fire on Inciweb or the Boise National Forest and Sawtooth National Forest Facebook pages for updated information, along with the latest maps and photos.

Wapiti Fire Map 8-29

Wapiti Fire InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6176/
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Snake Fire

Salmon-Challis National Forest
Cause Lightning
Date of Origin Saturday August 18th, 2018 approx. 08:30 AM
Location 36 miles east of Yellow Pine, Idaho in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness, northwest of the confluence of Big Creek and the Middle Fork Salmon River.
Current as of 8/29/2018, 7:14:40 AM
Total Personnel 1
Size 1 Acres
Estimated Containment Date Monday October 15th, 2018 approx. 12:00 AM

The Snake Fire is located in steep, inaccessible terrain in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness, northwest of the confluence of Big Creek and the Middle Fork Salmon River.

The lightning caused Snake Fire, was detected on August 17 at approximately 10:30 p.m. is 0.6 acres in size and is burning in Ponderosa Pine with a grass understory. The fire is on the ridgetop which divides the Salmon-Challis National Forest and the Payette National Forests. Fire activity remains minimal.

The Fuse Fire is located in steep, inaccessible terrain on the Middle Fork Ranger District in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness, approximately 2.5 miles west of Trail Creek.

The lightning caused Fuse Fire, was detected on August 17 at approximately 3:00 p.m. is 2 acres in size and is burning in timber and rock scree. Fire activity remains minimal.

The Snake and Fuse fires are being allowed to play, as nearly as possible, its natural ecological role in the environment while providing for firefighter and public safety. The fires will continue to be monitored by lookouts and by agency aircraft.

The Central Idaho Dispatch Zone is at HIGH Fire Danger.

Snake Fire InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6159/
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Rattlesnake Creek Fire

Nez Perce – Clearwater National Forests
Location West side of Highway 95 near mile marker 184; near Pollock
Cause Human
Date of Origin Monday July 23rd, 2018 approx. 12:00 PM

Low Fire Behavior Expected Today

Wednesday, August 29, 2018 9:00 a.m.

Summary: Yesterday, firefighters continued suppression actions as warmer and drier weather conditions returned to the area. Crews continued direct and indirect line construction on the south and east side, while air operations patrolled the western edge of the fire on White Bird Ridge. Due to the recent rain, fire activity was minimal yesterday.

Today’s fire behavior will be low again due to damp fuels from Monday’s precipitation. Fuels are beginning to dry out as breezy winds, lower humidity and higher temperatures return. Firefighters continue to repair fire lines constructed during suppression efforts. Firefighters will continue to remove equipment on the northern portion of the fire where they are no longer needed due to containment lines on that part of the fire. On the south side of the fire crews will use heavy equipment to improve an indirect contingency line. On the southeast and east side of the fire crews continue direct and indirect line construction in and around the areas of Pony Creek Trail, Pony Creek, and Squirrel Creek. Air operations will shuttle personnel and support crews as needed.

Resources Threatened: Private property and structures in the Pollock, Pinehurst, Hillman Basin and Elk Lake areas remain at risk, as well as state and federal infrastructure (Highway 95) and natural resources.

Adams County Sheriff’s Office Information: https://www.facebook.com/ACSO911/

Idaho County Sheriff’s Office Information: https://bit.ly/2OqK1J7

Forest Closures: The Nez Perce-Clearwater and Payette National Forests have Rattlesnake Creek Fire area closures in effect, including portions of the Hells Canyon National Recreation Area (NRA); see https://bit.ly/2ATSand, https://www.fs.usda.gov/payetteor Inciwebfor more details. FS #098 can be accessed from the south (Mud Creek Road FS #100 or from Price Valley), but not from FS #074 (the portion of Smokey Boulder Road located on Forest Service land). Boundary NFS Roads #112, #556, #101, #100 and #098 are open.

Fire map for hunters and anglers: https://bit.ly/2ziGO7A.

Temporary Flight Restrictions: Temporary flight restrictions (TFR) are in effect around the entire fire area.

Remember, that temporary flight restrictions also apply to unmanned aircraft systems (drones), so if you fly, we can’t!

Stage 1 Fire Restrictions are in effect: https://bit.ly/2ag2SUy Please adhere to all safety signage and speed reductions. For road conditions and closures call 511 or visit http://511.idaho.gov/.

For smoke and air quality information: See https://bit.ly/2nooV2z or https://bit.ly/2tm1VG6.Fire Information: (208) 495-6934 (7am-7pm)

InciWeb: https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/5999(maps, photos, links, etc.)

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/RattlesnakeCreekFire/ (daily updates & video updates)

August 29 Rattlesnake Creek Fire Map

Rattlesnake Creek Fire InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/5999/
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Rabbit Foot Fire

Salmon-Challis National Forest
Date of Origin Thursday August 02nd, 2018 approx. 12:30 PM
Location 14 Nautical Miles South West of Salmon, ID
Cause Lightning/natural
Current as of 8/28/2018, 9:32:52 PM
Total Personnel 333
Size 35,271 Acres
Percent of Perimeter Contained 10%
Estimated Containment Date Wednesday October 31st, 2018 approx. 12:00 AM

August 29, 2018 Daily Update for Rabbit Foot Fire

Contact Fire Information: 208.879.1243

Current Situation: Fire activity remained minimal thanks to previous precipitation. Increase in activity is expected in coming days as temperatures are on the rise, along with stronger winds and lowering humidity. Fire activity is still most active where vegetation is heavy, in large downed logs and thick pockets of trees. Lighter fuels, such as grass and sage, have potential to burn actively with the drier and warmer weather. Today, firefighters will continue to assess and protect values near the fire perimeter to the west, north, and east of the fire. In these areas they will also implement strategies to slow fire progression where possible. Firefighting aircraft were able to fly yesterday with the increased visibility and were used to aid in fire suppression on the eastern perimeter. Today, aircraft will again be working along with ground firefighters to secure areas of heat, reducing the potential for additional fire growth. Containment lines along the south are still being monitored, where the fire perimeter is fully contained. Roads and area closures west of the fire have been reopened as active fire is not expected to further impact them.

Weather: Today’s weather brings warmer temperatures into the mid-70s and lower 80s, along with humidity lowering into the teens. Light southwest winds returned to the fire yesterday with gusts of 20 miles per hour and will continue to increase in strength with gusts into the 30s to near 40s as the week progresses. Winds will be accompanied by the warming and drying trend beginning today and into the weekend. Skies will range from clear to partly cloudy with no thunderstorms or rain in the forecast.

Evacuations: As of yesterday morning, the Lemhi County Sheriff’s Office reduced the Level 2 evacuations to Level 1 pre-evacuation notifications. In Custer County, the Sheriff’s Office has lifted pre-evacuation notices for areas west of highway 93 and south of Watts Bridge. Level 1 evacuations are the lowest level of alert and are meant to raise awareness of the potential for evacuations. Residents should have a plan for what to take and where they will go if evacuations become necessary. See a map depicting the current evacuations at https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/maps/6090/. In Lemhi County, contact the Sheriff’s Department at 208.756.8980 for questions regarding evacuations.

Closures: The Salmon-Challis National Forest has reduced the area closure due to the Rabbit Foot Fire. Areas west of Black Mountain ridge are now open to the public. Silver Creek Road is open; however, the Morgan Creek Road remains closed between Rye Grass Pinnacle and Rooker Basin and NF108 road. The area closure does cover parts of hunting units 28 and 36B. The Cabin and Ringle Creek Roads and all spurs that connect to those roads remain closed by the Bureau of Land Management’s Salmon Field Office. For safety and travel planning, check the closure maps at https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/closures/6090/

August 29, 2018 Closure Evacuation Map Rabbit Foot

Rabbit Foot Fire InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6090/
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Stewart Creek Fire

Sawtooth National Forest
Cause Lightning/natural
Date of Origin Monday August 20th, 2018 approx. 02:30 PM
Location 18 miles northwest of Fairfield
Current as of 8/29/2018, 7:47:32 AM
Total Personnel 248
Size 1,200 Acres
Percent of Perimeter Contained 15%
Estimated Containment Date Saturday September 15th, 2018 approx. 12:00 AM

The Stewart Creek Fire enters its second week of burning near Fairfield, Idaho. More than 200 firefighters continue to fight the fire that is estimated to be 1,000 acres. Yesterday’s weather limited fire growth. Today scouting missions are taking place for projected fire suppression efforts of tying in natural features with constructed fire line for fire control.

Stewart Creek Fire InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6171/
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Quick action corrals Deer Creek fire

Other wildfires recently ignited in region

Greg Moore Aug 29, 2018 IME

A U.S. Forest Service spokeswoman said Tuesday morning that firefighters think they’ve got the Jolly Sailor Fire in Deer Creek pretty well under control.

The fire, ignited about 1 p.m. Monday by a Forest Service excavator machine picking up large rocks, was burning in Jolly Sailor Gulch, on the north side of Deer Creek about 1.5 miles west of the Sawtooth National Forest boundary.

According to a forest Facebook posting Monday, resources on the fire included five engines, three helicopters and three single-engine air tankers. On Tuesday, Fire Information Officer Bobbi Filbert said the fire is mostly burning in grass that has grown up since the 2013 Beaver Creek Fire and is estimated at 80 acres.

continued:
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Beaver Creek Fire reaches 35 percent containment, Goldstone Fire reaches 22 percent

Local News 8 Aug 28, 2018

The lightning-caused Goldstone Fire, located 18 miles S of Jackson, MT, that started on August 2 and has grown to 9,337 acres is 22 percent contained.

The lightning-caused Beaver Creek Fire, located 18 miles NE of Wisdom, MT, started on August 11 and has grown to 2,074 acres and is 35 percent contained.

There has been little observable smoke and no fire movement on both the Goldstone and Beaver Creek Fires for several days.

Both fires are currently holding within the established firelines, and crews have begun suppression repair work throughout both fire areas.

source:
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NIFC

August 29, 2018

Favorable weather conditions continue to help firefighters reach their containment goals throughout the West. No new large fires were reported and one fire was contained in Minnesota.

Weather: A breezy and dry westerly flow will develop over the northern half of the country. This will create pockets of critical fire weather conditions along the Rocky Mountain Front, as down-sloping winds accelerate and dry out. A weak, dry cold front will move into the Pacific Northwest in the afternoon, increasing winds along the eastern slopes of the Cascades and across the Columbia Basin. Isolated thunderstorms will be possible across southern Oregon and southern Idaho in the afternoon. Across the Great Lakes region, winds will be stronger yet…and gusty. However, humidities will be slightly elevated. In the East, a passing cold front will bring scattered showers and storms to New England, the Mid-Atlantic States, and the Mid-South. The monsoon over the Southwest will continue to be suppressed, with only isolated storms expected across mainly New Mexico and Colorado. A breezy onshore flow over California will keep weather conditions near average and humidity levels slightly elevated.

Idaho Fires: 13 Acres: 146,411 New: 0 Contained: 0
Bible Back Sawtooth National Forest FS 1,500 1 21 miles southeast of Stanley
Caton Payette National Forest FS 400 0 24 miles east of McCall 208-634-0820
Copper Mountain Idaho Panhandle National Forest FS 474 24 4 miles east of Eastport 208-267-5561
Cougar Idaho Panhandle National Forest FS 7,605 50 5 miles east of East Hope 208-265-8058
Kiwah Salmon-Challis National Forest FS 14,603 1 49 miles northwest of Challis 208-756-7853
Rabbit Foot Salmon-Challis National Forest FS 35,271 10 14 miles southwest of Salmon+ 208-879-1243
Rampike Idaho Panhandle National Forest FS 2,750 0 23 miles northeast of Kellogg 208-557-8813
Rattlesnake Creek Nez Perce-Clearwater National Forest FS 8,193 41 5 miles southwest of Riggins 208-495-6934
Sharps Eastern Idaho, Dept of Lands ST 64,853 90 6 miles east of Bellevue 208-731-8604
Smith Creek Idaho Panhandle National Forest FS 951 0 19 miles west of Bonners Ferry 208-267-5561
Stewart Creek Sawtooth National Forest FS 1,200 15 18 miles northwest of Fairfield 702-498-8082
Surprise Creek Idaho Panhandle National Forest FS 3,121 50 18 miles east of Athol 208-265-8058
Wapiti Boise National Forest FS 5,490 13 13 miles southwest of Stanley 208-3734105

source:
https://www.nifc.gov/fireInfo/nfn.htm
————————–

Updated Road Reports Aug 29

Note: Report (8-29) at 1230pm: “Two trees down on south fork with tight access…” – LI

Johnson Creek Stream Gauge Aug 29, 2018
20180829JohnsonCrkGauge-a

All roads to Yellow Pine are open. Please share road reports.

Yellow Pine: Sounds like the gravel trucks are working today. Local streets have not been as dusty since the rain early this week, but are starting to dry out. Please drive slow, kids, deer and dogs have the right-of-way (and it helps keep the dust down.) Click for Local Forecast.
Yellow Pine Webcam:

Johnson Creek Stream Gauge:
Idaho Smoke Info:

Quartz Creek: (July 2, 2018) “Quartz Creek has a big wash out just before a switch back towards the top. Right now only motorcycles can get by but with work some atvs can make it. A shovel and a saw may be needed to widen the trail.” – DB
link to FB photo:

Golden Gate Road: Closed. Road to Golden Gate is only passable on foot due to large deep wash-out about 2/3rds of the way up. (2017)
link to FB photo:

Warm Lake Highway: Warm Lake Highway is good.

South Fork Road: Report at 1230pm 8-29 “Two trees down on south fork with tight access…” South Fork road is good. Watch for fire traffic for the Caton Fire.
Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
South Fork Stream Gauge:

EFSF Road: Report (Aug 29) mail truck driver (Dean) says the EFSF road in good shape, dust abatement is holding up well. (Watch for possible fire traffic for the Caton Fire.)

Johnson Creek Road: Report (Aug 29) mail truck driver (Dean) says the road between Wapiti Meadow Ranch and Yellow Pine is in excellent shape. Washboardy on the upper end.
The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet
Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam:

Lick Creek: Old report (Aug 7) “I went out Lick Creek this morning. Was pretty nice. A bit bumpy starting the ascent to the cliffs and remained a bit bumpy to the summit. Was nice all the way down. A nice McCall police officer reminded me the speed limit right after Lick Creek is 25 mph (from 35 mph) and they will be enforcing it.” – AP
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Old report (Aug 12) “Profile is bumpy and dusty.” – BMc
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.
Big Creek Webcam:

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Old report that the road is good. Watch for possible Fire Traffic monitoring the Kiwah Fire.

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Report (Aug 14) The Meadow Creek Road above Stibnite is now open. Watch for possible fire traffic monitoring the Kiwah Fire.
Old report (July 19) Stibnite to Roosevelt Lake: Road was in great shape (but has not been graded.)
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Open to the adventurous.
Last report (July 13) folks made it over in a small pick up truck, road is rough and getting brushed in.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: Old report from Deadwood Outfitters (June 5) “Deadwood Summit is open and in good shape.” Report (July 3) via Stanley and Bear Valley, watch for pot holes and ruts.
Note: The approx elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
——————————-

Fire Update Aug 28, 2018

There are NO fires currently threatening Yellow Pine.

Aug 26-27 Yellow Pine received a total of .46″ of rain. Yesterday’s high was 59 degrees, the low this morning 36 degrees.
Yellow Pine Forecast

Stage 1 Fire Restrictions are in effect. Extreme Fire Danger!

P1000417-20180804BNF

Air Quality in Yellow Pine = Green

Air Quality Index (AQI) McCall
observed at 9:00 MDT
14 Good


— — — — — — — — — —

Caton Fire

Payette National Forest
Cause Lightning
Date of Origin Friday August 24th, 2018 approx. 11:30 AM
Location The fire is located 7 miles southwest of the Village of Yellow Pine near Indian Point and has been moving east into the Caton Creek drainage.
Current as of 8/28/2018, 10:09:50 AM
Size 400 Acres
Estimated Containment Date Monday October 15th, 2018 approx. 12:00 AM

Projected Incident Activity Firefighters will continue to monitor the fire and take actions as needed to protect values at risk.

This fire was detected in heavy timber around noon on August 24 – a likely holdover from the lightning storm several days prior.

The fire is holding at 400 acres, and has not grown over the past two days. The IR flight from last night showed very little heat in the fire. The cool, rainy weather has helped to hold this fire in place. Firefighters are assigned to monitor the fire – additional fire resources will be assigned as needed. The fire is being managed under a confine/contain and point protection strategy.

No closures are in effect, and the fire is not posing a threat to Yellow Pine.

Initial attack on this fire was rigorously conducted by smokejumpers, helirappellers, and ground crews aided by helicopters, single-engine air tankers, a heavy air tanker and Very Large Air Tankers. The fire quickly grew in the hot, dry, windy conditions on August 24 and 25.

The fire is located 7 miles southwest of Yellow Pine, near Indian Point and had been initially moving east into the Caton Creek drainage prior to the rain fall.

20180828CatonFire-a
Caton Fire Thermal Map 8/28/2018


Caton Fire Map Aug 26
Link to larger PDF map:

Aug 24 Water Drop Video
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/photograph/6177/0/86684

InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6177/
— — — — — — — — — —

Johnson Fire – Contained

Boise National Forest
Location – The fire is above Johnson Creek between Coffee and Halfway creeks, just a short distance above the Ditch Creek road.
Lat / Long: 44.768583, -115.654
Fire Discovery Date/Time: 8/20/2018, 4:36:26 PM
Incident ID: 2018-IDBOF-000923
Cause – Lightning
Acreage: 6.3 [total]
Strategy: Full Suppression
Resources – 65 people and 3 helicopters
Contained – August 23, 2018

8-23-2018 Update: It was declared contained today. Most resources will be off the fire by Saturday. Folks may still see some smoke from time to time as there are numerous snags in the interior of the fire that make it too dangerous to completely mop it up. Our folks will continue to monitor the fire until the rains or snows come.
– Jake Strohmeyer, BNF Cascade Ranger
— — — — — — — — — —

Kiwah Fire

Meadow Creek Road is Open
8-24 Update: With the decrease in fire activity on the Kiwah fire, we have terminated the closure of Meadow Creek road. While the safety risks to the public are currently reduced, people in the fire area should be aware that hazards do still exist such as; unexpected fire movement, falling trees, ash pits, and debris slides.
We will maintain a public safety awareness posting in the location of our previous closure signs.

Salmon-Challis National Forest
Location eight (8) miles northwest of Indian Creek Guard Station on the south side of the Indian Creek drainage in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness
Cause Lightning
Date of Origin Wednesday July 18th, 2018 approx. 05:30 PM
Current as of 8/28/2018, 8:27:50 AM
Total Personnel 15
Size 14,603 Acres
Percent of Perimeter Contained 1%
Estimated Containment Date Monday October 01st, 2018 approx. 12:00 AM

20180828KiwahCatonFires-a
Kiwah Fire Thermal Map 8/28/2018

Kiwah Fire Emergency Trail Closure #04-13-18-600 Terminated

The Salmon-Challis National Forest has terminated the Kiwah Fire Emergency Trail Closure #04-13-18-600.

Safety risks are reduced, people in the fire area need to be aware that hazards still exist, including, but not limited to unexpected fire movement, falling trees, ash pits, and debris slides.

The following trails are now open:

Forest Trail #4219 (Mule Hill Trail) Entire trail

Kiwah Fire Update August 28, 2018

The Central Idaho Dispatch Zone is at HIGH Fire Danger.

The lightning caused Kiwah Fire, was detected at approximately 5:30 p.m. on July 17, 2018. Fire managers estimate size at 14,603 acres. The fire is burning in a mixed conifer forest on the Middle Fork Ranger District and is being allowed to play, as nearly as possible, its natural ecological role in the environment while providing for firefighter and public safety. The fire is located in steep, inaccessible terrain northwest of Indian Creek Guard Station within the Indian Creek drainage in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness. Fire activity remains minimal with precipitation occurring over the fire area yesterday.

The Salmon-Challis National Forest, Middle Fork Ranger District has terminated the Kiwah Fire Emergency Trail Closure Order #04-13-18-600. Safety risks are reduced, but people in the fire area need to be aware that hazards still exist, including, but not limited to unexpected fire movement, falling trees, ash pits, and debris slides.

Fire management is being coordinated between the Salmon-Challis and the Payette National Forests. The Kiwah Fire is being managed to restore and maintain ecological process consistent with the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness Management Plan. A priority of fire mangers is providing employee and public safety while defending the identified values at risk. Specific values potentially threatened with this fire include private property and mining infrastructure, Forest Service Guard Stations, Middle Fork Salmon River boat traffic, road and trail improvements, lookout buildings, communication sites, and cultural resources. The cultural resources are abandoned, historical mining structures.

Firefighters are implementing a point protection strategy. A point protection strategy is a wildfire response strategy, which protects specific assets or highly valued resources from the wildfire without directly halting the continued spread of the wildfire. The strategy takes in to account exposure to firefighters, values at risk, impacts to area user groups, and in the case of the Kiwah Fire, wilderness values. The selected point protection strategy was determined to best balance for protection of values and firefighter safety.

To date firefighters have created protection plans for the Stibnite Mine Site, Thunder Mountain, Indian Creek Guard station, and Pistol Creek Ranch areas. The fire will continue to be monitored for fire spread in the direction of these values. There are five (5) firefighters assigned to the Kiwah Fire.

Fire managers expect the Kiwah Fire will continue to spread until a significant precipitation event occurs. Typically, season-ending weather events occur in this area between the last half of September through the first half of October.

Mostly sunny skies, lighter winds today, and Wednesday. Warmer and drier. A disturbance on Thursday will bring breezy winds to the Salmon- Challis Forest area, but minimum afternoon humidity is expected to be in the 15 to 20 percent range.

Nationally, there are 44 uncontained large fires in the west managed under a full suppression strategy, and 66 large fires managed under a strategy other than full suppression.

