Monthly Archives: March 2019

Mar 31, 2019 The Yellow Pine Times

Mar 31, 2019 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Community Calendar:

April 21 – 2pm Easter pot luck at the YP Tavern
May 5 – 3pm Taco Feed at the Community Hall
May 20 – Deadline 2019 Festival T-Shirt Contest
May 25 – ATV-UTV Scavenger Hunt Memorial Day Weekend
June 11 – Vet Day Yellow Pine
July 6 – Golf Tournament & Breakfast
July 13 – Ride to Big Creek
July 18 – (tentative) Noxious Weed Spray day
Sep 14 – Ride to Cinnabar

(details below)
———-

Local Events:

April 21 2pm Easter pot luck at the YP Tavern

Fried Chicken and Potato Salad provided by the Tavern
— — — —

May 5, 2019, 3pm, Taco Feed at the Community Hall

In thanks for the great support of the community, the Community Hall Committee is giving back.

A Taco Feed will be held at the Community Hall on May 5th at 3pm. The Community Hall is providing the fixin’s.

Please join us for good food and to check out the progress that has been made in the Community Hall.

Thanks again for all your support.
Kathy Hall
Community Hall Chairman
— — — —

2019 Festival T-Shirt Contest – Deadline May 20

The contest for the 30th Annual Yellow Pine Music Festival T-shirt logo is open!
This year’s theme is “Then and Now”.
The winner receives $100!
Your one-color design* must include the following:

* 30th Annual
* 2019
* Yellow Pine Music Festival
* musical instruments incorporated into the design

Designs must be submitted electronically to yellowpinefestival@gmail.com or by snail-mail to Yellow Pine Festival, PO Box 10, Yellow Pine, ID 83677
All submissions must be received by 5:00 p.m., Monday, May 20, 2019.
Submissions become the property of the Village of Yellow Pine Association.

*Note: We have learned that simple designs show and sell better.
— — — —

June 11 – Vet Day

On Tuesday June 11th the Cascade Vet clinic will be coming to Yellow Pine. Please call (208) 382-4590 to get on the list.
— — — —

Golf Tournament

It’s time to plan for the annual 4th of July Yellow Pine Golf Tournament. This year the proceeds will support the Community Hall and road repair.

The event will begin July 6th at 11am at the golf course, where the fairways aren’t fair and the greens aren’t green. The cost will remain the same at $50 per couple for sponsoring a hole with a sign displayed. $20 for individuals, each person playing will get a ticket for beer, additional tickets can be purchased for $3. Soda and water are free. Checks can be written to VYPA (Village of Yellow Pine Association)

There will be prizes for first, second and third places for men’s women’s and mixed. Also, there will be a prizes for closest to the pin. Spots go quickly, so be one of the first!

There will be a hearty breakfast at the museum from 8-10. The cost is $6 and all proceeds benefit the upkeep of the museum.
— — — —

Noxious Weed Spray day July 18

Hello Yellow Pine,

I’m beginning my transition from snow plowing to noxious weed control. Yellow Pine is 1st on my list to start talking about dates to schedule our 2nd annual noxious weed Homeowners assistance spray day. Last year we got together on Thursday, July 19, 2018. I tentatively have Thursday, July 18, 2019 marked on my calendar.

We had really good participation last year but we can do better, lets start talking now and get more people involved as it is “Everyone’s responsibility to control Noxious and Invasive plants”. I think last years event went very well, we will try and be a little more organized this year, if we missed someone put them on top of the priority list. I will bring my entire crew, all of our equipment, PPE, and mixed herbicide, you provide the volunteers, we’re here to help you not do it for you.

I misplaced 1-backpack sprayer last year, please keep your eyes peeled in case we laid it down someplace or forgot to pick it up.

Spread the word, save the date. I look forward to hearing from you. The best way to contact me this time of year is through e-mail, I will be in and out of the office until May, I check my e-mails daily but I can’t always respond until I get back into the office.

Thank you,
Steve Anderson
Valley County Weed and Pest Control
SAnderson@co.valley.id.us
— — — —

2019 Yellow Pine Escapades

The 2019 schedule for the Yellow Pine Escapades has been updated on the website!

Expect new escapades this coming year, including an ATV-UTV Photo Scavenger Hunt; two (yes, two) ATV-UTV rides, a golf tournament, and even a community yard sale. Other events will be added to the calendar as plans are finalized.

Join us for a great season of fun! The starting point for fun in Yellow Pine! The website includes information on the events hosted by the Yellow Pine Community Hall as well as the other “goings-on” in the village. Food, lodging and fuel are available in Yellow Pine.

link:
———-

Village News:

Missing US Flag

A report that the US Flag at the Kiosk on main street went missing. If you have any info, please contact the YP Tavern. A temporary flag will be hoisted until a replacement flag arrives.
— — — —

History of the log cabin at the Cemetery

The Cemetery Committee is interested in any information on the cabin that is located by the cemetery. We know that it had been on the property that was known as “Mary’s Cabins”. It was moved by Tom Richter while the Filler’s were building their house. Donna Valdez said that the people who ran the cafe and bar slept there, before the Tavern was built.

Do people have pictures or any information they can share? We’d love to put a plaque up on the cabin while we repair it.

– Marj Fields
— — — —

Roads

It is Spring Rock Migration Season

A report of a rather large slide on the South Fork road late this week, south of Krassel around MM26. The local plow went out and cleared the slide before the weekend. The local plow also went out and kicked rocks off the EFSF before this weekend, watch for fresh rock fall.

Lower Johnson Creek Plowing

Note: when traveling to the dump, please use the river side of the road for wheeled vehicles so the hill side can be for snowmobilers. Turnouts will be plowed. – CD
— — — —

Yellow Pine Transfer Station

A report March 14 that the transfer station was emptied. A report March 15 that the dumpsters are empty, but there is trash strewn between and behind the bins. Road report March 17 that the ice floor is starting to break up, slushy during warm afternoons.

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.


— — — —

Come Spring…

“To Yellow Pine residents. I will be making several trips next spring and summer hauling out metal, appliances, etc. . If you need anything hauled away please get on the list. Vehicles require a title. I will be hauling gravel back if anyone is interested.”

Contact Mike Amos
— — — —

Yellow Pine US Mail

We are on 3-day a week mail delivery from Cascade. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 55 cents
— — — —

Predators

Bears are due to come out of hibernation soon. Please do not leave pet food outdoors and remember to keep trash secured, it will draw bears, foxes, coyotes and loose dogs.
— — — —

Ice Hole Campground Closed

The Campground has been temporarily closed to provide for public safety during reconstruction. This order will be in effect from September 27, 2018 through July 2, 2019, unless rescinded earlier by the Forest Supervisor. (0402-04-80)
———-

Local Groups:

YPWUA News:

Please conserve water, a report that the village is using over 50,000 gallons per day!

Winter Water Advice

To help prevent frozen water, avoid parking over buried water lines, allow the natural snow cover to insulate the ground. Driving over the lines will also push the frost deeper and can result in frozen pipes. Also, don’t plow the snow over where water lines are buried, and avoid covering up water shut off valves.

link to: 2018 September Water Department Update.docx
— — — —

VYPA News:

VYPA Meeting Dates 2019

June 8th; July 20th; August 10th; September 14th.

Note that the July 20th meeting is not on the second Saturday due to a conflict with a planned ATV rally involving many residents and visitors.

Yellow Pine Harmonica Meetings 2019:

March 30, 2019 Saturday 2pm at the Tavern
April 23, 2019 Tuesday 2pm at the Tavern
May 23, 2019 Thursday 2pm at the Community Hall
June 20, 2019 Thursday 2pm at the Community Hall
July 27, 2019 Saturday 2pm at the Community Hall
— — — —

YPFD News:

The next meeting to be May 18th, 2019 at the Community Hall

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Updates:

Fire Department Training on Sundays at 11am will resume in the Spring.

The YPFD has 2 Size Chimney Brushes with extension rods that were donated for use around YP. If you would like to borrow one, please contact Cecil or Jeff and we’ll get them for you. The YPFD also has loanable mitigation tools, (Weed-Whacker, Hedge Trimmer, backpack blower and 16’ pole saw). If you would like to borrow one or all, please contact Cecil or Jeff and we’ll get them for you.

It’s also time to check the Smoke Alarm batteries and Fire Extinguishers. Please test the alarm and replace Smoke Alarm Batteries every year, if you have the replaceable battery type. Fire Extinguishers should be checked as well and should be easily seen and reachable. A good location for the Fire Extinguishers would be the kitchen and near the wood stove and/or fireplace. The needle should be in the green.

If you need a Smoke Detector or Fire Extinguisher for your YP residence please contact Jeff F.

Smoke Alarm Info:
——–

Biz Listings:

Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377

Closed for winter
— — — —

The Corner (208) 633-3325

Closed for winter
— — — —

Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233

Winter Hours at the Tavern: 9am-2pm and 4-8pm Mon, Wed, Fri, Sat and 9am-2pm Sun. Or call 208 633-2233 the phone rings into the house.
— — — —

Buck Horn Outfitters LLC
Link to FB page:

Deadwood Outfitters
Link to website:
— — — —

Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed (208) 382-4430, Suet blocks. 50# bag of Polar Ice Melt available for $7.99.
— — — —

Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, Will service Yellow Pine

B&T Safety Solutions LLC
208-271-1600 Based out of Donnelly
Snow removal, cleaning chimneys and stoves, we do cabin staining/chinking as well
— — — —

Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
———————–

Local Observations:

Monday (March 25) overnight low of 25 degrees, thinning overcast and breezy this morning, average of 16″ old snow on the ground. Northern flicker, cassins finches and jays visiting. Thicker clouds mid-day and breezy. Quiet day, hardly any traffic. Mid-afternoon overcast and lighter breezes, snow melting and soaking in, high of 56 degrees. At dusk it was cloudy and light breezes, a robin chirping.

Tuesday (March 26) overnight low of 31 degrees, solid dark overcast and sprinkled from 1030am to 11am, measured an average of 15″ old snow. Northern flicker calling to the north east, cassins finches at the feeders. Sprinkles on and off mid-day. Northern flicker and red-breasted nuthatches joined the cassins finches at the feeders. Steady rain mid-afternoon, dark overcast and rather breezy, high of 45 degrees. Break in the showers early evening, but sprinkling again at dusk and mountain peaks and ridges fogged in.

Wednesday (March 27) overnight low of 32 degrees, overcast and sprinkling, estimate 15″ old snow, it is getting softer. Robin calling in the neighborhood. Still sprinkling mid-day, low dark clouds. Finches visiting after lunch and not raining. Mid-afternoon dark and cloudy, slight breeze and not raining, high of 47 degrees. Hard shower late afternoon, then drizzles and drips. Another blast of rain late evening, moderate rain at dusk. Trace of snow fell sometime during the night/early morning.

Thursday (March 28) overnight low of 30 degrees, overcast this morning, measured an average of 14″ old snow on the ground. Raven and robin calling, jays, finches and pine squirrel visiting. Breaks in the clouds mid-day, a little bit of sun early afternoon. Red-breasted nuthatches, flickers and hairy woodpecker visited. Mid-afternoon sleet storm, little snowballs mixed with rain, then huge flakes of snow for about 10-15 minutes, tapering off to rain/snow mix then broken clouds, high of 46 degrees. It was mostly clear at dusk, getting foggy up Johnson Creek. Overcast before midnight.

Friday (March 29) trace of snow fell before 730am, overnight low of 28 degrees, overcast and occasional flakes of snow this morning, measured 13″ old snow. Raven and robin calling, finches, red-breasted nuthatch and jays visiting. Breaks in the clouds mid-day. Finches and a jay visited. Cloudy mid-afternoon and a little breezy, high of 46 degrees. Broken cloud cover at dusk and light breezes. Cloudy at midnight.

Saturday (March 30) overnight low of 25 degrees, clear sky and light breeze, average of 12″ old snow on the flat (bare ground under trees growing, south facing hills getting bare spots.) Robin, flicker and finches calling this morning, finches at the feeders. Mostly cloudy by mid-day. Jays joined the finches at the feeders. Mid-afternoon had mostly cloudy skies and variable breezes, high of 49 degrees. Quiet afternoon, very little traffic. Broken cloud cover at dusk. Looked cloudy at midnight.

Sunday (March 31) overnight low of 21 degrees, mostly clear sky, average of 12″ old snow on the flat in the open (bare ground on the south side of buildings.) Lots of finches calling this morning, 3 ravens calling and flying over the forest, pine squirrel scolding from the fence, and 2 tree swallows on the power line. Clouds building up mid-day and breezy. Hairy woodpecker, white-breasted nuthatch, finches and jays visiting. Partly clear and warm by mid-afternoon, light breezes, high of 53 degrees. Elk spotted out on the golf course. Partly cloudy at dusk and almost calm, a couple of robins calling.
———————–

RIP:

Linda Elaine (Murphy) Kildow

November 10, 1952 ~ March 16, 2019 (Age 66)

RIPLindaElaine(Murphy)Kildow-a

Linda Elaine Vipperman-Kildow age 66 of Nampa, Idaho, passed away on Saturday, March 16, 2019 at home with her loving husband Teddy by her side. She was born November 10, 1952 in Gooding, Idaho to her parents Charles and Lillie Vipperman.

Linda attended elementary school in Gooding, Idaho. Graduating from Mountain Home High School. Her love for learning continued as she attended the University of Idaho and Boise State University earning a Bachelor’s degree in English and several endorsements which allowed her to teach all subjects K-12. Her teaching career lasted for 29 years.

While learning and teaching was her passion, the real love of her life was family and friends. She was blessed with two sons, two daughters and four grandchildren. She married the love of her life Teddy on March 21, 2005. Together they enjoyed traveling, camping, fishing and just doing things together. She especially enjoyed their trips to Yuma, Arizona with flea markets as her main attraction.

Linda loved to read. When she wasn’t taking care of her family, it was not unusual to see her with a book in her hand. Being well informed and educated about many things was important in her life.

Linda is survived by her husband Teddy, her mother Lillie, two sons, Aaron and Dillon, two daughters Sasha and Sheena and four grandchildren, Cameron, Savaya, Shaela and Sloane. One brother Charlie two sisters Jeanne and Marilyn and a number of other loving relatives and close friends. She is preceded in death by her father Charles.

A celebration of life will be held at Dakan Funeral Chapel in Caldwell, Idaho on Saturday, April 6, 2019 at 10:30 a.m.

source:
[h/t IW & SMc]

[Note: Linda was the last teacher at the Yellow Pine School.]
——————-

Idaho News:

Snow-caused propane leaks disaster waiting to happen

McCall Fire responds to seven gas leaks in two weeks

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News March 28, 2019

Garrett de Jong’s gas detector screamed as he swept it back and forth on Thursday night at a home on Majestic View Drive in McCall.

