Monthly Archives: September 2018

Sept 30, 2018 The Yellow Pine Times

Sept 30, 2018 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Community Calendar:

May 10 Burn Permits required
May 15 – Nov 30 Firewood Season – permits at The Corner
August 6 Ice Hole Campground Closed for the season
October 6 YPFD Commissioners Meeting 10am YP Community Center

(details below)
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Village News:

Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Dear Village of Yellow Pine Members:

I hope that everyone has read the message on the Yellow Pine Times regarding the WOODY DEBRIS pile from our Valley County Commissioner, Gordon Cruickshank. If you missed it here it is.

The Yellow Pine and Warm Lake Transfer sites are seeing other material deposited into the Woody Debris pile which violates our agreement with the Forest Service to have the Woody Debris allowed to be there. The Valley County Commission is requesting from the folks in Yellow Pine to help police the Transfer site. Valley County and/or Lakeshore employees are working to clean up the site this fall. To avoid losing the Woody Debris Transfer Site I am asking for your help. The Forest Service will continue to burn once the NON-Woody Debris is removed.

Other items being left on site is also not in our agreement. The bins provided by Lakeshore are for Household Waste. Furniture and appliances left require additional cost and is not in our agreement. Please clean up this issue. Thank you for attending to this matter.

– Gordon Cruickshank, Valley County Commissioner

Losing the Transfer Station would truly be an inconvenience to all of us. The Village Council received many great suggestions from residents for resolving this issue. So, the Village Council is working on putting these suggestions in place:

* Getting the current problem cleaned up (while the transfer stations outside the VYPA area of responsibility, the Council agrees it affects all residents.}

* In addition to cleaning up the current problem, the following is in the works:

– Better signage to give everyone clearer information on what goes where in the Transfer Station.

– Educational Material for all current and future residents.

– Prevention Strategies to keep the problem from happening in the future.

The Council is hopeful that all residents will help us keep our Transfer Station in good condition.

All questions and suggestions should be sent by email to the Village Council Members below:

Kathleen Hall 75hallker @ att.net
Ronda Rogers
Lynn Imel
Deb Filler fillerd2 @ live.com


Note to Share Re: Transfer Station

Sept 27, 2018

Today the transfer station was cleaned by some anonymous YP residents.

There is now a pile of cardboard boxes, a pile of construction wood and furniture wood, a pile of sofas and recliners, an area with appliances, and a pile of “yard debris”. Lynn Imel is working on having the piles loaded and hauled out with the exception of the “yard debris”.

Photos (courtesy Ann F):

20180927YellowPineTransferStation-a
Yellow Pine Transfer Station

20180927YellowPineTransferStation2-a
Construction debris, furniture and appliances to be hauled out

20180927YellowPineTransferStation3-a
Cardboard pile to be hauled out

20180927YellowPineTransferStation4-a
Burn pile – Woody Debris ONLY!!
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The Cascade Ranger District has temporarily closed Ice Hole Campground

The Campground has been temporarily closed to provide for public safety during reconstruction. This order will be in effect from September 27, 2018 through July 2, 2019, unless rescinded earlier by the Forest Supervisor. (0402-04-80)
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Local Fall Rx Burns

* Lower Johnson Thinning (95 acres): Is a project designed to reduce hazardous fuels within the WUI. This project is located approximately 7 miles south of Yellow Pine along NFS road 413 and Johnson Creek.

* Yellow Pine Blowdown (40 acres): is located approximately 62 miles from Cascade, Idaho and is adjacent to the community of Yellow Pine. Hand Ignitions will be used to ignite machine piles along NFS roads 412, 413.

The Cascade RD is planning to burn both the Lower Johnson Thinning and Yellow Pine Blow Down units this fall, both of these projects will be pile burning only NO Broadcast Burning is planned.

The Lower Johnson Project (thinning & piling) was completed last summer, these handpiles are located along Johnson Creek road, Wapiti Ranch, Cox Ranch, Bryant Ranch/ Johnson Creek Airstrip.

Hand Ignition for Lower Johnson should take about a week to complete, once those piles have been completed, the crews will relocate to Yellow Pine to burn the logging slash piles.

If you have any addition questions please contact Tim Dulhanty tdulhanty@fs.fed.us (208-382-7400) or myself at 208-382-7400 or send me an email.

– Thanks
James Bishop
Fuels AFMO
Boise National Forest
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2018 Fuelwood permit cost reduced

Permits available May 15, 2018 through November 30, 2018 at The Corner.

Personal use fuelwood permits for the Payette, Sawtooth and Boise National Forests are changing to reflect new minimum permit requirements as well as a cost reduction.

Fuelwood permits have been reduced to $6.25 per cord with a 4-cord minimum and a 10-cord maximum per household.

link to more info:

Stay Out Of Riparian Areas!

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Pests

Bears have been roaming the Abstein orchard looking for apples (and any human/pet food they can find.) Please do not leave pet food outside and secure your trash. Long legged wasps are getting more numerous and invading sheds for shelter. Yellow Jackets are late this year, but really mean. Mosquito population dropped during the dry weather. Lots of gnats out now. Numerous grasshoppers clacking about. Colombian ground squirrels have gone into hibernation. Chipmunks had a population boom this summer. Pine squirrels are not as numerous as in past years.

Video Link Bear Visitor Aug 20, 2018
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Local Events:

The 5EV Memorial Run

Community Pig Roast potluck that was held yesterday afternoon in support of the 5EV Memorial and the Wildland Firefighters Foundation.

20180929MidasCornerPigRoast-a

photo by Dick Filler

Event Info

Wildland Firefighter Foundation Fund Raiser and Yellow Pine Community BBQ September 29

Midas Gold Idaho and The Corner are proud to sponsor the 5EV Memorial Run.

This 3.6 mile trail run is a fund raiser for the 5EV Memorial Trail Fund and Wildland Firefighter Foundation. Donations are greatly appreciated. The race starts at 10:00 am at the Williams Peak Trailhead on the East Fork Rd. and ends at the summit of the trail; a 3021 ft. elevation change.

A Community BBQ will be held after the race at 4:00 pm, at The Corner in Yellow Pine, Idaho. The roasted pig is provided by Midas Gold Inc. with great food by The Corner and the volunteers of the Yellow Pine Community.

Proceeds from this event will be shared 50/50 between the 5EV Memorial Trail Fund and the Wildland Firefighters Foundation.
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Welch Labor Day Golf Tournament was Sept. 1st (No results by press time Sunday 9-23.)
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Local Groups:

YPWUA News:

September Yellow Pine water update excerpts

The good news is the second sand filter is online and operating well. We have refurbished and upgraded the chlorinator and purchased new chlorine monitoring tools that will help us more accurately adjust the amount of chlorine injected into the water. Additionally, we received the $10,000 grant from Midas. We are looking at all options but it seems that for 2018 we must raise user fees a minimum of a $150 per year.

link to: 2018 September Water Department Update.docx

There will be a YPWUA meeting in October.

There was a YPWUA Annual Shareholder’s meeting Saturday July 7, no minutes yet.
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VYPA News:

Ditches

Attached is the ditch maintenance work that will be occurring during October 2018.

Residents can expect the work:

* along Abstein Rd. to happen during the first half of October;
* along Yellow Pine Ave. to happen in mid-October, and;
* along Profile & Riverside to happen during the last half of October.

Funds for this work are from the Road and Ditch Maintenance fund.

link to: 2018 October Ditch Maintenance Work.pdf

Yellow Pine Village Association
P.O. Box 10
Yellow Pine, ID 83677

Minutes: September 8, 2018 (updated with missing letters)

Officers present: Deb Filler, Chairman; Ronda Rogers, Vice Chairman; Lynnea Imel, Secretary; Kathy Hall, Member at Large. Absent: Joel Fields, Treasurer

The meeting opened at 2:00 by Deb Filler.

There being no objections or corrections, the minutes of the August 11, 2018, were accepted as posted on Facebook and community bulletin boards. Minutes and VYPA announcements will be e-mailed to property owners shown on the Secretary’s list. You can opt out by notifying limel @ ruralnetwork.net They are also available on Facebook via yptimes2 @ ruralnetwork.net

Treasurer’s Report Report submitted by Joel Fields, Treasurer (See attached) YP General Ledger printout, 7/8/2018 -8/31/2018;

link to: VYPA Financials – 8_10_2018.pdf

Cemetery Report was presented by Tim Rogers. The family of Chris Peterson will be placing a headstone. The Chris Peterson memorial gathering will be September 22nd in Yellow Pine. The committee plans to make fence repairs this Fall.

Lorinne Munn read a letter from the Welch and Sullivan families (see attached). In this letter the writers suggest that the Cemetery Fund transfer some money to the “Life Flight Landing Pad” project and the Restroom Fund to allow for moving these two projects forward. The Cemetery Committee has a copy of the letter and will respond.

Community Hall Report was presented by Kathy Hall, committee Chairman (see attached 9/8/2018 and General Ledger 7/8/18 – 8/31/18) Planned events next year:

* May 25th. Memorial Day ATV/UTV Fun run. See Kathy with your suggestions/ideas/help.

* Garage Sale the week of July 1-7. Bring donation to Community Hall after June 15, 2019

* July 13th ATV/UTV Ride to Big Creek, Smith Creek and back. See Kathy Hall.

The VYPA has title to a small camp trailer in back of the building. To be gifted free. Mike Amos has indicated an interest. The committee wishes to remove to outhouse in back of the Community Hall. Free. See Kathy Hall.

Several trees growing close to the building will be removed. A table and door outside should be removed. Flex Seal will be used in the basement to seal cracks. Picnic tables are to be moved and covered for winter. Lynn Imel has purchased new wheels for the piano; help is needed to install them. The kitchen floor is being reviewed, addressing cost/use/safety.

Thank You, Kathy Hall, for organizing work on the Community Hall this past year!

Harmonica & Music Festival Report by Lorinne Munn, committee Chairman. Some payments are still out-standing including one vendor fee from an un-authorized vendor. The event income is greater than the 2017 Festival. The breakfasts were particularly successful. All who volunteered are congratulated and thanked for their work. The committee works all year so there may be a meeting in November, but definitely starts with frequent meetings after February.

Old Business

Deb Filler has supplied maps of proposed ditch/culvert maintenance and repairs for this Fall and future projects. (see attached) The locations were identified by YP residents; there will be annual reviews to establish a priority list for maintenance and repairs to alleviate flooding and water damage to roads. A detailed work order form has been developed (see attached) so anyone wishing to work on a project/portion of a project can submit a proposal to the VYPA council. There are seven projects on the list to be done by October 31st. Copy and complete the form, mail it to Box 10 Yellow Pine, ID 83677 or give it to a Council member. VYPA Council will prioritize work and hire workers with full disclosure and publicizing. NOTE the deadline (9/20/18) and short time line for this year’s ditches, culverts, silt traps.

link to: Water Run-off – October 2018 Tasks Map.pdf

link to: Work Order for Maintenance Work.pdf

The Labor Day golf tournament sponsors reported they raised: $700 for the fireworks fund; $225 to give to Cecil Dallman for snow plow work on local, un-maintained, roads; $225 to help develop the helicopter landing pad. (fireworks are not sponsored by VYPA; helicopter pad is not a part of VYPA; VYPA does hire snowplow work and dust abatement on main roads. The golf tournaments are privately organized and frequently donate money to various Yellow Pine projects of their own choosing. See attached letters.)

Midas Gold sent their representative, Belinda Provancher. Groups opposed to the Stibnite mine re-opening recently held a rally in McCall. Midas continues to work with Valley County towns to develop Community Agreements to cultivate open dialogue between citizens and the mining company. The community delegates are meeting September 21st to create a written agreement that will be proposed to all Valley County communities.

link to: 2018 Community Partnership Agreement.pdf

Midas recently donated $10,000 to Yellow Pine Water Users Assoc. Lynn Imel reminded the attendees that a former mining company gave the water company approximately $80,000 to build water infrastructure improvements; this Midas donation is not without precedence.

Yellow Pine Water Users’ Assoc. submitted a written report to keep the community informed. (see attached) Residents need to be aware that there will be a considerable increase in the 2019 service fees. A Water Users’ meeting is planned for October. The date has not yet been arranged. The company is separate from the VYPA and residents may purchase shares if they wish to vote and participate in the management. See Willie Sullivan.

link to: 2018 September Water Department Update.docx

Heli-spot landing pad Anne Forster reported that the pad should be ready for use this coming winter after Danny Saleen did considerable work with his tractor. Removing additional trees at the site would be helpful and would allow for landing two helicopters, but that can only be done by Boise National Forest. The site is on the East Fork road near the Yellow Pine/Johnson Creek intersection. Contact Cecil Dallman and Merle Saleen with questions. Yellow Pine Fire Protection District (YPFD) is actively involved in the project.

Yellow Pine Fire Protection Dist. Anne Forster reported that the YPFD has brush clearing and chimney cleaning equipment for residents to borrow. The trucks and other equipment are kept ready even during the winter, inside the building. The Fire Commissioners are investigating the purchase of a new truck to replace one currently used. Training occurs every Sunday during Summer months and everyone is encouraged to become involved. The Commissioners are talking with Big Creek/Edwardsburg residents to assist them in improving their fire protection. There are two “pumpkins”, above ground collapsible water containers used for firefighting, available. Florescent paint and tape were recently applied to mark the fire hydrants. With current dangerous fire conditions, the local area is closely monitored by citizens.

New Business

Restroom construction at the Community Hall: Lorinne Munn read a letter from the Welch and Sullivan families (see attached). Please read this letter, and the letter regarding the Golf Tournaments, so everyone in the community understands this project and the funding.

link to: 20180902WelchSullivanletter1.pdf

link to: 20180902WelchSullivanletter2.pdf

VYPA Meeting Dates 2019 June 18th; July 20th; August 10th; September 14th. Note that the July 20th meeting is not on the second Saturday due to a conflict with a planned ATV rally involving many residents and visitors.

[Note: all letters have now been uploaded to the cloud, click the links to read.]

Midas Gold and Yellow Pine

August 28, 2018

Attached is the Community Partnership Agreement the Village of Yellow Pine signed with Midas Gold.

link to: 2018 Community Partnership Agreement.pdf
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YPFD News:

Next meeting: YPFD Commissioners Meeting October 6, 2018 10am YP Community Center

There was a YPFD Fire Commissioners Meeting June 9, no minutes yet.

There was a YPFD Fire Commissioners Meeting August 6, no minutes yet.

Yellow Pine Fire District Meeting Minutes

September 22, 2018

Attendees:

Cecil Dallman, Fire Commissioner District 1; Jeff Forster, Fire Chief; Dayle Bennett, Ann Forster, Nikki Saleen, Merrill Saleen, Steve Malm, Danny Saleen. Absent: Dan Stiff, District 2 Fire Commissioner; Tom Richter, District 3 Fire Commissioner

Discussion:

Nikki Saleen has been appointed Secretary/Treasurer for the Fire District. She has many years managing the wildland fire budget for the Payette National Forest and assisted with the national wildland fire budget for the Forest Service.

Cecil opened the meeting. He informed the group that Tom Richter; Fire Commissioner would not make the meeting today. However, Tom has verbally approved the budget. Dan Stiff, Fire Commissioner is not available. Cecil will obtain Tom Richter’s signature to finalize budget approval.

Action Item: Cecil will get the required signatures to approve the budget.
Proposed 2018 – 2019 Budget:
Firefighting/Rescue: $8,132
Wages: $0
Advertising: $2,000 – This covers costs of posting notices in the Star News
Repairs/Maintenance.: $4,000
Utilities (Fixed Costs): $4,000 – includes $2,500 insurance
Total: $18,132

Questions:

Merrill: Can/do you include capital improvements in the budget? This would be a continuing, ongoing fund that you add money to each year and build up the account over time. The money would be used to replace large items such as engines, when needed. It has been discussed that the District could use a smaller quicker response engine. How do you deal with that kind of acquisition?

Cecil: We would like to get a Type 6 engine w/ foam injection in the future.

Jeff: We are not allowed by the County Assessor’s Office to hold money without declaring what the expenditure is for. Apparatus is bundled into firefighting/rescue which is the fund we use to buy new equipment. We should not be carrying money over year to year, unless we identify a specific purpose for those expenditures. As we get more detailed with our budget, we can identify these large items that are needed in the future and work with the Assessors office on how to manage a large purchase with our future funding.

Merrill: The excess property program through the government usually requires expenditures of $5,000 to $10,000 to purchase used fire engines at a significant discount. We would need money available to purchase one in the future.

Jeff: It’s not that difficult to get approval to save up for this kind of purchase. We would need to talk to the County Assessor to understand more of the process. We could seek out potential Grants to help – the process is somewhat complicated and we would need a Grant Writer to help us.

Cecil: We need to line out our priorities. This is how I see them:

* Need to complete the helipad.
* We would like a smaller Type 6 engine with foam injection capabilities and a storage area for our extrication equipment (the use of foam injection increase the effectiveness of water and extends the useful life of water when used on a fire).
* Would like to excess the army truck.
* Would like to increase our Emergency Medical Services budget.
* Would like to join the Idaho State Fire Commissioners Association (www.isfca.org/). Their mission is “Informing, educating, representing, leading, and serving fire districts of Idaho in the preservation and protection of life and property”. Dues cost $50/year. The Association provides training, seminars, workshops, budget advice, and one hour of free legal advice. I would like to vote on us joining the ISFCA at our next meeting. Need the approval of one more Commissioner.

Jeff: The yearly budget is working for our current situation. Looking to the future – we will probably have bigger expenditures coming up with the need for better and more appropriate apparatus for our environment. I’m comfortable with the Yellow Pine Fire District as an organization if called upon – we can do something for the calling party or situation and do it as professionally as we can until backup comes, which can be 2 – 3 hours away. We just need to continue to get the right kind of equipment.

Nikki: What about getting reimbursements for search and rescue? Do we get any money back when we do a rescue? Will I need to do anything as treasurer?

Jeff: The State gives EMS/Rescue money and Valley County gets its portion. The County Commissioners has given $5,000 per year to Cascade Fire/EMS for Yellow Pine rescue/medical needs since the YP Ambulance has been placed into service. We work with Cascade Fire/EMS for any Rescue reimbursements; if YPFD is requested by the County to respond for a vehicle collision/rescue we would have the ability to receive reimbursement through the insurance carrier. We will work with you (Nikki) on that. As for EMS priorities, we will eventually need a newer ambulance that is designed for use in the backcountry.

Danny – Helipad update:

* We are looking into seeding the helipad area before winter. The Forest Service requires a specific seed mix. We may have to purchase the seed. Hydroseeding would be ideal if we could work with the Forest Service to get it done when they are in the area working on other projects that require Hydroseeding.
* We are in the process of acquiring “No Access – 24 hour Helispot” signs to post at the Helipad.
* Lifeflight gave us a windsock and frame. We will need one more windsock – costs around $300 to $400. Merrill mentioned that the Idaho Division of Aeronautics has made windsocks available to other airstrips/helibases in the past, maybe they would donate one.

Action Item: Cecil will contact Idaho Division of Aeronautics to see if they can provide another windsock.

Action Item: Jeff will coordinate with necessary parties on posting information on our next meeting.

Meeting adjourned. Next meeting will be at 10:00 am on October 6, 2018 at the Community Center.

Search & Rescue Training

Yesterday [9-29-2018] Valley County Search and Rescue (VCSAR) along with Yellow Pine Fire Protection District SAR members, and Cascade Fire & EMS – participated in a Search and Rescue training session near Herrick Reservoir.

It was an great day of training and many areas were addressed from – SAR set-up and orientation, GPS and map orientation, radio communication, rescue operations from incident command (IC) to field operations, EMS assessment of patient with field treatment – packaging – and transportation, as well as teamwork with SAR members and other agencies such as search dogs, pilots, law enforcement and others were addressed. After lunch there was a demonstration of rigging for rescue by YPFD team members.

Plans are underway to continue this working relationship and training in the future.

20180929YPFDSRTraining-a
(courtesy Ann F.)

Bring it, Don’t Burn it

For us in Yellow Pine, Jake Strohmeyer, Dist. Ranger with the Boise NF said we can use the area at our transfer station for yard debris and the FS will burn it once a year. Please no furniture, mattresses, construction debris, metal objects, tires or personnel junk. Please only woody yard debris. When using the pile please be mindful of where you place the debris as it should be contained to a manageable burnable area and kept as clean as possible. – JF

Burn Permits Needed After May 10

A reminder that May 10 is beginning of fire season where burning permits for open burning are required throughout most Fire Districts. Since the YPFD doesn’t issue actual “Burn Permits” per say, notification of a large pile burn would be appreciated. The notification makes the fire officials aware of those who have a planned burn. Seeing smoke can easily raise concerns. When neighbors call in seeing smoke, we can reduce their anxiety by knowing that there was a notification by a property owner. This elevates the response to smoke investigations.

Contact Fire Chief Jeff at 633-1010 or email j4star1911 @ gmail.com

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Updates:

Fire Department Training on Sunday’s at 11:00 all are welcome

Special Use Permit for Fire Station and Helispot:

The Boise National Forest has granted a “Special Use Permit” to the Yellow Pine Fire Protection District for the Fire Station lot and the Helispot. The Helispot is a new addition and the Fire Station lot was a renewal. This permit will expire 12/31/2037 (20 years) and will need to be rewed again at that time. Thanks to Jake Strohmeyer, District Ranger and Chris (Kit) Woras, Special Use Permit Administrator of the Boise Forest for spending a lot of time and correspondence to get this permit completed.

Helispot / Life Flight:

A lot of progress has been made on the new Helipad near the crossroads.

Anyone needing a Smoke/CO detector or fire extinguisher please let Jeff, Cecil or Dan know.

– Fire Chief Jeff

There are YPFD T-shirts, as well as YPFD patches and stickers for sale at the Tavern now.
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Biz Listings:

Yellow Pine Lodge

Open for summer (208) 633-3377
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Yellow Pine Tavern 633-2233

Fall Hours: 8am to close 7 days a week.

Daily Menu: full Breakfast served also Burgers and Pizza for Afternoon and Evening. Good selection of Beer and Wine also sold by 6 and 12 pack. Fuel available 92 Octane. Wi Fi, Ice.
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The Corner 633-3325

We sell FS wood cutting permits.

Our hours for this week: Monday-Friday 4pm-8pm, Saturday and Sunday 11am-close

We will also be cooking most of the week for private events so if anyone wants something outside of those hours just call and we can usually accommodate.

The Corner Store is open as well, just call for grocery needs, fresh produce, eggs, meat etc.
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Buck Horn Outfitters LLC

Buck Horn Outfitters in Idaho’s west Central Mountains in Units 25, 20 A, & 19 A. Providing Elk, Mule Deer, Black Bear, Mountain lion, & Wolf Hunts. We offer Guided Rifle or Archery Hunts & Drop Camps. We are not about Quantity we are about providing Quality Hunts. My husband and I have been in the back country all our lives, we offer Deluxe camps with great food & our Guides know hunting, the back country and Stock !!

Link to FB:
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Deadwood Outfitters
We’re currently interviewing for winter caretakers. A remote location and snowmobile only access in winter.
Duty services include:
Guest cabin up keep
Preparing meals
Keeping porches shoveled
And enjoying lots of solitude.
For more info. deadwoodoutfit @ gmail.com
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Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed (208) 382-4430
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Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, Will service Yellow Pine
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (Sept 24) overnight low of 27 degrees, mostly clear sky, frosty and smoky again. Rising sun painted the yellow leaves bright gold. Very quiet, a few finches flying and calling and a pine squirrel hunting cones. Rivers are below average for this time of year. Mostly cloudy at lunch time. A couple of finches visited in the afternoon, pine squirrel running down the fence. Cooler and partly cloudy in the afternoon, a little breezy at times, high of 62 degrees. Clear after sundown, calmer and fairly good air quality. Full Harvest Moon.

Tuesday (Sept 25) overnight low of 25 degrees, overcast, dry – very little frost or dew, and smoky haze. Power blipped off and back on at 1120am. Not many birds around today and one chipmunk. Mostly clear all day, haze of smoke, high of 68 degrees. Quiet evening.

Wednesday (Sept 26) overnight low of 26 degrees, mostly clear, dry – very little frost or dew and smoky haze. Pine squirrel and hairy woodpecker looking for snacks. Smoke was worse at lunch time, a few high thin clouds. Mid-afternoon mostly cloudy, a little breezy and better air quality, high of 75 degrees. Sounds like a helicopter flying around at 314pm. Late afternoon there was quite a bit of smoke way to the south in the Johnson Creek ‘notch’, might be from the Prospect Fire in the wilderness? Calm and cool at sunset, light haze of smoke.

Thursday (Sept 27) probably did not get below freezing overnight, very dry – no dew, appears to be mostly high thin clouds above eye burning smoke this morning. A few finches still around. Mostly clear before lunch time, haze of smoke. By mid-afternoon it was warm, mostly clear, light breezes, local haze of smoke and thicker smoke to the south, high of 80 degrees. Clear at sunset, somewhat better air quality, but smoke settled in after dark.

Friday (Sept 28) overnight low of 33 degrees, clear sky, dry – little bit of dew, and smelly haze of smoke. Clear, breezy and smoky at lunch time. Warm dry smoky afternoon, light breezes, high of 79 degrees. A northern flicker visited late afternoon. Clear, dry and smoky at sunset.

Saturday (Sept 29) overnight low of 33 degrees, mostly cloudy sky, dry – no dew, haze of smoke. A few critters this morning, 2 jays, a northern flicker, a pine squirrel and a chipmunk. Crunchy dry out in the forest. Local streets are very dusty. Pine martin crossing the road after lunch time. Overcast and quite smoky by early afternoon. Lots of long legged wasps. Increased traffic and dust. Warm, cloudy and smoky late afternoon and early evening, high of 77 degrees.

Sunday (Sept 30) did not get below freezing overnight, early morning rain 5am-6am, then after 7am to around 830am, then clouds breaking up and partly cloudy by 930am, better air quality, however there is still a slight haze of smoke in the air. Pine squirrel visiting at sunup. A couple of low flying airplanes around 1045am. Northern flicker visiting, hunting for bugs. Cloudy again before lunch time. Thunder and light sprinkle of rain just after 1pm. Strike map shows some hits near YP, on Johnson Creek across the river from Antimony camp, one up Profile Creek and another strike near the Missouri Ridge trail. More thunder than rain. Later afternoon rain showers for about an hour, high of 59 degrees. Clouds breaking up before sundown.
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Idaho News:

2019 property tax collections to rise $621K in Valley County

Agencies request $29.3 million for government operation

By Max Silverson for The Star-News September 27, 2018

About $29.3.million in property tax revenue will be collected in Valley County in 2019, an increase of about $621,000 compared to the total raised this year, according to figures from the Valley County Clerk’s Office.

Valley County will have 22 taxing districts requesting property taxes next year, one more than this year due to the creation of the Donnelly Public Library District.

McCall-Donnelly School District has requested the most money, at about $8 million, although that total is $90 less than the amount the district levied this year.

Valley County had the next largest balance to be levied with $6.9 million, followed by the City of McCall at $6 million.

Taxes for Valley County government will increase by a total of $331,000 next year and the City of McCall’s dollar amount will increase by almost $500,000.

… Commissioners decided to use taxing authority set aside from previous years to hire more employees and increase the pay of volunteers.

… The smallest amount of property taxes requested next year is $18,132 for the Yellow Pine Fire District.

full story:
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Valley waits for applicants for business tax break

New ordinance gives 5-year discount to investment of $500,000 or more

By Max Silverson for The Star-News September 27, 2018

An ordinance that gives property-tax breaks to new businesses in Valley County has been on the books since June, but so far there have been no takers.

The new rules give tax relief for up to five years to new non-retail businesses that invest more than $500,000 in a plant or facility within Valley County.

If approved, a property tax exemption would be granted with businesses enjoying a 90 percent deduction for year one, 80 percent for year two, 60 percent for year three, 40 percent for year four, and 20 percent for year five before being taxed at 100 percent each year thereafter.

“Non-retail” is defined broadly, including housing developments or agricultural manufacturing, Valley County Planning and Zoning Administrator Cynda Herrick said.

