Monthly Archives: January 2019

Road Reports Jan 30, 2019

The only way to get to Yellow Pine is via the South Fork route. Be aware of winter conditions, roads are likely ice and snow covered, trees and/or rocks may be down in the road. Higher elevation roads are closed. Please share road reports. Conditions change quickly this time of year.

Yellow Pine: We have had dry weather the last several days, 14″ of old snow on the ground. Local streets are snow packed, watch for ice on sunny corners.
Click for Local Forecast.
Yellow Pine Webcam: (check date on image)

Warm Lake Highway: Report Wednesday (Jan 30) mail truck driver (Dean) said road is snow covered and in good shape, a few icy spots in the shaded corners.
SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

Highway 55 Webcams Link:

South Fork Road: Report Wednesday (Jan 30) mail truck driver reports the road is icy and very slick in places, but overall has improved.
Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′

EFSF Road: Last report Wednesday (Jan 30) mail truck driver says the road is pretty good.

Lower Johnson Creek Road: Note to drivers – when traveling to the dump, please use the river side of the road for wheeled vehicles so the hill side can be for snowmobilers. Turnouts will be plowed. Report from Monday (Jan 28) that the road is in good shape.
Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam:

Upper Johnson Creek Road: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.
Big Creek Webcam: (check date on image)

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Midas Gold is keeping the road open.
Midas posted 1/22/2019: “This past weekend Stibnite received 10-14” of snow and our team spent long days clearing roads. This new snow, combined with recent rain and warmer temperatures left multiple trees down and small avalanches.”
Link to FB photo:

Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The approx elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′

Payette Avalanche Advisory
link:
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Jan 27, 2019 The Yellow Pine Times

Jan 27, 2019 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Community Calendar:

Feb 16 Pie Contest 2pm Yellow Pine Tavern
May 25 ATV-UTV Scavenger Hunt Memorial Day Weekend
Jul 13 Ride to Big Creek
Sep 14 Ride to Cinnabar

(details below)
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Local Events:

Annual Pie Contest

Saturday February 16th at 2pm at the Yellow Pine Tavern.
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2019 Yellow Pine Escapades

The 2019 schedule for the Yellow Pine Escapades has been updated on the website!

Expect new escapades this coming year, including an ATV-UTV Photo Scavenger Hunt; two (yes, two) ATV-UTV rides, a golf tournament, and even a community yard sale. Other events will be added to the calendar as plans are finalized.

Join us for a great season of fun! The starting point for fun in Yellow Pine! The website includes information on the events hosted by the Yellow Pine Community Hall as well as the other “goings-on” in the village. Food, lodging and fuel are available in Yellow Pine.

link:
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Village News:

History of the log cabin at the Cemetery

The Cemetery Committee is interested in any information on the cabin that is located by the cemetery. We know that it had been on the property that was known as “Mary’s Cabins”. It was moved by Tom Richter while the Filler’s were building their house. Donna Valdez said that the people who ran the cafe and bar slept there, before the Tavern was built.

Do people have pictures or any information they can share? We’d love to put a plaque up on the cabin while we repair it.

– Marj Fields
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Stibnite Road

Midas Gold is keeping the road open to Stibnite. Posted on FB 1/22/2019: “This past weekend Stibnite received 10-14” of snow and our team spent long days clearing roads. This new snow, combined with recent rain and warmer temperatures left multiple trees down and small avalanches.”

20190122MidasStibniteSlide-a
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Lower Johnson Creek Plowing

Note: when traveling to the dump, please use the river side of the road for wheeled vehicles so the hill side can be for snowmobilers. Turnouts will be plowed.

– CD
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Come Spring…

“To Yellow Pine residents. I will be making several trips next spring and summer hauling out metal, appliances, etc. . If you need anything hauled away please get on the list. Vehicles require a title. I will be hauling gravel back if anyone is interested.”

Contact Mike Amos
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Yellow Pine US Mail

We are on 3-day a week mail delivery from Cascade. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Be sure to buy your holiday stamps here.

Stamps are set to increase beginning Jan. 27. Forever Stamp: 55 cents
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Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Report the dump is pretty full. Report that Lakeshore will try and get in this coming week.

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.


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Ice Hole Campground Closed

The Campground has been temporarily closed to provide for public safety during reconstruction. This order will be in effect from September 27, 2018 through July 2, 2019, unless rescinded earlier by the Forest Supervisor. (0402-04-80)
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Local Groups:

YPWUA News:

The 2018 water bill is due Feb 15, 2019

Notice: Over the last month [December] there have been complaints of low water pressure. Nicki and Warren have been investigating and found out that the water usage is extremely high. We know there are leaks in the system but those leaks have been there for several years. We know that people leave a small stream of water running so their lines do not freeze but that is done every winter. If anyone notices any abnormal loss of water, please let me know.

– Steve Holloway 208-697-7343

Winter Water Advice

To help prevent frozen water, avoid parking over buried water lines, allow the natural snow cover to insulate the ground. Driving over the lines will also push the frost deeper and can result in frozen pipes. Also, don’t plow the snow over where water lines are buried, and avoid covering up water shut off valves.

link to: 2018 September Water Department Update.docx
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VYPA News:

VYPA Meeting Dates 2019

June 8th; July 20th; August 10th; September 14th.

Note that the July 20th meeting is not on the second Saturday due to a conflict with a planned ATV rally involving many residents and visitors.
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YPFD News:

The next meeting to be May 18th, 2019 at the Community Hall

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Updates:

Fire Department Training on Sundays at 11am will resume in the Spring.

The YPFD has 2 Size Chimney Brushes with extension rods that were donated for use around YP. If you would like to borrow one, please contact Cecil or Jeff and we’ll get them for you. The YPFD also has loanable mitigation tools, (Weed-Whacker, Hedge Trimmer, backpack blower and 16’ pole saw). If you would like to borrow one or all, please contact Cecil or Jeff and we’ll get them for you.

It’s also time to check the Smoke Alarm batteries and Fire Extinguishers. Please test the alarm and replace Smoke Alarm Batteries every year, if you have the replaceable battery type. Fire Extinguishers should be checked as well and should be easily seen and reachable. A good location for the Fire Extinguishers would be the kitchen and near the wood stove and/or fireplace. The needle should be in the green.

If you need a Smoke Detector or Fire Extinguisher for your YP residence please contact Jeff F.
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Biz Listings:

Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377

Closed for winter
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The Corner (208) 633-3325

Closed for winter
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Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233

Winter Hours at the Tavern: 9am-2pm and 4-8pm Mon, Wed, Fri, Sat and 9am-2pm Sun. Or call 208 633-2233 the phone rings into the house.
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Buck Horn Outfitters LLC
Link to FB page:

Deadwood Outfitters
Link to website:
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Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed (208) 382-4430
suet blocks (peanut crunch, and cherry) for $1.99 per block
50# bag of Polar Ice Melt available for $7.99.
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Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, Will service Yellow Pine

B&T Safety Solutions LLC
Cleaning chimneys and stoves
307-258-8951 – We’re moving from Idaho City to Donnelly in a few months and service all over Idaho, including Yellow Pine.
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (Jan 21) early morning snow (1/4″) then mostly clear and breezy by sunrise, measured 14″ old snow on the ground (the surface of the snow is very wavy, like a rumpled unmade bed.) Gusty winds and increasing clouds mid-day, high of 34 degrees. Jay birds, flicker and the local pine squirrel visited at lunch time. Below freezing and blustery mid-afternoon, partly clear. Calmer towards evening, ice freezing out of the air after dark. Bright moon and stars, cold night.

Tuesday (Jan 22) overnight low of 5 degrees, mostly hazy sky this morning. Jays, flicker and pine squirrel visited. Solid overcast by mid-day, cold – no drips, high of 28 degrees. Mid-afternoon slight chilly breeze, overcast and cold. Quiet afternoon. Overcast and cold breeze at dusk. Windy around 9pm. Snow fell early morning.

Wednesday (Jan 23) snowing early this morning, by 1030am 1.5″ new and 26 degrees, measured 15″ snow on the ground and still snowing. Jays, flicker, red-breasted nuthatch and hairy woodpecker visiting. Overcast and light snow falling mid-day, high of 35 degrees. By mid-afternoon about 1/2″ new snow, misty rain mixed with snow and clouds sitting down on the peaks. Below freezing and misting at dusk. Partly clear and a few stars after 10pm, and after midnight it was cloudy.

Thursday (Jan 24) overnight low of 19 degrees, measured 1/2″ new snow from yesterday and an average of 15″ snow on the ground (the snow is “pillowy” and ranges from 14-16″.) Jays bouncing around the trees and a raven calling, female hairy woodpecker, flicker, clarks nutcracker and local pine squirrel visiting. Broken clouds and icicles dripping mid-day, high of 43 degrees. By mid-afternoon it was partly clear, scattered sunshine, icicles dripping and chilly breezes. Partly clear after sundown, calmer. Lots of stars out after dark, then cloudy after midnight.

Friday (Jan 25) overnight low of 10 degrees, high thin hazy clouds this morning, no new precipitation, average snow depth 15″. Raven calling, jays and 2 hairy woodpeckers visiting. Thinner clouds and filtered sunshine at lunch time. Mid-afternoon partly clear, high of 38 degrees. Partly cloudy to mostly clear at dusk, temps dropping. Hazy sky and no stars by midnight, then clearing by dawn.

Saturday (Jan 26) overnight low of 14 degrees, mostly clear sky this morning, still have 15″ of snow on the ground. Jays calling all over the neighborhood. Pine squirrel, clarks nutcracker, jays and hairy woodpecker stopped by for lunch. Mostly clear sky and strong sun mid-day, high of 44 degrees. Mid-afternoon some high haze and wispy clouds, icicles dripping. At dusk there was a very thin high haze, almost clear. Hazy sky and a few fuzzy stars before midnight.

Sunday (Jan 27) 21 degrees and clear blue sky this morning, measured 15″ of old snow on the flat. Jays, red-breasted nuthatches and hairy woodpecker visiting, later the local pine squirrel stopped by. Warming up and icicles dripping mid-day, high of 51 degrees! Mid-afternoon partly cloudy, snow sliding off flatter roofs, standing water on ice in some places. Mostly clear at dusk and above freezing.
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RIP:

John B. Eiguren

December 24, 1942 ~ January 21, 2019 (Age 76)

ripjohnbeiguren-a

John Eiguren died Monday, January 21, 2019 at St. Al’s Hospital, surrounded family.

John was born in Washington, D.C. December 24, 1942 to Julio Eiguren and Annestelle Cancelmo Eiguren. Following the WW2, the family returned to Idaho and lived briefly in Boise and Caldwell before moving to Emmett, to be near family. The family moved to Stibnite in 1948, where his parents ran the recreation hall and later bought the store. In 1956 they returned to Boise briefly before finally settling in Emmett.

John attended Emmett schools and graduated in 1961. While there he played football briefly and participated in shot put in track. He had many jobs, including driving a truck and picking up milk for Osborn’s, working in the orchard for his grandfather, John Gamage, and Radke Furniture.

Following high school, he attended Idaho State University briefly before marrying Sandra Vahlberg in 1962. Two days after getting married, John joined the Air Force, where he worked in aircraft maintenance. He was first stationed at Amarillo Air Force Base before transferring to Mt. Home Air Force Base. He was a bomber crew chief and served time in Guam, supporting the Vietnam conflict. He and Sandra had two children, Tamie and Jeff, before divorcing and leaving the military.

John married Carla Arnold, and they moved to Australia. They divorced shortly after, and John remained in Australia. He then met Julie Gerken Eagles, who had a young daughter, Katherine. While in Australia, they had a son, Julio. After moving to New Zealand, they had two more children, Rachel and Riley. John had a successful leather craft business, where he created shoes and belts.

In about 1978, John returned to Idaho, where he began T & J Painting with his brother, Terry Eiguren. Shortly after, they dissolved the partnership and John continued on painting independently until retiring. Then the rest of the family moved to Idaho. Julie later returned to Australia with Katherine and Riley. His son, Julio, took over the business & changed the name to J & J Painting.

John had a colorful personality. He enjoyed working on and collecting cars, attending car shows, mining for gold, firing his cannons, collecting many model ships, the Eiguren Ranch in Yellow Pine, his dogs, and spending time with his many friends.

John is preceded in death by his parents, Julio and Annestelle Eiguren, son Jeff Schell, and cousin Pete Eiguren. He is survived by his brothers Tom (Barbara), and Terry (Trudy) Eiguren, his children, Tamie Schell, Julio (Angela), Rachael and Riley Eiguren, and grandchildren Amaya Schell and Josh Nett, and numerous nieces & nephews.

The family would like to say a special thanks to Trini Tompkins, and the staffs at St. Al’s and the VA.

A memorial service will be conducted at the Potter Funeral Chapel in Emmett at 5:00 p.m. on Friday, January 25, 2019.
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Midas News:

Valley commissioners get an earful on Midas Gold pact

Board defers decision on signing Community Agreement

By Max Silverson for The Star-News January 24, 2019

Valley County commissioners did not make a decision on whether to sign the Midas Gold Community Agreement after hearing public comment at Donnelly Elementary School last week.

Commission Chair Gordon Cruickshank began the meeting, held Jan. 16, by saying that commissioners would consider holding more public meetings on the proposed agreement.

Commissioners have not said when they would make a decision.

Public opposition to signing the agreement was stiff and far outweighed comments by those in favor.

With about 160 people in the audience, 51 spoke in opposition and 14 in support of signing. Of those in favor, five stated that they worked for Midas Gold and two have been named to the Stibnite Advisory Council.

Signing would mean that Valley County would participate in the council, which meets regularly with Midas Gold officials.

Signers also get to put a representative on the board of a forthcoming charitable foundation funded by Midas Gold.

The cities of Cascade, Donnelly, New Meadows, Council and Riggins as well as Idaho and Adams counties and the village of Yellow Pine all have agreed to sign the Community Agreement with the company. The agreement took effect Nov. 30.

The McCall City Council voted on Jan. 7 not to sign the agreement but will seek a separate agreement with Midas Gold later.

Several speakers on Wednesday noted that the commissioners are the only potential signatory to the agreement with jurisdiction over the mine.

“The perception that these jurisdictional duties may be influenced by signing a representative to the foundation board whose endowments directly correlate to the permitting approval and financial success of the company, quite frankly, is not good public policy,” Fred Coriell of McCall said.

Opponents to signing the agreement also echoed concerns stated in previous meetings, including perceived conflicts of interest and the concerns that the funding of a foundation constitutes a form of bribery.

Opponents also said that many would perceive signing the agreement as a support for the mine, as the agreement and the project are inextricably linked.

“Signing this agreement signals an implicit, but clear support of this project,” Amy Rush of McCall said.

Many also echoed the desire to postpone any decision until after the Payette National Forest releases a draft environmental study expected in May.

The question of what would be gained by Valley County signing on was also raised repeatedly with opponents noting that there are already clear paths of communication between the county and Midas Gold.

“Advisory council, I want to address that name, one group advises Midas, the National Forest Service, that is the law,” Rickey Minder, who lives in Boise and whose family owns property in Valley County said. “This council doesn’t give any of us a voice that we don’t already have.”

Midas Gold Vice President of Public Affairs Mckinsey Lyon portrayed the company and the agreement as misunderstood and good intentioned.

“I would challenge anyone who has the opportunity to work with us, to meet our people or see our actions to say that we are anything but good corporate citizens, well intentioned and most importantly kind,” she said. “Community members made this plan, is it perfect? Probably not, but our intentions are.”

Sherry Maupin of McCall also spoke in support of signing the agreement.

“I have been at the table the last 18 months and there is a lot of misinformation about what this agreement is,” McCall said.

“We built this agreement around the ABC (America’s Best Communities) strategic plan for our community that won national awards for strategic planning,” Maupin said.

“You can take Midas Gold’s name off this community agreement and put on Tamarack, put on XYZ manufacturing, and this is an agreement that we all built together as how we will address businesses as they come join our community,” she said.

Many opponents acknowledged that Midas Gold Idaho may have a local presence but expressed fears that Toronto-based Barrick Gold, which owns nearly 20 percent of Midas Gold, could take over entirely.