“We had an explosive level of gas in the whole home,” said de Jong, acting fire chief for McCall Fire & EMS.

Had the gas ignited, the home could have been destroyed in the same way as a house on Fairway Drive in was obliterated in an explosion on March 17.

The fire department has responded to seven propane leak calls in the last two weeks, most recently a report of a propane gas smell at a vacant commercial building at 319 N. Third St. about 8:37 a.m. Tuesday.

This year’s heavy snowfall has de Jong worried about snow and ice falling from roofs and damaging pipes and regulators on propane tanks located near buildings.

A gas leak from similar damage is being investigated as the cause of the Fairway Drive blast that killed Johnathan “Rob” Field, 69, and critically injured his granddaughter, Bella Field, 15.

De Jong wants McCall area residents to call McCall Fire to help them prevent a similar tragedy at their home or business.

continued:
— — —

Propane regulators should be cleared of snow

Mar 29, 2019 Local News 8

Ashton, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – Fall River Propane is advising property owners who use propane fuel to clear snow away from regulators.

The company says the large amount of high-country snow this year has created a significant number of damaged propane regulators. That damage can cause a propane leak that could result in an explosion.

Fall River’s photo (above) shows a green-colored regulator. It had so much snow on it that the weight ripped the regulator off the foundation of the home at the brass connection. The company said that damage could have easily resulted in a gas leak.

source:
— — — — — — — — — —

Nez Perce Tribe buys Zims Hot Springs near New Meadows

Area was used for ceremonial, spiritual purposes

By Tom Grote for The Star-News March 28, 2019

Zims Hot Springs north of New Meadows has been purchased by the Nez Perce Tribe.

The tribe purchased the property from long-time owners Al and Linda Dixon last Friday, a news release from the tribe said. The purchase price was not disclosed.

The property includes two pools fed by natural mineral water from an artesian well and cooled by the waters of the Little Salmon River.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Snow will start melting at higher elevations after warmer than average March

Water managers anticipate spring runoff

Mar 29, 2019 By Steve Dent KIVI TV

Idaho City — Mores Creek Summit north of Idaho City lost 30 inches of snow during the March, however, there is still 92 inches in the snow pack at the summit which is 16 more inches than average.

We went up for the NRCS snow survey with Ron Abramovich and it did look a lot different than it did a month ago following a historic snowfall that put several basins over the 100 percent clip for the entire season.

“The highest is Weiser at 148 percent, the Owyhee Basin is at about 130 and the Boise Basin is at 122 percent for the season,” said Abramovich.

… “The rivers are going to get really interesting in the next few weeks,” said Abramovich. “If it is melting an inch a day our rivers can absorb most of that and let it run off, but if you start pushing an inch and a half or two inches that’s when we know the streams will be rocking and rolling.”

full story:
— — — — — — — — — —

Be aware of noxious weeds as warmer weather approaches

Mar 29, 2019 By Katie Kloppenburg KIVI TV

With the warmer and wet weather over the week, seeds are sprouting and the plants are growing. But we do not want all plants to grow and thrive here in the Gem State.

Noxious weeds are not native to the state and are invasive. Ada County Weed Control says a mild winter means an early start for weeds this year.

If you want to learn more about how to deal with the weeds, you can get a free, detail-packed booklet here.

source:
— — — — — — — — — —

Landowner liability bill signed into law by Idaho governor

by Associated Press Wednesday, March 27th 2019

Boise, Idaho (AP) – Legislation to protect private landowners who allow the public on their land from liability under Idaho’s recreational immunity statute has been signed into law.

Idaho Gov. Brad Little late last week signed the legislation that clarifies that the state’s recreational immunity statute applies to private landowners.

Some state programs allow landowners to receive money to offset costs associated with opening their private property to the public.

State officials say that an Idaho Supreme Court ruling and a 2018 law mean government entities entering into agreements with nominal fees to the public are protected from liability under the recreational immunity statute.

source:
— — — — — — — — — —

ITD crews working to clear Highway 95 mudslide

Mar 27, 2019 By Steve Bertel KIVI TV

Weiser — Idaho Transportation Department crews are working to clean up a mudslide along U.S. Highway 95, north of Weiser.

The slide happened late Monday afternoon, according to ITD spokesman Jake Melder.

“This is a natural occurrence. Water from melting snow seeps into cracks along the hillside. With low temperatures, the water freezes and expands, widening the cracks, causing the landslide. It’s very common,” he explained.

The mud and boulders have not blocked the highway and have remained on the shoulder. North-south traffic on Highway 95 has not been impacted.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Avalanche closes section of Highway 21

by CBS 2 News Staff Thursday, March 28th 2019

Grandjean, Idaho (CBS 2) — An avalanche has closed a 12-mile stretch of Highway 21.

Idaho Transportation officials say the closure is between Warm Springs Creek Airport Road and the Custer/Boise county line.

ITD says the highway will remain closed until further notice, but crews will assess conditions at about 3 p.m. on today (Thursday).

source:
— — —

Avalanche traps some Stanley residents on south side of Highway 21

by CBS 2 News Staff Sunday, March 31st 2019

Boise, Idaho (CBS 2) — An avalanche on Highway 21, at mile marker 100, trapped some Stanley residents on the south side of the snow, Saturday.

A social media post by Boise County Emergency Management reported that no injuries had been reported.

According to the post, snow in the middle of the road is estimated to be at eight feet.

They added that the trapped residents were staying at the Sourdough Lodge, in the mean time.

source:
— — — — — — — — — —

Avalanche blocks road north of Ketchum

Forecasters warn of ‘considerable’ danger in Wood River Valley

Mark Dee 3/282019 IME


Express photo by Roland Lane

A small avalanche partially blocked state Highway 75 and caused delays near Lake Creek Drive north of Ketchum Wednesday afternoon, according to the Blaine County Sheriff’s Office.

No injuries were reported, and crews from the Idaho Department of Transportation cleared the road in about an hour, according to Blaine County Patrol Captain Curtis Miller.

The slide was about 30 feet long and up to three-and-a-half-feet deep, Miller said.

continued:
———————-

Mining News:

Legislature OKs law changing bonding for miners

Midas Gold, ICL disagree whether bill would ensure reclamation

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News March 28, 2019

A bill backed by Midas Gold that would change reclamation bonding for mining companies in Idaho only needs Gov. Brad Little’s approval before it is signed into law.

Representatives of the mining industry called the bill an assurance mined area would be restored, but an Idaho Conservation League spokesperson said its provisions could backfire.

The bill, known as House Bill 141, would give mining companies more flexibility for bonding reclamation costs by allowing the use of corporate guarantees, trust funds, letters of credit and certificates of deposit.

The bill passed the Idaho House of Representatives by vote of 59-11 on Feb. 28 and passed the Senate on a vote of 29-3 on March 19.

Among the bill’s sponsors was Rep. Dorothy Moon, R-Stanley. Moon represents District 8, which includes Valley County, where Midas Gold has proposed the Stibnite Gold Project near Yellow Pine.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Midas Gold begins process to raise $200M to build Stibnite Mine

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News March 28, 2019

Midas Gold Corp. has begun the process to raise up to $200 million to build its proposed Stibnite Gold Project in Valley County.

Midas Gold recently filed documents enabling it to raise the money over two years using a variety of investment offerings.

Midas Gold would use the fund for costs of permitting, pre-construction engineering, equipment and initial construction for the Stibnite Gold Project, said Mckinsey Lyon, vice president of external affairs for Midas Gold Idaho.

The $200 million could be raised anytime in the next two years, enabling the company to use the funds as the Stibnite project nears final approval, which could come as early as the fall of 2020.

The amount is intended to exceed what the company might raise, but the documents do not require the Vancouver, B.C., company to raise any of the money if it does not want to, Lyon said.

How the money is used would be detailed in a final document issued by Midas Gold Corp. after any financing is completed, she said.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Phosphate mine deal creates conservation fund

Mar 29, 2019 Local News 8

Pocatello, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – As part of a mining lease agreement, a new conservation fund has been established in eastern Idaho.

The U.S. Bureau of Land Management approved the Rasmussen Valley phosphate mine. In exchange, the fertilizer company, Itafos Conda LLC, provided $1.2 million to form the Southeast Idaho Wildlife Mitigation Fund.

Funds will be awarded to successful applicants by a Habitat Improvement Team comprised of natural resource, land management, and Tribal trustees. They will use a public forum to consider and evaluate proposed habitat protection and enhancement projects.

continued:
————————

Public Lands:

Notice – Public Hearings – Proposed Waterways Ordinance

Date: March 20, 2019
RE: Proposed Valley County Waterways Ordinance 19-OS

The Valley County Board of Commissioners will hold public hearings on the proposed Valley County Waterways Ordinance 19-05. This ordinance would repeal Title 4 Chapter 5 Motorboat Noise; Chapter 6 Powerboating on Warm Lake; Chapter 7 No Wake Zone, Certain Waters; and, Chapter 8 Big Payette Lake Watershed Regulations. It would implement standards for all Valley County Waterways. Specific standards are listed and include age of operators, living aboard vessels, swimmers outside a no-wake area, and that a boat creating a wake larger than 24 inches must be 1,000 feet from the shoreline. It also includes specifics standards for Payette Lake, Upper Payette Lake, Little Payette Lake, Granite Lake, Warm Lake, Deadwood Reservoir, and Lake Cascade

A copy of the proposed ordinance is available from the Valley County Clerk’s Office or from the website: [link below]

Our office would appreciate your comments as a potentially affected agency or interested party regarding the proposed amendment. You may comment in person or by mail, fax, email or phone call. Written comments should be submitted at least seven days prior to the public hearing.

Further information can be reviewed at the Valley County Courthouse located at 219 North Main Street, Cascade, Idaho.

Doug Miller
Valley County Clerk

link to notice and draft ordinance:
— — — — — — — — — —

Bill to ban exploding targets on state lands fails in House

by Associated Press Tuesday, March 26th 2019

Boise, Idaho (AP) — Legislation to ban exploding targets on state lands in Idaho during wildfire season has failed in the House.

Lawmakers voted 35-33 Tuesday to reject the bill to prohibit target shooters from using the exploding devices that have caused wildfires.

Backers say it would have brought state lands into alignment with laws on federal lands prohibiting exploding targets from early May to mid-October.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Bureau of Land Management seeks 2019 Artist-in-Residence in Morley Nelson Snake River Birds of Prey National Conservation Area

Date: March 27, 2019
Contact: Michael Williamson mwilliamson@blm.gov 208-384-3393

Boise, Idaho – The Bureau of Land Management is pleased to announce an opportunity to be the next Artist-in-Residence in the Morley Nelson Snake River Birds of Prey National Conservation Area. The program offers professional artists the opportunity to pursue their art, inspired by the majesty of Idaho public lands.

The selected artist will visit this scenic area guided by BLM staff for one week in May or June. The residency is open to all professional artists over 18 years of age who are United States citizens. Applications will be accepted until April 26, 2019.

All disciplines of artists will be considered including photographers, painters, sculptors, videographers, writers, poets, musicians and composers. Final selections are based on the merit and professionalism of the artist and the proposal presented in the application. Selected works from the artist will be showcased to the public in a venue to be announced and will be included in future BLM exhibits and publications.

Interested applicants must submit a cover letter detailing their interest in the program, proposed project, a professional resume and a minimum of five artwork samples in electronic format. A panel of professional artists and Bureau of Land Management staff will review the applications to select the artist.

Artist-In-Residence Program

The Artist-in-Residence program seeks to share the scenic beauty and unique stories of the landscapes and resources managed by the Bureau of Land Management through the world of art. It also provides an opportunity for learning and dialogue about the value of preserving these special places.

Morley Nelson Snake River Birds of Prey National Conservation Area

The deep canyon of the Snake River, with its crags, crevices and thermal updrafts, is home to the greatest concentration of nesting birds of prey in North America, if not the world. The BLM’s mission at the Morley Nelson Snake River Birds of Prey National Conservation Area (NCA) is to preserve this remarkable wildlife habitat, while providing for other compatible uses of the land. Some 800 pairs of hawks, owls, eagles and falcons come each spring to mate and raise their young. The NCA is “nature in the rough,” with few public facilities. However, the birds and their unique environment offer rich rewards to those willing to experience the NCA on its own terms and who have patience to fit into the natural rhythms of life in this special place.

For more information, please contact Cory Coffman at ccoffman@blm.gov 208-384-3485. To apply or to learn additional information about the program, please visit the BLM’s website at https://www.blm.gov/get-involved/artist-in-residence
——————

Critter News:

Pet Talk – Macadamia-nut toxicosis in dogs

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt 3/29/2019 IME

Macadamia nuts are harvested from Hawaiian macadamia trees. They are commonly eaten roasted and used in baked goods and candies. The nut is 75 percent oil.

The mechanism of the toxin is not well understood, but ingestion of nuts can result in temporary weakness and tremors of the rear legs in dogs. As little as 2 tablespoons of nuts ingested by a 25-pound dog may result in toxicity.

Signs are usually seen within 12 hours. Dogs may vomit, act lethargic, be shaky or weak, seem lame, or be unable to rise. Usually, the rear legs are affected more than the front legs. Often, a fever is present. Pancreatitis may arise because of the high fat content of the nuts.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Man warns pet owners after his dog got caught in trap during hike in Ada County

Brad Dubach’s dog has been caught in two animal traps in five years.

Shirah Matsuzawa March 29, 2019 KTVB

Boise, Idaho — As the weather gets warmer, a lot of pet owners will be hitting the trails with their dogs.

But beware, there are a lot of animal traps out there.

Brad Dubach has been walking his dogs on different trails around Boise for 25 years. On Monday, that walk became a little more dangerous. During a hike near Blacks Creek Reservoir, his dog, Rose, got caught in a trap that was intended for a different type of animal, likely coyotes.

continued:
— —

How to recognize and avoid wildlife traps while walking your dog

How to release your dog from a trap

— — — — — — — — — —

Ada County horse tests positive for equine herpes virus

The illness forced high school rodeo organizers to cancel this weekend’s rodeo events in Homedale.

Associated Press & KTVB March 29, 2019

Boise, Idaho — Idaho agriculture officials confirmed that a horse in Ada County has tested positive for an equine herpes virus.

The Idaho State Department of Agriculture say the horse traveled from Arizona to Idaho in February and then was transported to the Salty Dash Futurity in South Jordan, Utah, from March 15-17.