Updates and information will be provided as significant changes occur. The Kiwah Fire is on Inciweb at https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/5995/. Updates are also posted on Facebook @ https://www.facebook.com/salmonchallisnf, and on Twitter @ https://twitter.com/SalmonChallisNF

Kiwah Fire Map August 24
(good map you can zoom into showing old burns)

Kiwah Fire Area August 28
link to FB photo:

Kiwah Fire InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/5995/
— — — — — — — — — —

Wapiti Fire

Boise National Forest
Date of Origin Saturday August 25th, 2018 approx. 12:00 AM
Cause Under Investigation
Location 13 miles SW of Stanley, Idaho
Current as of 8/28/2018, 8:12:22 AM
Total Personnel 172
Size 6,190 Acres
Estimated Containment Date Monday October 01st, 2018 approx. 12:00 AM

8-26-2018 Boise NF – Wapiti Fire Area Closure Map

Wapiti Fire InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6176/

Rains slow growth of Wapiti Fire

Boise, Idaho, Aug. 27, 2018 — Firefighters on the Wapiti Fire, located near Grandjean, are being helped by showers and colder temperatures in keeping the fire largely in check at an estimated 6,190 acres.

Crews are taking advantage of the weather by building fire line on the western flank and focusing efforts on keeping the fire north of National Forest System (NFS) Road 524 to protect cabins to the south.

“While we greatly appreciate this change in the weather, in just a few days we expect things to start drying out and warm up,” said Lowman District Ranger John Kidd. “There is still a lot of summer left to go and this fire will be with us a while.”

There is an area closure around Grandjean and portions of the Sawtooth National Recreation Area for public and firefighter safety. NFS Road 524, which leads from Highway 21 to Grandjean, remains closed.

Resources assigned: 14 engines, 6 handcrews, 3 helicopters and 3 water tenders
Current containment: 0%
Estimated date of full containment: October 1
Structures lost: 4 cabins, 1 outbuilding
Cause: under investigation

Cabin owners and those who had to abandon campgrounds during the evacuation as asked to call the Lowman Ranger District (208-259-3361) for information about when they can gain access to the area.

For fire updates and maps of the closure areas, go to https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6176/
— — — — — — — — — —

Snake Fire

Salmon-Challis National Forest
Cause Lightning
Date of Origin Saturday August 18th, 2018 approx. 08:30 AM
Location 36 miles east of Yellow Pine, Idaho in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness, northwest of the confluence of Big Creek and the Middle Fork Salmon River.
Current as of 8/28/2018, 8:27:58 AM
Total Personnel 1
Size 1 Acres
Estimated Containment Date Monday October 15th, 2018 approx. 12:00 AM

The Snake Fire is located in steep, inaccessible terrain in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness, northwest of the confluence of Big Creek and the Middle Fork Salmon River.

The lightning caused Snake Fire, was detected on August 17 at approximately 10:30 p.m. is 0.6 acres in size and is burning in Ponderosa Pine with a grass understory. The fire is on the ridgetop which divides the Salmon-Challis National Forest and the Payette National Forests. Fire activity remains minimal.

The Fuse Fire is located in steep, inaccessible terrain on the Middle Fork Ranger District in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness, approximately 2.5 miles west of Trail Creek.

The lightning caused Fuse Fire, was detected on August 17 at approximately 3:00 p.m. is 2 acres in size and is burning in timber and rock scree. Fire activity remains minimal.

The Snake and Fuse fires are being allowed to play, as nearly as possible, its natural ecological role in the environment while providing for firefighter and public safety. The fires will continue to be monitored by lookouts and by agency aircraft.

The Central Idaho Dispatch Zone is at HIGH Fire Danger.

Snake Fire 8/19/2018

Snake Fire InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6159/
— — — — — — — — — —

Rattlesnake Creek Fire

Nez Perce – Clearwater National Forests
Location West side of Highway 95 near mile marker 184; near Pollock
Cause Human
Date of Origin Monday July 23rd, 2018 approx. 12:00 PM
Current as of 8/27/2018, 7:03:45 PM
Total Personnel 397
Size 8,193 Acres
Percent of Perimeter Contained 41%

All Evacuations for Rattlesnake Creek Fire Lifted

Tuesday, August 28, 2018 9:00 a.m.

Summary: The Adams and Idaho County Sheriffs lifted all evacuations for the Rattlesnake Creek Fire yesterday. Smokey Boulder Road to Railroad Saddle remains closed because firefighters are working in this area. Approximately .26 to .62 inches of rain fell on the fire yesterday, resulting in limited fire activity. Crews and heavy equipment worked in areas that were safe and accessible given the weather conditions.

Fire behavior will be low again today due to higher humidity and damp fuels from yesterday’s precipitation. A warming and drying trend is expected to begin today and continue through the next several days. Today, firefighters will continue to repair handlines and remove fire equipment in the northern area of the fire. Crews will continue working to construct direct line on the southeast corner of the fire, progressing north towards Pony Creek. They are also continuing to build an indirect contingency line on the south end of the fire using handline and heavy equipment. On the east side of the fire, crews continue direct and indirect line construction. Air operations will be used to move equipment and crews as needed today.

Resources Threatened: Private property and structures in the Pollock, Pinehurst, Hillman Basin and Elk Lake areas remain at risk, as well as state and federal infrastructure (Highway 95) and natural resources.

Adams County Sheriff’s Office Information: https://www.facebook.com/ACSO911/

Idaho County Sheriff’s Office Information: https://bit.ly/2OqK1J7

Forest Closures: The Nez Perce-Clearwater and Payette National Forests have Rattlesnake Creek Fire area closures in effect, including portions of the Hells Canyon National Recreation Area (NRA); see https://bit.ly/2ATSand, https://www.fs.usda.gov/payetteor Inciwebfor more details. FS #098 can be accessed from the south (Mud Creek Road FS #100 or from Price Valley), but not from FS #074 (the portion of Smokey Boulder Road located on Forest Service land). Boundary NFS Roads #112, #556, #101, #100 and #098 are open.

Fire map for hunters and anglers: https://bit.ly/2ziGO7A.

Temporary Flight Restrictions: Temporary flight restrictions (TFR) are in effect around the entire fire area.

Remember, that temporary flight restrictions also apply to unmanned aircraft systems (drones), so if you fly, we can’t!

Stage 1 Fire Restrictions are in effect: https://bit.ly/2ag2SUy Please adhere to all safety signage and speed reductions. For road conditions and closures call 511 or visit http://511.idaho.gov/.

For smoke and air quality information: See https://bit.ly/2nooV2z or https://bit.ly/2tm1VG6.
Fire Information: (208) 495-6934 (7am-7pm)
InciWeb: https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/5999(maps, photos, links, etc.)
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/RattlesnakeCreekFire/ (daily updates & video updates)

August 28 Rattlesnake Creek Fire Map

Rattlesnake Creek Fire InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/5999/
— — — — — — — — — —

Rabbit Foot Fire

Salmon-Challis National Forest
Date of Origin Thursday August 02nd, 2018 approx. 12:30 PM
Location 14 Nautical Miles South West of Salmon, ID
Cause Lightning/natural
Current as of 8/27/2018, 9:54:13 PM
Total Personnel 367
Size 35,271 Acres
Percent of Perimeter Contained 10%
Estimated Containment Date Wednesday October 31st, 2018 approx. 12:00 AM

August 28, 2018 Daily Update for Rabbit Foot Fire

Contact Fire Information: 208.879.1243

Current Situation: Due to precipitation Sunday afternoon and Monday, fire activity on the Rabbit Foot Fire was less active than previous days with limited spread in the grass and brush. The fire was most active where the vegetation is the heaviest such as thick pockets of trees and large down logs. No firefighting aircraft were able to fly yesterday because of the limited visibility due to clouds and rain.

Today, firefighters continue to remain prepared to protect values near the main fire perimeter. They will also work on strategies to slow fire progression to the north and east where possible. Containment lines on the southern edge are still being monitored, where about three miles of fire perimeter is been fully contained. The road and area closures are being constantly evaluated by fire managers and local agency officials. They will be reopened once there is certainty that the fire will not further impact them.

Weather: Monday’s cold front brought from .25 to .60 inches of rain to the fire and snow above 9,000 feet. No more precipitation is expected in the near future and a warming and drying trend will begin Tuesday with temperatures expected in the 70s and 80s by Wednesday.

Evacuations: As of this morning, the Lemhi County Sheriff’s Office has reduced the Level 2 evacuations to Level 1 pre-evacuation notifications. In Custer County, the Sheriff’s Office has lifted pre-evacuation notices for areas west of highway 93 and south of Watts Bridge. Level 1 evacuations are the lowest level of alert and are meant to raise awareness of the potential for evacuations. Residents should have a plan for what to take and where they will go if evacuations become necessary. See a map depicting the current evacuations at https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/maps/6090/. In Lemhi County, contact the Sheriff’s Department at 208.756.8980 for questions regarding evacuations.

Closures: An area closure remains in effect by the Salmon-Challis National Forest around the fire area. Additionally, the Bureau of Land Management’s Salmon Field Office has closed the roads in the Cabin Creek area, including the Cabin and Ringle Creek Roads and all spurs that connect to those roads. With moderated fire behavior and cooler weather conditions, the size and scope of the closure area is being evaluated. The area closure does cover parts of hunting units 28 and 36B. For safety and travel planning, check the closure maps at https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/closures/6090/

August 28, 2018 Evac/Closure Map Rabbit Foot Fire (pdf 13,938 kb)

Click to access pict20180728-105027-0.pdf

Rabbit Foot Fire InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6090/
— — — — — — — — — —

Stewart Creek Fire

Sawtooth National Forest
Cause Lightning/natural
Date of Origin Monday August 20th, 2018 approx. 02:30 PM
Location 18 miles northwest of Fairfield
Current as of 8/28/2018, 8:06:31 AM
otal Personnel 228
Size 1,000 Acres
Percent of Perimeter Contained 15%
Estimated Containment Date Saturday September 15th, 2018 approx. 12:00 AM

The Stewart Creek Fire enters its second week of burning near Fairfield, Idaho. More than 200 firefighters continue to fight the fire that is estimated to be 1,000 acres. Yesterday’s weather limited fire growth. Today scouting missions are taking place for projected fire suppression efforts of tying in natural features with constructed fire line for fire control.

Stewart Creek Fire Morning Update, August 28, 2018

Fire Information: 208-764-3202

Firefighters Scout for Natural Breaks to “Box In” Stewart Creek Fire

Current Situation: Yesterday’s rain helped to cool the fire and limit the spread, however it was not “wetting rain” or substantial enough to extinguish the fire that is burning hot in very heavy timber with a high fuel load. While the storm helped the fire, it hampered helicopter operations due to cloud cover and poor visibility. Several logistical missions were flown yesterday, but bucket drops were temporarily ceased. Today’s weather finds a warming and drying trend to return. With the increasing temperatures and lower humidity, the fire activity is expected to recover, and helicopter buckets drops will commence.

A scouting mission will continue today to determine the best natural fire break, ridges and other geographical features, for firefighters to utilize to assist in limiting the fire spread. Specifically, firefighters are looking to follow a ridge south to Lime Creek and turn east to tie in a ridge up to Smokey Dome. This will allow firefighters and a dozer to construct fire line that connects to the natural fire breaks in an attempt to “Box in” the fire. They can then begin burn operations to improve the fire line with the ultimate goal of 100% containment by September 15. This will substantially increase the acreage, but is necessary to reduce the exposure risk to firefighters, including extremely steep, inaccessible terrain, roll-out hazards and falling snags.

Finally, yesterday’s cattle drive operation was a success as our helicopter borne personnel located the herd grazing in the line of fire spread and directed a local wrangler to the scene and together they “hooved” it out of there.

Weather and Fuel Conditions: Monday’s rain slowed the active fire spread, however it was not “wetting rain”. Today high temperatures will be 62-67 with relative humidity at 28-33%. Southwest winds at 3-6 mph. Tonight cool temperatures 33-38 degrees, with humidity increasing to 70-80%. A warming, drying trend will continue tomorrow.

Forest Closures: For protection of public health and safety a closure order is in effect for all roads and trails in the Stewart Creek Fire area. For a complete list of closures please visit the Sawtooth National Forest website at https://www.fs.usda.gov/sawtooth.

Flight Restrictions: Temporary Flight Restrictions (TFR) for Stewart Creek Fire are in effect .

For More Information:
Facebook: facebook.com/Sawtooth National Forest

Fire Info Line: (208) 764-3202

Stewart Creek Fire InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6171/
— — — — — — — — — —

Nampa barn burns down; pigs saved

The blaze began at about 7 a.m. on Iowa Avenue near Lake Lowell.


Photo: Paul Boehlke/KTVB

KTVB August 28, 2018

Nampa — A pig barn in Nampa was destroyed after a fire broke out early Monday morning.

The blaze began at about 7 a.m. on Iowa Avenue near Lake Lowell.

About 25 pigs were inside the barn when the blaze began, the owner said, but they all got out safely. Firefighters worked quickly to knock down the flames.

Fire officials are still working to determine the cause of the fire. Check back for updates.

source:
— — — — — — — — — —

NIFC

August 28, 2018

Wildland fire activity has moderated a bit throughout the country due to favorable weather conditions. One new large fire was reported and contained in Montana.

Weather: Temperatures will begin to trend toward average, as the upper level trough over the West begins to weaken. Breezy winds and low humidities will be present across north central Montana, southern Wyoming, and northern Utah. Convection will be mostly isolated and dry, limited mainly to southwestern Oregon, northern California, southwestern Montana, and east central Idaho. The monsoon across the Southwest will continue to be suppressed, with most of the activity limited to mainly New Mexico and eastern Colorado. To the east, a weak but active disturbance will move into the Great Plains from the Rockies, bringing scattered wet storms to the central and northern Great Plains. Wetting rainfall will be possible across the Great Lakes Region as a frontal boundary hangs up along the Canadian Border. A breezy westerly flow, along with scattered showers and storms, is expected from Ohio and Pennsylvania north. In the South, high pressure will continue to dominate. Hot and humid conditions are expected. Isolated storms will be possible in the Smoky Mountains.

Idaho Fires: 13 Acres: 146,783 New: 0 Contained: 0
Bible Back Sawtooth National Forest FS 1,500 1 21 miles southeast of Stanley
Caton Payette National Forest FS 400 0 24 miles east of McCall 208-634-0820
Copper Mountain Idaho Panhandle National Forest FS 474 24 4 miles east of Eastport 208-267-5561
Cougar Idaho Panhandle National Forest FS 7,570 50 5 miles east of East Hope 208-265-8058
Kiwah Salmon-Challis National Forest FS 14,603 1 49 miles northwest of Challis 208-756-7853
Rabbit Foot Salmon-Challis National Forest FS 35,271 10 14 miles southwest of Salmon+ 208-879-1243
Rampike Idaho Panhandle National Forest FS 2,750 0 23 miles northeast of Kellogg 208-557-8813
Rattlesnake Creek Nez Perce-Clearwater National Forest FS 8,193 41 5 miles southwest of Riggins 208-495-6934
Sharps Eastern Idaho, Dept of Lands ST 64,853 90 6 miles east of Bellevue 208-731-8604
Smith Creek Idaho Panhandle National Forest FS 951 0 19 miles west of Bonners Ferry 208-267-5561
Stewart Creek Sawtooth National Forest FS 1,000 15 18 miles northwest of Fairfield 702-498-8082
Surprise Creek Idaho Panhandle National Forest FS 3,028 50 18 miles east of Athol 208-265-8058
Wapiti Boise National Forest FS 6,190 0 13 miles southwest of Stanley 208-3734105

source:
https://www.nifc.gov/fireInfo/nfn.htm
——————————

Fire Update Aug 27, 2018

There are NO fires currently threatening Yellow Pine.

Between 520pm 8/26 and 9am 8/27 Yellow Pine received 0.30″ of rain! Snow on top of VanMeter Hill this morning. Low clouds, ridges socked in.

Stage 1 Fire Restrictions are in effect. Extreme Fire Danger!

P1000417-20180804BNF

Air Quality in Yellow Pine = Green

Air Quality Index (AQI) McCall
observed at 9:00 MDT
18 Good

— — — — — — — — — —

Snow with five days left in August? Brundage Mountain gets first taste of winter

by CBS 2 News Staff Monday, August 27th 2018


(Brundage Mountain)

McCall, Idaho (CBS 2) — We’ve got five days left of August and yet Mother Nature seems to be having an off day.

On Monday, a skiff of snow fell up at Brundage Mountain, the first snowfall of the year.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Caton Fire

Payette National Forest
Cause Lightning
Date of Origin Friday August 24th, 2018 approx. 11:30 AM
Location The fire is located 7 miles southwest of the Village of Yellow Pine near Indian Point and has been moving east into the Caton Creek drainage.
Current as of 8/27/2018, 10:08:50 AM
Total Personnel 6
Size 400 Acres
Estimated Containment Date Monday October 15th, 2018 approx. 12:00 AM

This fire was detected in heavy timber around noon on August 24, a likely holdover from the lightning storm several days prior. Initial attack by smokejumpers, helirappellers, and a ground crew were aided by single-engine air tankers, a heavy air tanker and Very Large Air Tankers, but the fire quickly grew in the hot, dry, windy conditions on August 24 and 25. The fire is now estimated at 400 acres and the fire perimeter and size information is expected to be revised after a IR flight is conducted. With cooler temps and wetting rain, the fire will be reassessed after the weather moves through.

The fire is located 7 miles southwest of Yellow Pine, near Indian Point and had been moving east into the Caton Creek drainage prior to the rain fall. The fire is being managed under a confine/contain and point protection strategy.

Aug 24 Water Drop Video

August 24 Aerial view

Map (dated Aug 26)
20180826CatonFireTopo-a
Link to PDF map:

InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6177/
— — — — — — — — — —

Johnson Fire – Contained

Boise National Forest
Location – The fire is above Johnson Creek between Coffee and Halfway creeks, just a short distance above the Ditch Creek road.
Lat / Long: 44.768583, -115.654
Fire Discovery Date/Time: 8/20/2018, 4:36:26 PM
Incident ID: 2018-IDBOF-000923
Cause – Lightning
Acreage: 6.3 [total]
Strategy: Full Suppression
Resources – 65 people and 3 helicopters
Contained – August 23, 2018

8-23-2018 Update: It was declared contained today. Most resources will be off the fire by Saturday. Folks may still see some smoke from time to time as there are numerous snags in the interior of the fire that make it too dangerous to completely mop it up. Our folks will continue to monitor the fire until the rains or snows come.
– Jake Strohmeyer, Cascade Ranger
— — — — — — — — — —

Kiwah Fire

Meadow Creek Road is Open
8-24 Update: With the decrease in fire activity on the Kiwah fire, we have terminated the closure of Meadow Creek road. While the safety risks to the public are currently reduced, people in the fire area should be aware that hazards do still exist such as; unexpected fire movement, falling trees, ash pits, and debris slides.
We will maintain a public safety awareness posting in the location of our previous closure signs.

Salmon-Challis National Forest
Location eight (8) miles northwest of Indian Creek Guard Station on the south side of the Indian Creek drainage in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness
Cause Lightning
Date of Origin Wednesday July 18th, 2018 approx. 05:30 PM
Current as of 8/27/2018, 7:12:37 AM
Total Personnel 15
Size 14,603 Acres
Percent of Perimeter Contained 1%
Estimated Containment Date Monday October 01st, 2018 approx. 12:00 AM

Rain showers likely with snow showers possible on the higher ridge tops. The air mass is unstable enough for isolated thunderstorms to develop late this morning and later this afternoon. Precipitation amounts in the mountains may total .10 to .20 inches.

20180827KiwahCatonFires-a
Caton and Kiwah Fires Thermal Map 8/27

Kiwah Fire InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/5995/
— — — — — — — — — —

Wapiti Fire

Boise National Forest
Date of Origin Saturday August 25th, 2018 approx. 12:00 AM
Cause Under Investigation
Location 13 miles SW of Stanley, Idaho
Current as of 8/27/2018, 10:02:16 AM
Total Personnel 172
Size 6,190 Acres
Estimated Containment Date Monday October 01st, 2018 approx. 12:00 AM

The weather is predicted to be favorable over the fire area Monday, with a high likelihood of wetting showers and only a slight chance of thunderstorms.

8-26-2018 Wapiti Fire Area Closure Map

8-26-2018 Photo of Wapiti Fire burning upslope

Wapiti Fire InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6176/

More resources arrive at Wapiti Fire

Boise, Idaho, Aug. 26, 2018 — Firefighting continues on the Wapiti Fire, located near Grandjean, which is now at an estimated 6,190 acres as it continues to grow to the north and east. A Type 2 Incident Management Team has arrived, which increases the operational and logistical support for fighting a growing wildfire in remote and rugged terrain.

An area closure is now in place for the Grandjean area for public and firefighter safety. National Forest System (NFS) Road 524, which leads from Highway 21 to Grandjean, is closed.

Currently there are 9 engines, 5 helicopters, 2 air tankers, 5 handcrews and 1 water tender assigned to the fire. There are about 172 people total working the fire.

Four cabins and 1 outbuilding have been lost to the fire. No injuries have been reported.

Firefighters continue to focus efforts on keeping the fire north of both the South Fork of the Payette River and NFS Road 524 so as to provide protection to the many cabins in that area.

The weather is predicted to be favorable over the fire area Monday, with a high likelihood of wetting showers and only a slight chance of thunderstorms.

The fire was first reported on the afternoon of Aug. 25 and the cause is under investigation. Currently there is no reported percent contained, nor is there an estimated date of full containment.

Cabin owners and those who had to abandon campgrounds during the evacuation as asked to call the Lowman Ranger District (208-259-3361) for information about when it will be possible to gain access to the area.
— — — — — — — — — —

Snake Fire

Salmon-Challis National Forest
Cause Lightning
Date of Origin Saturday August 18th, 2018 approx. 08:30 AM
Location 36 miles east of Yellow Pine, Idaho in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness, northwest of the confluence of Big Creek and the Middle Fork Salmon River.
Current as of 8/27/2018, 7:12:06 AM
Total Personnel 1
Size 1 Acres
Estimated Containment Date Monday October 15th, 2018 approx. 12:00 AM

The Snake Fire is located in steep, inaccessible terrain in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness, northwest of the confluence of Big Creek and the Middle Fork Salmon River.