No business has applied for the tax break this year, Herrick said.

continued:
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Adjust your paycheck withholding now to avoid a tax shock

Sep 12, 2018 Local News 8

Boise, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – The Idaho State Tax Commission is urging you review your federal Form W-4 now to ensure you’re withholding enough from your paycheck for state and federal income taxes.

With significant changes to state and federal tax laws, you could be among many taxpayers who are having too little money withheld from your paychecks to cover the taxes you’ll owe for 2018.

That’s especially true if you have more than one job or both you and your spouse work.

continued:
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Idaho water organization gets workforce training grant

9/27/18 AP

Boise, Idaho — The Idaho Rural Water Association of Boise is getting a $1.4 million federal grant to build a workforce training center.

The grant was announced by the U.S. Department of Commerce on Thursday. The Idaho Rural Water Association of Boise estimates the project could help create or retain 550 jobs.

The center will be used to recruit and train members of the Idaho Water/Wastewater Agency Response Network to protect water and wastewater facilities during major flooding events. It will also be used to store special equipment that can be used in the event of a natural disaster.

The money comes from $600 million Congress appropriated for disaster relief and recovery as a result of wildfires and Hurricanes Harvey, Irma and Maria in 2017.

source:
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Scam Alerts:

Card skimmers placed on ATMs around Boise

“Thieves have the technology to hide skimmers in plain sight and the card user is none the wiser,” said Boise Police Sgt. John Terry.

KTVB September 26, 2018

Boise — Thieves have been using credit card skimmers hidden inside ATMs around Boise to steal money from more than a dozen victims in the last month, according to Boise Police.

The culprits appear to have more than one skimming device, and investigators say the devices are likely being moved to different ATMs around town. Police are urging residents to check their bank statements for any unusual activity, and asking local businesses that use card readers to check their equipment.

“Boise Police have heard from over a dozen victims whose financial information has been compromised due to a card skimmer. Thieves have the technology to hide skimmers in plain sight and the card user is none the wiser,” said Boise Police Sgt. John Terry. “The only way a citizen will know they’ve been victimized is to see a charge they didn’t make on the statement from their bank or financial institution.”

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Social Security and Medicare scam calls heating up: What to expect

New Social Security scam targeting your phone

Susan Tompor, Detroit Free Press September 30, 2018 (KTVB)

Hang up and keep hanging up. Or better yet, just don’t answer.

Scammers are hitting mobile phones and landlines with all sorts of wacky pitches – including false claims about what you need to do to get a new Medicare card.

“The best thing you can do is not answer calls you are not familiar with,” said Mark Fetterhoff, a senior program specialist with the AARP Foundation as part of a recent robocall town hall promoted by AARP and the Federal Communications Commission.

Even if it looks like a local call, it’s probably not. Many times, scammers are engaging in “neighbor spoofing” to make the number look like it’s local. Fraudsters can spoof phone numbers easily and change that spoofed number regularly. You’re more likely to answer it if it’s a new number, experts said.

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Fire Season:

Boise National Forest plans fall prescribed burning

Contact: Stephaney Kerley
Phone: (208) 373-4105

Boise, Idaho. Sept. 26, 2018 – Boise National Forest fire managers anticipate favorable weather conditions for planned low-intensity prescribed burns this fall. Prescribed burns are designed to reduce hazardous vegetation (fuels), minimize wildfire potential near communities and improve wildlife habitat.

Weather and fuel conditions permitting, prescribed burns are scheduled to start in October and continue through November. Approximately 2,600 acres are planned for controlled ignitions in 13 project areas within the Forest.

Public and firefighter safety is always the first priority in all public land fire operations. Fire managers develop burn plans that consider: safety, specific fuel and weather prescriptions and smoke management. All prescribed burns are closely evaluated and are only approved when conditions are favorable.

Fire officials strongly advise forest visitors and homeowners to prepare and plan activities around the proposed dates and locations of burns. Prescribed burns may impact individual’s that are sensitive to smoke. Recreationists should use extreme caution near prescribed fire areas and comply with closures.

Access to areas immediately within or adjacent to burning operations may be temporarily restricted for public health and safety. Specific information and signage will be posted in advance of ignitions and remain in place until operations are completed. Please be cautious of firefighters and additional equipment within these areas as visibility will be decreased with smoke.

The http://www.rxfire.com website is updated with information regarding southwest Idaho burns planned within Idaho Department of Lands, Bureau of Land Management, Payette National Forest and Boise National Forest.

The Boise National Forest prescribed burn hotline: (208)-373-4208.

Planned Boise National Forest fall prescribed burns include:

Idaho City Ranger District

* Alder Ridge (100 acres): located 1 mile north of Placerville, Idaho. This is a landscape burn (ground fire), using hand ignitions to reduce fuel in the Wildland Urban Interface (WUI).

* Amber (300 acres): located 2 miles east of Idaho City, Idaho. This is a modified tree well burn.

* Buckskin (200): located approximately 3 miles east of Idaho City, Idaho.

* Little Ophir (100 acres): located 4 miles west of Pioneerville, Idaho. A landscape burn using hand ignitions that will reduce fuel in the WUI.

* Mores South-Granite Creek (250 acres): located 3 miles east of Idaho City, Idaho. This is a landscape burn (ground fire) using hand ignitions to reduce fuels in the WUI.

Cascade Ranger District

* Horsethief (360 acres): located about 1 mile east/northeast of Horsethief Reservoir. This burn involves helicopter and hand ignitions to reduce fuels throughout the area and within the WUI.

* Westside Restoration Unit 39 (25 acres): This project is located on National Forest System (NFS) road 435 along West Mountain. It is approximately 10 miles west of Cascade, Idaho. This will be hand ignitions burn to reduce fuels within the WUI.

* Crawford (100 acres): located approximately 4 miles east of Cascade, Idaho adjacent to the Crawford Guard Station, located off of NFS road 22, northeast of Davis reservoir; within WUI area.

* Lower Johnson Thinning (95 acres): Is a project designed to reduce hazardous fuels within the WUI. This project is located approximately 7 miles south of Yellow Pine along NFS road 413 and Johnson Creek.

* Yellow Pine Blowdown (40 acres): is located approximately 62 miles from Cascade, Idaho and is adjacent to the community of Yellow Pine. Hand Ignitions will be used to ignite machine piles along NFS roads 412, 413.

* Rainbow Point (19 acres): This project is located approximately 25 miles northwest of Cascade, Idaho. Machine Piles located within the Rainbow Point campground will be ignited by hand to reduce fuel accumulations throughout the campground.

Mountain Home Ranger District

* Cottonwood II Rx (1000 acres): This project is located about 17 miles NE of Boise, Idaho along NFS roads 203 and 377 in the Cottonwood Creek drainage, north of Arrowrock Reservoir.

Emmett Ranger District

* Miscellaneous Administrative Piles (1-2 acres): At Garden Valley work center

Note from Cascade Ranger District:

The Cascade RD is planning to burn both the Lower Johnson Thinning and Yellow Pine Blow Down units this fall, both of these projects will be pile burning only NO Broadcast Burning is planned.

The Lower Johnson Project (thinning & piling) was completed last summer, these handpiles are located along Johnson Creek road, Wapiti Ranch, Cox Ranch, Bryant Ranch/ Johnson Creek Airstrip.

Hand Ignition for Lower Johnson should take about a week to complete, once those piles have been completed, the crews will relocate to Yellow Pine to burn the logging slash piles.

If you have any addition questions please contact Tim Dulhanty tdulhanty@fs.fed.us (208-382-7400) or myself at 208-382-7400 or send me an email.

– Thanks
James Bishop
Fuels AFMO
Boise National Forest
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Prescribed Burns planned for Fall 2018

Date Sept 19, 2018

The Krassel Ranger District, Payette National Forest is planning to implement prescribed burns in the Bald Hill and Four Mile project areas this fall. In the Bald Hill Project area we will be working in areas of Reegan Creek and Deadman Creek from the East Fork road up to Rainbow Ridge. In the Fourmile Project area we will be working on both sides of the South Fork, between Blackmare and Holdover Creeks on the west side of the river and in the Fourmile Creek drainage on the east side. See attached map for more specific areas. Ignitions will likely take place in September or October, dependent on weather and fuel conditions. Primary ignitions will take 1-3 days for each burn block, with residual smoke and flame present until the next significant rain. Please do not hesitate to give a call or email with questions, my contact information is lenelson@fs.fed.us or desk phone is 208-634-0622.

Thanks and have a nice day,

Laurel Ingram
Fuels Technician
Payette National Forest
Krassel Ranger District

The Payette National Forest, Krassel Ranger District, is planning on implementing a prescribed burn on the south facing aspect between Deadman Creek and Reegan Creek along the East Fork of the South Fork of the Salmon River this fall. The edge of burn block E is about 5 miles west of Yellow Pine. See map below. Ignitions could occur over a period of 1-3 days in September or October 2018.

(click here for larger image)
For more information please call Justin Pappani at 208-634-0623 or Laurel Ingram at 208-634-0622.

The Payette National Forest, Krassel Ranger District, is planning on implementing the Four Mile Prescribed fire project this fall. Ignitions may take place between Reed Ranch and Poverty Flat Camp Ground on both sides of the South Fork of the Salmon River. See map below. Ignitions could occur over a period of 2 or more days in September or October.

(click here for larger image)
For more information please call Justin Pappani at 208-634-0623 or Laurel Ingram at 208-634-0622
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Prospect Fire in Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness grows to more than 6,000 acres

The fire started Tuesday, and is burning in steep terrain. An emergency closure includes the Dagger Falls and Boundary Creek campgrounds as well as a section of Boundary Creek Road.


Photo: Salmon-Challis National Forest

KTVB September 29, 2018

Valley County — Emergency road and recreation site closures are in effect on part of the Salmon-Challis National Forest due to the Prospect Fire, burning east of Cascade in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness.

The fire has burned an estimated 6,247 acres of timber, brush, and tall grass. It is burning in steep, inaccessible terrain in the Prospect Creek and Morehead Creek drainages.

The fire had crossed to the east of the Middle Fork of the Salmon River toward Big Soldier Mountain on Friday. Activity moderated on Saturday with the cloud cover, according to a news release from the Salmon-Challis National Forest.

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Mining News:

Midas Gold proposes foundation for community projects

Agreement could mean millions of dollars if fully funded

By Tom Grote for The Star-News September 27, 2018

Midas Gold has proposed forming a foundation that could contribute millions of dollars into local communities during the life of the project and beyond.

The Stibnite Foundation would offer grants to a board made up of members of each community.

Governing bodies of cities and counties in Valley, Adams and Idaho counties have been asked to sign what Midas Gold calls a “Community Agreement “ that would be binding on both sides.

Midas would initially give the Stibnite Foundation $100,000 in cash and 1.5 million shares of Midas Gold Corp. stock, which was worth nearly a million dollars at the 66 cents per share stock price on Monday.

Midas Gold would add another $100,000 at the beginning of next year and at the beginning of 2020 regardless of the status of the project. Funding after this point becomes tied to the company’s growth.

Another $100,000 would be given to the foundation if the Forest Service gives approval to the project, an action projected for early 2020.

An additional $100,000 and another 1.5 million shares of stock would be given to the foundation once Midas Gold receives all permits to allow construction to begin.

Once construction begins on the project, the company would give the foundation $250,000 each year during the projected three-year construction phase.

That would be a total of $1.15 million in cash and 3 million shares of stock before Midas would extract an ounce of gold from its proposed mining project near Yellow Pine.

Once the Stibnite mine begins producing gold, Midas Gold would give 1 percent of its net profits to the foundation over the expected 12-year life of the project.

That pledge would be at least $500,000 per year, Midas Gold Idaho President & CEO Laurel Sayer said.

The company would give the foundation a final payment of $1 million when mining has been completed and reclamation efforts begin.

The intent of the foundation is to develop a lasting endowment and enable the foundation to continue to exist after the mine is closed, Sayer said.

Only signers of the Community Agreement would be able to appoint members to the foundation board, but anyone would be eligible to apply for grants, the draft agreement said.

The foundation is intended to provide a structured forum for communities and groups who want Midas Gold to help pay for community improvements, Sayer said.

“We don’t want to be the ones to judge the worthiness of a request,” she said.

“We believe Idahoans understand the issues facing their communities better than anyone else,” Sayer said. “We want to put local experts in control of community funding decisions.”

Midas Gold would continue to make charitable contributions and fund sponsorships, which totaled $125,000 and 1,700 hours of employee time in 2017, Sayer said.

The agreement also would form a Stibnite Advisory Council composed of representatives of each government to “discuss topics of interest,” including the proposed gold mine as well as jobs, housing, infrastructure and any other topic.

The agreement also would require each community to “take reasonable steps to be informed” about the project and make formal comments to the Forest Service about the project.

There is no requirement that the comments endorse the project, but the provision is intended to ask communities to “provide direct input on how we might make the project better” Sayer said in a Sept. 5 letter to the McCall City Council.

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McCall raises questions about proposed Midas Gold agreement

City to host lectures on Stibnite mine project

By Tom Grote for The Star-News September 27, 2018

Midas Gold has been working for the last two months to sign up communities for a proposed agreement that would see millions of dollars given for civic improvements.

But the process has been slowed by misunderstandings and questions about the agreement, especially by the McCall City Council, Midas Gold Idaho President & CEO Laurel Sayer said.

In July, Midas Gold representatives began meeting with city councils and county commissioners in Valley, Adams and Idaho counties to ask them for comment on the proposed Community Agreement.

The majority of the communities have provided comments but none of the governments have yet agreed to sign the agreement, which would form the Stibnite Foundation and the Stibnite Advisory Council.

Midas Gold would donate cash and company stock to the foundation, which would have an independent board of directors that would accept applications for community grants.

The advisory council would provide a forum for the communities in the area to stay abreast of the proposed gold mine near Yellow Pine as the project progresses.

Most communities have expressed support for the concept of the agreement but the most questions have been raised in front of the McCall City Council.

On July 26, a presentation by Midas and representatives from the West Central Mountain Community Partnership on the agreement was followed by several speakers, most of who expressed opposition to the mining project.

The protests led the council to schedule a series of meetings called the Stibnite Lecture Series. The first meeting will be held Oct. 9 with subsequent meetings scheduled for Oct. 23 and Nov. 13.

The McCall council will not make a decision to sign the agreement until after the lecture series.

Also, the Cascade City Council will hold a town hall meeting on Oct. 22 prior to its regular meeting to review the proposed agreement, Mayor Julie Crosby said.

The initial round of meetings has prompted some changes to the draft agreement to make the language more concise and clarify its intent, Sayer said.

A clarification letter was sent Sept. 5 to the McCall council by Sayer.

“We recognize we did not clearly communicate our intentions behind the Agreement and can understand why you and your constituents want to know more,” the letter said.

The agreement would commit Midas Gold to contribute to the foundation regardless of changes in management of the company, Sayer said.

There has been misunderstanding about a provision of the agreement that requires each community that signs it to provide formal comments to the Forest Service, which is reviewing the project, Sayer said.

“The Agreement does not specify the content of such a letter, or whether it must be supportive, only that a letter must be submitted,” she said.

Last Friday, Midas convened a meeting of representatives of several of the communities as a “working group” to review the draft agreement.

The meeting was held at the Midas Gold offices in Donnelly, but was limited to invited participants and was not open to the public.

Sayer said Monday that the meeting did not result in substantive changes in the agreement.

“Changes will be mostly style, consistency and clarity of terms and meaning,” she said.

Midas remains confident that the Stibnite Foundation and the Stibnite Advisory Council will be formed before the end of the year, Sayer said.

“However we understand that each community needs to go through their own process of public review,” she said.

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Restoring mined forest land with more mining?

Midas Gold says their new mine will improve land

Sep 26, 2018 KIVI TV

Stibnite, Idaho – For more than a century, prospectors and miners have been interested in the land upstream from Yellow Pine, Idaho in a place called Stibnite.

The area is rich with valuable minerals including gold and antimony. During World War Two and the Korean War, antimony used to make ammunition, was in high demand and the Stibnite Mine was booming.

But the mining here has scarred the land surrounding the East Fork of the South Fork of the Salmon River, prime habitat for endangered salmon and steelhead.

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Public comment opens on new open pit mine

Sep 28, 2018 Local News 8


Smoky Canyon

Soda Springs, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – Plans for expanding the Smoky Canyon phosphate mine, east of Soda Springs, are now out for public review.

The Bureau of Land Management in Idaho Falls and the Caribou-Targhee National Forest released a draft environmental impact statement Friday analyzing different alternatives.

If approved, J.R. Simplot Company said the East Smoky Panel Mine Project would develop a single linear open pit in seven sequential phases. It would enable the use of waste rock to backfill previously mined portions of the pit. The company said that would reduce certain impacts associated with the mining process.

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Ninth Circuit Upholds Oregon Law Banning Motorized Gold Mining In Salmon Streams

9/28/2018 CBB

The Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals recently handed down a ruling affirming an Oregon law that bans motorized gold mining in salmon streams, with potential ramifications for other states that choose to adopt environmental regulations pertaining to mining.

The Sept. 12 ruling rejected a challenge to Oregon’s 2017 Suction Dredge Reform Bill, also known as Senate Bill 3, that was filed by a coalition of Oregon miners and mining groups, such as the Galice Mining District, Millennium Diggers and the Willamette Valley Miners.

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Forest Service Recommendation To Withdraw 340,000 Acres In Methow Valley From Mining Applauded

9/28/2018 CBB

U.S. Sen. Maria Cantwell (D-WA), the top Democrat on the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee, U.S. Sen. Patty Murray (D-WA), and U.S. Rep. Dan Newhouse (R-WA, 4th District) applauded a recommendation made by the U.S. Forest Service to the Bureau of Land Management to withdraw 340,000 acres in the Methow Valley from consideration for mining for a 20 year period.

“From salmon to farming and outdoor recreation, the Methow Valley holds a special place in the Washington way of life,” Cantwell said. “We can’t afford to lose this area to copper mining. I am encouraged the Forest Service is taking this important step, and I will continue working with the Department of the Interior and the local community to move the process forward and protect the Methow Valley for generations to come.”

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Letter to Share:

Youth Pheasant hunt

9/30/2018

Hi All, I finally got hold of IDFG to find out if we would have birds for the hunt for kids on the river? I finally caught some one yesterday and we will have birds next Friday Oct. 5th to release Friday evening for the morning of the Oct. 6th when youth hunting starts on the youth Access area on the Palouse river about 2 ½ miles below Potlatch Idaho of Wellesley Road. Hunt limited to 5 hunters at a time and those that hunt need to be registered and must sign up at the sign up area at the river bridge. I don’t know if IDFG has their sign up ready or not. You can call me or email me and I will make sure you are registered. Your time when registering will be recorded and you will be given a time slot. The birds that we plant will have a leg tag. We need you to report the tag numbers to IDFG or call or email me and I will get them registered. For more information, give me a call or call IDFG. I hope to have a number to call Mondays morning Oct 1st. We had a great time last year and hope it will be better this year. We need volunteers to help release birds.

Jim Hagedorn
Executive Director
The Gamebird Foundation
thegamebirdfoundation.org
208-883-3423
Jhag1008 @ gmail.com

Youth 17 years old and younger can hunt with a licensed adult

Youth 17 years old and younger with an Idaho hunting license can participate in the youth pheasant hunt so long as they’re accompanied by an Idaho licensed hunter age 18 years or older.

The youth hunt runs from Saturday, Oct. 6 through Oct. 12.

Pheasant hunting starts a half hour before sunrise, except on C.J. Strike, Cartier Slough, Fort Boise, Market Lake, Montour, Mud Lake, Niagara Springs, Payette River, and Sterling wildlife management areas where pheasants are stocked. Shooting hours begin at 10 a.m. at those locations.

The daily bag limit is three cocks, and the possession limit is nine, except on nine WMA’s in southern Idaho where pheasants are stocked. On these WMA’s, the daily limit is two cocks and six in possession.

Youth hunters do not need a WMA upland game bird permit, but they are required to wear hunter orange above the waist during the pheasant season while hunting on these WMA’s. A hunter orange hat meets this requirement.

Young hunters who have never had a hunting license and have not taken hunter education can still participate in the hunt through Idaho’s Hunting Passport Program.
https://idfg.idaho.gov/licenses/hunter-passport

For more details about pheasant hunting, see the Upland Game, Furbearer and Turkey Seasons and Rules, or get the printed brochure available at Fish and Game license vendors.
https://idfg.idaho.gov/hunt/rules/upland-furbearer-turkey

General pheasant hunts for all ages start Oct. 13 or Oct. 20, depending which part of the state you’re in. There’s map of pheasant zones on page 12 of the rules brochure. Really need to thank Rodger Phillips for getting the above on IDFG web site so we could know what is happening.
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Critter News:

MCPAWS to host Tails on Trails, Oktoberfest on Oct. 6

The Star-News September 27, 2018

MCPAWS Regional Animal Shelter will host a race for canines and their human companions as well as a live music festival on Saturday, Oct. 6, to raise money for the animal shelter.

The activities will kick off with the dog-friendly Tails on Trails 5K fun run at 9 a.m. at Brundage Mountain Resort.

Registration is $35 for adults and $25 for youth under 21. The race fee includes a long-sleeved T-shirt, goodie bag and registration for Oktoberfest later that day.

Race registration is available at http://ultrasignup.com by searching for “Tails on Trails At Brundage”.

The festivities will continue with Oktoberfest from noon to 6 p.m. at the Alpine Village. The event will feature live music by Bottom Line Band and the Treasure Valley Musik Meisters as well as a costume contest, raffle, craft goods, activities for children and food and drinks.

Entry fee is $10 and includes a free beer and event koozie. Raffle tickets are $5 and may be purchased at the event.

Alpine Village is located at 616 N. Third St. in McCall.

All proceeds will benefit the dogs and cats at the MCPAWS Regional Animal Shelter. For more information on the shelter and the day’s activities, visit http://mcpaws.org

source:
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Pet Talk – Twisted stomachs in dogs

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt Sept 28, 2018 IME

A twisted stomach is called a gastric dilatation-volvulus (GDV) and is always an acute and life-threatening emergency. Gastric dilation is the sudden accumulation of excessive air, food and fluid in the stomach, and is commonly called bloat. Volvulus is the twisting of a bloated stomach so that the openings into and out of the stomach are blocked. This twisting causes blood flow to the stomach to be compromised and secondary shock ensues.

Nobody knows the exact reason for stomach bloating. Older larger and giant-breed dogs with deep chests are at the highest risk. Many veterinarians feel there is a heredity risk, but most veterinarians feel it involves the feeding of large amounts of food, then exercise that includes the swallowing of air and causes a pendulum effect on the stomach and subsequent twisting.

Affected dogs will be restless and agitated, salivate excessively, retch and try to regurgitate. The abdomen is obviously distended and painful. These physical abnormalities will lead your veterinarian to suspect a torsion or block. X-rays of the abdomen let your veterinarian assess the position of the stomach and ascertain if there is a bloat or a twist. An electrocardiogram (ECG) is indicated as irregular heart rhythms are common. Other lab tests are performed to see if other organs have been affected.

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Hunters urged to keep noxious weed seeds from spreading

The Star-News September 27, 2018

Hunters and other outdoor enthusiasts are being asked to take caution to not spread noxious weed seeds with their vehicles, ATVs and pack animals. “This time of year hunters and recreationalists can unknowingly spread huge amounts of noxious weed seed from one area to another,” said Roger Batt, the Idaho Weed Awareness Campaign’s coordinator.

Noxious weeds can choke out native vegetation, which deprives deer, elk, big horn sheep, and other wildlife of their natural food sources, resulting in starvation or migration to other areas, Batt said.

Noxious weeds and seeds can easily become lodged in ATVs, off-road vehicles and trailers that have been used in the summer and carried to a new location when the rigs are used during hunting season, he said.

Pack animals, bird dogs, and hunting gear also can carry noxious weeds to other areas, Batt said.

“Hunters and outdoor recreationalists should keep their pickups, ATVs, and off-road vehicles only on designated roads and trails and away from weed-infested areas,” he said.

Noxious weed seeds can be spread in the waste droppings of horses and pack animals. Preparation for hunting trips should include using feed certified as noxious weed free, Batt said.

A list of outlets selling certified weed free hay and forage is available at http://idahoweedawareness.com

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KWVR Oregon Wolf Education weekly Wolf Report

Last week of September 2018
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Wolf attack kills guard dog in southern Oregon

by AP Thursday, September 27th 2018

Prospect, Ore. (AP) — State wildlife officials say a dog guarding cattle in southern Oregon has died after being attacked by a wolf.

The report released Wednesday says an examination of the Tibetan mastiff’s body revealed 25 puncture wounds and scrape marks all over its body.

The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife says the attack early Monday occurred in an area frequented by a gray wolf known as OR-7 and his pack.

The incident happened southeast of Prospect.

The last confirmed attack by OR-7 and his pack was in January when two calves were killed two days apart near Butte Falls.

source:
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Wolf Education International

Newsletter 9/27/2018

Wolves Continue Killing Cattle In Northwest Minnesota

A Systematic Review of the Epidemiology of Echinococcosis in Domestic and Wild Animals
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Protections restored for grizzly bears; hunts blocked

By Matthew Brown – 9/25/18 AP

Billings, Mont. — A U.S. judge ordered federal protections restored for grizzly bears in the Northern Rocky Mountains on Monday, a move that blocks the first grizzly hunts planned in the Lower 48 states in almost three decades.

Wyoming and Idaho had been on the cusp of allowing hunters to kill up to 23 bears this fall. U.S. District Judge Dana Christensen had twice delayed the hunts, and the latest order blocking them was due to expire later this week. The hunts would have been the first in U.S. outside Alaska since 1991.

Christensen wrote in his ruling that the case was “not about the ethics of hunting.” Rather, he said, it was about whether federal officials adequately considered threats to the species’ long-term recovery when they lifted protections for more than 700 bears living around Yellowstone National Park.

continued:
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Blocked US grizzly hunts fuel call for species law changes

By Matthew Brown – 9/26/18 AP

Billings, Mont. — A court ruling that blocked grizzly bear hunts in the U.S. West carries far wider political implications amid a push by Congress for sweeping changes to how imperiled species are managed.

The ruling restored protections for more than 700 grizzlies in and around Yellowstone National Park. It will likely force federal wildlife officials to reconsider their piecemeal approach to restoring bruins across the Northern Rockies.

As wildlife advocates celebrated the ruling, it was quickly seized upon by Republicans as the latest example of supposed flaws in the Endangered Species Act, a 1973 law meant to shield plants and animals from potential extinction.

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Idaho authorities euthanize cougar wandering near day care

9/25/18 AP

Coeur d’Alene, Idaho — Coeur d’Alene authorities say they euthanized a male cougar that was wandering across a parking lot near a day care center.

On Monday, Idaho Fish and Game officials and the Coeur d’Alene Police waited until the cougar settled in a tree to dart and euthanized the cougar.

Idaho Fish and Game Biologist Jim Hayden says the male cougar was likely looking for “a place to settle down.”

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Cat in Nampa recovering after being shot by crossbow

by Haley Squiers Monday, September 24th 2018


(CBS 2 News Photo)

Nampa, Idaho (CBS 2) — A cat was shot in its side by a crossbow in a Nampa area neighborhood Sunday afternoon.

The cat, Charlie, was first seen with the crossbow in his side when the owner’s boyfriend went onto the porch and found the cat sitting on a lawn chair.

Keesha Boyum tells CBS 2 News her boyfriend then took the crossbow bolt out of the cat’s side, before he took the cat to a nearby veterinarian clinic.

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Bald eagle with lead poisoning recovering at raptor center

By Brian Walker – 9/24/18 AP

Coeur d’Alene, Idaho — This wasn’t how Janet Medley wanted to spot a bald eagle.

The Athol woman and her family were enjoying Lake Pend Oreille over Labor Day weekend when they found a helpless male eagle on the bank.

“He was wet and very sick and weak,” Medley told the Coeur d’Alene Press . “It got our blood pumping because we wanted to do something.”

The eagle was captured until the nonprofit Birds of Prey Northwest responded to care for it.

