Monthly Archives: May 2019

Road Reports May 29, 2019

As of today, Landmark is still snowed closed, but getting closer to opening. The only way to get to Yellow Pine right now is via the South Fork route. There is still a lot of snow in the high country left to melt, rivers are rising a bit. Be prepared for rocks and trees in the road, travel at your own risk and remember there is no cell phone service. Conditions can change VERY quickly this time of year. Please share road reports.

Yellow Pine: It has been fairly dry the last 3 days, roads are drying out. Please respect residents and slow down!
Click for Local Forecast.
Yellow Pine Webcam: (check date on image)

Warm Lake Highway: Clear
SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

Highway 55 Webcams Link:
Work to repave Idaho Highway 55 from milepost 91 to milepost 97 near Smiths Ferry will begin Thursday, May 9th and continue until the end of June, according to Idaho Transportation Department officials.
During the work, traffic will be reduced to a single lane, controlled by flaggers and a pilot car. Motorists should plan for delays of up to thirty minutes. Work will not be done after 12 noon Fridays through the weekends.

South Fork Road: Wednesday (May 29) mail truck driver (Dean) reports no trees or rocks down, said there is a backhoe working along the road (sounds like they are cleaning ditches.)
Note: The maintenance by Valley County has ended for the season and turned back to the USFS.
Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
South Fork Stream Gauge:

EFSF Road: Road is clear, getting some potholes.

Lower Johnson Creek Road: Locals went and cut the trees out of the road early this week. Report May 28 – the snow line is at “Trout Creek. You can drive all the way to the pavement in 2WD.” -KA
Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam:
Johnson Creek Stream Gauge:

Upper Johnson Creek Road: Closed at Landmark – but getting close to opening.
The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcam: (check date on image)

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Road is still closed. Report that work was stopped last week while they assessed the situation.
Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Closed to wheeled vehicles (snow and the Stibnite Slide.)
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The approx elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′
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May 26, 2019 The Yellow Pine Times

May 26, 2019 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Community Calendar:

April 2 – Boil water order issued
Every Sunday – 11am Fire Training
May 10 – Burn “permits” required
May 15 – Firewood Season opens
June 8 – VYPA meeting 2pm Community Hall
June 11 – Yellow Pine Vet Clinic
June 15 – 10am YPFD meeting at the Fire Hall
June 20 – Festival meeting Thursday 2pm at the Community Hall
June 27 – (confirmed) Noxious Weed Spray day
June 29 – Highland Games
July 2 – Ice Hole Campground opens
July 6 – Golf Tournament & Breakfast
July 7 – Annual YPWUA Meeting 10am Community Center
July 13 – 10am YPFD meeting at the Fire Hall
July 13 – Ride to Big Creek
July 20 – VYPA meeting 2pm Community Hall
July 27 – Festival meeting Saturday 2pm at the Community Hall
July 27 – Memorial and potluck for Wilbur Wiles (Big Creek/Edwardsburg)
Aug 10 – VYPA meeting 2pm Community Hall
Sept 14 – 10am YPFD meeting at the Fire Hall budget meeting
Sept 14 – Ride to Cinnabar
Sept 21 – VYPA meeting 2pm Community Hall

(details below)
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Local Events:

Memorial Weekend

May 25 – ATV-UTV Scavenger Hunt Memorial Day Weekend

The Corner will be opening up on Memorial Day Weekend with Willie and The Singlewides playing Saturday, 5/25.

May 26 – Celebration of Life 2pm-5pm Yellow Pine Tavern
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June 11 – Vet Day

On Tuesday June 11th the Cascade Vet clinic will be coming to Yellow Pine. Please call (208) 382-4590 to get on the list.
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June 29 – Highland Games

For the second year, Bald Mountain Knuckle Draggers will bring the Highland Games to Yellow Pine on June 29th. Last year they donated over $2,600 to the Helipad and this year money will be raised for the water department. Come see these fantastic athletes and support the water department.
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Ice Hole Campground Will open July 2nd

The Campground has been temporarily closed to provide for public safety during reconstruction. This order will be in effect from September 27, 2018 through July 2, 2019, unless rescinded earlier by the Forest Supervisor. (0402-04-80)
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Golf Tournament July 6

It’s time to plan for the annual 4th of July Yellow Pine Golf Tournament. This year the proceeds will support the Community Hall and road repair.