The lightning caused Snake Fire, was detected on August 17 at approximately 10:30 p.m. is 0.6 acres in size and is burning in Ponderosa Pine with a grass understory. The fire is on the ridgetop which divides the Salmon-Challis National Forest and the Payette National Forests. Fire activity remains minimal.

The Fuse Fire is located in steep, inaccessible terrain on the Middle Fork Ranger District in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness, approximately 2.5 miles west of Trail Creek.

The lightning caused Fuse Fire, was detected on August 17 at approximately 3:00 p.m. is 2 acres in size and is burning in timber and rock scree. Fire activity remains minimal.

The Snake and Fuse fires are being allowed to play, as nearly as possible, its natural ecological role in the environment while providing for firefighter and public safety. The fires will continue to be monitored by lookouts and by agency aircraft.

The Central Idaho Dispatch Zone is at EXTREME Fire Danger.

Snake Fire InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6159/
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Rattlesnake Creek Fire

Nez Perce – Clearwater National Forests
Location West side of Highway 95 near mile marker 184; near Pollock
Cause Human
Date of Origin Monday July 23rd, 2018 approx. 12:00 PM
Current as of 8/26/2018, 6:55:21 PM
Total Personnel 397
Size 8,193 Acres
Percent of Perimeter Contained 41%

Rattlesnake Creek Fire

Monday, August 27, 2018 9:00 a.m.

Low Fire Activity Today

Summary: Roughly .10 to .25 inches of rain fell on the fire yesterday, resulting in lower fire activity. Firefighters were successfully flown out of the west portion of the fire due to unsafe weather conditions. Crews continued direct and indirect suppression tactics on the southern and eastern portions of the fire where it was safe to do so with weather conditions.

Rain showers are expected to continue today, bringing cooler temperatures and higher humidity that will moderate fire behavior. A warming and drying trend is expected to begin tomorrow, which will likely increase fire activity. Where it is safe to do so, firefighters will continue to work on repairing handlines and removing fire equipment within the northern area of the fire today. On the most southern part of the fire, firefighters will continue direct and indirect suppression efforts by building hand lines and using heavy equipment.

Resources Threatened: Private property and structures in the Pollock, Pinehurst, Hillman Basin and Elk Lake areas remain threatened, as well as state and federal infrastructure (Highway 95) and natural resources.

Adams County Evacuation and Road Info: Smokey Boulder Road to Railroad Saddle is closed. Areas from mile marker 181 north to the county line are under Level 1 evacuation restrictions (Be Ready). Hillman Basin and Boulder Creek roads are under Level 2 (Be Set) evacuation restrictions. Residents should monitor https://www.facebook.com/ACSO911/ or visit https://bit.ly/2AU0C5R to sign up for emergency alerts.

Idaho County Evacuations: North Elk Lake Road, Lower Ranch Drive and High Meadow Lane are under Phase 1 (Ready) evacuation restrictions. Residents should monitor https://bit.ly/2OqK1J7 or call the Sheriff’s Department at 208-983-1100 to sign up for emergency alerts.

Forest Closures: The Nez Perce-Clearwater and Payette National Forests have Rattlesnake Creek Fire area closures in effect, including portions of the Hells Canyon National Recreation Area (NRA); see https://bit.ly/2ATSand, https://www.fs.usda.gov/payette or Inciweb for more details. FS #098 can be accessed from the south (Mud Creek Road FS #100 or from Price Valley), but not from FS #074 (the portion of Smokey Boulder Road located on Forest Service land). Boundary NFS Roads #112, #556, #101, #100 and #098 are open. Fire map for hunters and anglers: https://bit.ly/2ziGO7A.

Temporary Flight Restrictions: Temporary flight restrictions (TFR) are in effect around the entire fire area.

Remember, that temporary flight restrictions also apply to unmanned aircraft systems (drones), so if you fly, we can’t!

Stage 1 Fire Restrictions are in effect: https://bit.ly/2ag2SUy Please adhere to all safety signage and speed reductions. For road conditions and closures call 511 or visit http://511.idaho.gov/.

For smoke and air quality information: See https://bit.ly/2nooV2z or https://bit.ly/2tm1VG6.

Fire Information: (208) 495-6934 (7am-7pm)
InciWeb: https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/5999 (maps, photos, links, etc.)
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/RattlesnakeCreekFire/ (daily updates & video updates)

*Due to internet connectivity issues, we do not have a new map of the fire for today.

Rattlesnake Creek Fire InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/5999/
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Rabbit Foot Fire

Salmon-Challis National Forest
Date of Origin Thursday August 02nd, 2018 approx. 12:30 PM
Location 14 Nautical Miles South West of Salmon, ID
Cause Lightning/natural
Current as of 8/26/2018, 9:00:16 PM
Total Personnel 367
Size 35,271 Acres
Percent of Perimeter Contained 10%
Estimated Containment Date Wednesday October 31st, 2018 approx. 12:00 AM

August 27, 2018 Daily Update for Rabbit Foot Fire

Contact Fire Information: 208.879.1243

Current Situation: Moderate fire activity was observed yesterday on the Rabbit Foot Fire, but the perimeter has not been mapped since yesterday morning. The fire was most active on the eastern perimeter, to the west of Sheephorn and Iron Mountains, where the vegetation has transitioned to lighter fuels such as grass and sage. Isolated surface spread and torching was observed in Iron and Hat Creek drainages. Helicopters dropped water on these areas for most of the afternoon to limit spread downhill into the Hat Creek drainage.

Today, firefighters will continue improving indirect lines away from the main fire perimeter to the west and north of the fire. They will also work on strengthening containment lines on the southern edge, where about three miles of fire perimeter has been fully contained. The Morgan Creek Road, along with all other areas and roads currently closed, will remain closed for the near future for the safety of firefighters and the public. These closures are being constantly evaluated by fire managers and local agency officials. They will be reopened once there is certainty that the fire will not further impact them.

Weather: The cold front arrived yesterday and brought much lower temperatures and higher humidity. It cleared the regional smoke out of the valley and allowed aircraft to operate more safely and effectively over the fire. Light moisture began to fall last night and is likely to continue over the fire area today. Potential exists for snow above 9,000 feet. A warming and drying trend will return by Wednesday.

Evacuations: Notifications to be ready to evacuate have been issued to residents living in the Highway 93 corridor. Level 2 evacuations indicate that residents should be prepared to leave quickly if there is a change in conditions. Level 1 evacuations are a lower level and are meant to raise awareness of the potential for evacuations. A map depicting the current notification areas for Lemhi and Custer counties is available at https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/maps/6090/. In Lemhi County, contact the Sheriff’s Department at 208.756.8980 for questions regarding evacuations.

Closures: An area closure remains in effect by the Salmon-Challis National Forest around the fire area. Additionally, the Bureau of Land Management’s Salmon Field Office has closed the roads in the Cabin Creek area, including the Cabin and Ringle Creek Roads and all spurs that connect to those roads. With moderated fire behavior and cooler weather conditions, the size and scope of the closure area is being evaluated. The area closure does cover parts of hunting units 28 and 36B. For safety and travel planning, check the closure maps at https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/closures/6090/

August 26, 2018 Rabbit Foot Fire Map

Rabbit Foot Fire InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6090/

Rabbit Foot Fire holds at 10 percent containment

Aug 27, 2018 Local News 8

Challis, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – UPDATE 8/27/18: The lightning-caused Rabbit Foot Fire, 22 miles N. of Challis, has burned 35,271 acres and remains 10 percent contained.

Firefighters continue improving indirect lines away from the main fire perimeter to the west and north of the fire. They will also work on strengthening containment lines on the southern edge, where about three miles of fire perimeter has been fully contained.

The Morgan Creek Road, along with all other areas and roads currently closed, will remain closed for the near future for the safety of firefighters and the public.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Stewart Creek Fire

Sawtooth National Forest
Cause Lightning/natural
Date of Origin Monday August 20th, 2018 approx. 02:30 PM
Location 18 miles northwest of Fairfield
Current as of 8/26/2018, 8:56:29 PM
Total Personnel 237
Size 1,000 Acres
Percent of Perimeter Contained 15%
Estimated Containment Date Wednesday September 05th, 2018 approx. 12:00 AM

Stewart Creek Fire more than doubles in size since yesterday.

August 26, 2018

Safety Emphasized As Operational Tactics Change Due To Increase in Fire Size

Current Situation: Falling “snags”, made more precarious with the increase in windy conditions, excessive “spotting”, aircraft congestion and “roll outs” – rolling debris hazards (rocks and burning logs) due to the steep terrain are some of the hazards facing firefighters on the Stewart Creek Fire. Due to the increase in fire size and activity yesterday Incident Commander Ryan Erne emphasized firefighter safety today. The fire has now been burning nearly a week in heavy timber, leaving behind many torched trees with weakened roots and hollowed trunks. These present a great hazard to firefighters, as the winds come up, the snags come down. The needs of the fire require a large air support presence. Six helicopters and several fixed wing air attack planes working a relatively small fire perimeter presents “a lot of metal in the air”. Vigilance, coordination and good communications between fire personnel, crews and pilots is being emphasized. Lastly, the excessive heat still found in the interior and along the active eastern front of the fire, has created continual spotting – hot embers carried by the wind igniting new small fires some as far as ¼ to ½ mile east of the head of the fire.

The fire remained active last night and more than doubled in size requiring a change in suppression tactics to reflect the current circumstances. While the crews will continue utilizing “direct” fire line construction along the active edge of the fire, today’s emphasis is pivoting toward “indirect” suppression efforts. Indirect fire suppression tactics include using natural barriers, terrain and contours. Crews are steering the fire front toward the Soldier mountain range located to the northeast where the fire growth will be greatly hindered due to the rocky terrain, cliff faces and low fuel load. Earlier successful suppression efforts kept the fire from spreading to the heavy fuel load and timber located west of the fire. Those same tactics will now be deployed to prevent fire spread to the southeast where natural resources are threatened.

Weather and Fuel Conditions: Today’s forecast includes much cooler temperatures with high temperatures between 61-67 degrees with a relative humidity of 27-32%. West winds at 7-10 mph with gusts up to 20 mph. Tomorrow there is a 60% chance of rain.

Forest Closures: For protection of public health and safety a closure order is in effect for all roads and trails in the Stewart Creek Fire area. For a complete list of closures please visit the Sawtooth National Forest website at https://www.fs.usda.gov/sawtooth.

Flight Restrictions: Temporary Flight Restrictions (TFR) for Stewart Creek Fire are in effect .

Stewart Creek Fire InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6171/
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Fire breaks out in Pocatello destroying buildings

By Tristan Lewis Aug 26, 2018 Local News 8

Pocatello, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – A fire broke out in Blackrock Canyon between Inkom and Pocatello Sunday afternoon.

Sheriff Lorin Nielsen says the fire started about 1:30 p.m. As of 7:30 p.m. Sunday, the fire is out and crews are just mopping up.

The sheriff says it looks like the fire was started by a train going through. He says it is likely because of some sparks from the metal wheels traveling on metal track.

The fire did get close to a home but fire crews were able to save it. However, the fire did take out some outbuildings near the home. The sheriff says the fire was on the U.S. 91 side so Interstate-15 were not affected

continued:
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NIFC

August 27, 2018

Nationally, 110 large fires have burned 2.2 million acres. Firefighters are making progress toward containment goals on many fires in the West. Three new large fires were reported and six were contained.

Weather: A deep trough will move through the northwestern U.S. Scattered rain and snow will move across the Northern Rockies from eastern Washington to central Montana and south to the central Idaho and western Montana mountains. Rainfall of 0.25” to 0.50” with higher amounts up to 1.00” will be possible. Snow will fall over elevations above 8,000 feet in western Montana, central Idaho, and northwestern Wyoming with local amounts over 6” possible. Scattered thunderstorms will form over the central and southern Rockies and parts of Arizona. Critical fire weather conditions will continue across Nevada, southern Idaho, northern Utah, southern Wyoming, and northwestern Colorado, as relative humidity below 15 percent and winds over 30 mph continue along and ahead of the upper trough. The rest of the West will see moderating temperatures, breezy conditions, and generally dry weather through the day. East of the Rockies, strong thunderstorms will move through the upper Midwest, while gusty southerly winds blow across the Plains. Widely scattered afternoon thunderstorms will develop along the Gulf Coast. High pressure over the East Coast will keep warm conditions in place.

Idaho Fires: 13 Acres: 211,634 New: 0 Contained: 0
Bible Back Sawtooth National Forest FS 1,500 1 21 miles southeast of Stanley
Caton Payette National Forest FS 400 0 24 miles east of McCall
Copper Mountain Idaho Panhandle National Forest FS 474 24 4 miles east of Eastport 208-267-5561
Cougar Idaho Panhandle National Forest FS 7,570 24 5 miles east of East Hope 208-265-8058
Kiwah Salmon-Challis National Forest FS 14,603 1 49 miles northwest of Challis 208-756-7853
Rabbit Foot Salmon-Challis National Forest FS 35,271 10 14 miles southwest of Salmon+ 208-879-1243
Rampike Idaho Panhandle National Forest FS 2,750 0 23 miles northeast of Kellogg 208-557-8813
Rattlesnake Creek Nez Perce-Clearwater National Forest FS 8,193 41 5 miles southwest of Riggins 208-495-6934
Sharps Eastern Idaho, Dept of Lands ST 64,853 90 6 miles east of Bellevue 208-731-8604
Smith Creek Idaho Panhandle National Forest FS 951 0 19 miles west of Bonners Ferry 208-267-5561
Stewart Creek Sawtooth National Forest FS 1,000 15 18 miles northwest of Fairfield
Surprise Creek Idaho Panhandle National Forest FS 3,028 20 18 miles east of Athol 208-265-8058
Wapiti Boise National Forest FS 6,190 0 13 miles southwest of Stanley

source:
https://www.nifc.gov/fireInfo/nfn.htm
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Aug 26, 2018 The Yellow Pine Times

Aug 26, 2018 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Community Calendar:

May 10 Burn Permits required
May 15 Firewood Season Starts – permits at The Corner
August 6 Ice Hole Campground Closed for the season
September 1 Welch Labor Day Golf Tournament
September 1 5pm Boo to the End of Summer Potluck Yellow Pine Tavern
September 2 public meeting at the Big Creek Ranger Station re: Big Creek Hazardous Fuel Reduction
September 8 at 10am Community Hall YP Fire Budget Hearing
September 8 at 2pm Community Hall, Village of Yellow Pine Association meeting

(details below)
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Village News:

Caton Fire Info and Progression

Payette National Forest
Cause Lightning
Date of Origin Friday August 24th, 2018 approx. 11:30 AM
Location The fire is located 7 miles southwest of the Village of Yellow Pine near Indian Point and has been moving east into the Caton Creek drainage.
Total Personnel 6
Size 400 Acres
Estimated Containment Date Monday October 15th, 2018 approx. 12:00 AM

Aug 24 Water Drop Video
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/photograph/6177/0/86684

InciWeb link:


Caton and Kiwah fires thermal map 8-26-2018

Caton Fire 8/24/18 1300hrs: At about 12 noon today, we detected a fire, north and west of Caton Lake. Basically right near Indian Peak. We jumped 8 smokejumpers on the fire, we have a heavy helicopter with bucket dropping water and an air attack directing the air operations. The Air Attack ordered 2 heavy air tankers and a Single Engine Air Tanker (SEAT) for retardant. I have notified the Cascade District Ranger as well.

Currently the fire is 3+ acres, moderately active, in continuous fuel and we have warm temps and strong winds predicted. We are using available resources we have, including borrowing aircraft from the Rattlesnake, to catch this fire. We will provide updates as they are available.

Caton Fire 8/24/18 1530hrs: The fire is now 25-30 acres, we have ordered another 3 crews. We have dropped multiple loads of retardant with SEATs, heavy air tankers and air attack has ordered a VLAT (very large air tanker).

Caton Fire 8/25/18 0930hrs: Caton Fire update. From our detection at noon yesterday, we engaged the fire with smokejumpers and rappellers when it was at 2 acres. With high winds, low relative humidly and warm temps the fire moved quickly through the mature timber. We used Single Engine, C-130 and Very Large Air Tankers to drop many loads of retardant to try to box it in, until fire fighters could establish an anchor and begin to flank the fire. By late afternoon the fire was 60+ acres with a large spot fire ½ mile ahead of itself. Because of other large fires in the geographic area, our orders for additional crews went unfilled.

Due to its rapid growth and our limited firefighting resources, we are reassessing the strategy of this fire. Currently we are developing a point protection strategy to keep the fire up on the hill and prevent impacts to the East Fork, Johnson Creek, Eiguren Ranch, Yellow Pine and other values at risk.

We will keep you and folks in Yellow Pine informed as we have information.

Caton Fire Update 8/26/18 1000hrs: we ordered an Infrared flight yesterday to get and accurate map of the fires location and size, but the order was not filled. We very roughly estimate the size to be around 400+ acres, but that number will likely change once we get and accurate IR flight. At this time, the fire is still located near Indian Point and not posing a threat to the East Fork, Johnson Creek, Eiguren Ranch or the Village of Yellow Pine.

With our Geographic Area experience Planning Level 5 (high fire activity), crews and aircraft have been sent to other large fires in the Area and our firefighting resources are very hard to get.

Yesterday was a warm, dry, windy day and the fire did grow and move a bit. We are not expecting a lot of movement to the north, but the fire did move east into or toward Caton Creek.

We have firefighters stationed at Krassel who are keeping eyes on the fire and making sure none of our established Management Action Points are triggered.

We are expecting a change in the weather beginning today. The prediction is for much cooler temps and good chance of a wetting rain, maybe up to .20” After the weather system moves through, we will check fire growth and make sure we are still meeting objectives.

– PNF Krassel Ranger Anthony Botello

Photos Caton Fire 8-24-2018


– PNF Krassel Ranger Anthony Botello


8-24 Evening smoke plume from Yellow Pine.


(link to larger size)
Topo Map, Caton Lake at the bottom, red “X” marks approximate fire location, Yellow Pine is in upper right corner.
— —

Johnson Fire – Contained

Boise National Forest
Location – The fire is above Johnson Creek between Coffee and Halfway creeks, just a short distance above the Ditch Creek road.
Lat / Long: 44.768583, -115.654
Fire Discovery Date/Time: 8/20/2018, 4:36:26 PM
Incident ID: 2018-IDBOF-000923
Cause – Lightning
Acreage: 6.3 [total]
Strategy: Full Suppression
Resources – 65 people and 3 helicopters
Contained – August 23, 2018

8-23-2018 Update: It was declared contained today. Most resources will be off the fire by Saturday. Folks may still see some smoke from time to time as there are numerous snags in the interior of the fire that make it too dangerous to completely mop it up. Our folks will continue to monitor the fire until the rains or snows come.
– Jake Strohmeyer, BNF Cascade Ranger
— —

Kiwah Fire – Meadow Crk Road Open

The Kiwah fire is burning east of Yellow Pine in the Wilderness in the Indian Creek drainage.

8-24 Update: With the decrease in fire activity on the Kiwah fire, we have terminated the closure of Meadow Creek road. While the safety risks to the public are currently reduced, people in the fire area should be aware that hazards do still exist such as; unexpected fire movement, falling trees, ash pits, and debris slides.

We will maintain a public safety awareness posting in the location of our previous closure signs.

– Brian Harris PNF PAO
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Ice Hole Campground

The Cascade Ranger District [has] temporarily closed Ice Hole Campground for reconstruction beginning Monday, Aug. 6, 2018.

The Campground will remain closed for the remainder of the 2018 season. Project funding was provided by local Tribes and a State RV Grant.

Forest Service crews and contractors will repair existing resource damage, enabling visitors to have an improved recreational experience in the future.

link to project
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Possible Problem Bear

A report Sunday (Aug 19) of a “BIG bear” hanging out in the upper village. Be “Bear Aware” – Remember to secure your trash and pet food.

Update Friday (Aug 24) “it has been back but still not getting into anything.”
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Problem Mule Deer Doe

The old mean doe is still around. A report that she killed a small dog (Doogie?) in its yard on the west side of Yellow Pine last week. (Probably the same doe that has stomped other dogs in Yellow Pine!) Please watch your dogs and kids, and your back.

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Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Please do not dump appliances or tires at our transfer station, it is for household trash only and must be placed in the dumpsters.

“Bring it, Don’t Burn it.” There is a burn pile for woody debris only. Please don’t put trash or cardboard in the burn pile.
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Local Events:

Welch Labor Day Golf Tournament

Saturday September 1, check in at 11:30 am. Cannon start at 12 noon

$20 per person, $50 per pair to be sponsor

Boo to the End of Summer Potluck

Saturday September 1 at 5pm, Potluck and Fireworks Fundraiser at the Yellow Pine Tavern. Burgers and Dogs provided.
———-

Local Groups:

YPWUA News:

July 24th Yellow Pine water update:

It is good to go back to the even/odd watering schedule. Even/odd means if your address is 315 Yellow Pine Avenue, you can water on odd days such as the 1st, 3rd, 5th etc. And if your address is 316, water in even numbered days. The only request is that watering be done between 6am and 1pm. Also please limit to one sprinkler at a time.

Also it is requested that no lawn watering be done August 1st through the 6th to be able to withstand the draw from Harmonica.

Our second sand filter will be on line soon and give us more capacity. Thank you everyone for your patience during the high water demand time. – SH

There was a YPWUA Annual Shareholder’s meeting Saturday July 7, no minutes yet.
— — — —

VYPA News:

Next VYPA Meeting:

September 8, 2pm, Community Hall, Village of Yellow Pine Association meeting
— — — —

YPFD News:

There was a YPFD Fire Commissioner Meeting June 9, no minutes yet.

There was a YPFD Fire Commissioner Meeting August 6, no minutes yet.

Next meeting September 8 at 10am Community Hall YP Fire Budget Hearing

Yellow Pine Fire District Budget for Fiscal Year 2018 – 2019

Notice has been given that the Yellow Pine Fire District will hold a public hearing for consideration of the proposed budget, including the estimated revenue for the fiscal year, October 1, 2018 to September 20, 2019, pursuant to County Law chapter 14, Section 31-1419A. Said hearing will be held at the Yellow Pine Community Hall in Yellow Pine, Idaho on Saturday September 08, 2018, at 10:00 AM. At said hearing all interested persons may appear and show cause, if any they have, why said proposal budget should be adopted.

