Monthly Archives: November 2018

Road Reports Nov 28, 2018

Main roads to Yellow Pine are open, Lick Creek and Landmark may need chains and 4×4, higher elevation roads may be closed. Please share road reports. Conditions change quickly this time of year.

Yellow Pine: We received 1/4″ new snow this morning, total of 1.25″ on the ground, local streets have a little snow, ice in the shade. Watch for pot holes on the back Stibnite Road between the cross roads and the post office.
Click for Local Forecast.
Yellow Pine Webcam:

Johnson Creek Stream Gauge:

Warm Lake Highway: Report Wednesday (Nov 28) the mail truck driver (Robert) reports snow on the road all the way from Cascade to the South Fork turnoff.
SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

South Fork Road: Wednesday (Nov 28) mail truck driver (Robert) says the South Fork is bare from the EFSF junction up until about Reed Ranch, then snow all the way to the top.
Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
South Fork Stream Gauge:

EFSF Road: Wednesday (Nov 28) mail truck driver (Robert) says the road is very icy from YP for about 2/3rds of the way out to the South Fork turnoff.

Johnson Creek Road: Report Monday (Nov 26) from mail truck driver (Robert) last trip in via Johnson crk. There is about 6″ of new snow at N. Shore. Not advisable to travel with wheeled vehicles.
The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet
Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam:

Golden Gate Road: Report via FB Saturday (Nov 10, 2018) “Took the Samurai up Golden Gate Hill today. Cut a few trees off the road. Only a few inches of snow.” – SA
link to FB image:

Quartz Creek: (Nov 21) Made it about a mile from the top. There was about a foot of snow. Ice dams in the river. – SA
link to FB photo:

Lick Creek: Report Friday (Nov 23) “Lick Ck summit yesterday. All four tires chained up and 4 wheel drive. Then it continued to snow the rest of the day and part of the night.” – N
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Probably closed now to wheeled vehicles.
Report (Nov 11) “This is just a road report over Profile to Big Creek. There is a little less than a foot of snow at Profile Gap, and there has been a fair amount of wheeled travel over Profile Gap, but not all travelers were without problems. Coming out today on our tracked ATVs we observed a lot of tracks “in the ditch” & where one rig got stuck & backed down the road several miles before successfully turning around. For us it was a very enjoyable ride out although it was a bit chilly this morning, but sunshine all day warmed it up to the low 30s. For travelers using full sized 4×4 vehicles, tire chains seem advisable. There isn’t enough snow on the road from Jacob Ladder Flat to Edwardsburg for snowmobiles.” C&L
Link to video:
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.
Big Creek Webcam:

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Report (Nov 11) the road is very good, a few ruts around Vibika Creek.
Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: A report (Nov 11) of 6″ snow at Stibnite. Not advisable for wheeled vehicles beyond Stibnite and over Monumental summit.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Road is probably closed now.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: No current report, road may not be advisable for wheeled vehicles. SNOTEL station shows 22″ of snow 11-28.
Note: The approx elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′
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Nov 25, 2018 The Yellow Pine Times

Nov 25, 2018 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Community Calendar:

May 15 – Nov 30 Firewood Season – permits at The Corner
August 6 Ice Hole Campground Closed for the season
~ 2019 Events ~
May 25, 2019 ATV-UTV Scavenger Hunt Memorial Day Weekend
Jul 13, 2019 Ride to Big Creek
Sep 14, 2019 Ride to Cinnabar

(details below)
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Village News:

Small Earthquake 11/20

November 20th at 339pm a couple of folks felt a mild earthquake in Yellow Pine. Turns out there was a M 4.1 – 25km ENE of Grangeville, Idaho.

Link to quake at USGS:


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Thanksgiving Potluck at the Yellow Pine Tavern

Thanksgiving at the Tavern, as usual great food and good conversation

Tavern’s FB photo gallery link:
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November 24 “Stop the Bleed” Training

A big THANK YOU! to Jeff and Anne Forster. The YP community benefits greatly from Jeff and Anne Forster’s many hours of certified training in rescue and first aid. Saturday they instructed a group in the latest methods for treating life threatening and severe bleeding. The “Stop the Bleed” project is first aid training designed by several nationally recognized organizations that have united to develop a response to mass casualty events. Your quick, correct response at an accident could save a life……and in the Yellow Pine area an injured person needs trained people to help until EMT/Paramedics arrive. They will be providing more training next summer in Yellow Pine; involve your family. That tourniquet method you learned in school health class has been replaced by methods tested by the military and quick response groups. Just as the old methods for resuscitation were up-graded by CPR, there are new, improved ways to treat injuries. Check out Bleedingcontrol.org Get training Get first aid equipment.

– LI
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Christmas

“Santa’s Yellow Pine Elves, it is time to think of Christmas Bags again!! Let me know if you want to help!!”

Contact Nicki Harnar
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Come Spring…

“To Yellow Pine residents. I will be making several trips next spring and summer hauling out metal, appliances, etc. . If you need anything hauled away please get on the list. Vehicles require a title. I will be hauling gravel back if anyone is interested.”

Contact Mike Amos
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Yellow Pine US Mail

Three day a week mail delivery from Cascade started November 1, 2018. The Post Office in Yellow Pine will be open six days a week: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Be sure to buy your holiday stamps here.
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Wolf or Dog?

A report of a “black wolf” (or a dog that looks wolfish) was seen Monday (Nov 19) evening near the Eiguren ranch.
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Bears

It should be safe to put bird feeders back out, bears are hibernating (according to Jon Hunter our F&G CO.)

Please remember to keep trash secured, it will draw foxes, coyotes and loose dogs.
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Firewood Permits

Firewood Season ends November 30, 2018. Permits available at The Corner.

Fuelwood permits have been reduced to $6.25 per cord with a 4-cord minimum and a 10-cord maximum per household.

link to more info:
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Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.


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Ice Hole Campground Closed

The Campground has been temporarily closed to provide for public safety during reconstruction. This order will be in effect from September 27, 2018 through July 2, 2019, unless rescinded earlier by the Forest Supervisor. (0402-04-80)
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Local Events:

2019 Yellow Pine Escapades

The 2019 schedule for the Yellow Pine Escapades has been updated on the website!

Expect new escapades this coming year, including an ATV-UTV Photo Scavenger Hunt; two (yes, two) ATV-UTV rides, a golf tournament, and even a community yard sale. Other events will be added to the calendar as plans are finalized.

Join us for a great season of fun! The starting point for fun in Yellow Pine! The website includes information on the events hosted by the Yellow Pine Community Hall as well as the other “goings-on” in the village. Food, lodging and fuel are available in Yellow Pine.

https://www.ypescapade.org/atv-utv-events
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Local Groups:

YPWUA News:

There was a YPWUA Annual Shareholder’s meeting Saturday July 7, no minutes yet.

link to: 2018 September Water Department Update.docx

There was be a YPWUA meeting in October. (?)
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VYPA News:

VYPA Meeting Dates 2019

June 18th; July 20th; August 10th; September 14th. Note that the July 20th meeting is not on the second Saturday due to a conflict with a planned ATV rally involving many residents and visitors.
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YPFD News:

The next meeting to be May 18th, 2019 at the Community Hall

There was a YPFD Fire Commissioners Meeting June 9, no minutes yet.
There was a YPFD Fire Commissioners Meeting August 6, no minutes yet.
Sept 22nd YPFD meeting minutes posted in the Sept. 30th Yellow Pine Times.
October 6 YPFD meeting minutes posted in the Oct 21st Yellow Pine Times.

Bring it, Don’t Burn it

For us in Yellow Pine, Jake Strohmeyer, Dist. Ranger with the Boise NF said we can use the area at our transfer station for yard debris and the FS will burn it once a year. Please no furniture, mattresses, construction debris, metal objects, tires or personnel junk. Please only woody yard debris. When using the pile please be mindful of where you place the debris as it should be contained to a manageable burnable area and kept as clean as possible. – JF

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Updates:

Fire Department Training on Sunday’s at 11am all are welcome (training on pause for winter, will resume in the spring.)

The YPFD has 2 Size Chimney Brushes with extension rods that were donated for use around YP. If you would like to borrow one, please contact Cecil or Jeff and we’ll get them for you. The YPFD also has loanable mitigation tools, (Weed-Whacker, Hedge Trimmer, backpack blower and 16’ pole saw). If you would like to borrow one or all, please contact Cecil or Jeff and we’ll get them for you.

It’s also time to check the Smoke Alarm batteries and Fire Extinguishers. Please test the alarm and replace Smoke Alarm Batteries every year, if you have the replaceable battery type. Fire Extinguishers should be checked as well and should be easily seen and reachable. A good location for the Fire Extinguishers would be the kitchen and near the wood stove and/or fireplace. The needle should be in the green.

If you need a Smoke Detector or Fire Extinguisher for your YP residence please contact Jeff F.

Smoke Alarm Info:

Cooking safety in the home:
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Biz Listings:

Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377

Closed for winter
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Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233

Fall Hours: 9am to 2pm and 4pm to 8pm 7 days a week.

Daily Menu: full Breakfast served also Burgers and Pizza for Afternoon and Evening. Good selection of Beer and Wine also sold by 6 and 12 pack. Fuel available 92 Octane. Wi Fi, Ice.
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The Corner (208) 633-3325

We sell FS wood cutting permits.

Our hours for this week: Monday-Friday 4pm-8pm, Saturday and Sunday 11am-close

We will also be cooking most of the week for private events so if anyone wants something outside of those hours just call and we can usually accommodate.

The Corner Store is open as well, just call for grocery needs, fresh produce, eggs, meat etc.
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Buck Horn Outfitters LLC

Buck Horn Outfitters in Idaho’s west Central Mountains in Units 25, 20 A, & 19 A. Providing Elk, Mule Deer, Black Bear, Mountain lion, & Wolf Hunts. We offer Guided Rifle or Archery Hunts & Drop Camps. We are not about Quantity we are about providing Quality Hunts. My husband and I have been in the back country all our lives, we offer Deluxe camps with great food & our Guides know hunting, the back country and Stock.

Link to FB:
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Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed (208) 382-4430 – 50# bag of Polar Ice Melt available for $7.99. Breaks the Ice Barrier. Quick Melting action, even in heavy snow.
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Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, Will service Yellow Pine
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (Nov 19) overnight low of 14 degrees, clear sky, dry – very little frost, smaller patches of old snow in the shade. Several jays visiting. Clear sunny day, mild temperatures, high of 45 degrees. Light traffic on main street. Raven calling and flying over the village. Bright gibbous moon rising in the saddle north of Golden Gate around 530pm. At 6pm a p/u pulled out of the museum parking lot with no headlights on.

Tuesday (Nov 20) overnight low of 17 degrees, clear sky, moderate frost and smaller patches of old snow in the shade. Several jays visiting. A few wispy clouds by mid-afternoon and nearly calm, high of 50 degrees. The patchy snow in the shade isn’t melting, the ground is frozen. Small earthquake shook the house at 339pm. There was a M 4.1 earthquake north of us. Mostly clear at dusk, can hear the river. Fat almost full golden moon rising in the saddle north of Golden gate around 6pm.
Link to quake felt in YP:

Wednesday (Nov 21) overnight low of 15 degrees, mostly cloudy sky, moderate frost and persistent patches of old snow in the shade (ground is frozen.) A few jays and a hairy woodpecker visiting. Mail truck made it in on time. Overcast by mid-afternoon, feels colder than it looks (humidity seems to be up), high of 47 degrees. Thinner clouds after sunset and chilly light breeze. Dropped a little below freezing by 10pm, then warmed up during the night.

Thursday (Nov 22) a few sprinkles of rain early this morning, overcast and chilly light breeze. Jays and a hairy woodpecker visiting. Blustery before lunch time, dark clouds by early afternoon and sprinkles of rain for a while, high of 44 degrees. Holiday weekend traffic. Blustery and cloudy at sundown. Rain after dark turned to snow probably around midnight.

Friday (Nov 23) a little snow overnight 1/4″ new snow, low of 30 degrees, fine light snow falling and low overcast this morning. Steller jays visiting. Holiday weekend traffic. Light snowfall all day, bigger flakes after lunch for a bit. Snowed lightly all afternoon, barely above freezing and low clouds, but not much snow accumulation, high of 33 degrees. Quiet evening. About an inch of snow by 10pm, probably snowed very lightly during the night.

Saturday (Nov 24) overnight low of 26 degrees, overcast and light snowfall this morning, 1.25″ new snow, 1.5″ total snow. Raven calling and flying over the village, a couple of jays, a red-breasted nuthatch and a female hairy woodpecker visiting. Break in the snow around lunch time, then flaking snow and chilly breeze early afternoon, high of 33 degrees. Cold cloudy afternoon/evening, no new snow accumulation. Clearing during the night and cold.

Sunday (Nov 25) overnight low of 9 degrees, clear sky this morning, 1.5″ of snow on the ground. A couple of jays visited. A little bit of high haze in the sky around lunch time. Mostly clear sky and chilly light breeze mid-afternoon, high of 36 degrees. Quiet evening. Partly cloudy at dusk and below freezing.
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Tips & Advice:

Be Ember Aware! Tip Series

“Used with permission from University of Nevada Cooperative Extension and the Living With Fire program.”

Be Ember Aware Tip #6 – Much About Mulches

Mulches play an important role in northern Idaho landscapes. They can reduce the water requirements of plants, cool soil temperatures, reduce the occurrence of weeds, control soil erosion and dust, and can visually enhance the landscape. Unfortunately, some popular mulches are also combustible, a bad attribute for residential landscapes located in high fire hazard areas, and can be easily ignited by embers during a wildfire.

Organic mulches are made from plant materials. Examples include pine needles, wheat straw, pine bark nuggets of various sizes, shredded western red cedar and redwood sometimes referred to as “gorilla hair” mulch, and wood chips from recycled pallets or wildfire fuel reduction projects. These materials vary considerably in terms of size, shape, and texture; factors that also influence their flammability.

Experiments conducted by the University of Nevada Cooperative Extension, Nevada Tahoe Conservation District, Carson City Fire Department and the University of California Cooperative Extension, indicate that pine needle and gorilla hair mulches pose the greatest fire hazard of the organic mulches. Test results show that they are easily ignited, burn fast, and produce considerable heat. Other organic mulches, such as bark nuggets and wood chips, burn somewhat slower but also produce considerable heat. Partially composted wood chips produce very little flame and burn much slower than the other mulches, but burn hot via glowing combustion.

Inorganic mulches are derived from non-plant materials and include rock, stone, and gravel. Most inorganic mulches are noncombustible and are good choices for homes located in high fire hazard areas. The important exception would be ground or shredded recycled rubber. Rubber mulch products, which are often used in playgrounds, burn very intensely and are difficult to extinguish.

Some important mulch tips for homeowners living in high fire hazard areas are:

* Do not use organic mulches within 3 to 5 feet of the house. This is particularly important for wood or other combustible material (e.g, vinyl and other plastic materials sided houses. During a wildfire, burning embers may accumulate in this area, thus providing ample sources of ignition for wood and bark mulches.
* Keep organic mulches at least several feet away from combustible materials such as wood posts, firewood stacks, wooden fences, decks, stairs, etc.
* Irrigating organic mulches, as in a flowerbed, may improve their ignition resistance, although the surface layers of mulch will dry out quickly during wildfire weather conditions.
* Do not allow thick layers of pine needles to accumulate within 30 feet of the house.
* Do not use ground rubber mulches within 30 feet of the house or deck.
* Near the home, emphasize the use of inorganic mulches such as rock and gravel.

[h/t Fire Chief Jeff]
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Thanksgiving leftovers: How long are they good for?

Susan Gonzalez Nov 24, 2018 KIVI TV

The best part of Thanksgiving is the food, and you’ll be hard pressed to find anyone who argues otherwise.

But as the holiday weekend winds down, it’s time to confront the horrible truth: that turkey isn’t going to last forever.