Midas Gold predicts it will employ 400 people during a two-to-three-year construction period, increasing to 500 employees over the 12-year life of the mine.

The company’s probable mineral reserves include more than 4.5 million ounces of gold, or 154 tons, and 100 million pounds of antimony from the Stibnite deposits.

From Carla Miller of McCall:

When I read the agreement, I found no words that guaranteed any kind of tangible power to any of the parties, these people who are going to be at the table.

We keep talking about a seat at the table, and to me it sounds like the kids table while the adults are over making decisions. I don’t find any words that say that those people at the table will have a voice that is listened to, or any kind of vote.

I’ve looked at the words, the words do not indicate that there is any power behind having a seat at this table.

We now are not just the kids at the table, we’re out in the yard playing and arguing over what we’re going to do with all our toys and who gets how much while the adults are remodeling the house we grew up in.

source:
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Idaho News:

First responder ‘superheroes’ to be honored as Mardi Gras Parade Grand Marshals

The Star-News January 24, 2019

The men and women who put themselves in harm’s way to aid the community will be honored as grand marshals of Saturday’s Mardi Gras Parade during the 2019 McCall Winter Carnival.

Local police and fire agencies as well as ski patrol groups were asked by the sponsoring McCall Area Chamber of Commerce and Visitors Bureau to select a member to represent their agency.

Those selected will be honored as “superheroes” in keeping with this year’s Winter Carnival theme of “Legends, Myths and Superheroes.”

The parade will begin at noon Saturday and head north along Idaho 55 (North Third Street) starting at Stibnite Street, bend west through downtown and turn south on First Street.

continued:
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Midas Gold to host warming station at Art Roberts Park

The Star-News January 24, 2019

Staffers from Midas Gold will host a warming booth for hot chocolate and a space to warm up during the McCall Winter Carnival.

The warming tent will be in Art Roberts Park, located across from Manchester Ice and Event Center.

The tent will be open at noon Friday, 10 a.m. Saturday and 11 a.m. Sunday. The tent will also be open at noon Friday, Feb. 1, and 10 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 2.

source:
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Payette forest employee to host snowman building area

The Star-News January 24, 2019

Employees of the Payette National Forest will host a “Build Your Own Snowman” area during the McCall Winter Carnival.

Payette employees traditionally have built a snow sculpture at the McCall Ranger District office located at Mission Street and East Lake Street (Idaho 55).

However, employees will not have access to needed equipment due to the partial shutdown of the federal government that started Dec. 22, according to the Facebook page of the Payette Employee Association.

Instead, an area near the McCall Ranger District office will be designated for snowman building from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. this Saturday and Sunday and again on Sunday, Feb. 3.

“The idea is that visiting kids don’t have many chances to build a snowman,” the PEA Facebook posting said. “We will provide charcoal for eyes, carrots for noses and sticks for arms.”

source:
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2019 Sculpture Winners announced

The Star-News January 25, 2019

1st Place: Ruby’s Kitchen
2nd Place: Payette Lakes Ski Patrol at Brundage Mountain Resort
3rd Place: Best Western PLUS
4th Place: Holiday Inn Express
5th Place: Krahn’s Home Furnishings
6th Place: The Mill
7th Place: Albertsons
8th Place: The Pancake House
9th Place: Lardos Grill and Saloon
10th Place: Café 6 Three 4

source:
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photo from KTVB
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Valley Home Companions to stage three shows Feb. 8-10

The Star-News January 24, 2019

Valley Home Companion will bring “Whee Haw” to the stage during three performances of its old-time “live radio” show beginning Friday, Feb. 8, at 7 p.m. at The Roxy in Cascade.

The live community show will also be staged on Saturday, Feb. 9, at 7 p.m. and Sunday, Feb. 10, at 2 p.m. Doors will open 30 minutes before showtime with pre-show entertainment.

Cost is $6 plus a canned food item. Proceeds will benefit local organizations.

Tickets will be available at the door. There will also be fresh-baked biscuits and other concessions for sale at the event.

For more information, contact Shauna Arnold at 208-634-6906 or ShaunaArnold@hughes.net

source:
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Letter to Share:

Board meeting Feb. 5th 2019. First Tuesday of each month

All invited, we would enjoy all that can make it to come join us. We would like to start having meetings around the Clearwater Region. We raise and release Pheasants in the region from baby chicks to adults. 2018 we raised and released about 8,000 pheasants. This year we would like to double that amount. The Foundation can help with feed and the purchase of the chicks. We build and loan out brooders or you can own your own for just the cost of the material. We can help and give you all the information to raise them. We do have a minimum of 25 chicks To start. We have folks raising chicks almost every location in the Clearwater Region. If you are interested give me a call and we will get you started. Visit our Facebook, see what we do.

Gamebird Foundation board meeting first Tuesday in February the 5th. Meeting will start 5 PM. Public is invited and welcome. Meeting held in the New Viola Community Center. Viola Idaho. Coffee and chocolate chip cookies. Handicap accessible. See ya there.

Jim Hagedorn
Executive Director
The Gamebird Foundation
thegamebirdfoundation.org
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Critter News:

It’s dogs vs. nature at Idaho Sled Dog Challenge

The Star-News January 24, 2019

The 2019 Idaho Sled Dog Challenge will see teams of sled dogs and their mushers tackle miles of rugged terrain with the hopes of qualifying for two iconic races.

The race will see 14 sled-dog teams and their mushers cover either 150 or 300 miles along the west side of Long Valley between McCall, New Meadows, Council, Donnelly and Cascade.

This year’s races are qualifiers for both the Iditarod and the Yukon Quest, two iconic 1,000-mile races.

A ceremonial start will be held at 2 p.m. Tuesday at Ponderosa State Park.

The public will have a chance to meet the mushers starting at 5:30 p.m. Tuesday at the lower level of the Idaho First Bank building at 475 E. Deinhard Lane in McCall.

The official start of the 300-mile race will be at 11 a.m. Wednesday at Bear Creek Lodge, 3492 Hwy 55 west of McCall.

The official start of the 150-mile race will be at 11 a.m. Thursday, Jan. 31, also at Bear Creek Lodge.

source:
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How To Be The Lead Dog

Sled dogs undergo rigorous training to prepare for races of hundreds of miles

By Max Silverson The Star-News January 24, 2019

Gabe Dunham’s sled dogs each need to eat between 10,000 and 20,000 calories per day during the peak of race season – the equivalent of 50 to 100 Big Macs.

Dunham, of Darby, Mont., will race the 300-mile distance in the Idaho Sled Dog Challenge that starts Tuesday in McCall.

Mushers entered in next week’s race said they must prepare their dogs for big races months in advance.

“When we start training in July we start with two or three mile runs, and gradually you’ll go up to racing 300-mile races to prepare,” said Jenn Campeau, of Rocky Mountain House, Alberta, who is one of 14 mushers entered in the McCall event.

“They’re a lot like people runners,” musher Rex Mumford from Huntsville, Utah, said. “You don’t start off and decide you’re going to do a 5k or 10k or half marathon; you start off running to the end of the driveway and you build up.”

Training to be a sled dog starts when they’re just puppies, Dunham said.

“You start off at about six months old, and start them in a harness, it’s all about just having fun,” she said.

continued:
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Search and Rescue seeks donations to help with K9 training

The Star-News January 24, 2019

Valley County Search and Rescue’s new K9 team is looking for volunteer “victims” to help with human-scent training for the dogs.

The K9 unit is new to the area and will perform general area search, avalanche victim recovery, human trailing and cadaver search.

Volunteers are needed to play a lost subject or avalanche victim for outdoor training exercises. Volunteers can also donate their surgical remains as scent materials for cadaver training.

For more information, call or text the Valley County Search and Rescue K9 Unit at 406-396-8500 or email huey133@icloud.com

source:
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Pet Talk – Colitis in Dogs

Dr. Karsten Fostvedt Jan 25, 2019 IME

Colitis is an inflammation of the colon. Acute colitis typically develops rapidly. The most common cause of acute colitis in dogs is dietary indiscretion, which is eating something that does not agree with the dog. Bacterial infection from eating spoiled foods is also common. Some parasites of the gastro-intestinal tract and certain drugs also cause colitis. Stress, such as airplane travel, or being placed in a kennel, can also cause colitis.

Because the colon is the last part of the intestinal tract before the rectum and anus, the major clinical sign is diarrhea. There is an increased urgency to defecate, with your dog asking to go outdoors frequently. Oftentimes, accidents occur in the home. When trying to have a bowel movement, severe straining often occurs. This is often confused with constipation. When a bowel movement is passed, it is often soft, small in volume, commonly mucoid and sometimes bloody.

A stool sample is usually tested for parasites. If the dog is dehydrated, blood tests are performed to check for kidney function and liver disease. X-rays are recommended if a foreign body, like a bone, is possibly caught in the colon, or there is severe constipation. There is no specific laboratory test for colitis. The diagnosis is made from clinical signs, X-rays and blood tests. Although the disease can be confirmed via colonoscopy and biopsies, this is rarely done because the colitis usually resolves quickly with appropriate therapy.

continued:
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Star officers save lost German Shepherd

KTVB Jan 25, 2019

Star, Idaho — Two Star police officers are being credited with saving an injured dog they spotted in a ditch while out on patrol.

According to the Ada County Sheriff’s Office, Officer Alan Speakes and Officer Sean Dalrymple were driving on Idaho 44 near Idaho 16 Tuesday morning when they spotted the motionless animal on the roadside. Sheriff’s office spokesman Patrick Orr said that at first, the pair thought the dog was a coyote.

But when they stopped to check it out, they realized it was a male German Shepherd. Speakes and Dalrymple loaded the dog up and drove him to the Star Veterinary Clinic on State Street.

continued:
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Kuna, Boise firefighters rescue pooch that fell 50 feet off Swan Falls overlook

by CBS 2 News Staff Friday, January 25th 2019

Kuna , Idaho (CBS 2) — One local pooch is getting some extra snuggles.

Earlier this week, Kuna and Boise Fire helped rescue a dog that had fallen off the Swan Falls overlook roughly 50 feet below.

The rescue went off without a hitch, Boise Fire says “making for one happy pup and a happy owner.”

source:
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New Idaho wolf trap rules intended to protect dogs on walks

by Keith Ridler, Associated Press Monday, January 21st 2019

Boise, Idaho (AP) — Lawmakers made an initial step Monday in approving rules changes requested by the Idaho Department of Fish and Game that require wolf and other trappers to set traps farther from paths to avoid catching dogs out on walks with their owners.

The House Resources and Conservation Committee approved the rules after Fish and Game officials told lawmakers that trappers worked with the agency on the new rules.

Trappers “recognize that things are changing in Idaho and there are more people out recreating, and they just want to be good citizens, and good members of their community,” Fish and Game Director Ed Schriever said after the committee meeting.

continued:
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KWVR Oregon Wolf Education weekly Wolf Report

3rd week Jan 2019
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Oregon rancher uses inflatable dancer to shoo wolves

by Associated Press Tuesday, January 22nd 2019

Medford, Ore. (AP) — A rancher in Jackson County who has had gray wolves eat his livestock is now using a lime-green inflatable dancing man to keep the predators at bay.

Ted Birdseye began using the contraption Saturday in his pasture after the pack killed another calf in the same field where the wolves have already eaten five calves and one guard dog, The Mail Tribune reported Tuesday.

The device is the same as those commonly seen a used car lots and is powered by a generator that blows air into the balloon so it jumps and wiggles in the air.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Wyoming records 32 Yellowstone-area grizzly bear removals

by Associated Press Friday, January 25th 2019

Jackson, Wyo. (AP) — A Wyoming report shows 59 Yellowstone-area grizzly bears were captured and 32 were euthanized last year, marking the state’s deadliest year on recent record for the animal.

The Jackson Hole News and Guide reports the Wyoming Game and Fish Department report published last week indicates last year had the second-highest number of captures on record, trailing 65 trappings in 2010.

Brian DeBolt, the department’s large carnivore conflict coordinator, says one reason for the high number of bear deaths is because the population is drifting away from the Yellowstone region’s core.

Of the 32 bears killed, 17 were captured outside the demographic monitoring area. One grizzly bear family was caught in Bighorn County, the farthest east the bears have been documented in recent years in the state.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Lake Cascade Ice Update

The Star-News January 24, 2019

The following update was issued on Tuesday by Paul Janssen, McCall Regional Fishery Biologist for the Idaho Department of Fish and Game:

Ice, snow and slush conditions on Lake Cascade have changed since the heavy rains last weekend. Ice thickness is fine but there is no snow on the lake now and it is a sheet of bare ice!

Traction devices are suggested on both feet and motorized vehicles. Have reports of snowmobiles doing 360s on the bare ice. Also snowmobiling on bare ice is a good way of overheating the machine and melting the track hyfax. Edges of the ice along shore may be flooded and thin.

Conditions of the access road to Sugarloaf Island and boat ramp area are unknown but most folks have been parking on the turnoff and snowmobiling down the road. Parking is very limited there so plan on using other access sites.

We’re getting reports of slow to good fishing on the lake for large perch and trout. Just depends on the day, area, and finding fish that are actively feeding.

As always be careful when going out on the ice as thickness can vary greatly in a given area, so drill holes and check for yourself. Use caution when traversing ice pressure ridges.

Ice can be very thin along these cracks as the ice sheet expands and contracts. Don’t go alone. Check out the Ice safety article under Ice Fishing on the IDFG home page under the Fishing tab.

source:
————————

Fish & Game News:

Southwest Region will host four meetings in February to take input on big game seasons

By Evin Oneale, Regional Communications Manager
Friday, January 18, 2019

Provide your input to help shape 2019 big game seasons

The 2019 big game hunting season in Idaho’s southwest region is the focus of a series of open house meetings where hunters and other wildlife enthusiasts will have a chance to review and discuss big game season proposals with Fish and Game staff.

A complete list of statewide deer, elk, pronghorn, black bear, mountain lion and wolf hunt proposals will be available on the Fish and Game website (https://idfg.idaho.gov/rules/big-game/19-20-proposals) in late January and at both the McCall and Nampa regional offices.

Four public open house meetings are scheduled for February. Plan now to attend the open house in your area.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

More F&G News Releases

https://idfg.idaho.gov/press
———————————-

Trivia:

Winter Precipitation Types

Do you remember the difference between different types of winter precipitation? Here’s a review.

Snow is small white ice crystals formed when supercooled cloud droplets freeze. Snow crystals can have different shapes usually dictated by the temperature at which they form.

Snow pellets, also called graupel, are white, opaque ice particles round or conical in shape. They form when supercooled water collects on ice crystals or snowflakes. They typically bounce when they fall on a hard surface and often break apart.

Snow grains are very small, white opaque particles of ice, more flattened and elongated than snow pellets. Snow grains can be thought of as the solid equivalent of drizzle, or as I like to call it, “snizzle”.

Ice pellets, or sleet, are small balls of ice. They form from the freezing of raindrops or the refreezing of melting snowflakes when falling through a below-freezing layer of air near the earth’s surface.

Freezing rain occurs when rain occurs and the surface temperatures is below freezing. The raindrops become supercooled as they fall through the layer of cold air near the surface and freeze upon impact with surfaces below freezing.

Thanks to Illinois CoCoRaHS state coordinator, Steve Hilberg for this message.
———————–

Fun Critter Stuff:

Video captures moose chasing skiers at Colorado resort

by Associated Press Monday, January 21st 2019

Breckenridge, Colo. (AP) — A woman, in an effort to warn others of the dangers of moose, posted a video on social media of a moose charging skiers and snowboarders at a ski resort.

The Summit Daily News reports Lauren Drogsvold captured the video Saturday at Breckenridge Ski Resort.

The video shows a large bull moose approach and then charge a crowd of people. There were no reports of injuries.

video link:

story link (w/video):
——————–

Seasonal Humor:

IceFishing-a.jpg
———————-

page updated Feb 10, 2019

Idaho History Jan 27, 2019

Colonel William H. Dewey

(part 2)

The Men, the Mountain, the Gold and the Town That Drowned
by Syd Albright

It all started about 1894 when the Caswell twins, their brother Dan and cousin A.O. Huntley came to Idaho from Colorado… Next, they tried Thunder Mountain (8,579 feet) and found surface gold at the mouth of Monumental Creek that flowed down from it.