Proposed Expenditures:

The following budget is an estimate set forth in said budget of the total proposed expenditures and accruing indebtedness of the Yellow Pine Fire District for the Fiscal year 2018 – 2019.

Yellow Pine Fire District Budget for 2018 – 2019:

* Fire Fighting/Rescue: $8,132
* Wages: $0
* Advertising: $2,000
* Repairs and Maintenance: $4,000
* Utilities (Fixed Cost*) $4,000

Total:
Fixed: $4,000
Includes Insurance $2,500
Total $18,132

I, Dan Stiff, Chair Yellow Pine Fire Commissioner, Yellow Pine, Idaho, do hereby certify that the above is a true and correct statement of the proposed expenditures for the fiscal year 2018 – 2019. All have been tentatively approved and entered into district records. I further certify Yellow Pine Fire District did give notice for said hearing in two (2) conspicuous places in the fire district, by order of the commissioners. Residents are invited to attend the budget hearing on September 08, 2018, at 10:00 AM at the Yellow Pine Community Hall, and have the right to approve written or oral comments concerning the fire district budget. A copy of the proposed fire district budget in detail is available at 320 Westside Ave, Yellow Pine, Idaho, 83677.

Dated this 15th day of August 2018

Bring it, Don’t Burn it

For us in Yellow Pine, Jake Strohmeyer, Dist. Ranger with the Boise NF said we can use the area at our transfer station for yard debris and the FS will burn it once a year. Please no furniture, mattresses, construction debris, metal objects, tires or personnel junk. Please only woody yard debris. When using the pile please be mindful of where you place the debris as it should be contained to a manageable burnable area and kept as clean as possible. – JF

Burn Permits Needed After May 10

A reminder that May 10 is beginning of fire season where burning permits for open burning are required throughout most Fire Districts. Since the YPFD doesn’t issue actual “Burn Permits” per say, notification of a large pile burn would be appreciated. The notification makes the fire officials aware of those who have a planned burn. Seeing smoke can easily raise concerns. When neighbors call in seeing smoke, we can reduce their anxiety by knowing that there was a notification by a property owner. This elevates the response to smoke investigations.

Contact Fire Chief Jeff at 633-1010 or email j4star1911 @ gmail.com

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Updates:

Fire Department Training on Sunday’s at 11:00 all are welcome

Special Use Permit for Fire Station and Helispot:

The Boise National Forest has granted a “Special Use Permit” to the Yellow Pine Fire Protection District for the Fire Station lot and the Helispot. The Helispot is a new addition and the Fire Station lot was a renewal. This permit will expire 12/31/2037 (20 years) and will need to be rewed again at that time. Thanks to Jake Strohmeyer, District Ranger and Chris (Kit) Woras, Special Use Permit Administrator of the Boise Forest for spending a lot of time and correspondence to get this permit completed.

Helispot / Life Flight:

A lot of progress has been made on the new Helipad near the crossroads.

Anyone needing a Smoke/CO detector or fire extinguisher please let Jeff, Cecil or Dan know.

– Fire Chief Jeff

There are YPFD T-shirts, as well as YPFD patches and stickers for sale at the Tavern now.
——–

Biz Listings:

Yellow Pine Lodge

Now open for summer (208) 633-3377
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Yellow Pine Tavern

Boo to the End of Summer Potluck, Saturday September 1 at 5pm, Potluck and Fireworks Fundraiser. Burgers and Dogs provided.

Fall Hours: 8am to close 7 days a week.

Daily Menu: full Breakfast served also Burgers and Pizza for Afternoon and Evening. Good selection of Beer and Wine also sold by 6 and 12 pack. Fuel available 92 Octane. Wi Fi, Ice.
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The Corner 633-3325

Our hours for this week: Monday-Friday 4pm-8pm, Saturday and Sunday 11am-close

We will also be cooking most of the week for private events so if anyone wants something outside of those hours just call and we can usually accommodate.

The Corner Store is open as well, just call for grocery needs, fresh produce, eggs, meat etc.
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Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed (208) 382-4430
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Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, Will service Yellow Pine
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (Aug 20) overnight low of 48 degrees, a few clouds to the south and smoky haze (Yellow AQ.) A few finches and a couple of pine siskins this morning. It appears the gravel trucks are working this morning (sound of jake brakes just after 9am.) Female hairy woodpecker visited. Cloudy and gusty breezes at lunch time. Around 130pm the wind started gusting pretty good, huge clouds of dust rolling in off the golf course, especially behind the school house, pine needles raining down like hail, thunder boomers. Lightning strike on Johnson Creek ridge just before 2pm. Thunder, wind and 7 minutes of rain at 215pm (first rain in 51 days!) then calmer and much cooler, high of 75 degrees. Seems like the storm brought more smoke instead of clearing the air. Female hairy woodpecker visiting at sundown. After sundown there was a helicopter flying slow above Johnson Creek ridge. Orange smoky waxing moon at dusk.

Tuesday (Aug 21) overnight low of 40 degrees, good amount of dew, clear sky above yucky smoke (Yellow AQ.) A few finches, a female hairy woodpecker and a hummingbird this morning. Several chipmunks and no ground squirrels. Good water pressure. Gravel trucks running down the back Stibnite road. A few clouds in the early afternoon, haze of smoke, light breezes and milder temperatures, high of 81 degrees. Chunky white-breasted nuthatch stopped by. Local streets are extremely dusty. Someone out tidying up the golf course again today. By evening the air quality had improved, light haze persists, mostly clear and cooling down. Fat waxing white moon rising over Antimony ridge before dusk.

Wednesday (Aug 22) overnight low of 41 degrees, dew on the metal roofs, mostly clear sky (high thin wisps) and smoky. Several very loud airplanes this morning, one especially low and loud at 9am. No birds around. Gravel trucks running down the back Stibnite road out Johnson Creek. Hairy woodpecker flying in the neighborhood. A few pine siskins and a chipmunk visited after lunch. Mild afternoon temperatures, high of 78 degrees, appears to be mostly cloudy above an obscuring layer of smoke (can barely see VanMeter Hill), light breezes. Increasing clouds and overcast by mid-afternoon, report of thunder, smells like rain and smoke. By evening dark overcast, breezy and a few drops of rain a little after 8pm, then very light sprinkles, steady rain at 855pm for 15 minutes. Broken clouds at moon rise.

Thursday (Aug 23) overnight low of 39 degrees, clear sky, light breeze and haze of smoke (Yellow AQ.) Finches flying and calling. Warm sunny day, high of 86 degrees, light breezes. A couple of finches and a pine siskin visiting early afternoon, two hummingbirds visiting their feeder, and a young golden mantel squirrel climbing around the porch. Increasing smoke in the afternoon. Female hairy woodpecker visited early evening. Clear, smoky and light breezes after sundown. Fat orange smoky moon rose over Antimony ridge after dark.

Friday (Aug 24) overnight low of 43 degrees, mostly cloudy from an earlier passing dry front and smoky (Orange AQ.) About half a dozen finches and pine siskins, a red breasted nuthatch and a hummingbird visiting this morning. A couple of loud airplanes. Trio of golden mantel squirrels raiding the bird feeders. Early afternoon a female hairy woodpecker, a hummingbird, a white-breasted nuthatch, a juvenile jay and a flicker stopped by. Most of the day yucky smoke – smells like a campfire, can’t see the sky (probably partly cloudy) breezy and Orange AQ, high of 80 degrees. Better air quality by evening, mostly clear and could see the smoke plume from the Caton Fire (photo in village news.) Small deer bounding through the golf course (hole #3) just after sundown. Clouds(?) at 10pm and cooling off.

Saturday (Aug 25) overnight low of 38 degrees, clear sky, light haze of smoke, dry (no dew), and light breezes (Green AQ.) Several cassins finches, a few pine siskins and a couple hummingbirds visiting this morning. A white-breasted nuthatch and a female hairy woodpecker joined the birds at the feeders for lunch. Getting breezy and light smoke by lunch time. By early afternoon the sky was about 80% white with smoke and a few real clouds, Yellow AQ, and high of 80 degrees. The smoke plume from the Caton Fire is growing in height and width. Jeep, UTV and ATV visitors on main street this afternoon. By evening thicker smoke (Orange AQ) mostly cloudy and lighter breezes. A family of flickers, one robin and a couple of red-breasted nuthatches visited at dusk.

Sunday (Aug 26) overnight low of 46 degrees, overcast, dry (no dew), light breezes and haze of smoke (Yellow AQ.) No birds around until late morning, then a female calliope humming bird, a jay and a few finches visited, female grosbeak sighting in the neighborhood. Cooler and cloudy early afternoon, high of 65 degrees, light breeze and light haze of smoke. Starting to rain at 520pm! Good steady rain this evening and much cooler, haze of smoke persists.
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Idaho News:

Captain John Coombs retires from Valley County Sheriff’s Office.

On 07/31/18 Captain John Coombs retired from service with the Valley County Sheriff’s Office after 21 years of service. It is a very bittersweet moment for all of us here at the Sheriff’s Office. Captain Coombs began his distinguished career with us in 1997 as a patrol deputy and he also served as a detective. He was promoted to Chief Deputy by then Sheriff Britt Durfee. We wish Captain Coombs the best on his well deserved retirement, he has been an integral part of our agency for a long time and will be missed greatly!

link to FB photo:

Congratulations are in order!

Valley County Sheriff’s Office

We are excited to announce the promotion of Lt. Jason Speer to Captain Jason Speer. On 08/01/18, Jason Speer was promoted by Sheriff Patti Bolen to the position of Chief Deputy. Captain Speer has been a member of the Sheriff’s team for 17 years. He started out his career with us as a patrol deputy, climbed the ranks as the Marine Sergeant, canine handler, Lieutenant of Operations and now as the Chief Deputy. He started his career in Law Enforcement by serving 8 years in the Air Force as a Security Policeman and received the accolades of Security Police Airman of the year while he served in the Air Force. Captain Speer has worn many hats in our agency and he will continue to serve our team and the citizens of Valley County with pride.

link to FB photo:

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Valley puts advisory vote on road taxes on Nov. 6 ballot

Commissioners seek advice on replacing federal funds

By Max Silverson for The Star-News Aug 23, 2018

Valley County voters will be asked on Nov. 6 if they want county commissioners to raise property taxes to fund road maintenance and improvements.

Commissioners on Monday voted to put an advisory question on the ballot whether they should levy a two-year property tax increase to raise an estimated $3.4 million per year for the county’s roads. The result of the vote will carry no legal authority.

“I believe an advisory vote is appropriate to hear from the citizens,” Commission Chair Gordon Cruickshank said.

Commissioners have the authority to institute a two-year levy without seeking voter approval, but were hesitant to do so without an advisory vote.

Any tax increase would be spent on pavement overlays, chip sealing and rock crushing to produce road mix to place on gravel roads, Cruickshank said.

The county would also paint stripes on major roads like Farm to Market Road, replace aging equipment, increase snowplowing capabilities and raise employee wages in order to increase retention, he said.

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ITD ‘exploring’ possible fix to Highway 55/Banks-Lowman Road intersection

Lots of people have called and written the Idaho Transportation Department to express safety concerns about the intersection.

KTVB Staff August 21, 2018

Boise — The Idaho Transportation Department says it is exploring several possible solutions to congestion at Highway 55 and the Banks-Lowman Road, but we won’t see any of them in the immediate future.

In an article called “The Sunday Backup,” posted on its own website, ITD acknowledges that many people have called and written to the department about congestion and safety concerns regarding the Highway 55/Banks-Lowman intersection.

The most popular suggestion: putting in a traffic signal.

Others include a roundabout or adding a third lane on Idaho 55.

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Higher wages intended to keep, attract workers

By Max Silverson for The Star-News Aug 23, 2018

Employees of Valley County would receive a raise of 3 percent or more under the proposed 2019 budget.

The raises are intended to help retain county employees, especially in the road department and Valley County Sheriff’s Office.

A public hearing on the budget is scheduled for 1 p.m. Monday at the commissioners’ meeting room in the Valley County Courthouse in Cascade. The 2019 budget year starts Oct. 1.

Most of the county’s 137 employees would receive a 3 percent raise next year but others would get a higher increase, Valley County Clerk Doug Miller said.

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Cascade fire district proposes $98,020 property tax hike

Money needed to increase manpower, shorten response times

By Max Silverson for The Star-News Aug 23, 2018

The Cascade Rural Fire Protection District proposes to raise property taxes by $98,020 to hire more full-time employees and to increase incentive pay to its volunteers.

The new money also would allow the district to provide more training and to buy equipment and make other improvements.

The district is proposing to add back all of the property taxes in its foregone account, where property taxes not levied by the district in previous years are held for possible future use.

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Land Board boosts payouts for public schools, sets new record for all endowments for fiscal year 2020

Idaho Department of Lands – News Release
August 21, 2018

(Boise) – The State Board of Land Commissioners (Land Board) today approved a 3.5-percent year-over-year increase in the fiscal year (FY) 2020 payout from the eight endowment funds that support Idaho’s public school system, universities and other beneficiaries.

The $80,918,000 total distribution to all endowment beneficiaries sets a new record. The money comes from timber sales and leases on endowment lands and earnings from invested funds.

Idaho’s public school system will receive $51,260,000 in FY20 – 1.9-percent more than the FY19 distribution. Other endowment trusts provide long-term support to higher education, state hospitals for the mentally ill, state veterans homes, the Idaho School for the Deaf and Blind, Idaho’s juvenile corrections system, and Idaho’s prison system.

The endowment fund that supports State Hospital South saw the largest year-over-year increase at 18.5 percent. The State Hospital South Endowment Fund will receive $5,955,000 in FY20.

The endowment fund that supports Lewis-Clark State College and Idaho State University also saw a large bump in payouts for FY20 with a 12.2 percent increase in distributions, for a total of $4,946,000 in FY20.

The Endowment Fund Investment Board (EFIB) manages the funds from the use of endowment lands and recommended the distributions.

The Land Board also approved the EFIB recommendation to transfer $50,309,000 of earnings reserves to the permanent fund in an effort to grow the permanent fund and boost long-term beneficiary distributions.

“The recommendations represent an appropriate balance between the interests of current and future beneficiaries,” EFIB Manager of Investments Chris Anton said.

The Land Board provides direction to the Idaho Department of Lands in its management of more than 2.4 million acres of endowment trust lands in Idaho and the EFIB in its management of $2.2 billion in trust funds generated from the use of the lands. The Land Board is comprised of the Governor, Attorney General, Secretary of State, State Controller, and Superintendent of Public Instruction.
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Idaho Land Board votes to keep endowment lands open for recreation

Steve Bertel Aug 21, 2018 KIVI TV

Boise – The State Land Board voted Tuesday to adopt a new recreation policy that allows continued recreational access on state endowment lands.

“The new recreation policy recognizes the Land Board is meeting its fiduciary obligation to maximize long-term financial returns from the use of endowment lands, consistent with the Idaho Constitution, while continuing to allow recreational access where it does not interfere with those obligations,’ said Idaho Department of Lands spokesperson Sharla Arledge.

The Land Board also approved an agreement with the Idaho Fish and Game Commission for continued access for hunting, fishing and related uses to approximately 2.3 million acres of endowment lands.

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Audit of oil and gas royalties on State of Idaho leases released

Idaho Department of Lands – News Release
August 21, 2018

(Boise) – An audit released Tuesday examines oil and gas royalties paid to the State of Idaho on three wells under State of Idaho leases.

The Idaho Department of Lands (IDL) asked for the audit to determine whether royalties paid to the State of Idaho for oil and gas produced under State leases complied with Idaho law and IDL lease agreements.

Texas-based energy consulting firm Opportune LLP secured the IDL contract in 2017 to conduct the audit, and presented its findings at the State Board of Land Commissioners (Land Board) meeting in Boise today.

The audit is available at this link:

Click to access audit_9-082118-oil-gas-royalty-audit-v0816.pdf

The IDL informational memo to the Land Board on the audit’s findings and the agency’s planned actions is available here:
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Small town recall election surrounded in big controversy

By Katie Keleher Aug 24, 2018 Local News 8

Atomic City, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – Atomic City may only be a town of about 30 people, but there is big drama happening there. And a lot of it has to do with city ordinances.

A petition has been signed by many to recall one of its three city council members. The mayor says it’s so they can get things done in the city, but the councilman thinks differently.

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Fire Season:

Kiwah Fire allowed to burn

Aug 21, 2018 Local News 8

Salmon, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – The lightning-caused Kiwah Fire, detected at approximately 5:30 p.m. on July 17, is estimated at 15,437 acres.

The fire is burning in a mixed conifer forest on the Middle Fork Ranger District and is being allowed to play, as nearly as possible, its natural ecological role in the environment while providing for firefighter and public safety.

The fire is located in steep, inaccessible terrain northwest of Indian Creek Guard Station within the Indian Creek drainage in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness.

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Residents in path of Rattlesnake Creek Fire evacuated for five days

‘Go’ orders rescinded after danger subsides

By Max Silverson for The Star-News Aug 23, 2018

Residents in Hillman Basin and Boulder Creek south of Riggins were allowed go home on Tuesday, five days after being told to evacuate as the Rattlesnake Creek Fire moved toward their homes.

The Adams County Sheriff’s Office downgraded the evacuation order for the area from “go” to “set.”

The order for residents on the west side of U.S. 95 between mile markers 178 to 182 were also downgraded on Tuesday from “set” to “be ready” after the fire burned past the area.

… The Rattlesnake Creek Fire had grown to 8,135 acres as of Wednesday. The fire was declared 28 percent contained on Wednesday with 386 people assigned to the fire.

… The Rattlesnake Creek Fire had cost a total of $19 million as of Tuesday. …

Kiwah Fire

The Kiwah Fire had grown to an estimated 15,437 acres as of Wednesday in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness within the Indian Creek drainage.

… Firefighters have placed sprinklers and large water tanks for dipping by buckets from helicopters to protect the Stibnite area near Yellow Pine.

The efforts are in addition to efforts by Midas Gold Corp. to protect their buildings and equipment in the area.

The cost of the Kiwah Fire was set at $373,000, Payette Public Affairs Officer Brian Harris said.

Mesa Fire

The Mesa Fire east of Council was fully contained as of Wednesday with only limited “creeping and smoldering” occurring, the Forest Service said. The fire burned a total of 34,700 acres.

… The Mesa Fire has cost $14.3 million, Harris said.

full story:
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Wildfire in Boise County’s Grandjean area destroys four cabins

The Wapiti Fire about 100 miles northeast of Boise, Idaho, has grown to at least 4,000 acres. The road from Idaho 21 to Grandjean is now closed.

Jeremy Stiles August 26, 2018 KTVB


Wapiti Fire August 25, 2018, from Sawtooth Lodge, Grandjean Road, in Boise County, Idaho. (Photo from @soundslikesarah via Twitter)

Boise County — A wildfire first reported Saturday afternoon in the Grandjean area west of Stanley has destroyed four cabins and an outbuilding, the Boise County Sheriff’s Office says.

What is now called the Wapiti Fire was reported at 2:12 p.m. Saturday, and quickly grew to 1,200 acres. The fire continued to burn actively Sunday morning, and has grown to an estimated 4,000 acres. There is no estimate regarding an expected containment date.

An area closure is being put in place around the Grandjean area for public and firefighter safety. National Forest System Road 524, which connects Grandjean to Idaho Highway 21, is closed.

The Boise County Sheriff’s Office says the following areas have been evacuated: Sawtooth Lodge, Grandjean campground, and summer homes and hiking trails in the area. Cabin owners and people who had to leave campgrounds during the evacuation are asked to call the Lowman Ranger District at (208) 259-3361 for information about when it will be possible to access the area again.

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Drought conditions begin to creep into Treasure Valley, West Central Mountains

by Associated Press Tuesday, August 21st 2018

Boise, Idaho (AP) – Idaho is seeing more hot, dry weather and with it some parts of the state are experiencing drought.

Data from the U.S. Drought Monitor shows about 31 percent of the state is experiencing a moderate drought. Boise State Public Radio reports the drought regions include much of the Treasure Valley, the West Central Mountains, several counties in the southeast corner of the state and the tip of the Idaho panhandle.

The only areas untouched by the summer dry spell so far include counties in eastern Idaho near the border with Montana and Wyoming.

The U.S. Drought Monitor says states experiencing the most significant droughts include Arizona, Colorado, Missouri, Oregon and Utah. The U.S. Drought Monitor is a weekly map by the National Integrated Drought Information System that uses climatic and other data to track drought conditions nationwide.

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Don’t vacuum while wildfire smoke is in the air

A doctor says that vacuuming can stir up unhealthy wildfire smoke particulates in your carpet and recirculate them inside your home. He advises avoiding the chore while our air is unhealthy.

KTVB August 21, 2018

The air quality in the Pacific Northwest is so poor due to wildfire smoke that we’re now being told not to vacuum our carpets.

Doctors warn that vacuuming can kick up particulate matter, potentially making unhealthy air even worse.

Northwest residents should avoid vacuuming for up to a week as they wait for the wildfire smoke that has again descended over the lowlands to clear.

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Smoky conditions create difficulties for small plane pilots

KIVI TV Aug 23, 2018

Treasure Valley – Flying into the beautiful Idaho backcountry in the summer should be an enjoyable experience.

“Right now we fly a lot of guided raft trips, in fact most of the charter operators, that’s the share of the business that they’re doing right now. We also service a bunch of the ranches in the Frank Church Wilderness Area,” said William Foote, chief pilot, SP Aircraft, Boise.

He says visibility can be much less due to smoke from wildfires and they have a minimum visibility to fly.

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Decreasing Number of Rainy Days in Summer Has Increased Western Wildfire

USDA 8-20-2018

Missoula, Mont. Aug. 20, 2018 – The number and size of large wildfires have increased dramatically in the western United States during the past three decades. Contrary to previous understanding, new research shows that significant declines in summer precipitation and lengthening dry spells during summer are major drivers of the increase in fire activity. Prior understanding was that the increase in fires was attributable mainly to warming temperatures and earlier snowmelt.