The horse is now under quarantine and receiving veterinary care at a private facility in the Treasure Valley.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

KWVR Oregon Wolf Education weekly Wolf Report

Fourth week of March 2019
— — — — — — — — — —

Government-funded study says red wolves are distinct species

By Jonathan Drew and Matthew Brown – 3/28/19 AP

Durham, N.C. — A panel of top scientists concluded Thursday that the endangered red wolf of the southeastern U.S. is a species unto itself, giving the beleaguered canine a scientific and political boost as its numbers plummet in the wild.

The government-funded study by the National Academy of Sciences also found that the Mexican gray wolf of New Mexico and Arizona is a subspecies, which advocates say should support conservation efforts.

Another wolf species, the Western gray wolf, is thriving in the Northern Rockies and Great Lakes and could lose federal protections under a proposal released earlier this month.

For red wolves, the affirmation of their genetic uniqueness comes after some North Carolina officials and a small but vocal group of landowners pushed the government to abandon recovery efforts, arguing the animal is a coyote hybrid.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Wolf Education International

3/28/2019 Newsletter

Arizona: Wolves Enter Barn, Kill Young Girls Horse

Wolves make a comeback in Madrid 70 years after their disappearance

Wolf kills flock of sheep

Wolves target rancher’s animals again
— — — — — — — — — —

Idaho man charged with illegal guiding

Indictment related to Alaska grizzly hunts

Mar 28, 2019 By Steve Liebenthal KIVI TV

US attorneys have charged Paul Silvas of Nampa, Idaho, in a four-count indictment with multiple felony Lacey Act violations.

According to the indictment, Silvas violated the Lacey Act by illegally guiding and filing false state of Alaska Department of Fish and Game hunt records in order to conceal the illegal take of brown bears and to conceal illegally guided hunts, along with transporting illegally taken game across state lines.

The indictment alleges that, on September 5 and September 12, 2014, as well as September 25, 2013, Silvas knowingly guided illegal hunts within the Noatak National Preserve for other residents of Idaho that did not possess the appropriate permits.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Hunting for shed antlers could disrupt wildlife

Mar 28, 2019 By Anna Silver KIVI TV

Idaho — While the Treasure Valley is enjoying warmer temperatures, wildlife in the area are not out of the woods yet.

While it is not illegal to hunt for shed antlers in Idaho, it can disrupt the wildlife.

“They’re at their last fat reserves,” said Krista Biourn, Wildlife Biologist, Boise River Wildlife Habitat District.

“Because you’re pushing them around. You’re using that energy that they might need to survive,” said Biourn.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Birds of Prey honored with national award

Mar 29, 2019 By Katie Kloppenburg KIVI TV

If you have been out to the Birds of Prey you know how special a place it is for southwest Idaho. Now, their conservation efforts have been recognized nationally.

The Bureau of Land Management’s Morley Nelson Snake River Birds of Prey National Conservation Area (NCA) and Birds of Prey NCA Partnership (BOPP), a Boise based non-profit organization, were recently honored with a 2019 Public Lands Partner Award. NCA and BOPP received the award in honor of their work to protect and conserve public lands and enhance visitor experience at the NCA.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Photos: 60,000 snow geese flock to Parma area

Flocks of snow geese in Parma

Up to 60,000 snow geese are migrating through the Treasure Valley at the end of March. They make a stop near Parma at the Fort Boise Wildlife Management Area. Some will fly all the way to Siberia. (Photos by Axel Quartarone)

photo gallery:
— —

Idaho Fish & Game photo


— — — — — — — — — —

F&G to open Chinook fishing season April 27

The Star-News March 28, 2019

The Idaho Fish and Game Commission has approved spring Chinook fishing on the Salmon and Little Salmon rivers starting on April 27.

Fishing will open with a four-day-a-week season on the Salmon and Little Salmon rivers and will run until sport anglers’ shares of the harvest are met or Aug. 11, whichever comes sooner.

Fishing will be open Thursdays through Sundays with a limit of four total fish, only two of which may be adults.

… The Fish and Game Commission is scheduled to decide on summer Chinook salmon fisheries on the South Fork Salmon River and upper Salmon River at its May meeting, the news release said.

full story:
— — — — — — — — — —

The Columbia Basin Bulletin

Weekly Fish and Wildlife News
http://www.cbbulletin.com
March 26, 2019
Issue No. 902
Table of Contents

* Corps Selects New Fish Count Contractor At Columbia/Snake Dams; Data Release Delays At Some Dams Until Transition Complete
http://www.cbbulletin.com/442357.aspx

* NOAA Approves Idaho’s Steelhead Fishery Management Plan, Allows ‘Take’ With Protections
http://www.cbbulletin.com/442356.aspx

* Draft Report: Watercraft Inspections For Invasive Mussels Increased By 23 Percent Last Year; 16 Percent More Contaminated Vessels
http://www.cbbulletin.com/442358.aspx

* Council Letter Requests More Federal Funds For Watercraft Inspections In 2020; Competition From Other States Could Be Coming
http://www.cbbulletin.com/442355.aspx

* NOAA Opens Consultation On Offshore Fisheries To Take A Look At Impacts On Orcas
http://www.cbbulletin.com/442354.aspx

* Snake River Runoff Allows River Managers To Maintain Flows For Salmon Redds Below Bonneville Dam
http://www.cbbulletin.com/442353.aspx

* Due To Low Numbers Fishery Managers Say No Smelt Dipping This Year
http://www.cbbulletin.com/442352.aspx

* WDOE To Raise Osoyoos Lake On Washington/B.C. Border A Month Earlier To Avoid Water Shortages, Low Flows
http://www.cbbulletin.com/442351.aspx

* Idaho Fish And Game To Host Lake Pend Oreille State Of The Lake Meeting; Updates On Status Of Fish Stocks
http://www.cbbulletin.com/442350.aspx

* Research: Rising Global Shipping Traffic Could Lead To Surge In Invasive Species Over Next 30 Years
http://www.cbbulletin.com/442349.aspx

* First Large Scale Analysis Of Gas Emissions Off Washington Coast: Contributes To Productive Fishing Grounds
http://www.cbbulletin.com/442348.aspx

* Study: Climate Change Having Profound Negative Impacts On Waterbirds In American West
http://www.cbbulletin.com/442347.aspx
————————–

Fish & Game News:

Spring bear seasons open April 1 in some units, many others open April 15

By Brian Pearson, Conservation Public Information Specialist
Friday, March 29, 2019

General hunts are available in most parts of the state

The state’s spring black bear season opens on April 1 in a number of units in the state, providing Idaho hunters with a chance to hunt big game in the spring.

The balance of units with spring black bear hunts are set to open on April 15.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Public’s help sought in bull elk poaching case in the Tower Creek area near Salmon

By Mike Demick, Staff Biologist
Friday, March 29, 2019

Citizens Against Poaching (CAP) is offering a reward for information in the case

The remains of an illegally killed bull elk were discovered recently in the Salmon area and Fish and Game is asking the public for information to bring the poacher to justice.

Citizens Against Poaching (CAP) is offering a reward for information in the case and callers can remain anonymous. Contact CAP at 1-800-632-5999 twenty four hours a day.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

More F&G News Releases

https://idfg.idaho.gov/press
———————————-

Fun Critter Stuff:

Watch how this happy-go-lucky rescue dog hilariously fails his agility course

It’s one of the cutest dog routine fails in dog show history.

———————-

Seasonal Humor:


———————-

Idaho History March 31, 2019

History of Telephones in Yellow Pine

Modern visitors to Yellow Pine have to find the local hot spot for their mobile devices to connect to the outside. Prior to 1997 when the land lines were installed, Yellow Pine was known as the “Town Without a Telephone”. However, Yellow Pine did have telephones before the village was even platted.
-Admin

080310YellowPine-a
Yellow Pine August 3, 2010 by Local Color Photography
— — — — — — — — — —

Early Telephones Boise National Forest

Because the years from 1908 to 1919 were light fire years, forest personnel had additional time for construction and maintenance. The first telephone-line construction began on the former Payette National Forest in 1908 with the purchase of a private line from Crawford to Knox. The line was then connected with Van Wyck, Thunder [Mountain] City [in Long Valley], Smith’s Ferry, High Valley, Ola, Sweet, and Emmett. The Forest Service operated a “central” switchboard at Crawford (near present Cascade) for many years, until private use of the line became too much of a burden for the Forest Service.

In 1910, the former Payette National Forest bought the telephone lines from Thunder City to Roosevelt (built in 1903) and Garden Valley to Peace Valley for $100. The lines were then moved to connect Knox, Stolle Meadows, Blue Point, Deadwood, and Bear Valley. A line was also built from Third Fork to Mill Creek.

Costs of phone-line construction were from $40 to $60 per mile, and the cost of cutting and peeling poles was 30 cents apiece.

Leo Fest, a retired ranger, tells of repairing phone lines in the early 1920’s between Third Fork Ranger Station and Cascade:

“I finally got the line pulled together and I was working on it. I had fastened the come-alongs on one line at one end of it, and had the other in my hand ready to fasten, when somebody decided to ring. They put four long rings through, and didn’t want to let loose of that line because I knew I’d have to go back down the hill a hundred yards or so to get it back.”

Glen Smith considers the old “tree-to-tree” phone lines the best telephone system the forest ever had.

“As long as the wire was together, you could talk on it, even though it was down on the ground… We had a switchboard in Cascade, just in the office, or a box with a series of bells and a spring in between so you could see which one was vibrating if you didn’t get there in time to hear it. And we could talk pretty well around the Forest… The first work in the spring when the ranger would move out onto his district and his seasonal men would come on was to start working the trails and the telephone lines. Cut the logs out of the trail and work the telephone lines as they went. Their first job was to get the telephone lines talking.”

source: “History of the Boise National Forest 1905-1976”, by Elizabeth M. Smith
— — — — — — — — — —

Telephone Line Knox to Yellow Pine

… In 1924, a phone line was built from Knox to Yellow Pine and in 1924, “The auto road from Cascade to Yellow Pine, with a spur from Landmark to Deadwood was completed…”
(Chapman, n.d.:5).

source: pg 126 “Cultural Integrity and Marginality Along the South Fork of the Salmon River, Idaho”, Thesis by SJ Rebillet 1983 (7 megs)
— — — — — — — — — —

Big Creek Ranger Station Switchboard

[h/t CG]
— — — — — — — — — —

Early Telephones Payette National Forest

Phone lines were an important improvement in communications. Early attempts at speeding fire messages by using carrier pigeons between Big Creek and McCall were only partially successful. Ranger Walter Estep said in a 1922 report “the experiment would have been more successful if the forest dispatcher had been present to receive the birds in McCall.” In appreciation for services rendered, the carrier pigeons were eaten by Forest personnel.

By 1925 a phone line was completed to Big Creek, and in 1927, a phone line had been run to the Reed Ranch. Rangers of the early 30’s like J. W. (Bill) West no doubt found this to be a great improvement over horseback and messenger. Through the 40’s and 50’s these phone lines were maintained by Forest Service personnel. The biggest effort became a smokejumper project to put the line over Lick Creek back in every spring after avalanches had knocked it down. Although subject to storm damage and grounding by wet limbs, the lines provided fairly reliable communications.

Warren Brown is said to have talked to someone in New York City from Chamberlain Basin over the old crank phone. The lines have now been largely replaced by radios and the wire rolled up over most stretches, but many trees along the routes exhibit a strange growth, which upon closer examination will prove to be an insulator.

excerpted from “Bury My Soul at Krassel Hole” – A History of the Krassel District, Payette National Forest, by Tom Ortman 1975
— — — — — — — — — —

Telephones in Yellow Pine

by Ted Abstein

“There used to be Forest Service telephones in Yellow Pine, the old wall-mounted phones with hand cranks where there was a signal ring, like 2 short and a long, or whatever. That was probably one of the longest party lines in existence, and lead to a long-standing feud between at least one set of individuals (Profile Sam Willson and Mrs. Edwards) who each felt his (her) access rights were being infringed upon by the other! Listening to their acrimonious exchanges was a liberal education in the fine art of cussing!

“Dad was one of the last to tie to the Forest Service line and so his ring was a long one: 2 shorts, one long and 3 shorts! Supposedly, as latecomes to the line, our usage was restricted during fire season but I don’t believe the rule was really enforced.”

source: pages 75-76 “Yellow Pine, Idaho” compiled by Nancy Sumner
— —

Albert C. Behne – Postmaster, Justice of the Peace – Yellow Pine Idaho. Courtesy Sandy McRae
— —

Telephone Tricks

by Ted Abstein

“The old Forest Service phone line came down the hill and Behne had the switching center at that time, before the store was established. Our favorite trick was to get a long pole and rattle it along the phone line. This would cause nearby phones to ring, so by timing our rattles we could fake Behne’s call. Behne would try to answer the phone and it was take some time for him to catch on that he was being had. When he got it he’d come tearing out of the cabin and shake his fist up the hill at us, he couldn’t see a thing but he knew we were up there doing it.”

source: page 75 ibid.
— — — — — — — — — —

Telephone Line Stibnite to Yellow Pine

Bradley installed a mountain telephone line to Yellow Pine. [1928]

During the summer of 1928, packers brought in 385 tons of machinery and equipment with mules, and they were using 75 head in the packing operation by fall. They could make one round trip between Yellow Pine and Stibnite in a day, and they packed in everything: mining equipment, construction equipment, food.

source: “History of the Boise National Forest 1905-1976”, by Elizabeth M. Smith
— — — — — — — — — —

Portable Telephone Payette National Forest

A special thanks to a local for bringing this 1932 Forest Service Model A-1 Field Telephone into the Forest Supervisor’s Office. This specific telephone was made by the Kellogg Switchboard & Supply Company, and was used in the Granite Lake area on the then Idaho National Forest.

1932FStelephone-a

Per the Forest Service 1937 Telephone Handbook, this is a portable telephone used on trails and in camps. It weighs 30 pounds and is in an aluminum case to help protect it from the weather. Imagine packing one of these around just to make a phone call!

1932FStelephone2-a

“The Model A-1 is a camp or trail telephone, similar to the iron mine set except that the case is made of aluminum, is reasonably waterproof, and will withstand exposure to the weather. Standard telephone parts are used, including a 6 bar magneto, a 2500 ohm ringer, and induction coil, a 1/2 M.F. condenser in the receiver circuit, 3 dry cells, a hook switch, and a one piece hand set with standard transmitter and receiver. The talking and ringing range of this telephone is equal to that of the average heavy duty telephone. It weighs about 30 pounds, including the batteries.”