… In 1894, they recovered $245 worth of gold in eight days—about $7,000 in today’s money. The following year, they made another $190, while they started building sluices for future production.

Then one day in 1900 at the old Overland Hotel in Boise, a man named Erb Johnson showed a glitzy sample of the Caswell gold to Ed H. Dewey who quickly told his father, the “fabulous Col. Dewey” in Pittsburgh about it. Millionaire Col. William H. Dewey instructed his son to get an 18-month option on the Caswell property and would pay $100,000 for it.

One report said, “The extent of this auriferous (gold-bearing) porphyry is not known, but the whole mountain appears to be porphyry (igneous rock with crystals embedded in finer grained minerals).”

The word was out, and by 1902 a frenzy of some 20,000 rushed to Thunder Mountain buying claims—most worthless. Newspaper headlines screamed the latest news:

“2,000 men working in mines, twice as many as many more seeking gold in district.”

“Law enforcement a problem, necktie parties.”

“Stores waxing rich.”

“Claims staked out over a 30-mile area” and “Dewey mine total production: $35,000.”

Dewey Mine 1902

deweymine1902-aDewey Gold Mine, Thunder Mountain, ID (c.1902)

… “Thunder Mountain itself is nothing but a mass of ore,” another report touted. “This has been fully demonstrated by the operations of Col. Dewey and his associates. It is ore everywhere… the almost limitless quantities in sight will make it one of the most productive sections of the world.”

… When Colonel Dewey, returned from Pittsburgh with $100,000 to buy out the Caswells, a report trumpeted, “Colonel W. H. Dewey of Idaho believes he is the richest man in the world or that he soon will be…The colonel carries in his pocket a little Vaseline bottle filled with pure gold, all extracted from just three pounds of quartz.”

… Adrenaline was running high in Idaho towns where prospectors were waiting out the winter of 1901-02, hoping for an early spring when they could race to the “mountain of gold.” Some couldn’t wait and headed out into the snow. On Feb. 10, three miners were killed in a snow slide near Elk summit between Thunder Mountain and Warren.

March opened with heavy snowfall, scarcity of fuel to operate Dewey’s mill, and all timber within a mile had been used up; 250 speculators were more interested in gobbling up new claims rather than going to work; the price of flour jumped to $50 a sack, and Boise traffic could only reach the camps on horses fitted with snowshoes.

… One difficulty was getting the ore down the mountain to the mill. That was no job for “little guys” without much money, and better suited for wealthy miners like Col. Dewey who could afford the machinery and labor needed. But he had his problems too:

He had two mills shipped from Chicago — one a 10-stamp mill that could crush from 50 to 70 tons of ore in a day, and the other a 100-stamp mill. The big one only got as far as Emmett and languished there for two years and was never used. A hotel bought the boilers.

The stampede to the “New El Dorado Mountain” began on Sunday, May 25, 1902, with 350 loaded horses and a hundred men crossing Elk Creek Summit into the mountain.

… In the years that followed, it was mostly blood, sweat and tears on Thunder Mountain. Everyone overestimated the amount of gold per ton of ore, and operating expenses were much too high. Few made a profit. Some of the big boys did, but not the Colonel. He recovered only about half of his investment.

… By the end of the year [1909], the Thunder Mountain bonanza was all over. A few continuing efforts sputtered for a while, then everyone pulled out. Col. Dewey died the following year — along with his dream.

The Colonel and Nampa …


Dewey Palace Hotel. Canyon County Historical Society & Museum.

“In 1896, Colonel William Dewey became interested in Nampa and bought 2,000 lots upon which he built a majestic hotel called the Dewey Place at a cost of $243,000. The hotel was four stories high with 81 rooms. A pair of verandahs ran the length of the facade and at each end was a cupola tower sheeted with copper that could be seen in Caldwell five miles away. The interior boasted ceiling frescos, oak paneling and many amenities that are common at today’s luxury hotel properties. The hotel closed in 1956 and was demolished in 1963.”

excerpted from: The Men, the Mountain, the Gold and the Town That Drowned

see also: Roosevelt the Town that Drowned
— — — — — — — — — —

Dewey, Idaho (Owyhee County)

deweymill-a

Dewey Mill (on left), Store House, Dewey Office, Dewey Hotel (far right). Col. Dewey’s house is to the left of the hotel on the hillside.

source: Idaho State Historical Society
— — — — — — — — — —

Biography Of Colonel William H. Dewey


Colonel Dewey, Illustrated History.

Among the prominent influential citizens of Idaho, Colonel Dewey, of Dewey, enjoys a unique position and reputation. He is a pioneer Idahoan in the true sense of that word, and the marvelous development of the interests and industries of his adopted state is largely attributable to his enterprise and sagacity. He is a man of remarkable resources, and has never failed to measure fully up to all the requirements and emergencies of life. Although over seventy years old, he is well preserved and exhibits unabated vigor of mind and body. Colonel Dewey is a native of the state of New York, and his first American ancestors were early settlers in Massachusetts.

In the autumn of 1863 he came to Idaho and located where the town of Dewey now is, but subsequently removed to where the town of Ruby City was located, and with others, March 21, 1864, laid out the town of Silver City.

The gentleman whose name introduces this review is a born miner, and from his first arrival in Idaho the Colonel became prominently connected with the mining interests of the northwest, in which connection it is perfectly fair to say that he has been one of the leading and principal factors in the development of the mineral resources of this state. He owned nearly half of the South Mountain camp during the period of its greatest activity and was one of three men to discover and locate this magnificent property.

He purchased the Trade Dollar mine in 1889, and after making numerous and expensive improvements upon it, sold to the present owners one hundred and thirty-four thousand of the five hundred thousand shares.

He also owns over one-half of the Florida Mountain group of mines and has just succeeded in forming a combination of these mining properties, in which he holds the strategic position. The accomplishment of this consolidation required rare tact and finesse.

At the village of Dewey, a town named in his honor, the Colonel has erected one of the best twenty-stamp mills in Idaho, or even in the west. He has also erected the fine Dewey Hotel, which is considered one of the best in the state, and he has built a beautiful residence for himself, and in addition constructed numerous valuable residences and business houses in the town of Dewey. He is also the projector and owner of the Boise, Nampa & Owyhee Railway, on which line is a splendid steel bridge, crossing the Snake River at Guffey, which is the pride of the whole state. Colonel Dewey built this bridge at his own expense, and also the railroad from Nampa to Guffey, which he is now extending to Murphy. He is also preparing to extend his road north from Nampa, the surveys now having been completed for a distance of fifty miles. When all these extensions are completed, the road will connect with the Central Pacific and furnish a continuous line from San Francisco to Butte, Montana, and thereby shorten the distance between these two points by about three hundred miles.

Colonel Dewey is distinctly a man of great practical turn of mind. He is simple in his habits and unassuming in his manners, being all energy, push and enterprise. He was cast in a large mold and would have been conspicuous and successful in any department of human activity that he might have entered. He has been frequently urged to accept nominations for import-ant official positions, but has invariably declined. His name is now mentioned in connection with the nomination for United States senator from Idaho. This is against the Colonel’s wishes, but his many friends are very urgent in their requests that he shall openly enter the field for that distinguished office.

source: Access Genealogy – Illustrated History of the State of Idaho. Chicago: The Lewis Publishing Company. 1899.
— — — — — — — — — —

Silver City Court House

“A nice old postcard of the stage in Silver City.”

from the Hugh Hartman collection courtesy Bob Hartman Idaho History 1800 to 1950
— — —

Silver City Post Office

Stagecoach in front of the Silver City Post Office, Courthouse next door. Directory of Owyhee County.

source: South Fork Companion
— — — — — — — — — —

Dewey, William H. 1858

whdewey-a

Author: S. J. Clarke (Publisher, 1920)

Colonel William H. Dewey of Nampa, who has departed this life was one of the builders of Idaho’s greatness. His contributions to the work of development were real and creditable and his signal service was in the vigor he lent to the pioneer era in making his region habitable, in bringing its resources to light and in stamping his intensely practical ideas upon the constructive measures which have led to the upbuilding of the state. Such careers are too near us now for their significance to be appraised at its true value, but the future will be able to trace the tremendous effect of their labors upon the society and the institutions of their time. The possibilities of high position afforded in the United States to industry and fidelity were never better illustrated than in Colonel Dewey’s case. He crossed the plains when a man of about forty years and thereafter bent his energies to constructive work in the development of Idaho.

Colonel Dewey was born in Massachusetts in 1822 and in 1863 came to the northwest, making his way first to Ruby City, Owyhee county. From that town he afterward removed to Silver City, where he spent many years in the boom mining days, contributing much to the utilization of the great mineral resources of that district and to the progress made in other directions. He at once saw the necessities and the opportunities of the state and in pioneer times became identified with trail building; and his labors were continued in accordance with the period of development until he was actively associated with railroad building. He regarded no project that would benefit his community too unimportant to receive his attention, nor did he hesitate to become identified with the most extensive interests. In pioneer times he labored in the development of the trails, later assisted in the building of wagon roads and finally of railroads. He was also closely associated with the development of mining interests and whatever he undertook seemed to be attended with prosperity and success.

For twenty years Colonel Dewey was actively engaged in mining and his operations placed him in the front rank among those who were developing Idaho’s mineral resources. The notable properties which he owned included the Trade Dollar and Black Jack mines, which he afterward sold to Pittsburgh (Pa.) corporations. These properties had been brought to a stage of production that added greatly to the fame of Owyhee county as a mineral section. With various other mining interests Colonel Dewey was also closely associated. However, he gradually diverted his business activity to other fields, becoming interested in railroad construction and in community building.

In 1893 he was one of the incorporators of the Boise, Nampa & Owyhee Railroad Company, which constructed a standard line from Nampa to Murphy and included the building of the pioneer steel bridge across the Snake river, which still stands as one of the most substantial structures of the kind—a splendid example of the permanency of the Dewey construction. With the completion of that road Colonel Dewey took up the work of building a line north from Nampa and organized the Idaho Northern, which in 1900 undertook the work of constructing a railroad from Nampa to Emmett which was completed in 1902.

Later this road was extended to Payette lakes, one of the greatest natural summer resorts in the northwest, but which was neglected and isolated for many years because of the lack of transportation facilities. As he promoted his mining projects he always secured the best equipment that could be purchased and the same was true in connection with railroad construction. The result of this high standard of work is seen today in the excellent condition of the railroads which he built and the mines which he developed.

A contemporary writer has said: “Colonel Dewey was a typically rugged western specimen. He lived many years in the mountains but at no time did he permit that environment to render him provincial. His ambition as a builder was abridged only by his most supreme effort and his last dollar. His determination in all his work to build big and broad for the future was exemplified in a thousand directions, but perhaps at no time more noticeably to the general public than in the case of the Dewey Palace hotel at Nampa, then a small place. Colonel Dewey projected his vision down the avenues of time and built for that little place a hotel costing two hundred and fifty thousand dollars. Time has fully justified his judgment. Colonel Dewey, in all his busy life, was never so much concerned as to his own financial future as he was about the future of his home section and his state, although he had amassed considerable of a fortune before he died. Essentially a builder for future generations, he left to the people of the state a magnificent heritage.”

source: Canyon-Owyhee County ID Archives Biographies File contributed for use in USGenWeb Archives by: Joy Fisher
[h/t SMc]
— — — — — — — — — —

Col William H. Dewey

deweyheadstone-aAdded by: David M. Habben on 8 Jan 2011

Birth: 1 Aug 1823 New York
Death: 8 May 1903 (aged 79)
Burial: Kohlerlawn Cemetery Nampa, Canyon County, Idaho

“Dewey, Colonel W. H., was born in New York state in 1822, and came to Owyhee in the fall of 1863, to the then town of Ruby City; but owing to a “hog-em” real estate crowd in that town, he, in company with others, located a rival town—Silver City—the following spring, and eventually Ruby City moved up to the new location, bag and baggage.

In April, 1864, Mr. Dewey built the first wagon road to Ruby and Silver, and in May of the same year started work on the Reynolds creek road.

At the time of the South Mountain activity, from 1871 to 1875, he owned nearly one-half of that prosperous camp.

For over twenty years past Mr. Dewey has been engaged in mine operating and promoting.

He sold the Black Jack group to a Pittsburgh company in 1889, and in 1892 disposed of the Trade Dollar group to another Pittsburgh company. Both of these properties have proven fabulously rich, and are large and constant dividend payers.

In 1895 he organized a company upon the Boonville group of mines, on Florida mountain, and in 1896 extensive improvements were made upon the property: but, with the exception of a short run to test the mill machinery, the property has been closed, with the exception of a prospecting force.

Considerable valuable ground has been blocked out in the mine, and orders to resume work on a large scale are expected at any time.

In 1896 Mr. Dewey incorporated the Boise, Nampa & Owyhee railroad, and started work on the same. It connects with the Oregon Short Line and Idaho Central railways at Nampa; at present has its terminus at Guffey, in Owyhee county. The present season will see it well up into the Owyhee mountains. The bridge across Snake river (illustrated in this book) is one of the finest steel structures in the West.

Mr. Dewey has other large mining and property interests in this county, and notwithstanding his advanced age, seventy-five years past, is recognized as one of the leading spirits in public improvement and development. Much of the prosperity of Owyhee is due to hit, untiring energy and labor in this section’s behalf”.

[A Historical, Descriptive and Commercial Directory of Owyhee County, Idaho, 1898]

source: Find a Grave
— — — — — — — — — —

Guffey Bridge, ca. 1898


Directory of Owyhee County.
——————–

See also: Colonel William Dewey part 1

Link: Thunder Mountain / Roosevelt History index page

page updated September 18, 2020

Road Reports Jan 27, 2019

The only way to get to Yellow Pine is via the South Fork route. Be aware of winter conditions, roads are likely ice and snow covered, trees and/or rocks may be down in the road. Higher elevation roads are closed. Please share road reports. Conditions change quickly this time of year.

Yellow Pine: We have had dry weather the last few days, 15″ of old snow on the ground. Local streets are snow packed, watch for ice on sunny corners.
Click for Local Forecast.
Yellow Pine Webcam: (check date on image)

Warm Lake Highway: Last report Wednesday (Jan 16) road is snow covered and in good shape, a few icy spots in the shaded corners.
SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

Highway 55 Webcams Link:

South Fork Road: Last report Tuesday (Jan 22) mail truck driver reports the road is icy and very slick.
Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′

EFSF Road: Last report Tuesday (Jan 22) Mail truck driver says the road is pretty good.