The event will begin July 6th at 11am at the golf course, where the fairways aren’t fair and the greens aren’t green. The cost will remain the same at $50 per couple for sponsoring a hole with a sign displayed. $20 for individuals, each person playing will get a ticket for beer, additional tickets can be purchased for $3. Soda and water are free. Checks can be written to VYPA (Village of Yellow Pine Association)

There will be prizes for first, second and third places for men’s women’s and mixed. Also, there will be a prizes for closest to the pin. Spots go quickly, so be one of the first!

There will be a hearty breakfast at the museum from 8-10. The cost is $6 and all proceeds benefit the upkeep of the museum.
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Noxious Weed Spray day June 27

We have a confirmed date of Thursday, June 27th for the Yellow Pine Noxious weed spray day. Mark your calendars, hope to see you there.

Hello Yellow Pine,

I’m beginning my transition from snow plowing to noxious weed control. Yellow Pine is 1st on my list to start talking about dates to schedule our 2nd annual noxious weed Homeowners assistance spray day. Last year we got together on Thursday, July 19, 2018. I have June 27, 2019 marked on my calendar.

We had really good participation last year but we can do better, lets start talking now and get more people involved as it is “Everyone’s responsibility to control Noxious and Invasive plants”. I think last years event went very well, we will try and be a little more organized this year, if we missed someone put them on top of the priority list. I will bring my entire crew, all of our equipment, PPE, and mixed herbicide, you provide the volunteers, we’re here to help you not do it for you.

I misplaced 1-backpack sprayer last year, please keep your eyes peeled in case we laid it down someplace or forgot to pick it up.

Spread the word, save the date. I look forward to hearing from you. The best way to contact me this time of year is through e-mail, I will be in and out of the office until May, I check my e-mails daily but I can’t always respond until I get back into the office.

Thank you,
Steve Anderson
Valley County Weed and Pest Control
SAnderson@co.valley.id.us
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Celebration of Life – Wilbur Wiles

Potluck celebration of life at his cabin 27 July.
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2019 Yellow Pine Escapades

The 2019 schedule for the Yellow Pine Escapades has been updated on the website!

Expect new escapades this coming year, including an ATV-UTV Photo Scavenger Hunt; two (yes, two) ATV-UTV rides, a golf tournament, and even a community yard sale. Other events will be added to the calendar as plans are finalized.

Join us for a great season of fun! The starting point for fun in Yellow Pine! The website includes information on the events hosted by the Yellow Pine Community Hall as well as the other “goings-on” in the village. Food, lodging and fuel are available in Yellow Pine. link:
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Village News:

Dust Abatement

I am in process of obtaining cost and date information. Please let me know if you are interested in dust abatement this year.

Deb Filler, fillerd2@live.com, 208.633.6945
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Firewood Permits May 15

The Corner has firewood permits in stock now. 4 cord minimum at $6.25 per cord. Please call to make sure I’m around before Memorial Day, bring drivers license and cash is preferred, no CC.
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Spring Fuel Delivery

Diamond Fuel & Feed will be going to the back country soon. They are waiting for Johnson Creek to open up and dry out enough for their truck to travel on. If you would like to be put on the schedule for fuel delivery please call the office at 208-382-4430 and let them know.

Thanks, Megan 5/15/2019
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Wildland Firefighter Memorial Project

2019-WildlandFirefighterMemorialProject-a
(click image for large size)

Last week the Forest Service began using the funds that we raised last fall to make trail improvements at the 5EV crash site. The funds were partially used to purchase landscaping stones for the trail. We are working now on finding a supplier for the individual plaques for each firefighter with the remaining funds and what we expect to raise again this year. Thank you all for the help and support for the project. Attached find the pictures of the improvements made to the trail.

– Matt Huber – The Corner
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Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Received a report on May 17 that the Transfer Station was emptied the previous week. We have started having an issue with the burn pile already. READ the SIGNS!

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

Yellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is located approximately 3 miles south on Johnson Creek Road.

The TRANSFER STATION is for household trash and yard waste:
* Household trash must be put inside (and fit) the dumpster;
* Yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, et.) goes in the burn pile on the south end of the turn-around;
* Cardboard boxes should be flattened before putting the in the dumpster,

The DUMPSTERS are NOT for:
* Furniture (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station).