[Hat tip to SMc 2014]
— — — — — — — — — —

VO Ranch Telephone 1940’s

by Roxie (Cox) Himes

Our telephone was a hand crank phone that you could call the USFS office in Landmark which was 16 miles away or talk to Yellow Pine 10 miles away. If you wanted to talk outside that area you had to call Landmark and the operator would have to repeat everything to the party you called.

– excerpted from “Greyson’s school assignment on my life”
— — — — — — — — — —

The Last Telephones?

Q: How long did Yellow Pine have crank phones?

Vernon and Roxie Himes: I know I got pranked on the crank phone in 1959 or 1960 by Iva Kissinger. We got married and moved to Spokane in 1961 and we called home by the radio. However, I don’t know if the ranch could still talk to Yellow Pine on the crank phone.
— — —

Dads-old-phone-a

Gillihan’s old phone – photo courtesy Kristy Gillihan Scaraglino

Q: Do you remember crank phones when you lived in Yellow Pine 1963-1967?

Pat Gillihan: Yes, Mom would stand me on a chair in the kitchen of our Yellow Pine house to talk to Dad in the hunting camp.

Milton Gillihan: [I don’t] remember the crank phones in Yellow Pine, but that we did have them at the Neal Ranch and we could call to all of Dad’s hunting sites, including Base Camp at Crooked Creek, the Snowshoe Mine, Jensen Cabin and several other places. … when the lines started interfering with and injuring the deer and elk, they hired Dad as a contractor to remove them all.
— — —

Q: How would someone make a reservation at the Yellow Pine Lodge or for a hunting trip? Did you have a back country radio?

Kristy Gillihan Scaraglino: We never had a back country radio when we lived up there. … I believe people called the number on our brochure and then our neighbor would place a call to Cascade Aviation (or whatever it was back then) and they would patch calls through to whomever had a radio.
— — —

Can add a little something to the history. When I worked for Earl Dodds at Big Creek during the early 1960s the Forest Service gave the tele line to Yellow Pine and in 1963 the fire crew took the line down from Big Creek to Yellow Pine. I was part of that group.
– Sandy McRae
— — — — — — — — — —

Telephone1-photo-a
photo by Steve Smith [1985]

Telephone1-headline

Telephone1-sidebar

by Michael S. Lasky

America is a labyrinth of wires. With more than 160 million telephones in the country today, virtually every home in the nation is connected by wires and space satellites that permit one to talk to anywhere in the world.

Can you imagine, then, a world without them? If the telephone in your home suddenly goes out of order, you can always use a neighbor’s or find a pay phone nearby.

But what would it be like without even those? Could you live without phones completely? Could you live in Yellow Pine, Idaho, for example?

Yellow Pine is truly an American anachronism. It is one of the last towns in the U.S. without a single phone. Situated deep in the mountainous 2.9 million-acre Boise National Forest, Yellow Pine is 52 miles from the nearest town (and telephone). From January to late April, the only way into this snowbound wilderness is by ski plane.

Most people journey to this tiny hamlet (pop. 100; 60 in winter) to hunt, fish and pan for gold. But I came to Yellow Pine to find out firsthand how, in this day and age, people live without telephones.

The main street of the town is just a block long. There are two bars, two inns, a single-room schoolhouse, a nondenominational church and Parks’ Merc, an old-fashioned combination general store-gas station-Laundromat-post office that is usually the first place a visitor stops upon arrival.

I’m no different, and when I go inside, I’m greeted by Debbie Rekow, an employee. “Now I know why you folks don’t have telephones,” I comment as I enter. “The phone installers probably got lost trying to find this place.”

“Yellow Pine isn’t the easiest place to travel to, that’s for sure,” says Debbie. “A burly truck driver came in here recently and said, ‘This sure is God’s country!’ ‘Oh, you find it pretty?’ I asked. He said. ‘What I mean is that God’s the only one who could find it!'” She laughs.

“So how do you get along without a telephone nearby’? Aren’t there times when you wish you had one’?”

“The only time when a telephone seems to be really important around here is when there’s an emergency of some sort,” says Debbie. “We do have a two-way radio to receive and send messages. But there are only certain hours that the radio is monitored.

“Now that I’m a mother, a phone seems like more of a necessity. One night my baby, Amber, was running a very high fever. But it was 3 a.m., and the radio monitor was off. If I’d had a phone, I could have called a doctor to help her and quiet my nerves.

Across the dusty dirt street that is the town’s main drag is the nine-room, 19-bed Yellow Pine Lodge, run by Bob and Darlene Rosenbaum. As soon as I enter, Darlene pours me a cup of coffee.

“How can you live way out here in the middle of nowhere without a telephone?”

Bob … says, “You know, we really can communicate with the outside world. We just have to do it over the radio. We call down to Cascade, and they have some gizmo that patches us into a phone, which they dial.”

“The bad part about these calls is that they aren’t private,” says Darlene. “Anyone who’s tuned in can hear. In winter, some people monitor the radio all day as entertainment.

“Some visitors come purposely to get away from telephones. We had a man staying here who was playing hooky from his wife,” Darlene tells me… “After a while, he decided he’d better call his wife to say he was staying a few days more. They started arguing, and she told him in no uncertain terms to get home.

“Unfortunately, he didn’t know how to handle the radio microphone, which has this button you press in to talk and release to listen. So I stood by him and pushed it in and out at the right moments. When he finally couldn’t stop her screaming, he yelled. ‘Well, listen, honey. right now I have a lady here, and she’s pushing my button!’

“She hung up. It must have been a conversation with very high ratings, because all the radios were on monitor.

“People here are pretty self-sufficient,” notes Darlene. “One man knows automotive mechanics, and there’s another who’s a carpenter and plumber. Someone else can handle electronics, and so on. Neighbors help neighbors. We can’t just pick up a phone and call a service man to come way out here!”

Telephone2-photo-a

Although the townsfolk enjoy the isolation that life in Yellow Pine provides, the snowbound winters test the fortitude and resolution of everyone.

Some people have gone stir-crazy here, and I’ve had to escort them to Boise for a little R and R,” Sheriff Dave McClintock tells me. “Booze and boredom are the biggest problems I get from the locals. Frankly, my job would be easier if I had a telephone. Radio airwaves are not always dependable. Sometimes atmospheric conditions make it impossible to transmit or receive messages. But, personally. I don’t need a phone. I’ve lived so long without one that I’ve learned to live without.”

Part of the Yellow Piners’ reluctance to install phones is that they are, symbolically at least, the last link with civilization. The absence of phones has kept the townsfolk independent, pioneers and, well, different from the rest of us.

“Like everything else, there is good and bad about having no phones in town,” says Bob Rosenbaum. “The constant ringing doesn’t interrupt your life, especially during meals.

“Of course, potential customers of the inn can’t call us for reservations. But,” he adds, “we don’t get bill collectors bothering us either.”

source: Parade Magazine January 12, 1986 (pages 14-15)
[h/t SM]
link: Page 1
link: Page 2
— — — — — — — — — —

Yellow Pine Post Card

YellowPinePostcard-a

purchased at Park’s Merc in mid 1980s.
————————–

Refrence Books:

“Yellow Pine, Idaho” compiled by Nancy Sumner
(this book can be purchased in Yellow Pine from Marj Fields)
—————————–

page updated Dec 21, 2019

Road Report March 31, 2019

It may be Spring in the valley (and on the calendar), but its still winter in the Back Country. The only way to get to Yellow Pine is via the South Fork route, advised to carry chains. Be aware of winter conditions there is a LOT of snow in the back country, travel at your own risk and remember there is no cell phone service. Roads are likely ice and snow covered, trees and/or rocks may be down in the road. Higher elevation roads are closed. Conditions change quickly this time of year. Please share road reports.

Yellow Pine: We had some rain mid-week, down to 12″ old snow on the flat. Local streets are starting to break up, patches of dirt in the sunny places, snow packed and icy in the shade. Local snow plow has been scraping slush off the roads recently.
Click for Local Forecast.
Yellow Pine Webcam: (check date on image)

Warm Lake Highway: Report Wed (Mar 27) Warm Lake Hwy is pretty much bare in the lower parts, the hills have ice in the shady spots.
SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

Highway 55 Webcams Link:
A warning from ITD about pot holes in the canyon between Smith’s Ferry and Banks. The road is falling apart! Advised to use Hwy 95.

South Fork Road: Got a report of a big slide south of Krassel at MM 26 Wednesday or Thursday. Local plow went out and cleaned up the slide. Report from Wednesday (March 27) mail truck driver (Robert) says the lower parts are pretty much bare pavement – watch for pot holes – until you get up to around Reed Ranch, then it is rough, icy and rutted.
Note: The SF is the best it can be with what equipment we have available. It is posted on top of SF to put chains on when snow covered and as a reminder you travel the back country roads at your own risk. – CD
Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′

EFSF Road: Report the local plow went out and knocked rocks off the road Thursday or Friday. Watch for more rocks coming down with the freeze thaw cycle.

Lower Johnson Creek Road: No recent reports. Last report Saturday (March 16) a few bare spots, starting to break up, road is pretty good.
Note to drivers – when traveling to the dump, please use the river side of the road for wheeled vehicles so the hill side can be for snowmobilers. Turnouts will be plowed.
Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam:

Upper Johnson Creek Road: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcam: (check date on image)

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Midas Gold is keeping the road open.
Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The approx elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′

Payette Avalanche Advisory
link:

Valley County Grooming Reports
link:

Snowmobile Trail Map – Warm Lake & Johnson Creek areas
link:
——————————-

Weather Reports Mar 24-30, 2019

Mar 24 Weather:

Sprinkling at 10am, at 1030am it was 38 degrees, overcast and sprinkling. By 1pm the ridges were socked in with low clouds and steady light rain. It quit raining long enough for the roof to dry out, poka-dotted with drops at 3pm. At 330pm it was 42 degrees, low overcast and occasional drop of rain. Not raining at 4pm. Gusty breezes at 710pm, low clouds. At 8pm it started sprinkling lightly and 35 degrees. Around 9pm it was sprinkling lightly.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time March 25, 2019 at 10:30AM
Thinning overcast and breezy
Max temperature 43 degrees F
Min temperature 25 degrees F
At observation 32 degrees F
Precipitation 0.06 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 16 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

Mar 25 Weather:

At 1030am it was 32 degrees, thinning overcast and breezy. Thicker clouds at 1pm and quite breezy. At 4pm it was 55 degrees, overcast and lighter breezes. At 820pm it was 38 degrees, cloudy and still a bit breezy.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time March 26, 2019 at 10:30AM
Overcast and starting to rain
Max temperature 56 degrees F
Min temperature 31 degrees F
At observation 39 degrees F
Precipitation Trace
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 15 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

Mar 26 Weather:

At 1030am it was 39 degrees, dark overcast and starting to rain. Rained for about half an hour. Sprinkling at 1250pm for a short time. Not raining at 2pm. Sprinkling at 250pm. At 330pm it was 40 degrees, breezy, overcast and steady rain. Just sprinkling at 4pm and the top of Golden Gate was fogged in, probably quit not long after. At 8pm it was 36 degrees, low clouds – peaks and ridges foggy, starting to sprinkle lightly (no idea how long it lasted.)

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time March 27, 2019 at 10:30AM
Overcast, sprinkling, light breeze
Max temperature 45 degrees F
Min temperature 32 degrees F
At observation 36 degrees F
Precipitation 0.09 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 15 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

Mar 27 Weather:

Started sprinkling around 10am. At 1030am it was 36 degrees, overcast, light breeze and sprinkling. Still raining lightly at noon. Not raining at 2pm. At 4pm it was overcast and 44 degrees. Drizzling a little at 420pm. Raining pretty good at 430pm. Drizzles and drips at 6pm. Steady rain at 710pm, then hard rain. At 8pm it was 34 degrees, low overcast and moderate rain. Not raining at 11pm. Trace of snow fell before morning.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time March 28, 2019 at 10:30AM
Overcast
Max temperature 47 degrees F
Min temperature 30 degrees F
At observation 35 degrees F
Precipitation 0.45 inch
Snowfall Trace
Snow depth 14 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

Mar 28 Weather:

At 1030am it was 35 degrees and overcast. Broken cloud cover at 1pm. At 350pm it was 43 degrees, mostly cloudy and light breeze. Sleet (graupel) falling pretty hard at 408pm. Snowing big flakes at 420pm, rain/snow mix at 430pm lasted about 10-15 minutes, then breaks in the clouds. At 8pm it was 35 degrees and mostly clear (small clouds around the edges, getting foggy up Johnson Creek.) Overcast at 1030pm. Trace of snow fell before 730am.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time March 29, 2019 at 10:30AM
Overcast, occasional flake of snow
Max temperature 46 degrees F
Min temperature 28 degrees F
At observation 34 degrees F
Precipitation 0.07 inch
Snowfall Trace
Snow depth 13 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

Mar 29 Weather:

At 1030am it was overcast, occasional flake of snow. Breaks in the clouds at noon and an occasional flake of snow. At 4pm it was 45 degrees, a little breezy and overcast. At 830pm it was 38 degrees, broken overcast and light breezes. Cloudy at midnight.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time March 30, 2019 at 10:30AM
Mostly clear, light breeze
Max temperature 46 degrees F
Min temperature 25 degrees F
At observation 33 degrees F
Precipitation Trace
Snowfall Trace
Snow depth 12 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

Mar 30 Weather:

At 1030am it was 33 degrees, mostly clear and light breeze. Mostly cloudy at 1pm. At 330pm it was 47 degrees, mostly cloudy and a little breezy. At 815pm it was 38 degrees and broken cloud cover. Cloudy at 1030pm.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time March 31, 2019 at 10:30AM
Mostly clear
Max temperature 49 degrees F
Min temperature 21 degrees F
At observation 33 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 12 inch
——————————–

Road Reports Mar 27, 2019

It may be Spring in the valley (and on the calendar), but its still winter in the Back Country. The only way to get to Yellow Pine is via the South Fork route, advised to carry chains. Be aware of winter conditions there is a LOT of snow in the back country, travel at your own risk and remember there is no cell phone service. Roads are likely ice and snow covered, trees and/or rocks may be down in the road. Higher elevation roads are closed. Conditions change quickly this time of year. Please share road reports.