Lower Johnson Creek Road: Note to drivers – when traveling to the dump, please use the river side of the road for wheeled vehicles so the hill side can be for snowmobilers. Turnouts will be plowed.
Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam:

Upper Johnson Creek Road: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.
Big Creek Webcam: (check date on image)

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Midas Gold is keeping the road open.
Midas posted 1/22/2019: “This past weekend Stibnite received 10-14” of snow and our team spent long days clearing roads. This new snow, combined with recent rain and warmer temperatures left multiple trees down and small avalanches.”
Link to FB photo:

Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The approx elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′

Payette Avalanche Advisory
link:
——————————-

Weather Reports Jan 20-26, 2019

Jan 20 Weather:

At 1030am it was 32 degrees, light breeze and overcast. Light rain started around 1115am. Wind kicking up at 1145am. Raining and breezy at noon. Ground fog out in the forest by 1pm. At 3pm it was 35 degres, very low clouds and still sprinkling. At 6pm it was 33 degrees, lightly misting, low clouds and foggy. Still raining at 830pm. Foggy at 10pm. Skiff of snow fell after 8am this morning.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time January 21, 2019 at 10:30AM
Partly cloudy, breezy
Max temperature 39 degrees F
Min temperature 26 degrees F
At observation 26 degrees F
Precipitation 0.20 inch
Snowfall 1/4 inch
Snow depth 14 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

Jan 21 Weather:

At 1030am it was 26 degrees, partly cloudy and breezy, the old snow looks “wrinkled” (like an unmade bed.) Windy and increasing clouds at lunch time. At 3pm it was 29 degrees, windy and partly clear. At 945pm it was 25 degrees and fine light “snow” falling. At midnight bright moon casting shadows and starry sky.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time January 22, 2019 at 10:30AM
Mostly high haze
Max temperature 34 degrees F
Min temperature 5 degrees F
At observation 11 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 14 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

Jan 22 Weather:

At 1030am it was 11 degrees, mostly high haze in the sky and almost calm. Solid overcast by noon. At 3pm it was 28 degrees and overcast, slight breeze. At 6pm it was 26 degrees, overcast and cold breeze. Wind kicking up at 9pm. Snow probably started around 2am.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time January 23, 2019 at 10:30AM
Overcast, light snowfall
Max temperature 28 degrees F
Min temperature 11 degrees F <- yesterday morning
At observation 26 degrees F
Precipitation 0.13 inch
Snowfall 1.5 inch
Snow depth 15 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

Jan 23 Weather:

At 1030am it was 26 degrees, overcast and still snowing lightly. At noon it was overcast and still snowing. At 3pm it was 34 degrees, low overcast, steady light snow (about 1/2″ new, then most melted.) A little rain mixed with snow before 4pm. At 5pm just a few flakes and probably misting, low clouds and light breezes. At 6pm it was 30 degrees, lightly misting rain and low overcast. At 1030pm it looked partly clear, high haze with a few stars and smaller clouds. Looked mostly cloudy – thicker haze – after midnight.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time January 24, 2019 at 10:30AM
Mostly cloudy
Max temperature 35 degrees F
Min temperature 19 degrees F
At observation 27 degrees F
Precipitation 0.05 inch
Snowfall 0.5 inch
Snow depth 15 inch (average)
— — — — — — — — — — — —

Jan 24 Weather:

At 1030am it was 27 degrees and mostly cloudy. Broken cloud cover and bits of sunshine at 1pm. At 330pm it was 40 degrees, partly clear and cold breezes. At 6pm it was 30 degrees and partly clear. Lots of stars out at 1030pm. Cloudy after midnight.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time January 25, 2019 at 10:30AM
High thin haze
Max temperature 43 degrees F
Min temperature 10 degrees F
At observation 19 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 15 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

Jan 25 Weather:

At 1030am it was 19 degrees and the sky covered in high thin haze. Less haze and filtered sun at noon. At 3pm it was 38 degrees and partly cloudy, filtered sunshine. At 6pm it was 25 degrees and partly cloudy. Appeared to be cloudy at 1030pm (no stars.)

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time January 26, 2019 at 10:30AM
Mostly clear, light breeze
Max temperature 38 degrees F
Min temperature 14 degrees F
At observation 17 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 15 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

Jan 26 Weather:

At 1030am it was 17 degrees, mostly clear and light breeze from the south. At 4pm it was 39 degrees and partly cloudy (high haze and wisps.) At 6pm it was 29 degrees, very thin high haze. At 1030pm thin haze – a few fuzzy stars.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time January 27, 2019 at 10:30AM
Clear
Max temperature 44 degrees F
Min temperature 17 degrees F <- yesterday morning
At observation 21 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 15 inch
——————————–

Road Report Jan 23, 2019

The only way to get to Yellow Pine is via the South Fork route. Be aware of winter conditions, roads are likely ice and snow covered, trees and/or rocks may be down in the road. Higher elevation roads are closed. Please share road reports. Conditions change quickly this time of year.

Yellow Pine: We had rain/snow over the weekend, and it snowed 1.5″ this morning (still snowing) we have 15″ snow on the flat. Local streets last plowed Saturday (Jan 19). Streets are snow packed.
Click for Local Forecast.
Yellow Pine Webcam: (check date on photo)

Warm Lake Highway: Report Wednesday (Jan 16) road is snow covered and in good shape, a few icy spots in the shaded corners.
SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

Highway 55 Webcams Link:

South Fork Road: Report Tuesday (Jan 22) mail truck driver reports the road is icy and very slick.
Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′

EFSF Road: Tuesday (Jan 22) Mail truck driver says the road is pretty good.

Lower Johnson Creek Road: Note to drivers – when traveling to the dump, please use the river side of the road for wheeled vehicles so the hill side can be for snowmobilers. Turnouts will be plowed.
Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam:

Upper Johnson Creek Road: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.
Big Creek Webcam:

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Midas Gold is keeping the road open.
Report posted 1/22/2019: This past weekend Stibnite received 10-14” of snow and our team spent long days clearing roads. This new snow, combined with recent rain and warmer temperatures left multiple trees down and small avalanches.
Link to FB photo:

Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: Closed to wheeled vehicles. (73″ at summit)
Note: The approx elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′

Payette Avalanche Advisory
link:
——————————-

Winter Weather Advisory Jan 22, 5pm to Jan 23, 5pm

Winter Weather Advisory Jan 22, 5pm to Jan 23, 5pm

Yellow Pine Forecast

This Afternoon A 40 percent chance of snow. Cloudy, with a high near 32. West southwest wind around 6 mph. Total daytime snow accumulation of less than a half inch possible.
Tonight Snow likely, mainly after 11pm. Cloudy, with a low around 23. West southwest wind around 6 mph becoming south in the evening. Chance of precipitation is 70%. New snow accumulation of 1 to 2 inches possible.
Wednesday Snow likely. Cloudy, with a high near 37. South wind 5 to 7 mph. Chance of precipitation is 70%. New snow accumulation of around an inch possible.
Wednesday Night A 50 percent chance of snow, mainly before 11pm. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 23. Northwest wind 5 to 7 mph. New snow accumulation of less than a half inch possible.

Winter Weather Advisory

URGENT - WINTER WEATHER MESSAGE
National Weather Service Boise ID
209 PM MST Tue Jan 22 2019

...SNOWFALL EXPECTED IN THE IDAHO CENTRAL MOUNTAINS TONIGHT
THROUGH TOMORROW...

.A warm front with an ample moisture tap is expected to move
through tonight through tomorrow. This will cause a roughly 24
hour period of snowfall in the Idaho Central Mountains, impacting
travel and roads. Snow ratios are expected to decrease as
Wednesday wears on, so a lighter fluffy snow will be replaced with
a wet and heavier snowfall by mid day Wednesday.

West Central Mountains-Upper Weiser River-
209 PM MST Tue Jan 22 2019

...WINTER WEATHER ADVISORY IN EFFECT FROM 5 PM THIS AFTERNOON TO
5 PM MST WEDNESDAY...

* WHAT...Snow expected. Total accumulations of 2 to 5 inches,
  with localized amounts up to 11 inches, are expected. Plan on
  slippery road conditions.

* WHERE...West Central Mountains and Upper Weiser River zones.
  This includes the towns of Cascade, McCall, New Meadows,
  Council, Cambridge, and surrounding areas. Roads impacted
  include Highways 55 and 95.

* WHEN...From 5 PM this afternoon to 5 PM MST Wednesday.

* ADDITIONAL DETAILS...Be prepared for reduced visibilities and
  difficult travel at times.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...

A Winter Weather Advisory for snow means periods of snow will
cause primarily travel difficulties. Be prepared for snow covered
roads and limited visibilities, and use caution while driving.
The latest road conditions can be obtained by calling 5 1 1.

 

Jan 20, 2019 The Yellow Pine Times

Jan 20, 2019 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Community Calendar:

Feb 16 Pie Contest 2pm Yellow Pine Tavern
May 25 ATV-UTV Scavenger Hunt Memorial Day Weekend
Jul 13 Ride to Big Creek
Sep 14 Ride to Cinnabar

(details below)
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Local Events:

Chili Contest Jan 19

Winners of the 2019 Yellow Pine Chili Cook-off:

1st Place – Sarah Lanham
2nd Place – Nikki Harnar
3rd Place – Michelle Asdell

20190119chilicook-off-a

A report of: “at least 22 hungry people and later three wet snowmobiles showed up.”

The Cross Country Ski Race was called off as there were no participants. So a giant snowman was built instead.

20190119snowman-a

(photos by Dick Filler Photography)

Photo gallery at the YP FB Group:
— — — —

Annual Pie Contest

Saturday February 16th at 2pm at the Yellow Pine Tavern.
— — — —

2019 Yellow Pine Escapades

The 2019 schedule for the Yellow Pine Escapades has been updated on the website!

Expect new escapades this coming year, including an ATV-UTV Photo Scavenger Hunt; two (yes, two) ATV-UTV rides, a golf tournament, and even a community yard sale. Other events will be added to the calendar as plans are finalized.

Join us for a great season of fun! The starting point for fun in Yellow Pine! The website includes information on the events hosted by the Yellow Pine Community Hall as well as the other “goings-on” in the village. Food, lodging and fuel are available in Yellow Pine.

link:
———-

Village News:

History of the log cabin at the Cemetery

The Cemetery Committee is interested in any information on the cabin that is located by the cemetery. We know that it had been on the property that was known as “Mary’s Cabins”. It was moved by Tom Richter while the Filler’s were building their house. Donna Valdez said that the people who ran the cafe and bar slept there, before the Tavern was built.

Do people have pictures or any information they can share? We’d love to put a plaque up on the cabin while we repair it.

– Marj Fields
— — — —

Lower Johnson Creek Plowing

Note: when traveling to the dump, please use the river side of the road for wheeled vehicles so the hill side can be for snowmobilers. Turnouts will be plowed.

– CD
— — — —

Come Spring…

“To Yellow Pine residents. I will be making several trips next spring and summer hauling out metal, appliances, etc. . If you need anything hauled away please get on the list. Vehicles require a title. I will be hauling gravel back if anyone is interested.”

Contact Mike Amos
— — — —

Yellow Pine US Mail

We are on 3-day a week mail delivery from Cascade. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Be sure to buy your holiday stamps here.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Report Thursday (Dec 20) the road to the dump is icy, 3 of the 4 dumpsters were full.

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.


— — — —

Ice Hole Campground Closed

The Campground has been temporarily closed to provide for public safety during reconstruction. This order will be in effect from September 27, 2018 through July 2, 2019, unless rescinded earlier by the Forest Supervisor. (0402-04-80)
— — — —

Predators

A report from Warm Lake that a Mountain Lion killed a dog. Wolves have been spotted in the Clear Creek area. We have plenty of predators in our area too.

Please do not leave pet food outdoors and remember to keep trash secured, it will draw foxes, coyotes and loose dogs.
———-

Local Groups:

YPWUA News:

Notice

Over the last month [December] there have been complaints of low water pressure. Nicki and Warren have been investigating and found out that the water usage is extremely high. We know there are leaks in the system but those leaks have been there for several years. We know that people leave a small stream of water running so their lines do not freeze but that is done every winter. If anyone notices any abnormal loss of water, please let me know.

– Steve Holloway 208-697-7343

Note: The 2018 water bill is due Feb 1, 2019

Winter Water Advice

To help prevent frozen water, avoid parking over buried water lines, allow the natural snow cover to insulate the ground. Driving over the lines will also push the frost deeper and can result in frozen pipes. Also, don’t plow the snow over where water lines are buried, and avoid covering up water shut off valves.

link to: 2018 September Water Department Update.docx
— — — —

VYPA News:

VYPA Meeting Dates 2019

June 8th; July 20th; August 10th; September 14th.

Note that the July 20th meeting is not on the second Saturday due to a conflict with a planned ATV rally involving many residents and visitors.
— — — —

YPFD News:

The next meeting to be May 18th, 2019 at the Community Hall

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Updates:

Fire Department Training on Sundays at 11am will resume in the Spring.

The YPFD has 2 Size Chimney Brushes with extension rods that were donated for use around YP. If you would like to borrow one, please contact Cecil or Jeff and we’ll get them for you. The YPFD also has loanable mitigation tools, (Weed-Whacker, Hedge Trimmer, backpack blower and 16’ pole saw). If you would like to borrow one or all, please contact Cecil or Jeff and we’ll get them for you.

It’s also time to check the Smoke Alarm batteries and Fire Extinguishers. Please test the alarm and replace Smoke Alarm Batteries every year, if you have the replaceable battery type. Fire Extinguishers should be checked as well and should be easily seen and reachable. A good location for the Fire Extinguishers would be the kitchen and near the wood stove and/or fireplace. The needle should be in the green.

If you need a Smoke Detector or Fire Extinguisher for your YP residence please contact Jeff F.
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Biz Listings:

Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377

Closed for winter
— — — —

The Corner (208) 633-3325

Closed for winter
— — — —

Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233

Winter Hours at the Tavern: 9am-2pm and 4-8pm Mon, Wed, Fri, Sat and 9am-2pm Sun. Or call 208 633-2233 the phone rings into the house.
— — — —

Buck Horn Outfitters LLC
Link to FB page:

Deadwood Outfitters
Link to website:
— — — —

Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed (208) 382-4430
suet blocks (peanut crunch, and cherry) for $1.99 per block
50# bag of Polar Ice Melt available for $7.99.
— — — —

Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, Will service Yellow Pine

B&T Safety Solutions LLC
Cleaning chimneys and stoves
307-258-8951 – We’re moving from Idaho City to Donnelly in a few months and service all over Idaho, including Yellow Pine.
— — — —

Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
———————–

Local Observations:

Monday (Jan 14) clear last night, low of 4 degrees, clear this morning, measured 10″ snow on the ground. Sunrise turning the frost to vapor. Woodpecker drumming on a power pole somewhere, male northern flicker, female hairy woodpecker and jays visiting the porch. Pine squirrel showed up late for lunch. Mid-day it was clear and a few icicles dripping, high of 33 degrees. Mid-afternoon it was very clear, 1st quarter moon above the ridge and below freezing. At dusk the sky was clear and the temperature was dropping into the teens. Bright moon and starry before midnight, then high clouds.

Tuesday (Jan 15) high overcast this morning, thick layer of hoar frost (like a skiff of snow) and slight breeze, measured 10″ of old snow on the ground. It was 15 degrees at sunrise. Jays calling and flying around the neighborhood. Cloudy mid-day, cold and not many drips, high of 28 degrees. A female flicker, a female hairy woodpecker and the local pine squirrel visited. Mid-afternoon thicker lower clouds, foggy looking on the peaks and a few flakes, yet there was a patch of blue sky overhead. Overcast at dusk. Breaks in the clouds and filtered moonlight before midnight.

Wednesday (Jan 16) overnight low of 10 degrees and overcast this morning, est. 10″ of old snow on the ground, paths are very icy. Steller jays visiting. A few flakes of snow falling for a bit at mail time, high of 36 degrees. Mid-afternoon thicker lower clouds, higher humidity and very light snow fell for a short time. At dusk it was cloudy. Thick clouds at midnight, very little moonlight. Warmed up during the night and rain/snow mix then rain.

Thursday (Jan 17) it was 35 degrees this morning, overcast and light rain falling, measured 10″ old snow on the ground, water on top of ice – very slick. Stellar jay visiting. Rain on and off, sometimes a few snow blobs during the morning and mid-day, high of 39 degrees. Early afternoon a few breaks in the clouds and lightly misting. Very slick paths, water on top of ice. Mid-afternoon, misting once in a while, dark clouds around the horizon, but breaks in the clouds above. At dusk it was cloudy and not raining. Started snowing before midnight and probably snowed all night.

Friday (Jan 18) overnight low of 29 degrees, 5.5″ new heavy wet snow, 15″ total snow on the ground, thinning overcast and trees dumping snow loads. Stellar jay and hairy woodpecker visiting. Overcast mid-day, above freezing and roofs dripping snowmelt, high of 36 degrees. Local plowing streets today. Mid-afternoon overcast, tendrils of mid-mountain fog on VanMeter. At dusk the clouds were thin enough to see a bit of the moon coming up over the ridge. Snowing after midnight.

Saturday (Jan 19) overnight low of 27 degrees, 2″ new wet snow this morning, 15″ total snow on the ground (compressed, not melting.) The new snow makes for better traction, not as slick. Male northern flicker, female hairy woodpecker and steller jays visiting. Low clouds, tendrils of mid-mountain fog and lightly misting by mid-afternoon, high of 34 degrees. Rained all afternoon, socked in nearly to the valley floor. Still sprinkling at dusk. Rain with blobs of snow in the evening, turning to wet snow after midnight. Snowed for a good part of the night, hovering right around freezing.