The BURN PILE is NOT for:
* Cardboard boxes (flatten and put in dumpster);
* Furniture and appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Drywall and building material (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wire or fencing (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Foam Rubber (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wood with metal (like nails) attached (take to Donnelly Transfer Station.)

When closing the DOORS on the front of the dumpsters:
* Make sure the “U” brackets at the top and bottom of the door are engaged;
* The retaining bar at the middle of the door is slid into the pipe;
* And the “L” bars at the bottom of the doors dropped into place.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: 208/634-7176
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Roads

Johnson Creek Road

5/14 I rode Johnson Creek last night to Halfway and was blocked by snow there, county road graders are working on this end cleaning ditches. No major slides or sluffs between YP and Halfway. – Matt

Stibnite Road Update

5/24 – work stopped this week for agencies to evaluate the situation.
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Tick Season

Please check your pets (and kids) for ticks, a tick bite paralysed a local dog recently, removal of the tick led to full recovery.


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History of the log cabin at the Cemetery

The Cemetery Committee is interested in any information on the cabin that is located by the cemetery. We know that it had been on the property that was known as “Mary’s Cabins”. It was moved by Tom Richter while the Filler’s were building their house. Donna Valdez said that the people who ran the cafe and bar slept there, before the Tavern was built.

Do people have pictures or any information they can share? We’d love to put a plaque up on the cabin while we repair it.

– Marj Fields
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Come Spring…

“To Yellow Pine residents. I will be making several trips next spring and summer hauling out metal, appliances, etc. . If you need anything hauled away please get on the list. Vehicles require a title. I will be hauling gravel back if anyone is interested.”

Contact Mike Amos
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Yellow Pine US Mail

We are still on 3-day a week mail delivery from Cascade. Staring in June we will have 6-day a week delivery. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 55 cents
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Predators

Watch for mean mamma does this time of year – they will stomp your dogs!

Bears are out of hibernation and hungry. Please do not leave pet food outdoors and remember to keep trash secured, it will draw bears, foxes, coyotes and loose dogs.

Reminder for people living in bear country:

* Garbage should be stored inside the house or in a secure garage or storage building.
* If garbage cannot be stored in a secure location, a bear-resistant container approved by the Interagency Bear Committee is recommended.
* Avoid using bird feeders from March through November. Birds do not need supplemental feeding this time of year.
* Pet food should not be left outside.
* BBQ grills or anything with a strong odor should not be left out at night.
* Protect gardens, beehives, and compost piles with electric fencing.
* Never intentionally feed bears. A food-conditioned bear may pose a threat to human safety and usually results in the removal of the bear.
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Local Groups:

YPWUA News:

2019 YPWUA Yearly Meeting

Sunday July 7th 10am Community Center

1. Financial Report – Willie
A. Current Account
B. Budget
C. Future rate increases
D. New Procedure Actions for Non-Payment

2. Operations Report – Steve
A. Current Operations
B. Chlorine levels
C. Grant and work necessary
D. Boil Order Notification
E. Future Grants
F. Summer lawn watering

3. Election of Board Members
A. Dawn Brown and Stu Edwards, both are automatically nominated
Only shareholders can run and vote

4. Questions

Water Update May 19th

The refurbished and rebuilt altitude valve and control valve were successfully reinstalled today restoring automatic control of the level in the water storage tanks. There is plenty of water available, there should be no supply concern for the holiday weekend. As of today, water plant output capacity exceeds 60,000 gallons per day.

The boil water advisory will need to remain in effect due to continued high water demand. Non-approved filter maintenance continues to be required to keep water flowing at such a high rate. Water demand is estimated at more than 30,000 gallons per day. The ongoing concern is reducing water usage due to leaks. Clearly citizens are not using that much water day to day. The water is going somewhere, the best explanation is additional leaks in the system.
– Warren Drake

link to: #4430059 Yellow Pine Water Users Boil Water Notification 4-2-19.pdf

link to: 2018 September Water Department Update.docx
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VYPA News:

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting Agenda

June 8, 2019; 2pm; at the Community Hall

1. Call to Order
2. Approval of the prior meeting minutes
3. Treasurer’s Report
4. Annual Community Hall Committee Written Report
5. Cemetery Committee Oral Report
6. Harmonica Festival Committee Oral Report
7. Nominations Committee Selection (Chairman, Treasurer, Member-At-Large)
8. Old Business:
– a. Transfer Station signage
– b. Update from Midas Gold
– c. Update on Community Hall Toilet Progress
– d. Update from YP Water Assn (if representative is available)
– e. Update from YPFD/Heli-spot (if representative is available)
9. New Business:
– a. Dust Abatement
– b. Discussion – Options for 2019 Midas Gold Community Agreement Payment – (Suggestions received so far: Give to Heli-Spot; Repair Abstein Road as identified in 2014; Resurfacing & Fixing holes in Village roads; Survey of Village property lines; Dust Abate all village roads; Install a permanent outhouse downtown to reduce impact on businesses; Give to Water Users Association for replacing water lines; Give to Community Hall Toilet committee; Purchase road-sized canopy to provide shade to audience during festival; build a playground for kids)
10. Adjournment

VYPA Meeting Dates 2019

June 8th; July 20th; August 10th; September 14th – 2pm at the Community Hall.

Note that the July 20th meeting is not on the second Saturday due to a conflict with a planned ATV rally involving many residents and visitors.

Yellow Pine Harmonica Meetings 2019:

March 30, 2019 Saturday 2pm at the Tavern
April 23, 2019 Tuesday 2pm at the Tavern *Cancelled*
May 23, 2019 Thursday 2pm at the Community Hall
June 20, 2019 Thursday 2pm at the Community Hall
July 27, 2019 Saturday 2pm at the Community Hall
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YPFD News:

There was a YPFD meeting on May 18th at the Fire Hall

Meetings will be held at the fire station at 10:00am and everyone is welcome to attend. June 15th; July 13th; and Sept 14th (which will also be the budget meeting as well).

Every Sunday 11am – Training

May 10th Burn Permits – contact the YPFD

Pile burning: Dress appropriately, have enough help on hand (people, water and tools) and make a firebreak before you start. Call your local fire protection district chief to let them know you’ll be conducting a debris burn. This saves them from sending emergency responders to your property if they are not needed.

Bring it, Don’t Burn it

For us in Yellow Pine, Jake Strohmeyer, Dist. Ranger with the Boise NF said we can use the area at our transfer station for yard debris and the FS will burn it once a year. Please no furniture, mattresses, construction debris, metal objects, tires or personnel junk. Please only woody yard debris. When using the pile please be mindful of where you place the debris as it should be contained to a manageable burnable area and kept as clean as possible. – JF

Training: Sunday Fire/EMS training has begun. Sundays at 11:00 AM unless otherwise posted. If Jeff F is in town the trainings will be held. All are welcome.

Safety Message: The best place to be during an avalanche, rock fall or a tree fall due to the wind is not there, please use extreme caution and common sense when conditions exist for these scenarios.

“If you are an Adventurist, please do not go out alone in steep areas. The spring thaw is an extremely dangerous time for Avalanches. The freezing and thawing create layers that break away from each other with the slightest disturbance. Scree fields are especially dangerous this time of year because of hidden ice that makes them even more unstable. Please be careful out there.”

YP Helispot: We are working with Valley County Road Department and the Boise National Forest for the rock base for the road leading into the Helispot and the actual Helispot itself. We are also receiving rock for the Fire Hydrants, water tank foundations, etc. The rock will come from the Valdez pit and will be less expensive than having it trucked in from Cascade.

Stop the Bleed Course: This course was well attended in the Fall and Jeff F and Ann F will be presenting another course when the new instructor material comes out. There are “Stop The Bleed” kits at the Tavern in an emergency.

Siren Testing: The YPFD siren will be tested only once this year on the first of May at noon. 3 blasts of the siren is a test, more than 3 is an Emergency.

-JF
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Biz Listings:

Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377

May be opening Memorial weekend.
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The Corner (208) 633-3325

Opening Memorial Weekend, Firewood Permits available
The Corner Store will also be open with snacks, groceries, fresh produce, soda, ice and packaged beer. If you know you will be coming in over the summer and need special grocery orders, let me know and I will order it in for you while you are here, 2 deliveries a week. The best way to get a hold of me is to call or stop by and say hello.
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Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233

Winter Hours at the Tavern: 9am-2pm and 4-8pm Mon, Wed, Fri, Sat and 9am-2pm Sun. Or call 208 633-2233 the phone rings into the house.
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Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Tom & Sarah Lanham
156 Yellow Pine Ave, Yellow Pine Id 83677
Website:
Link to FB page:

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
208-315-3554 cabin rentals
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
Link to website:
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Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed (208) 382-4430 – Wild Bird Seed 50LB Bag for $25.58
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Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, Will service Yellow Pine

B&T Safety Solutions LLC
208-271-1600 Based out of Donnelly
Snow removal, cleaning chimneys and stoves, we do cabin staining/chinking as well
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (May 20) overnight low of 39 degrees, mostly cloudy sky this morning. Black-headed grosbeaks and finches visiting. Overcast and slight breeze mid-day. Occasional drops of rain mid to late afternoon, light breezes and mostly cloudy, high of 58 degrees. A few finches and grosbeaks visiting. Blustery by early evening, dark clouds and windy by late evening. Started raining after dark. Probably rained on and off most of the night.

Tuesday (May 21) overnight low of 38 degrees, breezy, low overcast and ridges socked in this morning, splatters of rain on and off. Tree swallows left, but lots of finches and black-headed grosbeaks, a few humming birds, ground squirrels still underground. Light rain and sprinkles all morning and into the early afternoon, very low clouds – ridges socked in. Ground squirrels out, finches and a brown-headed cowbird at the feeders, a couple of hummingbirds feeding. Sprinkles on and off mid-afternoon, high of 52 degrees. Breaks in the clouds late afternoon. Elk running pretty hard across the golf course just before dusk. Cloudy at dusk and calm. Lots of robins chirping just before dark. Rain shower after dark. Cloudy and calm before midnight.

Wednesday (May 22) overnight low of 37 degrees, mostly cloudy and breezy this morning. The tree swallows came back, finches mobbing the feeders. Black-chinned, rufus and calliope hummingbirds visiting. Red-winged blackbird visited before lunch time. Overcast and quite breezy mid-day. Ray was driving the mail truck today, said FS working on South Fk road and County working on EFSF road. Steller jay visited, Pine squirrel chasing the golden mantel squirrel around, ground squirrels active. Breaks in the clouds mid-afternoon and bits of sunshine, gusty breezes, high of 57 degrees. Cloudy and lighter breezes by early evening, red-winged blackbird singing from the power lines. Patches of stars before midnight.

Thursday (May 23) overnight low of 34 degrees, partly cloudy and light breezes this morning. Lots of swallows and finches, both evening and black-headed grosbeaks along with a red-wing blackbird visiting, pine squirrel chased the golden mantle, ground squirrels active. A rather loud airplane circled over at 951am. Red-breasted nuthatch visiting the suet feeder. Brown-headed cowbirds and red-wing blackbird with the finches for lunch. Dark clouds and breezy mid-day. Pine squirrel busy moving pine cones from here to there. Breezy mid-afternoon, dark clouds to the south and clearing to the north, high of 62 degrees. Overcast and breezy late evening Cloudy and calmer at dusk, robins and blackbirds calling. Calm and cloudy before midnight.

Friday (May 24) overnight low of 36 degrees, mostly clear sky this morning. Swallows calling and swooping, finches mobbing the feeders and robins chirping. Ground squirrels, chipmunks, golden mantels and pine squirrels active. Overcast and breezy mid-day, rain showers started at 1pm. Mid-afternoon cool, dark overcast and very light little sprinkles, high of 60 degrees. Lots of finches, a few grosbeaks and blackbirds. Broken clouds and a little sun late afternoon, then dark clouds by early evening and a couple rain drops. Cloudy and calm at dusk, robins and blackbirds calling. Cloudy and calm after midnight.

Saturday (May 25) overnight low of 43 degrees, dark overcast this morning. Robins, swallows and finches calling. Increasing traffic. Breezy and dark clouds mid-day. A little rain shower early afternoon. Red-wing blackbird with the finches and steller jays visiting. Dark clouds and a little breezy mid-afternoon, high of 62 degrees. Shooting on the lower golf course started around 430pm, until after 5pm. Light sprinkles in the evening. Brown-headed cowbirds and red-winged blackbirds visiting with the finches. Steady light rain at dusk and low clouds sitting down on the mountains, a few robins calling. Stopped raining before midnight.