The study, “Decreasing fire season precipitation increased recent western US forest wildfire activity,” was published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences and was conducted by a team of scientists from the USDA Forest Service and the University of Montana.

The research team contrasted the effects of snowmelt timing, warming summer temperatures and variations in the volume and distribution of summer precipitation on forest area burned. They found that summer precipitation totals and the duration of dry spells were the strongest controls on forest area burned by wildfire.

“Summer dry periods are tightly coupled to how warm and dry the air is during the fire season,” said Zack Holden, USDA Forest Service scientist and lead author of the study. “Longer windows without rain lead to more surface heating, which dries out woody fuels.”

“The maps of declining precipitation help us think about patterns of future drought, which can help us focus work near communities likely to experience continuing declines,” said Charlie Luce, USDA Forest Service Rocky Mountain Research Station scientist and co-author of the study.

“This new information can help us better monitor changing conditions before the fire season to ensure that areas are prepared for increased wildfire potential. Further, it may improve our ability to predict fire season severity,” said Matt Jolly, USDA Forest Service Rocky Mountain Research Station scientist and co-author of the study.

The study, funded by NASA and USDA, was conducted as part of a larger project aimed at improving wildfire danger and drought monitoring.

This news release is issued jointly with the University of Montana.

The Rocky Mountain Research Station is one of seven units within the U.S. Forest Service Research and Development. RMRS maintains 14 field laboratories throughout a 12-state territory encompassing parts of the Great Basin, Southwest, Rocky Mountains, and the Great Plains. RMRS also administers and conducts research on 14 experimental forests, ranges and watersheds and maintains long-term research databases for these areas. While anchored in the geography of the West our research is global in scale. To find out more about the RMRS go to http://www.fs.fed.us/rmrs. You can also follow us on Twitter at http://www.twitter.com/usfs_rmrs.
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Regional Intermountain Newsletter Special Issue

USFS Regional Intermountain Wildfire August 21, 2018

link:
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Mining News:

How the Stibnite Mining District Shortened WWII

August 20 Midas Gold

During World War II, while many U.S. citizens were sent to Europe and Asia to complete their military service, some were sent to the hills outside of Yellow Pine, Idaho. To continue fighting the war against the Axis Powers, the U.S. desperately needed critical metals such as antimony and tungsten and one of the few places to find these in the U.S. was in Idaho.

Why Was Tungsten So Important in the War?

Tungsten is an incredibly hard metal and it retains its strength at high temperatures. In fact, at 6,152 degrees Fahrenheit, tungsten has the highest melting point of any metal known to man. The Germans tapped into the strength of tungsten by inventing armor-piercing shells. Suddenly, they had bullets that could cut through armored vehicles and even military tanks. This advancement in warfare left the allies scrambling to keep up.


George Nock photo from Bradley Mining Company Collection, photo courtesy Jim Collard

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Public Lands:

BCYPSR August Meeting CANCELED

(via email Aug 20)

The steering committee met today and decided to cancel the August forest collaborative meeting. There will not be a meeting this week. Please get in touch with your sub committee leaders if you have any questions.

The next meeting will be on Thursday September 27th. Melissa will be facilitating through the last few months of meetings so make sure you use mbhamilton@uidaho.edu for questions about meetings. Facilitating has been a really valuable learning experience for me and I’m glad I got the chance to be a part of it all. I hope you all can work together to finalize that matrix.

Josie Greenwood
STEAM and Environmental Educator
UI Valley County Extension Office
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Payette National Forest Whitebark Pine Conservation Effort

Over the last several decades, Whitebark pine decline has been extensive due to whitepine blister rust, mountain pine beetle infestations, wildfire and climate change has been pronounced. As a result, Whitebark pine has been placed on the Payette National Forest’s Sensitive plant list and on the Federal list of Candidate plant species.

Whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) is a slow growing, long-lived pine of high-elevation forests and timberlines of the northwestern United States and southwestern Canada. It occupies harsh, cold sites characterized by rocky, poorly developed soils and snowy, wind-swept exposures.

Whitebark pine can be distinguished from other pines because it is the only 5 needle per bunch pine to grow at high elevations. It is a critical food source for Clark’s nutcracker (the primary seed disperser), grizzly bears and squirrels.

Fortunately, some Whitebark pine trees on the Payette National Forest offer hope of recovery to the species as a whole! Our Forest is home to populations of Whitebark pine trees that have a relatively high level of resistance to the whitepine blister rust fungus. Due to this increased resistance, we are conducting a cone collection project with the intent to locate, propagate and eventually plant back into Whitebark pine habitat, those seedlings of Whitebark trees that are most resistant to the whitepine blister rust fungus.

After extensive resistance studies are conducted, the seedlings of resistant trees will be grafted onto rootstock, planted back into Whitebark pine habitat, and left to grow and produce new seed cones. The grafting technique tricks the seedlings into producing seeds in 5-10 years, rather than waiting the 50+ years it would take for a “nature-grown” Whitebark pine to produce viable seed cones.

It is through efforts such as this, and through the conservation of highly-resistant, cone-producing Whitebark pine trees, that Whitebark pine will have a chance at recolonizing ridges and mountain tops.

source (FB) and photos:
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Public reminded not to remove timber along streams

Boise, Idaho, Aug. 21, 2018 — The Boise National Forest would like to remind woodcutters not to cut or gather fuelwood from areas alongside streams, called the Riparian Conservation Area (RCA).

RCAs are used to protect valuable fish and streamside wildlife habitat by not allowing the cutting or gathering of fuelwood within 300 feet of a flowing stream, or 150 feet for intermittent streams and lakes. Consult your Fuelwood Brochure for more detailed information.

“Within the Pioneer Fire we have several areas where roadside hazard trees were cut down and in some cases piled,” said Boise National Forest Supervisor Cecilia Seesholtz. “While personal fuelwood can be collected from these areas please be mindful of areas marked closed for active timber sales and that you not remove any downed timber from the RCA.”

Downed trees and other large woody debris in the RCA serve many important physical, biological and ecological functions. They act to slow runoff from storms and snowmelt that reduces the amount of sediment entering streams. Large woody debris is also important to stream channel function by creating deep scour pools which makes for excellent fish habitat.

For more information contact Mike Williamson, Acting Public Affairs Officer, 208-373-4105.
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BLM seeks comments on Ridge to Rivers trail development

Date: August 22, 2018
Contact: Holly Hovis, hhovis@blm.gov, 208-384-3393

Boise, Idaho – The Bureau of Land Management would like to invite the public to provide input on a proposal for new trail and trailhead development in the Boise Foothills Ridge to Rivers planning area. A public meeting on the proposal will be held in conjunction with a City of Boise and Ridge to Rivers Open House on Aug. 29 from 6 to 7:30 p.m. at the Boise Depot, 2603 Eastover Terrace, Boise, ID 83706.

The BLM will be providing information on the 14.8 miles of proposed non-motorized trails, approximately 6 miles of which would occur on BLM land. Four single track trails and one mountain bike flow trail are proposed within the Ridge to Rivers trail network. The Cartwright Trailhead would also be expanded to accommodate additional parking spaces and to install a vault toilet. These developments are being proposed in response to increased public interest in and use of the Ridge to Rivers network. The project aims to reduce crowding on existing trails by providing new opportunities for hiking and biking.

More information about the proposed project can be found at: https://go.usa.gov/xUF7k (please note: the address is case sensitive).

The scoping period for this proposed project starts on Aug. 29 and ends on Sept. 14, 2018. The scoping period allows the public, organizations and other interested parties to provide input on the proposed trail and trailhead developments and identify potential issues, which the BLM may opt to include in the environmental analysis. Interested individuals may provide input at the public meeting or directly to the following email: BLM_ID_FRFO_R2R@blm.gov.

For more information, contact Dave Draheim, Four Rivers Outdoor Recreation Planner, at (208) 384-3300.
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US agencies OK Idaho wilderness plans for pristine areas

By Keith Ridler – 8/24/18 AP

Boise, Idaho — The final management plan has been approved for the last two of Idaho’s three most recent wilderness areas that protect some of the most pristine landscapes in central Idaho.

The signing on Tuesday of the Hemingway-Boulders and Cecil D. Andrus White Clouds Wilderness Management Plan by the U.S. Forest Service puts the finishing touches on a nearly two-decade effort by Republican U.S. Rep. Mike Simpson of Idaho.

The Forest Service and U.S. Bureau of Land Management signed off on the Jim McClure-Jerry Peak Wilderness Plan earlier this month.

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Critter News:

Pet Talk – Hotspots in dogs

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt Aug 24, 2018 IME

A hotspot is an area of acute moist dermatitis, or an area of local skin irritation that arises when some primary problem leads to self-trauma. The self-trauma causes further irritation, and this is called an itch-scratch cycle. It can occur in any breed and at any age.

Acute moist dermatitis is common in animals with parasites and ear infections. Other common causes are environmental allergies, food allergies and contact allergies. Hotspots occur most often in hot and humid weather. Predisposed animals tend to have a dense undercoat, such as golden retrievers, German shepherds and Labrador retrievers.

Acute moist dermatitis is an intensely itchy to sometimes painful irritation of the skin surface. It develops rapidly and can spread very rapidly, as well. There is hair loss, redness to the skin and a moist skin surface. The outer thighs, neck and face are common sites of infection.

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US denies liability after boy is sprayed by its cyanide trap

By Keith Ridler – 8/22/18 AP

Boise, Idaho — The U.S. government said an Idaho family is to blame for any injuries it alleges a boy received after he was doused with cyanide by a predator-killing trap that a federal worker mistakenly placed near their home.

Any injuries were caused by the negligence of the parents and child, the U.S. Department of Justice said in documents filed Monday in U.S. District Court, and asked for the family’s lawsuit to be dismissed.

Mark and Theresa Mansfield of Pocatello sued in June seeking more than $75,000 in damages and more than $75,000 for pain and suffering.

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4 wolf pups found dead on public land in Wyoming

The wolf pups were found dead on public land south of Jackson, Wyoming.

Associated Press August 20, 2018

Jackson Hole, Wyo. — Authorities are releasing few details about four wolf pups that were found dead on public land south of Jackson.

The Jackson Hole News and Guide reports Wyoming Game and Fish Department spokesman Mark Gocke could give no more details other than saying the pups were reported dead Thursday within Game and Fish’s “trophy game” wolf hunting area, where there are defined seasons and rules on killing wolves.

A Wyoming law prohibits wildlife managers from identifying anyone who legally kills a wolf – or releasing information that could lead to their identity being revealed.

The four wolf pups were born this year, so they would have been about 4 or 5 months old. They were taken to the Wyoming State Veterinary Laboratory in Laramie for necropsies.

source:

Wildlife officials: Wolf pups likely died of natural causes

AP August 23, 2018

Jackson Hole, Wyo. (AP) – Officials say four wolf pups found dead last week in the Horse Creek area near Jackson likely died of natural causes.

The Jackson Hole News and Guide reports Wyoming Game and Fish Department spokesman Mark Gocke says the agency won’t know for sure until they get the necropsies back from the lab.

Game and Fish officials initially said they could not release much information, citing a Wyoming statute that’s intended to protect the identity of people who legally kill wolves.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Washington judge blocks kill order on wolves to save cattle

By Nicholas K. Geranios – 8/21/18 AP

Spokane, Wash. — A judge in Washington has issued an emergency order blocking the state from killing members of a wolf pack that have been preying on cattle.

The Department of Fish and Wildlife had announced Monday morning that it would immediately begin efforts to kill members of the wolf pack who had been preying on cattle in Washington’s northeastern Ferry County, near the Canadian border.

Members of the Togo wolf pack have preyed on cattle three times in the past 30 days and six times in the past 10 months, which exceeds the state’s threshold to take action, the agency said.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Wolf Education International

August 20, 2018 Newsletter

In Search of the Hidden Public Costs of Wolves

Togo wolf pack members kill another cow in northeast Washington

134 sheep killed by wolves; farmers demand money for electric fences

August 26, 2018 Newsletter

Austrian region: rubber bullets OK to scare off wolves
— — — — — — — — — —

Bear attack injures 10-year-old boy in Yellowstone park

8/23/18 AP

Helena, Mont. — A bear charged a family hiking in Yellowstone National Park on Thursday, knocking down and injuring a 10-year-old boy before his parents were able to drive the animal off with bear spray, park officials said.

The unidentified boy from Washington state was transferred to a hospital for puncture wounds to his back, wounds around his buttocks and an injured wrist, park officials said in a statement. It’s unclear how serious his injuries are, spokeswoman Morgan Warthin said.

The park is home to grizzly and black bears, both of which are a top draw for the more than 4 million tourists who visit each year. It’s not clear whether the bear that attacked the boy was a grizzly or a black bear.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Man accused of taunting bison sentenced to 130 days in jail

by Heidi Meili and Deion Broxton Thursday, August 23rd 2018

Missoula, Mont. — An Oregon man was sentenced to 130 days in jail for taunting a bison in Yellowstone National Park, resisting arrest and disorderly conduct.

Prosecutors charged Raymond Reinke, 55, with disturbing wildlife in the park and carrying an open container of alcohol in a vehicle.

He faced various charges from other national parks as well.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Angler catches a 19-inch illegally stocked walleye in Lake Cascade

by CBS 2 News Friday, August 24th 2018


(Google Earth + Idaho Fish and Game)

Cascade, Idaho (CBS 2) — An angler fishing for smallmouth bass and perch on Lake Cascade caught something they shouldn’t have — a 19-inch adult walleye, which is not supposed to be in Lake Cascade.

Idaho Fish and Game says the fish was illegally stocked in the reservoir and it’s the first-ever confirmed report of walleye in Lake Cascade.

“This illegal introduction was carefully thought out,” said Dale Allen, Idaho Fish and Game fisheries manager. “The closest walleye fishery is more than 200 miles from Cascade. To survive the extended transport time, this fish – and possibly others – would have required clean, cold, aerated water for a number of hours.”

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Angler catches massive catfish in Horseshoe Bend Pond

by CBS 2 News Friday, August 24th 2018


Idaho Fish and Game

A woman caught a massive channel catfish in Horseshoe Bend Pond recently.

Craig Mickelson with Fish and Game captured Tammy Thomas reeling in the big surprise on video.

The Fish and Game says Thomas had her hopes of originally catching a bluegill or bass.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

The Columbia Basin Bulletin

Weekly Fish and Wildlife News
http://www.cbbulletin.com
August 24, 2018
Issue No. 883
Table of Contents

* Columbia Basin Partnership Develops Preliminary Abundance Goals For Salmon, Steelhead; All Delisted Within 100 Years
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441382.aspx

* Survey Details Salmon, Steelhead Spawning In White River After Condit Dam Removal
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441381.aspx

* New Research Shows Coming Impacts Of Melting Glaciers In Cascade Mountains At Watershed Level
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441380.aspx

* NW Power/Conservation Council Approves Lamprey Restoration Plan, Funding Uncertain
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441379.aspx

* Salmon Migration Model Seeks Greater Accuracy In Matching Modeled Predictions, Observed Abundance
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441378.aspx

* Biologist Explains Why Last Year’s Idaho Wild Steelhead B-Run Better Than Dam Counts Showed
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441377.aspx

* Lower Granite Water Remains Cool; Snake River Sockeye Run Nearly Complete At 272 Fish
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441376.aspx

* Review Of Surface Collectors Show Some Designs Better At Getting Juvenile Fish Through A Dam
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441375.aspx

* Work Begins On Culvert To Bring Salmon Back To Portland’s Oaks Bottom Wildlife Refuge
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441373.aspx

* Comments Sought On Proposal For New Off-Channel Storage Reservoir At McNary Dam Pool
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441372.aspx

* Judge Issues Temporary Restraining Order Prohibiting WDFW From Lethal Wolf Removal
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441371.aspx

* New ‘Droughty’ Soils Model Can Enhance Forest Health Efforts, Landscape Restoration
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441370.aspx
——————————-

Fish & Game News:

Reward Offered for Illegal Walleye Stocking in Lake Cascade

News from Idaho Fish and Game 8-24-2018

An angler fishing for smallmouth bass and perch on Lake Cascade near Crown Point earlier this week instead reeled in an adult walleye, measuring more than 19 inches in length. Fish and Game regional fisheries manager Dale Allen positively identified the fish on Wednesday, August 22.

The fish was illegally stocked in the reservoir and is the first-ever confirmed report of a walleye in Lake Cascade. Because of the illegal stocking and the threat walleye pose to Cascade’s and other downstream fisheries, Citizens Against Poaching (CAP) is offering a cash reward for information regarding this criminal case. Call the CAP hotline anytime at 1-800-632-5999.

Idaho has just a few walleye fisheries, all established by Fish and Game, and all in isolated reservoirs. Salmon Falls Creek Reservoir in south central Idaho is one example; no outlets from the reservoir exist that might allow walleye to escape to other waters. It is because of their potential threat to existing fisheries that walleye have not been more widely stocked in other Idaho waters.

The Department receives angler requests to establish new walleye populations every year. For the reasons noted, these requests are courteously denied. Unfortunately, some self-serving anglers are not willing to take no for an answer, instead taking matters into their own hands. “This illegal introduction was carefully thought out,” Allen noted. “The closest walleye fishery is more than 200 miles from Cascade. To survive the extended transport time, this fish – and possibly others – would have required clean, cold, aerated water for a number of hours.”

The Department may not know the extent or severity of this illegal stocking for several years. Because of the high stakes, resources will be diverted from other projects to expand fish sampling in Lake Cascade later this year to see if more adult walleye are present and to determine whether reproduction has occurred.

“This incident is particularly disheartening for Cascade,” Allen said. “Fish and Game spent years rebuilding a world-class perch fishery, and the reservoir is also full of big trout and trophy smallmouth bass. Adding another top predator like walleye will almost certainly impact these other sport fish.”

The negative ramifications of this illegal stocking extend well beyond the shores of Lake Cascade. With thousands of acre feet of irrigation water released from the reservoir on an annual basis, it’s no stretch that walleye could move through the Payette River system into Brownlee Reservoir and the Hells Canyon section of the Snake River.

Please contact fisheries manager Dale Allen at the Fish and Game McCall office (208-634-8137) should you have questions.
— — — — — — — — — —

Last fall’s wild steelhead return exceeded expectations because of unusually small fish

Idaho “B” run fish are famous for their large size, but not all achieve it

By Brett Bowersox, Fisheries Staff Biologist
Friday, August 17, 2018 – 3:44 PM MDT

Last year’s Idaho steelhead run received a lot of attention for the wrong reason. It was a low run year, and Fish and Game biologists did not initially see as many fish back as they would have liked, but they were pleasantly surprised in the spring.

The wild run of large fish known as “B-runs” destined for the upper Clearwater, Middle Fork and South Fork of the Salmon rivers received even more attention because of a very low return based on window counts at dams as steelhead migrated up the Columbia and Snake rivers.

The low return focused the attention and concerns of fisheries managers and anglers alike. But data from last fall also suggested the return of wild “B-runs” wasn’t as low as window counts estimated, and information gathered during spring in spawning streams confirmed it. The run wasn’t great by any stretch, but not catastrophic, either.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

F&G Commission approves agreement to continue recreation access on state endowment lands

Fish and Game will provide money and services to continue public access for hunting, fishing and trapping

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Specialist
Thursday, August 23, 2018

Idaho Fish and Game Commission on Aug. 23 approved a memorandum of agreement with the Idaho Department of Lands to continue public access for hunting, fish, trapping and other recreation on about 2.3 million acres of state endowment lands.

Fish and Game will provide $.25 per acre annually to the Department of Lands – about $580,000 – which includes credit for in-kind, law-enforcement services provided by Fish and Game conservation officers on endowment lands.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

F&G traps and relocates North Idaho grizzly spotted on private lands

F&G staff is monitoring bear to see if it returns, or continues to frequent private property

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Specialist
Thursday, August 23, 2018

Idaho Fish and Game recently trapped and released a sub-adult grizzly bear that was spotted several times in North Idaho. F&G conservation officers hauled a trap to a location near where the bear was spotted digging up and eating a goat that had been buried on private property near Chilco.

Officers caught the bear in a culvert trap baited with a portion of the goat. The bear was then transported to McArthur Lake WMA where it was fitted with a transmitter collar. Biologists also took DNA samples, then transported the bear to a remote area of the Cabinet Mountains near the Montana border.

After release, the bear had moved down toward the eastern end of the Kootenai Valley, and biologists are monitoring it and preparing to trap it if it appears likely it will get back into trouble.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

More F&G News Releases

https://idfg.idaho.gov/press
———————————-

Tips & Advice:

Be Bear Aware – Nature’s Calling (June 2018)


— — — — — — — — — —

Be Bare Aware

Residential Areas

* Minimize odors and the availability of food rewards through out your yard and neighborhood. Report all residential wildlife encounters to your local wildlife management agency and police department, and notify your neighbors of the situation

* Remove any dense brush that could provide cover for a bear or cougar and make a surprise encounter likely. Also remove brush piles that snakes may hide in.

* If a bear or other wild animal repeatedly enters your yard, look for what attractants are drawing it there and remove them.

* Put out garbage on the day of pick up, not the night before. Store in a sturdy building or place in an approved bear-resistant trash receptacle.

* Do not leave pet food out. Hang bird feeders out of a bears reach and take down during periods of high bear activity.

* Keep bar-b-ques clean and grease free. Store with livestock/pet feed and other attractants inside a sturdy building.

* Fruit trees: Pick all ripe fruit from the tree and surrounding ground.

* Compost piles may attract wildlife, especially bears. Do not put meat, fish and other pungent scraps in compost piles. Add lime to reduce odors and accelerate decomposition.

* Electric fences are an effective way to keep bears and other animals out of orchards, gardens, compost piles and beehives. Follow appropriate safety precautions.

* Never feed wildlife. Feeding marmots and deer can attract cougars. Feeding chipmunks and ground squirrels can increase the possibility of hantavirus and rabies. Feeding ducks and fish can attract alligators.