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The Columbia Basin Bulletin

Weekly Fish and Wildlife News
http://www.cbbulletin.com
September 28, 2018
Issue No. 886
Table of Contents

* New U.S.-Canada Pacific Salmon Treaty Would Reduce Alaska, British Columbia Harvests When Forecasts Low
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441565.aspx

* Commerce Department Declares West Coast Fishery Disaster, 2015-17; Warm Water Impacts
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441564.aspx

* Bureau Awards $76 Million For Juvenile Fish Passage Facilities At Cle Elum Dam In Upper Yakima Basin
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441563.aspx

* Yakama Nation, Chelan PUD Agree To 15-Year, $9.7 Million Program For Mid-Columbia Coho Reintroduction
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441562.aspx

* Orca Task Force Recommendations Include Focus On Salmon Runs; Change Non-Native Game Fish To ‘Predatory’
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441561.aspx

* Research: Beaver Dams Create Habitat Complexity Benefiting Juvenile Steelhead In John Day Tributary
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441560.aspx

* Study: New Scientific Tool Uses Otolith Geochemistry To Identify Source Of Illegally Introduced Invasive Fish
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441559.aspx

* Council Draft Report ‘Energy, Fish, Wildlife: the Columbia River Basin In Fiscal Year 2018’ Out For Review
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441558.aspx

* Tribes Get More Fishing Days Above Bonneville; Steelhead Numbers Still A Concern
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441557.aspx

* Warm Ocean Temperatures Off NW Coast Forced Forage Fish To Eat Less Energy Rich Food
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441556.aspx

* NOAA Fisheries Says Updated Management Blueprint For Blue Mountains Prioritizes Habitat Restoration For Salmonids
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441555.aspx

* Ninth Circuit Upholds Oregon Law Banning Motorized Gold Mining In Salmon Streams
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441554.aspx

* Forest Service Recommendation To Withdraw 340,000 Acres In Methow Valley From Mining Applauded
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441553.aspx

* NOAA: A Warm, Dry Columbia Basin Will Continue That Way Through October, With El Nino Guiding Winter
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441552.aspx

* Corps Seeks Comments For Next Stage Of Draft Mid-Columbia Master Plan
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441551.aspx

* National Science Foundation Awards $220 Million For Ocean Observatories Initiative; Includes OSU, UW
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441550.aspx
————————–

Fish & Game News:

Getting ready to buy your hunting license? Consider a three-year license

Three-year license saves money and keeps you hunting

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Specialist
Thursday, September 27, 2018

Idaho hunters can buy a three-year hunting license or three-year hunting/fishing combo and not have to worry about buying another license until 2021.

The price for a three-year resident hunting license is $34.75 (plus vendor fees) and $97 (plus vendor fees) for a three-year combo license.

Benefits of a three-year license include:

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Trapper Instructor-led Course

Saturday, October 6, 2018 10:00am – 4:00pm

Located at:
IDFG Office
555 Deinhard Lane
McCall, ID 83638

Course Fee $9.75

This course includes trapping laws, ethics, avoiding non-target catch, trapping laws, basic trapping methods, and safety.

Trapper Education certification cards will be awarded to students upon successful completion of the course, which includes attending all class sessions, passing the field exercises and a written test.

Age Requirements:

* Minimum age is 9 unless accompanied by a parent or guardian.
* A parent must check in students under age 18.

registration link:
— — — — — — — — — —

More F&G News Releases

https://idfg.idaho.gov/press
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Fun Critter Stuff:

This moose has “Old Glory” stuck to his antlers

By Michael VanZetta 9/27/2018 Circa

Jackson Hole has tons of wildlife, but none are as patriotic as this moose.

Mary Jo Maher was with her husband, Roger, outside Jackson Hole, Wyoming when they saw the moose.

Maher took the video of it with “Old Glory” stuck to its antler. People cannot get enough of this once in a lifetime sighting.

There’s no word on how the moose ended up in this patriotic predicament.

source with video:
————————–

Seasonal Humor:

HuntingMooseCall-a
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Fire Update Sept 30, 2018

There are NO fires currently threatening Yellow Pine.

We had some nice rain showers early this morning in Yellow Pine, 0.19″, enough to settle the dust. Rain total for the month of Sept 2018 = 0.26″.

Air Quality in Yellow Pine = light haze of smoke
— — — — — — — — — —

Southwest Idaho Fall prescribed burning planned

Wednesday, September 26, 2018

Boise, Idaho. Sept. 26, 2018 — Southwest Idaho interagency fire managers anticipate favorable weather conditions for planned low-intensity prescribed burns this fall. Prescribed burns are designed to reduce hazardous vegetation (fuels), minimize wildfire potential near communities and improve wildlife habitat.

Weather and fuel conditions permitting, prescribed burns are scheduled to start in October and continue through November. Approximately 2,600 acres are planned for controlled ignitions in 13 project areas within the Boise National Forest.

Public and firefighter safety is always the first priority in all public land fire operations. Fire managers develop burn plans that consider: safety, specific fuel and weather prescriptions and smoke management. All prescribed burns are closely evaluated and are only approved when conditions are favorable.

Fire officials strongly advise forest visitors and homeowners to prepare and plan activities around the proposed dates and locations of burns. Prescribed burns may impact individual’s that are sensitive to smoke. Recreationists should use extreme caution near prescribed fire areas and comply with closures.

Access to areas immediately within or adjacent to burning operations may be temporarily restricted for public health and safety. Specific information and signage will be posted in advance of ignitions and remain in place until operations are completed. Please be cautious of firefighters and additional equipment within these areas as visibility will be decreased with smoke.

The http://www.rxfire.com website is updated with information regarding southwest Idaho burns planned within Idaho Department of Lands, Bureau of Land Management, Payette National Forest and Boise National Forest.

The Boise National Forest prescribed burn hotline: (208)-373-4208.

Idaho City Ranger District

* Alder Ridge (100 acres): located 1 mile north of Placerville, Idaho. This is a landscape burn (ground fire), using hand ignitions to reduce fuel in the wildland urban interface (WUI).
* Amber (300 acres): located 2 miles east of Idaho City, Idaho. This is a modified tree well burn.
* Buckskin (200): located approximately 3 miles east of Idaho City, Idaho.
* Little Ophir (100 acres): located 4 miles west of Pioneerville, Idaho. A landscape burn using hand ignitions that will reduce fuel in the WUI.
* Mores South-Granite Creek (250 acres): located 3 miles east of Idaho City, Idaho. This is a landscape burn (ground fire) using hand ignitions to reduce fuels in the WUI.

Cascade Ranger District

* Horsethief (360 acres): located about 1 mile east/northeast of Horsethief Reservoir. This burn involves helicopter and hand ignitions to reduce fuels throughout the area that is within the WUI.
* Westside Restoration Unit 39 (25 acres): This project is located on National Forest System (NFS) road 435 along West Mountain. It is approximately 10 miles west of Cascade, Idaho. This will be hand ignitions burn to reduce fuels within the WUI.
* Crawford (100 acres): located approximately 4 miles east of Cascade, Idaho adjacent to the Crawford Guard Station, located off of NFS road 22, northeast of Davis reservoir; within WUI area.
* Lower Johnson Thinning (95 acres): Is a project designed to reduce hazardous fuels within the WUI. This project is located approximately 7 miles south of Yellow Pine along NFS road 413 and Johnson Creek.
* Yellow Pine Blowdown (40 acres): is located approximately 62 miles from Cascade, Idaho and is adjacent to the community of Yellow Pine. Hand Ignitions will be used to ignite machine piles along NFS roads 412, 413.
* Rainbow Point (19 acres): This project is located approximately 25 miles northwest of Cascade, Idaho. Machine Piles located within the Rainbow Point campground will be ignited by hand to reduce fuel accumulations throughout the campground.

Mountain Home Ranger District

* Cottonwood II Rx (1000 acres): This project is located about 17 miles NE of Boise, Idaho along NFS roads 203 and 377 in the Cottonwood Creek drainage, north of Arrowrock Reservoir.

Emmett Ranger District

* Miscellaneous Administrative Piles (1-2 acres): At Garden Valley work center.
— — — —

Note from Cascade Ranger District:

The Cascade RD is planning to burn both the Lower Johnson Thinning and Yellow Pine Blow Down units this fall, both of these projects will be pile burning only NO Broadcast Burning is planned.

The Lower Johnson Project (thinning & piling) was completed last summer, these handpiles are located along Johnson Creek road, Wapiti Ranch, Cox Ranch, Bryant Ranch/ Johnson Creek Airstrip.

Hand Ignition for Lower Johnson should take about a week to complete, once those piles have been completed, the crews will relocate to Yellow Pine to burn the logging slash piles.

If you have any addition questions please contact Tim Dulhanty tdulhanty@fs.fed.us (208-382-7400) or myself at 208-382-7400 or send me an email.

– Thanks
James Bishop
Fuels AFMO
Boise National Forest
— — — — — — — — — —

Prescribed Burns planned for Fall 2018

Date Sept 19, 2018

The Krassel Ranger District, Payette National Forest is planning to implement prescribed burns in the Bald Hill and Four Mile project areas this fall. In the Bald Hill Project area we will be working in areas of Reegan Creek and Deadman Creek from the East Fork road up to Rainbow Ridge. In the Fourmile Project area we will be working on both sides of the South Fork, between Blackmare and Holdover Creeks on the west side of the river and in the Fourmile Creek drainage on the east side. See attached map for more specific areas. Ignitions will likely take place in September or October, dependent on weather and fuel conditions. Primary ignitions will take 1-3 days for each burn block, with residual smoke and flame present until the next significant rain. Please do not hesitate to give a call or email with questions, my contact information is lenelson@fs.fed.us or desk phone is 208-634-0622.

Thanks and have a nice day,

Laurel Ingram
Fuels Technician
Payette National Forest
Krassel Ranger District

The Payette National Forest, Krassel Ranger District, is planning on implementing a prescribed burn on the south facing aspect between Deadman Creek and Reegan Creek along the East Fork of the South Fork of the Salmon River this fall. The edge of burn block E is about 5 miles west of Yellow Pine. See map below. Ignitions could occur over a period of 1-3 days in September or October 2018.

(click here for larger image)
For more information please call Justin Pappani at 208-634-0623 or Laurel Ingram at 208-634-0622.

The Payette National Forest, Krassel Ranger District, is planning on implementing the Four Mile Prescribed fire project this fall. Ignitions may take place between Reed Ranch and Poverty Flat Camp Ground on both sides of the South Fork of the Salmon River. See map below. Ignitions could occur over a period of 2 or more days in September or October.

(click here for larger image)
For more information please call Justin Pappani at 208-634-0623 or Laurel Ingram at 208-634-0622
— — — — — — — — — —

Caton Fire

Caton Thermal Map 9-30
20180930Caton-a

Payette National Forest
Cause Lightning
Date of Origin Friday August 24th, 2018 approx. 11:30 AM
Location The fire is located 7 miles southwest of the Village of Yellow Pine near Indian Point and has been moving east into the Caton Creek drainage.
Current as of 9/21/2018, 10:04:49 AM
Size 790 Acres
Estimated Containment Date Monday October 15th, 2018 approx. 12:00 AM

This fire was detected in heavy timber around noon on August 24 – a likely holdover from the lightning storm several days prior. The fire is located 7 miles southwest of Yellow Pine, near Indian Point. The Communities of Yellow Pine and Edwardsburg are not threatened by the fire.

Fire activity for the past several days has been minimal with smoldering and backing fire to the west from Indian Point. Occasional tree torching has been observed.

Indian Peak Trail (FS #090) has an emergency closure – please do not use this trail. No Area Closures have been implemented at this time.

Firefighters are assigned to monitor the fire – additional fire resources will be assigned as needed. The fire is being managed under a confine/contain and point protection strategy.

Indian Ridge Trail Closure
For public safety, the Indian Ridge Trail #090 has been close to public use due to hazards associated with Caton Fire. The entire trail is closed from its beginning at the junction of trial #291 Phoebe Meadows Trail, and the junction of trail #091 Caton Creek Trail.

Caton Fire Map September 26

Click to access 2018_09_27-17.49.40.349-CDT.pdf

Caton Fire September 26

Caton Fire from Miners Peak Lookout September 26

Caton Fire InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6177/
— — — — — — — — — —

Bum Creek Fire

Bum Creek Thermal Map 9-30
20180930Bum-a

Payette National Forest
Date of Origin Friday September 07th, 2018 approx. 08:00 AM
Location The fire is 3 miles southeast of the Pinnacles, near the West Fork of Monumental Creek Lakes.
Cause Lightning
Current as of 9/21/2018, 10:19:27 AM
Size 3,438 Acres
Estimated Containment Date Monday October 15th, 2018 approx. 12:00 AM

The fire has moved to the east in the Monumental Lakes area.

The fire is 3 miles southeast of the Pinnacles, and within the area of the West Fork of Monumental Creek Lakes.

Fire Management personnel monitoring the fire report that the fire is fairly inactive as of September 26. The size of the fire is approximately 5340 acres with a lot of unburned incorporated in the displayed perimeter. The majority of the fires perimeter has not grown for about a week. The fire area in the WF of Monumental creek is a mix of burned and unburned my guess right now at about 50% of each, with a couple smoldering spots high on the ridge on the north side of west fork monumental creek. The area continues to smolder with some interior cleanup.

Bum Fire September 26

Bum Fire Map September 27

Click to access 2018_09_27-17.41.10.184-CDT.pdf

Bum Creek Fire InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6197/
— — — — — — — — — —

Kiwah Fire

Kiwah Fire Thermal Map 9-30
20180930Kiwah-a

Meadow Creek Road is Open

Salmon-Challis National Forest
Location eight (8) miles northwest of Indian Creek Guard Station on the south side of the Indian Creek drainage in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness
Cause Lightning
Date of Origin Wednesday July 18th, 2018 approx. 05:30 PM
Current as of 9/30/2018, 8:33:29 AM
Size 14,603 Acres
Estimated Containment Date Monday October 01st, 2018 approx. 12:00 AM

Fire is in monitor status and will be flown to check on status occasionally.

A low pressure system will bring showers and a few thunderstorms to the region today. Wind gusts up to 40 mph are possible near thunderstorms. Drier weather is expected for Monday with more showers possible for Tuesday and beyond.

Kiwah Fire InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/5995/
— — — — — — — — — —

Pistol Fire

Pistol Fire Thermal Map 9-30
20180930Pistol-a

Salmon-Challis National Forest
Location: west of the confluence of Pistol and Forty-Four Creeks in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness on the Middle Fork Ranger District.
457.188 acres as of 9/11/18, 6:00 PM

Sept 13 update

The Pistol Fire estimated at 426 acres is burning in grass, brush, and timber; west of the confluence of Pistol and Forty-Four Creeks in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness on the Middle Fork Ranger District. The fire is currently in monitor status. The cause of the fire is undetermined.
— — — — — — — — — —

Prospect Fire

Prospect Fire Thermal Map 9-30
20180930Prospect-a

Salmon-Challis National Forest
Location one (1) mile northwest of Morgan Airstrip in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness on the Middle Fork Ranger District.
Cause Human
Discovery Date 9/25/2018, 3:45:04 PM
County Valley
Current as of 9/30/2018, 8:58:50 AM
Total Personnel 93
Size 7,024 Acres
Estimated Containment Date Saturday October 20th, 2018 approx. 12:00 AM

Fire is in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness, Middle Fork Ranger District. One outbuilding is confirmed lost. Resources on the fire include, one (1) Type I crew, two (2) Type II crews, two (2)Type I helicopters, one (1) Type II helicopter, one (1) Type III helicopter, and one (1) Type 6 engine.

Update September 29, 2018

A local Type III Incident Management Organization is managing the Prospect Fire located on Middle Fork Ranger District. The fire is burning in timber, brush, and tall grass, in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness in steep, inaccessible terrain. The fire is burning in the Prospect Creek and Morehead Creek drainages and has crossed to the east of the Middle Fork of the Salmon River towards Big Soldier Mountain. Fire activity moderated today with the cloud cover. Single tree and group torching was observed along with active runs when the winds and terrain aligned. The fire was active on the northwest of the fire with backing into the Boundary Creek drainage.

Fire resources are working to inform forest visitors in the area of the fire. Officials on the Salmon-Challis National Forest have implemented an Emergency Road and Recreation Site Closure #04-13-18-610 for the Prospect Fire. The following are closed:

Forest Road 568 (the Boundary Creek Road) is closed at the Camp Tender Trailhead, which is approximately 3 miles north of the Junction of Forest Roads 579 and 568 at Bruce Meadows. Dagger Falls Campground, Boundary Creek Campground, and Boundary Creek Boat Launch are closed.

These closures are necessary to provide protection to forest visitors from the current fire safety hazards associated with the Prospect Fire.

Firefighters are implementing a point protection strategy. A point protection strategy is a wildfire response strategy, which protects specific assets or highly valued resources from the wildfire without directly halting the continued spread of the wildfire. The strategy takes in to account exposure to firefighters, values at risk, impacts to area user groups, and in the case of the Prospect Fire, wilderness values. The selected point protection strategy was determined to best balance for protection of values and firefighter safety. Values at risk in which work is in progress or completed is the administrative sites at Boundary Creek and the Morgan Ranch and Sulphur Creek Ranch properties. One outbuilding is confirmed lost.

Weather: Dry conditions are expected to persist through most of today. Winds will be breezy today and, more so, on Sunday. Scattered showers will develop on Sunday ahead of an upper disturbance. Isolated thunderstorms cannot be ruled out. Expect ridgetops wind gusts of 20 to 25 mph with 13 to 28 percent humidity Saturday and gusts around 30 mph with 30 to 40 percent humidity on Sunday.

Updates and information will be provided as significant changes occur.

Visit the Salmon-Challis National Forest website: http://www.fs.usda.gov/main/scnf/home, and check out News & Events, ‘Like Us’ on https://www.facebook.com/salmonchallisnf, and ‘Follow Us’ on https://twitter.com/SalmonChallisNF for further information.

Closures — Prospect Fire
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/closures/6226/

Prospect Fire Infared Map September 30

Prospect Fire September 29

Prospect Fire InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6226/
— — — — — — — — — —

NIFC

September 28, 2018

Idaho Fires: 15 Acres: 95,593 New: 1 Contained: 0
Bible Back Sawtooth National Forest FS 3,600 66 21 miles southeast of Stanley
Bum Creek Payette National Forest FS 5,340 0 10 miles east of Yellow Pine 208-634-0820
Caton Payette National Forest FS 630 0 24 miles east of McCall 208-634-0820
Conner Cassia County CNTY 13,617 75 4 miles southwest of Malta
Copper Mountain Idaho Panhandle National Forest FS 473 23 4 miles east of Eastport 208-267-5561
Cougar Idaho Panhandle National Forest FS 7,871 85 5 miles east of East Hope 208-557-8813
Pistol Salmon-Challis National Forest FS 457 0 38 miles southeast of McCall
* Prospect Salmon-Challis National Forest FS 2,000 0 31 miles northwest of Stanley
Rabbit Foot Salmon-Challis National Forest FS 36,004 82 14 miles southwest of Salmon+ 208-756-7853
Rampike Idaho Panhandle National Forest FS 3,100 0 23 miles northeast of Kellogg 208-664-2318
Rattlesnake Creek Nez Perce-Clearwater National Forest FS 8,220 90 5 miles southwest of Riggins 208-820-1965
Smith Creek Idaho Panhandle National Forest FS 1,115 0 19 miles west of Bonners Ferry 208-267-5561
Stewart Creek Sawtooth National Forest FS 5,295 62 18 miles northwest of Fairfield 208-764-3202
Surprise Creek Idaho Panhandle National Forest FS 3,300 78 18 miles east of Athol 208-664-2318
`Wapiti Boise National Forest FS 4,571 80 13 miles southwest of Stanley 208-259-3361

source:
https://www.nifc.gov/fireInfo/nfn.htm
———————–

Idaho History Sept 30, 2018

Cottonwood, Idaho County, Idaho

Cottonwood began in 1862 as a series of way station shelters for prospectors and mining suppliers on their way south to Florence and Warrens. It was named for the dense growth of trees that formerly lined Cottonwood Creek.

source: Idaho Territorial Sesquicentennial
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1870

Idaho Tri-weekly Statesman – Boise, Idaho – October 4, 1870

Murder in North Idaho

Another Evidence of the “Peaceable and Law-abiding Character of our Citizens.

The following is from the Oregon Heralds:

Walla Walla, Sept 23, 1870

A gentleman just down from the Nez Perce country furnishes the following account of a cold-blooded murder perpetrated at Camas Prairie, on the night of the 15th. It seems that a man named Peters Walters, the owner of a saw mill, met one of his workmen, named Joseph Yates, for the purpose of having a settlement. They met at Brown’s house, and made their settlement without difficulty. Walters paid Yates several hundred dollars. The business over, Walters went to the door and in a few moments called for Yates to come out. On going to the door, Walters addressed Yates as follows: “Well, sir, you have got the money; I don’t owe you anything.” To which Yates replied: “Yes, It’s all settled:” when Walters said to Yates; “I’ve got another settlement to make with you.” And immediately drew his revolver and fired twice, both balls taking effect. Yates lived several hours after being shot, but from the first, death was inevitable. The shooting occasioned great excitement and for a time there was talk of mob execution, but finally better counsel prevailed and the party was arrested and sent to jail. Both the parties to the tragedy were single men, and have heretofore stood fair in the community. The only explanation of the shooting was that Yates had made remarks reflecting upon Walter’s integrity, and it is supposed that this coming to his knowledge, he determined to take Yates’ life.

Copyright Notice: All materials contained on these pages are furnished for the free use of those engaged in researching their family origins. Any commercial use or distribution, without the consent of the host/author of these pages is prohibited. All images used on these pages were obtained from sources permitting free distribution, or generated by the author, and are subject to the same restrictions/permissions. All persons contributing material for posting on these pages do so in recognition of their free, non-commercial distribution, and further, is responsible to assure that no copyright is violated by their submission.
source: Murders, Poisonings and Executions in Idaho County from Area Newspaper Articles compiled by Penny Bennett Casey, Idaho County GenWeb
— — — — — — — — — —

1877

IdahoMonumentCottonwood-a

“Here We Have Idaho” – a few miles east of Cottonwood near the North & South Highway stands this concrete monument, shaped like the state of Idaho to mark the spot where Capt. D.B. Randall fell when he led the “brave 17” volunteers from Mount Idaho to the rescue of beleaguered soldiers at Cottonwood during the Nez Perce Indian War of 1877. The monument was erected by the late Evan Evans of Grangeville.

source: Lewiston Morning Tribune – Oct 6, 1955
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1883

1883Cottonwood-a

Cottonwood in 1883 – An artist’s charcoal drawing of the “Cottonwood Ranch and Hotel” shows how this important way station on the Camas Prairie had grown by 1883 from a single all-purpose log house built for men and horses in 1862. Cottonwood had by this time become a center for annual livestock roundups as well as an over-night stopping place. Sheep, hogs and cattle are shown at the right and across the road. A four-horse team hitched to a light wagon with passengers, a man on horseback and others in the street indicate the junction’s importance to travelers. Army troops were stationed here, taking over all buildings, when opening incidents of the Nez Perce war occurred at Cottonwood, July 3, 1877. (Drawing supplied by Sister M. Alfreda of St. Gertrude’s Academy, Cottonwood.)

source: Lewiston Morning Tribune – Oct 6, 1955
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1888 Idaho Map

1888--Idaho-Cottonwood
— — — — — — — — — —

1892 Fire At Cottonwood

Idaho County Free Press Friday, June 3, 1892

Fire at Cottonwood

The Store of Wax & Goldstone and Residence of Sam’l Goldstone Destroyed

Tuesday morning about two o’clock the residence building at Cottonwood, situated back of Wax & Goldstone’s store, which had just been completed as a residence for Mr. Goldstone, was discovered to be on fire. Owing to the unseasonable hour there were not enough men present to do anything toward checking the conflagration which soon communicated to the store building. The spring stock of goods had just been received, and at the time the stock would invoice between $25,000 and $30,000. Everything possible was done but few of the goods could be saved. The stock and store was pretty well insured, the exact figures of which we have been unable to ascertain, but the loss will be $12,000 or $15,000 above insurance. No insurance on the dwelling or contents. There is no doubt that the origin of the fire was incendiary, as there was no one residing in the house and no fire had been in it for some time and the time of the night shows the fire could not have accidentally started. No clue is to be had to the perpetrator of this crime, who if caught, would be summarily punished. The fire is a heavy blow to Wax and Goldstone, but they are not discouraged and Mr. Wax at once went to Lewiston to adjust the insurance and make arrangements to resume business.

source: © PBC Idaho County GenWeb – Miscellaneous Published Articles and Newspaper Items From Idaho County and the Vicinity, compiled by Penny Bennett Casey
— — — — — — — — — —

1892

Marble discovered on the Salmon River

Idaho County Free Press Friday, June 10, 1892

Robert Nugent and others, of Cottonwood, are exhibiting specimens of marble, both white and blue, which they recently discovered on Salmon River.

source: © PBC Idaho County GenWeb – Miscellaneous Published Articles and Newspaper Items From Idaho County and the Vicinity, compiled by Penny Bennett Casey
— — — — — — — — — —

1903 Cottonwood

This historic point was for many years during the early life of the county an important resting place for teams traveling from Lewiston to Grangeville, Mount Idaho and the mines. In 1863 Wheeler & Toothacher were in charge of the Cottonwood station, situated where Joslin’s shop now is. They were succeeded about a year later by John Byram, and he by Joe Moore and Peter Ready, from the latter of whom it passed to Benjamin Norton, the man who lost his life during the Indian war. After the cessation of hostilities, L. P. Brown became practically the owner of the townsite by buying the place of Knighten, Harry Wilson and others.

A post office was established in the early days but the first business aside from that and a blacksmith shop was the store of F. B. King, opened about 1880. Some four or five years later, Charles Wood and A. A. Harris built a saloon. Robert Nugent tells the writer than when he came to the place in 1887, he found “Judge” Gilmore in charge of the blacksmith shop. H. H. Nuxoll and Barney Stubert in a carpenter shop, and the business men just referred to at their respective places. Mr. Nubent bought out Wood & Harris’s saloon. F. B. King’s store was transferred to Weiler & Wax about 1891. Mr. Nugent started a restaurant in 1893, in which year a pork packing establishment was also started. Dunham & Company, of Chicago, ran it for a couple of years, but eventually failed through mismanagement and gave the farmers a bill of sale of the property in payment of the sums due them. At present the building is used as a slaughter house.

In 1893, the first paper of the town, the Cottonwood Report, made its bow. Its first issue, bearing date January 27th, shows by its advertising columns that Wax & Goldstone were then engaged in the dry goods and grocery business: that C. B. Wood was proprietor of the Cottonwood House; that Felix Warren owned the Lewiston-Cottonwood stage line; that Revs. T. L. Buzzell and William Cronger were pastors of the Methodist and Catholic churches, respectively; that Davis & Sweet had a saw and planing mill; that F. M. Bridgfarmer was engaged in house, sign and carriage painting; that J. W. Gains had a livery, feed and sales stable; that J. W. Turner, M. D., was practicing medicine and surgery; and that Tannatt & Hogan were engaged in the real estate business and in surveying, also were townsite agents. The paper shows, too, that a literary society was in existence, of which E. T. Tannatt was president and Miss Ettie Simpson, secretary.

In 1895, the town began building rapidly, and it is since that date that the Cottonwood of today has come into existence. Without attempting to fix the dates of the coming of later business houses or the sequence of their establishment, we summarize the present business houses of the town as follows: Three merchandise stores, Samuel Goldstone’s, Brown & Brusts’s and Harry Nuxoll’s; three livery stables, J. T. Hale’s, C. C. Burge’s, and J. M. Eller’s; J. W. Turner’s drug store and that of the Idaho Drug Company; the Idaho County Bank, of which E. M. Ehrhardt is cashier; the saloons of Lyons & Dixon, John Peterson and John Funke; and the brewery of Schobert & Peterson; the St. Albert hotel, of which A. B. Rooke is proprietor, and the Cottonwood hotel (closed at this writing), owned by John Proctor; harness and saddles, Schiller & Simons; planing mill, sash and door factory, Webster & Wright; a steam flour mill of twenty-five barrels capacity, J. W. Crawford; blacksmiths, J. F. Davidson, E. Joslin and S. Saux; meat market, Simons Brothers; millinery and dress making, Mrs. William Bash; bakery, Mrs. Alice Tipton; grain warehouse, Samuel Goldstone; barber, John Caldwell; hardware and implements, H. H. Nuxoll; printing office (Camas Prairie Chronicle), Frank S. Wimer, proprietor; furniture, J. N. Moden; a Chinese laundry. It is said that a large creamery, capable of handling the cream from four or five hundred cows, is in project, also a new brewery. J. M. Wolbert, an attorney, is engaged in the real estate business, and George W. Coutts is also engaged in the practice of law. The dentists of the town are Drs. T. W. Bray and J. E. Smith, and the physicians practicing there are Drs. J. W. Turner and R. Truitt. Samuel R. Libby, the postmaster, is a watch repairer and jeweler.