So instead of calling up mom and asking “How long are Thanksgiving leftovers good for?” just take a gander at this breakdown of when to toss the holiday foodstuff.

continued:
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Idaho News:

Two earthquakes reported in Idaho today

by CBS 2 News Staff Tuesday, November 20th 2018

Boise, Idaho (CBS2) — According to the USGS, two earthquakes were felt in Idaho today.

One was in the Challis National Forest around midnight last night with a magnitude 3.0.

The other happened at about 3:39 p.m. east of Grangeville and registered at 4.1.

USGS’ shake map shows the impact could be felt as far as Kamiah, Orofino, and Riggins.

Boise State’s seismology lab says the Grangeville earthquake was about eight miles depth. They say it produced weak ground shaking on the intensity scale as far as Lewiston, and some people in Boise are said to have felt it.

The most prominent fault in the area is the Salmon River fault but it cannot be confirmed if this is the fault that moved. Little is known about the history of this fault.

source:
[Note: The M4.1 quake was felt by at least 2 Yellow Piners.]
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Cascade man accused of sexually assaulting teenage girls

Investigators say the suspect may have additional victims.

KTVB November 22, 2018

Valley County — A Cascade man is facing charges after investigators say he had sexual contact with a 17-year-old girl and a 13-year-old girl.

The Valley County Sheriff’s Office began investigating Nov. 2 after deputies were called to the Arrowhead RV Park.

When they arrived, they found 29-year-old Danial James (DJ) Bixler and a 17-year-old. Bixler had been stabbed, deputies say, but the sheriff’s office has not released whether he was injured by the girl or someone else.

continued:
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Warren Wagon Road rebuild project shuts down for the winter

Monday-Friday closures to resume next spring

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News Nov 21, 2018

Work on a two-year project to reconstruct 5.5 miles of Warren Wagon Road between McCall and Eastside Drive shut down for the winter last week.

The $9.9 million federally-funded project is expected to resume in May, but could begin as early as April, said Cody Brown, a spokesperson for M.A. DeAtley Construction of Clarkston, Wash., the general contractor for the project.

Work next summer will focus on widening and stabilizing the roadway at the southern end of the project, which starts about 2.2 miles north of McCall, as well as securing slopes that were scaled back as part of work this year, Brown said.

Part of the work will include installing mesh to prevent any falling rocks from endangering motorists, pedestrians or bicyclists along slopes that were stabilized by rock scaling crews this year.

continued:
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Public lands access clashes with private property rights as Wilkses lock up land

As Texas billionaires Dan and Farris Wilks buy up hundreds of square miles of private forest land in Idaho, they are blocking off roads on their property that connect to vast swaths of public land. And that has many who have historically used those roads for recreation purposes crying foul.


A gate blocks an access road in Valley County. Paul Boehlke/KTVB

Morgan Boydston November 19, 2018 KTVB

Boise — Idahoans treasure their public lands, but also respect and stand firmly behind private property rights.

As the uber-wealthy Wilks brothers buy up hundreds of square miles of private timber land across the Gem State, they’re locking it up, and in some cases, they’ve shut Idahoans out of accessing public lands or roads that have always been open.

… “I mean everybody talks about the quality of life: the clean air, a place to go mountain bike, a place to go ride your motorcycle, a place to snowmobile, a place to cross country ski, fishing, hunting,” said Valley County Commissioner Gordon Cruickshank. “We have it all here in Idaho and I think people really embrace that.”

… But the new owners aren’t open to a free-for-all, prompting gates on portions of their nearly 200,000 acres in Boise, Valley, Adams and Idaho counties.

“They have gates on probably every place they have seen major activity,” Cruickshank said.

full story w/video:

[h/t Gordon C]
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Tamarack Resort gets new owner, vows to complete Village Plaza

Tamarack Resort Holding plans close the deal by the end of the month. Work could begin on the Village Plaza in early 2019.

KTVB Staff November 20, 2018

Donnelly, Idaho — Tamarack Resort has a new owner.

The announcement was made today after the Idaho Land Board approved transferring the state lands lease to the new owner, Tamarack Resort Holding (TRH), for continued operations on the mountain.

According to a news release, TRH is a partnership of investors and managers with decades of development and operations experience at premier resort properties across North America. A purchase price has not been disclosed.

TRH has entered into an agreement to purchase all Tamarack Resort operations and key assets in Donnelly, Idaho. That includes operating the resort now, future expansion plans and investing immediately to complete Village Plaza.

continued:
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State approves event venue on Payette Lake without McCall review

Lease of 28 acres exempt from local zoning laws

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News Nov 21, 2018

Plans for an event venue on Payette Lake were approved by the Idaho Department of Lands two months ago, but the City of McCall and neighboring residents only recently found out.

The 10-year lease encompasses 28 acres of state lands between the Tamarack Bay Condominiums and Paradise Point on Eastside Drive, including the northern six acres of Shellworth Island. The lease rate is $4,000 per year.

The lakefront event venue will be called “The Lookout on the Lake.” Construction is set to begin in the spring with a goal of a July 1 opening to host weddings, family reunions and other events.

Plans call for a parking and drop-off area, access gates, temporary sheds, a paver patio covered by a party tent and a redwood deck overlooking Payette Lake, all of which will be removed at the end of the lease, project developer Travis Leonard of McCall said.

continued:
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Tamarack Bay condo owners tell Otter Payette Lake lease is illegal

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News Nov 21, 2018

The Tamarack Bay Homeowners Association has written a letter to Idaho Gov. “C.L.” Butch Otter requesting the termination of a recent Idaho Department of Lands lease on Payette Lake.

The letter to Otter, who serves as chairman of the Idaho Land Board, argues that the lease is in violation of constitutional obligations of the land department.

… One violation is that the $4,000 for the parcel is well below market value of between $35,000 and $50,000 paid annually for similar lakefront parcels, said letter, written by attorney Deborah Nelson of the Givens Pursley law firm in Boise.

A mandate in the Idaho Constitution requires state land leases to generate as much money as possible from the use of the lands.

Another violation is that a public auction for the property was not held, which would make the lease void, the letter said.

full story:
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Lawsuit dismissed against deputies in death of Idaho rancher

By Keith Ridler – 11/21/18 AP

Boise, Idaho — A judge has dismissed a federal wrongful death lawsuit filed by the family of an Idaho rancher who was fatally shot by deputies in a dispute that occurred after one of his bulls was hit by a car.

The judge tossed the lawsuit Tuesday after an apparent settlement was reached between the family of rancher Jack Yantis, Adams County, its sheriff and the two deputies.

Widow Donna Yantis said Wednesday she couldn’t comment about specifics of the case.

continued:
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Idaho attorney general, other AGs urge FCC to act against robocalls

by Scott Logan Monday, November 19th 2018

Boise, Idaho (CBS2) — With the advent of the National Do Not Call registry, the Idaho Attorney General’s Do Not Call list was folded into that national program.

But the Idaho AG continues to fight against illegal robocalls and is asking the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to do more.

“We’re urging the FCC, saying look robocalls are a plague upon us,” said Brett DeLange, deputy attorney general. “We’d like to figure out more ways to block them. You (FCC) have the technological wherewithal, we’re urging you to spend some serious time on this.”

continued:
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Idaho group asks Supreme Court to block Medicaid Expansion

11/21/18 AP

Boise, Idaho — A conservative group is asking the Idaho Supreme Court to overturn the voter-approved expansion of Medicaid coverage to potentially more than 60,000 low-income adults across the state.

The lawsuit filed on behalf of the Idaho Freedom Foundation Wednesday alleges that the language of the measure is unconstitutional, the Idaho Statesman reported . The plaintiff named in the lawsuit is Brent Regan, an IFF board member.

The group has been the most vocal opponent of Medicaid expansion, or Proposition 2, and officials had said after voters approved it that they would challenge the measure. Voters approved the proposition Nov. 6 by a 60 percent margin.

continued:
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New jobs report shows stagnant Idaho wages

Madeline White Nov 21, 2018 KIVI TV

New research from the Idaho Center for Fiscal Policy reveals wages across the country have risen by more than 21 percent in the last 40 years, while Idaho wages have barely moved at all.

Fiscal Policy Analyst Sasha Pierson says even though each dollar stretches about 7 percent further in Idaho, due to our relatively low cost of living, it doesn’t make up for our difference in wages, since Idaho is more than 20 percent below the national average.

continued:
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Mining News:

Valley commissioners set Dec. 10 workshop on Midas Gold agreement

The Star-News November 21, 2108

Valley County Commissioners have scheduled a public meeting to discuss the county’s possible involvement in the Midas Gold Community Agreement.

The meeting is scheduled for Monday, Dec. 10 at 1 p.m. at the Valley County Courthouse.

Public comment is encouraged at the meeting, which is on the commissioner’s agenda as a two-hour workshop.

Under the agreement, each community that signs on would appoint an individual to serve on the Stibnite Advisory Council.

The council would meet regularly to get updates from Midas Gold on the Stibnite Gold Project.

Each of the communities would also appoint one person to serve on the Stibnite Foundation, a charitable community foundation to be established to support projects that benefit communities surrounding the project.

The signers also agree to submit letters to the Forest Service as part of an effort by Midas Gold to encourage community participation in the permitting process.

Under the proposed agreement, Midas Gold would give the Stibnite Foundation cash and company stocks at various stages of the permitting process, construction and operation of the mine.

There would be no restrictions on how the money given to the foundation would be spent.

source:
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What Are The Potential Impacts From An Open Pit Mine In Idaho’s West Central Mountains?

By Frankie Barnhill & Monica Gokey Nov 17, 2018 Boise State Public Radio


The Yellow Pine pit blocks natural passage of the East Fork of the South Fork of the Salmon River, a barrier to Chinook reaching their historic spawning grounds. It’s also a source of heavy metal leaching into the river. MIDAS GOLD

Wanna Know Idaho traveled to Idaho’s West Central Mountains to answer this question from McCall resident Fred Coriell: “What impacts will an open-pit mining operation, like the one proposed by Midas Gold, have on our region?” Cascade-based reporter Monica Gokey has the story for this episode of the podcast.

… What are the mine’s potential impacts, Coriell wonders, on a beautiful scene like this? He tells us his concerns are two-fold — he worries about the boom-bust cycle of the mining industry, and about the environmental consequences of a mine.

“And I’m thinking generations … I’m thinking of my grandchildren and great grandchildren,” he says.

The Stibnite mine has been dormant for nearly 20 years, but a new company, Midas Gold, sees Stibnite as economically attractive again. Midas Gold is currently in the permitting process to open a new mine at Stibnite, and the new plans are bigger than ever before.

continued:
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Montana Resources has high-tech ways of hazing birds

By Ted Mcdermott – 11/17/18 AP

Butte, Mont. — On a recent afternoon, Ian Fairweather, president of Fairweather IT, remotely navigated a six-propeller drone his company designed and built toward an exhausted snow goose that had recently landed on the placid, reflective water of the Berkeley Pit.

But the snow goose resisted the attempts to be hazed from the toxic, artificial lake, swimming away from the drone but refusing to take flight.

… According to Swant, those techniques have been largely successful since an estimated 3,000 to 4,000 geese perished in the pit in December 2016. Though MR has run a bird-hazing program since 1996, the 2016 die-off sparked a renewed effort to come up with a science-based approach to keep migratory waterfowl away.

full story:
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Public Lands:

Court decision is a temporary setback for Payette forest project

The news of the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals decision on the Lost Creek-Boulder Creek Landscape Restoration project was disheartening. The three groups that litigated the project are simply opposed to logging. That is clear based on the content of their court filings.

The court’s decision halted not just the logging, but the entire forest restoration project that included restoration efforts such as culvert replacement designed to improve fish habitat, road work that reduces the amount of sediment from reaching streams, and the non-commercial thinning operations and prescribed burning that reduces hazardous fuel loads and creates safer spaces for wildland firefighters to manage wildfires. Because the logging and thinning operations were halted, the contractors may have to lay off staff.

The project originated from consensus recommendations from the Payette Forest Coalition. The groups that litigated refused to come to the table to do the hard work of collaboration – understanding others’ perspectives and compromising to find solutions that all can support. It is easier to wait for the Forest Service to approve a project and then litigate. It’s dispiriting, and somewhat ironic, that environmental groups who choose not to come to the table, shut down a forest health restoration project.

The appeals court decision is a temporary setback. Payette National Forest staff are already working to address the issues the judges identified. We will clarify how the proposed timber harvests and thinning operations comply with the Payette forest management plan.

We will issue a new record of decision. And then, barring more litigation, we will resume the important work of improving forest conditions, reducing wildfire potential, and creating jobs in our communities through the delivery of forest products.

Keith Lannom, Supervisor, Payette National Forest

source: The Star-News November 21, 2108
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Coalition votes to cut 250 acres of timber from Mesa Fire area

By Max Silverson for The Star-News November 21, 2018

Members of the Payette Forest Coalition voted last Thursday to pursue a salvage timber harvest of up to 250 acres in the most severely burned areas of the Mesa Fire located on Forest Service land.

The collaborative group pondered what salvage measures would be the best course of action in the area burned by the fire east of Council last summer.

The vote was 13-0, with two abstentions, to cut a maximum of 250 acres of timber and create no more than a half-mile of temporary road.

Additional salvage logging is also planned within the Middle Fork Weiser River timber sale. But since the area is already slated for commercial timber harvest, no action was required to conduct salvage operations.

The Mesa Fire burned 34,000 acres primarily within the 50,000-acre Mill Creek-Council Mountain restoration project, which is managed by the Payette National Forest, but under recommendations made by the coalition.

continued:
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Critter News:

Local marine reunited with lost dog: ‘It means the world to me’

by CBS 2 News Staff Saturday, November 24th 2018

The dog of a local marine was reunited with his owner Saturday morning after a viewer recognized the dog in their neighbor’s backyard.

In a phone interview with CBS 2 News, marine Vince Apodaca said they received a phone call Saturday morning from a family in the Horseshoe Bend area, saying they might have his dog. Pictures were sent and confirmed that it was the three-year-old German Shepard/Pit mix, named Doogie.

“I got the news that he was missing only a couple days before I got back, and I knew it wasn’t really going to be the holidays without him,” Vince said. “It’s so great that we were able to get him back and that we’ll have him for Christmas and all that. It means the world to me. It really does.”

continued:
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Missing North End dog found in Memphis after five months

“I just haven’t given up,” Lisa Corbett said. “Not a bit. Never.”

KTVB Katie Terhune November 23, 2018

Boise — After Lisa Corbett’s Australian shepherd Jake disappeared from her Boise backyard in June, she was distraught.

Corbett went door to door, asking neighbors if they seen Jake. She papered the North End with flyers, offering a reward for his safe return. She even paid more than $100 to a website that promised to send out an “alert” about her missing dog, she said, only to later learn she had been scammed.

Corbett, who had raised the dog from a puppy, said at first she thought her dog might wander home on his own.

continued:
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KWVR Oregon Wolf Education weekly Wolf Report

Second week of November 2018
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Arizona man gets probation for Mexican gray wolf killing

11/16/18 AP

Flagstaff, Ariz. — An Arizona man has pleaded guilty to shooting and killing an endangered Mexican gray wolf.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced Friday that Jason William Kunkel, of Peoria, Arizona, was sentenced to five years of unsupervised probation after pleading guilty to the slaying of a Mexican wolf in December 2017.

Federal authorities say Kunkel shot and killed a wild-born, female Mexican wolf in the Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest.

continued:
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Endangered Mexican wolf escapes at Colorado wildlife center

By Dan Elliott – 11/21/18 AP

Denver — An endangered Mexican wolf escaped from a Colorado wildlife center where it had been taken to breed with other captive wolves, authorities said Wednesday.

The year-old, captive-born male got out of an enclosure at the Colorado Wolf and Wildlife Center in the town of Divide, 55 miles (90 kilometers) south of Denver.