* All wildlife can be dangerous. Do not attempt to chase or harass an animal out of your yard, especially if it is a bear or alligator. Contact the appropriate authority for assistance.

* Be sure to seal holes and spaces around your home to prevent insects, snakes and rodents from entry.

Bear activity may intensify in the spring when bears are hungry and emerging from their dens, in the fall when bears are bulking up for hibernation, and during drought periods. This is due to natural foods often being scarce.

source w/more info:
————————

Fun Critter Stuff:

Caught on video: Fox steals golfer’s ball

August 23, 2018 (Local News 8)

West Springfield, Mass. – A Massachusetts golfer lost a golf ball to a fox that was sharing the green with him.

Video posted to the Facebook shows two foxes sitting on the course near the hole the golfer was playing at Springfield Country Club.

The curious foxes watch as the golfer’s ball lands just beyond its mark, and a few seconds pass before one fox casually trots over, picks up the ball with its mouth, and scampers away almost playfully.

The Facebook post made by the country club had a lighthearted caption: “If your ball has mysteriously disappeared over the past month………we think we know why!”

source w/video:
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Seasonal Humor:

SmokeSeason-a
—————————-

Updated Fire Report Aug 26, 2018

There are NO fires currently threatening Yellow Pine.

Stage 1 Fire Restrictions are in effect. Extreme Fire Danger!

P1000417-20180804BNF

Air Quality in Yellow Pine = Yellow


— — — — — — — — — —

Caton Fire

8/26/2018 size estimate 400+ acres
Location The fire is located 7 miles southwest of the Village of Yellow Pine near Indian Point and has been moving east into the Caton Creek drainage.

August 24 water drop video

InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6177/

20180826CatonKiwahFires-a
Caton and Kiwah fires thermal map 8-26-2018

Caton Fire 8/24/18 1300hrs: At about 12 noon today, we detected a fire, north and west of Caton Lake. Basically right near Indian Peak. We jumped 8 smokejumpers on the fire, we have a heavy helicopter with bucket dropping water and an air attack directing the air operations. The Air Attack ordered 2 heavy air tankers and a Single Engine Air Tanker (SEAT) for retardant. I have notified the Cascade District Ranger as well.

Currently the fire is 3+ acres, moderately active, in continuous fuel and we have warm temps and strong winds predicted. We are using available resources we have, including borrowing aircraft from the Rattlesnake, to catch this fire. We will provide updates as they are available.

Caton Fire 8/24/18 1530hrs: The fire is now 25-30 acres, we have ordered another 3 crews. We have dropped multiple loads of retardant with SEATs, heavy air tankers and air attack has ordered a VLAT (very large air tanker).

Caton Fire 8/25/18 0930hrs: Caton Fire update. From our detection at noon yesterday, we engaged the fire with smokejumpers and rapellers when it was at 2 acres. With high winds, low relative humidly and warm temps the fire moved quickly through the mature timber. We used Single Engine, C-130 and Very Large Air Tankers to drop many loads of retardant to try to box it in, until fire fighters could establish an anchor and begin to flank the fire. By late afternoon the fire was 60+ acres with a large spot fire ½ mile ahead of itself. Because of other large fires in the geographic area, our orders for additional crews went unfilled.

Due to its rapid growth and our limited firefighting resources, we are reassessing the strategy of this fire. Currently we are developing a point protection strategy to keep the fire up on the hill and prevent impacts to the East Fork, Johnson Creek, Eiguren Ranch, Yellow Pine and other values at risk.

We will keep you and folks in Yellow Pine informed as we have information.

Caton Fire Update 8/26/18 1000hrs: we ordered an Infrared flight yesterday to get and accurate map of the fires location and size, but the order was not filled. We very roughly estimate the size to be around 400+ acres, but that number will likely change once we get and accurate IR flight. At this time, the fire is still located near Indian Point and not posing a threat to the East Fork, Johnson Creek, Eiguren Ranch or the Village of Yellow Pine.

With our Geographic Area experience Planning Level 5 (high fire activity), crews and aircraft have been sent to other large fires in the Area and our firefighting resources are very hard to get.

Yesterday was a warm, dry, windy day and the fire did grow and move a bit. We are not expecting a lot of movement to the north, but the fire did move east into or toward Caton Creek.

We have firefighters stationed at Krassel who are keeping eyes on the fire and making sure none of our established Management Action Points are triggered.

We are expecting a change in the weather beginning today. The prediction is for much cooler temps and good chance of a wetting rain, maybe up to .20” After the weather system moves through, we will check fire growth and make sure we are still meeting objectives.

– PNF Krassel Ranger Anthony Botello

Photos Caton Fire 8-24-2018


– PNF Krassel Ranger Anthony Botello


8-24 Evening smoke plume from Yellow Pine.


(link to larger size)
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1Qnhp5Rg_kwmdzcRXNM2DS2RkLqQNKgic/view
Topo Map, Caton Lake at the bottom, red “X” marks approximate fire location, Yellow Pine is in upper right corner.
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Johnson Fire – Contained

Boise National Forest
Location – The fire is above Johnson Creek between Coffee and Halfway creeks, just a short distance above the Ditch Creek road.
Lat / Long: 44.768583, -115.654
Fire Discovery Date/Time: 8/20/2018, 4:36:26 PM
Incident ID: 2018-IDBOF-000923
Cause – Lightning
Acreage: 6.3 [total]
Strategy: Full Suppression
Resources – 65 people and 3 helicopters
Contained – August 23, 2018

8-23-2018 Update: It was declared contained today. Most resources will be off the fire by Saturday. Folks may still see some smoke from time to time as there are numerous snags in the interior of the fire that make it too dangerous to completely mop it up. Our folks will continue to monitor the fire until the rains or snows come. – Jake Strohmeyer, Cascade Ranger
— — — — — — — — — —

Kiwah Fire

Meadow Creek Road is Open
8-24 Update: With the decrease in fire activity on the Kiwah fire, we have terminated the closure of Meadow Creek road. While the safety risks to the public are currently reduced, people in the fire area should be aware that hazards do still exist such as; unexpected fire movement, falling trees, ash pits, and debris slides.
We will maintain a public safety awareness posting in the location of our previous closure signs.

PM Update 8-26: A low-pressure system will deepen over the region into Monday with gusty winds and increasing precipitation chances beginning tonight. Snow levels drop to about 9,000 feet Monday as cooler temperatures settle into the region as well. Wetting rains will be possible, with potential for isolated thunderstorms Monday afternoon that may locally enhance precipitation totals. Drier conditions arrive Monday night through mid-week.

Salmon-Challis National Forest
Location eight (8) miles northwest of Indian Creek Guard Station on the south side of the Indian Creek drainage in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness
Cause Lightning
Date of Origin Wednesday July 18th, 2018 approx. 05:30 PM
Current as of 8/26/2018, 7:10:37 AM
Total Personnel 15
Size 14,603 Acres
Percent of Perimeter Contained 1%
Estimated Containment Date Monday October 01st, 2018 approx. 12:00 AM

Fire managers on the west side continue to monitor the fire activity near Meadow Creek Road on the Payette National Forest. Fire managers continue to monitor progress on the east side of the fire by aircraft.

Firefighters are implementing a point protection strategy.

To date firefighters have created protection plans for the Stibnite Mine Site, Thunder Mountain, Indian Creek Guard station, and Pistol Creek Ranch areas. To date, significant progress has been made to implement these protection plans, with point protection measures in place on both the Salmon-Challis and Payette National Forests. The fire will continue to be monitored for fire spread in the direction of these values. There are 15 firefighters assigned to the Kiwah Fire. Work will continue into the coming weeks.

Firefighters and fire managers will continue to utilize the resources available complete the needed work as efficiently as possible. Fire managers expect the Kiwah Fire will continue to spread until a significant precipitation event occurs. Typically, season-ending weather events occur in this area between the last half of September through the first half of October.

The Central Idaho Dispatch Zone is at EXTREME Fire Danger.

Meadow Creek Road Closure 0412-524 Terminated

The Payette National Forest has terminated the Meadow Creek Road Closure #0412-524.

Safety risks are reduced, people in the fire area need to be aware that hazards still exist, including, but not limited to unexpected fire movement, falling trees, ash pits, and debris slides.

Kiwah Fire Map August 24

Kiwah Fire InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/5995/
— — — — — — — — — —

Wapiti Fire

Boise National Forest
Date of Origin Saturday August 25th, 2018 approx. 12:00 AM
Cause Under Investigation
Location 13 miles SW of Stanley, Idaho
Current as of 8/26/2018, 10:19:32 AM
Total Personnel 112
Size 2,000 Acres
Estimated Containment Date Monday October 01st, 2018 approx. 12:00 AM

8-26-2018 – Fire crews responding to wildfire near Grandjean, Idaho

Fire crews are responding to the Wapiti Fire, located near Grandjean, that is currently estimated at over 2,000 acres. The fire is 13 miles southwest of Stanley, Idaho and spreading in a northeast direction.

The Boise County Sheriff is evacuating the Sawtooth Lodge, Grandjean campground, and area summer homes and hiking trails.

Currently there are 7 engines, 3 helicopters, 3 heavy air tankers, 1 handcrew and 1 water tender engaged in fighting the fire.

Several more handcrews, along with engines and water tenders, have been ordered.

A Type 2 Incident Management Team has been ordered and will arrive Sunday, afternoon August 26.

The fire was first reported at 2:12 p.m. Saturday, August 25, 2018 and the cause is under investigation.

Currently there is no reported percent contained and the estimated containment date is Oct.1, 2018.

Wapiti Fire InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6176/

Boise National Forest

Fire crews respond to wildfire near Grandjean

Boise, Idaho, Aug. 25, 2018 — Fire crews are responding to the Wapiti Fire, located near Grandjean, that is currently estimated at over 1,200 acres.

The Boise County Sheriff is evacuating the Sawtooth Lodge, Grandjean campground, and area summer homes and hiking trails.

Currently there are 7 engines, 3 helicopters, 3 heavy air tankers, 1 handcrew and 1 water tender engaged in fighting the fire. Several more handcrews, along with engines and water tenders, have been ordered.

A Type 2 Incident Management Team has been ordered and will arrive Sunday afternoon.

The fire was first reported at 2:12 p.m. today and the cause is under investigation. Currently there is no reported percent contained, nor is there an estimated date of full containment.


Wapiti Fire from Stanley 8-25

Wapiti Fire grows near Grandjean

BOISE, Idaho, Aug. 26, 2018 — Fire crews continue to battle the Wapiti Fire, located near Grandjean, which is now an estimated 4,000 acres. A Type 2 Incident Management Team has been ordered and will arrive this afternoon.

An area closure is being put in place around the Grandjean area for public and firefighter safety. National Forest System Road 524, which leads from Highway 21 to Grandjean, is closed.

Four cabins and 1 outbuilding have been lost to the fire. No injuries have been reported.

The fire has burned actively throughout the morning. While several spot fires have been found south of the South Fork Boise River, they have all been caught to this point. Firefighters continue to patrol this area to keep the fire north of the river.

Currently there are 7 engines, 3 helicopters, 3 heavy air tankers, 1 handcrew and 1 water tender engaged in fighting the fire. Several more handcrews, along with engines and water tenders, have been ordered.

The fire was first reported at 2:12 p.m. on Aug. 25 and the cause is under investigation. Currently there is no reported percent contained, nor is there an estimated date of full containment.

Cabin owners and those who had to abandon campgrounds during the evacuation as asked to call the Lowman Ranger District (208-259-3361) for information about when it will be possible to gain access to the area.
— — — — — — — — — —

Snake Fire

Salmon-Challis National Forest
Cause Lightning
Date of Origin Saturday August 18th, 2018 approx. 08:30 AM
Location 36 miles east of Yellow Pine, Idaho in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness, northwest of the confluence of Big Creek and the Middle Fork Salmon River.
Current as of 8/26/2018, 7:10:15 AM
Total Personnel 1
Size 1 Acres
Estimated Containment Date Monday October 15th, 2018 approx. 12:00 AM

The Snake Fire is located in steep, inaccessible terrain in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness, northwest of the confluence of Big Creek and the Middle Fork Salmon River.

The lightning caused Snake Fire, was detected on August 17 at approximately 10:30 p.m. is 0.6 acres in size and is burning in Ponderosa Pine with a grass understory. The fire is on the ridgetop which divides the Salmon-Challis National Forest and the Payette National Forests. Fire activity remains minimal.

The Fuse Fire is located in steep, inaccessible terrain on the Middle Fork Ranger District in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness, approximately 2.5 miles west of Trail Creek.

The lightning caused Fuse Fire, was detected on August 17 at approximately 3:00 p.m. is 2 acres in size and is burning in timber and rock scree. Fire activity remains minimal.

The Snake and Fuse fires are being allowed to play, as nearly as possible, its natural ecological role in the environment while providing for firefighter and public safety. The fires will continue to be monitored by lookouts and by agency aircraft.

The Central Idaho Dispatch Zone is at EXTREME Fire Danger.

Snake Fire, August 22

Fuse Fire August 22

Snake Fire InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6159/
— — — — — — — — — —

Rattlesnake Creek Fire

Nez Perce – Clearwater National Forests
Location West side of Highway 95 near mile marker 184; near Pollock
Cause Human
Date of Origin Monday July 23rd, 2018 approx. 12:00 PM
Current as of 8/25/2018, 6:38:10 PM
Total Personnel 416
Size 8,193 Acres
Percent of Perimeter Contained 35%

Rattlesnake Creek Fire 41% Contained

Sunday, August 26, 2018 9:00 a.m.

Summary: The Rattlesnake Creek Fire is now 41% contained. The newest area of fire containment is near Pollock Lookout Point. Yesterday, firefighters continued to suppress hotspots and construct hand line on the southwest side of the fire closest to Hells Creek and Castle Creek. Firefighters were actively engaged on taking direct suppression efforts on the southeastern part of the fire where it was safe and effective to do so. On the south end near Chokecherry Flat crews made good progress with constructing an indirect contingency line using heavy equipment and hand line with assistance from air operations.

Cooling temperatures and higher humidity are predicted today with an increasing chance for showers beginning late this afternoon. Low to moderate fire activity is expected with some creeping and smoldering. Today, firefighters are continuing to construct handline on the southwest part of the fire, north of Pollock Mountain. The crews located on the southwest part of the fire will be flown back to camp for safety reasons because of the predicted weather this afternoon. On the most southern part of the fire, crews will continue to use heavy equipment and hand line to build a contingency fire line moving north from Chokecherry Flat. Firefighters will take indirect suppression actions due to the rugged terrain on the southeastern part of fire between Squirrel Creek and Pony Creek. Crews have completed structure mitigation and protection in and around the Elk Creek, Hillman Basin and Boulder Creek areas.

Resources Threatened: Private property and structures in the Pollock, Pinehurst, Hillman Basin and Elk Lake areas remain threatened, as well as state and federal infrastructure (Highway 95) and natural resources.

Adams County Evacuation and Road Info: Smokey Boulder Road to Railroad Saddle is closed. Areas from mile marker 181 north to the county line are under Level 1 evacuation restrictions (Be Ready). Hillman Basin and Boulder Creek roads are under Level 2 (Be Set) evacuation restrictions. Residents should monitor https://www.facebook.com/ACSO911/ or visit https://bit.ly/2AU0C5R to sign up for emergency alerts.

Idaho County Evacuations: North Elk Lake Road, Lower Ranch Drive and High Meadow Lane are under Phase 1 (Ready) evacuation restrictions. Residents should monitor https://bit.ly/2OqK1J7 or call the Sheriff’s Department at 208-983-1100 to sign up for emergency alerts.

Forest Closures: The Nez Perce-Clearwater and Payette National Forests have Rattlesnake Creek Fire area closures in effect, including portions of the Hells Canyon National Recreation Area (NRA); see https://bit.ly/2ATSand, https://www.fs.usda.gov/payetteor Inciwebfor more details. FS #098 can be accessed from the south (Mud Creek Road FS #100 or from Price Valley), but not from FS #074 (the portion of Smokey Boulder Road located on Forest Service land). Boundary NFS Roads #112, #556, #101, #100 and #098 are open. Fire map for hunters and anglers: https://bit.ly/2ziGO7A.

Temporary Flight Restrictions: Temporary flight restrictions (TFR) are in effect around the entire fire area.

Remember, that temporary flight restrictions also apply to unmanned aircraft systems (drones), so if you fly, we can’t!

Stage 1 Fire Restrictions are in effect: https://bit.ly/2ag2SUy Please adhere to all safety signage and speed reductions. For road conditions and closures call 511 or visit http://511.idaho.gov/.

For smoke and air quality information: See https://bit.ly/2nooV2z or https://bit.ly/2tm1VG6.

Fire Information: (208) 495-6934 (7am-7pm)
InciWeb: https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/5999(maps, photos, links, etc.)
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/RattlesnakeCreekFire/ (daily updates & video updates)

8/26/18 Rattlesnake Creek Fire Map

Rattlesnake Creek Fire InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/5999/
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Rabbit Foot Fire

Salmon-Challis National Forest
Date of Origin Thursday August 02nd, 2018 approx. 12:30 PM
Location 14 Nautical Miles South West of Salmon, ID
Cause Lightning/natural
Current as of 8/26/2018, 11:16:44 AM
Total Personnel 349
Size 35,271 Acres
Percent of Perimeter Contained 10%
Estimated Containment Date Wednesday October 31st, 2018 approx. 12:00 AM

August 26, 2018 Daily Update for Rabbit Foot Fire

Contact Fire Information: 208.879.1243

Current Situation: A Type 2 Incident Management Team (IMT) assumed command of the Rabbit Foot Fire this morning. Great Basin Team 4 will continue to support firefighters at the command post in Challis and at camps in Cobalt and near Spring Creek south of Salmon. The strategies and tactics will remain the same, consisting of fireline preparation along existing roadways and protection of values at risk, including homes, infrastructure, and habitat. This indirect approach allows firefighters to contain the fire perimeter in areas that are safer and where the likelihood of success is higher.Yesterday, the fire grew about 400 acres, primarily in the upper reaches of Iron Creek. Firefighters continue to reduce the vegetation along the Morgan Creek Road (FR 055) and Moyer Creek Road (FR 103). Chippers are being used to spread the vegetation and prevent a build-up of heavy vegetation near the indirect firelines. Firefighters continue to monitor fire progress and implement plans for structure protection of residences and infrastructure.

Firefighter and public safety is the number one concern to fire managers and local officials. For this reason, evacuation notices and closures are in place. Both are being evaluated on a daily basis between fire mangers, local agencies, and emergency officials. Outside of the closure area, drive cautiously and with lights on. There are many large fire vehicles traveling between the fire and the camp locations.

Weather: A cold front is approaching the region today and may bring strong winds. However, increased cloud cover, higher relative humidity, and lower temperatures are expected to keep fire behavior minimal. Tomorrow, there is increased chance for precipitation and thunderstorms over the fire area. By mid-week, a warming trend will return to central Idaho.

Evacuations: Notifications to be ready to evacuate have been issued to residents living in the Highway 93 corridor. A map depicting the notification areas is available at https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/maps/6090/. In Lemhi County, contact the Sheriff’s Department at 208.756.8980 for questions regarding evacuations.

Closures: An area closure remains in effect by the Salmon-Challis National Forest around the fire area. Additionally, the Bureau of Land Management’s Salmon Field Office has closed the roads in the Cabin Creek area, including the Cabin and Ringle Creek Roads and all spurs that connect to those roads. With moderated fire behavior and cooler weather conditions, the size and scope of the closure area is being evaluated. The area closure does cover parts of hunting units 28 and 36B. Check closure maps at https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/closures/6090/ and plan travel accordingly.

August 25, 2018 IR Map Rabbit Foot Fire

Click to access 2018_08_25-10.34.20.761-CDT.pdf

Rabbit Foot Fire InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6090/
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Stewart Creek Fire

Sawtooth National Forest
Cause Lightning/natural
Date of Origin Monday August 20th, 2018 approx. 02:30 PM
Location 18 miles northwest of Fairfield
Current as of 8/25/2018, 9:27:16 PM
Total Personnel 147
Size 475 Acres
Percent of Perimeter Contained 20%
Estimated Containment Date Wednesday September 05th, 2018 approx. 12:00 AM

Stewart Creek Fire Morning Update August 26, 2018

Fire Information: 208-764-3202

Safety Emphasized As Operational Tactics Change Due To Increase in Fire Size

Current Situation: Falling “snags”, made more precarious with the increase in windy conditions, excessive “spotting”, aircraft congestion and “roll outs” – rolling debris hazards (rocks and burning logs) due to the steep terrain are some of the hazards facing firefighters on the Stewart Creek Fire. Due to the increase in fire size and activity yesterday Incident Commander Ryan Erne emphasized firefighter safety today. The fire has now been burning nearly a week in heavy timber, leaving behind many torched trees with weakened roots and hollowed trunks. These present a great hazard to firefighters, as the winds come up, the snags come down. The needs of the fire require a large air support presence. Six helicopters and several fixed wing air attack planes working a relatively small fire perimeter presents “a lot of metal in the air”. Vigilance, coordination and good communications between fire personnel, crews and pilots is being emphasized. Lastly, the excessive heat still found in the interior and along the active eastern front of the fire, has created continual spotting – hot embers carried by the wind igniting new small fires some as far as ¼ to ½ mile east of the head of the fire.

The fire remained active last night and increased approximately 25% in size requiring a change in suppression tactics to reflect the current circumstances. While the crews will continue utilizing “direct” fire line construction along the active edge of the fire, today’s emphasis is pivoting toward “indirect” suppression efforts. Indirect fire suppression tactics include using natural barriers, terrain and contours. Crews are steering the fire front toward the Soldier mountain range located to the northeast where the fire growth will be greatly hindered due to the rocky terrain, cliff faces and low fuel load. Earlier successful suppression efforts kept the fire from spreading to the heavy fuel load and timber located west of the fire. Those same tactics will now be deployed to prevent fire spread to the southeast where natural resources are threatened.

Weather and Fuel Conditions: Today’s forecast includes much cooler temperatures with high temperatures between 61-67 degrees with a relative humidity of 27-32%. West winds at 7-10 mph with gusts up to 20 mph. Tomorrow there is a 60% chance of rain.