The churches of the town at this time are the Catholic, Rev. H. A. Kremers, pastor; the Baptist, to which Mr. Daik ministers; and the Methodist, without a pastor at the time of the writer’s visit. There is a large four-room public school in Cottonwood in which three teachers labor, namely, Prof. E. O. Steininger, Miss Mary T. Hayden and Mrs. Gussie H. Clark. A Catholic school is maintained by Rev. H. A. Kremers in connection with the church, intended, it is said, as a forerunner of a sisters’ school. Fraternal orders are well represented, there being subordinate lodges of the I. O. O. F., Rebekahs, K. of P., M. W. A., and K. O. T. M. The first mentioned order has a large two-story hall with lodge and banquet rooms above and an opera and dance hall below.

While Cottonwood is as yet without a railroad it has daily stage connections with Grangeville, Lewiston and Keuterville, and tri-weekly with Kamiah. The O. R. & N. survey passes through the town.

Cottonwood enjoys a very favorable situation on the creek from which it takes its name. It is convenient to a large stock raising country, and there are six saw mills within ten miles of the place. The rich surrounding country furnishes the business men of the town assurance of a reasonably abundant and permanent patronage, and as the country grows their business and their number must enjoy a corresponding increase.

source: © PBC Idaho County GenWeb, History of North Idaho, Western Historical Publishing Company, 1903, pages 424-425 (verbatim), provided by Clara D. Ford, owner of book
— — — — — — — — — —

1908

Idaho County Free Press Thursday, July 23, 1908

Cottonwood in Ashes

Second Largest Town on Camas Prairie Wiped Out Early Monday Morning by Disastrous Fire, Heroic Work of No Avail

Over $225,000 Lost in Two Hours

The Entire Business Section of the Town and Some Residences Destroyed. Will Build a Modern City on Site of Present Ruins

The second greatest fire Idaho county has so far known occurred early Monday morning when a blaze starting in the Martin Kuhn saloon reduced to ashes the second largest town in our county and entailed a loss close onto $250,000, adding another to the disasters that have befallen Idaho County within the last six months. First, the flood of the early spring when much loss was sustained, then when recovery was progressing rapidly and the Clearwater country was becoming itself once again, the hail storm of a week ago passed through the wheat belt of the Prairie and as a result another large sum is taxable to loss. Now comes the burning of the second largest city on the Prairie, Cottonwood.

The Origin of Fire

It seems the swamper of what is known as the Club saloon, a place located in the Kurdy block and opened this spring by Martin Kuhn of Nez Perce, had built up a hot fire and was heating water with which to clean up the place and later on left for home. Along about 12:15 in the morning Mrs. Tom Hale saw flames shooting from the building and turned in the alarm. In a very short time the town was aroused and a fight which was to last close onto two hours and result in defeat was opened on the spreading flames.

A Desperate Fight

When the alarm was turned in the fire company was quick to respond but equipped with nothing but a chemical engine and a hook and ladder brigade, but little headway could be made. After making desperate efforts to extinguish the fire, efforts were concentrated upon the section of the city occupied by the brewery and Overland livery. The hardest kind of a fight was waged and finally the spread of the fire in that direction was saved. The mill and several other properties were saved by the same tactics and while the firefighters were strengthened by every citizen in the town nothing could save the city from destruction. As the flames leaped from building to building people could be seen scurrying hither and thither with arms filled with books, valuable papers, etc. The town was light as day and visible from many points on the Prairie.

The Path of Destruction

While the people fought with desperation huge tongues of flame leaped for one structure to another and the wooden buildings, dry as tinder, were consumed in rapid succession. Up both sides of Main Street the business blocks were leveled to the ground; up King street, another section of business blocks was consumed. The burned district was confined to the buildings on both sides of Main from the Cottonwood stables on the east to the Overland stables on the west and up King street on both sides to and including the Brust store. Practically every business house in the city was wiped out besides several residences. There remain one mill three liveries, the brewery, a butcher shop, several blacksmith shops, the electric plant and a small store known as the Bee Hive. Over forty of the business houses were totally destroyed.

$235,000 Lost in Two Hours

The following is as careful an estimate of the losses and insurance as is possible to get at the present time. In some instances the figures given represent the lose of stock and building. Some parties who have sustained a loss we have listed and not given the amount as it was impossible to get any figures at the time of going to press. It will be seen by comparing the total loss to the total insurance carried that close on to a third of the loss was covered by insurance.

Owner and Business / Value / Insurance

Roberts Bros., Confectionary / $400
W.M. Felberth, Confectionary / $500
S.R. Butler, Jeweler / $4000 / $2000
Foster & Blakley, Harness
J.N. Moden, Furniture / $4000 / $2000
Mrs. Duffey, Confectionary / $ 350
O.E. Van Dorn, Drugs / $4500 / $2000
A.J. Payne, Hotel / $1500
Brown & Ehrhardt, Hotel Bldg. / $8000 / $4500
John Hoene, Hardware / $7500 / $3500
L.L. Gordon, Bowling Alley / $1800
Hugh Beck, Barber Shop, Bldg / $2900 / $1300
Simon Bros., Butchers / $2500 / $1300
L.L. Gordon, Saloon Bldg. / $1500
Joe Schober, Saloon Bldg. / $1500 / $1000
Morrison & McNamara, Saloon / $1500
German State Bank / $3000
Cottonwood Hardware Co. / $23,000 / $8000
W.G. Brust, Gen. Mdse. / $25,000 / $8000
Severus & Fuchs, Gen. Mdes. / $9000 / $3500
Sam Goldstone, Gen. Mdse / $35,000 / $20,000
S.R. Libby, Furniture / $3000 / $1500
M. Kuhn, Saloon / $4000 / $2000
Bailor & Robinson, Undertakers / $800
Mertes & WAldmann, Saloon / $2000 / $1000
A.J. Robinson, Drugs / $1500 / $500
A.J. Barth, Jewelry / $2000
J.M. Wolbert, Office
John Peterson, Saloon / $2000 / $1400
First National Bank / $4000 / $2000
Sims McKinney Co., Dry Goods / $10,000 / $2000
Post Office / $400
Camas Prairie Lan Co. / $400
Nate Reed, Barber Shop
John Funke, Saloon
Chas. Steal, Office
Dr. Smith, Office & Fixtures / $1500
Dr. Turner, Office / $2000 / $1000
Dr. Shineck, Office / $800 / $ 350
W.A. Peterson, Plumber / $250
J.O. Short, Barber
Chas. Betz, Shoemaker
A.B. Rooke, Cottage
Jos. Schober, Cottage

From the Ruins a Modern City

While the blow is a serious one and will effect the city for a half dozen years, from the ashes will arise a modern little city of substantial brick business blocks and secure from fire by a modern water plant. It must not be understood that nothing remains, the residence section is almost intact but of course all of her business institutions have been leveled to the ground. There is a reason for Cottonwood; situated in one of the best portions of the Prairie she has grown from a hamlet to the second largest city on the Prairie. It is a natural trade center for a large territory settled up with a prosperous set of people.

It has had a steady and healthy growth. The citizenry is of the class known as town-builders and it will not be long until the ring of the mechanic’s hammer will announce the re-building of the New Cottonwood.

Notes and Comment

Grangeville extends a helping hand to its sister city in her time of distress. Several wagon loads of provisions were sent out at once upon the receipt of the news. The people are already talking of the future town and while the ruins were still smoking plans were being prepared for one brick block. Sam Goldstone, one of the heaviest losers, says; “While the loss is very heavy we are going to re-build the city. There’s a reason for Cottonwood and the fire will hurt the town only temporarily.”

Herman N. Nuxoll, president of the German State Bank, one of the leading institutions of the town, is a firm believer in the future.

Food was mighty scarce the first two days after the fire but the merchants have made heavy purchases of supplies which are now arriving.

Mr. Brust, owner of one of the largest stores, is east at the present but we understand will re-open. Cottonwood has realized the necessity of a good water system and some time ago voted a franchise to a company that is now busy sinking a well and putting in a reservoir.

While the post office was destroyed and Postmaster Farnsworth is in the mountains, the assistant opened up the office in the Turner residence and is handling the mail same as every.

Nez Perce telephone office is also located in the Turner residences. In thirty days they will have a railroad then watch the building material roll in.

Many Grangeville people visited the ruins the first of the week and offered their assistances to the citizens in every way possible. No accidents or loss of life.

Joe Paine is keeping hotel in the I.O.O. F. hall and taking care of the traveling public.

source: © PBC Idaho County GenWeb – Miscellaneous Published Articles and Newspaper Items From Idaho County and the Vicinity, compiled by Penny Bennett Casey
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1908

Camas Prairie Chronicle – Cottonwood Idaho Friday, August 21, 1908

John Spot, an insane man, was found roaming in the woods on the Florence road beyond Grangeville by wood choppers late last week and was brought to the county seat where he was examined and ordered committed to the asylum. Spot claimed to have been lost in the mountains for six weeks during which time he lived on huckleberries and herbs. His clothing was in rags.

source: © PBC Idaho County GenWeb – Miscellaneous Published Articles and Newspaper Items From Idaho County and the Vicinity, compiled by Penny Bennett Casey
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1912

1912CottonwoodPigs-a

Prof Arthur Brissette & the Famous Cottonwood Pigs, Nemo & John, July 4th, 1912

source: From the Mike Fritz Collection.
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Cottonwood Pigs

CottonwoodPigs-a
(click image for original)

source: The Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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1914

Idaho County Free Press – December 3, 1914

H.J. Schmidt Held for Murder of Joe Marcus

Preliminary Held Before L. Vineyard, Justice of Peace, Friday and Saturday

Bail Bond Fixed at $2500

Defendant Hit by Three Bullets in Back and Clothing Burned According to Testimony of Dr. Orr

The preliminary of H.J. Schmidt, charged with the murder of Joe Markus, near Cottonwood on November 3, was held before L. Vineyard, justice of the peace, the hearing being commenced last Friday and ending Saturday. The accused was held to appear before the District Court on a charge of murder and Judge Vineyard fixed his bond at $2500, which it is though he will not be able to furnish. Wallace N. Scales appeared as counsel for the defendant. Eight witnesses were called to testify for the state.

Schmidt the defendant, and Joe Marcus, the deceased were members of a railroad bridge crew stationed on a siding near the rock crusher beyond Cottonwood. The deceased was killed in one of the three cars in which the crew were housed, both Schmidt and Marcus sleeping in the same car.

Hanson testified that Barney Marcus came and awakened him saying that Schmidt had shot his brother, where upon he went to the car where the other men bunked and found Marcus lying on the floor of the car. He endeavored to get a blanket under Marcus but on account of the pain caused to the wounded man he had to roll him onto the blanket. Two men were sent for medical aid to Cottonwood and Dr. Orr was called to attend to the man’s wounds.

Dr. Orr testified as to being called to care for Marcus and that he found three wounds in the back, where three bullets had entered. As the clothing of the deceased was burned near the place the bullets entered, Dr. Orr stated that this would indicate that the shots were fired at close range. He also testified that the man was fatally injured and could not live and that he worked on him for twenty minutes to prepare him for the trip to Lewiston.

Deceased’s Brother Testifies

The next witnesses put on were the men who were in the car at the time the shooting took place. Barney Marcus, brother of the man shot, testified that he was in the car at the time of the shooting. He said he returned from Cottonwood about 9:30 in the evening, and that his brother Joseph, returned to the car about 11:30 or perhaps a little later. Witness said it was an arrangement in the car that the occupants should take care of the car for a week at a time in turns and this week it was his brother’s turn to look after the car. He said that when his brother arrived at the car that he came to the bed and pulled the covers and then went to the stove to lay the fire for the morning. He said he made some noise in fixing the fire and Schmidt asked if he was looking for trouble. Mr. Marcus testified that his brother replied that he was not but that Schmidt got up and commenced dressing and Joe Segil was also on the floor. Witness testified that Segil wrestled a shovel from his brother and he then heard his brother say, “You are not going to shoot me, Jack?” Witness said he then saw a revolver in Schmidt’s hand and as soon as Segil broke from his brother, Schmidt shot three times and his brother fell to the floor. He testified there had been no previous trouble between the men.

Testimony of Other Men

William Rudeseld, the next witness testified that he was sleeping in the car at the time of the shooting and was awakened when Joe cam home and commenced working around the stove. He stated that he heard one of the Marcus boys ask Joe to come to bed but that the deceased continued working around the stove. He also testified that he heard Schmidt ask Marcus if he was looking after trouble and the answer that he was not. Schmidt then told Joe to go to bed and the next thing he heard was Joe asking Schmidt if he was going to shoot. Segil and Joe then wrestled over a shovel and when Segil got the shovel, Joe walked toward Schmidt and said “Jack,” and put his arm over the defendant’s shoulder and three shots followed.

W.A. Melton, a bridge carpenter, testified that he had known both men since July and that he was sleeping in the car the night Marcus was killed, being awakened by talk between Barney and Joe Marcus, the former stating that he would throw Joe out of the car if he did not get in bed and keep still. He testified that Joe was working around the stove and sounded as if he was intoxicated. He said he heard Schmidt ask if he was looking for trouble and Joe replied that he was not but he then saw Joe with the shovel raised. Witness said Segil got the shovel and he heard Joe say, “Don’t shoot.” He testified that Schmidt was not making any effort to reach Marcus when the latter had the shovel raised.

Witness testified that he had never known Schmidt to have trouble and that Schmidt did not drink. He said Marcus drank a little but there had never been trouble between the men. Witness said he had seen a knife carried by Marcus and it looked like the knife shown by the attorney for the defendant. He testified that Segil had this knife the morning following the shooting but he did not know where he got it.

Hearing Resumed Saturday

This concluded Friday’s work and the case was resumed on Saturday. Peter Marcus, brother of deceased was called and testified as to the ownership of a knife alleged to have been found on the floor of the car the morning after the trouble and the witness stated that the knife was not the one which he had seen his brother carrying around that last time he had seen him. He stated that there was no knife in his brother’s clothes.

James Smith testified as to being in the car at the time of the trouble and saw Marcus with his arm around Schmidt before he was shot. He stated that he entered the car first in the morning after the shooting and found the knife put is evidence lying open on the floor. Thime, another witness was in an adjoining car and came after the shooting. Sheriff Eimers was put on the stand and testified as to making the arrest of the accused.
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Idaho County Free Press – February 11, 1915

Smith Acquitted of the Charge of Murder

Trial Lasted Two Days and Was Followed With Exceptional Interest.

Jury Was Out All Night

Verdict of Not Guilty About 7:15 this Morning and Defendant Given His Freedom

The jury in the case of the State of Idaho vs. H.J. Smith, after being out about 14 hours returned a verdict of not guilty and Smith is free. The verdict was brought in about 7:15 this morning and the jury went to the jury room about 5:00 o’clock last night.

The case has been followed with exceptional interest and the court room was crowded with spectators all of the time during the trial. The case was a close one and puzzling in some ways, but the evident good appearance and the good reputation which the defendant bears were matters in his favor. The defense set up self defense and endeavored to establish the good character of the defendant, and a quarrelsome disposition on the part of the deceased which was aggravated by the fact that he was a drinking man.

Smith’s trial was set for Monday of this week last on account of the fact that the Marcus boys, brothers of the deceased, were not present that State asked that the case be continued until Tuesday. The brothers were in Minneapolis when last heard from and Prosecutor Hattabaugh received information that they could not arrive until Friday.

The State was represented by M.R. Hattabaugh and B. Auger, who was entered on Monday to assist the prosecution. Tuesday forenoon and a part of the afternoon was used in getting a jury and every name in the box was drawn out before a jury was agreed upon. The jurymen finally selected to hear the case were William G. Hanson, T.S. McCune, Robt. Marnett, Jas. L. McHugh, Fred Collison, Peter Aschenbrenner, John F. Oliver, E.W. Barnum, Chas Sallec, J.H. Johnson, M,.I. Cross and J.D. Stanbery.

After the information had been read to the jury and defendant’s plea stated, all of the witnesses present were sworn and excluded from the court room excepting Dr. J.B. Morris, Dr. W.F. Orr and C.J. Vassar who were permitted to remain in the court room. Statement of the case was hereupon made by M.R. Hattabaugh and following him W.N. Scales made the statement for the defense and the state proceeded to introduce its testimony.

The state put seven witnesses on the stand to establish the guilt of the defendant. Dr. Orr of Cottonwood testified as to being called to the car on the siding near the rock crusher to minister to the man killed and as to the nature of the wounds. Dr. Morris of Lewiston testified as to meeting the car at Lewiston which brought Marcus to that place for medical attention and also as to accompanying Marcus to St. Joseph’s hospital where he died.

John Hanson, the first man put on the stand by the state, was the foreman of the crew of which Joe Marcus and J.H. Smith, the principals in the affairs were members. Hanson slept in a car which was next to the one in which the shooting took place and testified as to being called to the car on the night of – – – – – -unreadable- – – for Dr. Orr at Cottonwood.

Testimony of Principal Witnesses.

The men who occupied the car in which Joe Marcus was killed were W.A. Melton, Wm. Rudseld, J.H. Smith, Jim Smith, Barney and Warner Marcus, brothers of deceased; and Joe Siegel. Of these the Marcus brothers were unable to be present at the trial of the case, having to come from Minneapolis their home, and the state therefore had to rely on the testimony of Melton, Haybert Thine and Wm. Rudseld as its principal witnesses.

Wm. Rudseld, a Swede, was sleeping in the end of the car in which the Marcus brothers had their bunks according to his testimony, and was awakened about the time of Joe Marcus returned to the car from Cottonwood. He said that Marcus made some noise while preparing the fire for morning and that he heard Smith tell him to make less noise. Marcus made some answer to Smith and then the witness stated that he heard Smith ask if he, Marcus, was looking for trouble to which Joe answered that he was not. He then testified that Smith got out of his bunk and that Joe Siegel followed him. Marcus then backed between the bunks holding the shovel in his hand and Siegel took the shovel away from him, according to the witness, whereupon he heard Marcus say, “you are not going to shoot me are you Jack?” According to the witness Smith then backed into the center of the car and Joe went up and put his hands on the defendant’s shoulders and then he heard three shots.

The testimony of W.A. Melton, another occupant of the car practically substantiated the testimony of Rudseld and he was awakened by Smith and Joe Marcus talking and then the acts followed which ended in the shooting.

The testimony of Hagbert Thine also substantiated in effect the circumstances brought out by Melton and Rudseld, and upon cross examination it was endeavored to show by Thine that Joe Marcus was quarrelsome and that he was looking for trouble among the crew. Thine stuck to the statement that he had never had any trouble with Joe though he admitted that the deceased was somewhat quarrelsome, and that he drank. John Eimers was put on the stand and testified as to making the arrest. The state rested and the defense put in its testimony.

Evidence of Defense

The defense recalled John Hanson, W.A. Melton, and Hagbert Thine who were questioned with reference to whether Joe Marcus was quarrelsome, whether he drank and other particulars of this nature and also with reference to a knife which was alleged to have been found on the floor of the car the morning after the shooting by Jim Smith.

Jim Smith, who is deaf in his left ear, and was sleeping on his good ear, according to his testimony, when awakened by the trouble between Smith and Marcus. He stated that he saw the scuffle from the bunk and that Marcus threw his left arm around Smith’s neck, and that he saw Smith reach to his hip pocket for his gun with his right hand and then he heard the three shots. The men had their backs toward him, the witness testified and he said he did not see the gun nor did he see the knife in Marcus’ hand. He told of finding the knife in the car the next morning near a clothes locker which was not far away from where the scuffle —-unreadable— preceded the shooting occurred and that he gave it to Siegel.

Joe Siegel testified as to having known the defendant from time to time, having worked with him before coming to Idaho and testified as to his being of a good character, and never touching liquor nor gambling and that he was not of quarrelsome disposition. He then testified as to the difficulty which occurred, saying that he was sleeping in a bunk near Smith when Joe came into the car and started to make a great deal of noise. He said that Joe first started in by daring his brother Barney to come out of the bunk in which he was sleeping using strong language and telling what he would do and that Barney tried to get him to go to bed. Witness testified that Marcus then tipped some things over in the car and started over to the stove and made more noise when Melton Smith and he told Joe to go to bed. That Marcus then called Smith a vile name and started towards the bunk in which Smith was sleeping with the shovel. Siegel stated that Smith then got out of the bunk and that Marcus backed down towards the other end of the car and that he got out of bed and got between the two men, holding Marcus and taking the shovel away from him and that Joe then broke away from him and threw him down in the car, jumping over his body and throwing his arm around Smith and that the shots followed shortly thereafter.

Defendant Put on Stand

The defendant testified that he was a bridge carpenter by occupation and formerly engaged in farming in Missouri about twelve years ago and has worked on the Burlington, Santa Fe and O.W.R. & N. railroads before coming up on the prairie.

With reference to the trouble in the car he stated that he first heard Joe Marcus talking outside the car when he returned from Cottonwood and that he had gone to sleep and was again awakened by Marcus coming into the car. He then testified as to Marcus having an altercation with his brother Barney, and calling him a vile name and daring his to come out of the bunk. That the deceased then went over to the water keg and made a great deal of noise tipping things over and from there went to the stove and started to put some coal in the stove and spilled it on the floor of the car. Smith then testified that he, Melton and Siegel then told Joe to go to bed and that Joe answered, saying “come out of that bunk you—- and I’ll fix you” and that he then came towards the bunk with the shovel. Smith said that he then got out of the bed and put on his overalls and shoes and that Joe went back towards the other end of the car and that he went towards him and told him to go to bed.

Smith next testified that Siegel came up and stepped between them and that Sigel got the shovel out of Joe’s hand and handed it to him and he threw it against the side of the car. That Marcus then knocked Siegel down, stating that he would get him and that he came up and threw his arm around the defendant’s neck and then he grabbed the hand which held the knife but that Marcus jerked his hand away and that he then reached for his gun and shot Marcus but he did not know how many times at that time. Smith identified the knife as one he had seen in the possession of Marcus prior to the trouble but stated that he did not know at the time whether it was the knife Marcus held in his hand or not.

Smith stated that he got the gun in —unreadable– there was generally considerable money in the car and that he wanted it for protection in case of a hold up of the car having heard of such an event before and that he always slept with the gun under his pillow.

The defense then rested and after a ten minutes recess the argument for the state was opened by B. Auger, and W.N. Scales following for the defense. M.R. Hattababugh closing the argument for the state. The instructions were then read to the jury by the court and the jury went the their room about five o’clock.

**The Free Press reports that follow have two different spellings of the accused. Schmidt and Smith.

Copyright Notice: All materials contained on these pages are furnished for the free use of those engaged in researching their family origins. Any commercial use or distribution, without the consent of the host/author of these pages is prohibited. All images used on these pages were obtained from sources permitting free distribution, or generated by the author, and are subject to the same restrictions/permissions. All persons contributing material for posting on these pages do so in recognition of their free, non-commercial distribution, and further, is responsible to assure that no copyright is violated by their submission.
source: Murders, Poisonings and Executions in Idaho County from Area Newspaper Articles compiled by Penny Bennett Casey, Idaho County GenWeb
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c.1914

CottonwoodPostcard1914-a

View from Grain Elevator Cottonwood, Idaho
(click image for original)

source: Mike Fritz Collection History of Idaho
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1915

Ferdinand Enterprise – October 1, 1915

Cosand’s Get-Away Nipped

Carl Cosand, a rancher, who lives on a ranch between here and Cottonwood, attempted to make his “get away” last Sunday last, and leave several of his creditors in the lurch. Cosand, so it is said, was making a pretty general cleanup on things about the place and showed little, if any disposition to settle his bills according to agreements.

Sunday morning he hitched up a rig and drove in the direction of Forest, but one of his creditors had suspicion that all was not on the square. He had notified the constable at Cottonwood to put on his rubber boots and goggles and be ready for a man chase upon a moment’s notice.

Cosand was overtaken by the constable several miles the other side of Forest, and returned. He secured Attorney Gilmore from Grangeville and settlement of a number of accounts was made in Ferdinand, Monday.

The Enterprise deplores that it is called upon to chronicle this, as well as other unfortunate circumstances, but hopes that the matter may be amicably settled. This paper stands for law and order and if a man with sober mind willingly breaks any reasonable law within our jurisdiction, we most certainly will give it publicity the same as other news matter.

source: © PBC Idaho County GenWeb – Miscellaneous Published Articles and Newspaper Items From Idaho County and the Vicinity, compiled by Penny Bennett Casey
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Cottonwood Postcard

CottonwoodPostcard2-a

(click image for original)
source: The Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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1937 Cottonwood Parade

1937CottonwoodParade-a

“My grandpa S.F. Winkler is top left. He was born in Kueterville in 1903.” – Scott Winkler

source: Scott Winkler, Idaho History 1860s to 1960s
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1955 Cottonwood

1955CHeadline

Cottonwood, the second largest town today in the sprawling “golden” reaches of Idaho County, traces its history from 1862 when it first became a cluster of way station shelters for prospectors and mining suppliers.

Its growth in a community of rich agricultural resources, lumbering and livestock remains second only to its younger neighbor, Grangeville.

Cottonwood’s trade area reaches east to Fenn, north to Meadow Creek and northeast to Winona. The town’s population is about 800. Its present “hub” for this section of the Camas Prairie was established as a distribution point in the days when travel from Lewiston to the Prairie presented difficulty of bogs and timber over Craig Mountain.

The town is named for the dense growth of stately cottonwood trees that once lined Cottonwood Creek. Some of these trees went into chairs, tables and other furniture for the homes built by early settlers.

Indians called Cottonwood “Kap-kap-peen,” meaning “village in a hole”

High Yields Common

Grain crops of 60 to 70 bushels to the acre are not unusual for fall wheat. Dairying has recently become part of the grain growers’ diversified methods. Although numerous small sawmills flourished in nearby timber of Craig Mountain in the early days, modern methods of the “long haul and fast transportation” have reduced lumbering to one major company at Cottonwood. Five to eight million feet of milling is the average yearly lumber output now.

Cottonwood became a livestock roundup center during the 1880s. Horse thieves found the area profitable as early as the 1870s. Many hogs were fattened by grain farmers in the early days and driven overland to rail point at Genesee for shipment. Coming of the railroad in 1908 increased Cottonwood’s importance an a livestock sale point. By 1914, it was shipping more grain and more livestock than any other point on the line between Lewiston and Grangeville.

An auction sale yard at Cottonwood now moves an estimated 20,000 head of livestock and an equal number of hogs per year. Stock is brought in to weekly sales held there from Montana, Washington and Oregon.

First Building Was Versatile

Cottonwood’s first building in 1862 was a combination store, saloon, hotel, stage station and stable opened by an enterprising man named Allen.

This was when miners were streaming in after placer gold discoveries at Florence and Warrens in the Salmon River mountains. The way station was placed at the most strategic point for overnight stops. Cottonwood still is at a strategic junction on Highway 95 leading from Lewiston to southern Idaho.

Its access to the Graves Creek Trail, leading 12 miles from Cottonwood to the Salmon River, caused Cottonwood to suffer some of the opening events of the Nez Perce Indian war in 1877.

This trail, “one of the oldest paths traveled by white men in Idaho,” leads to the mouth of Rocky Canyon on the Salmon River. Rocky Canyon was a favorite crossing for Chief Joseph and his tribe when they came to visit other Nez Perces on the Prairie or the Clearwater River.