It escaped Nov. 11, the same day it arrived in Colorado with two other wolves, all from the California Wolf Center.

continued:
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Wolf Education International

Newsletter 11/19/2018

‘Rogue Pack’ Wolves Kill Calves at Jackson County Ranch

Wolf De-Listing Bill A Win For Hunters

Wolf war howls between western and eastern Washington
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Record breaking northern pike caught in Lake Coeur d’Alene

This monster fish broke the previous record that was set last March and weighed in at 32 pounds.

KTVB November 19, 2018

Coeur d’Alene — There’s a new catch-and-release record-breaking northern pike in Lake Coeur d’Alene for Idaho anglers to match, and it’ll be a challenge to beat.

Idaho Fish and Game say the 46-inch beast was caught on Nov. 3 by Mark Mills from Spokane, Wash. Mills weighed the fish on a digital scale at 32 pounds.

continued:
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The Columbia Basin Bulletin

Weekly Fish and Wildlife News
http://www.cbbulletin.com
November 19, 2018
Issue No. 890
Table of Contents

* Oregon Plan To Euthanize Sea Lions At Willamette Falls Approved By NOAA Fisheries
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441816.aspx

* 27-Pound Pike Caught In Lake Roosevelt; Council Oks Plan For Science, Economic Review Of Pike Predation
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441815.aspx

* Council Committee Recommends $11.6 Million To Continue BPA Funding For 25 Research Projects
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441814.aspx

* River Managers Reduce Downstream Bonneville Dam Flows For Spawning Chum Salmon
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441813.aspx

* Seven New Lamprey Conservation, Restoration Projects To Go To Council For Approval
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441812.aspx

* Orca Recovery Task Force Recommendations Include Considering Removal Of Lower Snake Dams
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441811.aspx

* Science Panel Completes Review Of Klickitat River Spring Chinook Master Plan
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441810.aspx

* Four-Year, $48 Million MOA Between Kootenai Tribe, BPA Out For Review
http://www.cbbulletin.com/441809.aspx
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Fish & Game News:

Time to shop for 2019 hunting and fishing license deals

By Ian Malepeai, Marketing Manager
Monday, November 19, 2018

You can save a few bucks on licenses, and they make good gifts

With Black Friday and holiday shopping deals going on, here are some Idaho Fish and Game “hacks” you may not be aware of that can save you money and increase your opportunities.

continued:
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Gift Certificates, Wildlife Guides, and Wildlife Prints– Let Fish and Game Help You with Your Holiday Shopping!

By Jennifer Jackson, Regional Communications Manager
Tuesday, November 20, 2018

Looking for a simple way to fill those holiday wish lists, especially for those who are hard to buy for?

Shop at your regional Fish and Game office!

continued:
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Information sought on Mule Deer buck shot from Tammany Rd. Nov 10

By Jennifer Bruns, Regional Communications Manager
Friday, November 23, 2018

Officers looking for information on mule deer buck shot from road

Conservation officers are seeking information regarding a Mule deer buck that was shot from Tammany Creek Road around 3:45 p.m. Saturday November 10, 2018. The buck was shot from the roadway and died in a hay field a short distance away.

“After the buck was shot, the suspects were alarmed by passing traffic and left the deer in the field”, said Conservation Officer Rick Cooper. “Someone may have that piece of information that could help us identify them.”

continued:
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More F&G News Releases

https://idfg.idaho.gov/press
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Fun Critter Stuff:

These Are the Finalists of 2018 Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards, and They’re Hilarious

September 14, 2018 by Dunja Djudjic


Jonathan Irish/The Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards 2018

There are plenty of great wildlife photographers who take awe-inspiring and interesting shots. But when these animals do funny things and take silly poses: it adds a whole new level to wildlife photography.

The Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards is centered on the photos of animals that are sure to improve your day.

continued w/lots of neat photos:
[h/t Boise NF]
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Seasonal Humor:


(FB link to larger size)
Image: Collection of John T. Richards, great-grandson of Governor Frank Steunenberg

This 1924 photo gives a whole new meaning to the term “jailbirds.”

These gobblers were part of a special flock raised by the inmates at the Old Idaho Penitentiary in Boise.

The guy who started the poultry program: Harry Orchard, who was convicted of murdering Idaho’s Governor Frank Steunenberg in 1905 by placing a bomb at the gate to governor’s residence in Caldwell, Idaho.

One of the many “turkey men” over the years who maintained the penitentiary’s turkeys was Charles George, also convicted of murder. With a team of dogs, George led his “herd” through the Boise foothills to graze. Under his watch, the Idaho Penitentiary turkey flock grew to nearly 3,000, one of the largest in the country.

George’s turkeys eventually found their way to Treasure Valley Thanksgiving and Christmas tables.

(courtesy Idaho Experience)
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Idaho History Nov 25, 2018

Stibnite, Idaho 1940s

1943 Stibnite Recreation Hall and School

1943StibniteSchoolRecHall-a

Stibnite showing recreation hall (under construction) on left and school.
Copyright Idaho state Historical Society

source: Idaho state Historical Society
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Stibnite, Idaho

(probably mid 1940s)

StibniteIdaho-1-a
(click image for larger size)

Rec Hall (completed) on the left

source : The Mike Fritz Collection courtesy Heather Heber Callahan
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Mining Camp Memories

of Patty Anderson Herbel

Just where is Stibnite? Most people living in Idaho do not know, or have never even heard of this town, and it probably will not appear on your map, unless you have an older one. Few, if any buildings remain. Yet sixty years ago this tungsten and antimony mining town tucked deep within the mountains of Central Idaho at an elevation of about 6,500 feet was home to well over a thousand individuals. “Stibnite” is the common name for antimony sulfide.

Bradley Mining Company began mining and milling gold here about 1927. At least as late as the mid 1930’s mail was still delivered by dog sled to the miners and their families during the winter months. About a dozen families wintered over each year. Old timers told us that one advantage of being snowed in was that no one caught colds after the road closed. There simply were not enough people to keep the germs circulating. However when the road opened in spring, everyone came down with a cold. The winter of 1941-1942 was the first year the road into Stibnite was plowed open in winter.

My father, Jim Anderson, a carpenter, went to Stibnite in October of 1941 seeking work because in Caldwell, where we lived, house building was ending for the winter. Several events had created a need for more workers in Stibnite, and consequently more houses. A couple of years earlier, antimony and tungsten had been listed as strategic metals for national defense. About the same time, high-grade tungsten and antimony ore were discovered in Stibnite, and a workable method was developed for refining antimony. In December, after Pearl Harbor was bombed, it became nearly impossible to import tungsten and antimony, both used in making steel. Stibnite became the prime source of both in the United States. This made the work in Stibnite vital to the war effort.

Dad was immediately hired to do carpenter work, first, finish in houses being built near Midnight Creek. He was given living space in a tent-house with three other men. Its floor was made of raw boards. A 2×4 was nailed upright up at each corner and one in the center of each side. To these a few boards were nailed around for low walls, and three pair of 2x4s nailed to the end of the uprights, in a V-shape to hold the roof. A tent was thrown over that and tied down. A rough wooden door attached to an equally rough frame provided access. Furnishings, beside the four cots, included a wood heating stove, and a chopping block, with some wood stacked inside for the stove. Tent-houses were quick to erect when immediate housing was needed. That winter some families even with babies lived in tent-houses.

The four men in Dad’s tent-house all needed overalls. The store received a shipment, but every one had extremely long legs that fit no one. So the men folded them up and wore them anyway. One day Dad had had enough of that, so he rolled his two overall legs together lengthwise, went over to the chopping block, and chopped off the extra length. The others all watched and laughed, and then each in turn stood up from his cot and did the same with his.

Meanwhile, Mother and my ten-year-old sister, Pauline and I continued to live in our home in Caldwell until Dad felt sure he would be staying on for some time. To provide a livable home for us, evenings after work he nailed boards and bats around a tent-house frame, installed a small window in each side, and a tarpaper covered roof above. A light hung from the ceiling on a cord.

At home in Caldwell, Mother listened intently to the radio reports of the war. Blackout practice was required, and Mother went to great lengths to be sure our windows were adequately covered, the lights out, and the radio dial covered. I was highly fearful of the war. I watched anxiously as the block warden walked his beat and checked that no house had visible light. Even though the block warden was our neighbor and a family friend, it didn’t help my feelings of concern, especially with Dad far away (180 miles) at a time like this.

1928whippetcoupe-aOn February 5, 1942 with some of our household items loaded into a small utility trailer, the same friend who served as block warden hauled them to Cascade, 100 miles away. We followed in our 1928 model one-seated Whippet, with our kitty in a wooden box with slats nailed over the top, and the box nailed to the running board of our car. At Cascade, our household goods were loaded onto an ore truck to go the last eighty miles to Stibnite. Kitty and our family of four spent the night in the hotel before continuing the rest of the journey the next morning.

The eighty-mile trip to the mine was quite an adventure for us girls. The Whippet’s top speed was 35 miles per hour, but Dad said that was too fast for the car, and would damage it, so we drove much slower. We had never been back on narrow snowy mountain roads. The windshield wiper ran by compression, so it slowed down or stopped when we climbed a hill. Since most of the trip meant going either up and down, the windshield wipers rested frequently. In addition, the radiator tended to boil over when we drove up steep hills. This happened a little way up the long climb to Warm Lake Summit. We needed water for that radiator. A small creek flowed near the road, however there was deep snow, and our only container was a slop jar. (This was a bucket with sloped rim and a lid, used at night for a potty to avoid going outside to the privy.) So Dad took the slop jar and waded through snow up to his waist to get down to the creek where he could find water for the radiator. Coming back he held the slop jar full of water over his head to keep it out of the snow while he waded back. There sat Mother, watching him and laughing until the tears rolled, saying she just wished she had a camera with her!

Just before we reached Stibnite, we came to guard gates and were met by an inspector who made sure we had a legitimate reason to be there. Bradley Mining Company didn’t keep guards there very long, but it was comforting to me at the time, afraid as I was of war.

The items we brought included a bed for our parents, a drop-leaf type cot for us girls, a wood-burning cook stove, plus warm wool quilts and spreads, flannel sheets, a few clothes, dish cloths, towels, and wash cloths, minimal dishes, silverware, and pans, a broom and dustpan, a copper boiler to heat water for washing clothes, a pounder, a scrub board, and a rinse tub. The tub hung outside on a nail by the front door. We also brought our tent, which was pitched outside to protect the two steamer trunks that would not fit in the small cabin. A man gave us an old card table, and Dad brought home four dynamite boxes to sit on to eat. The latches on the table legs were pretty useless, so each of us was assigned to one leg during a meal to keep the table upright while we ate. An orange crate held the washbasin. Mother nailed a few boards on the front wall for a cupboard. That was our only furniture. She made curtains for the cupboard and for the orange-crate washstand out of green checked material. For the windows she made princess style curtains from flour sacks, with a ruffled edge and tiebacks from the green checked material. She braided a small rug for the floor. It was a cozy little place. The cook stove provided sufficient heat to keep the little cabin warm. Added to that was the fun of curling up on our bed with Kitty purring between us and listening to our parents tell us stories about their childhood. At night Dad hung a double length blanket between our beds to provide privacy.

I celebrated my eighth birthday two days after our arrival. I loved the frequent snowfalls, the pure white world around us, and the softly falling snowflakes. The snow muffled the sounds, and it was so peaceful and still. The lights would go out often, too, but not from air raid drills. At first our only electricity came from a generator at the mill. It often failed. When Idaho Power later put in a power line, every major snowstorm would knock it down. We used a candle then. I loved the flickering, subdued light. This was a perfect environment for listening to our father tell us stories, and our mother recite poems.

The road closed once for eight weeks that winter. In the last mail before it closed Mother received her order of a 100-pound sack of flour and a 5-pound block of yeast. That kept us supplied with bread during the closure. (The store always ran out of milk and bread within a day or two after the road closed, and within a few days, also ran out of yeast.) When the road finally opened after that long closure, there was so much mail the tiny post office room could not hold it, so they took it over to the schoolhouse to sort.

In 1942 for some months the men worked about 70 hours a week. The government had frozen the wages, but it was impossible to keep most people staying and working in the harsh and isolated conditions unless they could earn more money than an eight-hour day would provide. Eventually the mining company received government permission to raise the wages, and the workweek was reduced to 48 hours. Every night when Dad came home from work he would chop down a dead lodgepole pine tree, cut it into stove lengths, and chop it into cook-stove size pieces for fuel. The cook-stove also provided the heat for our cabin. That winter Dad was the only one in our family to bring water from the well across the road because the ice was very slippery around the well, and we might fall in. I never heard him complain about any of his work. He took it all in stride. In spring, he and the neighbors that used the same well cleaned out the dead frogs and other objects in the well, boxed it up, and added a hand pump. After that it was Pauline’s and my job to bring water to the house.

That first winter we were in Stibnite the snow reached a depth of eight feet on the level. At one point our thermometer dropped to minus 42 degrees. The snow depth was about five feet in average winters, however, with the addition of the snow sliding off the metal roofs, the windows would be completely covered unless the snow was shoveled away from them. Below zero temperature was a special treat to us girls. At about ten or twenty below, we could take our sleds, which would normally sink into the soft snow, and glide easily over the top crust. That usually meant getting up before school to go sledding, as the sun would soften the snow later in the day. We also enjoyed blowing soap bubbles in zero and colder weather, as the bubbles would freeze and fall to the ground, where they continued to hold their frozen shape.

There were a number of log houses in Stibnite, apparently built in the 1930’s or before. By the time we arrived, only frame houses were being built. However the log houses lasted many years after the mine closed and any remaining frame houses had collapsed from the weight of winter snow.

A nurse, Bea Green, provided medical care in 1942. People held great respect for Bea. A doctor did come in from Emmett one day a month to see patients, weather permitting, which it often didn’t. But Bea handled a wide assortment of problems, including casting the arm of a four-year-old after she caught it in the wringer on their washing machine, and caring for a lady who cut the artery at the base of her thumb when she was trying to cut up some hard brown sugar. By the following year a 16-bed hospital had been built, and a physician, Dr. Haliday, hired. He was the first of a succession of physicians who came and went. Between doctors, the nurses took care of the needs, or sent people out by plane, if the weather allowed it.

An old building served as a two-room schoolhouse when we arrived. We girls finished out the school year there. The following school year, Mother decided to teach us girls at home. She did this through a church school system. She was required to be state certified, which was no problem as she was already a teacher. The length of our class days and recitation periods, as well as the subjects and required number of days in the year was regulated like any other school. I would be in the third grade, and Pauline in the fifth. During the summer we added on a second room to the back of our cabin. I say “we” because Dad was so busy he would lay out the work for us and we three at home would nail the boards during the day. A small section of the room was partitioned off for a classroom. Meanwhile a new three-room schoolhouse was completed in town, but by fall it was overfilled, so a third and fourth grade classroom was set up in the basement. Down there, there were only tiny windows high over the children’s heads. In spring the water flooded in, so the children had to walk on boards laid down to try to keep their shoes dry. We heard the teacher finally became so distraught that one day she went back behind the stove and started screaming.

Until about 1945, we had never heard of trick-or-treating. On Halloween in 1942, some kiddies came and knocked on our door. They were wearing masks. We happened to be popping corn, so offered some to them. They all took some and went on their way. Years later we wondered if they might have said “Trick or Treat!” but if they did, we didn’t know.