Forest Closures: For protection of public health and safety a closure order is in effect for all roads and trails in the Stewart Creek Fire area. For a complete list of closures please visit the Sawtooth National Forest website at https://www.fs.usda.gov/sawtooth.

Flight Restrictions: Temporary Flight Restrictions (TFR) for Stewart Creek Fire are in effect .

For More Information:
Facebook: facebook.com/SawtoothNational Forest

Stewart Creek Fire InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6171/
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NIFC

August 26, 2018

Nationally, 113 large fires have burned 2.2 million acres. Firefighters are making progress toward containment goals on many fires in the West.

Weather: Below average temperatures and scattered showers and storms are possible across portions west of the Continental Divide, as an unseasonably cool system drops south from British Columbia and Alberta into the country. As the system moves into the region, breezy winds will be possible across the Great Basin, particularly the western half where fuels remain critically dry. In the Southwest, the monsoon will continue across the Four Corners as the flow begins to weaken. Across the East, high pressure over the mid-South will keep conditions hot and humid from the Ohio River Valley south to the Gulf Coast. To the north, wet conditions are expected across the Great Lakes Region as a system moves east across the region, while the Northeast will remain dry as a westerly flow continues. While overall dry conditions are expected, scattered storms will be possible across the Midwest and across New England.

Idaho Fires: 13 Acres: 141,476 New: 2 Contained: 1
Bible Back Sawtooth National Forest FS 1,500 1 21 miles southeast of Stanley
* Caton Payette National Forest FS 179 0 24 miles east of McCall
Copper Mountain Idaho Panhandle National Forest FS 474 24 4 miles east of Eastport 208-267-5561
Cougar Idaho Panhandle National Forest FS 7,570 24 5 miles east of East Hope 208-265-8058
Kiwah Salmon-Challis National Forest FS 14,603 1 49 miles northwest of Challis 208-756-7853
Rabbit Foot Salmon-Challis National Forest FS 34,900 10 14 miles southwest of Salmon+ 208-879-1243
Rampike Idaho Panhandle National Forest FS 2,750 0 23 miles northeast of Kellogg 208-557-8813
Rattlesnake Creek Nez Perce-Clearwater National Forest FS 8,193 35 5 miles southwest of Riggins 208-495-6934
Sharps Eastern Idaho, Dept of Lands ST 64,853 90 6 miles east of Bellevue 208-731-8604
Smith Creek Idaho Panhandle National Forest FS 951 0 19 miles west of Bonners Ferry 208-267-5561
Stewart Creek Sawtooth National Forest FS 475 20 18 miles northwest of Fairfield
Surprise Creek Idaho Panhandle National Forest FS 3,028 20 18 miles east of Athol 208-265-8058
* Wapiti Boise National Forest FS 2,000 0 13 miles southwest of Stanley
Mesa Payette National Forest FS 34,719 100 4 miles south of Council 208-634-0820

source:
https://www.nifc.gov/fireInfo/nfn.htm
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Idaho History Aug 26, 2018

Mount Idaho, Idaho County, Idaho

(Part 3) Transportation

Lewiston Mount Idaho Wagon Road

The Lewiston-Mountain House [Mount Idaho] Wagon Road began in Lewiston, Idaho and ended at Mount Idaho, some 75 miles later. The route climbed out of the Snake River Canyon, crossed through the Craig Mountain area and ended at the eastern edge of the Camas Prairie. It was used by miners, trappers, gamblers, outlaws, girls of the night, immigrants, farmers, merchants, the Chinese, and the U. S. Army. The road was a major route into Idaho County from the spring of 1862 to June of 1924.

The Lewiston-Mountain House Road from Mount Idaho to Cottonwood has been obliterated by farming. Most evidence of the road has succumbed to the plow. However, some evidence might be found where the road crossed Shebang Creek.

StagecoachCottonwood-a
(click image for larger size)
This picture taken northwest of Cottonwood on the Lewiston-Mountain House [Mount Idaho] Road Courtesy of the Idaho County Genealogy Society

StagecoachGrangeville1-a
(click image for larger size)
Stage coach leaving Grangeville, Courtesy of Idaho State Historical Society (copyrighted)

StagecoachGrangeville2-a
(click image for larger size)
Mr. Jackson with coach in front of Jersey Hotel, Grangeville, Idaho. Courtesy of Idaho State Historical Society (copyrighted)

source: Lewiston-Mountain House Wagon Road, The Mapping And Location Of The Road And Associated Sites In Idaho County, For the Idaho County Historic Preservation Commission, & Idaho State Historical Society, Assessment prepared by James G. Huntley, Winter of 2013-2014
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North Idaho Stage Lines Lewiston-Grangeville-Mount Idaho

Mining excitements at Florence, Elk city and other interior locations bordering the Salmon River created a need for adequate transportation routes. Lewiston became the supply headquarters for the new mines and Mount Idaho the dispersal point. Suitable wagon and stage roads soon developed between those two points, but beyond Mount Idaho pack trains remained the standard for supplying the mines until the emergence of wagon roads in the 1890’s. Following the Nez Perce War in 1877, Camas Prairie rapidly developed as an important agricultural and stock area and Grangeville became the leading town, eventually surpassing Mount Idaho as the dispersal point for the interior mining camps.

In the summer of 1862, Francis and Company initiated a stage line between Lewiston and Mount Idaho. Way stations emerged at Sweetwater (run by James Donnelly), Mason Prairie (C. W. Durkee and George Crampton), Cottonwood (Mr. Allen), and Mount Idaho (Mose Milner and his partner Francois).
(Idaho County Free Press, July 27, 1888, p. 4, c. 1-2, hereafter cited as ICFP)

The following May C. W. Durkee and George Crampton began a semi-weekly stage line to Mount Idaho. They ran the line with Concord coaches and carried Wells, Fargo & Co.’s express. The fare was $15 and their stage office was located in the Luna House.
(The Golden Age [Lewiston], August 8, 1863, p. 3, c. 6)

In the fall of 1863, George Crampton sold his share in the line and returned to Boston. Durkee also sold his share and traveled to Burnt River in Oregon, where he started the popular station known as Express Ranch. Frank Shissler succeeded the pair and continued to run the Camas Prairie line.
(History of North Idaho, p. 389.)

The success of a stage line depended upon the owner receiving the government mail contract, which was periodically placed open for bids. If a stage owner failed to receive the bid, he was usually obliged to sell his outfit to the successful bidder. Often individuals not familiar with the terrain and weather conditions would receive the bid, but soon let the contract lapse after realizing the folly of a low bid. Sometimes, though, the successful bidder would sublet the contract to the current owner and still be able to realize a small profit.

The Walla Walla, Washington, paper in March of 1864 noted, “New Mail Contract.–The former contractor having failed to fulfill his contract, the Department of Washington has made a new contract with Capt. John Mullan to carry mails from here to Lewiston, Oro Fino, Florence, Colville and Helgate. New contract will be effective in April.”
(Washington Statesman, March 26, 1864, p. 3, c. 1)

Between 1859 and 1862, Mullan had been in charge of the construction of a military road between Fort Benton, Montana, and Walla Walla, Washington, which became known as the Mullan Road. He would later attempt to start a stage between Boise and the South Boise mines and one from Silver City to California. In the spring of 1870, the Lewiston and Warrens mail contract was let to Samuel Phinney for $2,575 a year.
(Idaho Tri-Weekly Statesman, April 12, 1870, p. 2, c. 3)

By 1874 Ezra Baird and his two brothers, Lewis and William, were running an express line between Lewiston and Warrens. They operated stages to Mount Idaho and provided saddle horses for the remainder of the journey.
(The Northern [Lewiston], September 12, 1874, p. 1, c. 3)

… In 1878 L. Dunwell and D. Merrill received the mail contract and purchased the stage and stock of the Baird brothers.
(Lewiston Teller, June 28, 1878, p. 3, c. 1)

The new company placed the following advertisement in the Teller: Dunwell & Morrill, proprietors of the Lewiston and Mount Idaho Stage line, transacting business with Wells, Fargo & Co.’s Express. Also carrying the U.S. Mail from Lewiston to the above named places, and intermediate points. Always supplied with the best of horses, coaches and “accommodating drivers,” never failing to go through on time. Transportation of passengers, treasure, collections, orders &c made a specialty, and any and all business entrusted to them will be attended to promptly. Tri-weekly trips to and from Lewiston, I. T. and Mount Idaho, I. T. Leave Lewiston 4 a.m. on Tuesday, Thursday & Saturday. Leave Mount Idaho at 5 a.m. on Monday, Wednesday & Friday of each week, make weekly connections with the expressmen from the upper mining camps.
(July 5, 1878, p. 2, c. 5)

Winter travel was often hazardous for stage drivers, and in January 1879 the upward-bound stage became lost in a snowstorm between Cottonwood and Grangeville. The driver wandered around all night on the prairie and did not arrive at Mount Idaho until after dawn. The newspaper article describing this ordeal noted: “Who would not be a stage driver at $50 per month.”
(Ibid., January 17, 1879, p. 3, c. 2)

In August 1879 the Teller mentioned the possibility of a new route to Grangeville from Lewiston. “We learn that it is contemplated soon to have opened a new route to Camas Prairie via Waha Lake and along the mountains south of the traveled road just this side of Cottonwood.”
(August 15, 1879, p. 3, c. 1)

In January 1880 the Utah, Idaho and Oregon Stage Company received the mail contract and John Hailey, superintendent of the line, arrived in Lewiston to make the necessary arrangements. The company hired Ezra Baird to carry the mail at $20 per day on a temporary basis. Baird set out and stocked the road in order that the mail could be carried through in one day on a daily schedule.
(Ibid., January 30, 1880, p. 3, c. 1)

After Dunwell & Co. lost the contract to Hailey’s company, residents of Camas Prairie passed a resolution praising the fine stage and mail service provided them by Dunwell and asked the sheriff to find him a good job.
(Ibid., February 6, 1880, p. 4, c. 1-2)

In the spring of 1881 a Chinese was running a four-horse team and presumably would also haul passengers for a price.
(Idaho Tri-Weekly Statesman, April 23, 1881, p. 3, c. 1)

By April 1881, the Lewiston and Mount Idaho line was owned and operated by the Baird Brothers. They made daily trips, Sunday excepted, and left Lewiston at 3 a.m. and Mount Idaho at 5 a.m., arriving at both places by 6 p.m. They maintained an office in Lewiston at the Raymond House.
(Nez Perce News [Lewiston] April 28, 1881, p. 1, c. 3)

On May 16, 1881, Loyal P. Brown, a prominent Mount Idaho businessman, purchased the stage line from the Baird brothers and kept the line on the same schedule as that of the previous owners. Brown maintained an office at the Hotel de France in Lewiston.
(Ibid., May 19, 1881, p. 2, c. 2; May 26, 1881, p. 3, c. 2)

Baird kept his hand in the stage business and commissioned L. Wiggins and a Mr. Wishard to construct some new coaches.
(Lewiston Teller, June 30, 1881, p. 3, c. 2)

In the spring of 1882, a Mr. Campherson of San Francisco received the mail contract between Lewiston and Mount Idaho for $2,780. Apparently, he never became actively involved with the route, as in August Postmaster Hunt, of Lewiston, received a telegram from Washington authorizing temporary service on the daily route at the rate of $5,000 per year or $16 for each round trip. Ezra Baird again returned to the line and started on the road to perform the service while the roads were still in good condition.
(Ibid., March 16, 1882, p. 3, c. 1; August 10, 1882, p. 3, c. 1)

In August 1884, G. D. Smith was operating the line and ran the following ad in the Teller: “Lewiston to Mt. Idaho Stage Line. Transacting business with Wells, Fargo & Co.’s Express. Also carrying the U.S. Mail from Lewiston to the above named place, and intermediate points. Always supplied with the best of horses, coaches and accommodating drivers. Never failing to go through on time. Transportation of passengers, treasure, collections, orders &c. Daily trips (Sunday excepted), to and from Lewiston and Mount Idaho, I. T. Leaves Lewiston at 3 a.m. and leaves Mount Idaho 5 a.m. Agents – Lewiston, E. J. Bonore, post office bldg.; H. Titman, Grangeville; L. P. Brown, Mt. Idaho.”
(August 14, 1884, p. 1, c. 4)

In February 1886, L. P. Brown was back at the helm of the line and the Nez Perce News complimented Brown on the efficiency of his operation.
(February 4, 1886, p. 5, c. 1)

The Free Press on August 6, 1886, p. 1, c. 3, remarked: “The Hon. L. P. Brown is determined that the efficiency of his stage line not be allowed to retrograde. Several fine hacks have been placed on the route lately, the stock is in excellent condition, and is cleverly handled by those efficient and gentlemanly drivers, George Anderson and Steve Fenn. We learn the former has been steadily ‘throwing the braid’ for the last eighteen months.”

In the summer of 1886, Brown traveled along the new Lake Waha road to ascertain the feasibility of transferring his stage to that route. “He says it can easily be made a good road and will do much to stimulate settlement on that part of the mountain. The Nez Perce county commissioners have already appropriated $200 to be used on their side just as soon as viewers from both counties can meet on the county line and arrange a point of departure each way.”
(Ibid., August 27, 1886, p. 1, c. 3)

In October 1887, Brown applied to the Interior Department for permission to establish a stage station on the Nez Perce Indian reservation at Willow Creek. The erection of this station was to insure that the mail would not be stopped by a build-up of snow on the mountain, as had happened in the past.
(Ibid., October 21, 1887, p. 1, c. 4)

An early spring thaw allowed the stages to begin their summer schedule on May 1, 1888, with Jay Rhoads and Neil McMillan handling the driving duties.
(Ibid., May 4, 1888, p. 1, c. 4)

The popularity of a stage line was often determined by the food and conversation served at the stage stops. The Free Press on March 22, 1889, p. 1, c. 5, wrote: “The eating houses on the stage road between the Prairie and Lewiston were never in better hands and it is now almost a pleasure to travel. At Riley Dixon’s and at Fountain’s, the tables are liberally supplied with substantial food and excellent service.”

A change of mail contracts in 1889 saw Felix Warren take charge of the line on July 1. He bought all the stock of the former owner and prepared to run the line until the new mail contracts were let the following year.
(Ibid., July 12, 1889, p. 1, c. 6)

Warren soon hired John Lemmon, a former division agent for the Northwestern Stage Company who had at one time managed Rattlesnake Station on the Overland Road, to oversee the Lewiston and Mt. Idaho Line. The Free Press noted that “Felix now owns every stage line running out of Lewiston except the Asotin and Pierce City routes, and he has bought Baird Bros. stable in addition. He is a rustler and a thorough stage man.”
(July 19, 1889, p. 1, c. )

In September the stage made its first trip over the Lake Waha route and the Free Press commented: “The stage was three hours late Monday evening. The trip was made for the first time ever over the new road and was found to be too rough for the mechanism of the vehicle, consequently there was a breakdown on the other side of Mason and the rest of the distance had to be traversed in a lumber wagon.
(September 20, 1889, p. 1, c. 4)

Despite this setback, Warren reported that the stage would continue to travel the new road and take in the Lake Waha and Tammany settlements.
(Ibid., September 27, 1889, p. 1, c. 3)

Further changes were made in the road in November: “Another change in the stage, throwing it still further to the southward, has been made on the Cottonwood side, and if the stage drivers were not Sunday school graduates they would swear lustily at having to break new roads so frequently.”
(Ibid., November 1, 1889, p. 1, c. 5)

The Free Press reported: “Stage men and passengers claim that the new stage route via Waha Lake and on the Willow creek is superior to the old route across the reservation. They find settlers all along the route and much more business and some claim it is a shorter distance.”
(December 13, 1889, p. 1, c. 6)

In May 1890 Warren hired Charley W. Austin to assume the management of all his stage lines.
(Ibid., May 30, 1890, p. 1, c. 5)

During the winter of 1891-1892 grain and freight haulers used the old stage road, and in April 1892 the stages once again resumed operations over the old road by way of Spring Ranch and Sweetwater.
(Ibid., March 18, 1892, p. 4, c. 2; April 22, 1892, p. 1, c. 5)

In the summer of 1892, a Mr. Graham, of Moscow, began a stage line to the Prairie from Lewiston. He planned to put on four horses between Lewiston and Denver and a fast team from the latter place to Grangeville.
(Ibid., August 12, 1892, p. 1, c. 5)

In the spring of 1893 Felix Warren was planning big changes for his stage operations. “Felix Warren has traded his Pomeroy and Lewiston Stage line to C. A. Lundy for the latter’s Elk City route. Felix talks of putting on a four-horse team and coach between Lewiston and Grangeville when the summer schedule goes into effect, and arriving here at six o’clock sharp, every evening. He also contemplates putting in a barn, feed yard and livery stable here, to feed his stage stock, and also the horses he has bought for his new saddle train and express line he is going to run between Grangeville and Elk City this spring. If Felix carries out these improvements he will mount the pedestal of fame at a single leap, and all hands this way will rise up and bless him as a public benefactor.”
(Ibid., March 31, 1893, p. 1, c. 6)

The following month Warren disposed of all his stage lines with the exception of the Lewiston-to-Grangeville and Grangeville-to-Elk City lines. He made arrangements to make Grangeville the headquarters for the two lines and planned to put on four horses and Concord coaches on the Grangeville and Lewiston run. Until completion of the wagon road, he would continue to run a saddle train to Elk City.
(Ibid., May 12, 1893, p. 1, c. 5; July 7, 1893, p. 1, c. 3)

Another change in the stage road occurred in May and the Free Press remarked, “the new road now traverses a wet, soft and marshy lane lying on the north side of Dave Yates’ and the south of the land owned by the Denver syndicate. A softer piece of ground than this land cannot be found on Camas Prairie; and it can never be made into a good road . . . .” (Ibid., May 5, 1893, p. 4, c. 2) The article further commented that the road had only been opened a few days and already numerous teams had mired in the mud at the side.

In May 1893 John Riggins began a competitive Grangeville-to-Lewiston line. He ran four-horse stages three times a week and made connections with the steamers in Lewiston. The stage left both places in the morning and met on the mountain. Here passengers were exchanged and each driver returned to his place of origin.
(Ibid., May 12, 1893, p. 1, c. 5; July 7, 1893, p. 1, c. 3)

By the fall of 1893, Warren was running stages from Lewiston to Mount Idaho, Uniontown, Pomeroy, and Moscow. His Lewiston-to-Mount Idaho line made four stops to change horses. The noon dinner stop was at Soldiers Meadow, where the meal was served by Mrs. Smalls and Mrs. Warren.
(Lewiston Tribune, October 5, 1893, p. 2, c. 6)

In January 1894 another change of ownership for the mail contract transpired; “C. F. Taylor, of San Francisco, has been awarded the mail contract from Lewiston to Mount Idaho for the four years commencing July 1, 1894, for the sum of $2,600 per year. The present contractor gets $3,400 per year for the same service. We presume Mr. Taylor intends making a horseback route of it. It is a matter of indifference to our people whether our mail comes in a stage or a wheelbarrow. All we ask is that it shall be delivered on time.”
(ICFP, January 5, 1894, p. 1, c. 6)

In April 1894 Grangeville was made the distributing post office for Idaho County and Felix Warren reduced his stage fares between Grangeville and Lewiston from $8 to $6 one way, and $12 to $9 round trip.
(Ibid., April 13, 1894, p. 1, c. 6; April 20, 1894, p. 4, c. 2)

Also during April, Warren changed his office from Pearson & Bonebrake’s to the Jersey House with Auchinvole & Fitzgerald as agents.
(Ibid., April 27, 1894, p. 1, c. 6)

C. F. Taylor, after receiving the mail bid, must have had second thoughts after investigating the line, as “Felix Warren has signed the contract papers to carry the mails between Lewiston and Mt. Idaho for four years ending July 1, 1898. He has bought two fine Concord coaches costing $450 each, and is going to hook on six white horses and a spotted dog to each coach and otherwise run the line as it ought to be run. The government allows $570 per year compensation for the new Sunday service. Felix promises the best stage service we have ever had.”
(Ibid., May 25, 1894, p. 1, c. 3)

In June Warren reported the roads in bad condition over the mountain and that a storm had blown down forty-one big pine trees at his place on Soldier Meadows.
(Ibid., June 15, 1894, p. 1, c. 3)

In order to better outfit his line, he ordered the construction of two new Concord coaches from a firm in Stockton, California.
(Lewiston Tribune, July 26, 1894, p. 4, c. 1)

By March 1895, new owners were once again in charge of the route. Messrs. Baird & Stonebreaker, proprietors of the Lewiston and Mt. Idaho Stage line, are progressive wide-a-wake and up-to-date men. Their latest move is to transfer their coaches and stock to the Fountain route for the accommodation of passengers and through freight, thus saving from two to four hours travel, both coming and going. When summer schedule goes into effect they will take breakfast in Lewiston at 6 a.m., have an early dinner at Fountains’s, and put their passengers up in Grangeville in good time for supper . . . . The way mail will come by Waha in a light rig so that passengers will not be delayed by stoppages at small offices on the mountain. Covered coaches and four or six horses if required will be on the route at all times.
(ICFP, March 9, 1895, p. 1, c. 3)

Baird and Stonebreaker’s winter schedule called for the stages to leave Lewiston at 4 a.m. and arrive in Cottonwood at 5 a.m., leave Cottonwood at 5 a.m., and arrive in Grangeville at 9 a.m. On the return trip the stages left Grangeville at 2 p.m. and arrived in Cottonwood at 6 p.m. They left Cottonwood at 5 a.m. and arrived in Lewiston at 6 a.m.
(Ibid,, March 15, 1895, p. 4, c. 5)

In May Ezra Baird purchased Stonebraker’s interest in the line and planned to run it by himself. “The service by way of Fountain’s will be discontinued, and Mr. Baird will devote his entire attention to putting mails and passengers through by way of Waha promptly on schedule time. The summer service is now in effect, so that travelers can leave Lewiston in the morning and take an early supper in Grangeville. The same coaches and four-horse teams will be continued right along.”
(Ibid., May 13, 1895, p. 1, c. 4)