Sunday (May 26) overnight low of 39 degrees, dark low clouds and ridges socked in this morning, light sprinkles of rain. Swallows, finches, robins and red-winged blackbirds calling, chipping sparrows foraging on the ground. A few breaks in the clouds and not raining mid-day. Black-headed grosbeaks and pinesiskins with the finches. Short little shower early afternoon and overcast. A few hummingbirds visiting. Overcast and a bit breezy mid-afternoon, high of 61 degrees. Breaks in the clouds late afternoon, partly cloudy by early evening.
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Idaho News:

Idaho 55 back open after stalled-out RV blocks the highway

The broken down RV caused headaches and delays for people trying to get out of town Friday afternoon.

KTVB May 24, 2019

Boise, Idaho — Motorists traveling along Highway 55 Friday afternoon experienced lengthy delays after a stalled-out RV blocked failed to make it up a hill.

The Ada County Sheriff’s Office sent out a traffic alert at 1:22 p.m. via Twitter.

They warned motorists that traffic on Idaho 55 between the Shadow Valley golf course and Avimor subdivision was backed up in both directions because of a stalled-out RV in the northbound lane. The RV was pulling an SUV.

continued:
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Voters reject McCall-area recreation district by 69%

Proponents planned rec center, trail network

By Max Silverson for The Star-News May 23, 2019

Voters gave a clear message on Tuesday that they did not want to see the creation of a Northern Valley Recreation District.

A total of 901 voters cast ballots against formation of the district, or 69 percent of the total. A total of 407, or 31 percent, voted in favor.

… The recreation district would have taxed property values in the northern half of Valley County at a rate of $30 per $100,000 in value. The district would have had an initial budget of $1 million per year.

Funds were proposed to be used to pursue the construction of a recreation center; maintenance, expansion and construction of a trail network; and public river access to the North Fork of the Payette.

full story:
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Donnelly voters approve extension of local-option taxes

The Star-News May 23, 2019

Donnelly voters on Tuesday approved a 10-year extension of the city’s local-option taxes.

The vote was 22 to 4 to renew the current 1 percent general sales tax and a 3 percent tax on motels, hotels and short-term rentals.

The tax has collected an average of more than $6,000 per month this year, putting it on pace to exceed the nearly $77,000 collected by the tax in 2018.

The tax has invested more than $500,000 into projects in the community since it was first passed in 2008 and renewed in 2012.

Some of the most notable projects funded by the tax include water system improvements, electronic speed check signs, public pathways and streetscape improvements, Hedges said.

Revenue generated by the tax can only be used for projects that benefit residents or stimulate economic growth in the city.

source:
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Wyden, Crapo, Merkley, Risch Reintroduce Legislation to Provide Long-term Stability for Secure Rural Schools Program

Thursday, May 23, 2019

Washington, D.C. – U.S. Senators Ron Wyden, D-Ore., Mike Crapo, R-Idaho, Jeff Merkley, D-Ore., and Jim Risch, R-Idaho, today reintroduced legislation to provide much-needed financial certainty for rural counties to ensure they have the long-term funding needed for schools, road maintenance, law enforcement and other essential services.

The bipartisan Forest Management for Rural Stability Act, which the senators first introduced in December 2018, makes the Secure Rural Schools program—which expired at the end of FY 2018—permanent by creating an endowment fund to provide stable, increasing and reliable funding for county services.

… The Secure Rural Schools and Community Self-Determination Act (SRS)—originally co-authored by Wyden—was enacted in 2000 to financially assist counties with public, tax-exempt forestlands. Since then, Wyden, Crapo, Merkley and Risch have worked to give SRS a more permanent role in assisting rural counties with large tracts of federal lands.

full story: [h/t GC]
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Idaho Free Trappers to host Backwoods Rendezvous June 13-16

The Star-News May 23, 2019

The Idaho Free Trappers will host their annual Backwoods Rendezvous reenactment with competitions and prizes from Thursday, June 13, through Sunday, June 16, at Kennedy Ranch in Cascade.

The event is a celebration and reenactment of the way of life experienced by the pre-1840s buck skinners, fur trappers, traders and Native Americans.

Visitors are welcome to observe Thursday, June 13, through Saturday, June 15, from noon to 7 p.m.

For $5, visitors can try their hand at loading and shooting a black powder rifle, throwing a tomahawk and knife as well as shooting a primitive bow.

Attendees may also enter the hawk and knife and the bow and arrow re-entry contests. Cost is $5 for the first throw and $1 for subsequent ones.