When people started flooding into Stibnite, the Company purchased prefabricated houses, or “prefabs” as we all called them, which could be erected quickly. They were walled inside and out with plywood. The nails were all double headed so they could be easily removed. The prefabs were put up along the banks of Fiddle Creek. They each had a kitchen cupboard and sink, but no bathroom. As the first people moved into the prefabs, they attached shelves to the trees to keep their food cold, but the bears soon found those handy pantries. In February we moved to a prefab with two bedrooms, a living room, kitchen, and laundry room. With coils in our cook-stove firebox, we had hot and cold running water at the kitchen sink. By morning the stove and water tank were cold, so Mother started the kitchen fire early. We also bought an oil-stove to heat the house. These seemed like marvelous advancements. Someone moved out of town and sold us their couch. New furniture was not available during the war. This couch had flat springs that were forced up to a rounded shape. When a person sat down on it, the springs reversed, rounding down. Many a visitor jumped up in surprise after sitting down on our couch for the first time, and experiencing an unexpected drop.

Dad and we girls enjoyed living in Stibnite very much. Mother, Violet Anderson, however, did not share our enthusiasm. Once one of her friends wrote to her that it must inspire her to write poetry, living, as we did in “Nature’s Winter Wonderland”. Mother immediately composed and sent her this poem:

Nature’s Winter Wonderland

by Violet Anderson

WinterWonderland-aWe wonder, when we rise at dawn
If it’s six below or twenty-one.
We wonder why the stove won’t heat
Beyond a sphere of seven feet –
In Nature’s winter wonderland.

We wonder, too, just what mishap
Has rendered dead the water tap.
We start to work before the sun
And wonder why the car won’t run –
In nature’s winter wonderland.

All day at work we freeze our toes,
And wonder where our money goes.
Then home again at close of day,
We wonder why we even stay –
In nature’s winter wonderland.

In the winter of 1945-1946, we moved once more. Dad built a sleigh to fasten to the Whippet and haul our furniture. This house included a large kitchen and living room, two bedrooms, and a small bathroom. There were also a couple woodsheds and a garage on the place. The Company did not charge rent for housing. In later years, with so much damage done to some houses, they started charging a monthly maintenance fee for painting and repairs inside the houses. This monthly charge built up to a certain level, and then stopped until some was used and the fund needed to be replenished.

Laundry drying was always a problem in Stibnite. In the later years two or three families moved in with a dryer. Then the Company had to forbid anyone else from getting a dryer. There wasn’t enough electric power available for that. With little to spend money on, about anyone could afford one, so that idea would have caught on quickly. Dad joined three pieces of pipe together with elbows and attached them to the wall close to the ceiling around the kitchen stove. He also put hooks up in the kitchen, so in the evening before bedtime he would string clothesline back across the kitchen. The sheets, pillowcases, and towels were hung on those lines, and pants and dresses went on hangers that hung on the pipe around the stove. We also had a reel clothesline to use on sunny days. It stretched from the front porch, across the driveway, to the top of a pole above the garage. We could stand on the front porch and hang out the laundry, pulling on the line to draw the washing out over the driveway.

As we girls grew, the little one-seated Whippet was too small to hold all of us, so Dad built a bench that fit in the trunk and Mother padded it with a quilt. Dad took the trunk lid off its hinges, and tied it on the back bumper. We girls rode back there in the trunk, and loved it. In 1945, Dad was able to buy a 1941 model two-seated Studebaker. We hated having to be quiet inside the car. The Studebaker had leaf springs. One of them had a habit of turning sideways and puncturing the gas tank. He was not able to get a replacement, so when we headed down to the valley from Stibnite, we took along a good supply of chewing gum, And sure enough, the leaf turned again and punctured the gas tank, so Dad turned the spring around while we three chewed mightily. He then plugged the hole in the tank with our prepared gum.

The axle broke on one man’s car. Andy Anderson, who owned the service station and garage, welded it for him, but warned him that the weld would not hold indefinitely, so ordered a new axle for him. When it arrived, the weld was still holding, so the man put it in the trunk of his car. Later he took a trip out to Boise. On the way, while still in the high mountains, the weld gave way, so he stopped by the roadside and replaced the broken axle with the new one. Telling about it afterward, he said it took more time to explain to all the people who came by why he happened to be carrying a spare axle in his trunk than it did to install the new axle.

The town had a 50% population turnover per year, as many came for work, but couldn’t handle the winters, cabin fever, and the isolation. Mail sorting time provided a source of socialization. Every evening when the mail came in, the post office window was closed so the two ladies could sort the mail without interruption. It was usually late in the day, and many people were getting off work. Some came, checked their mail, and left, while quite a few stood against the walls, talking joking, and watching everyone that came and went. It was a chance to observe who was in town. Each person kept an eye on his mailbox, and every time a piece of mail was slipped in, would go to see what he was getting. That mail was our one link with the outside world. As soon as the mail was sorted, the windows were again opened, and there was a rush for the package window, each person with a package slip in hand. Sears in Seattle and Wards in Portland were the chief sources of the packages.

Stibnite had an interesting social structure. The kind of house you could live in was based on how long you had been there rather than your social status. All the men had jobs, with no huge pay differences. So everyone was pretty much on the same level. Once sufficient houses were built, there was no longer anyone living in tent-houses or cabins, and eventually the prefab houses were also vacated. There were a few houses in one small area designated for some of the main managers, but they weren’t especially nicer than other houses. Since the mining company owned all the houses, there were no retired people living in town. Everyone considered somewhere else as “home”.

During the years we were in high school, all the students had to room and board out of town. There had been a high school in Stibnite a short time, but not when we were that age. To come home from school we took a bus to Boise from Caldwell, and then transferred to another bus to go to Cascade, then caught the mail stage in to Stibnite. We could do that in one day. But going back was a different story as the stage reached Cascade too late to catch a bus to Boise until the next day, and that bus arrived in Boise too late to transfer to a bus to Caldwell. So we would take a bus in to Stibnite and then on our return, fly out to Bradley Field in Boise. The flight cost a whole $10.

One day we were supposed to catch the flight out, and it was minus 40° Fahrenheit. Mother was going to take us to the airport, but the car wouldn’t start. So she called the office to ask for Dad, as he’d driven the old Whippet to work earlier. He wasn’t there. In just a bit he called back, but Mom had called the neighbors by then, and they were going to take us, so she told Dad don’t bother. But the neighbors couldn’t get their car started either. By then Dad was gone again. Finally he received the message and came. We had a full load on the seven-passenger Curtis Robin plane; all were students returning to high school after Christmas vacation. There was snow on the runway, which kept us from picking up speed, so about half way down the runway, the pilot cut the speed and taxied the rest of the way to try to pack a trail. He did that a couple times. By then the windshield was getting fogged up, so he sent us over to the post office to warm up while he cleaned the windshield. But when he started warming it, the oil line broke. He hadn’t realized it was frozen. So someone took us all home while he sent to Boise for repairs. We were home no more than half an hour when they called and said a four-passenger plane was going out, and we girls could go on it. We figured we’d have to walk the two miles to the airport. It had warmed up to minus 10 or 20 by then. But someone came after us. We would have preferred to stay home one more day.

There were 63 phones listed in the mimeographed phone book in Stibnite. They were scattered in homes around town with the understanding that others could use them if needed. There was a telephone in our house. It was an old hand-crank party line type. Pauline, being older, went out to Caldwell to school at Gem State Academy before I did. In May of her second year there, the creeks flooded from the spring snow melt, and blocked the road. Pauline was due to come home by bus in a day or two, so Mother called her to tell her she would need to fly home. Otherwise she would find herself stranded in Cascade with no money for a hotel room. Mother reached her, delivered the message, and then chatted for a few seconds when suddenly there was a terrible noise on the line. I could hear it clear across the room. Mother dropped the phone in alarm. Lightning struck the line. It was dead, and stayed that way for quite a few days. The roads were closed a couple weeks or so, too. We praised God that the call went through in time.

One time Melvina Bishop, who was attending the same boarding school with us, needed to call her mother. However when the operator asked for her Mother’s phone number in Stibnite, Melvina made the mistake of saying her mother didn’t have a telephone. She didn’t know whether her mother was at home or work, so expected the lady in the Company telephone office to locate her. However she had a difficult time convincing the operator to put the call through to someone who didn’t have a phone. Her mother happened to be at work, and the call went through promptly. Another time I had mumps and was placed in the dormitory infirmary in isolation. My sister called home to tell Mother. The lines were bad, so an operator somewhere between had to relay the message. Mother said, “Just leave her at school.” The operator exclaimed, “Leave her in school when she has the mumps?”

We moved out of Stibnite in June of 1951. Both my sister and I look back on our time there as a delightful experience. The following year the mine closed.

(via personal correspondence 2004)
— — — — — — — — — —

Summer of 1942 housing and families in Stibnite

Photos from the Mike Fritz collection

StibniteIdahoSummer1942-6-a
StibniteIdahoSummer1942-4-a
StibniteIdahoSummer1942-11-a
StibniteIdahoSummer1942-10-a
StibniteIdahoSummer1942-8-a
StibniteIdahoSummer1942-5-a
StibniteIdahoSummer1942-2-asource : The Mike Fritz Collection courtesy Heather Heber Callahan
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page updated September 4, 2020

Road Reports Nov 25, 2018

Main roads to Yellow Pine are open, there is snow on top of Lick Creek and Landmark, higher elevation roads may be closed or only advisable with 4×4 and chains. Please share road reports. Conditions change quickly this time of year.

Yellow Pine: We received 1.5″ of snow 11-24, local streets have a little snow, ice in the shade. Watch for pot holes on the back Stibnite Road between the cross roads and the post office. Click for Local Forecast.
Yellow Pine Webcam:

Johnson Creek Stream Gauge:

Warm Lake Highway: Probably snow covered now. Report (Nov 19) Watch for icy road on the west side of Big Creek Summit on down to about Scott Valley, icy in the shaded corners.
SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

South Fork Road: Monday (Nov 19) reports the lower part of the road is clear and dry. The upper road has icy patches and snow. A few elk near the road to watch out for.
Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
South Fork Stream Gauge:

EFSF Road: Monday (Nov 19) the road is good, some pot holes are developing. Probably snow on the road now.

Johnson Creek Road: Report Wednesday (Nov 21) from mail truck driver (Dean) There is 4 to 6 inches of snow up on Warm Lake Summit. The upper half of Johnson Creek is snow covered. This will probably be his last trip in via Johnson Creek due to the storms coming.
The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet
Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam:

Golden Gate Road: Report via FB Saturday (Nov 10, 2018) “Took the Samurai up Golden Gate Hill today. Cut a few trees off the road. Only a few inches of snow.” – SA
link to FB image:

Quartz Creek: (Nov 21) Made it about a mile from the top. There was about a foot of snow. Ice dams in the river. – SA
link to FB photo:

Lick Creek: Report Friday (Nov 23) “Lick Ck summit yesterday. All four tires chained up and 4 wheel drive. Then it continued to snow the rest of the day and part of the night.” – N
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Probably closed now to wheeled vehicles.
Report (Nov 11) “This is just a road report over Profile to Big Creek. There is a little less than a foot of snow at Profile Gap, and there has been a fair amount of wheeled travel over Profile Gap, but not all travelers were without problems. Coming out today on our tracked ATVs we observed a lot of tracks “in the ditch” & where one rig got stuck & backed down the road several miles before successfully turning around. For us it was a very enjoyable ride out although it was a bit chilly this morning, but sunshine all day warmed it up to the low 30s. For travelers using full sized 4×4 vehicles, tire chains seem advisable. There isn’t enough snow on the road from Jacob Ladder Flat to Edwardsburg for snowmobiles.” C&L
Link to video:
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.
Big Creek Webcam:

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Report (Nov 11) the road is very good, a few ruts around Vibika Creek.
Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: A report (Nov 11) of 6″ snow at Stibnite. Not advisable for wheeled vehicles over Monumental summit.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Road is probably closed now.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: No current report, road may not be advisable for wheeled vehicles w/out chains. SNOTEL station shows 14″ of snow 11-25.
Note: The approx elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′
——————————-

Weather Reports Nov 18-24

Nov 18 Weather:

At 1030am it was 21 degrees, partly clear (high haze), light breezes, moderate frost. At 230pm it was 41 degrees and mostly clear. At 530pm it was 27 degrees and mostly clear.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time November 19, 2018 at 10:30AM
Clear and dry (not much frost) patches of old snow
Max temperature 42 degrees F
Min temperature 14 degrees F
At observation 23 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth Trace
— — — — — — — — — — — —

Nov 19 Weather:

At 1030am it was 23 degrees, clear sky, dry – very little frost, patches of old snow in the shade getting smaller. At 245pm it was 44 degrees and clear. At 545pm it was 27 degrees, looks clear, bright gibbous moon.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time November 20, 2018 at 10:30AM
Clear and frosty, smaller patches of old snow
Max temperature 45 degrees F
Min temperature 17 degrees F
At observation 25 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth Trace
— — — — — — — — — — — —

Nov 20 Weather:

At 1030am it was 25 degrees, clear sky, moderate frost, and smaller patches of old snow in the shade. At 3pm it was 47 degrees, partly cloudy – high thin wisps, and nearly calm. At 545pm it was 29 degrees and mostly clear.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time November 21, 2018 at 10:30AM
Mostly cloudy, moderate frost, patches of old snow
Max temperature 50 degrees F
Min temperature 15 degrees F
At observation 26 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth Trace
— — — — — — — — — — — —

Nov 21 Weather:

At 1030am it was 26 degrees, mostly cloudy, moderate frost, and patches of old snow in the shade. At 245pm it was 42 degrees and overcast. Thinner clouds at sundown. At 10pm it was 29 degrees.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time November 22, 2018 at 10:30AM
Overcast, light chilly breeze
Max temperature 47 degrees F
Min temperature 26 degrees F <– yesterday morning
At observation 37 degrees F
Precipitation Trace
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth Trace
— — — — — — — — — — — —

Nov 22 Weather:

At 1030am it was 37 degrees, overcast, chilly light breeze and a drop or two of rain (had sprinkled a little earlier.) Gusty breezes before lunch time. A couple of sucker holes in the clouds at 1pm. Dark clouds and breezy at 2pm. Sprinkling by 215pm, dark clouds and breezy. At 3pm it was 40 degrees and still sprinkling. Not raining at 5pm (not sure when it quit) overcast and a little breezy. At 630pm it was 33 degrees and overcast. Steady rain 8pm. Still raining 9pm. At 2am enough snow had fallen to make the ground white. Probably didn’t snow much more during the night.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time November 23, 2018 at 10:30AM
Overcast, very light snow falling
Max temperature 44 degrees F
Min temperature 30 degrees F
At observation 32 degrees F
Precipitation 0.21 inch
Snowfall 1/4 inch
Snow depth 1/4 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

Nov 23 Weather:

At 1030am it was 32 degrees, low overcast, fine light snow falling, measured 1/4″ new snow. Light snow all morning, big flakes after lunch. Just flaking at 110pm. Light snowfall at 2pm. At 240pm it was 33 degrees, low overcast and snowing lightly. At 530pm it was 32 degrees and still snowing, very low overcast, ridges socked in nearly to the valley floor, less than 1/2″ of snow so far. By 10pm looks like maybe an inch of snow. Probably light snow during the night and early morning.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time November 24, 2018 at 10:30AM
Overcast, light snowfall
Max temperature 33 degrees F
Min temperature 26 degrees F
At observation 30 degrees F
Precipitation 0.10 inch
Snowfall 1.25 inch
Snow depth 1.5 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

Nov 24 Weather:

At 1030am it was 30 degrees, overcast and snowing lightly, 1.25″ new snow, 1.5″ total snow. A few flakes at noon. Not snowing at 1pm. Very light snow falling 2pm. At 245pm it was 32 degrees, overcast, breezy and flaking. Breaks in the clouds at 430pm. At 530pm it was 39 degrees, overcast and cold light breeze. Clearing during the night/early morning.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time November 25, 2018 at 10:30AM
Clear and cold
Max temperature 33 degrees F
Min temperature 9 degrees F
At observation 15 degrees F
Precipitation Trace
Snowfall Trace
Snow depth 1.3 inch
——————————-

Winter Storm Watch Nov 23, 5am to Nov 24, 5am

Winter Storm Watch

URGENT - WINTER WEATHER MESSAGE
National Weather Service Boise ID
238 PM MST Wed Nov 21 2018

...HEAVY SNOW EXPECTED ON FRIDAY IN BAKER COUNTY OREGON AND THE
WEST CENTRAL AND BOISE MOUNTAINS IN IDAHO...