Yellow Pine: It has been cooler with rain showers the last 3 days. Local streets are snow/ice covered, starting to break up in some spots, bare dirt in a few others. We have about 15″ of old snow on the flat down by the school.
Click for Local Forecast.
Yellow Pine Webcam: (check date on image)

Warm Lake Highway: Report Wed (Mar 27) Warm Lake Hwy is pretty much bare in the lower parts, ice in the shady spots on the hill, an inch of new snow on the summit.
SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

Highway 55 Webcams Link:
A warning from ITD about pot holes in the canyon between Smith’s Ferry and Banks. The road is falling apart! Advised to use Hwy 95.

South Fork Road: Report Wednesday (March 27) mail truck driver (Robert) says the lower parts are pretty much bare pavement – watch for pot holes – until you get up to around Reed Ranch, then it is rough, icy and rutted.
Note: The SF is the best it can be with what equipment we have available. It is posted on top of SF to put chains on when snow covered and as a reminder you travel the back country roads at your own risk. – CD
Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′

EFSF Road: Report Wednesday (Mar 27) From Zena Creek to around Jakie Creek there are a lot of rocks to dodge. Last plowed on Saturday the 23rd.

Lower Johnson Creek Road: No recent reports. Last report Saturday (March 16) a few bare spots, starting to break up, road is pretty good.
Note to drivers – when traveling to the dump, please use the river side of the road for wheeled vehicles so the hill side can be for snowmobilers. Turnouts will be plowed.
Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam:

Upper Johnson Creek Road: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcam: (check date on image)

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Midas Gold is keeping the road open.
Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The approx elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′

Payette Avalanche Advisory
link:

Valley County Grooming Reports
link:

Snowmobile Trail Map – Warm Lake & Johnson Creek areas
link:
——————————-

Mar 24, 2019 The Yellow Pine Times

Mar 24, 2019 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Community Calendar:

May 5, 2019, 3pm, Taco Feed at the Community Hall
May 25 – ATV-UTV Scavenger Hunt Memorial Day Weekend
June 11 – Vet Day Yellow Pine
July 6 – Golf Tournament & Breakfast
July 13 – Ride to Big Creek
Sep 14 – Ride to Cinnabar

(details below)
———-

Local Events:

May 5, 2019, 3pm, Taco Feed at the Community Hall

In thanks for the great support of the community, the Community Hall Committee is giving back.

A Taco Feed will be held at the Community Hall on May 5th at 3pm. The Community Hall is providing the fixin’s.

Please join us for good food and to check out the progress that has been made in the Community Hall.

Thanks again for all your support.
Kathy Hall
Community Hall Chairman
— — — —

June 11 – Vet Day

On Tuesday June 11th the Cascade Vet clinic will be coming to Yellow Pine. Please call (208) 382-4590 to get on the list.
— — — —

2019 Festival T-Shirt Contest – Deadline May 20

The contest for the 30th Annual Yellow Pine Music Festival T-shirt logo is open!
This year’s theme is “Then and Now”.
The winner receives $100!
Your one-color design* must include the following:

* 30th Annual
* 2019
* Yellow Pine Music Festival
* musical instruments incorporated into the design

Designs must be submitted electronically to yellowpinefestival@gmail.com or by snail-mail to Yellow Pine Festival, PO Box 10, Yellow Pine, ID 83677
All submissions must be received by 5:00 p.m., Monday, May 20, 2019.
Submissions become the property of the Village of Yellow Pine Association.

*Note: We have learned that simple designs show and sell better.
— — — —

Golf Tournament

It’s time to plan for the annual 4th of July Yellow Pine Golf Tournament. This year the proceeds will support the Community Hall and road repair.

The event will begin July 6th at 11am at the golf course, where the fairways aren’t fair and the greens aren’t green. The cost will remain the same at $50 per couple for sponsoring a hole with a sign displayed. $20 for individuals, each person playing will get a ticket for beer, additional tickets can be purchased for $3. Soda and water are free. Checks can be written to VYPA (Village of Yellow Pine Association)

There will be prizes for first, second and third places for men’s women’s and mixed. Also, there will be a prizes for closest to the pin. Spots go quickly, so be one of the first!

There will be a hearty breakfast at the museum from 8-10. The cost is $6 and all proceeds benefit the upkeep of the museum.
— — — —

2019 Yellow Pine Escapades

The 2019 schedule for the Yellow Pine Escapades has been updated on the website!

Expect new escapades this coming year, including an ATV-UTV Photo Scavenger Hunt; two (yes, two) ATV-UTV rides, a golf tournament, and even a community yard sale. Other events will be added to the calendar as plans are finalized.

Join us for a great season of fun! The starting point for fun in Yellow Pine! The website includes information on the events hosted by the Yellow Pine Community Hall as well as the other “goings-on” in the village. Food, lodging and fuel are available in Yellow Pine.

link:
———-

Village News:

Stibnite Advisory Council

March 14, 2019 Special Meeting Summary

Attendance:
Lynn Imel – Yellow Pine
Ronda Rogers – Yellow Pine Alternate
Gene Tyler – Donnelly
Julie Good – New Meadows
Darla Webber – New Meadows Alternate
Glenna Young – Cascade
Tami Testa – Council
Denis Duman – Idaho County
Joe Iveson – Adams County
Anne Labelle – Midas Gold Corp.
Laurel Sayer – Midas Gold Idaho
Absent:
Bob Crump – Riggins
Summary approved by the Chair
Distributed on March 14, 2019 to Advisory Council
1. Decision was made to record the Stibnite Advisory Council meetings.
2. Meeting protocol for the public will be listen and observe.
3. Discussed need for questions to be fielded through the community’s representatives. No new questions were presented to the Advisory Council from Cities or Counties at this time.
4. Discussed community input process from unrepresented areas.
— — — —

History of the log cabin at the Cemetery

The Cemetery Committee is interested in any information on the cabin that is located by the cemetery. We know that it had been on the property that was known as “Mary’s Cabins”. It was moved by Tom Richter while the Filler’s were building their house. Donna Valdez said that the people who ran the cafe and bar slept there, before the Tavern was built.

Do people have pictures or any information they can share? We’d love to put a plaque up on the cabin while we repair it.

– Marj Fields
— — — —

Roads

It is Spring Rock Migration Season

March 21, 2019 EFSF Road “Bowling Alley” photo by Chris Eaton. The rocks were plowed off the road on Friday March 22nd, however there will be more coming down.

Lower Johnson Creek Plowing

Note: when traveling to the dump, please use the river side of the road for wheeled vehicles so the hill side can be for snowmobilers. Turnouts will be plowed. – CD
— — — —

Yellow Pine Transfer Station

A report March 14 that the transfer station was emptied. A report March 15 that the dumpsters are empty, but there is trash strewn between and behind the bins. Report March 17 that the ice floor on Johnson Creek road is starting to break up, slushy during warm afternoons.

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.


— — — —

Come Spring…

“To Yellow Pine residents. I will be making several trips next spring and summer hauling out metal, appliances, etc. . If you need anything hauled away please get on the list. Vehicles require a title. I will be hauling gravel back if anyone is interested.”

Contact Mike Amos
— — — —

Yellow Pine US Mail

We are on 3-day a week mail delivery from Cascade. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 55 cents
— — — —

Predators

Snow mosquitoes are out. Please do not leave pet food outdoors and remember to keep trash secured, it will draw foxes, coyotes and loose dogs.
— — — —

Ice Hole Campground Closed

The Campground has been temporarily closed to provide for public safety during reconstruction. This order will be in effect from September 27, 2018 through July 2, 2019, unless rescinded earlier by the Forest Supervisor. (0402-04-80)
———-

Local Groups:

YPWUA News:

Winter Water Advice

To help prevent frozen water, avoid parking over buried water lines, allow the natural snow cover to insulate the ground. Driving over the lines will also push the frost deeper and can result in frozen pipes. Also, don’t plow the snow over where water lines are buried, and avoid covering up water shut off valves.

link to: 2018 September Water Department Update.docx
— — — —

VYPA News:

VYPA Meeting Dates 2019

June 8th; July 20th; August 10th; September 14th.

Note that the July 20th meeting is not on the second Saturday due to a conflict with a planned ATV rally involving many residents and visitors.

Yellow Pine Harmonica Meetings 2019:

March 30, 2019 Saturday 2pm at the Tavern
April 23, 2019 Tuesday 2pm at the Tavern
May 23, 2019 Thursday 2pm at the Community Hall
June 20, 2019 Thursday 2pm at the Community Hall
July 27, 2019 Saturday 2pm at the Community Hall
— — — —

YPFD News:

The next meeting to be May 18th, 2019 at the Community Hall

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Updates:

Fire Department Training on Sundays at 11am will resume in the Spring.

The YPFD has 2 Size Chimney Brushes with extension rods that were donated for use around YP. If you would like to borrow one, please contact Cecil or Jeff and we’ll get them for you. The YPFD also has loanable mitigation tools, (Weed-Whacker, Hedge Trimmer, backpack blower and 16’ pole saw). If you would like to borrow one or all, please contact Cecil or Jeff and we’ll get them for you.

It’s also time to check the Smoke Alarm batteries and Fire Extinguishers. Please test the alarm and replace Smoke Alarm Batteries every year, if you have the replaceable battery type. Fire Extinguishers should be checked as well and should be easily seen and reachable. A good location for the Fire Extinguishers would be the kitchen and near the wood stove and/or fireplace. The needle should be in the green.

If you need a Smoke Detector or Fire Extinguisher for your YP residence please contact Jeff F.

Smoke Alarm Info:
——–

Biz Listings:

Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377

Closed for winter
— — — —

The Corner (208) 633-3325

Closed for winter
— — — —

Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233

Winter Hours at the Tavern: 9am-2pm and 4-8pm Mon, Wed, Fri, Sat and 9am-2pm Sun. Or call 208 633-2233 the phone rings into the house.
— — — —

Buck Horn Outfitters LLC
Link to FB page:

Deadwood Outfitters
Link to website:
— — — —

Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed (208) 382-4430, Suet blocks (peanut crunch, and cherry) for $1.99 per block. 50# bag of Polar Ice Melt available for $7.99.
— — — —

Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, Will service Yellow Pine

B&T Safety Solutions LLC
208-271-1600 Based out of Donnelly
Snow removal, cleaning chimneys and stoves, we do cabin staining/chinking as well
— — — —

Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
———————–

Local Observations:

Monday (March 18) overnight low of 16 degrees, clear sky this morning and light breeze, estimate 22″ old snow on the ground. Birds are vocalizing more, heard the red-wing blackbird singing a little, hairy woodpeckers and jays calling, raven flew over “cronking”. Clear and sunny mid-day and flags flapping in the breeze. Warm and sunny mid-afternoon, light breeze, slushy snow on the street, high of 53 degrees. Clear at dusk, bright almost full moon to the east.

Tuesday (March 19) overnight low of 17 degrees, clear sky this morning, light breeze, measured 21″ old snow. Jays and hairy woodpecker visiting early. Sunny and warm mid-day. Starlings and jays visiting after lunch, red-wing blackbird calling from the trees, northern flicker on the ant pile (now snow free.) Very warm with strong sunshine mid-afternoon, snow melting near buildings, some of the tall snow piles are subsiding, high of 58 degrees. Beautiful almost full moon rising in a clear sky at dusk. Bright mars low in the sky before midnight.

Wednesday (March 20) overnight low of 19 degrees, clear sky this morning, measured 20″ crusty old snow on the ground. Lots of starlings, a few jays and a northern flicker visiting this morning, another flicker calling from up near the village. Sunny and warm mid-day, blindingly bright snow and deep blue sky. A report of the first Spring robin sighted, and a butterfly. Warm and sunny mid-afternoon, getting “mushy” on the paths, high of 62 degrees. A few late afternoon little clouds and haze, mostly clear at dusk. Robin calling as the light faded. Bright full moon with a bit of a halo at midnight.

Thursday (March 21) overnight low of 20 degrees, mostly clear sky with a few clouds to the south, measured an average of 19″ old crusty snow. Starlings, jays and northern flicker visiting. First sighting of Cassins Finches, a male and a female. Mostly cloudy right after lunch time, and light breezes. Finches and jays visiting early afternoon. By Mid-afternoon it was mostly clear for a while and warm with light breezes, high of 60 degrees. The water is starting to soak in where it had been puddling on the paths. High hazy clouds late afternoon. Hazy thin clouds at dusk and still above freezing. It was down to 32 degrees at midnight and mostly cloudy.

Friday (March 22) overnight low of 23 degrees, mostly cloudy (thin haze) and slight breeze, measured 18″ crusty old snow on the ground. Jays visiting, flicker, raven and finches calling. Mostly cloudy mid-day, male and female finches visiting. Mostly cloudy with gusty breezes mid-afternoon, warm and snow melting, high of 55 degrees. At dusk it was much calmer, appears to be some high haze in the sky and quiet. Looked like it might by hazy at midnight.

Saturday (March 23) overnight low of 31 degrees, mostly clear sky this morning, average 17″ old snow. Tree wells are bare and growing, lots of snow has melted away from buildings, a few patches of bare ground on south facing hills. Finches and jays visiting. Overcast by mid-day, seeing more places where the snow pack in the street is breaking-up. Jays visiting. Fairly warm by mid-afternoon, gray overcast and melting, high of 52 degrees. Two pine squirrels chasing each other around the neighborhood just before dusk. Overcast at dusk, robin chirping. Cloudy at midnight.

Sunday (March 24) overnight low of 31 degrees, overcast and sprinkling this morning, average of 16″ old snow on the ground. Jays visiting. Very quite day. Mid-day steady light rain, low clouds – ridges socked in, high of 43 degrees. Stopped raining for a bit early afternoon, trees “twittering”, raven calling from the forest and jay visiting. Mid-afternoon low clouds and occasional drop of rain. Not raining late afternoon, gusty breezes early evening, then light rain at dusk.
————————–

RIP:

Daphne “Arlene” Pryor September

19, 1924 – March 21, 2019

Daphne “Arlene” McPheeters Pryor, passed away on Thursday, March 21, 2019. Arlene was born September 19, 1924 in Caldwell Memorial Hospital. She lived in the Lakeview community until she moved with her parents, Albert and Isa McPheeters, to Salem, Oregon. In 1938, the family moved back to Lakeview and she started school in 1931, graduating in 1939. She met and married Donald Wayne Pryor in 1942. Arlene lived with her parents in Culver, Oregon while Don was in the Army. Upon his return, they moved to New Meadows then the Nampa/Caldwell area where Don was employed with Union Pacific. They lived in Parma from 1956 to 1976 when Don retired and they moved to Nampa. Many wonderful winters were spent in the warm Arizona sun. Arlene was a loving and devoted mother to six children, Kay Curless (Jack), Sharon Korn (Dan), Vickie McArthur (Dave), Lorna O’Brezar, Phil Pryor (Roxie), and Jeff Pryor (deceased). She also became grandmother to many grandchildren, great-grandchildren, and great great-grandchildren whom Arlene loved so much. Arlene was an excellent seamstress and homemaker. She enjoyed cooking, crafts, collecting dolls, painting, and picnics with her family. She and Don were avid square dancers and loved traveling. Arlene has resided in Heron Springs Assisted Living since February of 2016. The family would like to thank the personnel and aides at Heron Springs and Idaho Home Health and Hospice for their loving care in Arlene’s final years. Arlene was preceded in death by her parents, Albert and Isa McPheeters; husband, Don Pryor; son, Jeff Pryor; siblings, Dalton McPheeters, Clarence McPheeters, Warren McPheeters, Edna Jessen, and Iona Clark. She is survived by her sister, Wilma Adsmond, who lives in Lebanon, Oregon; and sister-in-law, Marge Bolstridge. A graveside service will be held on Wednesday, March 27, 2019 at 3:00 PM at Wilder Cemetery District, off of Batt Corner Road in Wilder, Idaho.