Soon after the first battle at Whitebird, June 14, 1877, hostile Indians came up the trail to Cottonwood. U. S. Army troops had been stationed at Cottonwood House, a roomy log structure with stables large enough to accommodate horses.

Here on July 3, 1877, the “Rains Massacre” occurred. Indians “molested” the troops all day, July 4, but made no direct attack. On July 5, the “Brave 17” battle – wiping out an entire detachment dispatched to meet the Indians – was fought at what is now the southeast limits of Cottonwood. A highway marker locates the site.

Cottonwood’s civic pride comes forth in its fair and livestock show. A night parade of fine floats is held and prize stock is judged. This has been held annually in September since about 1932.

Schools and Cottonwood’s hospital are the work of the Sisters of St. Gertrude’s Community. The order originated at Sarnen, Switzerland.

St. Gertrude’s Convent, 2 1/2 miles south of the town, is an imposing structure of native blue porphyry overlooking the Camas Prairie. The convent was completed in 1924. A large brick addition was finished in 1949. In the spring of 1930, the Sisters opened Our Lady of Consolation Hospital which has continued since to serve the Cottonwood area. A new co-educational St. Gertrude’s Academy was dedicated at the Convent in May of 1954. The former academy had served since August of 1927. The new building will take care of increased enrollment up to approximately 200. Enrollment this year is about 125 for boarder and day pupils through the grades and high school.

source: Lewiston Morning Tribune – Oct 6, 1955
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St. Gertrude’s Cottonwood

StGertrudes-a

(click for large image)
source: Bill Hatke
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Cottonwood, Idaho

Cottonwood is a city in Idaho County, Idaho, United States. Located on the Camas Prairie, the population was 900 at the 2010 census, down from 944 in 2000. It is just west of U.S. Route 95, between Grangeville and Lewiston.

source: Wikipedia
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page updated August 15, 2020

Road Reports Sept 30

All roads to Yellow Pine are open. Please share road reports.

Yellow Pine: We had some nice rain showers this morning, enough to settle the dust.
Click for Local Forecast.
Yellow Pine Webcam:

Johnson Creek Stream Gauge:

Quartz Creek: (July 2, 2018) “Quartz Creek has a big wash out just before a switch back towards the top. Right now only motorcycles can get by but with work some atvs can make it. A shovel and a saw may be needed to widen the trail.” – DB
link to FB photo:

Golden Gate Road: Closed. Road to Golden Gate is only passable on foot due to large deep wash-out about 2/3rds of the way up. (2017)
link to FB photo:

Warm Lake Highway: Warm Lake Highway is good.

South Fork Road: South Fork road is good. Watch for hunters, campers and extra traffic – mostly on the weekends.
Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
South Fork Stream Gauge:

EFSF Road: Report (Sept 26) Mail truck driver (Dean) reports the EFSF road is in good shape. Other reports say there are some wash boards developing.

Johnson Creek Road: Report (Sept 26) Mail truck driver (Dean) says the first 13 miles in from Landmark is “the road from hell” and the last 13 miles to Yellow Pine are “great”.
The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet
Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam:

Lick Creek: Old report (Aug 7) “I went out Lick Creek this morning. Was pretty nice. A bit bumpy starting the ascent to the cliffs and remained a bit bumpy to the summit. Was nice all the way down. A nice McCall police officer reminded me the speed limit right after Lick Creek is 25 mph (from 35 mph) and they will be enforcing it.” – AP
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: (Sept 17) “They have started to grade Profile. Not too bad, lots of small rocks on the road, but pot holes have gotten filled in. From the looks of it they should be done by this week.” – BMc
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.
Big Creek Webcam:

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Old report that the road is good.

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Old report (Aug 14) The Meadow Creek Road above Stibnite is open. Old report (July 19) Stibnite to Roosevelt Lake: Road was in great shape (but has not been graded.)
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Open to the adventurous.
Old report (July 13) folks made it over in a small pick up truck, road is rough and getting brushed in.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: Old report from Deadwood Outfitters (June 5) “Deadwood Summit is open and in good shape.” Report (July 3) via Stanley and Bear Valley, watch for pot holes and ruts.
Note: The approx elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
——————————-

Weather Reports Sept 23-29

Sept 23 Weather:

At 9am it was 45 degrees, mostly cloudy and damp from earlier rain showers. At 2pm it was 68 degrees, partly cloudy, breezy and good air quality. At 7pm it was 57 degrees, partly cloudy, slight breeze and good air quality.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time September 24, 2018 at 09:00AM
Mostly clear, frosty and smoky
Max temperature 68 degrees F
Min temperature 27 degrees F
At observation 29 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

Sept 24 Weather:

At 9am it was 29 degrees, mostly clear, frosty and smoky. Mostly cloudy at lunch time. At 240pm it was 58 degrees, partly cloudy, light cool breezes and better air quality. At 745pm it was 52 degrees, clear and slight breeze, good air quality.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time September 25, 2018 at 09:00AM
Overcast, dry (very little frost) and smoky
Max temperature 62 degrees F
Min temperature 25 degrees F
At observation 27 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

Sept 25 Weather:

At 9am it was 27 degrees, overcast, smoky and dry (very little dew/frost.) Mostly clear day, a bit of a cool breeze and haze of smoke. At 740pm it was 52 degrees, mostly clear and slight haze of smoke.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time September 26, 2018 at 09:00AM
Mostly clear, light frost, light breeze, haze of smoke
Max temperature 68 degrees F
Min temperature 26 degrees F
At observation 29 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

Sept 26 Weather:

At 9am it was 29 degrees, mostly clear, dry – light frost, light breezes and haze of smoke. Thicker smoke at lunch time. At 240pm it was 73 degrees, mostly cloudy, a little breezy and better air quality. At 730pm it was 58 degrees, some high hazy clouds and smoke settling in.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time September 27, 2018 at 09:00AM
Mostly cloudy (?) very smoky and very dry – no dew
Max temperature 75 degrees F
Min temperature 29 degrees F <– yesterday morning
At observation 35 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

Sept 27 Weather:

At 9am it was 35 degrees, appears to be mostly cloudy (high thin) above eye burning smoke, very dry – no dew. Mostly clear at 11am and smoky. At 3pm it was 79 degrees, mostly clear and light breezes, haze of smoke – thicker smoke to the south. At 8pm it was 66 degrees and clear, light haze of smoke.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time September 28, 2018 at 09:00AM
Clear, dry and smoky
Max temperature 80 degrees F
Min temperature 33 degrees F
At observation 34 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

Sept 28 Weather:

At 9am it was 34 degrees, clear, dry (a little bit of dew) and smoky. Clear, breezy and smoky at noon. Clear, dry and warm afternoon, light breezes and smoky. At 730pm it was 61 degrees, clear, dry and smoky.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time September 29, 2018 at 09:00AM
Mostly cloudy, dry (no dew) and smoky
Max temperature 79 degrees F
Min temperature 33 degrees F
At observation 37 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

Sept 29 Weather:

At 9am it was 37 degrees, mostly cloudy, dry (no dew) and smoky. At 150pm it was 69 degrees, overcast and smoky. At 740pm it was 60 degrees, overcast and haze of smoke. Early morning rain probably started just after 5am, pounding down pretty good at 745am, probably ended by 830am. Breaks in the clouds at 850am.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time September 30, 2018 at 09:00AM
Partly cloudy, low fog belts, light haze of smoke
Max temperature 77 degrees F
Min temperature 37 degrees F
At observation 43 degrees F
Precipitation 0.19 inch
—————————–

Fire Update Sept 28, 2018

There are NO fires currently threatening Yellow Pine.

It has been very dry and quite smoky in Yellow Pine the last several days. Looks like the Caton fire kicked up some yesterday, and the Prospect fire to the south is active.

Air Quality in Yellow Pine = poor
— — — — — — — — — —

Southwest Idaho Fall prescribed burning planned

Wednesday, September 26, 2018

Boise, Idaho. Sept. 26, 2018 — Southwest Idaho interagency fire managers anticipate favorable weather conditions for planned low-intensity prescribed burns this fall. Prescribed burns are designed to reduce hazardous vegetation (fuels), minimize wildfire potential near communities and improve wildlife habitat.

Weather and fuel conditions permitting, prescribed burns are scheduled to start in October and continue through November. Approximately 2,600 acres are planned for controlled ignitions in 13 project areas within the Boise National Forest.

Public and firefighter safety is always the first priority in all public land fire operations. Fire managers develop burn plans that consider: safety, specific fuel and weather prescriptions and smoke management. All prescribed burns are closely evaluated and are only approved when conditions are favorable.

Fire officials strongly advise forest visitors and homeowners to prepare and plan activities around the proposed dates and locations of burns. Prescribed burns may impact individual’s that are sensitive to smoke. Recreationists should use extreme caution near prescribed fire areas and comply with closures.

Access to areas immediately within or adjacent to burning operations may be temporarily restricted for public health and safety. Specific information and signage will be posted in advance of ignitions and remain in place until operations are completed. Please be cautious of firefighters and additional equipment within these areas as visibility will be decreased with smoke.

The http://www.rxfire.com website is updated with information regarding southwest Idaho burns planned within Idaho Department of Lands, Bureau of Land Management, Payette National Forest and Boise National Forest.

The Boise National Forest prescribed burn hotline: (208)-373-4208.

Idaho City Ranger District

* Alder Ridge (100 acres): located 1 mile north of Placerville, Idaho. This is a landscape burn (ground fire), using hand ignitions to reduce fuel in the wildland urban interface (WUI).
* Amber (300 acres): located 2 miles east of Idaho City, Idaho. This is a modified tree well burn.
* Buckskin (200): located approximately 3 miles east of Idaho City, Idaho.
* Little Ophir (100 acres): located 4 miles west of Pioneerville, Idaho. A landscape burn using hand ignitions that will reduce fuel in the WUI.
* Mores South-Granite Creek (250 acres): located 3 miles east of Idaho City, Idaho. This is a landscape burn (ground fire) using hand ignitions to reduce fuels in the WUI.

Cascade Ranger District

* Horsethief (360 acres): located about 1 mile east/northeast of Horsethief Reservoir. This burn involves helicopter and hand ignitions to reduce fuels throughout the area that is within the WUI.
* Westside Restoration Unit 39 (25 acres): This project is located on National Forest System (NFS) road 435 along West Mountain. It is approximately 10 miles west of Cascade, Idaho. This will be hand ignitions burn to reduce fuels within the WUI.
* Crawford (100 acres): located approximately 4 miles east of Cascade, Idaho adjacent to the Crawford Guard Station, located off of NFS road 22, northeast of Davis reservoir; within WUI area.
* Lower Johnson Thinning (95 acres): Is a project designed to reduce hazardous fuels within the WUI. This project is located approximately 7 miles south of Yellow Pine along NFS road 413 and Johnson Creek.
* Yellow Pine Blowdown (40 acres): is located approximately 62 miles from Cascade, Idaho and is adjacent to the community of Yellow Pine. Hand Ignitions will be used to ignite machine piles along NFS roads 412, 413.
* Rainbow Point (19 acres): This project is located approximately 25 miles northwest of Cascade, Idaho. Machine Piles located within the Rainbow Point campground will be ignited by hand to reduce fuel accumulations throughout the campground.

Mountain Home Ranger District

* Cottonwood II Rx (1000 acres): This project is located about 17 miles NE of Boise, Idaho along NFS roads 203 and 377 in the Cottonwood Creek drainage, north of Arrowrock Reservoir.

Emmett Ranger District

* Miscellaneous Administrative Piles (1-2 acres): At Garden Valley work center.
— — — —

Note from Cascade Ranger District:

The Cascade RD is planning to burn both the Lower Johnson Thinning and Yellow Pine Blow Down units this fall, both of these projects will be pile burning only NO Broadcast Burning is planned.

The Lower Johnson Project (thinning & piling) was completed last summer, these handpiles are located along Johnson Creek road, Wapiti Ranch, Cox Ranch, Bryant Ranch/ Johnson Creek Airstrip.

Hand Ignition for Lower Johnson should take about a week to complete, once those piles have been completed, the crews will relocate to Yellow Pine to burn the logging slash piles.

If you have any addition questions please contact Tim Dulhanty tdulhanty@fs.fed.us (208-382-7400) or myself at 208-382-7400 or send me an email.

– Thanks
James Bishop
Fuels AFMO
Boise National Forest
— — — — — — — — — —

Prescribed Burns planned for Fall 2018

Date Sept 19, 2018

The Krassel Ranger District, Payette National Forest is planning to implement prescribed burns in the Bald Hill and Four Mile project areas this fall. In the Bald Hill Project area we will be working in areas of Reegan Creek and Deadman Creek from the East Fork road up to Rainbow Ridge. In the Fourmile Project area we will be working on both sides of the South Fork, between Blackmare and Holdover Creeks on the west side of the river and in the Fourmile Creek drainage on the east side. See attached map for more specific areas. Ignitions will likely take place in September or October, dependent on weather and fuel conditions. Primary ignitions will take 1-3 days for each burn block, with residual smoke and flame present until the next significant rain. Please do not hesitate to give a call or email with questions, my contact information is lenelson@fs.fed.us or desk phone is 208-634-0622.

Thanks and have a nice day,

Laurel Ingram
Fuels Technician
Payette National Forest
Krassel Ranger District

The Payette National Forest, Krassel Ranger District, is planning on implementing a prescribed burn on the south facing aspect between Deadman Creek and Reegan Creek along the East Fork of the South Fork of the Salmon River this fall. The edge of burn block E is about 5 miles west of Yellow Pine. See map below. Ignitions could occur over a period of 1-3 days in September or October 2018.

(click here for larger image)
For more information please call Justin Pappani at 208-634-0623 or Laurel Ingram at 208-634-0622.

The Payette National Forest, Krassel Ranger District, is planning on implementing the Four Mile Prescribed fire project this fall. Ignitions may take place between Reed Ranch and Poverty Flat Camp Ground on both sides of the South Fork of the Salmon River. See map below. Ignitions could occur over a period of 2 or more days in September or October.

(click here for larger image)
For more information please call Justin Pappani at 208-634-0623 or Laurel Ingram at 208-634-0622
— — — — — — — — — —

Caton Fire

Cation Fire Thermal Map 9-28
20180928CatonFire-a

Update Sept 27

The Caton fire has been moderately active the past few days, with growth on the southwest corner of the fire. Its mostly backing and flanking fire on top of the ridge where the Indian Peak trail is. Attached is a map and photo taken from Miners Peak lookout on the afternoon of September 26th. Acreage on the Caton fire is approximately 800 acres.

– Justin Pappani, Fire Management Specialist, Payette National Forest, Krassel Ranger District (via email)

Caton Fire Map September 26

Click to access 2018_09_27-17.49.40.349-CDT.pdf

Caton Fire September 26

Caton Fire from Miners Peak Lookout September 26

Payette National Forest
Cause Lightning
Date of Origin Friday August 24th, 2018 approx. 11:30 AM
Location The fire is located 7 miles southwest of the Village of Yellow Pine near Indian Point and has been moving east into the Caton Creek drainage.

Indian Ridge Trail Closure
For public safety, the Indian Ridge Trail #090 has been close to public use due to hazards associated with Caton Fire. The entire trail is closed from its beginning at the junction of trial #291 Phoebe Meadows Trail, and the junction of trail #091 Caton Creek Trail.

Caton Fire InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6177/
— — — — — — — — — —

Bum Creek Fire

Update Sept 27

The Bum Creek fire was mostly inactive yesterday when we flew a recon flight. I have attached a map displaying the fires perimeter on September 26th. The size of the fire is approximately 5340 acres with a lot of unburned incorporated in the displayed perimeter. The majority of the fires perimeter has not grown for about a week. The portion of the Bum Creek fire area in the WF of Monumental creek is a mix of burned and unburned my guess right now at about 50% of each, with a couple smoldering spots high on the ridge on the north side of west fork monumental creek. The area continues to smolder with some interior cleanup of dead and downed fuels.

– Justin Pappani, Fire Management Specialist, Payette National Forest, Krassel Ranger District (via email)

Bum Fire Map September 27

Click to access 2018_09_27-17.41.10.184-CDT.pdf

Bum Fire September 26 Looking up Bum Creek

Payette National Forest
Date of Origin Friday September 07th, 2018 approx. 08:00 AM
Location The fire is 3 miles southeast of the Pinnacles, near the West Fork of Monumental Creek Lakes.
Cause Lightning

Bum Creek Fire InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6197/
— — — — — — — — — —

Kiwah Fire

Meadow Creek Road is Open

Salmon-Challis National Forest
Location eight (8) miles northwest of Indian Creek Guard Station on the south side of the Indian Creek drainage in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness
Cause Lightning
Date of Origin Wednesday July 18th, 2018 approx. 05:30 PM
Current as of 9/28/2018, 8:40:26 AM
Size 14,603 Acres
Estimated Containment Date Monday October 01st, 2018 approx. 12:00 AM

High pressure in place Thursday – Saturday with clear skies and highs in the 60-70° range. Low pressure forecasted to move in Saturday night bringing slight chance of precipitation and a drop in daytime temperatures by 10 degrees through mid-week.

Kiwah Fire InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/5995/
— — — — — — — — — —

Pistol Fire

Salmon-Challis National Forest

Location: west of the confluence of Pistol and Forty-Four Creeks in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness on the Middle Fork Ranger District.

Release Date: Sep 10, 2018

The Central Idaho Dispatch Zone is at HIGH Fire Danger.

The Pistol Fire was reported this afternoon at approximately 4:00 p.m. The fire is estimated at 150 acres and is burning in grass, brush, and timber; west of the confluence of Pistol and Forty-Four Creeks in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness on the Middle Fork Ranger District. The fire is currently in monitor status. The cause of the fire is undetermined.

perimeter date 9/12/2018
gis acres 457.19
— — — — — — — — — —

Prospect Fire

Thermal Map Prospect Fire 9-28-2018
20180928ProspectFire-a

link to Prospect Fire FB photo gallery Sept 27:

Salmon-Challis National Forest
Cause Human
Discovery Date 9/25/2018, 3:45:04 PM
County Valley
Last Update 9/26/2018, 8:32:22 AM
Incident Size (Acres) 560
Location one (1) mile northwest of Morgan Airstrip in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness on the Middle Fork Ranger District.

Release Date: Sep 27, 2018

The Prospect Fire was reported on September 25th at approximately 4:00 pm. The fire is currently estimated at 560 acres, burning in timber, approximately one (1) mile northwest of Morgan Airstrip in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness on the Middle Fork Ranger District in steep, inaccessible terrain. The fire is actively burning in the Prospect Creek and Morehead Creek drainages. There are eight (8) firefighters and two helicopters assigned to the fire. An additional 12 firefighters are on order and will be on scene on Saturday morning. The cause of the fire is undetermined.

Firefighters are implementing a point protection strategy. A point protection strategy is a wildfire response strategy, which protects specific assets or highly valued resources from the wildfire without directly halting the continued spread of the wildfire. The strategy takes in to account exposure to firefighters, values at risk, impacts to area user groups, and in the case of the Prospect Fire, wilderness values. The selected point protection strategy was determined to best balance for protection of values and firefighter safety.

Weather: Dry conditions are expected to persist through Saturday. Winds will be breezy today and back off slightly Friday before becoming breezy again Saturday and more so on Sunday. Scattered showers will develop on Sunday ahead of an upper disturbance. Isolated thunderstorms cannot be ruled out. Ridgetops may see wind gusts to 30 mph on Sunday.

source:
https://www.fs.usda.gov/detail/scnf/news-events/?cid=FSEPRD597352
— — — — — — — — — —

BLM urges hunting and wildfire safety

Date: September 25, 2018
Contact: Jennifer Kline, (208) 373-3963

Statewide, Idaho – As the weather starts to cool and leaves turn golden brown, many Idaho residents are getting ready for hunting season. Whether you’re target shooting or building your family’s traditional hunting camp, fire managers urge Idahoans to shoot responsibly and to be vigilant about taking precautions to prevent wildland fires.

“Wildfire conditions are dynamic this time of year,” said BLM Idaho State Fire Management Officer Michael Morcom. “We are still seeing wildfires ignite and grow at alarming rates, which is unusual for this late in the fire season.”

Multiple fires are currently burning in Idaho and some of them are either in or near hunting units. Please be mindful that even though you may not see the firefighters, they are out there. Remember the Ten Commandments of Firearm Safety, especially Rule #3: “Be sure of the target, what is in front of it and beyond it.” For more information, please visit https://www.hunter-ed.com/idaho/studyGuide/The-Ten-Commandments-of-Firearm-Safety/201014_700016216/

On May 10, 2018, acting BLM Idaho State Director Peter J. Ditton issued a Fire Prevention Order prohibiting the possession or use of steel core, incendiary, and/or tracer ammunition as well as exploding targets while shooting. Be proactive and take precautionary measures by clearing all flammable materials and rocks away from the target shooting area and having fire safety equipment (shovel, fire extinguisher and/or water) on hand. Studies have shown that sparks from steel core/steel jacketed fragments cause vegetation fires as often as lead core/copper jacketed and solid copper jackets fragments.

Before you head out to your favorite hunting spot, make sure your vehicle and trailers are properly maintained by ensuring the safety chain is not dragging, wheel bearings are well greased, and tires are inflated to the proper level to help prevent a blown tire. Sparks thrown from an improperly maintained vehicle or trailer can cause roadside fires without the knowledge of the driver.

Finally, everyone enjoys a campfire, but the devastating effects of an escaped campfire when left unattended could last for many years. Please take the proper steps to completely extinguish your campfire and any warming fires before leaving the area.

For more information on current area wildfires and fire prevention information visit http://www.idahofireinfo.com, Idaho Fire Info on Facebook, and follow @BLMIdahoFire on Twitter.
— — — — — — — — — —

NIFC

September 28, 2018

A total of 73 large wildfires have burned approximately 1,002,970 acres. Two large fires were reported today.

Emergency responders and support personnel continue to assist with relief efforts in North Carolina.

Weather: The off shore, easterly wind event across Oregon and northern California will begin to weaken as a strong, fast-moving cold front drops south from British Columbia into Washington and the Northern Rockies. The prefrontal flow will become westerly by afternoon. Elsewhere, a flat westerly flow will continue across the remainder of the country. A departing cold front will bring widespread showers to New England, and a dissipating stationary front will allow for scattered showers and storms to develop along the Gulf Coast.

Idaho Fires: 15 Acres: 95,593 New: 1 Contained: 0
Bible Back Sawtooth National Forest FS 3,600 66 21 miles southeast of Stanley
Bum Creek Payette National Forest FS 5,340 0 10 miles east of Yellow Pine 208-634-0820
Caton Payette National Forest FS 630 0 24 miles east of McCall 208-634-0820
Conner Cassia County CNTY 13,617 75 4 miles southwest of Malta
Copper Mountain Idaho Panhandle National Forest FS 473 23 4 miles east of Eastport 208-267-5561
Cougar Idaho Panhandle National Forest FS 7,871 85 5 miles east of East Hope 208-557-8813
Pistol Salmon-Challis National Forest FS 457 0 38 miles southeast of McCall
* Prospect Salmon-Challis National Forest FS 2,000 0 31 miles northwest of Stanley
Rabbit Foot Salmon-Challis National Forest FS 36,004 82 14 miles southwest of Salmon+ 208-756-7853
Rampike Idaho Panhandle National Forest FS 3,100 0 23 miles northeast of Kellogg 208-664-2318
Rattlesnake Creek Nez Perce-Clearwater National Forest FS 8,220 90 5 miles southwest of Riggins 208-820-1965
Smith Creek Idaho Panhandle National Forest FS 1,115 0 19 miles west of Bonners Ferry 208-267-5561
Stewart Creek Sawtooth National Forest FS 5,295 62 18 miles northwest of Fairfield 208-764-3202
Surprise Creek Idaho Panhandle National Forest FS 3,300 78 18 miles east of Athol 208-664-2318
`Wapiti Boise National Forest FS 4,571 80 13 miles southwest of Stanley 208-259-3361

source:
https://www.nifc.gov/fireInfo/nfn.htm
————————-

Road Reports Sept 26

All roads to Yellow Pine are open. Please share road reports.

Yellow Pine: It has been very dry (and smoky) the last few days in Yellow Pine, below freezing in the early morning but not much frost/dew. Local streets are very dusty. Please drive slow, kids, dogs and deer have the right-of-way (and it helps keep the dust down.) Click for Local Forecast.
Yellow Pine Webcam:

Johnson Creek Stream Gauge:

Quartz Creek: (July 2, 2018) “Quartz Creek has a big wash out just before a switch back towards the top. Right now only motorcycles can get by but with work some atvs can make it. A shovel and a saw may be needed to widen the trail.” – DB
link to FB photo:

Golden Gate Road: Closed. Road to Golden Gate is only passable on foot due to large deep wash-out about 2/3rds of the way up. (2017)
link to FB photo:

Warm Lake Highway: Warm Lake Highway is good.

South Fork Road: South Fork road is good. Watch for hunters, campers and extra traffic – mostly on the weekends.
Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
South Fork Stream Gauge:

EFSF Road: Report (Sept 26) Mail truck driver (Dean) reports the EFSF road is in good shape. Other reports say there are some wash boards developing.

Johnson Creek Road: Report (Sept 26) Mail truck driver (Dean) says the first 13 miles in from Landmark is “the road from hell” and the last 13 miles to Yellow Pine are “great”.
The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet
Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam:

Lick Creek: Old report (Aug 7) “I went out Lick Creek this morning. Was pretty nice. A bit bumpy starting the ascent to the cliffs and remained a bit bumpy to the summit. Was nice all the way down. A nice McCall police officer reminded me the speed limit right after Lick Creek is 25 mph (from 35 mph) and they will be enforcing it.” – AP
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: (Sept 17) “They have started to grade Profile. Not too bad, lots of small rocks on the road, but pot holes have gotten filled in. From the looks of it they should be done by this week.” – BMc
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.
Big Creek Webcam:

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Old report that the road is good.

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Old report (Aug 14) The Meadow Creek Road above Stibnite is open. Old report (July 19) Stibnite to Roosevelt Lake: Road was in great shape (but has not been graded.)
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Open to the adventurous.
Old report (July 13) folks made it over in a small pick up truck, road is rough and getting brushed in.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: Old report from Deadwood Outfitters (June 5) “Deadwood Summit is open and in good shape.” Report (July 3) via Stanley and Bear Valley, watch for pot holes and ruts.
Note: The approx elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
——————————-

Updated Fire Report Sept 26, 2018

There are NO fires currently threatening Yellow Pine.

Dry, dusty and smoky here in Yellow Pine. Smoke is probably from the Bum Creek Fire. No fire restrictions, please be very careful with fire.

Update: It is very smoky south of Yellow Pine this afternoon. Possibly the Prospect Fire in the Wilderness (see below.)

Air Quality in Yellow Pine = Yellow-ish
— — — — — — — — — —

Southwest Idaho Fall prescribed burning planned

Wednesday, September 26, 2018

Boise, Idaho. Sept. 26, 2018 — Southwest Idaho interagency fire managers anticipate favorable weather conditions for planned low-intensity prescribed burns this fall. Prescribed burns are designed to reduce hazardous vegetation (fuels), minimize wildfire potential near communities and improve wildlife habitat.

Weather and fuel conditions permitting, prescribed burns are scheduled to start in October and continue through November. Approximately 2,600 acres are planned for controlled ignitions in 13 project areas within the Boise National Forest.

Public and firefighter safety is always the first priority in all public land fire operations. Fire managers develop burn plans that consider: safety, specific fuel and weather prescriptions and smoke management. All prescribed burns are closely evaluated and are only approved when conditions are favorable.

Fire officials strongly advise forest visitors and homeowners to prepare and plan activities around the proposed dates and locations of burns. Prescribed burns may impact individual’s that are sensitive to smoke. Recreationists should use extreme caution near prescribed fire areas and comply with closures.

Access to areas immediately within or adjacent to burning operations may be temporarily restricted for public health and safety. Specific information and signage will be posted in advance of ignitions and remain in place until operations are completed. Please be cautious of firefighters and additional equipment within these areas as visibility will be decreased with smoke.

The http://www.rxfire.com website is updated with information regarding southwest Idaho burns planned within Idaho Department of Lands, Bureau of Land Management, Payette National Forest and Boise National Forest.