.A warm front slowly moving through the area on Friday will create
a prolonged period of snow fall. While most of these same
locations will receive light snow accumulations on Thursday, the
more impactful snow amounts will occur on Friday. A cold front is
expected to move through Saturday morning that will bring an end
to precipitation.

West Central Mountains-Boise Mountains-Baker County-
238 PM MST Wed Nov 21 2018 /138 PM PST Wed Nov 21 2018/

...WINTER STORM WATCH IN EFFECT FROM LATE THURSDAY NIGHT THROUGH
LATE FRIDAY NIGHT...

* WHAT...Heavy snow possible. Total snow accumulations of 3 to 5
  inches between 3500 and 6000 ft, and 5 to 10 inches above 6000
  ft with local amounts of 12-15 inches.

* WHERE...Baker County in Oregon and in the West Central and Boise
  Mountains in Idaho.

* WHEN...Late Thursday night through late Friday night.

* ADDITIONAL DETAILS...Plan on difficult travel conditions
  especially along higher mountain passes. Highways 95 and 55 and
  Interstate 84 may be snow covered at times, creating hazardous
  travel conditions. Reductions in visibility are possible.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...

A Winter Storm Watch means there is potential for significant
snow, sleet or ice accumulations that may impact travel. Continue
to monitor the latest forecasts.

Yellow Pine Forecast:

Tonight A chance of rain and snow after 11pm. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 31. South southwest wind around 6 mph. Chance of precipitation is 30%. Total nighttime snow accumulation of less than a half inch possible.

Thanksgiving Day A chance of rain and snow. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 38. Light south southwest wind becoming southwest 5 to 9 mph in the morning. Chance of precipitation is 50%. New snow accumulation of less than a half inch possible.

Thursday Night Rain and snow, becoming all snow after 11pm. Low around 29. Southwest wind around 9 mph. Chance of precipitation is 80%. New snow accumulation of less than a half inch possible.

Friday Snow before 11am, then rain and snow. High near 36. South southwest wind 6 to 10 mph. Chance of precipitation is 80%. New snow accumulation of 1 to 3 inches possible.

Friday Night Rain and snow, becoming all snow after 11pm. Low around 25. West wind around 9 mph. Chance of precipitation is 80%. New snow accumulation of 1 to 3 inches possible.

Saturday A 30 percent chance of snow showers, mainly before 11am. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 33. New snow accumulation of less than a half inch possible.
————————

Road Reports Nov 21, 2018

Main roads to Yellow Pine are open, there is snow on top of Lick Creek and Landmark, higher elevation roads may be closed or only advisable with 4×4 and chains. Please share road reports. Conditions change quickly this time of year. Winter storms due to arrive for the holiday weekend.

Yellow Pine: Local streets are clear and dry, we still have a little patchy snow on the ground here in the shade. Watch for pot holes on the back Stibnite Road between the cross roads and the post office. Click for Local Forecast.
Yellow Pine Webcam:

Johnson Creek Stream Gauge:

Warm Lake Highway: Report (Nov 19) Watch for snow and ice on the road on the west side of Big Creek Summit on down to about Scott Valley, icy in the shaded corners.
SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

South Fork Road: Monday (Nov 19) reports the lower part of the road is clear and dry. The upper road has icy patchs and a little snow. A few elk near the road to watch out for. No rocks or trees down.
Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
South Fork Stream Gauge:

EFSF Road: Monday (Nov 19) the road is good, some pot holes are developing.

Johnson Creek Road: Report Wednesday (Nov 21) from mail truck driver (Dean) There is 4 to 6 inches of snow up on Warm Lake Summit. The upper half of Johnson Creek is snow covered. This will probably be his last trip in via Johnson Creek due to the storms coming.
The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet
Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam:

Golden Gate Road: Report via FB Saturday (Nov 10, 2018) “Took the Samurai up Golden Gate Hill today. Cut a few trees off the road. Only a few inches of snow.” – SA
link to FB image:

Quartz Creek: (July 2, 2018) “Quartz Creek has a big wash out just before a switch back towards the top. Right now only motorcycles can get by but with work some atvs can make it. A shovel and a saw may be needed to widen the trail.” – DB
link to FB photo:

Lick Creek: Report Sunday (Nov 4) “I didn’t start getting into snow until ‘the big rocks’. There were 6-8 inches at different locations going over the top. No problems at all.” – B (Note: has snowed in YP since this report.)
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Report (Nov 11) “This is just a road report over Profile to Big Creek. There is a little less than a foot of snow at Profile Gap, and there has been a fair amount of wheeled travel over Profile Gap, but not all travelers were without problems. Coming out today on our tracked ATVs we observed a lot of tracks “in the ditch” & where one rig got stuck & backed down the road several miles before successfully turning around. For us it was a very enjoyable ride out although it was a bit chilly this morning, but sunshine all day warmed it up to the low 30s. For travelers using full sized 4×4 vehicles, tire chains seem advisable. There isn’t enough snow on the road from Jacob Ladder Flat to Edwardsburg for snowmobiles.” C&L
Link to video:
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.
Big Creek Webcam:

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Report (Nov 11) the road is very good, a few ruts around Vibika Creek.
Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: A report (Nov 11) of 6″ snow at Stibnite. Probably not advisable for wheeled vehicles w/out chains over Monumental summit.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: [Note: road may be closed now.] Old report (Oct 13) “Lots of drifting snow, downed trees, and less than travel-friendly conditions.” – SA
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: No current report, road may not be advisable for wheeled vehichles w/out chains. SNOTEL station shows 5″ of snow 11-21.
Note: The approx elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′
——————————-

Travel safe in winter weather

Nov 21, 2018 Local News 8

The old Scout motto, “Be Prepared,” is the best advice for Thanksgiving travelers.

The Madison County Sheriff’s Office has compiled a list of items you might want to pack in the car.

It begins with a flashlight and extra batteries. Bring your cell phone with a vehicle charger or extra batteries and stock some extra car fuses just in case.

Other safety gear should include flares or reflective triangles, jumper cables, winter formula window washer solvent, an ice scraper and a general first aid kit.

Be sure to keep the gas tank full. And, make sure to have enough cash on hand to pay for it.

It’s also a good idea to pack rags or paper towels, several bottles of water, non-perishable food items, and an ice-scraper, snow brush and snow shovel.

Don’t forget tire chains and non-clumping kitty litter for tire traction. And remember an extra set of clothes and a blanket.

Check the weather forecast and try to avoid traveling in a snow storm. Call 5-1-1 or visit 511.idaho.gov for latest road conditions.

If you do get stuck in a storm, play it smart.

If visibility is too bad, pull over and stop before you run into another car or person.

Stay inside your car, unless you can see a building next to you. It is very easy to become disoriented or lost during a snowstorm.

Turn your heater on occasionally, but keep a window cracked to avoid carbon monoxide poisoning. Don’t leave the heater on for more than ten minutes every half-hour or so to avoid running out of gas.

Make sure your tailpipe isn’t blocked by snow, because that can send carbon monoxide into the car. Stay hydrated and do a little exercise, otherwise keep your seatbelt on in case another vehicle runs into you.

And, at night, keep the overhead light in your vehicle on, so others can see you.

source:
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Nov 18, 2018 The Yellow Pine Times

Nov 18, 2018 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Note: You have 4 days left to order a 2019 Yellow Pine calendar, deadline is Thanksgiving.

Community Calendar:

May 15 – Nov 30 Firewood Season – permits at The Corner
August 6 Ice Hole Campground Closed for the season
November 22 at 4pm Thanksgiving Potluck at the Yellow Pine Tavern
November 24 “Stop the Bleed” Training YPFD
2019 Events
May 25, 2019 ATV-UTV Scavenger Hunt Memorial Day Weekend
Jul 13, 2019 Ride to Big Creek
Sep 14, 2019 Ride to Cinnabar

(details below)
———-

Village News:

Yellow Pine US Mail

Three day a week mail delivery from Cascade starts November 1, 2018. The Post Office in Yellow Pine will be open six days a week: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Be sure to buy your holiday stamps here.
— — — —

Firewood Permits

Season May 15 through November 30, 2018 Permits available at The Corner.

Fuelwood permits have been reduced to $6.25 per cord with a 4-cord minimum and a 10-cord maximum per household.

link to more info:
— — — —

Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.


— — — —

Ice Hole Campground Closed

The Campground has been temporarily closed to provide for public safety during reconstruction. This order will be in effect from September 27, 2018 through July 2, 2019, unless rescinded earlier by the Forest Supervisor. (0402-04-80)
— — — —

Bears

It should be safe to put bird feeders back out, bears are hibernating (according to Jon Hunter our F&G CO.)

Please remember to keep trash secured, it will draw foxes, coyotes and loose dogs.
———-

Local Events:

Thanksgiving Potluck at the Yellow Pine Tavern

Thursday November 22 at 4pm

Turkey, dressing, mashed potatoes and gravy provided
— — — —

November 24 “Stop the Bleed” Training

Jeff and I are now instructors for the National Program from the American College of Surgeons on educating the public on “Stop the Bleed”. We are going to hold a class here in YP the Saturday after Thanksgiving November 24, 2018 at the YP Fire Station and will do more once we return from our winter break. We are in the process of building “stop the bleed” packets to be placed in the businesses around town as well.

Background: Motivated by the 2012 tragedy in Sandy Hook and multiple tragedies that have occurred in the ensuing years, what has become known as the Hartford Consensus was convened to bring together leaders from law enforcement, the federal government, and the medical community to improve survivability from manmade or natural mass casualty events. The resulting injuries from these events generally present with severe bleeding which, if left unattended, can result in death. The participants of the Hartford Consensus concluded that by providing first responders (law enforcement) and civilian bystanders the skills and basic tools to stop uncontrolled bleeding in an emergency situation, lives would be saved. The first responder program has received very good response and is widely being used across the country. The next step is to focus on needs of civilian bystanders.

Need: Civilians need basic training in Bleeding Control principles so they are able to provide immediate, frontline aid until first responders are able to take over care of an injured person. Due to many situations, there may be a delay between the time of injury and the time a first responder is on the scene. Without civilian intervention in these circumstances, preventable deaths will occur.

Mission/Objective: The American College of Surgeons Committee on Trauma is leading the effort to save lives by teaching the civilian population to provide vital initial response to stop uncontrolled bleeding in emergency situations. This will be accomplished by the development of a comprehensive and sustainable bleeding control education and information program targeted to civilians that will inform, educate and empower the 300+million citizens of the United States.

Copyright © 2017 by the American College of Surgeons
— — — —

2019 Yellow Pine Escapades

The 2019 schedule for the Yellow Pine Escapades has been updated on the website!

Expect new escapades this coming year, including an ATV-UTV Photo Scavenger Hunt; two (yes, two) ATV-UTV rides, a golf tournament, and even a community yard sale. Other events will be added to the calendar as plans are finalized.

Join us for a great season of fun! The starting point for fun in Yellow Pine! The website includes information on the events hosted by the Yellow Pine Community Hall as well as the other “goings-on” in the village. Food, lodging and fuel are available in Yellow Pine.

https://www.ypescapade.org/atv-utv-events
———-

Local Groups:

YPWUA News:

There was a YPWUA Annual Shareholder’s meeting Saturday July 7, no minutes yet.

link to: 2018 September Water Department Update.docx

There will be a YPWUA meeting in October. (?)
— — — —

VYPA News:

VYPA Meeting Dates 2019

June 18th; July 20th; August 10th; September 14th. Note that the July 20th meeting is not on the second Saturday due to a conflict with a planned ATV rally involving many residents and visitors.
— — — —

YPFD News:

The next meeting to be May 18th, 2019 at the Community Hall

There was a YPFD Fire Commissioners Meeting June 9, no minutes yet.
There was a YPFD Fire Commissioners Meeting August 6, no minutes yet.
Sept 22nd YPFD meeting minutes posted in the Sept. 30th Yellow Pine Times.
October 6 YPFD meeting minutes posted in the Oct 21st Yellow Pine Times.

Bring it, Don’t Burn it

For us in Yellow Pine, Jake Strohmeyer, Dist. Ranger with the Boise NF said we can use the area at our transfer station for yard debris and the FS will burn it once a year. Please no furniture, mattresses, construction debris, metal objects, tires or personnel junk. Please only woody yard debris. When using the pile please be mindful of where you place the debris as it should be contained to a manageable burnable area and kept as clean as possible. – JF

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Updates:

Fire Department Training on Sunday’s at 11am all are welcome

The YPFD has 2 Size Chimney Brushes with extension rods that were donated for use around YP. If you would like to borrow one, please contact Cecil or Jeff and we’ll get them for you. The YPFD also has loanable mitigation tools, (Weed-Whacker, Hedge Trimmer, backpack blower and 16’ pole saw). If you would like to borrow one or all, please contact Cecil or Jeff and we’ll get them for you.

It’s also time to check the Smoke Alarm batteries and Fire Extinguishers. Please test the alarm and replace Smoke Alarm Batteries every year, if you have the replaceable battery type. Fire Extinguishers should be checked as well and should be easily seen and reachable. A good location for the Fire Extinguishers would be the kitchen and near the wood stove and/or fireplace. The needle should be in the green.

If you need a Smoke Detector or Fire Extinguisher for your YP residence please contact Jeff F.

Smoke Alarm Info:

Cooking safety in the home:
——–

Biz Listings:

Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377

Open for summer
— — — —

Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233

Fall Hours: 8am to close 7 days a week.

Daily Menu: full Breakfast served also Burgers and Pizza for Afternoon and Evening. Good selection of Beer and Wine also sold by 6 and 12 pack. Fuel available 92 Octane. Wi Fi, Ice.
— — — —

The Corner (208) 633-3325

We sell FS wood cutting permits.

Our hours for this week: Monday-Friday 4pm-8pm, Saturday and Sunday 11am-close

We will also be cooking most of the week for private events so if anyone wants something outside of those hours just call and we can usually accommodate.

The Corner Store is open as well, just call for grocery needs, fresh produce, eggs, meat etc.
— — — —

Buck Horn Outfitters LLC

Buck Horn Outfitters in Idaho’s west Central Mountains in Units 25, 20 A, & 19 A. Providing Elk, Mule Deer, Black Bear, Mountain lion, & Wolf Hunts. We offer Guided Rifle or Archery Hunts & Drop Camps. We are not about Quantity we are about providing Quality Hunts. My husband and I have been in the back country all our lives, we offer Deluxe camps with great food & our Guides know hunting, the back country and Stock.

Link to FB:
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Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed (208) 382-4430 – 50# bag of Polar Ice Melt available for $7.99. Breaks the Ice Barrier. Quick Melting action, even in heavy snow.
— — — —

Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, Will service Yellow Pine
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (Nov 12) overnight low of 9 degrees, clear sky, dry – not much frost, and chilly light breeze. There is still about an inch of snow in the shade but more open ground. Clear skies and lots of sunshine early afternoon, a little snow melting but still frozen in the shade, high of 42 degrees. Quiet afternoon and evening, no traffic. Mostly clear at sundown and below freezing.

Tuesday (Nov 13) overnight low of 16 degrees, mostly high thin clouds, dry – hardly any frost. Two hairy woodpeckers visited looking for the missing feeder. Checked with F&G, bears are hibernating, OK to put feeders back out. Happy woodpeckers. Clouds thickening and by early afternoon the sky was overcast with thick white haze, high of 44 degrees. Quiet afternoon and evening, very little traffic. Faint fuzzy crescent moon up at dark. Some stars visible at 9pm.