Arrangements are under the direction and care of Alsip and Persons Funeral Chapel, 404 10th Avenue South, Nampa, Idaho. To visit Arlene’s online guestbook or to leave condolences please visit: http://www.alsippersons.com

[Phil and Roxy Pryor were former caretakers at Johnson Creek International]
———————

Idaho News:

Propane blast kills McCall man, injures teen

House on Fairway Drive leveled by Sunday explosion

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News March 21, 2019

20190321McCallExplosion-a
Aerial photo shows the devastation at the scene of Sunday’s propane explosion at 910 Fairway Dr. in McCall, destroying the house and throwing debris over a wide area.

A McCall man died and his granddaughter was critically injured on Sunday when a propane leak exploded at their home on Fairway Drive, obliterating the house and spreading debris over a wide area.

The body of Johnathan “Rob” Field, 69, was removed Sunday night from the rubble of his home at 910 Fairway Drive adjacent to the McCall Golf Course.

Field’s granddaughter, Belle Field, 15, was critically injured in the blast. The Heartland High School student was rescued from the basement of the house by responders and taken by air ambulance to a Boise hospital.

20190321McCallExplosionplume-a
A plume of smoke from Sunday’s propane explosion was visible from downtown McCall.

The cause of the blast was traced to a propane gas leak, McCall Fire & EMS Acting Chief Garret de Jong said Tuesday.

The leaking propane probably accumulated in the crawl space under the basement, de Jong said. Still to be determined is how the gas found its way into the crawl space and how it was ignited, he said.

Firefighters rushed to the home after the massive blast that occurred about 4:19 p.m. Sunday and found the home leveled, McCall Fire & EMS Chief Garrett de Jong said.

Glass shards, window frames, insulation and boards were scattered as far as 100 yards from the house.

Neighboring homes were severely damaged by the blast. Two buildings containing four townhomes caught fire and had broken windows, collapsed roof sections and foundation damage, de Jong said.

Investigators from the Idaho State Fire Marshal’s Office spent Monday and Tuesday on the scene searching for clues.

The results of the investigation will take “weeks to months” to complete, Idaho State Fire Marshal Knute Sandahl told The Star-News.

continued:
— — — —

‘They Had To Go’: McCall firefighters rescue teenager from wreckage of house

By Tom Grote for The Star-News March 21, 2019

Where others saw danger all around, Jon Metz and Jason Beck saw the need to save a life.

As employees of McCall Fire & EMS, Metz and Beck ignored danger and rescued a teenage girl trapped in the burning basement of house in McCall that had exploded minutes before on Sunday afternoon.

Metz, a firefighter/paramedic, and Beck, an firefighter/emergency medical technician, were walking from their ambulance in the parking lot at Albertsons when they spotted a plume of smoke rising from near the McCall Golf Course about 4:19 p.m.

Not waiting to be dispatched, the two sped to the scene at 910 Fairway Dr., where a hellish scene confronted them.

“It was complete chaos,” said Capt. Freddie Van Middendorp, the public information officer for McCall Fire & EMS.

The house had been leveled by an explosion, debris had been tossed over a wide area, damaging adjacent houses, and fires were raging throughout the scene.

Metz and Beck saw a bystander yelling into the now-exposed basement of the house. That is when they heard a girl’s voice, Van Middendorp said.

The girl, identified by neighbors as Isabelle “Belle” Field, 15, was screaming for help from the burning wreckage.

The two did not hesitate, even though McCall Fire & EMS has strict rules that say the safety of firefighters takes priority, Van Middendorp said.

“Our protocol is ‘our safety is first,’ but we will risk a lot to save a lot,” he said. “When they heard the screaming, in their words, they had to go.”

Donning heavy fire-resistant coats and grabbing a water-powered fire extinguisher from their ambulance, Metz and Beck leaped into the blast zone, working their way between areas that were not on fire toward the sound of Field’s voice.

“When we got to the girl we were surrounded by fire and another explosion went off,” Metz told The Star-News. “We covered the girl from a fireball and then dragged her about 20 feet out of the hot fire area.”

continued:
— — — —

‘His House Was Literally Gone’: Fairway Drive neighbors rocked by propane blast

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News March 21, 2019

Annelle Adams had just risen from a nap on Sunday afternoon when what seemed like a war zone erupted outside of her home on Fairway Drive in McCall.

“It was like three explosions, just rocking the house,” said Adams, 67. “It felt like bombs going off and windows were shattering and things were falling off the wall.”

Unknown to Adams, the home of her next-door neighbor, Johnathan “Rob” Field, had just exploded, sending trusses and debris skyward before raining down onto the roof of the two-unit townhome where she lives at 908 Fairway Drive.

The explosion, caused by leaking propane, killed Field, 69, and critically injured Field’s granddaughter, Belle, 15.

Russ Adams was equally confused by the commotion, first thinking something had slammed into the house before realizing the violence of the force that had shook it.

“My next thought was that an airplane or something had hit,” said Adams, 62. “We were just wanting to make sure our neighbors were okay.”

The couple tried to escape the house but found several of their doors jammed from the sheer power of the blast.

The couple finally made their way outside and discovered that the roof to the other side of the townhome, which was closer to the explosion, had caved in.

The residents of the other townhome, Don and Cindy Sterling, were unharmed and joined the Adamses outside to determine what happened.

“And then we looked over and saw the flames starting and realized that his (Field’s) house was literally gone,” Annelle Adams said.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

CPR, First Aid, to be taught in Donnelly April 1-2

The Star-News March 21, 2019

The Donnelly Fire Station will teach a CPR/AED and First Aid class on Monday and Tuesday, April 1-2, at 6 p.m.

The CPR/AED course will be on Monday, April 1, and First Aid on Tuesday, April 2.

Cost is $20, and space is limited. To register, call 208-325-8619.

source:
— — — — — — — — — —

Stretch of Highway 21 closes again due to avalanche

Mar 23, 2019 By Karen Lehr KIVI TV

Grandjean, Idaho — This may sound familiar: A stretch of Highway 21 between Lowman and Stanley is closed because of an avalanche.

The stretch of road near Grandjean just reopened last weekend after being closed for 25 days after more than 50 avalanches covered the highway in 60 feet of snow in some places .

The closure is in place between Warm Springs Creek Airport Road and The Custer – Boise County Line (23 to 35 miles south of the Stanley area).

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Bill limiting crop damage payments to farmers passes House

by Associated Press Saturday, March 23rd 2019

Boise, Idaho (AP) — Legislation to limit how much the Idaho Department of Fish and Game has to pay ranchers and farmers for damage to crops caused by elk, deer and other big game is headed to Gov. Brad Little.

The House on Friday voted 54-12 to approve the bill that would cap the amount paid for any single claim at 10 percent of the money in the Expendable Big Game Depredation Trust Account.

Backers say the cap is needed because a claim recently came in for $1 million, enough to wipe out the fund and eliminate smaller payments to others.

Those opposed to the bill say it lets Fish and Game off the hook when it comes to paying for damage to crops caused by big game.

source:
—————————-

Mining News:

3,000 Trees and 500 People

Mckinsey Lyon Midas Gold March 20, 2019

We just released our 2018 Sustainability Report and I am really proud to share it with you: http://www.MidasReport.com. This year’s report is centered around Midas Gold’s vision & values. After reading our report, I hope you will understand our dedication to living out our values through the work we do every day.

Here are a few of our proudest accomplishments from 2018:

* We know earning trust requires transparency. Last year, we brought more than 500 people up to our site to learn about our plans and see our daily operations.

* Our team spent 636 hours in local classrooms and afterschool programs teaching STEM education.

* The safety of our employees, consultants and the community is one of our top priorities. Last year, we partnered with St. Luke’s to help make our local schools safer by helping to provide them with Stop the Bleed kits.

* Midas Gold understands the importance of protecting Idaho’s star-studded skies. We hired a dark skies intern to help us determine what steps we can take to reduce light pollution associated with the Stibnite Gold Project. His work will help guide our engineering team into the future.

* Our company also continued our efforts to reduce erosion and, in turn, improve water quality and fish habitat by planting more than 3,000 trees at site which brings the total to over 55,000 trees over the last few years.

To see more of what our company was working on in 2018, read the full report. Please let me know if you have questions after reading it. You are welcome to share the report with friends and colleagues and on social media channels.
— — — —

Midas Gold Dark Skies Report

link:
— — — — — — — — — —

Updates to Idaho mining law heads to governor

by Associated Press Tuesday, March 19th 2019

Boise, Idaho (AP) — Legislation rewriting portions of Idaho’s mining law is headed to Gov. Brad Little.

The Senate on Tuesday voted 29-3 to approve the legislation backed by the Idaho Mining Association that updates the state’s nearly 50-year-old mining law.

Backers say the update is needed to protect the viability of Idaho mining from federal litigation, federal regulation and those opposed to mining.

Those opposed to the legislation say financial mechanisms intended to make sure companies pay for cleanup costs of abandoned mines could leave Idaho taxpayers with cleanup bills if a company declares bankruptcy.

On a related front, Idaho taxpayers are paying for ongoing cleanup at the Triumph Mine in central Idaho about 7 miles (11 kilometers) southeast and downstream of Sun Valley following the bankruptcy of a mining company there.

source:
———————–

Public Lands:

2019 Maintenance Schedule so far…

3/20/19

It is officially Spring!

As such, I wanted to give you all an accurate an update on the 2019 Payette NF Trail Maintenance Schedule…we are still dialing this in based on ongoing collaborations, pre-scheduled projects, annual maintenance priorities and other committed partnership projects. There is still some info coming in so this is not yet final. We should have a final plan ready for implementation by May.

For the partners… if you see a trail that isn’t scheduled and you are assuming otherwise, please follow-up with me as soon as you can and we can discuss it and either update the map or not. For the rest of you, this is information for your consideration.

Please visit this link to see what we have so far and if you have questions, please hit me up.

Trails Link:

Joshua Simpson
Recreation, Wilderness, Trails and Noxious Weeds Program Manager
Payette National Forest
Krassel Ranger District
— — — — — — — — — —

Secretary of Agriculture Award Received for Good Neighbor Authority Projects

March 22, 2019 News Release
Contact: Brian Harris (208) 634-0784 office (208) 634-6945 cell

McCall, ID. – Steve Kimball, Natural Resources Staff Officer on the Payette National Forest, was recently recognized with USDA Forest Service colleagues with a U.S. Department of Agriculture Secretary’s Honor Award for efforts to advance the Good Neighbor Authority (GNA) in the state of Idaho.

Kimball, along with Maureen Bookwalter from the Region 1 Office, Matt Staudacher from the Idaho Panhandle National Forest, Scott Godfrey from the Nez Perce-Clearwater National Forests, and Lynn Oliver from the Boise National Forest were recognized for outstanding execution of GNA projects in the state of Idaho. GNA is helping the USDA Forest Service improve forest conditions on National Forest System lands and supports the Department’s Strategic Goal #6 – “Ensure Productive and Sustainable Use of our National Forest System Lands.” The award was presented by U.S. Department of Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue and USDA Forest Service Chief Vicki Christiansen to representatives that were able to attend the ceremony in Washington, D.C. on March 12.

GNA was authorized under the 2014 Farm Bill and allows the USDA Forest Service to enter into partnership agreements with state forestry agencies to complete critical land management projects that restore and keep National Forest System lands healthy and productive. Idaho has spearheaded this national program since its inception, with five GNA timber projects sold in the state so far. Income from these sales is being used to complete restoration projects on National Forest System lands across the state.

Kimball has worked for the USDA Forest Service for 38 years, having spent the past 4 years on the Payette National Forest where he provided leadership on forest health restoration through the GNA and Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration program. He is set to retire in early April and we wish him the best of luck in his new adventures.

For more information about the Good Neighbor Authority, please visit http://www.fs.fed.us/managing-land/farm-bill/gna and http://www.idl.idaho.gov/forestry/gna. To view a short video of the award presentation, visit this link: https://spark.adobe.com/video/fd7Tl79u3z0Vk

Brian Harris
Public Affairs Officer
Payette National Forest
— — — — — — — — — —

Bill increases penalty for attacking Idaho parks officers

Mar 22, 2019 By Associated Press

Boise, Idaho (AP) — Legislation to increase penalties for a person who attacks an Idaho Parks and Recreation employee authorized to enforce state laws is heading to Gov. Brad Little.

The House voted 37-28 on Thursday to approve the change to make the punishment for assaulting an Idaho parks Compliance Enforcement Officer the same as assaulting police officers, public defenders, correctional officers, firefighter and others.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Interior boss order aims to protect US public land access

By Matthew Brown – 3/21/19 AP

Billings, Mont. — Acting U.S. Interior Secretary David Bernhardt ordered federal land managers on Thursday to give greater priority to access for hunting, fishing and other kinds of recreation when the government considers selling or trading public land.

The secretarial order comes amid longstanding complaints that millions of acres of state and federal land in the American West can be reached only by traveling across private property or small slivers of public land.

Bernhardt’s order requires the Bureau of Land Management to identify alternatives to access that could be lost during land sales or exchanges.

continued:
—————————-

Critter News:

Zero Scores Big

Avalanche rescue dog passes certification test

By Max Silverson for The Star-News March 21, 2019

Zero, a two year old border collie, passed her certification as an avalanche and cadaver dog with flying colors on Saturday.

Zero successfully found two volunteers “buried” in one of several snow caves dug for the test, which took place at the McCall Airport.

Zero, owned by Tori Swan of McCall, is now cleared to join the Valley County Search and Rescue team.