Sunday (Jan 20) overnight low of 32 degrees, 2.5″ new wet heavy slushy snow this morning, 16″ total snow on the ground, overcast and light breeze. Two ravens flew over calling, female hairy woodpecker, red-breasted nuthatches and jays visiting. Light rain and gusty winds before noon. Ground fog out in the forest, breezy and raining mid-day, very low clouds, high of 39 degrees. Foggy and misting at dusk.
————————-

Tips & Advice:

How to Walk on Ice Without Falling

* Wear sticky shoes. Invest in a pair of low, wide-heeled shoes with thick-tread soles made of rubber or neoprene composite. Skip the plastic and leather soles, which provide no traction. For an even surer step, buy ice grippers that slip over your shoes or boots, available online or at sporting goods stores. Regularly remove sticking ice and snow from them so they don’t pose their own hazard.

* Prop yourself up. You may not ordinarily use a cane, but ones with an ice pick on the end can help you balance on slippery surfaces. You can find them online and at drugstores.

* Stay puffed. Wear a bulky coat to cushion some of the blow if you do fall. You can also try hip protectors, pads that slip into your pants or are worn as a belt. They’re available online or at big box stores.

* Sport sunglasses. The snow’s white glare can be blinding; seeing clearly can help you avoid slippery spots.

* Get gritty. Really want to avoid falling? Carry a small bag of sand, grit or non-clumping kitty litter to sprinkle when you encounter icy spots.
[*Note: put sand in an old season salt bottle to sprinkle a thin layer]

* Walk like a penguin. Spread your feet. This broadens your base, making it harder to fall. Bend your knees slightly to lower your center of gravity. And put your arms out to your sides for balance.

* Do the slow shuffle. If you can’t bring yourself to do the Penguin, keep feet about a foot apart, and take small, shuffling steps, aligning your feet after each step. Keep your pace slow.

* Take stair steps one at a time. Whether you’re going up or down icy steps, test the handrail and then make sure to plant both feet on a step before moving to the next one.

* Fall like a pro. If you’re about to go down lean forward so the back of your head and spine don’t hit the pavement. Try to fall on your thigh, hip and shoulder, not on your easily broken arms, knees, wrists or spine. And hard as it may be, relax your muscles as you fall. You’ll be less likely to get hurt.
—————————–

Midas News:

Stibnite Advisory Council Meeting Summary for January 10, 2019

January 10, 2019 Meeting Synopsis

Attendance:
Lynn Imel – Yellow Pine
Gene Tyler – Donnelly
Julie Good – New Meadows
Bob Crump – Riggins
Tami Testa – Council
Denis Duman – Idaho County
Joe Iveson – Adams County
Anne Labelle – Midas Gold

Absent:
Glenna Young – Cascade

Synopsis prepared by: Anne Labelle, Midas Gold Idaho, Inc.

Distributed on January 10, 2019 to Advisory Council

Project Overview – At the request of the Stibnite Advisory Council (Advisory Council), Midas Gold Idaho technical staff presented an overview of the project and Council members had the opportunity to ask questions and request more information. From this discussion, council members requested copies of the economic studies regarding the project.

Working Groups – The Advisory Council agreed that before the next meeting (before January 31) each member will identify and share a list of working group topics that they believe would be the most beneficial to their community. Based on this feedback, the Council will appoint working groups at the February 14 meeting.

Working Group for Transportation – The Advisory Council requested that before the next meeting Midas Gold staff brief the group on the work that has been done so far to evaluate regional transportation needs and identify Representatives willing to serve on the Transportation Working Group.

Bylaws – After review of draft bylaws for the Stibnite Advisory Council, members agreed to consolidate changes for final review and approval at the next meeting on February 14, 2019.

Reporting and Materials — The Advisory Council reiterated that after each meeting a summary document will be approved for immediate distribution to stakeholders and communities. A portal will also be set up so that Council members can access information.

Role and Function — The Advisory Council reiterated that the role and function of the Stibnite Advisory Council is not to advocate or support Midas Gold. Instead, the role and function of the Stibnite Advisory Council is for each member to represent their communities.

Stibnite Foundation Working Group – The working group appointed to help set up the Stibnite Foundation reported back on their progress to establish the Stibnite Foundation.
— —

Stibnite Advisory Council January 15, 2019 Special Meeting Summary

Attendance:
Lynn Imel – Yellow Pine
Gene Tyler – Donnelly
Julie Good – New Meadows
Bob Crump – Riggins
Tami Testa – Council
Denis Duman – Idaho County
Joe Iveson – Adams County
Anne Labelle – Midas Gold

Excused:
Glenna Young – Cascade

Summary approved by the Chair
Distributed on January 15, 2019 to Advisory Council
By-Laws – The Advisory Council unanimously voted to approve by-laws.

Slate of Officers – The Advisory Council presented a slate of officers as follows:
Julie Good as Chair
Gene Tyler as Vice Chair
Lynn Imel as Secretary/Treasurer

Election of Officers – The Advisory Council unanimously voted to approve slate of officers as presented.
— —

Stibnite Advisory Council – Approved Bylaws

Link:
— —

2018 Community Partnership Agreement with the Village of Yellow Pine

Link:
— — —

[Valley County] Commissioners’ meeting, Donnelly, Jan. 16th, 2019

I attended the Valley County Commissioners’ meeting at the Donnelly Elementary School, Wednesday, January 16th.
report prepared by Lynn Imel

The elementary school gym had chairs ready for about 200; when the meeting started at 6:00 p.m. there were about 15 empty chairs in front and several people standing in the back. Commissioner Gordon Cruickshank introduced the other two Commissioners, the County Clerk, County Prosecuting Atty., and a county employee who served as timer for the people’s comments. He set out the rules for the meeting: state your name and where you live; speak for three minutes only; if you have spoken at another public meeting wait until all others have had a turn; stay on the topic of why or why not the Commissioners should sign the Community Agreement offered by Midas Gold. No applause, yelling, comments from the audience. Speakers who wander off the topic will be interrupted and told to talk only about the agreement.

Anne Labelle, representing Midas Gold, presented the background of the creation of the Community Agreement already signed by seven Valley County communities. She explained the purpose of the Stibnite Advisory Council and Stibnite Foundation. Each signing community has a representative attending monthly meetings. (see public articles for details)

About 50 residents of the county stood and spoke directly to the Commissioners, including several Midas Gold employees who live in Valley County. By 9:00 everyone who wished to speak had commented.

My notes show the main opinions against signing:

* County signing the agreement should be delayed until the EIS (Environmental Impact Statement) is released by the Payette Forest and restoration funding information is provided.
* County is the agency issuing Condition Use Permits to Midas Gold. Signing the agreement puts the County in a legal conflict of interest position.
* County should not sign, but should create a Memorandum of Understanding with Midas Gold.
* County membership on the Foundation would result in the County (ownership) of stock, which is illegal.
* County signing infers that the County is in support of the proposed mining project; County should remain neutral.
* Felt that the agreement was written by Midas to benefit Midas Gold more than the signers. Midas’ stock value increased after announcement seven had signed.
* Signing would commit the County taxpayers to potential expenses if the project caused damage (ref. Tamarack failure)
* Pushing/urgency to sign signals lack of transparency.
* Cooperative agreements are created to “shield” company officers, create tax write-offs, encourage investment.
* Public shouldn’t have to sign in order to get information. Advisory Council meetings are for representatives only.
* Wait until Record of Decision (ROD) is final (Payette Forest’s decision) then create a Memorandum of Understanding.
* County can’t be objective in Use Permits if they are on Stibnite Advisory Council and Stibnite Foundation.

Proponents of the signing commented:

* Signing and participating at this early date provides a constant communication of concerns, thus eliminating mis-information.
* Participating in the Stibnite Advisory Council makes all communities and Midas Gold aware of impact concerns of other communities.
* Agreement was created by representatives of the communities over the course of many months; Midas provided some guidance on what should be included; secretarial help.
* Midas Gold has not provided benefits to communities to encourage signing.
* Collaborative groups have been proven to be effective and inclusive. This is a collaborative group to consider everyone’s concerns.
* Agreement does not undermine National Environmental Policies Act (NEPA) or scoping (public letters of support/objection to Forest Service)
* “I feel the County should sign.”
* County should sign and recluse themselves on topics that could be construed to be conflict of interest; would benefit from hearing representatives.
* Signing does not “grant power” to anyone; Advisory Council is a communication opportunity.
* Collaboration now answers questions/concerns.
* (non-profit group) “feel it is beneficial”.
* Most residents of our community welcomed the opportunity to ask questions and provide input on the project.

“Off Topic” comments not being influential to Valley County signing:

* Nez Perce tribe was not invited to sign. (Tribe has separate agreement with Midas)
* County has the final say.
* Conditional Use permits will require Midas to address impact costs to Valley County.
* Midas is required to make full disclosure to shareholders.
* This meeting creates a referendum vote.
* Midas has circumvented Forest Service by lobbying at Washington D.C.
* Midas personnel felt uncomfortable at the McCall meeting.
* Representatives cannot know what everyone in their community thinks.
* Mine operation will: increase taxes for cleanup, Foundation is to keep communities supporting the project; past mines left damage.
* Numerous comments emphasizing how long their family lived in Valley County; live here to enjoy recreation and forest, want to raise family here.
* Adding “25%” more people will require more staff at hospital and housing for them; hospital will be unable to serve more.
* Environmental impact of the mine.
* Mining companies (should not) give money to agencies.
* Barrick has a poor history and will be the “end owner”.
* Tamarack left County & taxpayers will a huge problem; Midas may bankrupt.
* Roads, people, business will be dislocated and will suffer.
* Midas website promotes investment.
* “Midas wants to set rules and procedures” and must follow county rules.
— — — — — — — — — —

Midas Gold advisory panel to keep meetings closed

Chair cites need to avoid ‘disruption or delay’

By Tom Grote for The Star-News January 17, 2019

The citizens committee formed to consult with Midas Gold about the company’s proposed gold and antimony mine in Valley County has decided to keep its meetings closed.

Members of the Stibnite Advisory Council on Tuesday voted to approve by-laws which calls for public statements to be prepared at the end of each meeting.

The group decided that keeping their meetings closed would “achieve our common goals without disruption or delay,” said Julie Good of New Meadows, who was elected on Tuesday as chair of the panel.

The council could still invite individuals to attend the meetings who may offer information that would be helpful, Good said.

The panel is composed of representatives of seven government agencies plus the Village of Yellow Pine.

Each member was appointed by the governing body of the area they represent following the signing of a Community Agreement between Midas Gold and those agencies.

The McCall City Council on Jan. 7 voted not to sign the agreement but to seek a separate agreement later.

Valley County commissioners held a public meeting in Donnelly on Wednesday on whether to sign the agreement. Results of that meeting were not available.

The advisory council is one of two entities formed by the Community Agreement between Midas Gold and the signers of the agreement.

The Stibnite Advisory Council will “serve as the principal forum for communication among the parties regarding the Stibnite Gold Project now and throughout the life of the project,” according to wording in the Community Agreement.

The council will receive comprehensive updates of the project as it moves through construction and operation if it receives needed permits from regulatory agencies, under the agreement.

Topics would not be limited to the project itself but would include housing, traffic, recreation, police and fire, education and recycling.

The Community Agreement also authorizes the formation of The Stibnite Foundation, which will be formed later this year and funded by Midas Gold to issue grants for community projects.

Separate appointments will be made to the foundation board by the governing boards of the signing agencies.

Here are the community members of the Stibnite Advisory Council:

• Lynn Imel – Yellow Pine
• Gene Tyler – Donnelly
• Julie Good – New Meadows
• Bob Crump – Riggins
• Tami Testa – Council
• Denis Duman – Idaho County
• Joe Iveson – Adams County
• Glenna Young – Cascade

Good has served on the New Meadows City Council since 2014.

She has been a business owner in New Meadows for more than 20 years doing bookkeeping, taxes and offering business services such as copies and faxes.

She and her husband own and operate The Connection in downtown New Meadows and are the managers of A to Z Storage in New Meadows.

Good called the decision by the City of McCall not to sign the agreement “unfortunate and will result in the lack of input from a part of the region that would benefit from being part of the conversation.”

Tuesday’s meeting was the second in a week by the council, which meets at the Midas Gold offices in Donnelly.

The group met last Thursday and asked Midas Gold staffers to schedule a briefing for the group on the work that has been done so far to “evaluate regional transportation needs,” according to the approved summary of the meeting.

The council also stated that its role is “not to advocate or support Midas Gold,” but “for each member to represent their communities,” the summary said.

The advisory group is scheduled to meet next on Feb. 14.

Midas Gold is the name being used for Midas Gold Idaho, the operating company for the Stibnite Gold Project, and its parent company, Midas Gold Corp. of Vancouver, B.C.

source:
— — — — — — — — — —

Viewpoint: Midas Gold, community stronger together

By Laurel Sayer

Midas Gold has been your neighbor for almost a decade. Many of our team members have lived here their entire lives. You know us, and you know this company.

Those who know us, know that we share the deeply held belief of many Idahoans that we are stronger when we work together. From this belief, we proposed a community agreement to bring the region together and to follow through on our promise and commitment to work collaboratively with you.

We are grateful to formally be working with eight of our neighbors. However, the process to adopt a regional community agreement has not always been easy. It has been filled with a fair amount of misinformation and mischaracterizations of our intent and of our people. As we move forward, I believe it is important to set the record straight – one more time.

We developed a community agreement because, as a company, we wanted to do the right thing.

We know we are stronger, and will design a better project, when we work side-by-side with our neighbors. We see formal agreements with the communities closest to us as a vehicle for input on the project design and for communication and accountability throughout the life of the Stibnite Gold Project.

This format also allows us to give everyone an equal voice and influence over the future of the Stibnite Gold Project – regardless of community size or opinion.

The Stibnite Gold Project will undoubtedly have impacts on the region. We believe many of these impacts will be positive for local communities, but we recognize a project of our size could also bring some unforeseen challenges. This is why we wanted to create a place where communities in the region could come together to address concerns and opportunities that require regional collaboration directly with Midas Gold.

We look forward to having meaningful conversations with Adams County, Cascade, Council, Donnelly, Idaho County, New Meadows, Riggins and Yellow Pine around how we can plan for transportation needs, workforce development, safety and economic impacts. These communities will have a direct line of communication with our company to advocate for their needs and promote issues important to them for the life of the project.

We will establish a foundation to make good on our promise to be a part of the solutions for needs in the communities we live and work. There is no impropriety in being a good corporate citizen by creating an endowment for the future.

Doing the right thing is not a public relations campaign, a bid to attract more investors to our project or an attempt to win local support for our project. However, a small vocal group continued to make these false accusations and insults against our people instead of learning the facts or speaking with us personally.

The City of McCall decided they did not want to join the community agreement at this time. We respect the city council’s decision. However, we find it bizarre that some people in the community are choosing to celebrate this as a victory.

Is it a win to stay siloed and not work with other communities in the region? Is success not having a forum for local communities to raise matters of interest with Midas Gold?

To us, it is a loss not to have McCall represented. Naturally, we are disappointed the city has elected to stand on the sidelines and pass on the opportunity to shape the future of a major project in its area. But we are continuing to move forward.

I am proud of the work we are doing in Idaho. I am proud of the possibility we can bring hundreds of family-wage jobs to the area. I am proud we are doing things differently by voluntarily working with our neighbors. And I am proud of our team who work so hard and hold us accountable to create a project that will positively benefit their communities.

If you want to move forward with us, or if you have questions about Midas Gold, please come stop by our office or send us an email. Each month, we host office hours on the second Friday in Donnelly. But you can always reach us by emailing community@midasgoldinc.com.