Wednesday (Nov 14) overnight low of 20 degrees, mostly clear sky, dry – light frost, patchy snow in the shade. Truck traffic on main street this morning. Female Hairy woodpecker visiting. Mail truck made it in on time. High thin clouds covered most of the sky mid-afternoon, nearly calm air, high of 54 degrees. Overcast by sundown.

Thursday (Nov 15) overnight low of 25 degrees, mostly clear sky, dry – very light frost, chilly light breezes, about 1/2″ old patchy snow in the shade. Mid-afternoon warmer, high haze over most of the sky, nice day, high of 54 degrees. Quiet afternoon, a little traffic. Stellar jay visiting. Fuzzy half full moon at dark, dew starting to condense on metal roofs.

Friday (Nov 16) overnight low of 25 degrees, overcast this morning, slight bit of frost, about 1/2″ patchy old snow still in the shade. Steller jay visiting. Overcast and chilly breezes mid-day, high of 44 degrees. Raven calling and flying over the village. Airplane traffic at 3pm. Female hairy woodpecker stopped by. Decreasing clouds by sunset, bright half moon following Mars at dusk.

Saturday (Nov 17) overnight low of 20 degrees, clear sky this morning, light frost, patches of old snow in the shade. A couple of steller jays visiting. Clear sunny day, mild temperatures and cold light breezes, high of 43 degrees. Shots fired south west of the school around 245pm. Pine squirrel visiting. Clear sky at dusk, fat moon rising over Golden Gate peak, temperatures dropping.

Sunday (Nov 18) overnight low of 12 degrees, partly clear sky this morning – high haze, moderate frost and light breezes, smaller patches of snow in the shade. A female hairy woodpecker fighting with a starling, 2 jays and a pine squirrel visiting. Power went off and back on at 145pm. Mostly clear by early afternoon, a few clouds to the south, sunny and mild, high of 42 degrees. Quiet evening, fat moon peeking over the north shoulder of Golden Gate hill at dusk.
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Tips & Advice:

Be Ember Aware! Tip Series

“Used with permission from University of Nevada Cooperative Extension and the Living With Fire program.”

Be Ember Aware Tip #5- A Noncombustible Must

During a wildfire, thousands of windblown embers may pelt your house like hail during a fire storm. Many of the embers that strike the side of the house can fall to the ground and accumulate next to your home. If your neighborhood is asked to evacuate as wildfire approaches, the embers can lie there, glowing unattended for hours or even days. If the embers are in contact with a wood or other combustible material sided house, or something that can ignite in the flowerbed, your home could be in jeopardy.

The vegetation, landscape materials and other items located immediately adjacent to your home have critical influence on house survival during wildfire and ember attack. Homeowners living in high fire hazard areas need to create a “noncombustible (or low combustible) area” within 3 -5 feet of their houses. Some of the important “do’s” and “don’ts” of a noncombustible area include:

Dos…

* Do use hard surfaces such as concrete, brick and rock
* Do use green, healthy well maintained lawn
* Do use gravel or rock mulches
* Do use irrigated herbaceous plants such as annual and perennial flowers and groundcovers
* Do use short, less than 18” in height, deciduous shrubs, but don’t locate them in front of foundation vents

Don’ts…

* Don’t locate the firewood pile, or other combustible materials such as lumber in this area
* Don’t use wood, bark or rubber mulches
* Don’t have uncovered garbage cans or recycling bins here
* Don’t have dried grass and weeds, fallen pine needles and leaves or dead branches located in this area
* Don’t use ornamental evergreen plants, such as shrub junipers

Having a noncombustible (or low combustible) area next to your home is an important part of protecting it from wildfire. Don’t wait – take action now before the embers arrive.

[h/t Fire Chief Jeff]
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Winter Safe Driving Tips

* Prepare: Ensure your vehicle’s headlights and brake lights are in working condition, along with its tires, heater, defroster, brakes, and windshield wipers, and that you have enough windshield wiper fluid.

* Take Your Time: Give yourself extra time to get where you’re going. Increasing following distance, traveling at slower speeds and accounting for the extra stopping time will all go a long way to help avoid collisions.

* Stay Alert: Give the road your undivided attention. That’s always true and especially important with slick streets and potentially dangerous conditions.

* Don’t Panic: If your vehicle begins to slide or skid, don’t slam on the brakes. Look down the road in the direction you want to go and gently steer your vehicle that way. Release the accelerator until traction returns.

* Emergency Kit: Keep an emergency kit in your car with the tools you need to protect yourself, should a problem arise. Gloves, boots, blankets, flares, a brush, water, jumper cables, a flashlight and something for traction, such as sand or kitty litter are all great things to include.

source: KIVI TV
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Idaho News:

Payette project shutdown could mean loss of dozens of timber jobs

By Max Silverson for The Star-News November 15, 2018

The shutdown of the Lost Creek-Boulder Creek project west of New Meadows could put dozens of people from the local timber industry out of work, according to employers.

The 9th Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals ruled against the 80,000 acres project last month, finding that the designation of land within the project was done contrary to the Payette Forest Plan.

McCall-based Ikola Logging was planning to start working within the project, but has since been forced to search for other projects, owner Gerry Ikola said.

“Lost Creek-Boulder Creek was planning to be our winter job, the one we would move to in about two or three weeks,” Ikola said.

“There was enough work on that job to last us through winter and then some,” he said.

Without a substitute project, the company has no work lined up for a majority of the their employees and 15 to 20 jobs may be lost.

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Three Blaze Trail to be reviewed in Nov. 28 presentation

The Star-News November 15, 2018

Central Idaho’s historic Three Blaze Trail will be discussed on Wednesday, Nov. 28, from 6:30 to 8 p.m. at the Payette National Forest Supervisor’s Office.

Forest Service Heritage employees and members of the Idaho Trails Association will join citizen hiker Wallace Kimball in talking about construction of the historic trail and Idaho’s Thunder Mountain Gold Rush of 1902.

Discussions will also include early homesteading in Chamberlain Basin and the historic mining town of Roosevelt as well as modern perspectives on the significance of backcountry trails.

Presentations are free and will be in the Weiser Conference Room at the Payette National Forest Supervisor’s Office, located at 500 N. Mission St.

source:
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The Jim Moore Place

Nez Perce-Clearwater National Forests Nov 15, 2018

The Jim Moore Place, located approximately 50 miles upriver from Riggins on the Salmon River is an important historic site, listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1976. Originally from Kentucky, Jim Moore moved to the Salmon River canyon in 1898. He initially claimed the property as a placer mining claim in 1900. Over the next 15 years, he constructed nine log buildings and a rock walled root cellar. He irrigated the adjacent fields with water diverted from Slide Creek via a handmade flume.

During the early days of the Thunder Mountain gold rush there was a need for a direct route from the northwest to the diggings. Demand for such a route resulted in the donation of three thousand dollars from prospectors, miners, and businessmen to construct a trail in 1900. The Three Blaze Trail from Grangeville via Dixie to the Thunder Mountain gold fields was built, passing through Jim Moore’s place on the river. Jim Moore lived on the north side of the river across from Campbell’s Ferry and took advantage of the influx of travelers on the trail and his neighbors’ ferry. In two years, from 1900 to 1902, nearly 1,800 men used this trail going into the Thunder Mountain area. Moore carried on a profitable business in supplying hides and meat to these travelers as well as supplying them with alcohol distilled from his extra fruit.

Jim Moore lived here until his death in 1942 and is buried on his property. Over the next 30 years, the property had several different owners including the Forest Service who had plans to build a guard station and an airstrip at this location. However, by 1971 the withdrawal designating the property as an administrative site was terminated.

In the early 1980s, several restoration projects were performed on some of these buildings. Some of the wall, gable, and roof purlin logs were replaced and new board and batten roofs were installed. Over the past 30+ years, mother-nature has taken her toll and additional maintenance is needed. Last September, South Zone Archaeologist Steve Armstrong and Fred Walters of the Idaho Heritage Trust, visited the site to determine current maintenance needs for the log buildings. A restoration and stabilization project is being planned for the spring of 2019. This will be the first of a multi-year effort to ensure the 100+ year old log buildings will be preserved well into the future for forest visitors to learn from and enjoy while passing through the wild Salmon River Canyon of central Idaho.

link to: FB photo gallery

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Cascade first-graders to raise money for California fire victims

By Max Silverson for The Star-News November 15, 2018

First graders at Cascade Schools are working to raise money to help people affected by the Camp Fire, currently burning in California.

Students were discussing the question of “how do people help out in the community,” when the idea of a penny drive got started, first grade teacher Melanie Stocks said.

“The students were brainstorming ideas and came up with the idea of helping those impacted by the Camp Fire,” Stocks said.

Students set the goal of raising $500 by Friday, Nov. 30.

The class has made the fundraiser into a competition, offering brownies to the elementary class and high school class that can raise the most money.

All of the funds raised will go directly to victims of the Camp Fire.

As of Tuesday the fire had burned 125,000 acres and is only 30 percent contained. It is the deadliest wildfire in California history, with 42 people confirmed dead and 6,552 residences destroyed, according to news reports.

source:
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Cascade mayor resigns, citing ‘health and well-being’

Julie Crosby stepped down Tuesday, less than a year into her four-year term.

Katie Terhune November 15, 2018 KTVB

Cascade — The mayor of Cascade has stepped down from her position, less than a year into her her four-year term.

Julie Crosby announced her resignation Tuesday night after the city council meeting.

In her resignation letter, Crosby wrote that she had come into the position “with my eyes wide open” but had not foreseen the toll the mayorship would take on her own health.

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Salmon River Brewery in McCall to expand with 1,800-square foot brewhouse

by CBS 2 News Staff Monday, November 12th 2018

McCall, Idaho (CBS 2) — A popular brewery and restaurant in McCall continues to grow.

Salmon River Brewery recently broke ground on a new 1,800 square-foot brew house across the street from its restaurant near the town’s historic railroad depot.

“We could not be more excited to see construction start on this project,” Salmon River Brewery co-owner Matt Hurlbutt says. “The new brew house will enable us to double our beer-making capabilities, as well as expand the community gathering space in the Hotel McCall Courtyard. Plus, the new facility will allow us to offer brewery tours, set aside a dedicated tasting room, and provide other new services.”

With the expansion Salmon River Brewery’s capacity will grow from 1,100 barrels per year to 2,200 barrels annually. It will also sport a tasting room overlooking the brewhouse, a 900-square-foot rooftop deck, and redesigned patio seating between the brewery and the current restaurant.

source:
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Idaho man dies in hunting accident

The 25-year-old died after accidentally shooting himself.

Associated Press November 12, 2018

Lewiston, Idaho (AP) – Authorities say a north-central Idaho man died while hunting Sunday morning after accidentally shooting himself.

The Nez Perce County Sheriff’s Office says 25-year-old Ryan S. Rigney of Lewiston was hunting near Soldiers Meadow Lake when he accidentally discharged his gun.

The Lewiston Tribune reports emergency medical crews were sent to the rural location about 7:42 a.m. but lifesaving measures were unsuccessful and Rigney died at the scene.

Deputy Kris Schmidt said the investigation is continuing but the death appears to be an accidental gunshot.

On social media, Rigney described himself as a dedicated father and avid outdoorsman. Earlier this year, he and his 3-year-old son were the subject of a search when they went missing while hunting for shed antlers. They were later located in Orofino.

source:
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Volunteer firefighters receive FEMA grant

Hailey and Wood River Fire & Rescue are beneficiaries

Alejandra Buitrago Nov 16, 2018 IME

Two Blaine County fire departments have been awarded federal grant funding to help them with recruitment and retention initiatives, as fire departments across the county work to recruit firefighters for firehouses that have become increasingly busier.

Hailey Fire Department and Wood River Fire & Rescue were awarded more than $650,000 from the Federal Emergency Management Agency—FEMA—in a grant called SAFER: Staffing for Adequate Fire and Emergency Response. The grant funding will go towards yet-to-be-determined benefits for every volunteer firefighter in both departments.

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Graves at tiny Idaho cemetery remain a mystery

11/12/18 AP

Minidoka, Idaho — A wind-swept parcel of ground on the edge of the tiny town of Minidoka once cradled the remains of at least 40 people.

But now, The Times-News reports no one knows how many grave sites remain.

Minidoka County Historical Museum Curator Melissa Alley says some families moved the remains of their loved ones to other locations as the cemetery fell into disrepair. Only one grave marker is still at the cemetery, and it belongs to Henry Mitchell, who died in 1905. The others have all been removed or crumbled.

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Several small earthquakes strike southeastern Idaho

Michael Coats Nov 13, 2018 Local News 8

Soda Springs, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – Several small earthquakes have struck southeastern Idaho near Soda Springs over the past couple of days.

The United States Geological Survey reports the two largest quakes registered at magnitudes of 3.2 and 3.3. Several smaller quakes under a 2.0 have also been picked up by the USGS.

The 3.3 quake struck Monday afternoon, around 4:52 p.m. The 3.2 quake striking Tuesday morning at around 10:17 a.m.

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No damage reported following 3.8-magnitude earthquake

AP Nov 15, 2018

Soda Springs, Idaho (AP) – Authorities in southeastern Idaho say there are no reports of damage following a 3.8-magnitude earthquake.

The U.S. Geological Survey says the temblor struck at about 2:30 a.m. Thursday about 7 miles east of Soda Springs.

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USPS increases stamps price to record-high 55 cents

Kristina Wright Oct 16, 2018 KIVI TV

The cost of mailing a letter is going up in January.

In an effort to improve its financial situation, the U.S. Postal Service has made a 5-cent increase on its first-class stamp, which increases the cost of mailing a one-ounce envelope from 50 cents to 55 cents.

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Scam Alerts:

Hang up on spoofed SSA calls

If you get a call that looks like it’s from the Social Security Administration (SSA), think twice. Scammers are spoofing SSA’s 1-800 customer service number to try to get your personal information. Spoofing means that scammers can call from anywhere, but they make your caller ID show a different number – often one that looks legit. Here are few things you should know about these so-called SSA calls.

These scam calls are happening across the nation, according to SSA: Your phone rings. Your caller ID shows that it’s the SSA calling from 1-800-772-1213. The caller says he works for the Social Security Administration and needs your personal information – like your Social Security number – to increase your benefits payments. (Or he threatens to cut off your benefits if you don’t give the information.) But it’s not really the Social Security Administration calling. Yes, it is the SSA’s real phone number, but the scammers on the phone are spoofing the number to make the call look real.

What can you do if you get one of these calls?

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Thousands of dollars stolen with ‘skimmer’ devices found at a Meridian gas station

Police say the devices were likely sitting idle for months.

Gretchen Parsons November 13, 2018 KTVB

Meridian — Police on Tuesday uncovered and removed at least three skimmer devices used to steal people’s credit card information at a Meridian gas station.

The crooks stole thousands from unsuspecting victims who visited the Jackson’s Chevron on Eagle Road and Goldstone Drive.

Meridian Police Officer Terry Hodges says the criminals are getting slightly more sophisticated.

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Mining News:

Cascade seeks members to serve on Midas Gold council

The Star-News Nov 15, 2018

The City of Cascade seeking interested individuals to serve on the Stibnite Advisory Council.

The Cascade City Council voted on Oct. 22 to sign the community agreement offered by Midas Gold, which is proposing a gold and antimony mine in the Stibnite area of Valley County.

The agreement is not an endorsement of the Stibnite Gold Project and does not contain any obligation to endorse the project.

Cascade’s representative to the advisory council would serve a one-year term.

The city is also seeking someone interested in serving as a board member on the Stibnite Foundation for one year.

Applicants should submit statements of interest no later than Monday to mayor@cascadeid.us, City of Cascade, PO Box 649, Cascade, ID 83611, or in person at Cascade City Hall.

source:
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Groups file lawsuit to stop eastern Idaho gold exploration

By Keith Ridler – 11/15/18 AP

Boise, Idaho — Two conservation groups say the federal government violated environmental laws by approving a Canadian company’s plan to search for gold in key wildlife habitat in eastern Idaho.