The event will include a potluck dinner on Friday night as well as council fire activities Friday and Saturday nights.

There will be no drinking water available at the site. To visit the Kennedy Ranch, turn east off of Idaho 55 onto Corral Creek Road between mile markers 109 and 110.

For more information, visit http://idahofreetrapper.org, write to idahofreetrapper@yahoo.com or visit the “Idaho Free Trappers” page on Facebook.

source:
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NM recycling center no longer accepts plastics, cardboard

The Star-News May 23, 2019

The New Meadows Recycling Center no longer accepts plastics and cardboard as well as any recyclables from Valley County residents.

The decision was made by Adams county commissioners as a result of rising costs associated with processing recyclables, a statement from the county said.

Drop-off locations in McCall at 540 E. Deinhard Ln., in Donnelly at the Donnelly Fire Department and in Cascade at the corner of Mill Street and South Front Street will continue to accept various recyclables, but not glass, which must be taken to Treasure Valley recycling centers.

source:
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Boise County Emergency Management works to remove deadly log jam on the Payette River

May 20, 2019 By Steve Dent KIVI TV

Banks — Boise County Emergency Management is working to remove a deadly hazard on the South Fork of the Payette River.

A log jam is blocking the left side of the river just below Bronco Billy Rapid and has already claimed a kayak. Fortunately, the woman who was in the kayak safely made it to shore.

Monday afternoon, Boise County set the wood on fire using a gel accelerant that burns off before it reaches the water.

continued:
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Idaho Land Board looks to invest $240 million

May 21, 2019 By: Associated Press

Boise — Idaho Gov. Brad Little, Attorney General Lawrence Wasden and a financial expert will examine how the Idaho Land Board should invest $240 million from the sale of hundreds of residential home sites as well as a number of commercial real estate properties.

… A financial adviser has already told the Land Board to use the money to buy timberland and farmland.

But at least one timber company concerned about competition and some counties worried about losing property tax income have voiced concerns about that plan.

full story:
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Task force created to improve Idaho broadband infrastructure

by Associated Press Thursday, May 23rd 2019

Boise, Idaho (AP) – Gov. Brad Little has created a task force aimed at improving broadband infrastructure across Idaho.

The Republican in a news release on Thursday announced he had signed an executive order creating the Idaho Broadband Task Force.

Little says connectivity in a data-driven society is imperative for a vital economy.

continued:
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Letter to Share:

Valley County Commissioner Gordon Cruickshank Receives National Award

May 22, 2019

Spokane – Valley County Commissioner Gordon Cruickshank was awarded the prestigious Dale Sowards Award at the National Association of Counties’ (NACo) Western Interstate Region (WIR) Conference in Spokane County, Washington, during the closing ceremonies on Friday, May 17, 2019. The purpose of the award is to recognize individuals who have demonstrated outstanding service to public lands counties and to draw attention to the public policies they represent.

[photo WIR-Spokane-County-May-17-2019-a

Commissioner Cruickshank was recognized by his peers from throughout 15 Western states for his 12 years of outstanding leadership and service to counties throughout the Western Interstate Region, including a term as WIR president in 2015-2016.

WIR President Kevin Cann, a Mariposa County, Calif. supervisor, highlighted Cruickshank’s advocacy on behalf of the Secure Rural Schools and Payments in Lieu of Taxes programs his hours of congressional testimony in support of the program.

“He is an outstanding example of what it means to be a public servant,” Cann said, noting that Cruickshank uses his position to educate and inform constituents and fellow county officials of issues critical to public lands counties.

Cruickshank was nominated by the Idaho State Association of Counties because of his tenure, engagement and significant accomplishments associated with natural resources and public lands at the local, state and federal level.

Cruickshank while a Valley County Road Superintendent and then a Commissioner has witnessed the reduction in funding and has advocated every year for the funding to continue as was the compact made when the National Forests were formed many years ago.

Cruickshank is a WIR past president and serves on NACo’s executive committee as its West region representative.