The Boise National Forest prescribed burn hotline: (208)-373-4208.

Idaho City Ranger District

* Alder Ridge (100 acres): located 1 mile north of Placerville, Idaho. This is a landscape burn (ground fire), using hand ignitions to reduce fuel in the wildland urban interface (WUI).
* Amber (300 acres): located 2 miles east of Idaho City, Idaho. This is a modified tree well burn.
* Buckskin (200): located approximately 3 miles east of Idaho City, Idaho.
* Little Ophir (100 acres): located 4 miles west of Pioneerville, Idaho. A landscape burn using hand ignitions that will reduce fuel in the WUI.
* Mores South-Granite Creek (250 acres): located 3 miles east of Idaho City, Idaho. This is a landscape burn (ground fire) using hand ignitions to reduce fuels in the WUI.

Cascade Ranger District

* Horsethief (360 acres): located about 1 mile east/northeast of Horsethief Reservoir. This burn involves helicopter and hand ignitions to reduce fuels throughout the area that is within the WUI.
* Westside Restoration Unit 39 (25 acres): This project is located on National Forest System (NFS) road 435 along West Mountain. It is approximately 10 miles west of Cascade, Idaho. This will be hand ignitions burn to reduce fuels within the WUI.
* Crawford (100 acres): located approximately 4 miles east of Cascade, Idaho adjacent to the Crawford Guard Station, located off of NFS road 22, northeast of Davis reservoir; within WUI area.
* Lower Johnson Thinning (95 acres): Is a project designed to reduce hazardous fuels within the WUI. This project is located approximately 7 miles south of Yellow Pine along NFS road 413 and Johnson Creek.
* Yellow Pine Blowdown (40 acres): is located approximately 62 miles from Cascade, Idaho and is adjacent to the community of Yellow Pine. Hand Ignitions will be used to ignite machine piles along NFS roads 412, 413.
* Rainbow Point (19 acres): This project is located approximately 25 miles northwest of Cascade, Idaho. Machine Piles located within the Rainbow Point campground will be ignited by hand to reduce fuel accumulations throughout the campground.

Mountain Home Ranger District

* Cottonwood II Rx (1000 acres): This project is located about 17 miles NE of Boise, Idaho along NFS roads 203 and 377 in the Cottonwood Creek drainage, north of Arrowrock Reservoir.

Emmett Ranger District

* Miscellaneous Administrative Piles (1-2 acres): At Garden Valley work center.
— — — — — — — — — —

Prescribed Burns planned for Fall 2018

Date Sept 19, 2018

The Krassel Ranger District, Payette National Forest is planning to implement prescribed burns in the Bald Hill and Four Mile project areas this fall. In the Bald Hill Project area we will be working in areas of Reegan Creek and Deadman Creek from the East Fork road up to Rainbow Ridge. In the Fourmile Project area we will be working on both sides of the South Fork, between Blackmare and Holdover Creeks on the west side of the river and in the Fourmile Creek drainage on the east side. See attached map for more specific areas. Ignitions will likely take place in September or October, dependent on weather and fuel conditions. Primary ignitions will take 1-3 days for each burn block, with residual smoke and flame present until the next significant rain. Please do not hesitate to give a call or email with questions, my contact information is lenelson@fs.fed.us or desk phone is 208-634-0622.

Thanks and have a nice day,

Laurel Ingram
Fuels Technician
Payette National Forest
Krassel Ranger District

The Payette National Forest, Krassel Ranger District, is planning on implementing a prescribed burn on the south facing aspect between Deadman Creek and Reegan Creek along the East Fork of the South Fork of the Salmon River this fall. The edge of burn block E is about 5 miles west of Yellow Pine. See map below. Ignitions could occur over a period of 1-3 days in September or October 2018.

(click here for larger image)
For more information please call Justin Pappani at 208-634-0623 or Laurel Ingram at 208-634-0622.

The Payette National Forest, Krassel Ranger District, is planning on implementing the Four Mile Prescribed fire project this fall. Ignitions may take place between Reed Ranch and Poverty Flat Camp Ground on both sides of the South Fork of the Salmon River. See map below. Ignitions could occur over a period of 2 or more days in September or October.

(click here for larger image)
For more information please call Justin Pappani at 208-634-0623 or Laurel Ingram at 208-634-0622
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Caton Fire

Payette National Forest
Cause Lightning
Date of Origin Friday August 24th, 2018 approx. 11:30 AM
Location The fire is located 7 miles southwest of the Village of Yellow Pine near Indian Point and has been moving east into the Caton Creek drainage.
Current as of 9/21/2018, 10:04:49 AM
Size 790 Acres
Estimated Containment Date Monday October 15th, 2018 approx. 12:00 AM

This fire was detected in heavy timber around noon on August 24 – a likely holdover from the lightning storm several days prior. The fire is located 7 miles southwest of Yellow Pine, near Indian Point. The Communities of Yellow Pine and Edwardsburg are not threatened by the fire.

Fire activity for the past several days has been minimal with smoldering and backing fire to the west from Indian Point. Occasional tree torching has been observed.

Indian Peak Trail (FS #090) has an emergency closure – please do not use this trail. No Area Closures have been implemented at this time.

Firefighters are assigned to monitor the fire – additional fire resources will be assigned as needed. The fire is being managed under a confine/contain and point protection strategy.

Indian Ridge Trail Closure
For public safety, the Indian Ridge Trail #090 has been close to public use due to hazards associated with Caton Fire. The entire trail is closed from its beginning at the junction of trial #291 Phoebe Meadows Trail, and the junction of trail #091 Caton Creek Trail.
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/article/6177/47537/

Caton Fire IR Map, September 7, 2018

Caton Fire, Sep 20 looking south from Indian Point

Caton Fire InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6177/
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Bum Creek Fire

Bum Creek Fire Update 9/24/2018

The fire has shown low to moderate activity, with some growth in the past week or so, and active in the interior. We do not have any trail or area closures at this point, but if activity picks up, we may have restrictions on the West Fork Monumental Trail or Cougar Basin. For now, we have signs going up at the Lick Creek trailhead notifying Wilderness visitors that there is natural fire in the area and to make appropriate precautions.

– Krassel Ranger Anthony Botello via email 9/24

Thermal Map Bum Creek Fire 9-26-2018
20180926BumCreek-a

Payette National Forest
Date of Origin Friday September 07th, 2018 approx. 08:00 AM
Location The fire is 3 miles southeast of the Pinnacles, near the West Fork of Monumental Creek Lakes.
Cause Lightning
Current as of 9/21/2018, 10:19:27 AM
Size 3,438 Acres
Estimated Containment Date Monday October 15th, 2018 approx. 12:00 AM

Fire Area Map, September 20, 2018

Sep 20, Head of West Fork Monumental Creek

Sep 20, Head of Cain Creek

Sep 20 looking southeast up trib of Bum Creek

Bum Creek Fire InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6197/
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Kiwah Fire

Meadow Creek Road is Open

Salmon-Challis National Forest
Location eight (8) miles northwest of Indian Creek Guard Station on the south side of the Indian Creek drainage in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness
Cause Lightning
Date of Origin Wednesday July 18th, 2018 approx. 05:30 PM
Current as of 9/26/2018, 7:48:56 AM
Size 14,603 Acres
Estimated Containment Date Monday October 01st, 2018 approx. 12:00 AM

The lightning caused Kiwah Fire, was detected at approximately 5:30 p.m. on July 17, 2018. Fire managers estimate size at 14,603 acres. The fire is burning in a mixed conifer forest on the Middle Fork Ranger District and is being allowed to play, as nearly as possible, its natural ecological role in the environment while providing for firefighter and public safety. The fire is located in steep, inaccessible terrain northwest of Indian Creek Guard Station within the Indian Creek drainage in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness.

Fire activity remains minimal throughout the fire area.

Fire managers expect the Kiwah Fire will continue to burn until a significant precipitation event occurs. Typically, season-ending weather events occur in this area between the last half of September through the first half of October.

The dry northwesterly flow pattern continues today through Friday. The rate of warming will increase, 6 to 8 degrees today and another 2 to 6 degrees Thursday. Winds remain light. Showers or thunderstorms are not expected before late Saturday night or Sunday.

Kiwah Fire Map August 24

Kiwah Fire Area September 5

Kiwah Fire InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/5995/
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Pistol Fire

Salmon-Challis National Forest

Location: west of the confluence of Pistol and Forty-Four Creeks in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness on the Middle Fork Ranger District.

Release Date: Sep 10, 2018

The Central Idaho Dispatch Zone is at HIGH Fire Danger.

The Pistol Fire was reported this afternoon at approximately 4:00 p.m. The fire is estimated at 150 acres and is burning in grass, brush, and timber; west of the confluence of Pistol and Forty-Four Creeks in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness on the Middle Fork Ranger District. The fire is currently in monitor status. The cause of the fire is undetermined.

perimeter date 9/12/2018
gis acres 457.19

Thermal Map Pistol Fire 9-26-2018
20180926Pistol-a
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Prospect Fire

Cause Human
Discovery Date 9/25/2018, 3:45:04 PM
County Valley
Last Update 9/26/2018, 8:32:22 AM
Incident Size (Acres) est 75

Thermal Map Prospect Fire 9-26-2018 Afternoon
20180926ProspectFire-a

FB photo link:

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BLM urges hunting and wildfire safety

Date: September 25, 2018
Contact: Jennifer Kline, (208) 373-3963

BLM urges hunting and wildfire safety

Statewide, Idaho – As the weather starts to cool and leaves turn golden brown, many Idaho residents are getting ready for hunting season. Whether you’re target shooting or building your family’s traditional hunting camp, fire managers urge Idahoans to shoot responsibly and to be vigilant about taking precautions to prevent wildland fires.

“Wildfire conditions are dynamic this time of year,” said BLM Idaho State Fire Management Officer Michael Morcom. “We are still seeing wildfires ignite and grow at alarming rates, which is unusual for this late in the fire season.”

Multiple fires are currently burning in Idaho and some of them are either in or near hunting units. Please be mindful that even though you may not see the firefighters, they are out there. Remember the Ten Commandments of Firearm Safety, especially Rule #3: “Be sure of the target, what is in front of it and beyond it.” For more information, please visit
https://www.hunter-ed.com/idaho/studyGuide/The-Ten-Commandments-of-Firearm-Safety/201014_700016216/

On May 10, 2018, acting BLM Idaho State Director Peter J. Ditton issued a Fire Prevention Order prohibiting the possession or use of steel core, incendiary, and/or tracer ammunition as well as exploding targets while shooting. Be proactive and take precautionary measures by clearing all flammable materials and rocks away from the target shooting area and having fire safety equipment (shovel, fire extinguisher and/or water) on hand. Studies have shown that sparks from steel core/steel jacketed fragments cause vegetation fires as often as lead core/copper jacketed and solid copper jackets fragments.

Before you head out to your favorite hunting spot, make sure your vehicle and trailers are properly maintained by ensuring the safety chain is not dragging, wheel bearings are well greased, and tires are inflated to the proper level to help prevent a blown tire. Sparks thrown from an improperly maintained vehicle or trailer can cause roadside fires without the knowledge of the driver.

Finally, everyone enjoys a campfire, but the devastating effects of an escaped campfire when left unattended could last for many years. Please take the proper steps to completely extinguish your campfire and any warming fires before leaving the area.

For more information on current area wildfires and fire prevention information visit http://www.idahofireinfo.com, Idaho Fire Info on Facebook, and follow @BLMIdahoFire on Twitter.
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NIFC

September 26, 2018

Nationally, there were no new large fires reported or contained. Only a handful of fires reported any acreage gains. Firefighters continue to work toward their containment goals.

Emergency responders and support personnel continue to assist with relief efforts in North Carolina.

Weather: A secondary, more compact upper level trough will move into south-central Canada, pushing a back door cold front across the northern Great Plains into the Northern Rockies. Scattered showers will be possible along the Continental Divide as far south as north-central Wyoming. Offshore wind flow will continue along the West Coast as the thermal trough remains positioned just offshore. In the East, a passing cold front will bring widespread showers to all states along the Atlantic and Gulf Coasts.

Idaho Fires: 14 Acres: 91,772 New: 0 Contained: 0
Bible Back Sawtooth National Forest FS 3,500 33 21 miles southeast of Stanley
Bum Creek Payette National Forest FS 3,500 0 10 miles east of Yellow Pine 208-634-0820
Caton Payette National Forest FS 790 0 24 miles east of McCall 208-634-0820
Conner Cassia County CNTY 13,607 65 4 miles southwest of Malta
Copper Mountain Idaho Panhandle National Forest FS 473 23 4 miles east of Eastport 208-267-5561
Cougar Idaho Panhandle National Forest FS 7,866 85 5 miles east of East Hope 208-557-8813
Pistol Salmon-Challis National Forest FS 458 0 38 miles southeast of McCall
Rabbit Foot Salmon-Challis National Forest FS 36,004 82 14 miles southwest of Salmon+ 208-756-7853
Rampike Idaho Panhandle National Forest FS 3,100 0 23 miles northeast of Kellogg 208-664-2318
Rattlesnake Creek Nez Perce-Clearwater National Forest FS 8,220 90 5 miles southwest of Riggins 208-820-1965
Smith Creek Idaho Panhandle National Forest FS 1,113 0 19 miles west of Bonners Ferry 208-267-5561
Stewart Creek Sawtooth National Forest FS 5,270 62 18 miles northwest of Fairfield 208-764-3202
Surprise Creek Idaho Panhandle National Forest FS 3,300 78 18 miles east of Athol 208-664-2318
Wapiti Boise National Forest FS 4,571 80 13 miles southwest of Stanley 208-259-3361

source:
https://www.nifc.gov/fireInfo/nfn.htm
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Sept 23, 2018 The Yellow Pine Times

Sept 23, 2018 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Community Calendar:

May 10 Burn Permits required
May 15 Firewood Season Starts – permits at The Corner
August 6 Ice Hole Campground Closed for the season
September 29 Wildland Firefighter Foundation Fund Raiser and Yellow Pine Community BBQ
October 6 YPFD Commissioners Meeting 10am YP Community Center

(details below)
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Village News:

Yellow Pine Transfer Station

The Yellow Pine and Warm Lake Transfer sites are seeing other material deposited into the Woody Debris pile which violates our agreement with the Forest Service to have the Woody Debris allowed to be there. The Valley County Commission is requesting assistance from the folks in Yellow Pine to help police the Yellow Pine Transfer site. Valley County and/or Lakeshore employees are working to clean up the site this fall. To avoid losing the ability to have the Transfer Site be a place for woody debris to be allowed to be used. The Forest Service will continue to burn the debris but only if the other material is removed from the debris pile.

Other items being left on site is also not appreciated as this site is designed to just have Household Waste in the bins. Furniture and appliances left require additional costs and are not in our program. However with working with others we continue to handle the issues but maybe better education would help.

– Gordon Cruickshank, Valley County Commissioner


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Ice Hole Campground

The Cascade Ranger District [has] temporarily closed Ice Hole Campground for reconstruction beginning Monday, Aug. 6, 2018.

The Campground will remain closed for the remainder of the 2018 season. Project funding was provided by local Tribes and a State RV Grant.

Forest Service crews and contractors will repair existing resource damage, enabling visitors to have an improved recreational experience in the future.

link to project:

Ice Hole Update

Progress made with renovation and remodel of Cascade Ranger District – Ice Hole Campground!

Thanks for the photo shares from Boise NF employees Marie Willis and Danelle Highfill.

link to FB photo gallery:
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Lost Tablet – Reward

On July 21 one of our crews lost a Samsung tablet on the Profile Road between the switchback below Red Metals mine road and Missouri Creek road. They realized it was missing almost immediately and went back and gridded the road for it, but could not find it. It could have bounced into the roadside brush, or been picked up off the road by someone travelling from Big Creek or Yellow Pine or vice versa.

This tablet has a summers worth of field data and we would sure like to have it back. Would you please spread the word that Ranger Botello will pay a handsome reward of cheeseburger, fries, pop and ice cream for its safe return!?

Contact: Anthony B. Botello, District Ranger, p: 208-634-0601, c: 208-634-9286
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Pests

Yellow Jackets are late this year, but really mean. Long legged wasps are getting more numerous and invading sheds for shelter. Mosquito population dropped during the hot dry summer. Lots of gnats out now. Numerous grasshoppers clacking about. Colombian ground squirrels have gone into hibernation. Chipmunks had a population boom this summer. Pine squirrels are not as numerous as in past years. Bears have been roaming the Abstein orchard looking for apples (and any human/pet food they can find.)

Link to Bear Visitor video Aug 20, 2018
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Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Please do not dump appliances or tires at our transfer station, it is for household trash only and must be placed in the dumpsters.

“Bring it, Don’t Burn it.” There is a burn pile for woody debris only. Please don’t put trash, furniture, construction debris or cardboard in the burn pile.

Note 9-23: Please stop dumping cardboard boxes on the burn pile!!!
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Local Events:

Chris Petersen Celebration

The Celebration of Chris Petersen’s life in Yellow Pine was 9/22/18 at 2pm at the Yellow Pine Tavern.
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Wildland Firefighter Foundation Fund Raiser and Yellow Pine Community BBQ September 29

Midas Gold Idaho and The Corner are proud to sponsor the 5EV Memorial Run.

This 3.6 mile trail run is a fund raiser for the 5EV Memorial Trail Fund and Wildland Firefighter Foundation. Donations are greatly appreciated. The race starts at 10:00 am at the Williams Peak Trailhead on the East Fork Rd. and ends at the summit of the trail; a 3021 ft. elevation change.

A Community BBQ will be held after the race at 4:00 pm, at The Corner in Yellow Pine, Idaho. The roasted pig is provided by Midas Gold Inc. with great food by The Corner and the volunteers of the Yellow Pine Community.

Proceeds from this event will be shared 50/50 between the 5EV Memorial Trail Fund and the Wildland Firefighters Foundation.

For additional information or to sign up for the race, contact: Matt Huber Matt @ ypcorner.com 208/633-3325

Update: Community Pig Roast Potluck:

Saturday, September 29, 2018, 4:00 pm at The Corner – To support the 5EV Memorial Run and the Wildland Firefighters Foundations, a Community Pig Roast Potluck will be held after the race at 4:00 pm, at The Corner in Yellow Pine, Idaho. The roasted pig is provided by Midas Gold Inc. and Macaroni & Cheese by The Corner. We are expecting approximately 50 folks. Please bring a dish to share like: Scalloped Potatoes, Rice dishes, Green Salads, Sauerkraut, Vegetable Salads, Veggie Tray, Vegetable dishes, Deviled Eggs, Applesauce, Dinner Rolls, Cake, Cookies, Cobbler. Let’s support the folks who help protect us.

Link to: 2018 WFF Race event flyer.pdf
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Welch Labor Day Golf Tournament was Sept. 1st
(No results by press time Sunday 9-23.)
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Local Groups:

YPWUA News:

July 24th Yellow Pine water update:

It is good to go back to the even/odd watering schedule. Even/odd means if your address is 315 Yellow Pine Avenue, you can water on odd days such as the 1st, 3rd, 5th etc. And if your address is 316, water in even numbered days. The only request is that watering be done between 6am and 1pm. Also please limit to one sprinkler at a time.

Also it is requested that no lawn watering be done August 1st through the 6th to be able to withstand the draw from Harmonica.

Our second sand filter will be on line soon and give us more capacity. Thank you everyone for your patience during the high water demand time. – SH

There was a YPWUA Annual Shareholder’s meeting Saturday July 7, no minutes yet.
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VYPA News:

Yellow Pine Village Association
P.O. Box 10
Yellow Pine, ID 83677

Minutes: September 8, 2018

Officers present: Deb Filler, Chairman; Ronda Rogers, Vice Chairman; Lynnea Imel, Secretary; Kathy Hall, Member at Large. Absent: Joel Fields, Treasurer

The meeting opened at 2:00 by Deb Filler.

There being no objections or corrections, the minutes of the August 11, 2018, were accepted as posted on Facebook and community bulletin boards. Minutes and VYPA announcements will be e-mailed to property owners shown on the Secretary’s list. You can opt out by notifying limel @ ruralnetwork.net They are also available on Facebook via https://www.facebook.com/The-Yellow-Pine-Times-278419589262862/

Treasurer’s Report Report submitted by Joel Fields, Treasurer (See attached) YP General Ledger printout, 7/8/2018 -8/31/2018;

link to: YPVA Financials – 8_10_2018.pdf

Cemetery Report was presented by Tim Rogers. The family of Chris Peterson will be placing a headstone. The Chris Peterson memorial gathering will be September 22nd in Yellow Pine. The committee plans to make fence repairs this Fall.

Lorrine Munn read a letter from the Welch and Sullivan families (see attached). In this letter the writers suggest that the Cemetery Fund transfer some money to the “Life Flight Landing Pad” project and the Restroom Fund to allow for moving these two projects forward. The Cemetery Committee has a copy of the letter and will respond.

Community Hall Report was presented by Kathy Hall, committee Chairman (see attached 9/8/2018 and General Ledger 7/8/18 – 8/31/18) Planned events next year:

* May 25th. Memorial Day ATV/UTV Fun run. See Kathy with your suggestions/ideas/help.

* Garage Sale the week of July 1-7. Bring donation to Community Hall after June 15, 2019

* July 13th ATV/UTV Ride to Big Creek, Smith Creek and back. See Kathy Hall.

The VYPA has title to a small camp trailer in back of the building. To be gifted free. Mike Amos has indicated an interest. The committee wishes to remove to outhouse in back of the Community Hall. Free. See Kathy Hall.

Several trees growing close to the building will be removed. A table and door outside should be removed. Flex Seal will be used in the basement to seal cracks. Picnic tables are to be moved and covered for winter. Lynn Imel has purchased new wheels for the piano; help is needed to install them. The kitchen floor is being reviewed, addressing cost/use/safety.

Thank You, Kathy Hall, for organizing work on the Community Hall this past year!

Harmonica & Music Festival Report by Lorrine Munn, committee Chairman. Some payments are still out-standing including one vendor fee from an un-authorized vendor. The event income is greater than the 2017 Festival. The breakfasts were particularly successful. All who volunteered are congratulated and thanked for their work. The committee works all year so there may be a meeting in November, but definitely starts with frequent meetings after February.

Old Business

Deb Filler has supplied maps of proposed ditch/culvert maintenance and repairs for this Fall and future projects. (see attached) The locations were identified by YP residents; there will be annual reviews to establish a priority list for maintenance and repairs to alleviate flooding and water damage to roads. A detailed work order form has been developed (see attached) so anyone wishing to work on a project/portion of a project can submit a proposal to the YPVA council. There are seven projects on the list to be done by October 31st. Copy and complete the form, mail it to Box 10 Yellow Pine, ID 83677 or give it to a Council member. YPVA Council will prioritize work and hire workers with full disclosure and publicizing. NOTE the deadline (9/20/18) and short time line for this year’s ditches, culverts, silt traps.

Link to: Water Run-off – October 2018 Tasks Map.pdf

Link to: Work Order for Maintenance Work.pdf

The Labor Day golf tournament sponsors reported they raised: $700 for the fireworks fund; $225 to give to Cecil Dallman for snow plow work on local, un-maintained, roads; $225 to help develop the helicopter landing pad. (fireworks are not sponsored by YPVA; helicopter pad is not a part of YPVA; YPVA does hire snowplow work and dust abatement on main roads. The golf tournaments are privately organized and frequently donate money to various Yellow Pine projects of their own choosing. See attached letters.)

Midas Gold sent their representative, Belinda Provancher. Groups opposed to the Stibnite mine re-opening recently held a rally in McCall. Midas continues to work with Valley County towns to develop Community Agreements to cultivate open dialogue between citizens and the mining company. The community delegates are meeting September 21st to create a written agreement that will be proposed to all Valley County communities.

link to: 2018 Community Partnership Agreement.pdf

Midas recently donated $10,000 to Yellow Pine Water Users Assoc. Lynn Imel reminded the attendees that a former mining company gave the water company approximately $80,000 to build water infrastructure improvements; this Midas donation is not without precedence.

Yellow Pine Water Users’ Assoc. submitted a written report to keep the community informed. (see attached) Residents need to be aware that there will be a considerable increase in the 2019 service fees. A Water Users’ meeting is planned for October. The date has not yet been arranged. The company is separate from the YPVA and residents may purchase shares if they wish to vote and participate in the management. See Willie Sullivan.

Heli-spot landing pad Anne Forster reported that the pad should be ready for use this coming winter after Danny Saleen did considerable work with his tractor. Removing additional trees at the site would be helpful and would allow for landing two helicopters, but that can only be done by Boise National Forest. The site is on the East Fork road near the Yellow Pine/Johnson Creek intersection. Contact Cecil Dallman and Merle Saleen with questions. Yellow Pine Fire Protection District (YPFD) is actively involved in the project.

Yellow Pine Fire Protection Dist. Anne Forster reported that the YPFD has brush clearing and chimney cleaning equipment for residents to borrow. The trucks and other equipment are kept ready even during the winter, inside the building. The Fire Commissioners are investigating the purchase of a new truck to replace one currently used. Training occurs every Sunday during Summer months and everyone is encouraged to become involved. The Commissioners are talking with Big Creek/Edwardsburg residents to assist them in improving their fire protection. There are two “pumpkins”, above ground collapsible water containers used for firefighting, available. Florescent paint and tape were recently applied to mark the fire hydrants. With current dangerous fire conditions, the local area is closely monitored by citizens.

New Business

Restroom construction at the Community Hall: Lorrine Munn read a letter from the Welch and Sullivan families (see attached). Please read this letter, and the letter regarding the Golf Tournaments, so everyone in the community understands this project and the funding.

VYPA Meeting Dates 2019 June 18th; July 20th; August 10th; September 14th. Note that the July 20th meeting is not on the second Saturday due to a conflict with a planned ATV rally involving many residents and visitors.

[Note: Missing letters from YPWUA and from the Welch and Sullivan families at press time 9-23]

Midas Gold and Yellow Pine

August 28, 2018

Attached is the Community Partnership Agreement the Village of Yellow Pine signed with Midas Gold.

link to: 2018 Community Partnership Agreement.pdf
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YPFD News:

Next meeting: YPFD Commissioners Meeting October 6, 2018 10am YP Community Center

There was a YPFD Fire Commissioners Meeting June 9, no minutes yet.

There was a YPFD Fire Commissioners Meeting August 6, no minutes yet.

There was a YPFD Budget Hearing September 22, no minutes yet.

Bring it, Don’t Burn it

For us in Yellow Pine, Jake Strohmeyer, Dist. Ranger with the Boise NF said we can use the area at our transfer station for yard debris and the FS will burn it once a year. Please no furniture, mattresses, construction debris, metal objects, tires or personnel junk. Please only woody yard debris. When using the pile please be mindful of where you place the debris as it should be contained to a manageable burnable area and kept as clean as possible. – JF

Burn Permits Needed After May 10

A reminder that May 10 is beginning of fire season where burning permits for open burning are required throughout most Fire Districts. Since the YPFD doesn’t issue actual “Burn Permits” per say, notification of a large pile burn would be appreciated. The notification makes the fire officials aware of those who have a planned burn. Seeing smoke can easily raise concerns. When neighbors call in seeing smoke, we can reduce their anxiety by knowing that there was a notification by a property owner. This elevates the response to smoke investigations.

Contact Fire Chief Jeff at 633-1010 or email j4star1911 @ gmail.com

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Updates:

Fire Department Training on Sunday’s at 11:00 all are welcome

Special Use Permit for Fire Station and Helispot:

The Boise National Forest has granted a “Special Use Permit” to the Yellow Pine Fire Protection District for the Fire Station lot and the Helispot. The Helispot is a new addition and the Fire Station lot was a renewal. This permit will expire 12/31/2037 (20 years) and will need to be rewed again at that time. Thanks to Jake Strohmeyer, District Ranger and Chris (Kit) Woras, Special Use Permit Administrator of the Boise Forest for spending a lot of time and correspondence to get this permit completed.

Helispot / Life Flight:

A lot of progress has been made on the new Helipad near the crossroads.

Anyone needing a Smoke/CO detector or fire extinguisher please let Jeff, Cecil or Dan know.