The Idaho Conservation League and the Greater Yellowstone Coalition in a lawsuit filed Tuesday say the U.S. Forest Service needs to halt British Columbia-based Otis Gold Corporation’s 5-year mining exploration project in the Caribou-Targhee National Forest.

The Forest Service in August approved the project that includes 10 miles (16 kilometers) of new roads and 140 drill stations.

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Public Lands:

Boise, Payette forests to begin Christmas tree permit sales

The Star-News Nov 15, 2018

Vendors will begin selling Christmas tree permits for the Payette and Boise national forests on Saturday.

Area permit vendors are Albertsons in McCall and C&M Lumber in New Meadows.

On Monday, permits will be available at Boise and Payette forest district offices.

Each permit allows one tree to be cut, with a limit of three permits per family. Cost is $10, and the maximum height of a permitted tree is 12 feet.

All purchasers will be provided with information about where a Christmas tree may be harvested as well as restrictions and helpful tips.

Some areas may be closed early to Christmas tree gathering if an unusually heavy snowfall occurs and forest roads become a safety concern, a news release said.

source:
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Court order shuts down 80,000-acre Payette forest project

Logging, environmental work left undone

By Max Silverson for The Star-News Nov 15, 2018

The Payette National Forest’s 80,000-acre Lost Creek-Boulder Creek Project has been forced to shut down after a federal court found fault with the project.

The 9th Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals ruled against the project last month, finding that the designation of land within the project was done contrary to the Payette Forest Plan.

“No additional work will be accomplished at this time,” Payette Forest Public Affairs Officer Brian Harris said.

The Lost Creek-Boulder Creek project area is located west of New Meadows

About 4,300 acres of commercial timber harvest was not completed before the shutdown, which represents 42 percent of proposed harvests, Harris said.

About 4,000 acres of non-commercial thinning, or 80 percent of the amount proposed, was not completed, Harris said.

Environmental improvement projects were also halted.

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Review of Payette forest landscape restoration projects

The Star-News Nov 15, 2018

Here is a rundown on the projects underway and in the planning stages for the Weiser-Little Salmon Headwaters Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration Project on the Payette National Forest.

Mill Creek-Council Mountain

The 50,000-acre Mill Creek-Council Mountain project was the first of the collaborative projects, with implementation of restoration work starting in 2012.

Work on the project located to the east of Council is now winding down and close to completion.

Lost Creek-Boulder Creek

The 80,000-acre Lost Creek-Boulder Creek project located to the west of New Meadows was under way, but was shut down due to a decision last month by the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals.

Middle Fork Weiser River

The 50,000-acre Middle Fork Weiser project was approved December 2017 and implementation is in the initial stages.

The project is located to the west of Council adjacent to the Mill Creek-Council Mountain project.

Huckleberry

The Huckleberry Landscape Restoration Project covers 67,000 acres northwest of Council.

The project is in the early stages of public involvement and analysis. A firm plan is projected to be completed in the spring of 2019.

Granite Meadows

The 70,000-acre Granite Meadows project is now open for public comment.

A public meeting is scheduled for Tuesday, Nov. 27, 6:30 p.m. at the Payette National Forest Supervisor’s Office on Mission Street in McCall.

source:
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Public Comments Sought on the Proposed Granite Meadows – Public Meeting November 27, 2018

Date: November 13, 2018
Contact: Erin Phelps (208) 347-0300 cell: (208) 514-5809

New Meadows, ID– The Payette National Forest is seeking comments on the proposed Granite Meadows Project. A public meeting is scheduled for November 27, 2018 from 6:30 to 8:00p.m. at the Forest Supervisors office (500 North Mission Street, McCall, Idaho 83638). Forest Service personnel will be available to share the project proposal and answer questions.

The Granite Meadows Project is the fifth project on the Forest that is part of the Weiser – Little Salmon Headwaters Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration (CFLR) Project. The Granite Meadows Project encompasses approximately 83,000 acres on the McCall and New Meadows Ranger Districts of the Payette National Forest, and is located north of New Meadows and north and west of McCall, primarily in the Little Salmon River watershed.

This project is based in part on recommendations provided by the Payette Forest Coalition (PFC). The PFC is a collaborative group whose recommendations are structured to meet the intent of the Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration Act (CFLRA). The PFC members represent stakeholders from a broad range of interests, including the environmental community, timber industry, recreational groups, and state and county government. For more information on the PFC visit their website at http://www.spatialinterest.info/main_page.html.

The purpose and need of this landscape-scale project is to improve conditions across multiple resource areas including;

* Forest conditions and ecosystem function
* Wildfire resiliency
* Watershed health
* Recreation.

Regarding vegetation, the intent is to move toward, restoration and management of wildlife habitat, with an emphasis on but not limited to addressing the need to maintain and promote large tree forest structure, early seral species composition (e.g. aspen, western larch, ponderosa pine and Douglas-fir), and forest resiliency; and reducing the risk of uncharacteristic and undesirable wildland fire.

Recreation improvements would include:

* Improving the existing trail system by establishing trails where appropriate, and removing user-created trails that negatively impact natural resources
* Replacing or repairing existing recreation facilities, including restrooms and lake amenities;
* Evaluating authorized and unauthorized roads identified for decommissioning for possible conversion to motorized or non-motorized trails
* Managing or improve dispersed recreation opportunities by hardening and improving sites, closing some sites, and/or install informational signs
* Managing roads (including relocation), posting signage and/or considering closure orders where conflicting use may occur
* Improving skier experience and safety through vegetative treatments within the Brundage Mountain Resort’s ski area.

How to Comment and Timeframe

The Environmental Protection Agency published a Notice of Intent (NOI) for the Proposed Action in the Federal Register on October 31, 2018. Written, facsimile, hand-delivered, and electronic comments concerning this action will be accepted for 45 days following that date. The publication date of the NOI in the Federal Register is the exclusive means for calculating the comment period for a proposed action documented in a DEIS. Those wishing to comment should not rely upon dates or timeframe information provided by any other source.

The preferred method to submit comments is electronically via the project webpage and must be submitted to: http://www.fs.usda.gov/goto/granitemeadows . Simply click on “how to comment” on the right side of the page and fill out the web form with your comments.

Written comments must be submitted to Keith Lannom, Forest Supervisor, Payette National Forest, 500 North Mission Street Building 2, McCall, Idaho 83638 or by fax to 208-634-0744. The office business hours for those submitting hand-delivered comments are 8:00 am to 4:30 pm Monday through Friday, excluding holidays.

Electronic comments may also be submitted in a format such as an email message, pdf, plain text (.txt), rich text format (.rtf), and Word (.doc or .docx) and must be sent to comments-intermtn-payette@fs.fed.us. Comments must have an identifiable name attached or verification of identity will be required. A scanned signature may serve as verification on electronic comments. For objection eligibility each individual or representative from each entity submitting timely and specific written comments regarding the proposed project must either sign the comments or verify identity upon request.

All comments received will be published with authorship information in the public reading room on the project webpage. Only those who submit timely and specific written comments regarding the proposed project during a public comment period established by the responsible official are eligible to file an objection.

The project file is posted on the Payette National Forest web site at: http://www.fs.usda.gov/goto/granitemeadows For additional information, please contact Erin Phelps, New Meadows District Ranger, New Meadows Ranger District, 208-347-0300.

Brian Harris
Public Affairs Officer
Payette National Forest
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Weak Forest Trees Can Pick Up the Tussock Moth Infestation

November 12, 2018 by Janet Juroch – BCC – Garden Valley

The Tussock Moth outbreak is seen in our region in a cyclical pattern, causing browning of foliage, particularly on the Douglas Fir Trees. Typically, an infestation can last three years in an 8 to 10-year outbreak cycle. The US Forest Service explains that the cycle being seen in our area may be likely to end after 2019. The outbreak has hit other areas in the state, including Craters of the Moon and in the Owyhees.

Aerial detection is the most common way to locate the problem areas. The US Forest Service monitors the moth, so they can predict the cycle and make decisions of what to do about it. The moth is an invasive insect and likes diseased trees or trees that are [un]healthy due to drought or lack of water.

At the recent information meeting held at the Crouch Community Hall, Laura Lowrey, considered the “bug lady” of the local US Forest Service, explained what a Tussock Moth is, its life cycle and the problem it creates in the forest. About 30 people attended the meeting to learn about the insect. Her presentation left everyone with an understanding of how the USFS is managing these outbreaks.

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New BLM program will help boost rural Idaho wildland firefighting

Nov 14, 2018 Local News 8

Idaho Falls, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – The Bureau of Land Management is launching a process to transfer excess vehicles, equipment and supplies to local fire departments and Rangeland Fire Protection Associations in Idaho to enhance their wildland firefighting capabilities.

Under BLM’s new Rural Fire Readiness (RFR) program, local wildland firefighting cooperators that meet certain requirements may receive at no cost wildland fire engines, water tenders, radios, pumps, hose, chainsaws, hand tools, personal protective equipment, fire shelters and other items the BLM no longer needs.

“Local fire departments and Rangeland Fire Protection Associations are critical partners of the BLM in wildland firefighting in Idaho,” said Peter J. Ditton, acting BLM Idaho State Director. “We appreciate the opportunity to augment their capability to respond to wildland fires safely and effectively through the Rural Fire Readiness program.”

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Critter News:

Pet buyers beware: Puppy scams on the rise

WMAR Nov 13, 2018

If you’re thinking of getting a pet for the holidays, be extra careful.

The Better Business Bureau says puppy-buying scams are on the rise, and up to 80 percent of sponsored advertisements about pets may be fake.

The BBB says their ScamTracker has 907 reports of this type of fraud and the Federal Trade Commission found 37,000 complaints regarding pets, and a majority of them are believed to be puppy scams.

One couple found three french bulldogs online, spoke with someone on the phone and paid $500, but on their way to pick the dogs up, the scammer called and asked for another $400. They never got the puppies.

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Pet Talk – Breast tumors in dogs

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt Nov 16, 2018 IME

Breast tumors, or mammary gland tumors, are benign or malignant masses that develop in breast tissue. They usually affect older female dogs. They are the most common tumors found in female dogs. These tumors usually occur in unspayed females, or in dogs that were spayed later in life.

The risk of developing mammary tumors is directly related to the number of heat cycles the dog has experienced. If the dog is spayed before the first heat cycle, the risk is 0.05 percent. Relative risk increases to 8 percent after one heat cycle and to 26 percent after a second heat cycle.

Any swelling in the mammary glands should be brought to the attention of your veterinarian. The mammary gland closest to the rear legs is most commonly affected. Mammary masses that are reddened and painful and ulcerated are usually malignant. Many malignant breast tumors will spread to other organs (metastasis).

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KWVR Oregon Wolf Education weekly Wolf Report

Second week of November 2018
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Lawsuit seeks to maintain federal gray wolf protections

11/14/18 AP

Minneapolis — An environmental group has sued the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to preserve federal protections for gray wolves and force the agency to develop a national recovery plan for the species.

The Center for Biological Diversity filed the lawsuit in federal court in Washington, D.C., Wednesday, a day after the service denied the group’s petition for a nationwide recovery plan. The service said its regional approach meets the legal requirements.

But the group says the agency is required under the Endangered Species act to foster the recovery of gray wolf populations across their former range, not just in the northern Rockies, the Great Lakes region and the southwest.

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House passes bill to drop legal protections for gray wolves

The Republican-controlled House has passed a bill to drop legal protections for gray wolves across the lower 48 states, reopening a lengthy battle over the predator species.

By Matthew Daly, Associated Press November 16, 2018

Washington (AP) – The Republican-controlled House has passed a bill to drop legal protections for gray wolves across the lower 48 states, reopening a lengthy battle over the predator species.

Long despised by farmers and ranchers, wolves were shot, trapped and poisoned out of existence in most of the U.S. by the mid-20th century. Since securing protection in the 1970s, wolves have bounced back in the western Great Lakes states of Michigan, Minnesota and Wisconsin, as well as in the Northern Rockies and Pacific Northwest.

The Fish and Wildlife Service is reviewing the wolf’s status and is expected to declare they’ve recovered sufficiently to be removed from protection under the Endangered Species Act.

The House bill enshrines that policy in law. It was approved, 196-180, and now goes to the Senate.

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Wolf taken to Isle Royale National Park this fall dies

By John Flesher – 11/13/18 AP

Traverse City, Mich. — A gray wolf relocated this fall from mainland Minnesota to Isle Royale National Park has died of unknown causes, officials said Tuesday, a minor setback in a multiyear plan to rebuild the predator species on the Lake Superior archipelago.

The 5-year-old male was among the first two wolves released at the park Sept. 26 . Staff biologists became concerned in late October when his radio tracking collar indicated he was no longer on the move, park spokeswoman Liz Valencia said.

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Pair of critically-endangered red wolves arrive at Akron Zoo

11/15/18 AP

Akron, Ohio — The Akron Zoo says two wolves that are a part of a critically endangered species have come to live at the zoo as part of a Species Survival Plan.

The red wolf is one of the world’s most endangered wolf species, and it is believed only about 60 wolves remain in the wild. Cleveland.com reports the wolf species were decimated by predator-control programs.

continued:
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Wolf Education International

Newsletter Nov 13, 2018

Christmas Lights And Pitchforks: Terrified Russian Villagers Try To Keep Encroaching Wolves At Bay
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USDA Forest Service announces public meetings on Greater Sage-grouse Plan amendments

November 13, 2018

Ogden, Utah – The U.S. Forest Service (USFS) will hold four public meetings in Idaho regarding the Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) for its Sage-Grouse Plan Amendments. On Oct. 5, 2018, the USDA Forest Service published a Notice of Availability (NOA) announcing the release of a Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) with proposed amendments to Forest Service land management plans for greater sage-grouse. The affected plans occur within five western states: Colorado, Idaho, Nevada, Wyoming, and Utah. The purpose of the proposed changes is to improve the clarity, efficiency, and implementation of the current greater sage-grouse plans, including promoting landscape-scale alignment with state efforts.The USFS is encouraging the public to attend one of the four DEIS public comment open house meetings in Idaho:

* Boise, Nov. 26, from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m., Idaho Fish and Game Headquarters Trophy Room , 600 S. Walnut Street (enter through rear door);
* Jerome, Nov. 29, from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m., Idaho Fish and Game, 324 South 417 East;
* Challis, Dec. 17, from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Challis Community Center, 411 Clinic Road;
* Idaho Falls, Dec. 18, from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m., Caribou-Targhee Forest Headquarters Office, 1405 Hollipark Drive.

Several information stations will be located within the meeting venue that will present information on key issues, the planning process and the public commenting process. Forest Service staff will give a short introduction at 5:30 p.m. Attendees can learn about the amendment comment process, ask questions, and provide comments on the actions being considered.

To read and comment on the DEIS please visit the Forest Service Intermountain Region webpage: https://www.fs.usda.gov/detail/r4/home/?cid=stelprd3843381

For more information, please contact: Sandra Underhill, Capitol City Coordinator at 307-777-6087 or John Shivik, National Sage grouse Coordinator at 801-625-5667 or johnashivik@fs.fed.us.
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Idaho officials suspend steelhead season in face of lawsuit

11/14/18 AP

Coeur d’Alene, Idaho — Idaho wildlife officials have decided to suspend the current steelhead fishing season because of a possible federal lawsuit by six conservation groups contending the state’s steelhead regulations harm federally protected wild steelhead.

The Idaho Fish and Game Commission on Wednesday voted to end the current season on Dec. 7.

Idaho Rivers United, Friends of the Clearwater and other groups in a notice of their intent to sue last month say Idaho doesn’t have an approved Fisheries Management and Evaluation Plan to allow steelhead fishing.