In order to gain the certification, Zero had to identify the correct burial location of the volunteers while ignoring several empty snow caves, Valley County Search and Rescue South Lieutenant Larry Scarborough said.

Zero also had to find three locations at the test site where a cadaver scent was placed. Anything less than 100 percent would be failing, Scarborough said.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Labrador retrievers still number one dog breed in the U.S.

Mar 20, 2019 By Jennifer Peltz KIVI TV

Labrador retrievers are still the most popular U.S. dog breed, but German shorthaired pointers are tugging on the top ranks of doggie pup-ularity.

That’s according to new American Kennel Club data being released Wednesday.

Labs topped the list for the 28th year in a row, followed by German shepherds, golden retrievers, French bulldogs and bulldogs.

Rounding out the top 10 are beagles, poodles, Rottweilers, German shorthaired pointers and Yorkshire terriers.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Pet Talk – Acne in cats

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt March 22, 2019 IME

Feline acne is the obstruction of hair follicles on the chin. The underlying cause and reason the problems develop are unknown. Underlying hormonal abnormalities are always suspected, but difficult to prove.

Early lesions consist of blackheads and black debris on the chin. Sometimes, mild scabbing, red bumps and pimples occur. Lesions may also involve the skin of the upper and lower lips. After time, the pimples can get larger and cause the hair follicles to rupture, which leads to discomfort and bloody drainage.

Diagnosis of feline acne is straight-forward, based on appearance of chin lesions. Rarely are biopsies or cultures necessary of the affected skin. The abnormal skin follicles are usually infected by staph bacteria, not transferable to people.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

KWVR Oregon Wolf Education weekly Wolf Report

Third week of March 2019
— — — — — — — — — —

Wyoming governor planning grizzly ‘summit’ with other states

Mar 22, 2019 By Associated Press

Casper, Wyo — Wyoming’s governor says he has spoken with governors of neighboring states about the possibility of holding a grizzly summit.

The Casper Star-Tribune reported Thursday that Wyoming Gov. Mark Gordon says he met with the governors of Montana and Idaho to discuss convening a summit to address the growing population of grizzly bears in the northern Rockies.

Gordon says Gov. Steve Bullock of Montana and Gov. Brad Little of Idaho are both open to the idea of a forum to discuss strategies for grizzly management.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Most radio-collared fawns and elk calves survived unusually snowy February

Mar 19, 2019 Local News 8

Despite February storms that battered much of Idaho and pushed snowpack and precipitation above average in most areas, radio-collared young fawns and elk calves were faring relatively well across the state through the end of February.

Through the end of February, 78 percent of the collared fawns and 94 percent of the calves were still alive.

That compares with 88 percent of the fawns and 97 percent of the calves surviving through February in 2017-18, and 55 and 80 percent in 2016-17.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Mustang Mania Training Incentive Program continues to grow

Mar 22, 2019 by Steve Dent KIVI TV

Boise — The Mustang Mania Training Incentive Program allows people to adopt a wild horse or burro, train it, and then showcase what the horse has learned later this summer in a competition in Nampa.

It’s part of a partnership with the Bureau of Land Management to help manage wild horse herds and it continues to grow in popularity. In the past six years, the Zimmerman’s out of Caldwell have helped 600 horses find new homes.

“We have 67 animals going into private homes, which gets them off the government’s feed bill,” said Matt Zimmerman. “So it’s kind of a win-win situation for everybody.”

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Horse owners advised to take precautions due to virus

March 21, 2019 AP

Utah’s state veterinarian is advising horse owners to limit travel for their animals and to take precautions because of multiple cases of an equine virus reported in neighboring Nevada.

Dr. Barry Pittman says the cases reported in Nevada involve horses that traveled on rodeo circuits but that all the specifics of possible exposure in Utah aren’t clear.

Nevada agriculture officials have ordered the quarantine of several horses that tested positive for an equine herpes virus after the state high school rodeo last month in Pahrump.

The Utah Department of Agriculture and Food says the virus is usually spread by direct horse-to-horse contact through the respiratory tract and nasal secretions but that it can also move indirectly through contact with physical objects that have virus contamination.

source:
— — — — — — — — — —

Helping wildlife while avoiding common pitfalls

US Fish and Wildlife

We’ve been seeing a lot of tips for providing food, water and nesting materials to animals. Unfortunately, many of those tips are misguided end up being detrimental to the species we all want to help. Here are a few pitfalls you should avoid and some great alternatives that will help keep animals safe!

Avoid: String, twine, yarn, dryer lint and pet hair

String, twine and yarn can get wrapped around the legs and necks of birds and nestlings, cutting off circulation and often resulting in death. Stringy items can also become a choking hazard if mistaken for food. Never offer dryer lint as it could contain chemicals that are harmful to birds. Pet hair may also be dangerous due to chemicals from flea treatments and shampoos.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Idaho Fish and Game Commission sets spring Chinook opening date

Mar 21, 2019 By Steve Bertel KIVI TV

Boise — The Idaho Fish and Game Commission has approved spring Chinook fishing on the Clearwater, Salmon and Little Salmon rivers.

Fishing will open on April 27, with a two-day-a-week season on the Clearwater River and a four-day-a-week season on the Salmon and Little Salmon rivers. The season will run until sport anglers’ shares of the harvest are met (which varies by river) or Aug. 11 -— whichever comes sooner.

“Due to very low projected returns the Upper Snake River in Hells Canyon, fisheries managers did not propose to open a spring Chinook season for the fishery this year,” according to Fish and Game spokesman Brian Pearson.

continued:
—————————–

Fish & Game News:

Seven wolves taken in control actions in the Lolo Elk Zone

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Supervisor
Tuesday, March 19, 2019

Control actions have been conducted in seven of the last eight years to boost elk herds

Idaho Fish and Game has completed wolf control actions in northern Idaho’s Lolo elk zone to improve elk survival in the area. Seven wolves were taken during the operation, which started in late February. The operation is consistent with Fish and Game’s Elk Management Plan and Lolo Predation Management Plan.

The control operation was paid for using Fish and Game license dollars transferred to the Idaho Wolf Depredation Control Board, created by the Idaho Legislature in 2014.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Trap Education Effort Partners with Rattlesnake Avoidance Training for Dogs

By Evin Oneale, Regional Communications Manager
Friday, March 22, 2019

Hunters and other dog enthusiasts now have another reason to attend the 24th annual Premier Rattlesnake Avoidance Training for Dogs event. Idaho Fish and Game officers will be holding a trap awareness seminar as part of the day’s events.

To register or just learn more about the training day, visit http://www.snakeavoidance.org, or contact event organizer Heidi Funke at hfunke3dk@gmail.com.

The combined event will be held at Veterans’ Memorial Park – State Street and Veterans’ Parkway in Boise – on Sunday, June 9th from 10:00am to 2:00pm. While the cost of the rattlesnake avoidance training is $65 for pre-registered dogs, the trap awareness seminar is free, with no appointment required.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Irrigators asked to contact Fish and Game before turning water on

By Mike Demick, Staff Biologist
Thursday, March 21, 2019

Ditch screens will be set, which safely return fish back to river or stream

To keep fish out of irrigation ditches, irrigators who divert water from local rivers and streams are asked to contact Idaho Fish and Game’s Anadromous Fish Screen Program at 208-756-6022 one week prior to turning their water on.

This will allow Fish and Game enough time to get all fish screens in place and fully operational, which will prevent trapping fish in the irrigation ditches.

continued:
— — — — — — — —

More F&G News Releases

https://idfg.idaho.gov/press
———————————-

Fun Critter Stuff:

This bison feels like all of us on the first day of spring

March 22, 2019 Circa

Randolph County, N.C. — One of North Carolina Zoo’s resident bison celebrated the first day of spring with what the zoo called a “happy dance” Wednesday.

continued w/video:
—————————

Seasonal Humor:

cmon-spring-a
————————-

Idaho History March 24, 2019

Yellow Pine School 1931-1959

Part 2

Early 1930s Yellow Pine

1930s-YellowPine-Idaho-Fritz-a

from the Mike Fritz Collection:
— — — — — — — — — —

History of the Yellow Pine School

by Emma Cox

1936-37 The third and present school was built of wood frame with one room for the classes and a woodshed included in the building. A large wood heater kept the classroom warm, as the teacher who was also a janitor started her fire at 5:00 a.m. An oil heater has been used in recent years.

1942-43 A victory tax was paid on the teacher’s salary according to records of the late Mr. Albert C. Behne, the founder of Yellow Pine. The Yellow Pine District paid $25 a month toward the teacher’s salary at Deadwood. Mrs. Bernice Chiarello had an enrollment of five pupils. Some of the records in the possession of a local resident show teachers’ salary ranged from $75 a month on up, with $5 a month for janitor work. According to records on hand, the largest enrollment in the little one-room school was 27 and that was in 1941-42.

1942 Nine pair of blinds were purchased from Montgomery Ward for the school at 39c. each for a total of $3.51.

excerpted from page 92 “Yellow Pine, Idaho” compiled by Nancy Sumner
— — — — — — — — — —

Present day Yellow Pine School

YPSchoolPresent-a

(from pg 131 “Idaho Mountains Our Home”)
— — — — — — — — — —

List of Teachers 1932 – 1957

1932-34 – Alice Johnson (Hawley)
1934-35 – Virginia Dougherty
1935-36 – Lucile Parsons
1936-38 – Elsie McKenzie
1938-40 – Allen K. Fritschle
1940-41 – Arthur Purnell
1941-42 – Geneva Quary
1942-44 – Ellen M. Ikola
1944-45 – Eileen Blackwell
1945-46 – Anna M. Hughes
1946-50 – Bertha White
1950-51 – Mrs. Brainard (1/2 Year) Mrs. Inman (1/2 year)
1951-52 – Bessie Williams (Sept-Dec) school closed
1952-55 – Fannie Roark
1955-56 – Mrs. Emma Bryant
1956-57 – Joseph A. Giroux

source: Emma Cox “Yellow Pine, Idaho” compiled by Nancy Sumner
— — — — — — — — — —

c. 1935-1945

1935-1945YPDogSledFreight-a

Freighting into Yellow Pine, Idaho in wintertime. I’m guessing from the type of sleigh and the man’s dress that this is around 1935-1945.

courtesy Neal Wickham
— — — — — — — — — —

Third School

“The building used today is the third school in Yellow Pine. It was built in 1936. The most students in one year, was 27 in 1941-42.”

excerpted from pages 33 “Three ‘R’s’ The Hard Way – One Room Schools of Valley County” by Duane L. Petersen, 2000
— — — — — — — — — —

1942 Yellow Pine

YP1942-a
Yellow Pine as it looked during the mining boom.

Photo from “The Middle Fork and the Sheepeater War” by Johnny Carrey and Cort Conley – copyright 1977
— — — — — — — — — —

Summer 1942 Yellow Pine

1942YellowPineFritz-a

photo from the Mike Fritz collection
— — — — — — — — — —

Yellow Pine School 1940s

by Emma Cox

In 1948 Janet was ready for school. I got a permit from the school superintendent, Doris Squires at Cascade, to teach her the first grade at home.

Roxie-5-(8)-a

Roxie (5) and Janet (6) Cox at the Dude Ranch
(from the VO Ranch collection, used with permission)

Roxie sat next to her sister while Janet was learning to read. No one noticed that Roxie was paying close attention. The next year we enrolled both of the girls, Janet in the second grade and Roxie starting first grade. Their teacher, Bertha White from Donnelly, thought at first Roxie was a very good reader for the first year. It didn’t take long for Mrs. White to discover that Roxie had memorized what was said while she looked at the picture on the page.

It made a long drive in the winter months, as we drove them to school in the mornings. We would come back to finish our chores, then go again about three. Sometimes Lafe and I both went, but usually one or the other. It was a distance of 40 miles with the two trips down and back. The heater in the little 1945 Jeep was not that great, but the girls never once complained about being cold. Nor did they complain of the roughness or anxiety of the trips. At different times the roads would be dusty, rough, icy or snow covered.

We both served on the Yellow Pine school board, I as clerk.

According to some of my records, a victory tax was paid on the teacher’s salary. The Yellow Pine district paid $25 to a teacher at the Deadwood Mine who had five pupils. The Yellow Pine teacher was paid $75 a month and $5 a month for janitorial work. School was heated by a wood heater.

The largest enrollment in the one-room school was 27 in the 1941-42 term.

Among the purchases were nine pairs of blinds for the tall windows, at 39 cents a blind.

excerpted from pages 133-134 “Idaho Mountains Our Home”
— — — — — — — — — —

Memories of a Yellow Pine Student

by Roxie (Cox) Himes

Roxie-6-a
Roxie Cox age 6 on Cracker Jack
(from the VO Ranch collection, used with permission)

I was raised on my parent’s dude ranch in the primitive area of Idaho.

V. O. Dude Ranch 1950s Post Card
VODudeRanch1950sPostCardFritz-a
from the Mike Fritz Collection

My dad went to school 10 miles away by dog team but we never did. We did ride the dog team but only around the house.


1st dog team for Cox’s in 1928. Lafe drove this team to school.
(from page 32 “Idaho Mountains Our Home”)

My parents had a little army jeep that they would drive us the 10 miles to school in and that was our school bus. Sometimes if it snowed hard and they would be late in picking us up they called the café owner and she would come to school and take us to the café and give us hot chocolate and always fresh baked cookies until the folks could come pick us up. Our school ran from 8am to 4pm. I never remember homework other than taking books home to read. The reason they drove the jeep to school is it would go through deep snow and was small enough to go around big rocks in the road.

P1000472-CoxJeep
Taking our girls 10 miles to school in the winter using our Jeep.
(from page 160 “Idaho Mountains Our Home”)

Our one room schoolhouse in Yellow Pine had students in grades 1 thru 8 with one teacher. There were times when we had high school students and they would come to school to do their correspondence work. Sometimes the older students would help us younger ones with our assignments when the teacher was busy with another student. Sometimes during recess we had one boy that could take the bell apart quickly when the teacher wasn’t looking so when the teacher picked up the bell to ring it to come back inside it would all fall apart and it would take her awhile to put it together so you got a longer recess.

The schoolhouse did not have electricity and heat was a wood stove. We all took turns packing wood for the stove and pumping water into a bucket for our drinking water. The bucket had a dipper that we all drank from. One day the older boys dared a young boy to put his tongue on the frozen water pipe handle and his tongue stuck to the handle. After carefully working by the teacher he was set free and the screaming stopped. Since we did not have indoor plumbing we had to use outhouses. There was one for the boys and one for the girls. We all would have to shovel snow to clear the path to the outhouses.