(Laurel Sayer is CEO of Midas Gold Idaho.)

source: The Star-News January 17, 2019
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Idaho News:

Deadwood Outfitters Events & Clinics

Backcountry Fly Fishing Clinic

June 27 – 30, 2019
$950.00 per person

Held on the beautiful Deadwood River, there are three days and two nights of fly fishing instruction for all levels. This is an excellent opportunity for experienced fly fishers and novices alike. We ride on horseback to fish a remote lake in the pristine Boise National Forest. The seminars are taught by renowned fly fishers known for both their expertise and ability to teach the art successfully. Arrive and experience the camaraderie of a beautiful outdoor adventure with others who share your passion.

link to flyer: 2019 Fly Fishing Adventure Web.jpg

Long Range Hunting & Shooting School

July 18 – 20 2019
$950.00 per person

link to flyer: 2019 Shooting School Flyer web.jpg

This is a class students will learn to shoot extreme angles up and down, calculate the wind and other environmental effects on their bullet, and positional shooting techniques in the beautiful mountains of Central Idaho. Shoot game animal targets at ranges out to 700 yards in realistic practical hunting situations. We guarantee you will have fun, learn and enjoy your time in class.

link to more info:
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Search and Rescue seeks donations to help with K9 training

The Star-News January 17, 2019

Valley County Search and Rescue’s new K9 team is looking for volunteer “victims” to help with human-scent training for the dogs.

The unit, which is new to the area, will perform missions including general area search, avalanche victim recovery, human trailing and cadaver search.

Volunteers are needed to play a lost subject or avalanche victim for outdoor training exercises. Volunteers can also donate their surgical remains as scent materials for cadaver training.

For more information, call or text the Valley County Search and Rescue K9 Unit at 406-396-8500 or email huey133@icloud.com.

source:
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First aid, CRP training to be offered in Donnelly

The Star-News January 17, 2019

The Donnelly Fire Station will host CPR/AED and First Aid training on Tuesday and Wednesday, Feb. 5-6, at 6 p.m.

The CPR/AED class will be Tuesday, Feb. 5, and the First Aid class on Wednesday, Feb. 6.

Cost is $20, and space is limited. To register, call 208-325-8619.

The Donnelly Fire Station is located at 244 W. Roseberry Rd..

source:
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Torchlight parade to kick off Winter Carnival opening ceremonies

The Star-News January 17, 2019

The Children’s Torchlight Parade will kick off the McCall Winter Carnival on Friday, Jan. 25.

Marchers are asked to gather at the McCall Community Congregational Church at 901 First St. starting at 5:30 p.m. Jan. 25. Parents and children can keep warm in the church’s fellowship room.

The parade is scheduled to start at 6:30 p.m. and go to East Lake Street before heading through downtown and ending at Depot Park for the opening ceremonies.

The winners of the local snow sculpture competition will be formally announced during the opening ceremonies after which the unique sight of fireworks over snow will cap off the evening.

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Mardi Gras Parade to feature the wacky & weird through downtown McCall

The Star-News January 17, 2019

An annual highlight of the Winter Carnival is the Mardi Gras Parade to begin at noon on Saturday, Jan. 26.

The parade will head north along Idaho 55 (North Third Street) starting at Stibnite Street, bend west through downtown and turn south on First Street.

Floats, bands, and the usual wacky drill teams are sure to please those braving the winter chill lining the streets downtown.

This year’s parade will be limited to 60 entries in order to keep the length to one hour, carnival organizers said. Priority will be given to local entries.

The grand marshals will be in keeping with the carnival theme, “Legends, Myths and Superheroes,” by celebrating the superheroes who make up the first responders of local police and fire departments as well as ski patrollers.

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New events venue planned for Payette Lake; development draws concern from neighbors

by Deni Hawkins Friday, January 18th 2019


Overlook viewpoint from the Lookout on the Lake

McCall, Idaho (CBS 2) — There’s a battle brewing on Payette Lake in McCall over an events center that’s being constructed near the lakefront.

The venue, known as the Lookout on the Lake, sits on the east side of the lake, south of Paradise Point and west of Shellworth Island in an area known and cherished for its natural atmosphere and beautiful surroundings. According to the developer, the land is intended as a day-use space, and is designed to be used for weddings, family reunions, corporate retreats and other gatherings.

But neighbors who live in condominiums just down the road on Tamarack Bay have raised concerns about the process involved in leasing the land, and the changes this space could bring to the area. Now, the group is petitioning to the Idaho Land Board in attempt to get the development stopped.

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Judy Nissula appointed mayor of Cascade

She will replace Julie Crosby, who resigned

By Max Silverson for The Star-News January 17, 2019

Judy Nissula was appointed mayor of Cascade on Monday by the Cascade City Council.

Nissula will serve out the remainder of Julie Crosby’s term, who resigned in November citing the stress associated with the job.

Nissula will serve through this year and will need to seek election in November if she wishes to keep the job into 2020.

“I am honored to have the confidence of the Cascade City Council with the appointment,” Nissula said.

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Cascade to try again to pass dark sky ordinance

New draft to be heard Monday by P&Z commission

By Max Silverson for The Star-News January 17, 2019

An ordinance that would put restrictions on outdoor lighting to enhance the night sky in the City of Cascade will be presented at a public hearing on Tuesday at Cascade City Hall.

The hearing will begin at 6 p.m. Tuesday before the Cascade Planning and Zoning Commission.

The ordinance, called a “dark sky” law, is being proposed to protect Cascade from light pollution, officials said.

The new rules are an updated draft of a similar ordinance that was brought before the Cascade City Council in February 2017.

At the time, council members tabled the proposed rules, saying the draft was too ambiguous and requested more specific language be added.

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Idaho officials want to cap hundreds of artesian wells

by Keith Ridler, Associated Press Monday, January 14th 2019

Boise, Idaho (AP) — Lawmakers have advanced legislation to help state officials cap what are thought to be hundreds of artesian wells across southern Idaho in a plan that could help irrigators and a federally protected snail.

The Senate Resources and Environment Committee on Monday unanimously approved moving ahead with legislation that will alter a 1987 law with an expired cost-sharing provision.

Idaho Department of Water Resources Director Gary Spackman told lawmakers the change is needed to boost pressure in aquifers and avoid confusion about whether the state will partially pay for capping wells on private land. He said a cost-sharing provision that expired in 1992 needs to be removed from the 1987 statute.

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Mining News:

Idaho environmental official seeks money for mine pollution

Jan 18, 2019 AP

Idaho’s top environmental official says his agency needs money for continued cleanup efforts of toxic discharge from an abandoned silver and lead mine in central Idaho near one of the world’s top ski destinations.

Idaho Department of Environmental Quality Director John Tippets on Friday also told the Legislature’s budget-setting Joint Finance-Appropriations Committee additional money is needed as the agency takes over regulating pollution discharge into waterways from the federal government.

Tippets is requesting $1.5 million for work at the Triumph Mine in central Idaho about 7 miles southeast of Sun Valley Resort’s Bald Mountain ski area.

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Public Lands:

Idaho Parks And Rec Wants To Clarify Who Needs To Pay To Photograph Public Lands

By James Dawson Jan 16, 2019 BSU Radio

Anyone taking photos or shooting video for commercial purposes at an Idaho state park is required to get a permit. But that definition isn’t so black and white.

State officials say they’re tweaking rules to let Youtubers and social media influencers take selfies and shoot vlogs without a permit in Idaho parks.

They say they only want for-profit companies to pay to shoot among the state’s forests, mountains and deserts. A permit application costs $100 and then negotiates with the company on how much Parks and Recreation will charge for a particular shoot.

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USDA Forest Service 2018 CuMo Exploration Project Update

1/18/2019

Dear Interested Party:

On December 22, 2018, a 30-day notice and comment period began for the CuMo Exploration Project Supplemental Redline Environmental Assessment (SREA) with publication of a legal notice in the Idaho Statesman. This is the same day that the lapse in Federal government funding began, our offices closed, and government employees were furloughed. Consequently, this comment period has been interrupted due to cancellation of the public meeting, project website issues, and Forest staff being unavailable to answer project questions and respond to requests.

Forest Supervisor Seesholtz has decided to initiate an additional comment period for the CuMo Exploration Project SREA to assure that interested parties have sufficient time effectively participate. The additional 30-day comment period will start with publication of a legal notice in the Idaho Statesman, newspaper of record. Comments from both comment periods will be considered, evaluated, and included in the project record. If you have already submitted comments during the initial comment period there is no need to resubmit the comments. Additional comments will be accepted during this 30-day comment period. All individuals and organizations who submit comments during one or both of the 30-day comment periods that meet requirements at 36 CFR 218 will have standing for objection.

Project Information

The supplemental DN/FONSI (SDN/FONSI) for the CuMo Exploration Project addressing the 2011 Court order and other changed conditions/new information that occurred between 2011 and 2015, was signed on September 30, 2015. Plaintiffs in the 2011 lawsuit again filed a lawsuit challenging the 2015 supplemental decision in January 2016. The lawsuit challenged the analysis of potential effects of exploration activities to groundwater and Sacajawea’s bitterroot (Lewisia sacajaweana; LESA). The Court issued the memorandum of decision and order to this lawsuit on July 11, 2016. The Court’s decision upheld the Forest Service’s 2015 SDN/FONSI relating to groundwater, however, found the analysis and conclusions concerning LESA to be arbitrary and capricious because it failed to re-examine the baseline LESA population in the Project Area following the 2014 Grimes Fire.

Following issuance of the 2016 Court Order, the Pioneer Fire began on July 18, 2016. This fire burned approximately 190,000 acres, including 1,578 acres (55 percent) of the CuMo Exploration Project area. As identified in the 2017 scoping documents for this project, consideration of changed conditions resulting from the 2016 Pioneer Fire and updates to most resource baseline conditions and effects analyses were needed. To address the 2016 Court order and changed conditions resulting from the 2016 Pioneer Fire, Forest Supervisor Seesholtz decided to proceed with a supplemental redline environmental assessment (SREA) to specifically undertake and document further analysis.

The 2018 CuMo Exploration Project SREA has been prepared and the Forest is seeking comment. The 2018 SREA is presented in the form of a supplemental “Redline” EA. That is, information from the 2011 EA and 2015 SEA (supplemental EA) that is still relevant and did not change remains in original black text, while any new information, updates, and/or clarifications are presented in red text. As was done in the 2011 EA and 2015 SEA, the 2018 SREA evaluates three alternatives in detail: Alternative A – Proposed Action, Alternative B – Reduced Roads, and Alternative C – No Action. It is important to note that the SREA discloses the analyses of the mineral exploration activities and does not include mine development.

The 2018 SREA and additional Project information can be downloaded from the project website at:
https://www.fs.usda.gov/project/?project=52875
To request a hard copy of the 2018 SREA, please contact Rick Wells, Project Team Leader, by phone 208-373-4136 or by email at rickywells@fs.fed.us.

Timeframe and How to Comment

Individuals and organizations wishing to be eligible to object must meet the information requirements at 36 CFR 218 Subparts A and B. For objection eligibility each individual or representative from each entity submitting timely and specific written comments regarding the proposed project must either sign the comments or verify identity upon request. In cases where no identifiable name is attached to a comment, a verification of identity will be required for objection eligibility. If using an electronic message, a scanned signature is one way to provide verification. Comments submitted anonymously will be accepted and considered; however, if a name and address are not provided, receiving further correspondences concerning this project will not be possible nor will the anonymous commenter be eligible to object under 36 CFR 218.

It is the responsibility of persons providing comments to submit them by the close of the comment period. Only those who submit timely and specific written comments regarding the proposed project during a public comment period established by the Responsible Official are eligible to file an objection under 36 CFR 218. The responsible official for this project is Forest Supervisor, Cecilia R. Seesholtz.

Written, facsimile, hand-delivered, and electronic comments concerning this SREA will be accepted for 30 calendar days following the publication of the legal notice for public comment in the Idaho Statesman, the newspaper of record for the Boise National Forest. The publication date in the newspaper of record is the exclusive means for calculating the comment period for this analysis. The anticipated date of publication in the Idaho Statesman is January 23, 2019. The legal notice will be posted on the project website within four calendar days of publication: (https://www.fs.usda.gov/project/?project=52875). Please verify the actual legal notice publication date to confirm the start and closure of the 30-day notice and comment period. Those wishing to comment should not rely upon dates or timeframe information provided by any other source. The regulations prohibit extending the length of an individual comment period (36 CFR 218.25 (a)(iv)).

Please submit specific written comments to Rick Wells, Project Team Leader; at Boise National Forest, 1249 South Vinnell Way, Suite 200; Boise, Idaho 83709; or by fax at 208-373-4111. Office hours for those submitting hand-delivered comments are 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday, excluding Federal holidays.

Comments may be submitted through the CuMo Exploration Project web page using the web form located at
https://cara.ecosystem-management.org/Public/CommentInput?project=52875.

Email comments may be submitted with attachments in MS Word (.doc) or Adobe (.pdf) format to:
comments-intermtn-boise@fs.fed.us
Please include “CuMo Exploration Project” in the subject line of the email.

Comments received in response to this solicitation, including names and addresses of those who comment, will be part of the public record for this project and will be made available for public inspection in the “Public Comment Reading Room” on the Project webpage at
https://cara.ecosystem-management.org/Public/ReadingRoom?project=52875

Only those who subscribe to email updates via the project web page, submit comments, or notify the Forest that they would like to remain on the mailing list for this project will receive future correspondences on this project.

Public Meeting

One public meeting will be held during the 30-day Notice and Comment Period. The public meeting will be conducted in an open house format with the overall goal to share with the public the current supplemental environmental analysis. The meeting will be held on February 6, 2019 from 5:00 to 7:00 p.m. at the Best Western Plus – Vista Inn at the Airport, 2645 Airport Avenue, in Boise, Idaho.

For additional information on this project, please contact me by email at myenko@fs.fed.us or Rick Wells, Team Leader, by phone at 208-373-4100 or by email at rickywells@fs.fed.us

Sincerely,
Melissa Yenko
Boise National Forest
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Letters to Share:

Gamebird Foundation

(via FB 1/15/2019)

Yes, what a year it has been for the Gamebird Foundation. We started off the year gathering surplus feed for maintenance feed for the pheasants, quail and turkeys that made it through the winter. We spread the feed where we find wild birds as well supply it to folks that want to raise baby pheasant chicks and release them. The released birds will remain close to good habitat and need some feed if the snow gets on the ground for very long.

Next project was working with Little Canyon Preserve in Peck Idaho for the FREE KIDS DAY, this is a special day in April where kids that have completed Hunter Education, have their license or pass port, can sign up or show up for a free day to shoot clay’s, then go out and hunt rooster pheasant over some of the best dogs and dog handlers that come from as far away as Seattle, to help mentor the kids. When this is all done the kids and their mentors get to enjoy a great BBQ lunch. Everything is supplied but the effort in getting there. This all happens at Little Canyon Shooting Preserve & Sporting Clays up in the Canyon above Peck Idaho. With the help of many Donors of ammunition, food and funds.

All this time we are building brooders and soft net release pens for the baby pheasant chicks that started arriving the last week in April. This year we were able to supply baby chick feed to all members of the Gamebird Foundation. We raised and released around 8,000 baby pheasants that were released into wild habitat. We always like to talk about the Youth Access Yes Area that we have help develop with The Gottchalk Family Land Owners, Region Idaho Fish and Game Commissioner, Dan Blanco and other Commissioners, the Idaho Fish and Game Department, The Gamebird Foundation and other contributors. (TGF) and (IDFG) released 300 Wild Rooster pheasants on the Access area this fall for the Youth and there Mentors to harvest. I don’t have a harvest report yet as there is a few more days to hunt.

Members of the foundation now have 4 large soft release pens that will hold 300 to 500 young birds each till they reach 8 to 9 weeks of age before we turn them loose on their own. Where we have been raising pheasants and releasing them we are now seeing pheasants in the area. Coyotes are the main predator of the birds when they are released at 8-9 weeks.

We finished out the season with a free spare rib feed here in Viola at the New Community Center. We had about 90-100 folks. Great food and fellowship. We are talking pheasants for this next year. The kids in the picture are the youth that raise the birds and help release them. We thank them for their great help.

You can visit our Facebook and see more of what the Gamebird Foundation is doing. We need your help. If you can afford $20.00 for a family membership or a donation to the Gamebird Foundation. We can sure put it to a good use. No funds go to any other use except to raise and house and feed baby pheasants and other birds. Nobody gets paid in this organization. We work to increase the habitat and the number of pheasants and other birds you see in your travels.