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Fish & Game News:

F&G Commission votes to continue general hunts for Sawtooth Elk Zone in 2019

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Supervisor
Wednesday, November 14, 2018

Commissioners reverse earlier decision to convert zone to controlled hunts

Idaho Fish and Game Commission on Nov. 14 voted to continue a general hunt with capped tags for the Sawtooth Elk Zone in 2019, which typically sells out in minutes due to its popularity with hunters.

Commissioners may adjust the number of tags available in the zone when it sets its seasons and rules in March. Those tags will be sold on a first-come, first-served basis on the same dates and times as in 2018.

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Mule Deer Buck Found Shot and Left to Waste in Southeast Idaho

By Jennifer Jackson, Regional Communications Manager
Wednesday, November 14, 2018

Idaho Department of Fish and Game is seeking information regarding a dead buck discovered just off Miles Canyon Road (also known as Mill Canyon Road) near Liberty, Idaho, in Game Management Unit 78. The buck, a large 4×5 mule deer, was shot and left to waste on the south side of the road, approximately 1.2 miles west of the Lanark Road turnoff.

The investigation into this incident was initiated by Fish and Game after a caller submitted information to Citizens Against Poaching (CAP) on November 9.

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See the changes to fishing rules for 2019-21 seasons

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Supervisor
Friday, November 16, 2018

Fish and Game Commission approved new fishing rules at its November 14 meeting.

The Idaho Fish and Game commission set seasons and rules for the 2019-21 fishing seasons at its Nov. 14 meeting in Coeur d’Alene. New rules to take effect Jan. 1 are as follows:

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Steelhead will be released into Boise River Nov. 21

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Supervisor
Friday, November 16, 2018

Boise River steelhead season will not be affected by suspension of steelhead fishing in other rivers

Idaho Fish and Game will stock 150 to 200 hatchery steelhead into the Boise River on Wednesday, Nov. 21. The steelhead are trapped at Hells Canyon Dam on the Snake River, and they will be released in equal numbers at five locations: Glenwood Bridge, Americana Bridge, below the Broadway Avenue Bridge behind Boise State University, at West Parkcenter Bridge and at Barber Park.

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More F&G News Releases

https://idfg.idaho.gov/press
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Fun Critter Stuff:

And the fattest bear in Alaska is … 409 Beadnose

Yereth Rosen Oct 9, 2018 Reuters

Anchorage (Reuters) – In an Alaska clash of tubby titans that has become a social media sensation, a shaggy, brown and possibly pregnant mother known as 409 Beadnose was crowned on Tuesday as Fattest Bear of 2018.

Beadnose nosed out a larger Alaska brown bear, a male called 747 – and likened to a jumbo jet – in online votes collected by staff at Katmai National Park and Preserve during a wildly popular event called Fat Bear Week. Male bears are bigger but Beadnose was deemed to be more rotund.

“Her radiant rolls were deemed by the voting public to be this year’s most fabulous flab,” the park said on its Facebook page. “Our chubby champ has a few more weeks to chow down on lingering salmon carcasses before she heads up the mountains to dig herself a den and savor her victory.”

Katmai, which hugs the mountainous Gulf of Alaska coast, is known for its massive, salmon-chomping ursine residents.

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Seasonal Humor:

Funny Thanksgiving Showdown – Farmer vs. Turkey

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Idaho History Nov 18, 2018

Mount Idaho, Idaho County, Idaho

(part 5) More News clippings

Mount Idaho Courthouse, built in the early 1870s


(click here for larger size)

[Hawley] (photo probably taken around 1911)

source: South Fork Companion
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1875

By 1875 Mount Idaho was developing into a prosperous town. Built largely as a stop for traffic to the gold fields, it seemed destined to be a more permanent settlement than the boom towns. It won a special election in 1875 for county seat. Mining was spreading to other areas: Orogrande, Dixie, Newsome, Salmon River, Golden, Marshall Lake, Burgdorf and others. Seventeen mining districts existed at that time, according to the Bicentennial Edition of the Idaho County Free Press published in 1976.

source: Idaho County.org
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1887

Idaho Tri-weekly Statesman – Boise, Idaho July 30, 1887

Idaho Pioneer Association

Several days ago a large number of the citizens of Idaho County met at the courthouse at Mt. Idaho to take steps to organize the Idaho County Pioneer Association. The meeting was called to order by Hon. L.P. Brown, and J.H. Robinson elected chairman and M.H. Truscott secretary. The secretary was instructed to prepare a paper setting forth the object of the association, and twenty-seven citizens signed the same. A committee of six was appointed to draft a constitution and by-laws to govern the same. The chair appointed K.W. White, B.F. Morris, W.C. Pearson, J.G. Rowden, J.J. Manuel and M.H. Truscott as such committee. Moved and carried that all persons who were residents of Idaho County prior to June 13, 1877, are eligible for membership. The meeting then adjourned to meet again at the court house at Mt. Idaho, on Saturday, August 6th, 1887, to consider the constitution and by laws, and to effect a permanent organization

source: © PBC Idaho County GenWeb – Miscellaneous Published Articles and Newspaper Items From Idaho County and the Vicinity, compiled by Penny Bennett Casey
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Stage coach leaving Grangeville


Courtesy of Idaho State Historical Society (copyrighted)
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1898

Idaho Daily Statesman – Boise, Idaho January 3, 1898

Hold-ups Arrested

Two Men Captured Who Robbed the Mt. Idaho Stage

According to a dispatch to the Spokesman-Review, Charles Frush is confined in the Idaho County Jail charged with the perpetration of Tuesday night’s stage robbery, and Sam Hurley is detained at Grangeville as an accomplice. Their examination will be held today and the officers say they undoubtedly have the right men. A letter found by the sheriff’s posse near the scene of the robbery, with other discarded letters from the mutilated mail sack, led to the arrest of the men. The letter bore the address of Frush and proved to be one sent to him the day before by the Grangeville vigilance committee instructing him to leave town.

source: © PBC Idaho County GenWeb – Miscellaneous Published Articles and Newspaper Items From Idaho County and the Vicinity, compiled by Penny Bennett Casey
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Original Mount Idaho Mail newspaper 1901

MountIdahoMai-al

“I have 2 consecutive week issues. Their motto was “No cash No paper”. Editor was Frank J Parker. Subscription $5 /year paid in advance. Not sure how long it was in existence, probably not long.

The Mount Idaho Radiator pre-dated it in 1873, but it didn’t last long either. From my personal collection.”

courtesy: Penny Bennett Casey
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1900

Idaho Daily Statesman – Boise, Idaho February 21, 1900

The County seat of Idaho County now has a newspaper, a very creditable publication called the “Mt. Idaho Mail”. The paper says that precinct will this year cast the largest republican vote in its history. That is likely to be true of practically all precincts in the state.

source: © PBC Idaho County GenWeb – Miscellaneous Published Articles and Newspaper Items From Idaho County and the Vicinity, compiled by Penny Bennett Casey
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Abandoned Home

This was one of the fine old homes built at Mount Idaho in the community’s heyday and abandoned when the town died. The picture was taken in May of 1911, when only a relatively few people remained.

source: Adkison, Norman B. (July 1, 1962). “Bustling, booming Mount Idaho now nothing but a ghost town”. Lewiston Morning Tribune. p. 1-sec.2.
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1915

Idaho Daily Statesman – Boise, Idaho – September 12, 1915

Idaho Town That Once Teemed With Life, Now Deserted

Once of the center of activities in Idaho territorial days, Mt. Idaho, established in the late fifties, was the mecca for thousands of people from all parts of the great Pacific northwest. It was for many years the county seat of Idaho county and radiating in every direction was the great mining camps of central Idaho. IN the Elk City, Florence, Warrens and other mining camps’ boom days, Mt. Idaho was the supply point and the village was the chief objective point of strangers. Territorial conventions brought many of Idaho’s most active citizens and it was there that the first territorial convention was held in 1861. With the removal of the count seat to Grangeville in the eighties, Mt. Idaho’s importance as a trading center waned and year after year it deteriorated until now nothing is left but dilapidated structures built during pioneer days, occupied yet by many of its pioneer residents.

One of Idaho’s Oldest Hotels

Every pioneer of note in Idaho from territorial days onward is acquainted with L.P. Brown’s hotel, a structure built at Mt. Idaho in 1859. It was regarded as one of the most palatial hostelries in the west during those early periods of central Idaho mining activities. Political leaders of every party have honored the hotel with their presence. Not a few of the best citizens of Oregon, Montana, Washington and California have occupied quarters there during those early days. It was built and owned by L.P. Brown, a gentleman of culture who was among the first settlers at Mt. Idaho. He had a host of friends and a disposition that warmed to him anyone who chanced to accept his hospitality. He was the owner of the town site and because of his difficulty with merchants who desired to purchase property, which he held high, Grangeville was born and ultimately he saw the historic town which he established dwindle to a mere way station. Many a political plot was hatched within its walls in territorial days. The hotel still stands a monument to his energy and is the chief building remaining at Mt. Idaho. Though with not its old time popularity, the place is still maintained as a stopping place by those chancing to pass through the old village. Brown died in the nineties.

source: © PBC Idaho County GenWeb – Miscellaneous Published Articles and Newspaper Items From Idaho County and the Vicinity, compiled by Penny Bennett Casey
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1920

Clearwater Republican. April 02, 1920, Page 8

19200402CR2Boy Now Goes to His Mother
Boy Stolen 24 Years Ago And Raised By Indian Women, Found By Mother

Raised by an Indian woman who adopted him when he was little more than a year old and not knowing of his parentage until a few months ago, Howard Wilson, will now join his mother, Mrs. A. E. Danley, near San Francisco. He was adopted by the tribe and was given an allotment of 120 acres near Stites. Since attaining manhood he has engaged in the sheep business and has a small herd near Kooskia.

Wilson was away to war when his mother, who was a nurse in a military hospital at San Francisco, learned from an Idaho boy from Orofino, that a white child had been raised in the upper Middle Fork country by Mrs. William Wilson, an Indian woman. The soldier knew that the white child knew nothing of his parentage and as his age corresponded with that of Mrs. Danley’s missing child, she began an investigation through the Indian department and the Indian agent at Lapwai, with the result that she has established beyond all doubt the identity of the white boy as her missing child.

It was more than 24 years ago when Charles Wilson, then a babe in the cradle, was stolen from his mother’s home at Mt. Idaho. The Elk City mining excitement was on and his father was away to the mines. Mail service was slow and uncertain and the entire country was filled with strangers moving to and from the mining districts. All efforts to gain a clue of the missing babe were fruitless and the mother finally removed from the scene of her grief and established her home in California.

Mrs. Danley never forgot her missing boy and when the United States entered the war she volunteered her services as a hospital nurse and was assigned to duty in San Francisco, near her home. It was while rendering this service to the sons of other mothers, that she nursed the soldier who gave her the first clue to her missing son. As soon as Mrs. Danley had positively established the identity of her son, she came to Idaho to await his return from the army and now the son will visit his mother at her California home.

Mrs. Wilson, the Indian woman who reared the child, knew there was something wrong in the transaction by which the child came into her possession, but never suspected the truth. She told Mrs. Danley that the child had been placed in her care by a white man and was able to give the name of the man who had the child. This later information cleared up the matter for Mrs. Danley as the man named was well known to her at Mt. Idaho, and when trouble between the families arouse, he had made a threat that he would make her suffer severely, but at the time the child was kidnapped the man who had made the threat had been away from Mt. Idaho for some time and was not suspected. He told the Indian woman that the child was his but that his wife was dead and that he had no place where the child could be cared for. The man then disappeared and after due time the child was adopted by Mrs. Wilson according to Indian custom.

Howard Wilson said last evening that his foster Indian mother and her husband had always been kind to him. The Wilson home is up the Middle Fork about 12 miles from Kooskia and comparatively few of the residents of the upper Clearwater knew that this Indian woman was raising a white child. When the Indian allotments were made the adopted child came in for his allotment and is now the owner of a very desirable 120 acres above Stites.

– Lewiston Tribune

source: Clearwater Republican. (Orofino, Idaho), 02 April 1920. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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LP Brown Hotel Mount Idaho

undated – uncredited

source: “History of the State of Idaho” By C. J. Brosnan 1918 (18 meg)
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Link to Mount Idaho (Part 1) Pioneers
Link to Mount Idaho (Part 2) History
Link to Mount Idaho (Part 3) Transportation
Link to Mount Idaho (Part 4) News clippings
Link to Mount Idaho (Part 5) More News clippings
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page updated Jan 27, 2022

Road Reports Nov 18, 2018

Main roads to Yellow Pine are open, there is snow on top of Lick Creek and Landmark, higher elevation roads may be closed or only advisable with 4×4 and chains. Please share road reports. Conditions change quickly this time of year.

Yellow Pine: We still have a little patchy snow on the ground here in the shade, local streets are pretty much bare. Watch for pot holes on the back Stibnite Road between the cross roads and the post office. Click for Local Forecast. (50% chance of snow on Thanksgiving)
Yellow Pine Webcam: (check image date)

Johnson Creek Stream Gauge:

Warm Lake Highway: Report (Nov 13) “Big Creek summit down almost to Scott Valley has a frozen ice floor. Very slick.” – LI
Another report (via FB Nov 10) “Some [snow] on top of Big Creek Summit, probably 6 inches packed down, a little icy in spots. Not bad driving.” – VB
SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

South Fork Road: Wednesday (Nov 14) mail truck driver (Robert) reports a couple inches of snow on the upper end, morning ice on the shady curves up high, bare dry pavement on the lower parts.
Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
South Fork Stream Gauge:

EFSF Road: Wednesday (Nov 14) mail truck driver (Robert) says the road is good. (Old report warns of pot holes developing.)

Johnson Creek Road: Report Tuesday (Nov 13) there is about 4-6 inches of snow at Landmark and on upper Johnson Creek.
Report (via FB Nov 11) “Johnson Creek had a couple of icy patches, but all in all was in decent shape with only a few inches of snow.” – SA
The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet
Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam:

Golden Gate Road: Report via FB Saturday (Nov 10, 2018) “Took the Samurai up Golden Gate Hill today. Cut a few trees off the road. Only a few inches of snow.” – SA
link to FB image:

Quartz Creek: (July 2, 2018) “Quartz Creek has a big wash out just before a switch back towards the top. Right now only motorcycles can get by but with work some atvs can make it. A shovel and a saw may be needed to widen the trail.” – DB
link to FB photo:

Lick Creek: Report Sunday (Nov 4) “I didn’t start getting into snow until ‘the big rocks’. There were 6-8 inches at different locations going over the top. No problems at all.” – B (Note: snowed in YP since this report.)
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Report (Nov 11) “This is just a road report over Profile to Big Creek. There is a little less than a foot of snow at Profile Gap, and there has been a fair amount of wheeled travel over Profile Gap, but not all travelers were without problems. Coming out today on our tracked ATVs we observed a lot of tracks “in the ditch” & where one rig got stuck & backed down the road several miles before successfully turning around. For us it was a very enjoyable ride out although it was a bit chilly this morning, but sunshine all day warmed it up to the low 30s. For travelers using full sized 4×4 vehicles, tire chains seem advisable. There isn’t enough snow on the road from Jacob Ladder Flat to Edwardsburg for snowmobiles.” C&L
Link to video:
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.
Big Creek Webcam: (check image date)

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Report (Nov 11) the road is very good, a few ruts around Vibika Creek.
Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: A report (Nov 11) of 6″ snow at Stibnite. Probably not advisable for wheeled vehicles w/out chains over Monumental summit.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: [Note: road may be closed now.] Old report (Oct 13) “Lots of drifting snow, downed trees, and less than travel-friendly conditions.” – SA
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: No current report, road may not be advisable for wheeled vehicles w/out chains. SNOTEL station shows 5″ of snow 11-18.
Note: The approx elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′
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