Our school celebrated every holiday that included all the community. From winding the maypole to large Christmas programs. We had box socials where you would decorate a box really pretty and put pies you baked in it. Whoever bought your box you would eat the pies with them. We would have play days of sledding with the parents and the community and would have hot dogs and hot chocolate after.

… I think my childhood and schooling was a lot different that other children my age… One difference was we did get trips like they do today but it was different. Our school was small but the mining town of Stibnite was 25 miles away on narrow gravel steep roads. They had a school, a hospitals, a bowling alley, restaurant and movie theater. Whenever the school showed a movie we would get to go watch it. One-time roads were bad and snowing hard and my dad drove our little jeep to the Stibnite school for the movie with 10 of us kids in it. We were crammed in there like sardines in a can.

Yellow_Pine_to_Stibnite_Idaho_Early_Days-a
Road Yellow Pine to Stibnite, Idaho (Early Days)
source: Idaho State Archives

They closed the school in Yellow Pine after my 4th grade as the mine in Stibnite closed and no one was left in the town with children to go to school. My parents hired the teacher that was teaching in Yellow Pine to teach us. They turned one of the cabins at the ranch into a schoolhouse for my sister and I. The teacher was qualified to teach elementary as well as high school. So we did this every year until my junior year in high school. She would teach us from the time school started in McCall until about the 15th of December. This was the end of hunting season and then we would move to Emmett for the school season and return to the ranch in early spring. Our teacher would get the lesson plans from Emmett and would always get us ahead of where the students in Emmett were. So we could relax for a week or so until they caught up and then we were back to studying again and we had homework there.

This was written for a Grandson’s school project. Roxie went to the Yellow Pine school in 49 50 51 52.

– excerpted from “Greyson’s school assignment on my life” from Roxie (Cox) Himes via personal correspondence March 13, 2019
— — — — — — — — — —

Pie Social at the School

by Emma Cox

Roxie-5-(6)-a
(photo from the VO Ranch Collection, used with permission)

While writing of our life at the dude ranch, we asked each of our girls to tell of a happening that comes to their mind today. There were many, but following are what came to each of them at he time of the question:

Janet said she will never forget a box social we all attended at the school at Yellow Pine. I made boxes in the shape of bugs, a big bug for me and smaller bugs, colored to resemble lady bugs, for the girls.

I filled the boxes with food, such as fried chicken, sandwiches, veggies, cake or cookies, and fruit. On arrival at the school we put our ‘bugs’ on a table with many other imaginatively decorated boxes and the girls waited expectantly for the bidding to start. The men bid on the boxes, with the highest bidder to eat with the lady or little girl who had brought the box.

An older man bought Janet’s ‘bug’ and she was so scared to be seated by him to eat that she could hardly swallow arty food. She said she will never forget that.

The money from the box or pie socials went to the school for supplies that were “extra” but needed. I remember one time one of my pies brought $75 and Murphy Earl purchased it. Everyone looked forward to these events.

excerpted from pages 130-131 “Idaho Mountains Our Home”
— — — — — — — — — —

Yellow Pine c. 1950

YellowPineC1950-a

Post Card delcampe.net
— — — — — — — — — —

The Year I Taught School

by Emma Bryant

In the summer of 1956 I went down to Boise to see if I could get a teacher up here, and the State Superintendent of Schools said, “Why don’t you take it?” My family pushed me into it. They thought that it would be wonderful for me. I was having a hard time adjusting to the loss of my husband in January.

I never regretted taking the job. It was a wonderful year. The children hadn’t had science, they hadn’t had music, and they hadn’t had any art. So it was really a fun year.

We had the old, old piano [the one Harry Withers tells the story about].** About once a month in the winter we had a covered-dish gathering on Friday and always square danced afterwards. There was always so much food left over that we all got together Saturday night too.

I lived in the teacherage, and we had Benjy the buck there (we raised two fawns that year). All the dogs accepted him as a friend and none chased him, you know. And I had a dog named Sheba. Every morning Benjy would come in and wake me up for his bottle. Finally, the nipple gave out and we found that he loved chocolate milk, so I made chocolate milk for him and pushed his head into the bowl. He was very obnoxious if he didn’t get his ration of milk for the day – and he was a grown buck by then – but every day I reduced the amount of chocolate until he was getting straight powdered milk. After the holidays he became too rambunctious for the children because the men up town teased him, so Dick Bailey took him down to South Fork where he got along fine, because they saw him the next year. The Fish and Game men had tagged him. He never came back because usually, you know, they get wild. He was a beautiful, beautiful buck.

That winter the water didn’t freeze at my teacherage, but it froze up town, so my supply was cut off after the first of the year. Vance Husky brought me 10 gallons of water per week. (Vance and Susan ran the store.) They couldn’t understand why one little lady had to use so much water. Why did she have to wash her hair every week and whatever? Once a week! My! That was too much. But the people from around Antimony Camp took pity on me, and every once in a while they would bring me an extra 10 gallons, which I certainly appreciated. I did melt quantities of snow water that winter, and I found out that snow doesn’t have very much water in it.

The water situation didn’t improve until the first of April when it finally thawed out, so I moved back up here to the ranch and commuted with the Baileys, Ethel and Dick, and their two children Connie and Bob. They had come up to live with me. They had lived where the Colenbaugh cabin is.

Anyway it was a wonderful year. I enjoyed the children and there were no disciplinary problems, thank God. I started the year with ten children and when school finished I think I still had seven. That was the year they hauled the machinery out of Stibnite and some of the families who had been living in Yellow Pine moved out.

from (pages 95-96) “Yellow Pine, Idaho” compiled by Nancy G. Sumner

see also: Bryant Ranch History
— — — — — — — — — —

1950’s Yellow Pine

1950sYellowPine-a

photo courtesy of Earl Waite (taken by his father) Note: The photo of Yellow Pine giving the credit to Earl Waite was taken by my dad, Lawrence Smith, in the 1950’s. – Ron Smith
— — — — — — — — — —

Yellow Pine School in 2010

20101210-Schoolhouse-a

by Local Color Photography
— — — — — — — — — —

Reference books:

“Yellow Pine, Idaho” compiled by Nancy Sumner
(this book can be purchased in Yellow Pine from Marj Fields)
“Idaho Mountains Our Home” by Lafe and Emma Cox – Copyright 1997 by V.O. Ranch Books
(this book can be purchased by writing to: VO Ranch Books, P O box 173, Emmett, Idaho 83617. Also available at Watkin’s Pharmacy in Cascade.)
“Three ‘R’s’ The Hard Way – One Room Schools of Valley County” by Duane L. Petersen, 2000
(this book is available at Watkin’s Pharmacy in Cascade.)
The Mike Fritz collection of Yellow Pine photos
—————————–

Yellow Pine Schools 1920-1930 part 1

page updated Aug 2, 2019

Road Reports March 24, 2019

It may be Spring in the valley (and on the calendar), but its still winter in the Back Country. The only way to get to Yellow Pine is via the South Fork route, advised to carry chains. Be aware of winter conditions there is a LOT of snow in the back country, travel at your own risk and remember there is no cell phone service. Roads are likely ice and snow covered, trees and/or rocks may be down in the road. Higher elevation roads are closed. Conditions change quickly this time of year. Please share road reports.

Yellow Pine: It has been dry with warm days and cold nights this last week. Local streets are snow/ice covered and starting to break up in places. Getting slushy in sunny places during the warm part of the day, hard and crunchy at night.
Click for Local Forecast.
Yellow Pine Webcam: (check date on image)

Warm Lake Highway: No recent reports. Report Wed (Mar 20) Warm Lake Hwy is pretty much bare in the lower parts, icy ruts and breaking up over the top, rough going.
SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

Highway 55 Webcams Link:
A warning from ITD about pot holes in the canyon between Smith’s Ferry and Banks. The road is falling apart! Advised to use Hwy 95.

South Fork Road: Report Thurs (March 21) Watch for pot holes on the South Fork. Report Fri (March 22) mail truck driver said it was a “rough trip in.”
Note: The SF is the best it can be with what equipment we have available. It is posted on top of SF to put chains on when snow covered and as a reminder you travel the back country roads at your own risk. – CD
Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′

EFSF Road: Report Thurs (Mar 21) Watch for Rocks in the “Bowling Alley” and around Reegan Creek Bridge. Conditions change hourly. Report Friday (Mar 22) that the EFSF road had been cleared of rocks. Be mindful of falling rock.
20190321BowlingAlleyEFSF-a
March 21, 2019 EFSF Road “Bowling Alley” photo by Chris Eaton

Lower Johnson Creek Road: No recent reports. Last report Saturday (March 16) a few bare spots, starting to break up, road is pretty good.
Note to drivers – when traveling to the dump, please use the river side of the road for wheeled vehicles so the hill side can be for snowmobilers. Turnouts will be plowed.
Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam:

Upper Johnson Creek Road: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcam: (check date on image)

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Midas Gold is keeping the road open.
Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The approx elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′

Payette Avalanche Advisory
link:

Valley County Grooming Reports
link:

Snowmobile Trail Map – Warm Lake & Johnson Creek areas
link:
——————————-

Weather Reports Mar 17-23, 2019

Mar 17 Weather:

At 1030am it was 25 degrees, mostly hazy sky and filtered sun. Overcast at 1pm. At 330pm it was 50 degrees and mostly clear, light breezes. At 8pm it was 35 degrees and mostly clear – high haze. At 1030pm there was a bit of haze, fuzzy moon, just the brightest stars (and planets.)

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time March 18, 2019 at 10:30AM
Clear, light breeze
Max temperature 53 degrees F
Min temperature 16 degrees F
At observation 26 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 22 inch (est)
— — — — — — — — — — — —

Mar 18 Weather:

At 1030am it was 26 degrees, clear sky and light breeze. Clear and breezy at 1pm. At 4pm it was 53 degrees, clear and light breeze. At 8pm it was 35 degrees, clear and calmer, almost full moon up before dark. At 11pm it was clear.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time March 19, 2019 at 10:30AM
Clear very blue sky, light breeze
Max temperature 53 degrees F
Min temperature 17 degrees F
At observation 30 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 21 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

Mar 19 Weather:

At 1030am it was 30 degres and clear very blue sky, light breeze. Sunny at noon. At 345pm it was 56 degrees and sunny. At 830pm it was 35 degrees and clear. At 1030pm it appeared to be a tiny bit hazy, rainbow ring around the moon.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time March 20, 2019 at 10:30AM
Clear
Max temperature 58 degrees F
Min temperature 19 degrees F
At observation 30 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 20 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

Mar 20 Weather:

At 1030am it was 30 degrees and clear. At 330pm it was 60 degrees and sunny, gusty breezes. Starting to get a few clouds and haze late afternoon. At 820pm it was 38 degrees and partly hazy. Bright moon with halo at 1030pm.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time March 21, 2019 at 10:30AM
Mostly clear, a few clouds to the south
Max temperature 62 degrees F
Min temperature 20 degrees F
At observation 31 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 19 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

Mar 21 Weather:

At 1030am it was 31 degrees, mostly clear – a few clouds to the south. Mostly cloudy at 1245pm. At 330pm it was 56 degrees and mostly clear. At 410pm it was mostly cloudy. At 810pm it was 38 degrees and appears to be mostly hazy. At 1220am it was 32 degrees and mostly cloudy.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time March 22, 2019 at 10:30AM
Mostly cloudy (thin), slight breeze
Max temperature 60 degrees F
Min temperature 23 degrees F
At observation 34 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 18 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

Mar 22 Weather:

At 1030am it was 34 degrees, mostly cloudy (thin haze) and slight breeze. At 1230pm it was 47 degrees and mostly cloudy. At 3pm it was 54 degrees, mostly cloudy and gusty breezes. At 810pm it was 38 degrees, calm and high thin haze.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time March 23, 2019 at 10:30AM
Mostly clear
Max temperature 55 degrees F
Min temperature 31 degrees F
At observation 39 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 17 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

Mar 23 Weather:

At 1030am it was 39 degrees and mostly clear. By 1pm it was mostly cloudy, thicker darker clouds. At 4pm it was 50 degrees and gray overcast. At 8pm it was 39 degrees and overcast. At 9pm it was 37 degrees and cloudy.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time March 24, 2019 at 10:30AM
Overcast and sprinkling
Max temperature 52 degrees F
Min temperature 31 degrees F
At observation 38 degrees F
Precipitation Trace
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 16 inch
—————————-

Road Reports March 20, 2019

It may be Spring in the valley (and on the calendar), but its still winter in the Back Country. The only way to get to Yellow Pine is via the South Fork route, advised to carry chains. Be aware of winter conditions there is a LOT of snow in the back country, travel at your own risk and remember there is no cell phone service. Roads are likely ice and snow covered, trees and/or rocks may be down in the road. Higher elevation roads are closed. Conditions change quickly this time of year. Please share road reports.

Yellow Pine: It has been dry with warm days and cold nights the last few days. Local streets are snow/ice covered and starting to break up in places. Getting slushy in sunny places during the warm part of the day, hard and crunchy at night. Measured 20″ snow on the ground by the school March 20th. Click for Local Forecast.
Yellow Pine Webcam: (check date on image)

Warm Lake Highway: Report Wed (Mar 20) Warm Lake Hwy is pretty much bare in the lower parts, icy ruts and breaking up over the top, rough going.
SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

Highway 55 Webcams Link:
A warning from ITD about pot holes in the canyon between Smith’s Ferry and Banks. The road is falling apart! Advised to use Hwy 95.

South Fork Road: Report Wed (March 20) mail truck driver (Robert) says the ice is breaking up in sunny places on the upper end, icy ruts. The lower parts are a mix of bare pavement and thick ice, rough and slow going.
Note: The SF is the best it can be with what equipment we have available. It is posted on top of SF to put chains on when snow covered and as a reminder you travel the back country roads at your own risk. – CD
Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′

EFSF Road: Report Wed (Mar 20) The road is starting to break up a little on the lower end, mostly smooth ice floor. Said there were a couple of big rocks down but easy to get around.

Lower Johnson Creek Road: Last report Saturday (March 16) a few bare spots, starting to break up, road is pretty good.
Note to drivers – when traveling to the dump, please use the river side of the road for wheeled vehicles so the hill side can be for snowmobilers. Turnouts will be plowed.
Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam:

Upper Johnson Creek Road: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.
Big Creek Webcam: (check date on image)

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Midas Gold is keeping the road open.
Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The approx elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′

Payette Avalanche Advisory
link:

Valley County Grooming Reports
link:

Snowmobile Trail Map – Warm Lake & Johnson Creek areas
link:
——————————-