Have a very Great and Blessed New Year.
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Wolves on RFD TV Monday evening

(via email 1/20/2019)

Hi everyone,

If you have ever wondered or want to know more about wolves and their impact on counties RFD TV is having a program Monday night January 21st at 6:00 PM Mountain Standard Time. The program is called Rural America Life and the topic is Big Game Forever. Colorado is considering having 500 wolves introduced into their state.

On the program Monday night is Phil Davis a former Valley County, Idaho Commissioner and Rancher who has had to deal with wolves impacting his livestock over the years. Along with Phil is other ranchers who are concerned about the impact the wolves have in Idaho not only on livestock but on the wildlife for the sportsman.

RFD is on Direct TV at Channel 345 or check you local listings.

I would encourage you to watch this show if possible to see how Idaho has had to deal with Canadian Grey Wolves being introduced in Idaho. Originally we were to have 10 breeding pair with 100 wolves. When Idaho Fish and Game took on the management they allowed 15 breeding pair and 150 wolves to insure the wolf would stay de-listed as an endangered species. Now it is estimated we have 1,500 to 1,600 wolves in Idaho and they are creating issues with the Livestock Industry grazing Public Lands and our Big Game numbers for the sportsman.

Thanks,
Gordon
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Critter News:

Pooches get to test their strength at Monster Dog Pull Jan. 27

The Star-News January 17, 2019

The Monster Dog Pull on Sunday, Jan. 27, will be the most dog-gone fun event of McCall Winter Carnival. The event begins at 11 a.m. Jan. 27 at Alpine Village in McCall.

Dogs will be asked to cover a short track while pulling a weighted sled, with the top three from each weight class getting a prize.

This event is just for fun, so no experience is necessary. All equipment is provided.

Registration is $15 per dog with registration starting at 10:45 a.m. The event is hosted by MCPAWS Regional Animal Shelter.

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Idaho Sled Dog Challenge returns with longer course

Mushers have chance to qualify for Iditarod, Yukon Quest

By Max Silverson for The Star-News January 17, 2019

Mushers in the 2019 Idaho Sled Dog Challenge will have the option to race 300 miles in the event’s second year with qualification for two iconic 1,000-mile races on the line.

2019sleddog-a
File Photo/The Star-News. A member of a sled-dog team jumps in excitement at the start of last year’s Idaho Sled Dog Challenge.

The event will start on Wednesday, Jan. 30, and end two days later.

In the race’s inaugural run last year, some mushers traversed 237 miles in a bid to qualify for the Iditarod race in Alaska, while others chose to complete a shorter 150-mile qualifying race, which is still an option this year.

With the longer distance increased to 300 miles in 2019, the race is now a qualifier for not only the Iditarod, but also the Yukon Quest, another 1,000-mile race between Fairbanks, Alaska and Whitehorse, Yukon.

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Pet Talk – Lyme disease in animals

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt 1/18/2019 IME

Lyme disease is a tick-borne disease that affects animals and people worldwide. It is also called borreliosis. The causative agent of Lyme disease in the United States is Borrelia burgdorferi, which is transmitted most commonly by deer ticks. Most cases of Lyme disease in the United States occur in the Eastern coastal states and upper Midwestern states, where white-tailed deer and their ticks are ubiquitous. Lyme disease primarily affects dogs and people. Cats are usually resistant to the disease.

Only about 10 percent of dogs exposed to Borrelia burgdorferi develop signs of Lyme disease. Initially, fever, lethargy, lameness and a decreased appetite occur.

Joint swelling and enlarged lymph nodes may occur. Multiple joints may be affected. Lameness tends to shift from one leg to another over several weeks. In very rare cases, especially in Labs and golden retrievers, severe kidney disease develops. These dogs will have extreme lethargy and vomiting, and immediate veterinary care is necessary.

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Idaho wolf control board seeks $200,000 to kill wolves

The board contracts with the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Wildlife Services and Idaho Department of Fish and Game to kill wolves that attack cattle, sheep, deer and elk.

Keith Ridler Associated Press January 16, 2019

Boise, Idaho (AP) — A $200,000 budget request by Gov. Brad Little for an Idaho board that manages money to pay a federal and state agency to kill wolves that attack livestock and big game is sufficient for fiscal year 2020, a board member told lawmakers Wednesday.

“We’re fine with the $200,000 this year,” Wolf Depredation Control Board member Carl Rey told the budget-setting Joint Finance-Appropriations Committee, noting the board has a surplus this year.

“I will tell you that I don’t think that is sustainable beyond fiscal year 2020,” he said.

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KWVR Oregon Wolf Education weekly Wolf Report

Third Week of January 2019
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Wolf Education International

Newsletter 1/15/2019

Oregon’s wolf management plan moves forward despite opposition

Colorado Stop the Wolf Campaign

Rogue Pack of wolves kills eighth cow in SW Oregon
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Hard Water Anglers: Ice fishermen report success catching perch in Lake Cascade

By Andrew Weeks for The Star-News January 17, 2019

Anglers have been reporting success ice fishing at Lake Cascade this season.

Most successes have been with the lake’s most popular wintertime catch: perch, said Dale Allen, McCall’s regional fisheries manager for the Idaho Department of Fish and Game.

“That’s what people seem to catch,” Allen said. “Anglers have fun catching perch and they usually do really well.”

Some anglers have reported catching jumbo-sized perch, though that likely will decline as the season progresses, according to Fish and Game reports,

Those with the best luck will likely find it by fishing off the bottom, or near the bottom, usually with small jigs. Trout also often do well at the lake, but it often depends on the location of the frozen lake.

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The Columbia Basin Bulletin

Weekly Fish and Wildlife News
http://www.cbbulletin.com
January 18, 2019
Issue No. 895
Table of Contents

* NW Power/Conservation Council Recommends BPA Funding For Pacific Lamprey Projects
http://www.cbbulletin.com/442031.aspx

* Not Clear What Government Shutdown Might Mean For Council’s F&W Program Amendment Process Schedule
http://www.cbbulletin.com/442030.aspx

* Anticipating Lethal Removal Of Steller Sea Lions At Bonneville Dam, Funding Ok’d For Barge, Large Cages
http://www.cbbulletin.com/442029.aspx

* A Wallowa Lake Dam Replacement Could Open Possibility Of Sockeye Salmon Reintroduction
http://www.cbbulletin.com/442028.aspx

* John Day Partnership Receives Grant To Pursue Restoration Of Native Fish Habitat Ridge To Ridge
http://www.cbbulletin.com/442032.aspx

* Website Highlights Yakama Nation Salmon Recovery Efforts, Tracks Progress
http://www.cbbulletin.com/442027.aspx

* Latest Numbers Show Cuts To BPA Fish and Wildlife Spending At $6.3 Million
http://www.cbbulletin.com/442026.aspx

* Council Changes Leadership, Montana Member Jennifer Anders Named Chair
http://www.cbbulletin.com/442025.aspx

* WDFW Commission Supports Crafting Fishing Seasons That Consider Orcas’ Dietary Needs
http://www.cbbulletin.com/442024.aspx

* Study Says ‘Natural Variability’ Since 1980s Offset Most Global Warming Impacts On Western Mountain Snowpack
http://www.cbbulletin.com/442023.aspx

* Alaska Study Says Prioritizing Reducing Bear, Wolf Populations Not ‘Science-Based’ Management
http://www.cbbulletin.com/442022.aspx
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Fish & Game News:

Windows to Wildlife: Where are the Wolverines, Winter Birding in SE Idaho, and Pygmy Rabbits

In the winter edition of Windows to Wildlife:

* Where are the Wolverines?

* Winter Birding in Southeast Idaho

* Pygmy Rabbits

* and Winter Wildlife Events

Thank you for your continued support,
Deniz Aygen
Watchable Wildlife Biologist, Idaho Department of Fish and Game

link:
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Fish and Game wants to hear from hunters on big game seasons for 2019-20

By Mike Demick, Staff Biologist
Friday, January 11, 2019

Idaho Fish and Game wants to hear from hunters on proposed changes to deer, elk, pronghorn, black bear, mountain lion and wolf seasons for 2019-2020. Hunters are encouraged to attend open house meetings in Salmon and Challis to provide their comments.

Open houses will be held at the following:

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Controlled hunt application periods for spring black bear opens Jan. 15, spring turkey Feb. 1

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Supervisor
Thursday, January 10, 2019

Mail-in applications will no longer be accepted for controlled hunt drawings

Hunters who are looking to apply for controlled bear or turkey hunts during spring can apply in January and February. The application period for spring controlled black bear hunts kicks off on Jan. 15 and runs through Feb. 15. Applications for the spring turkey controlled hunts will be accepted from Feb. 1 through March 1.

Under new rules, Fish and Game will not be accepting mail-in applications for the controlled hunts. Hunters may apply at any hunting and fishing license vendor or Fish and Game office; with a credit card by calling (800) 554-8685; or online. A 2019 Idaho hunting license is required to apply. There is a nonrefundable application fee of $6.25 for residents and $14.75 for nonresidents.

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More F&G News Releases

https://idfg.idaho.gov/press
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Fun Critter Stuff:

Chaser the Dog Shows Off Her Smarts to Neil deGrasse Tyson

NOVA PBS Video

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Dog that is super excited to meet the vet is breaking down dog stereotypes

By Jade Odette O’Leary 12/19/2018

Fort Collins, Colo. (Circa via Storyful) — Most dogs dread visiting the veterinarian, but one patient at the Colorado State University Veterinary Teaching Hospital couldn’t contain his excitement about coming in for a checkup.

A video shared to the hospital’s Facebook page Friday shows excited pooch Endo literally bouncing up and down in anticipation of paying the vet a visit. According to the hospital, Endo was in for a follow-up visit, and he can be seen leaping beside his owner the entire time.

The video had more than 10,000 views at the time of publication.

source w/video:
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Seasonal Humor:


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Idaho History Jan 20, 2019

1907 Trip to Riordan Lake

Southwest Idaho in 1907

1907mapswidaho-a

(Emmett to Roosevelt Wagon Road highlighted)

(click for larger zoomable map)

This was cropped from a 1907 State of Idaho Map.
source: Mike Fritz collection

Link to full size whole map:
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To Riordan Lake by Horse and Wagon

walterlcole-aWalter L. Cole 1907

In 1907, my great grandfather – Walter L. Cole – kept a journal of a trip he took with a friend, Perry, to Central Idaho’s Riordan Lake just southeast of Yellow Pine, Idaho. …

This copy of his journal is as he wrote it. I haven’t taken any liberties other than to put in paragraphs at the end of each day. I hope you enjoy it. – Ken Cole

Saturday Sept. 14, 1907
On this day we left Meridian at 12:35 and drove to Box Springs on Willow creek where we camped for the night.

Sunday Sept. 15, 1907
On the A.M. of the 15 we left Box Springs at 7:35 and nooned 1 1/2 miles from Sweet. At 6:15 we camped for the night at about 1/2 mile from Reed’s old sawmill on Dry Buck.

Monday Sept. 16, 1907
Next day at 7:45 o’clock we left camp and nooned at High Valley. At about 6 o’clock we camped 1 mile north of Clear Creek.

Tuesday Sept. 17, 1907
On Tues 17 we started very early and drove to Thunder City and spent until 2 o’clock getting a wheel fixed up and tire set. Then we pulled into Scott’s Valley and camped in a light rain at 5:15. Rain soon stopped and I went out and tried to catch some fish but it was too cold for them to bite.

Wednesday Sept. 18, 1907
Early next morning 7:10 we pulled out of camp and started our journey. We nooned about 4 miles west of Knox. We pulled up some very steep grade for 6 miles and then came to Cabin Creek Summit. Over the summit we drove into Trout Creek and after driving down 2 1/2 miles of the roughest road on the trip we came to camp in a nice little flat which was filled with very nice feed.

Thursday Sept. 19, 1907
Next morning we started early after my taking a picture of Perry and the team. We nooned at the Johnson Creek Summit. That night we camped on Riordan Creek. Today’s trip was the roughest and steepest we have had. We tried to catch some fish in Johnson Creek but was too cold for them to bite. We drove down Riordan Creek about 3/4 mile and camped. It was too muddy to go any further down as we feared we could not get back at all. At least without making about 1/2 mile of road.

Friday Sept. 20, 1907
Next A.M. we did not get up very early so consequently did not catch but 6 lake trout. After fishing until 2 o’clock we went to camp and got some supper and went back to fish again. I caught one on a White Miller and Perry caught 8 on a grub worm that he got out of a log. Tired and wet we pulled up the lake and went to camp to bed.

Saturday Sept. 21, 1907
Next morning the 21 we got breakfast pretty early and started to look for deer. After climbing about 4 hrs we did not see any deer sign and went back to camp. I shot the heads off of 4 fool hens and killed 2 more with rocks. After resting in camp for awhile we got dinner fed the horses & watered them and then hunted grub worms. We had fine luck finding enough for bait for tomorrow. We are having one of the best suppers that ever was cooked- Baked Beans- Jiblet gravy – fried chicken, and coffee with dutch oven bread and butter. After supper we cleaned up the dishes and smoked our pipes a short time and then turned in. Shortly before going to bed Tip raised a bark and we saw what was either a bear or a timber wolf within 25 yd’s of the camp. We were not sure that it was not a large dog that belongs at the station until after he got out of shotgun range.

Sunday Sept. 22, 1907
Next morning being, Sunday the 22, we got up early and went fishing – we did not get there early enough however but after fishing from about 9 o’clock until 4 we caught sixty-four trout and killed 2 ducks. We are living in hopes of Roast duck with dressing and brown gravy for tomorrow. We are now getting supper which consists of Dutch oven bread – good coffee, Baked beans & Bacon, Foolhen stew and prospects of duck tomorrow. Tomorrow we expect to go out for deer again.

Monday Sept. 23, 1907
We got up at 6 o’clock and after breakfast went to look for deer. After prowling around some of the worst country that ever was, until about 2 o”clock I went to camp. On the way I killed 2 chickens. About 4:15 Perry came plodding along , tired and hungry and no deer. Tomorrow we will fish again and hope for better luck. We had Bread & Butter- Tomatoes – Beans Coffee and Prunes. Pretty good for campers. And fish, I forgot that.

Tuesday Sept. 24, 1907
Next day we went fishing early. Got up at 4:20 and at 7:10 we were at the Lake. After fishing until about 4 o’clock we went home to camp and counted up. Perry had 110 and I had 75. We threw away about 50 as they were under 6 or 7 in. in length and we did not want to salt any thing so small. After supper we went to bed tired out nearly.

Wednesday Sept. 25, 1907
Next morning we did not get up until 6:30 and in the a.m. we cleaned & slimed fish and washed two towels. This after noon we corduroyed about 100 yd’s of road and had a terrible job of it. It was so bad that we were afraid that we could not get out unless we fixed it. Tonight we were expecting to pull towards home tomorrow but after having a talk with Peterson the stage man we have decided to stay and hunt some different country. He said that he was certain that we could get deer on Meadow Creek so we will try. We put the canvas on the wagon and put our tent up as it looks very much like snow or rain today.

Thursday Sept. 26, 1907
This morning we got up expecting to see a couple of inches of snow but instead the moon was shining. At about 7 o’clock the weather grew very cold and the fish did not bite at all well. We fished until 11:00 and only caught 12. This afternoon we got fish bait for tomorrow and salted down our fish. We think we have nearly 50 lbs. of trout salted and expect to get more. I tried to take a photo of the lake but was too cloudy. Will get one before we leave.

Friday Sept. 27, 1907
Today we went fishing but it was rather too cloudy & windy. We had no luck to speak of until about eleven o’clock when they started to bite pretty fair. We caught 85 good trout and about 25 that we threw back to grow bigger. We caught more big fish today than any other time. I took two photos of the lake and hope to get some more of the country around here before we leave. If we had not run out of bait we would have caught a number more fish. Perry & I shot 5 helldivers today but did not eat them. I suppose the lynx or whatever it is that prowls around our camp at night will get them before morning. Tomorrow we go for deer again.