– Fire Chief Jeff

There are YPFD T-shirts, as well as YPFD patches and stickers for sale at the Tavern now.
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Biz Listings:

Yellow Pine Lodge

Open for summer (208) 633-3377
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Yellow Pine Tavern 633-2233

Fall Hours: 8am to close 7 days a week.

Daily Menu: full Breakfast served also Burgers and Pizza for Afternoon and Evening. Good selection of Beer and Wine also sold by 6 and 12 pack. Fuel available 92 Octane. Wi Fi, Ice.
— — — —

The Corner 633-3325

Our hours for this week: Monday-Friday 4pm-8pm, Saturday and Sunday 11am-close

We will also be cooking most of the week for private events so if anyone wants something outside of those hours just call and we can usually accommodate.

The Corner Store is open as well, just call for grocery needs, fresh produce, eggs, meat etc.
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Deadwood Outfitters
We’re currently interviewing for winter caretakers. A remote location and snowmobile only access in winter.
Duty services include:
Guest cabin up keep
Preparing meals
Keeping porches shoveled
And enjoying lots of solitude.
For more info. deadwoodoutfit @ gmail.com
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Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed (208) 382-4430
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Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, Will service Yellow Pine
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (Sept 17) overnight low of 29 degrees, almost clear sky and light frost this morning, light chilly breeze. Traffic kicking up a lot of dust. A female hairy woodpecker and a couple of fluffed up finches visiting. Convoy of trucks and trailers headed up main street around 1pm. Sunny warm day, breezy afternoon, high of 78 degrees. Partly cloudy at sundown and calmer. Raven flying and calling at dusk.

Tuesday (Sept 18) overnight low of 29 degrees, dry – not much frost or dew, almost clear sky except for the haze of smoke (and dust) in the air, light breezes. Two fluffed up finches visiting this morning. A few noisy airplanes and light traffic kicking up dust this morning. Increasing smoke and decreasing visibility by 11am. Early afternoon mostly cloudy, lighter breezes, a little better air quality, high of 76 degrees. Low loud airplane circled over the village a little after 1pm, windy and warm. Clarks nutcracker and a steller jay flying around the neighborhood and calling. Mostly clear at dusk, fat waxing moon over Antimony Ridge.

Wednesday (Sept 19) overnight low of 31 degrees, frost and dew wetting roofs, clear sky and moderate haze of smoke. Looks like a fly-in on the airstrip camera, loud airplanes buzzing the village off and on during the morning and again during the heat of the afternoon. Raven flying and calling, not many song birds around. Increasing traffic and dust in the afternoon. Warm and mostly cloudy, stiff afternoon breezes, high of 73 degrees. Calmer and better air quality after sundown. Smoky yellow/orange moon at dark.

Thursday (Sept 20) overnight low of 29 degrees, dry – not much frost/dew, looks clear to mostly clear above moderate haze of smelly smoke, poor air quality. Multiple loud airplanes flying over the village at 1018am. Clear and smoky at lunch time, a little breezy. Another group of airplanes buzzed the village at 135pm. Breezy and mostly cloudy mid-afternoon, a little better air quality, high of 69 degrees. High wispy clouds at sundown, slight breeze and much better air quality. Fat fuzzy orange waxing moon rising above Antimony ridge at dark.

Friday (Sept 21) overnight low of 29 degrees, dry – hardly any dew/frost, appears to be mostly clear above layer of smoke – poor air quality. One finch visiting, hardly any birds around. Pine squirrel scolding from the trees. A pack of noisy airplanes buzzing the village after sunup. Warm, dry early afternoon, a few high wispy clouds and lighter haze of smoke, somewhat better air quality. Long legged wasps are active. Multiple shots fired to the west starting at 233pm. Warm afternoon, increasing clouds, high of 77 degrees. Overcast by evening, calmer and better air quality – light haze of smoke and dust.

Saturday (Sept 22) overnight low of 33 degrees, dry – not much dew, looks partly cloudy above the smoke – poor air quality again. Young pine squirrel scolding from the fence. Mostly cloudy by early afternoon, thinner smoke and better air quality, high of 76 degrees. By evening the smoke was getting thicker again, mostly cloudy and nearly calm at sundown.

Sunday (Sept 23) overnight low of 39 degrees, morning rain showers (0.04″), mostly cloudy and much better air quality. Heard a hairy woodpecker flapping and calling in the neighborhood. Partly cloudy, warm and breezy early afternoon, good air quality, high of 68 degrees. Lots of long legged wasps looking to get inside sheds. Fall colors brightening up the hills. A few gun shots to the west at 620pm. Partly cloudy at sundown, good air quality and slight breeze.
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Idaho News:

Sept. 29 fun run to aid Wildland Firefighter Foundation

The Star-News September 20, 2018

The 5EV Memorial Run near Yellow Pine on Saturday, Sept. 29 will raise money for the 5EV Memorial Trail Fund and Wildland Firefighter Foundation.

This 3.6 mile trail run will start at 10 a.m. Sept 29 at the Williams Peak Trailhead on the East Fork Road and end at the summit of the trail, a 3,021 feet elevation change.

A community barbecue will be held after the race at 4 p.m. at The Corner in Yellow Pine, with the roasted pig provided by Midas Gold Inc.

For additional information or to sign up for the race, contact Matt Huber at matt@ypcorner.com or 208-633-3325.

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CPR, First Aid classes to be held in Donnelly

The Star-News September 20, 2018

The Donnelly Fire Station will host a CPR/AED class on Tuesday, Oct. 2, and a First Aid class on Wednesday, Oct. 3, at 6 p.m.

Cost is $20 for both courses, and space is limited. To register, call 208-325-8619.

The Donnelly Fire Station is located at 244 W. Roseberry Road.

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Lake Cascade algae declines, but health warning still in place

2018algae-a

Satellite photo shows extent of algae bloom in Lake Cascade on Sept. 11

 

By Max Silverson for The Star-News September 20, 2018

A health advisory was still in effect this week over a bloom of blue-green algae in Lake Cascade, but the toxic bacteria is on the decline, Idaho Department of Environmental Quality officials said.

 

Satellite photos taken on Sunday show the bloom breaking up and it appears less widespread than before, DEQ Watershed Coordinator Chase Cusack said.

There are still some concentrated areas of the algae towards the south end of the lake by the dam and north of Sugarloaf Campground, he said.

“We’re hopeful that with the cooling weather that the health advisory could be over soon,” Cusack said.

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A Place in History: McCall seeks to place airport hangar on national register

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News September 20, 2018

Most people driving by the red hangar at the McCall Airport only see an old, battered building. But when Walt Sledzieski drives by, he sees an important part of McCall’s past.

Sledzieski heads the McCall Historic Preservation Commission, which plans to nominate the former Johnson Flying Service hangar at the airport to the National Register of Historic Places.

In doing so, he hopes to spur a passion for the history of McCall’s aviation establishment in local residents, especially youths.

Known as the “red hangar” or the “Elevation 5,021’” building, the hangar is the airport’s oldest building at about 80 years, Sledzieski said. The building covers 4,758 square feet.

Johnson Flying Service was founded by Bob Johnson in 1924 and headquartered in Missoula, Mt.. The service operated out of the hangar beginning at its completion in the mid-1930s until about 1980.

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Fall Newsletter 2018 – UI Extension, Valley County

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New trespass law impacts hunters

Major increase in punishment

Steve Liebenthal Sep 19, 2018 KIVI TV

Pat Ewing loves to hunt in Adams County. On this day, he is looking for grouse but he says a new trespass law makes him leery about hunting in this area.

“Down in the woods I just saw a grouse fly out to the left through the forest. I would like to go hunt and pursue that grouse. I don’t know if I can because of the private property law that passed, I could be in big trouble and get big fines if I go on private property and hunt.”

The new law that went into effect July first dramatically harshens the penalty for trespassing, while easing landowners requirements to identify private property. “The new thing is that the requirement for landowners to post their property every 660 feet is no longer part of the code,” said IDFG’s Matt O’Connell. “So now it’s a reasonable person standard where if the property is marked in such a way that a reasonable person would believe it’s private, that’s the main requirement.”

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Absentee ballots go out by mail this week in Idaho

by Scott Logan Tuesday, September 18th 2018

Boise, Idaho (CBS 2) — In-person early voting begins Oct. 15th in Ada County but the election really starts on Friday when absentee ballots are mailed out throughout Idaho.

“The very first ballots will go out live to voters on Friday,” said Phil McGrane, chief deputy clerk for Ada County. “It’s all our absentee ballot requests that have been coming in from voters throughout the community as well as any military and overseas voters. We start 45 days out.”

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Mining News:

Ask Midas: What Are Your Plans for Accessing the Site?

July 19

Midas Gold Idaho wants to keep the community informed about the work we are doing at the Stibnite Gold Project site. The Ask Midas blog series gives the experts in our company a chance to answer some of the community’s most frequently asked questions and help clear up any misconceptions around the project.

The Stibnite Gold Project is located 39 miles east of McCall and just outside the village of Yellow Pine. To get there today, you have to travel on narrow, winding dirt roads right alongside major fish-bearing creeks and rivers. When we were developing our plan for the redevelopment and restoration of the Stibnite site, we wanted to find the safest way for our employees to get to the site during mining while minimizing our impacts on, and risks to, the environment. Today, I want to give you more details about our plans to access the site during construction, operations and restoration.

What Your Plans for Traveling to and From the Site?

Under our plan, we propose to upgrade Burntlog Road starting at Landmark in order to access the site utilizing existing Forest Service roads wherever possible. This route will allow us to stay away from major fish-bearing creeks and rivers, avoid known avalanche sites in the winter and reduce potential conflicts with other folks who use the South Fork and Johnson Creek Roads. We believe it will take us one year to upgrade Burntlog Road and connect it to the existing Thunder Mountain Road, once our plan is approved. We would continue to use the South Fork, Johnson Creek and Stibnite roads until the upgrades are complete.

Our plans for travel to and from the project site were designed to prioritize the safety of our employees and Idahoans, given the frequent avalanches and rock falls that occur along the South Fork and Stibnite roads as well as the presence of local residents and road users. We know that continued access is a very important issue for many Idahoans, so our plan tries to maintain recreational access so that Idahoans can continue to safely hike, hunt, fish, snowmobile and explore the areas surrounding the site much as they do today. This is why, after hearing feedback from the public, we submitted an additional proposal for regulators to consider allowing public access to Thunder Mountain on Stibnite Road from Yellow Pine and through the site when it is safe and feasible, in addition to access along the improved Burntlog Road. Temporary closures would still occur seasonally, and when needed, because of activity at site. During construction and operations, we will be using very large equipment and, at times, we will need to us explosives to break ore and development rock. We don’t want to take any unnecessary risks that could jeopardize people’s safety, so would keep people clear at these times, usually once per day.

We know Thunder Mountain is an important place for Idahoans and, no matter what, the community will still be able to access the area during construction and operations of our project by using Trapper Flats Road and Landmark to Burntlog Road. We believe strongly in protecting public lands and maintaining Idahoans access to the backcountry.

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US agency endorses plan to block new mining near Yellowstone

By Matthew Brown – 9/21/18 AP

Billings, Mont. — U.S. officials recommended approval on Friday of a plan to block new mining claims for 20 years on the forested public lands that make up Yellowstone National Park’s mountainous northern boundary.

Regional Forester Leanne Marten submitted a letter to the Bureau of Land Management endorsing the plan to withdraw 30,000 acres (12,140 hectares) in Montana’s Paradise Valley and the Gardiner Basin from new claims for gold, silver, platinum and other minerals, U.S. Forest Service spokeswoman Marna Daley said.

A final decision is up to the office of U.S. Interior Sec. Ryan Zinke, who favors the withdrawal. Zinke said in a statement that it could be finalized in coming weeks.

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Fire Season:

Prescribed Fires on the Payette National Forest

Date: September 21, 2018
Contact: Brian Harris (208) 634-0784 cell: (208) 634-6945

McCall, Idaho – The Payette National Forest will be conducting multiple prescribed fires (broadcast and pile burning) this fall. Depending on weather conditions, prescribed fire could take place anytime from now through early November.

“Fire is one of the most important natural agents of change in our forested ecosystems,” said Keith Lannom, Payette National Forest Supervisor. “Our previous use of prescribed fire played a role in reducing fuels within the Mesa wildfire area this summer. That reduction of fuels from prescribed fire allowed our firefighters to aggressively attack the Mesa fire.”

Prescribed fire plays a major role in forest restoration efforts by reducing accumulated fuels, while promoting long-term ecosystem integrity and sustainability by reducing the risk to communities and wildlife habitat from high-severity wildland fire.

The Council and Weiser Ranger Districts plans to apply fire to 2,000 acres in East Fork of the Weiser River and 30 acres in the area of the community of Bear.

The McCall and New Meadows Ranger Districts plans to burn 1,500 acres in the Lost Creek area, 5,000 acres in Rapid River (southwest of Pollock Mountain), 700 acres in the Upper Weiser River drainage, 300 acres near Rock Flat, and 300 acres in Bear Basin.

The Krassel Ranger District plans to ignite 2,500 acres in the Fourmile drainage, and 1,800 acres in the Bald Hill project area.

Trail heads and roads that lead into these areas will be posted with caution signs and a map of the prescribed fire locations. Fire personnel will work closely with the Idaho/Montana Airshed Group, the National Weather Service, and the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality to insure that smoke impacts are minimized. The decision to ignite on any given day will depend on favorable weather conditions and the need to reduce smoke effects as much as possible.

Smoke from these prescribed fires will be much less than what would be expected from a wildfire. If smoke concentrations approach air quality standards fire ignition may be delayed until air quality improves. Residual smoke may be visible for up to 2 weeks following ignition, but most of the smoke from the fires will dissipate 1-2 days after ignition.

These prescribed fires will reduce fuels near communities and improve current big game habitat by opening timber stands (maintaining the large tree component) and rejuvenating the herbaceous and browse component. In addition, birds and small mammals generally benefit from an increase in snags and/or coarse woody debris. Reducing accumulated fuels will not only increase available forage, but also promote long-term ecosystem integrity and sustainability by reducing the risk to habitat from high-severity wildland fire.

Smoke sensitive individuals may call Patrick Schon (McCall and New Meadows RDs; 347-0300), Justin Pappani (Krassel RD; 634-0600), or Phil Graeve (Council and Weiser RDs; 549-4200) with any concerns they may have about the planned prescribed fires. The public may also call the Ranger District for more information.

Prescribed fire is an important component of forest restoration and part of the comprehensive fire management program on the Payette National Forest. For more information, please call: Council RD: 253-0100; Krassel RD: 634-0974; McCall RD: 634-0400; New Meadows RD: 347-0300; Weiser RD: 549-4200

Brian Harris
Public Affairs Officer
Payette National Forest
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Idaho’s firefighting season bills come to $17 million

9/19/18 AP

Boise, Idaho — The state of Idaho’s bills for this year’s wildfire season has come in at about $17 million, in line with averages from recent years.

The Idaho Press reports the total expenditures from firefighting on state-protected lands this year came to more than $21 million, but more than $4 million of that is reimbursable from other agencies. The Idaho Legislature’s Joint Finance-Appropriations Committee set aside $20 million earlier this year to cover the state’s firefighting season costs.

Acting state Lands Department Director David Groeschl told members of the Land Board on Tuesday that moderate weather in September with more moisture weakened the state’s fire conditions, and restrictions on campfires and some other activity on state lands are being lifted this week. Fire crews have a solid handle on the remaining wildfires on state land, he said.

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Public Lands:

BCYPSR Collaborative – Meeting Sept 27th Canceled

Here is an update from the Steering Committee:

Kyle, Wes, Nathan, and Sandra met last month and are inching closer to reaching a final grand plan for the EFSFSR. We are confident that we will reach the finish line by the next collaborative meeting in October to get feedback from the collaborative as a whole. We will still shoot for having November be the last meeting should we be able to reach consensus.

The next meeting will be on Thursday, October 25th.
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Prescribed Burns planned for Fall 2018

Date Sept 19, 2018

The Krassel Ranger District, Payette National Forest is planning to implement prescribed burns in the Bald Hill and Four Mile project areas this fall. In the Bald Hill Project area we will be working in areas of Reegan Creek and Deadman Creek from the East Fork road up to Rainbow Ridge. In the Fourmile Project area we will be working on both sides of the South Fork, between Blackmare and Holdover Creeks on the west side of the river and in the Fourmile Creek drainage on the east side. See attached map for more specific areas. Ignitions will likely take place in September or October, dependent on weather and fuel conditions. Primary ignitions will take 1-3 days for each burn block, with residual smoke and flame present until the next significant rain. Please do not hesitate to give a call or email with questions, my contact information is lenelson@fs.fed.us or desk phone is 208-634-0622.

Thanks and have a nice day,

Laurel Ingram
Fuels Technician
Payette National Forest
Krassel Ranger District

The Payette National Forest, Krassel Ranger District, is planning on implementing a prescribed burn on the south facing aspect between Deadman Creek and Reegan Creek along the East Fork of the South Fork of the Salmon River this fall. The edge of burn block E is about 5 miles west of Yellow Pine. See map below. Ignitions could occur over a period of 1-3 days in September or October 2018.

(click here for larger image size)
For more information please call Justin Pappani at 208-634-0623 or Laurel Ingram at 208-634-0622.

The Payette National Forest, Krassel Ranger District, is planning on implementing the Four Mile Prescribed fire project this fall. Ignitions may take place between Reed Ranch and Poverty Flat Camp Ground on both sides of the South Fork of the Salmon River. See map below. Ignitions could occur over a period of 2 or more days in September or October.

(click here for larger image size)
For more information please call Justin Pappani at 208-634-0623 or Laurel Ingram at 208-634-0622
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Land management agencies to lift Stage 1 Fire Restrictions in southwest Idaho

Date: 9/19/2018
Contacts: Bureau of Land Management – Jared Jablonski 208-384-3378
Forest Service – Stephaney Kerley 208-373-4105
Idaho Department of Land – Sharla Arledge 208-334-0233

Boise, Idaho – With cooler temperatures lowering the threat of wildfires, state and federal land management agencies will lift Stage 1 Fire Restrictions on all lands within southwest Idaho effective Sept. 21, 2018 beginning at 12:01 a.m.

The Stage 1 fire restrictions will be lifted in the Treasure Valley, West Central Mountains, Snake/Weiser River, and Owyhee Mountains of Idaho, which includes all federal, state and private forestland and rangeland in:

* Ada, Adams, Canyon, Gem, Payette, Elmore, Boise, Valley, Washington and Owyhee Counties
* Within Washington County, all Bureau of Reclamation lands surrounding Mann Creek Reservoir
* Within Valley County, all Bureau of Reclamation lands surrounding Lake Cascade
* Within Elmore and Boise counties, all Bureau of Reclamation lands surrounding Arrowrock and Anderson Ranch reservoirs

These restrictions are being lifted by agencies managing or providing wildland fire protection, including the U.S Forest Service (USFS), Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the Idaho Department of Lands (IDL). Fire managers divide Idaho into zones and fire restrictions will be lifted in the following zones:

Snake/Weiser River Zone:

* All state, private and BLM lands east of the Snake River, north and west of Highway 95 to the Little Weiser River, and north of the Little Weiser River to the Payette NF boundary. The boundary then follows the Payette NF boundary back to the Snake River.

Treasure Valley Fire Restrictions Zone

* All of Ada, Canyon, Gem, Payette and Washington counties. Portions of Boise County including the administrative boundary of Lucky Peak Lake to Arrowrock Dam, south shore of Arrowrock Reservoir and that portion of Elmore County that lies south of the South Fork Boise River to Anderson Ranch Dam, south along Anderson Dam Road (FS Rd 134) to Highway 20, east on Highway 20 to the Elmore/Gooding County line south to Interstate 84. The Treasure Valley Restriction area is bounded by the Idaho/Oregon boundary to Oreana then follows the Bachman Grade to Triangle and continues east-northeast of the Owyhee Front to the Bruneau River. The northern boundary begins near Weiser, Idaho and follows Highway 95 to Indian Valley, then generally follows the Little Weiser River to the Payette and Boise National Forest boundary lines.

West Central Mountains Fire Restrictions Zone

* Boise National Forest, Boise District BLM and State and Endowment Lands within Elmore County, Boise County, and Valley County to include all Bureau of Reclamation lands surrounding Lake Cascade. From the point where the Boise National Forest boundary intersects State Highway 20 near Dixie following the Boise National Forest boundary west and north along the ridge of the Danskin to Boise Front foothills and extending north encompassing the Idaho Department of Lands to its intersection back with the Boise National Forest boundary near Sage Hen Reservoir. The far northern boundary includes all Boise National Forest lands, excluding the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness. All lands north of Sage Hen Reservoir including Tripod Mountain and West Mountain within the North Fork Payette River drainage north to near Tamarack Resort.

Owyhee Fire Restrictions Zone

* All of Owyhee County west of the Bruneau Canyon.

Fire managers are asking the public to continue to be extra cautious when spending time in the outdoors. As a reminder, fireworks are prohibited on state and private forestland and rangeland during closed fire season (May 10 through Oct. 20), and on public lands, roads and trails in Idaho all times of the year.

Controlled burning restrictions may be in place due to air quality through the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality. Information about DEQ burn bans is available here: http://deq.idaho.gov/air-quality.aspx. The IDL fire safety burn permit is required during closed fire season, and local burn permits may be as well. To obtain permits for controlled burning activities, visit: http://burnpermits.idaho.gov/

For more information about fire restrictions and to view an interactive map, visit http://www.idahofireinfo.com

If you are planning a visit to public lands in these areas, please check with the Boise National Forest (www.fs.usda.gov/boise), the BLM Idaho (www.blm.gov/idaho), or the Idaho Department of Lands (www.idl.idaho.gov) websites for the latest information or visit http://www.idahofireinfo.com

Link to: 9-21-2018+-+0402-00-55+BNF+2018+Stage+1+TERMINATION.pdf

Link to: 9-19-2018+Stage+1+Fire+Restrictions+Lifted+BOI+%26+Payette.pdf
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Reminders for hunters on National Forest Lands

Boise, Idaho. September 21, 2018 – Forest Service law enforcement officers on the Boise, Payette and Sawtooth National Forests have received numerous complaints from hunters regarding illegal OHV use on designated trails and National Forest Systems (NFS) roads.

Motor Vehicle Use Maps (MVUM) that delineate the designated system of open roads and trails authorized for public motorized travel are a must have item for individuals operating any type of motorized vehicle.

MVUMs are free of cost, and are updated annually. They are available at all USFS district offices or can be downloaded to electronic devices through the Avenza App.

• All Boise National Forest (MVUM) can be downloaded here:
https://www.fs.usda.gov/detail/boise/maps-pubs/?cid=stelprdb5053223

• All Payette National Forest (MVUM) can be downloaded here:
https://www.fs.usda.gov/detailfull/payette/home/?cid=stelprdb5112468&width=full

• All Sawtooth National Forest (MVUM) can be downloaded here:
https://www.fs.usda.gov/detail/sawtooth/maps-pubs/?cid=stelprdb5421960

The penalty for violating National Forest Systems land regulations is a misdemeanor and can include up to a $5,000 fine, six months in jail, or both. The Forest Service may seek restitution for the repair of damaged areas, which often times costs thousands of dollars. Individuals witnessing illegal OHV usage are encourage to report violations to their local Ranger District.

Know before you go by visiting the Forest Alerts and notices pages that list all current closures:

• Boise National Forest: https://www.fs.usda.gov/alerts/boise/alerts-notices.

• Payette National Forest: https://www.fs.usda.gov/alerts/payette/alerts-notices

• Sawtooth National Forest: https://www.fs.usda.gov/alerts/sawtooth/alerts-notices
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Forest Products Modernization Announcement

Nora Rasure by payetteforestcoalition on 09/20 10:27 AM

Forests across the nation are facing serious challenges. Having sustainable, healthy, resilient forests in the future depends on our ability to address these challenges today. In 2017, the Forest Service began a strategic effort designed to better align our culture, policies, and procedures for how we manage and sell forest products with current and future forest restoration needs. The goal of this effort is to increase the pace and scale of restoration, improve forest conditions, and improve efficiency of forest products delivery.

Forest Products Modernization (FPM) is an overarching Forest Service effort to better train its employees, reform policy, increase use of technology, and adjust processes to improve efficiency. To achieve our goals, we need your help. We recognize the importance of strengthening existing and developing new relationships with our stakeholders and partners in this effort.

You may have heard of another parallel change effort going on within the Forest Service, called Environmental Analysis and Decision Making (EADM). These two change efforts are distinct, but connected. EADM is focused on increasing efficiency and reducing the cost of our environmental analysis and decision-making processes, while FPM is focused on better aligning the agency’s business practices for delivering forest products with current and future forest restoration needs. Together, these two efforts will allow us to get more work done on the ground and improve the overall conditions of our national forests.

In partnership with the National Forest Foundation, we are launching a series of FPM partner feedback sessions across the country, designed to enable two-way discussion and exploration between the Forest Service and our partners and stakeholders, presented virtually with satellite locations at select Forest Service units. An initial session in our Washington, DC headquarters took place on September 11, 2018. Regional sessions to present this same material are scheduled for:

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The U.S. Forest Service is hiring 1,900 seasonal staffers

Kate Streit Sep 14, 2018 KIVI TV

If you’re seeking a cure for those end-of-summer blues, just think of all the adventure next summer might bring — like perhaps a new job with the U.S. Forest Service, which is currently hiring more than 1,900 seasonal workers for spring and summer 2019.

The agency oversees 154 national forests and 20 national grasslands. Many of the jobs are located in two main regions, with about 1,000 positions available in the Pacific Northwest and 900 positions in the Rocky Mountain Region.

Both areas are known for their beautiful natural scenery and would be ideal places for outdoor enthusiasts to work. The other seven regions are also hiring for some positions.

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Tourist arrested after walking onto Old Faithful geyser, apparently urinating into hot spring

A video of the incident was posted on Facebook and widely shared.

Author Trevor Hughes, USA TODAY September 18, 2018 (KTVB)

Park rangers arrested a tourist after he walked onto the Old Faithful geyser and apparently urinated into it in front of hundreds of horrified tourists at Yellowstone National Park.

Video of the Friday incident has been widely shared online after a Wyoming woman recorded rangers screaming at the man to get off the dangerous geyser known for spewing boiling water. Rangers confirmed the incident but have refused to release the man’s identity or the charges he faces. The man, who was wearing a black shirt and maroon pants, ignored multiple warning signs and left a protective boardwalk to reach the hot spring.

“This is the Park Service,” a ranger yells to the man in the now viral video. “Get on the boardwalk.”

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Yellowstone geyser-walk suspect arrested again, in Cheyenne

AP Sep 20, 2018

Cheyenne, Wyo. (AP) – A man accused of walking dangerously close to Old Faithful Geyser in Yellowstone National Park faces additional charges after a police chase in Cheyenne.

Police said Thursday they arrested 27-year-old Gabriel Villalva, of Greeley, Colorado, after he drove recklessly around Wyoming’s capital city. Cheyenne is a 7-hour drive from Yellowstone.

Police say they stopped Villalva with spike strips after a 15-minute chase Wednesday. They say Villalva spun his wheels and his SUV caught fire.

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Letters to Share:

Nuisance bear problems continue in McCall area

During the past two weeks, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game has removed three more bears that became too habituated to human foods.

Unfortunately, when bears find human food even once, they will visit that area over and over to find those foods again. Just one trash can or bird feeder can start the cycle, which is then very hard to break.

We do not want to manage bears by killing them. Ideally, the bears that live near McCall would never find human food on their occasional trips through town. But we need everyone’s help to make that happen.

If you don’t have a bear-resistant dumpster, please get one – even if you are outside city limits. Do not feed birds or hummingbirds at this time of year. A bear can get more calories from one bird feeder than from a whole pound of huckleberries.

Most importantly, talk to your neighbors. If you see they have bird feeders out, or their trash can is too full and won’t latch, talk to them about what that means for bears and for your neighborhood. Help make sure visitors and part-time residents get this information, too. They’re hard for us to reach.

Regan Berkley, Regional Wildlife Manager, Idaho Department of Fish and Game, McCall

source: The Star-News September 20, 2018
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Mystic Farm Wildlife Rescue, Inc.