The summer schedule had the stage leaving Lewiston at 4 a.m., arriving Cottonwood at 3 p.m., arriving Denver at 5 p.m. and reaching Grangeville at 6 p.m. The return stage left Grangeville at 4 a.m., arrived in Denver at 5:30 p.m., made a stop in Cottonwood at 7 a.m., and reached Lewiston at 5 p.m.
(Ibid., May 10, 1895, p. 4, c. 4)

In November the Free Press made note of the winter schedule: “From Lewiston, by Waha, Forest, Westlake, Cottonwood, Denver and Grangeville to Mt. Idaho, 69.50 miles and back, seven times a week. Leave Lewiston daily at 12 m., arrive Waha by 6 p.m. Leave Waha at 5 a.m., arrive Grangeville by 6 p.m. Leave Grangeville at 6 a.m., arrive Waha by 6 p.m. Leave Waha at 6 a.m., arrive Lewiston by 12 m.”
(Free Press November 29, 1895, p. 4, c. 3)

In April 1897 the Free Press reported another change of ownership:

Jerry S. Baker and Frank Coston have purchased from Ezra Baird the Lewiston and Mt. Idaho Stage line and took possession yesterday. Mr. Baird has been running the line in good style, with good stock and frequent changes, and Mr. Baker assures us that the new proprietors will keep running it right up to the handle, with new stock and will himself be over the road twice a week to give his personal attention to all the details. Messrs. Baker and Coston also own the stage line from Grangeville to Florence and will operate both together. They are both experts on stage business and will do their best to give the public good satisfaction.
(Free Press April 16, 1897, p. 4, c. 1)

Apparently the deal with Baker and Coston failed to materialize, as the next month the line was reported as having been sold by Baird to Felix Warren. (Ibid., May 14, 1897, p. 1, c. 5) In October the Free Press wrote, “Felix Warren was over the road last week. He is erecting a fine barn at Soldier Meadows with the intention of making Meadows the stopping place for the stage over night, after December 1, instead of Lake Waha as heretofore. This should insure you an earlier arrival of your mail during the winter.”
(Free Press October 15, 1897, p. 4, c. 2)

The following month the stage changed to its winter schedule. This meant that the stage left Lewiston at 1 p.m., spent the night at Waha Lake, and arrived in Grangeville the following night. On the return trip the stage left Grangeville about 5 a.m., laid over at Waha, and reached Lewiston in the forenoon.
(Ibid., November 24, 1897, p. 1, c. 4)

In December the stage to Lewiston was held up by a couple of inexperienced robbers. The driver threw down the mail sacks as ordered but kept the locked mail pouch under his feet. After relieving two passengers of $28.30, the robbers left the scene. A halfbreed named Frush and his accomplice Dan Hurley were arrested soon after the incident occurred.
(Ibid., December 31, 1897, p. 1, c. 5)

By the summer of 1898, the line had been purchased by the Idaho, Nevada and California Stage Company. “W. E. Travis, of Salt Lake, who is connected with the Idaho, Nevada and California Stage Co., is in Lewiston. He has purchased the Mt. Idaho line from Felix Warren and in the future his company will handle the mails and passenger traffic between Lewiston and the Idaho County towns. He states he will immediately put new wagons and horses into service and make available the best of accommodations possible for passengers.”
(Lewiston Tribune, July 2, 1898, p. 2, c. 6; August 26, 1898, p. 5, c. 1)

The Tribune noted the following activities of the new owners along the line: “W. E. Travis, owner of the Lewiston-Mt. Idaho stage, arrived in Lewiston with three stage coaches, three large hacks and sixteen head of horses which he will put immediately on the line. He has decided to establish a relay station seven miles from Lewiston at the Nelson farm in Tammany Hollow thereby providing a change of fresh stock between Lewiston and Waha. From Waha, the stations will be fifteen miles apart. He hopes to reduce running time by three hours.
(September 30, 1898, p. 4, c. 6)

In July O. E. Clough, of Cottonwood, provided the new company with a little competition by running a four-horse covered passenger rig between Grangeville and Lewiston, but his efforts did not last long.
(ICFP, July 22, 1898, p. 1, c. 4)

In September, W. E. Travis ordered four coaches and fourteen horses delivered to Grangeville for use on the line. The horses and coaches arrived in Grangeville the last part of September and were immediately placed into service. Travis informed the Free Press that he would put on stations every twelve miles and run the line on schedule time or go broke in the effort.
(Ibid., September 23, 1898, p. 1, c. 3; September 30, 1898, p. 1, c. 5)

Travis reported the establishment of a new station at the Nelson farm in Tammany Hollow and related that the stage would continue to come through from Lewiston in a day as long as the weather permitted. He made Grangeville the terminus of the line for passengers and planned to deliver the Mount Idaho mail by horseback.
(Ibid., October 7, 1898, p. 1, c. 4)

With the coming of the railroad, the Free Press noted the following decline in areas formerly serviced by stage: “The stage system of Lewiston has been generally reorganized. The Leland and reservation mails now go by train to Spalding and are from there distributed to the reservation points. The Mt. Idaho stage now leaves at 6 a.m. and goes through to Cottonwood in one day and to Grangeville and Mt. Idaho the next day. Lewiston’s stage days are becoming things of the past. The Mt. Idaho line is the only one that is a public necessity. It is increased in importance. The others are auxiliary connecting links, that are only shadows of former importance.”
(December 9, 1898, p. 2, c. 5)

As noted, other stage lines declined in popularity with the coming of the railroad, but the Grangeville route continued to gain in popularity, if only temporarily. “Two stages will go out this morning on the Mt. Idaho line loaded with passengers, says the Lewiston Tribune. Mr. Travis bought twenty-four head of stock yesterday for his line, and expects two of his new stages today from California. In a few days two stages will be run regularly every day.”
(Ibid., March 10, 1899, p. 2, c. 2)

Most of the increased traffic on the line was due to the discovery of rich quartz at Buffalo Hump in August 1898, and Grangeville became the jumping-off place for the new mines. In March the stage company was forced to hire an extra four-horse rig at Cottonwood to handle an overflow of passengers heading for the new mines.
(Ibid., March 17, 1899, p. 2, c. 2)

Since the stage did not go to Mount Idaho, Bibby & Jerome started a line between Grangeville and Mount Idaho in an attempt to receive some of the passengers heading for the Hump.
(Ibid., March 24, 1899, p. 3, c. 7)

In April W. E. Travis reported that his company had added three more stations, Westlake, Denver, and Meadows. He also stated that the distance between stations was not more than twelve miles.
(Ibid., April 7, 1899, p. 3, c. 7)

During the same month Travis and veteran stage driver Felix Warren made an inspection trip over the line. Travis reported that the company had 100 head of horses on the line between Lewiston and Grangeville and that he had purchased 65 more head. “He now runs six horses from Lewiston to Waha, four from Waha over the snow to Westlake and six from Westlake to Grangeville. Additional stations have been established at Tammany, Soldier Meadows, Westlake and Denver, making seven changes in all or an average of nine miles between stations along the 65 mile route. . . .”
(Ibid., April 14, 1899, p. 2, c. 3)

The company also ran a six-horse baggage wagon three times a week and boasted of having three of the largest and best coaches that money could buy, each holding seventeen passengers.

The Free Press remarked: “There are two stage roads from Lewiston to this place, one known as the mail route running through the mountains by way of Waha Lake and the other coming around to the north and east via the Fountain road. The latter road is a little shorter than the main line and passengers are given their choice of the two routes. It requires about the same amount of time on each as the Fountain line joins the mail route at Westlake. First stop is at Nelson’s, 8 miles out–next is Waha Lake–steepest part of route is beyond Waha, stage next stops at Meadows–goes on to supper stop at Westlake, here passengers from the Fountain road join forces–Stop at Cottonwood and Denver–One way fare is $6.50. Two stage companies are operating between the two points.”
(Ibid., April 28, 1899, p. 3, c. 3)

W. E. Travis placed the following advertisement in the Lewiston Tribune: The Idaho, Nevada and California Stage Co. daily service from Lewiston to Grangeville and intermediate points, making close connections at Grangeville for the Buffalo Hump Mining District. This line affords a daily service to all the following points: Buffalo Hump, via Florence, Slate Creek, Adams Camp, Mt. Idaho and Grangeville: Buffalo Hump via Badger, Elk City, Bridgeport, Grangeville, Denver, Cottonwood, Westlake, Morrow and Waha Lake. C. F. Leland, General Agent, Lewiston. Six-horse stock, seventeen passenger coaches, Buffalo to Lewiston in 36 hours, all daylight travel. First class eating stations. W. E. Travis, General Manager, Salt Lake City, Utah.
(May 24, 1899, special edition to paper in magazine form. Cited in Elsensohn, V. I, P. 202.)

Travis also hired Felix Warren as superintendent of the line. Following a tour of inspection along the route, Warren stated that in the future the stage would start from Grangeville at 6 a.m. and make the trip to Lewiston in thirteen hours.
(ICFP, May 19, 1899, p. 4, c. 4)

An opposition line, the Lewiston and Buffalo Hump Stage Company, advertised a twelve-hour trip between Lewiston and Grangeville made in the comfort of Concord coaches. This company maintained its office in Lewiston at the corner of 5th and C streets and another at the Great Northern Express office.
(Lewiston Tribune, June 2, 1899, p. 2, c. 6)

In July, L. J. Dimmick, who had been running a stage between Grangeville and Mount Idaho, discontinued the line to devote his time to freighting.
(ICFP, July 21, 1899, p. 4, c. 3)

The following month, the Wilson Stage Line, which had been operating a stage line between Lewiston and Grangeville, also discontinued service. The stock used on this line were sent to British Columbia. Travis responded to this notice by stating that his company would soon begin supplying a six-horse service along the route and noting that all of his coaches had recently been refurbished.
(Lewiston Tribune, August 4, 1899, p. 3, c. 2)

In February 1900 W. E. Travis announced that his company would move all their equipment to Grangeville as soon as the Clearwater Short Line reached Stuart (known as Kooskia by 1902). At that time he would establish a daily service between Stuart and Grangeville, a distance of eighteen miles. He noted that arrangements had already been perfected to bring Camas Prairie mail from Lewiston to Stuart. He also planned to start a railroad ticket office in Grangeville and remarked that the people of the Prairie would no longer have to endure a long stage ride when traveling to Lewiston.
(Ibid., February 2, 1900, p. 1, c. 5)

In May the Free Press reported: “Commencing on Monday last [April 30] the stage left Lewiston at 4 a.m. and arrived at Grangeville the same night. This is the regular summer schedule and will be maintained until such time as the mails are sent to the Prairie by way of the Clearwater Short Line railroad.” (May 4, 1900, p. 1, c. 5) The following week the Free Press continued its report on the progress of the railroad and noted: “In a short time the stage company will discontinue hauling passengers over the Craig’s mountain route and will devote its energies to the line between Grangeville and Stuart. Until arrangements can be made with the postal department mails will continue to be brought over Craig’s mountain in a two-horse rig.”
(May 11, 1900, p. 2, c. 2)

Arrangements were soon negotiated with the postal authorities and mail for the Prairie began arriving on the train at Stuart about June 25. The Idaho, Nevada, and California Stage Co. At that time began hauling the mail and passengers on its stages between Stuart and Grangeville. At the same time, W. E. Travis reported that his company had received the mail contract between Grangeville and Florence and would be running a daily stage from Stuart to Florence. He would also arrange for stages to run from Adams Camp direct to Buffalo Hump.
(Ibid., June 22, 1900, p. 1, c. 4)

When the railway reached Stites in September, the stage company began running their line from that point.
(Ibid., September 7, 1900, p. 1, c. 4)

In the winter of 1902, Felix Warren received the mail contract between Lewiston and Cottonwood with a bid of $2,416 per year. He responded with an announcement that he would put on a daily stage line between the two points and take in many of the towns along the Culdesac-to-Grangeville extension of the Northern Pacific railroad. He ordered a new coach and planned to leave Lewiston every morning at 5 a.m., making stops at Tammany, Williams stage station, Morrow, Ferdinand, Cottonwood, Denver, and Grangeville. He also promised to put on an extra coach during the fruit season if the express proved too heavy for the regular coach.
(Ibid., April 25, 1907, p. 3, c. 2)

When the extension of the Northern Pacific railway reached Grangeville in December, 1908, the days of the daily horse-drawn stage between Grangeville and Lewiston were over. The train hauled its first passengers between the two towns on December 9, 1908. The train left Grangeville at 7 a.m. and arrived in Lewiston at 11:25 a.m. The return trip left Lewiston at 2 p.m. and reached Grangeville at 6:45 p.m.
(Ibid., December 10, 1908, p. 4, c. 4)

An era was over. After nearly fifty years of operation, horse-drawn stage coaches between Grangeville had become an item for old-timers to reminisce about at family gatherings and reunions.

The arrival of the automobile soon gave the railway some competition by offering an alternative form of travel. In the summer of 1915 S. C. Henderson initiated an auto stage between Grangeville and Lewiston. He made his first trip on Sunday, July 4. He announced that he would leave the Imperial Hotel at seven in the morning in his Winston Six and return from Lewiston at 2 p.m.
(Ibid., July 8, 1915, p. 8, c. 2)

On June 29, 1920, W. G. Peacock started an automobile stage line between the two towns, making a daily round-trip run. He left the Imperial Hotel at 7 a.m. and passed through the towns of Fenn, Cottonwood, Westlake, Forest, and Waha. He arrived at the Bollinger Hotel in Lewiston at 11 a.m. and started on his return trip at 2 p.m.
(Ibid., July 1, 1920, p. 1, c. 4)

Peacock continued to run his auto stage through the summer of 1921.
(Ibid., May 19, 1921, p. 1, c. 3)

During 1921, he encountered some competition from the 560 Transportation Company, which also offered a daily service to Lewiston. Their auto left Lewiston at 7 a.m. and reached Grangeville at 11:30 a.m. It left Grangeville at 1 p.m. and arrived in Lewiston at 6 p.m., making stops at Cottonwood, Ferdinand, Craigmont, Culdesac, Sweetwater, and Lapwai.
(Ibid., May 12, 1921, p. 5, c. 1)

As automobiles became cheaper and road systems improved, the small auto stages soon disappeared. Those who did not own an automobile could either ride the train or the vehicles of companies that began to offer a bus service throughout the state and nation.

source: North Idaho Stage Lines Lewiston-Grangeville-Mount Idaho, Idaho Historical Reference Series Number 814, 1985, Prepared by Larry R. Jones
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A stagecoach connection in Stites, 1907

1907StagecoachStites-a

source: Idaho County Free Press, Lauri Chapman, September 30, 2016
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Building the North South Highway

By the mid-1860s, two routes existed to get to Florence, the hotbed of mining, from the north. The first brought travelers south from Lewiston across the Camas Prairie, over White Bird Hill, and down the Salmon River to Slate Creek, where they turned up into the mountains to access Florence. The other route turned east from a point much further north on the prairie near what is now the town of Grangeville, and headed over Mount Idaho via the “Mose Milner” trail, constructed by Moses Milner in 1862.

Both routes charged users a $1 toll per pack or saddle animal.

… On February 5, 1889, the Idaho Territorial Legislature passed the Mount Idaho to Little Salmon Meadows Wagon Road Act financed by $50,000 in 20-year bonds. The act provided for state financing to cover the cost of the route’s initial construction, but required counties to continue maintenance. The press lauded the legislation, but the proposed route was controversial. The approved route originated at Idaho County’s Mount Idaho, the county seat, and traveled south via Florence and Warm Springs Resort (Burgdorf), then west to Little Salmon Meadows (Meadows) in Washington County, bypassing the Little Salmon River entirely.


(figure 2)

The state intended for this route to open more areas to settlement, connect the two regions of the territory, and provide easy transport of military supplies and troops in the event of Indian uprisings. But detractors felt that this mountainous route was far less sensible than the course of the proposed military road, which would have meandered lower along the Little Salmon River. Some felt that Governor Norman Willey’s experience as a prospector in Warren, a town more easily accessed by the mountain route, had unduly influenced the route selection.

Despite the controversy, the U.S. Congress ratified the Idaho territorial wagon road legislation in May 1890. Following Idaho’s admittance to the Union on July 3, 1890, the state legislature began taking bids for what came to be called the Mount Idaho-Little Salmon Meadows Wagon Road or hereafter the Mount Idaho Road. This route traveled from Payette Lake up and over Secesh Summit, past Burgdorf, and down to the Salmon River’s confluence with French Creek, well above the river’s confluence with the Little Salmon. Here, it crossed the Salmon River and continued north to Florence. Work on this road commenced immediately and continued to push through the ridges and valleys east of the Little Salmon River for the next few years.

As road construction progressed up in the mountains, advocates for the alternate route along the Little Salmon River did not give up their cause. The Mount Idaho Road did open rough access to mining areas (though it was incomplete), but the state still needed a road that easily facilitated settler access, and, perhaps more importantly, would remain open even during winter and inclement weather.

In January 1893, the State Legislature debated wagon road legislation that included a provision to connect Meadows with Riggins via a branch road along the Little Salmon. Riggins itself was already connected to Mount Idaho by the Salmon River Road. The measure passed, but required Idaho County to supply some of the funding. As Idaho County stalled, the state completed surveys of new state wagon routes, including a road that would connect the Salmon River Road with Meadows via the Little Salmon River rather than the mountains. The State Wagon Road Commission began advertising and awarding bids for construction of the road from Riggins south towards Meadows.

By February 1894, however, Idaho County still had not supplied any funds and the State Wagon Road Commission let half the contracts go. Road building stopped near Pollock, leaving the canyon along the Little Salmon River still untouched. The road gap between Meadows and Riggins had narrowed, but transportation between the two towns still required travelers to brave an incomplete road through the mountains. [This gap is represented on figure 2 above as the yellow area labeled “Little Salmon Canyon.”] In 1895, private parties took it upon themselves to connect Meadows and Pollock with a trail along the surveyed Little Salmon River wagon route. The trail allowed travel along the west bank of the Little Salmon River, but was not wide enough to be a road.

At this point it was clear to many in Idaho that the mountainous north-south route had been a mistake. The rugged terrain and wild water the Mount Idaho Road was supposed to traverse challenged engineers and the high elevation near Florence on the north side of the Salmon River and Warrens on the south meant long winters, which hampered road building. The state’s impassable route between north and south Idaho permitted the divide between the two regions of the state to persist.

Meadows to Riggins Travel Timeline

1897Meadows-a
Meadows, Idaho ca. 1897

1862 – Population at Florence peaked, and settlers left to prospect in Boise Basin or Warrens. Residents of Florence and others had built two trails into the settlement. One trail travelled from Camas Prairie to White Bird and Slate Creek and then up into the mountains. The other travelled from Mount Idaho across the mountains to Florence, called the Mose Milner Trail.

1889 – The Territorial Legislature passed the Mount Idaho to Little Salmon Meadows Wagon Road Act, which used bond issues for financing. The route was to travel over the mountains, following the Mose Milner Trail, rather than down the Little Salmon River Canyon.

1893 – The Idaho Legislature passed the State Wagon Roads Act, authorizing the establishment of a system of state wagon roads and providing for construction of a branch wagon road to travel down the Little Salmon River, linking Meadows with the Mount Idaho Road at Slate Creek. It required Idaho County to fund part of the road.

source: “Road of No Return” The Story of Travel Through the Little Salmon River Canyon
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Link to Mount Idaho (Part 1) Pioneers
Link to Mount Idaho (Part 2) History
Link to Mount Idaho (Part 3) Transportation
Link to Mount Idaho (Part 4) News clippings
Link to Mount Idaho (Part 5) More News clippings
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page updated Aug 11, 2020

Road Reports Aug 26

All roads to Yellow Pine are open. Please share road reports.

Yellow Pine: Local streets are beat up and DUSTY. Please drive slow, kids, deer and dogs have the right-of-way (and it helps keep the dust down.) Click for Local Forecast.
Yellow Pine Webcam: (check date on photo)

Johnson Creek Stream Gauge:
Idaho Smoke Info:

Quartz Creek: (July 2, 2018) “Quartz Creek has a big wash out just before a switch back towards the top. Right now only motorcycles can get by but with work some atvs can make it. A shovel and a saw may be needed to widen the trail.” – DB
link to FB photo:

Golden Gate Road: Closed. Road to Golden Gate is only passable on foot due to large deep wash-out about 2/3rds of the way up. (2017)
link to FB photo:

Warm Lake Highway: Warm Lake Highway is good.

South Fork Road: South Fork road is good. Watch for fire traffic for Caton Fire.
Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
South Fork Stream Gauge:

EFSF Road: Report (Aug 22) EFSF road in good shape. Watch for fire traffic for Caton Fire.

Johnson Creek Road: Report (Aug 22) mail truck driver (Robert) says the county has spread gravel on the road in the Twin Bridges area, from 100 yards below the lower bridge to about 100 yards past the upper bridge. Also the County has been grading the upper end (started Monday) down from Landmark and working in the Halfway area today. Watch for fire traffic monitoring the Johnson Fire.
The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet
Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam:

Lick Creek: Old report (Aug 7) “I went out Lick Creek this morning. Was pretty nice. A bit bumpy starting the ascent to the cliffs and remained a bit bumpy to the summit. Was nice all the way down. A nice McCall police officer reminded me the speed limit right after Lick Creek is 25 mph (from 35 mph) and they will be enforcing it.” – AP
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Report (Aug 12) “Profile is bumpy and dusty.” – BMc
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.
Big Creek Webcam:

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Old report that the road is good. Watch for Fire Traffic headed to Thunder Mountain.

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Report (Aug 14) The Meadow Creek Road above Stibnite is now open. Watch for fire traffic monitoring the Kiwah Fire.
Old report (July 19) Stibnite to Roosevelt Lake: Road was in great shape (but has not been graded.)
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Open to the adventurous.
Last report (July 13) folks made it over in a small pick up truck, road is rough and getting brushed in.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: Old report from Deadwood Outfitters (June 5) “Deadwood Summit is open and in good shape.” Report (July 3) via Stanley and Bear Valley, watch for pot holes and ruts.
Note: The approx elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
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