Saturday Sept. 28, 1907
At last we are in bed again after the hardest day yet. This morning we left camp at 7:25 and went over to Meadow Creek for deer. We went down the ridge north about one half mile from the road when Perry said “Let’s look around”, then we walked out on a rocky little point and he gazed across the valley of Meadow Creek. While he was engaged in this I cast my eye on the bottom near the hill when what do I see but two deer feeding. Hastily whispering to Perry “There is two” he turned around and said “two what”, I replied, “two deer”, and then I pointed them out to him. Then we commenced shooting at them. It was all of 150 yd’s and straight downhill. We over shot them but Perry got the range well enough to get one and wound another. I fired 4 shots and crippled one but was unable to get him. He bled like a stuck hog for a half of a mile or more but could not find him. Perry wounded one too but after trailing it for nearly a mile he too lost the track and did not get him. He and I tracked his quite a way and were standing talking when here came one deer loping along in plain sight of me about 3 jumps and I, like a damn fool, stood there and let him pass. Not that I could not have hit him but I did not know enough to shoot. Then Perry went back to dress his and I took a circle around the flat. I saw nothing however and we met on the East side of the valley. After eating a small lunch that we had we went back to where his deer lay. On the way we separated and I struck the trail of blood from my shot deer. I went up and then we came back and followed it but lost it. I went a way down in the bottom and jumped one but could not get a shot at it. On the way back I heard another deer jumping off at quite a distance. At first I thought that he was coming to me but he went off to one side. Perry was hunting bear at this time but Mr. Bear is still awenting. We dressed the deer skinned her half out and put the front parts up in a tree so the coyotes & cougar would not touch it. Perry hung his handkerchief up to scare them away. If that won’t nothing will. Then we got a pole and run it through the deer’s gumbles and carried her up the hill. It was a very hard climb but at last we reached the top after a hard struggle. Then we rested a short time and struck out for home. It got awfully heavy before we got there. We stopped and gave Mr. Peterson , the stage man a piece and got a bag of white bread for dressing. Then we went to camp and ate all we could hold of venison – deer gravy- fried spuds & onions – black coffee and bread. Perry ate so much that he had to let out his belt. Then we hung up the deer and rolled into bed. Tomorrow we will go back and try to get more. It rained here since 5:45 which we hope is snow up there. If so we are sure of 1 or 2 tomorrow.

Sunday Sept. 29, 1907
We went back this morning and hunted all day and could not even find a track of one in the Meadow creek vicinity. At 4:15 we carried the other half of Perry’s deer up to the horses and came home. Feet wet and hungry too. We got to camp at 6:10. Tomorrow we will try again.

Monday Sept. 30, 1907
Today was but another day of disappointments. We started at 8 o’clock and got back to camp 6:30 and did not see a deer. We both jumped one but did not get to see it. We found no fresh deer signs in all of today’s travel. Today’s trip was the hardest on the trip thus far. It was the steepest and brushiest & rockiest country that I ever saw, on the head of Meadow Creek. Well tomorrow we will try to catch some fish and rest up a little as we are nearly tired out. We have hunted for three days straight now.

Tuesday Oct. 1, 1907
This morning we got up at about 7 o’clock and saw the ground was white with snow. After getting breakfast we fixed up the tent with a pole and also fixed the wagon cover so that it would not leak. Then I slimed the fish and put soup and beans on to boil. Then we salted down the rest of the fish. After dinner of venison soup, beans and bread & coffee. I wrote a letter to Blanche and took it up to the station. While there I met Doc Allen and his party. They had been in to Chamberlain Basin and had 1 elk 1 black bear and several deer. They told me of a big buck track that crossed the road up the gulch a ways so I hurried to camp and got the two rifles and hunted Perry up (he was to the lake after his rope) and we went after him. Perry found a lynx track quite fresh and I found the buck track and followed him quite a ways but gave him up as his track was too old. After coming down the hill for about 100 yd’s I stumbled onto tracks of four deer and followed them nearly to the lake. As it was getting near dark I left them and went to camp. We set my two traps at the skin and meat of the deer Perry got in hopes that Mr. Lynx would get in one of them before morning. Tomorrow we will try for deer again. As it has snowed all day we feel quite confident of getting one or two in the next few days.

Wednesday Oct. 2, 1907
Well to bed again, at 7:45. Rather early but tomorrow we must get up and go for deer again. We started for Meadow Creek this morning and got about half way to the summit when we came across a right fresh bear track. We debated a while whether or no we should chase him and at last as Perry wanted to we went after him. We followed him about 4 miles and got so close to him that he lit out right smart. After following him until we were sure we could not catch him we hunted a while on Riordan Creek and then as I was not feeling very skookum I went to camp. Perry came along about 1 1/2 hours later. We cooked some ribs and heart and made dressing. I made a batch of corn bread and we had a swell supper. We will try over on the East of the summit between Riordan & Indian creeks tomorrow for deer.

Thursday Oct. 3, 1907
Today I got up at 4:30 and we started up the creek at about 7:15. We went up the road quite a ways and then swung into the timber and crossed the divide into some creek or other and then kept along the ridge until quite a ways beyond Black Lake. After going on around the ridge we came back through the Chilcoot Pass and past Black Lake & Poker Jacks cabin and then down Riordan Creek home. We did not see a track or sign of any deer but saw 4 blue grouse. We tried to get some of them but they were too wild to shoot with a rifle. We have found two new places for deer where Peterson says that they are sure to be. Tomorrow we will try over on Indian Creek. We went fishing this afternoon and caught 19. Perry took my picture this afternoon and I took a picture of Peterson’s stage station. We hope to get a deer tomorrow and then we will pull over to Trapper Flat and hunt there a day or two.

Friday Oct. 4, 1907
This morning at about half past six we started for Indian Creek to try and get some deer. We went over in Meadow Creek and hunted a while there and then went on over to Indian Creek. While in Meadow creek flat we found the fresh track of a good big bear and quite fresh. We swung way down Indian Creek and started down into the bottom. While on our way down we saw the tracks of three old bucks but they were quite old. We ate our lunch and I took a photo of the valley facing west (No. 20). After climbing like cats until about five o’clock we at last reached the summit and after I took a photo of the valley facing East (No. 21) we went on our road home. Today’s climb was the hardest of any day yet. I don’t think I will ever care to come in this country to hunt again. It is the worst & roughest & steepest country that I ever saw or want to see.

Saturday Oct. 5, 1907
Today we got up at 7:10 and after a good hot breakfast we went to work on our wagon. While Perry was busy on the wagon I cleaned up the breakfast dishes and started some beans to cook. At 11 o’clock I started dinner which consisted of fried venison – fried spuds & onions boiled rice with cinnamon and raisins in it – coffee and hot flapjacks, and tomatoes. After dinner we went up to Peterson and ground our axes and fixed [any?] iron for the wagon. Then we came back and worked on the road until 5:30. After supper we put the beans in the Dutch oven to bake and went to bed. Tomorrow we will finish the road and pull to Trapper Flat and hunt there for a day or two. The we will pull straight for home. Perry found his pipe which he lost day before yesterday also a can of Eagle milk which comes in very handy as we are nearly out of milk.

Sunday Oct. 6, 1907
Well here we are at Snow’s cabin in Trapper Flat. After working on the wagon and road until about 12 o’clock we loaded up and started at 2:20 at 5:10 we were at the summit. Birch balked 3 different times but by different means we got him to go on again. We got at the cabin at 5:45 and after looking around for horse feed have come to the conclusion that we will have to pull for home in the morning. The sheep have skinned every bit of feed out of here so we wont be able to hunt here as we expected to. It was very disappointing to spend a month and the sum of money we have and then have to go home with only one deer. Next year if I go hunting I am going into the South Fork of Salmon River Country, and go by pack train. If we could wait for 2 or 3 weeks more we could get plenty of deer but cannot do it.

Monday Oct. 7, 1907
This afternoon we pulled into Knox at about 5:30 and after mailing a postal to Art Ballard & buying some hay at $30 per ton and some oats a $2.25 per cwt & a can of fine ? cherries at 30¢ we went into camp at about a quarter of a mile west. This morning we started at 8:30 from Snow’s Cabin in Trapper Flat and made 25 miles today over some very rough roads. At half past two this morning Buck came up to get something to eat and we got up and dressed and went down to the creek and got Birch and brought him up and put in the barn & gave them some more oats. If nothing goes wrong we will be home by Friday noon. That is in Meridian. Oh won’t I be glad to get back to Blanche. Well, I just guess yes. I have had a good hard time. We have hunted and tramped very hard since we got to Riordan Creek and all for nothing. Still I don’t begrudge the time and money. Next year maybe I will get to go on a good hunt.

Tuesday Oct. 8, 1907
At 8:15 this morning we started and at about 6 o’clock we made camp at Charley Cantwell’s 4 1/2 miles from Thunder City. We made 30 miles today. We nooned about half way down the summit in a very nice little flat. Did not see any birds or anything else today. Am getting anxious to get home now. The nearer I get towards home the more anxious I am to get there. Well tomorrow night will see us to Box springs. I hope and then Friday noon we will be in Meridian. Well we can’t get there too quick to suit me. My time is very valuable from now on it seems, so that I must get home quickly. I hope to go on another hunt in the near future but may have to put it off for a year or two. Anyway I mean to go into the South Fork of Salmon River country and then I sure will get game.

Wednesday Oct. 9, 1907
This morning at 4:45 I woke up and got up at 5 o’clock. There was a very heavy frost and everything was very cold and wet to handle. We got started at 8:10 and after driving quite some we nooned at Smith’s Ferry. After dinner we moved on to Dry Buck. We made camp at about 6:45 the very latest yet. Just before coming into camp I shot a pheasant and treed another one but could not find him afterwards. It certainly tasted good for supper. Perry has just put the neck of the deer to boil and we will have some stew tomorrow morning for breakfast. Tomorrow will nearly finish our trip home. We camped in the same little flat which Pop and I camped in two nights when we were up to the Lakes two years ago.

Thursday Oct. 10, 1907
This morning we got up at about 5 o’clock and drove out of camp at 8 o’clock. We got to the summit and helped two men load a couple logs on their wagon. Then we drove down Dry Buck and as we went out we cut some pitch from an old log to make fire with at Box Springs. We stopped at Sweet and got some lard, butter, sugar, and cheese and two bottles of Beer and then drove over to the Payette river and nooned. We drove from there to Box Springs and gathered up a couple of posts on the way to make fire with. We got in at Box Springs at half past four o’clock and made camp. Perry made a couple of corn dodgers and we had “taters” and onions & corn & coffee – also honey. I got a half gallon of milk and 1/2 dozen eggs.

Friday Oct. 11, 1907
I got up at 10 to 6 and got fire started and breakfast going. After breakfast of taters & onions, coffee and corn cake & honey we pulled for home arriving in Meridian at 12:15. After dinner we got shaved and hair trimmed and unloaded and divided up. I started home at 4 o’clock and just got home in time to hear great news. About 8 or half past there came a visitor in the shape of a 6 1/2# boy.

source: Ken Cole Feb 2012
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Places mentioned in the diary

Early Meridian, Idaho

earlymeridian-a

source: Bob Hartman Idaho History 1800 to 1950
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Meridian (Willow Creek) Box Springs Sweet

1890meridiancrop

1890boxspringscrop

1890sweetcrop

source for above maps Boise Quad 1890 (very large)
Perry-Castañeda Library Map Collection Idaho Historical Topographic Maps
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Sweet Idaho ca. 1908

1908sweetidahomfritz-a

link to more old photos of Sweet from the Mike Fritz collection
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Dry Buck High Valley Smiths Ferry Round Valley

1891drybuckcrop

1891highvalleycrop

1891smithsferrycrop

source for map crops Squaw Creek Quad 1891 (very large)
Perry-Castañeda Library Map Collection Idaho Historical Topographic Maps
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High Valley post office 1914

1917highvalleypobeal-a

High Valley post office 1914, with Homer, Emily and Lydia Beal, courtesy of Art Beal, thanks for sharing!

(click for source size)
source: AHGP

Team and Wagon in High Valley – Valley County, Idaho

highvalleyteamwagonhhartman-a

source: Hugh Hartman (Idaho History 1800 to 1950)
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Clear Creek Thunder City

1893thundercitycrop

(cropped and stitched from two maps, Squaw Creek 1891 and Garden Valley 1893 Quads)
and
source: Perry-Castañeda Library Map Collection Idaho Historical Topographic Maps
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1895 Thunder City

Link: Hoff Phenomenology Research – ED 574 – Pioneer Life Photo Essay
[hat tip to SMc]

Note: Even though there is nothing left of Thunder City, a road by that name exists today.

thundercityroad-a

Thunder City Road (starts at Hwy 55 south of airport, bypasses Cascade and connects to the Warm Lake Road)

source: Map Quest
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Scott’s Valley to Trail Creek

1954scottvalleycrop

1954bigcreeksummitcrop

map source for crops Gold Fork Quad 1954
source: USGS Topo View (large file)
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Trail Creek to Knox

knoxmap-a

(click for larger zoomable map)

source: USGS Topo View Warm Lake Quad
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Knox 1905

1905 photo, Univ. of Idaho Library digital collection, Idaho Cities and Towns.

(click for source size)
source: AHGP
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Cabin Creek Summit Trout Creek

cabincreeksummit-a

(click for larger zoomable map)

source: USGS Topo View Warm Lake Quad
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Johnson Creek Twin Bridges

twinbridgesmap-a

(click for larger zoomable map)

source: USGS Topo View Log Mountain Quad 1973
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Riordan Lake

1937riordancreekmap-a

(click for larger zoomable map)

source: 1937 Yellow Pine Topo Perry-Castañeda Library Map Collection Idaho Historical Topographic Maps (very large)
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Riordan Lake 2007

riordanlake2007huston-a

source: Mike Huston Photo Collection
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Map sources

Perry-Castañeda Library Map Collection Idaho Historical Topographic Maps

and

USGS Topo View
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Road Reports Jan 20, 2019

The only way to get to Yellow Pine is via the South Fork route. Be aware of winter conditions, roads are likely ice and snow covered, trees and/or rocks may be down in the road. Higher elevation roads are closed. Please share road reports. Conditions change quickly this time of year.

Report Jan 17 Cascade to Yellow Pine: “Tense storm at Big Crk summit but County plow was out early & on his way to Cascade by 11:00. SF is much like EF with ice floor covered with water.” – LI

Report Jan 18 from Yellow Pine: “Thursday night’s 5 – 7”snow in Yellow Pine extended down the East Fork Road to about two miles past the Eiguren Ranch, gradually changing to a snow floor then no snow, ice floor, for the last mile by the South Fork. The snow over the ice is still very slick for stopping and starting. No new snow on the South Fork Road and the ice floor was beginning to break up into mush with ruts starting to develop. The miles near Poverty Flat are still ice.” – LI

Conditions have changed. It has been raining and snowing and raining in Yellow Pine the last 4 days, we currently have 16″ of snow on the ground.

Yellow Pine: Local streets last plowed Saturday (Jan 19). Streets are snow packed and getting slushy. Click for Local Forecast.
Yellow Pine Webcam: (check date on image)

Warm Lake Highway: Report Wednesday (Jan 16) road is snow covered and in good shape, a few icy spots in the shaded corners.
SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

Highway 55 Webcams Link:

South Fork Road: Report Wednesday (Jan 15) mail truck driver reports the road is icy and very slick. Report last Monday (Jan 14) the county road grader scraped the ruts off the upper South Fork road, good drive out. “Williams peak trailhead is glazed ice, shiny. A few corners also until Reed Ranch were polished ice. For this time of year it was nice overall.” – MA
Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′

EFSF Road: Wednesday (Jan 16) Mail truck driver says the road is pretty good. Last plowed (including out to Zena Creek) on Monday (Jan 7.) More recent reports to watch for ice on the lower end.

Lower Johnson Creek Road: Note to drivers – when traveling to the dump, please use the river side of the road for wheeled vehicles so the hill side can be for snowmobilers. Turnouts will be plowed. Plowed Monday (Jan 7).
Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam:

Upper Johnson Creek Road: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.
Big Creek Webcam: (check date on image)

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Midas Gold is keeping the road open.
Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The approx elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′

Payette Avalanche Advisory
link:
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