9/18/2018

Greetings from Mystic Farm:

This may be the hardest post I have ever had to write. My sweet Murphy – my LGD – my faithful buddy – chased down and brutally killed one of the fawns – one of the innocent fawns he was to protect. There is no coming back from that. Today I am grieving two losses…the beautiful little fawn I so deeply loved and cared for all these months – and my Murphy. He has been turned over to a rescue group that will be in charge of vetting and finding him the perfect home. I just have to let go – but my heart hurts like I never thought possible…

On a happier note, all the rest of the fawns (12) are doing great on their soft release. We looked out the window yesterday and eight of the group were prancing off into the woods behind a resident doe! They were gone for most of the day – but did return for their nighttime bottle (after which they are locked in for their safety and released again in the morning). All are fat, happy, and enjoying their freedom…

Remember to put October 20th on your calendars. Mystic Farm will be at the Ponderay Event Center with the wonderful handmade candles, T-shirts, hats, and raffle tickets for your purchase! There are still some vendor spaces available if you wish to be a part of the fun – let me know and I will put you in contact with the person organizing the event.

Speaking of the raffle…the event on October 20th will be the last day to purchase your tickets to win half a gourmet hog (cut and wrapped) generously donated by Maker’s Long Acres. You can purchase your tickets by mail – just let us know how many and we will fill them out and throw them in the hamper for you…the honor system works for us. Just send a check or PayPal for your purchase (make sure to put “raffle” in the subject line). Tickets: $5.00 each or five for $20.00. No limit on how many you can purchase!

Finally, a huge thank you to everyone donating apples and garden produce this year for the fawns. Feeding 13 fawns gets to be quite expensive! This year Safeway in Sandpoint came on board – along with Tango Cafe and Winter Ridge – and has provided the babes with plenty of fresh goodies to supplement their natural browse and bottles.

Thanks to everyone for your continued support…couldn’t do this without you.

Sincerely,
Dory and all
Mystic Farm Wildlife Rescue, Inc.
710 Sanctuary Hills
Sagle, ID 83860

FB: http://www.facebook.com/mysticfarmwildliferescue
Website: http://www.mystic-farm.com
PayPal: mysticfarmrescue @ yahoo.com
208 241-7081
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Critter News:

FDA: Your pets’ flea and tick medicine could cause them neurological issues

Justin Boggs Sep 20, 2018 KIVI TV

The FDA warned pet owners on Thursday that some flea and tick medicine could cause neurologic adverse events for dogs and cats.

The flea and tick medicine are in the isoxazoline class. Drugs in this class include Bravecto, Credelio, Nexgard and Simparica.

The FDA said that these products can and have been safely used in the majority of dogs and cats, pet owners should consult with their veterinarian to review their pets’ medical histories and determine whether a product in the isoxazoline class is appropriate for their pet.

The FDA said that neurologic events such as muscle tremors, ataxia and seizures could be caused by the aforementioned medicines.

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Note from Cascade Vet Clinic

9-23-2018

Some oral flea/tick preventatives can cause neurologic signs in dogs (the drugs listed include bravecto, simparica, nexgard, Credelio)

– Keep in mind that these side effects happen in a very small percentage of pets and that serious side effects from over-the-counter flea controls can actually be worse.

– Furthermore, serious diseases and conditions carried or caused by the FLEAS and TICKS that these products prevent are far more likely to cause pets (and their humans) problems than this class of flea controls themselves.

– We have seen very few (1 or 2 cases) which MIGHT have a link to these products.

– Our staff and doctors continue to use these products on their own personal pets as the benefits far outweigh the risks. Please talk to us with any concerns! We will keep you apprised of any major concerns!
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Therapy dogs help patients, staff at Saint Alphonsus

by Haley Squiers Tuesday, September 18th 2018


(CBS 2 News Staff Photo)

Boise, Idaho — Going to the hospital for any reason usually involves some level of stress.

“Helping Idaho Dogs” is a group of dogs that are working to help.

And, it’s a job that therapy dogs, Bernie and Blaze do very well.

“They bring a level of comfort,” said Blaze’s handler and owner, Nancy Eimer. “Just touching their soft fur or seeing those warm brown eyes looking at you can just make a total difference in how the day has gone.”

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Boise high school student saves dog from drowning in pond

When Timberline High School senior Will Hall went to check on an irrigation pump, he saw a golden retriever fighting for his life.

Author: Tami Tremblay September 20, 2018 KTVB

Boise — A Timberline High School student is being credited with saving a dog’s life. The senior found a golden retriever named Thor fighting for his life in an irrigation pond and jumped in to make sure the dog didn’t drown.

It happened on Monday and started with a pair of dogs jumping a fence and going on an adventure. They live with their owners just past the Idaho Shakespeare Festival along Warm Springs Avenue.

The rescue happened about five hours later, only about a mile away, when a 17-year-old went to check on an irrigation pump.

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Charges will not be filed against man who shot 2 Rigby dogs

One dog killed while the other is treated

By Matthew Cooper Sep 19, 2018 Local News 8

Rigby, ID – Charges will not be filed against the man who shot the two dogs in Rigby.

The dogs’ owner says his neighbor admitted to shooting at them when they got into his chicken coop. The neighbor claims he was protecting his hens, but did not intend to hurt the dogs. He said he only wanted to scare them off.

Rigby Police Chief, Sam Tower, says the neighbor was within his rights, so he will not be charged. The neighbor’s name has not been released.

continued:
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State marksman kills wolf from pack in northeast Washington

9/18/18 AP

Olympia, Wash. — A marksman with Washington state has shot and killed a young member of a wolf pack that was targeted because it attacked cattle in northeast Washington.

The state Department of Fish and Wildlife said Tuesday that a wolf from the so-called Old Profanity Territory was shot from a helicopter Sunday.

Agency director Kelly Susewind authorized the killing of one or more wolves last week after state officials documented several cattle attacks in Ferry County this month.

continued:
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Deputies investigating suspicious colt death

By Michael Collett Sep 18, 2018 Local News 8

Madison County (KIFI/KIDK)- – The Madison County Sheriff’s Office is investigating the killing of a colt in Thornton.

The owners of the colt live 4 to 5 miles away from the pasture where it was at.

Madison County deputies received a call at 7:30 Monday morning about the colt.

continued:
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Court sets trial dates for man accused in horses’ deaths

Sep 18, 2018 AP

Ontario, Ore. (AP) – A southwestern Idaho man who was charged with misdemeanor animal abuse after four of his horses were found dead in a pasture earlier this year will go to trial in January.

The Argus Observer newspaper in Ontario, Oregon reports Shannon Pearce has been scheduled for trial on Jan. 9 and 10. The horses were found dead in a Payette County pasture in mid-July, and police say the water trough in the pasture was dry.

Pearce has pleaded not guilty to the charges.

Animal abuse is generally a misdemeanor in Idaho with a maximum penalty of a $1,000 fine and one year in jail.

source:
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Pocatello considers wildlife feeding ordinance

Sep 19, 2018 Local News 8

Pocatello, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – The Pocatello City Council will hold a public hearing Thursday to consider an ordinance aimed at regulating the feeding of wildlife within city limits.

The city has seen a number of recent incidents involving not-always welcome wildlife encounters involving mountain lions, deer, two varieties of turkeys, moose, bears, and other animals.

The ordinance would prohibit citizens living in identified urban wildlife interface zones “from intentionally, knowingly, or recklessly feeding or attracting wildlife within city limits.” Those zones are defined as areas where wild lands and its wildlife meet and overlap in an urban setting.

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Boise Firefighters rescue falcon on Boise State Campus

by CBS 2 News Staff Monday, September 17th 2018


The falcon was found in the stairwell of the Lincoln Parking Garage. (Photo courtesy Boise Fire)

Boise, Idaho (CBS2) — A falcon was trapped in a Boise State parking garage and Boise Fire shared some photos of the little guy Monday afternoon.

“Sometimes we respond to calls that are a bit out of the ordinary,” they said in the post.

continued w/photos:
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Idaho city seeks volunteers to scare off crowds of crows

9/20/18 AP

Nampa, Idaho — City officials in Idaho are looking for volunteers to help ward off what has become a local sign of fall: The arrival of roughly 10,000 crows to the city of Nampa.

Nampa Chief of Staff Robert Sanchez tells Boise television station KTVB that he expects the annual migration of crows to start in the next week or two. The birds congregate around businesses downtown, creating a public health hazard with their droppings and sometimes breaking tree branches because of their combined weight.

Sanchez is looking for volunteers to help track when and where the crows show up to roost, and to use noisemakers and hand-held laser devices to scare the crows away.

The animals are protected by the federal Migratory Bird Treaty Act, so the city takes only non-lethal approaches to crow control.

source:
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$1,000 reward issued for info on illegal stocking of walleye in Lake Cascade

by CBS 2 News Staff Friday, September 21st 2018

Cascade, Idaho (CBS 2) — A $1,000 reward is being offered for information on who illegally stocked walleye into Lake Cascade.

Idaho Fish and Game says the fish was illegally stocked in the reservoir and it’s the first-ever confirmed report of walleye in Lake Cascade.

“This illegal introduction was carefully thought out,” Dale Allen, Idaho Fish and Game fisheries manager said in August. “The closest walleye fishery is more than 200 miles from Cascade. To survive the extended transport time, this fish – and possibly others – would have required clean, cold, aerated water for a number of hours.”

Fish and game says walleye in Lake Cascade threatens one of the country’s premiere yellow perch fisheries.

Anyone with information about the incident is asked to call 1-800-632-5999.

source:
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International 10-year salmon preservation plan advances

By Gillian Flaccus – 9/17/18 AP

Portland, Ore. — Canada and the U.S. states of Alaska, Oregon and Washington would all reduce their catch of fragile salmon species under the terms of an updated international agreement that, if approved, will spell out the next decade of cooperation between the U.S. and Canada to keep the migratory fish afloat in Pacific waters.

Members of the Pacific Salmon Commission on Monday recommended a conservation plan that stretches to 2028 after two years of intense negotiations involving fishermen, tribes on both sides of the border and state and federal officials. It must be approved by both the U.S. and Canadian governments.

The international commission first met in 1985 to create more cooperation between Canada and the U.S. on protecting salmon, which migrate thousands of miles from inland streams to the Pacific Ocean and then back to their spawning place. The agreement covers pink, Coho, sockeye, chum and chinook salmon and spans a territory from Cape Falcon, Oregon, in the south to southeast Alaska in the north. The current agreement expires Dec. 31.

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Fish & Game News:

F&G dropping Stage 1 fire restrictions starting Friday, Sept. 21

Change means campfires are allowed in usual places

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Specialist
Wednesday, September 19, 2018

Idaho Fish and Game will remove the stage 1 fire restrictions from lands it owns or manages, which will be in conjunction with Idaho Department of Lands removing restrictions statewide, effective Friday, Sept. 21.

Fish and Game may continue to prohibit fires in localized areas, which will be posted to notify the public of continued fire restrictions.

Fire season is winding down in Idaho, but land closures from recent fires, planned or active prescribed fires, and other fire-related restrictions could remain. To get more details, go to the Fire Information Page.

source:
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Youth Pheasant Hunts scheduled in Salmon and Challis

By Mike Demick, Conservation Information Supervisor
Friday, September 21, 2018

Idaho Department of Fish and Game will host Youth Pheasant Hunts for Salmon and Challis-area youth age 10-17 on Saturday, October 6. Both hunts will take place from 8:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. in Salmon and Challis.

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Gov. Otter proclaims Saturday, Sept. 22 as Idaho Hunting and Fishing Day

The day highlights the contributions hunting and fishing make to the state

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Specialist
Friday, September 21, 2018

C.L. “Butch” Otter, Governor of Idaho, has proclaimed Saturday, Sept. 22, 2018 to be Hunting and Fishing Day.

According to the proclamation, Idaho has a rich and storied tradition of hunting and angling that dates to before statehood, and carries forward to this day.

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More F&G News Releases

https://idfg.idaho.gov/press
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Funny Critter Stuff:

Hungry bear rips apart cars at Tahoe trailhead

Forest Service tweets photos of cars

“DO NOT leave any scented items in your car or it may look like this when you return,” the Forest Service tweeted.

Both the insides and the outsides of the cars had damage during the attacks, which happened Wednesday.
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Seasonal Humor:

BearHotel-a
[h/t SMc]

HuntingDeerTeeth-a.jpg
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Fire Update Sept 23, 2018

There are NO fires currently threatening Yellow Pine.

We had 0.04″ of rain this morning, not quite enough to settle the dust, but the air quality is much better.

Air Quality in Yellow Pine = Green
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Prescribed Burns planned for Fall 2018

Date Sept 19, 2018

The Krassel Ranger District, Payette National Forest is planning to implement prescribed burns in the Bald Hill and Four Mile project areas this fall. In the Bald Hill Project area we will be working in areas of Reegan Creek and Deadman Creek from the East Fork road up to Rainbow Ridge. In the Fourmile Project area we will be working on both sides of the South Fork, between Blackmare and Holdover Creeks on the west side of the river and in the Fourmile Creek drainage on the east side. See attached map for more specific areas. Ignitions will likely take place in September or October, dependent on weather and fuel conditions. Primary ignitions will take 1-3 days for each burn block, with residual smoke and flame present until the next significant rain. Please do not hesitate to give a call or email with questions, my contact information is lenelson@fs.fed.us or desk phone is 208-634-0622.

Thanks and have a nice day,

Laurel Ingram
Fuels Technician
Payette National Forest
Krassel Ranger District

The Payette National Forest, Krassel Ranger District, is planning on implementing a prescribed burn on the south facing aspect between Deadman Creek and Reegan Creek along the East Fork of the South Fork of the Salmon River this fall. The edge of burn block E is about 5 miles west of Yellow Pine. See map below. Ignitions could occur over a period of 1-3 days in September or October 2018.

(click here for larger size image)
For more information please call Justin Pappani at 208-634-0623 or Laurel Ingram at 208-634-0622.

The Payette National Forest, Krassel Ranger District, is planning on implementing the Four Mile Prescribed fire project this fall. Ignitions may take place between Reed Ranch and Poverty Flat Camp Ground on both sides of the South Fork of the Salmon River. See map below. Ignitions could occur over a period of 2 or more days in September or October.

(click here for larger size image)
For more information please call Justin Pappani at 208-634-0623 or Laurel Ingram at 208-634-0622
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Land management agencies to lift Stage 1 Fire Restrictions in southwest Idaho

Date: 9/19/2018
Contacts: Bureau of Land Management – Jared Jablonski 208-384-3378
Forest Service – Stephaney Kerley 208-373-4105
Idaho Department of Land – Sharla Arledge 208-334-0233

BOISE, Idaho – With cooler temperatures lowering the threat of wildfires, state and federal land management agencies will lift Stage 1 Fire Restrictions on all lands within southwest Idaho effective Sept. 21, 2018 beginning at 12:01 a.m.

The Stage 1 fire restrictions will be lifted in the Treasure Valley, West Central Mountains, Snake/Weiser River, and Owyhee Mountains of Idaho, which includes all federal, state and private forestland and rangeland in:

* Ada, Adams, Canyon, Gem, Payette, Elmore, Boise, Valley, Washington and Owyhee Counties
* Within Washington County, all Bureau of Reclamation lands surrounding Mann Creek Reservoir
* Within Valley County, all Bureau of Reclamation lands surrounding Lake Cascade
* Within Elmore and Boise counties, all Bureau of Reclamation lands surrounding Arrowrock and Anderson Ranch reservoirs

These restrictions are being lifted by agencies managing or providing wildland fire protection, including the U.S Forest Service (USFS), Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the Idaho Department of Lands (IDL). Fire managers divide Idaho into zones and fire restrictions will be lifted in the following zones:

Snake/Weiser River Zone:

* All state, private and BLM lands east of the Snake River, north and west of Highway 95 to the Little Weiser River, and north of the Little Weiser River to the Payette NF boundary. The boundary then follows the Payette NF boundary back to the Snake River.

Treasure Valley Fire Restrictions Zone

* All of Ada, Canyon, Gem, Payette and Washington counties. Portions of Boise County including the administrative boundary of Lucky Peak Lake to Arrowrock Dam, south shore of Arrowrock Reservoir and that portion of Elmore County that lies south of the South Fork Boise River to Anderson Ranch Dam, south along Anderson Dam Road (FS Rd 134) to Highway 20, east on Highway 20 to the Elmore/Gooding County line south to Interstate 84. The Treasure Valley Restriction area is bounded by the Idaho/Oregon boundary to Oreana then follows the Bachman Grade to Triangle and continues east-northeast of the Owyhee Front to the Bruneau River. The northern boundary begins near Weiser, Idaho and follows Highway 95 to Indian Valley, then generally follows the Little Weiser River to the Payette and Boise National Forest boundary lines.

West Central Mountains Fire Restrictions Zone

* Boise National Forest, Boise District BLM and State and Endowment Lands within Elmore County, Boise County, and Valley County to include all Bureau of Reclamation lands surrounding Lake Cascade. From the point where the Boise National Forest boundary intersects State Highway 20 near Dixie following the Boise National Forest boundary west and north along the ridge of the Danskin to Boise Front foothills and extending north encompassing the Idaho Department of Lands to its intersection back with the Boise National Forest boundary near Sage Hen Reservoir. The far northern boundary includes all Boise National Forest lands, excluding the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness. All lands north of Sage Hen Reservoir including Tripod Mountain and West Mountain within the North Fork Payette River drainage north to near Tamarack Resort.

Owyhee Fire Restrictions Zone

* All of Owyhee County west of the Bruneau Canyon.

Fire managers are asking the public to continue to be extra cautious when spending time in the outdoors. As a reminder, fireworks are prohibited on state and private forestland and rangeland during closed fire season (May 10 through Oct. 20), and on public lands, roads and trails in Idaho all times of the year.

Controlled burning restrictions may be in place due to air quality through the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality. Information about DEQ burn bans is available here: http://deq.idaho.gov/air-quality.aspx. The IDL fire safety burn permit is required during closed fire season, and local burn permits may be as well. To obtain permits for controlled burning activities, visit: http://burnpermits.idaho.gov/

For more information about fire restrictions and to view an interactive map, visit http://www.idahofireinfo.com

If you are planning a visit to public lands in these areas, please check with the Boise National Forest (www.fs.usda.gov/boise), the BLM Idaho (www.blm.gov/idaho), or the Idaho Department of Lands (www.idl.idaho.gov) websites for the latest information or visit http://www.idahofireinfo.com

9-21-2018+-+0402-00-55+BNF+2018+Stage+1+TERMINATION.pdf

9-19-2018+Stage+1+Fire+Restrictions+Lifted+BOI+%26+Payette.pdf
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Caton Fire

Payette National Forest
Cause Lightning
Date of Origin Friday August 24th, 2018 approx. 11:30 AM
Location The fire is located 7 miles southwest of the Village of Yellow Pine near Indian Point and has been moving east into the Caton Creek drainage.
Current as of 9/21/2018, 10:04:49 AM
Size 790 Acres
Estimated Containment Date Monday October 15th, 2018 approx. 12:00 AM

This fire was detected in heavy timber around noon on August 24 – a likely holdover from the lightning storm several days prior. The fire is located 7 miles southwest of Yellow Pine, near Indian Point. The Communities of Yellow Pine and Edwardsburg are not threatened by the fire.

Fire activity for the past several days has been minimal with smoldering and backing fire to the west from Indian Point. Occasional tree torching has been observed.

Indian Peak Trail (FS #090) has an emergency closure – please do not use this trail. No Area Closures have been implemented at this time.

Firefighters are assigned to monitor the fire – additional fire resources will be assigned as needed. The fire is being managed under a confine/contain and point protection strategy.

Indian Ridge Trail Closure
For public safety, the Indian Ridge Trail #090 has been close to public use due to hazards associated with Caton Fire. The entire trail is closed from its beginning at the junction of trial #291 Phoebe Meadows Trail, and the junction of trail #091 Caton Creek Trail.
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/article/6177/47537/

Caton Fire, Sep 20 looking south from Indian Point

Caton Fire InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6177/
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Bum Creek Fire

Thermal Map Bum Creek Fire 9-23-2018
20180923BumCreek-a

Payette National Forest
Date of Origin Friday September 07th, 2018 approx. 08:00 AM
Location The fire is 3 miles southeast of the Pinnacles, near the West Fork of Monumental Creek Lakes.
Cause Lightning
Current as of 9/21/2018, 10:19:27 AM
Size 3,438 Acres
Estimated Containment Date Monday October 15th, 2018 approx. 12:00 AM

The Bum Creek Fire was detected on September 7, 2018. It is a lightning caused fire burning in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness.
The Communities of Yellow Pine and Edwardsburg are not threatened by the fire.

The fire is under a monitor status, and is being allowed to play its natural role on the landscape, enhance and maintain wilderness character, and help restore ecological process in this forested ecosystem.

Fire activity has been moderate for the past few days, and putting up smoke that can be seen by backcountry travelers. The fire has grown approximately 350 acres from when it was mapped two days ago (Bum Creek Fire Map, September 20, 2018), and is established in the West Fork Monumental Lakes area at the head of the West Fork of Monumental Creek – burning in this area has been low to moderate intensity with about a 50/50 mix of burned and unburned vegetation. The fire is in the head of Cane Creek just outside the wilderness boundary – the fire is low intensity in this area and Management Action Points have been established to be implemented should the fire continue to burn outside the wilderness boundary.

Fire Area Map, September 20, 2018

Bum Fire, Sep 20 looking east up Tamarack Creek

Sep 20 looking southeast up trib of Bum Creek

Sep 20, Head of Cain Creek

Bum Creek Fire InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6197/
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Kiwah Fire

Meadow Creek Road is Open

Salmon-Challis National Forest
Location eight (8) miles northwest of Indian Creek Guard Station on the south side of the Indian Creek drainage in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness
Cause Lightning
Date of Origin Wednesday July 18th, 2018 approx. 05:30 PM
Current as of 9/23/2018, 8:46:39 AM
Size 14,603 Acres
Estimated Containment Date Monday October 01st, 2018 approx. 12:00 AM

The lightning caused Kiwah Fire, was detected at approximately 5:30 p.m. on July 17, 2018. Fire managers estimate size at 14,603 acres. The fire is burning in a mixed conifer forest on the Middle Fork Ranger District and is being allowed to play, as nearly as possible, its natural ecological role in the environment while providing for firefighter and public safety. The fire is located in steep, inaccessible terrain northwest of Indian Creek Guard Station within the Indian Creek drainage in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness.

Fire activity remains minimal throughout the fire area.

Fire managers expect the Kiwah Fire will continue to burn until a significant precipitation event occurs. Typically, season-ending weather events occur in this area between the last half of September through the first half of October.

Kiwah Fire InciWeb link:
https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/5995/
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Pistol Fire

Thermal Map Pistol Fire 9-23-2018
20180923PistolFire-a

Salmon-Challis National Forest

Location: west of the confluence of Pistol and Forty-Four Creeks in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness on the Middle Fork Ranger District.

Last update Sept 10th:
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Shell Fire

Salmon-Challis National Forest

The Shell Fire was reported yesterday [9-21] evening at approximately 7pm. The fire is located in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness on the Middle Fork Ranger District. The fire is approximately three (3) miles southwest of Falconberry Guard Station and approximately one and a half (1.5) miles south, southeast of Indian Springs Cabin.

Fire size is approximately one (1) acre with spot fires outside of the main fire perimeter and is burning in heavy timber. The fire is located in the the bottom of the drainage.

Fire managers are currently monitoring the fire. There will be resources on the ground today informing forest visitors in the area of the fire. Fire cause is undetermined.

link to FB photo gallery 9-21-2018

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Rabbit Foot Fire

Salmon-Challis National Forest

Cause Lightning/natural
Date of Origin Thursday August 02nd, 2018 approx. 12:30 PM
Location 22 Nautical Miles North of Challis, ID
Current as of 9/23/2018, 8:48:52 AM
Total Personnel 31
Size 36,004 Acres
Percent of Perimeter Contained 20%
Estimated Containment Date Tuesday October 23rd, 2018 approx. 12:00 AM

Update for September 21

Fire activity today was minimal. Firefighters continue to monitor the fire area. The Corral Creek, Iron Creek, and Moyer Creek areas are still showing smoke.

Rehabilitation work continues as does backhaul of equipment no longer needed to meet the objectives of the fire. Due to the excellent work of firefighters on the Rabbit Foot Fire, the forest is going to transition to a smaller Type IV organization tomorrow morning. The Type IV organization shadowed the Type III organization today.

The area closure changed today to a road closure. Please see Inciweb for the order and associated map.

link to FB photos 9-21:

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The Square Fire

Salmon-Challis National Forest

The Square Fire was reported this afternoon, September 20. The fire is located 1/2 mile into Idaho, from the Montana/Idaho border, in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness on the North Fork Ranger District. The fire is in the upper reaches of Bronco Creek, near Square Top Mountain. Fire is approximately one (1) acre in size burning in grass and brush with a heavy dead and down timber component in an old burn scar. The fire is currently in monitor status. The cause of the fire is undetermined.

Updates and information will be provided as significant changes occur.

link to FB photos 9-20:

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BLM officials responding to multiple Idaho fires

Natasha Williams Sep 22, 2018 KIVI TV

The BLM is responding to multiple Idaho fires.

8 Mile Fire

The 8 Mile Fire has burned 1,000 acres about five miles south of Soda Springs. The BLM says the fire is running in grass, shrubs, and timber.

County officials are evacuating the areas north of the fire and say over 75 residences are threatened.

The cause of the fire is unknown at this time.

Conner Fire

The Conner Fire four miles south of Malta has burned about 3.500 acres and is described as “running” and “very active.”

Structures are threatened but at this time no evacuations have been announced.

The cause of the fire is unknown.

source:
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NIFC

September 21, 2018

Firefighters contained 10 large fires yesterday. Two new ones were reported, one each in Montana and Oregon. Currently 71 large fires have burned 913,394 acres in 11 states.

Emergency responders and support personnel continue to assist with relief efforts in North Carolina.

Weather: A westerly flow will resume across much of the country as temperatures remain near average in most areas. Breezy conditions are expected near the mountain passes in the mountains across the northern tier of the country. Showers will develop in the Cascades by afternoon and spread east into the Okanogan by evening. A stationary front positioned across the South will allow for a return to wet conditions across Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, and Tennessee. All in all, widespread critical fire weather conditions are not expected today across the country.

Idaho Fires: 13 Acres: 78,050 New: 0 Contained: 3
Bible Back Sawtooth National Forest FS 3,500 33 21 miles southeast of Stanley
Bum Creek Payette National Forest FS 3,500 0 10 miles east of Yellow Pine 208-634-0820
Caton Payette National Forest FS 790 0 24 miles east of McCall 208-634-0820
Copper Mountain Idaho Panhandle National Forest FS 476 23 4 miles east of Eastport 208-267-5561
Cougar Idaho Panhandle National Forest FS 7,866 85 5 miles east of East Hope 208-557-8813
Pistol Salmon-Challis National Forest FS 458 0 38 miles southeast of McCall
Rabbit Foot Salmon-Challis National Forest FS 36,004 82 14 miles southwest of Salmon+ 208-756-7853
Rampike Idaho Panhandle National Forest FS 3,100 0 23 miles northeast of Kellogg 208-664-2318
Rattlesnake Creek Nez Perce-Clearwater National Forest FS 8,220 89 5 miles southwest of Riggins 208-820-1965
Smith Creek Idaho Panhandle National Forest FS 1,113 0 19 miles west of Bonners Ferry 208-267-5561
Stewart Creek Sawtooth National Forest FS 5,270 62 18 miles northwest of Fairfield 208-764-3202
Surprise Creek Idaho Panhandle National Forest FS 3,185 78 18 miles east of Athol 208-664-2318
Wapiti Boise National Forest FS 4,571 80 13 miles southwest of Stanley 208-259-3361
Indian Butte Clark County CNTY 13,072 100 8 miles northwest of Dubois 208-497-7270
Kiwah Salmon-Challis National Forest FS 14,603 100 49 miles northwest of Challis 208-756-7853
Oneida Franklin County ST 911 100 6 miles northeast of Preston

source:
https://www.nifc.gov/fireInfo/nfn.htm
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