Cruickshank has been a tireless advocate for counties before Congress, the White House and federal agencies. He is a national leader in advocating for the federal payments Payment In Lieu of Taxes and Secure Rural Schools programs that compensate counties for large amounts of federal public lands and forests with their borders. His peers and federal policymakers often look to Cruickshank for guidance on matters related to public lands, endangered species, environmental stewardship, infrastructure and community resilience. Cruickshank is also a 2012 graduate of NACo’s County Leadership Institute.
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Public Lands:

Huckleberry Landscape Restoration Project – DEIS Available on Webpage

The 45-day comment period HAS NOT started but the DEIS is available on the webpage for review.

Notice

Huckleberry Landscape Restoration Project – DEIS availability

This DEIS has been made available via the webpage, however the 45-day public comment period is expected to begin in early June when the Notice of Availability appears in the Federal Register. To be most useful, please do not submit comments until that time. Should any changes, other than to correct typographical, grammatical or changes in format, to this DEIS prior to the official publication of the document via a notice in the Federal Register, a document listing all changes will be posted on the website.
https://www.fs.usda.gov/project/?project=50218

The DEIS has all of the Appendices (1 through 7) included with the document. Each Appendix is also uploaded individually for convenience of review as well as large format maps.

For more information, please contact:

Mark Fox
Payette National Forest,
Council Ranger District
2092 Highway 95,
Council, ID 83612
(208) 253-0164
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NIFC Wildfire season: ‘Strong snowpack and heavy rains help fend off fire season for now’

by Sarah Jacobsen Wednesday, May 22nd 2019

Boise, ID (CBS 2) — “Nationally we are below the number of fires and the number of acres burned this time of year. and that’s because we had so much precipitation,” says Jessica Gardetto, External Affairs with the Nationa Interagency Fire Center.

According to the National Weather Service, our area gets an average of 1.38 inches of rain for the month of May.

As of this week, we are just four-tenths of an inch away from hitting that mark.

Our strong snowpack and heavy rains are helping fend off fire season for the time being, according to local fire forecasters.

continued:
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BLM seeks public input on draft Resource Management Plan for southwestern Idaho

Date: May 24, 2019
Contact: Michael Williamson, mwilliamson@blm.gov, (208) 384-3393

Boise, Idaho – The Bureau of Land Management today announced the release of the Draft Resource Management Plan (RMP)/Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the Four Rivers Field Office and is asking for public comments through August 22, 2019.

The BLM Four Rivers Field Office covers approximately 783,000 acres of public lands stretching from Glenns Ferry, northwest to Weiser, and north to McCall.

The purpose of publishing this Draft RMP/EIS is to inform the public about potential management options and to allow for comments on the range of alternatives being considered. The BLM will then use comments to revise the Draft RMP/EIS in preparation for the finalized document, expected in fall 2019, which will then be used to guide management decisions into the future. Issues addressed in the alternatives include mineral development, recreational uses of and access to public lands, livestock grazing, fire management, wildlife habitat and others.

“By having public input on these alternatives, the BLM — along with our tribal, state and other federal partners — promotes a shared conservation stewardship to support multiple-use on public lands,” said BLM Four Rivers Field Manager Brent Ralston. “This plan will guide our management for the next 20 years or so.”

Copies of the Draft RMP/EIS are available for review at the Boise District Office and on the web at: http://go.usa.gov/xnsn6. The BLM will host several public meetings during this 90-day comment period and will announce such meetings at least 15 days in advance through public notices, media releases, social media, and/or mailings.

The BLM encourages the public to provide comments, particularly those concerning the adequacy and accuracy of the proposed alternatives, the analysis of their respective management decisions, and any new information that would help development of the plan. Comments can be submitted through the following means:

Website: http://go.usa.gov/xnsn6
Email: Four_Rivers_RMP@blm.gov
Fax: 208-384-3326
Postal: Four Rivers Field Office
Attn: Brent Ralston
3948 Development Ave.
Boise, ID 83705

Please note that before including their personal identifying information (address, email, phone number), commenters should be aware that their entire comment – including their personal identifying information – may be made publicly available at any time. While those commenting can ask in their comments to withhold this information from public review, the BLM cannot guarantee that they will be able to do so.

For more information, contact Brent Ralston, Field Manager, at 208-384-3300.
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USDA Forest Service and State of Utah sign Shared Stewardship agreement

Salt Lake City, Utah — May 22, 2019 — Today, U. S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue joined Utah Governor Gary R. Herbert to sign an agreement between the Forest Service and the State of Utah focused on shared stewardship.

As part of this Shared Stewardship Agreement, the State of Utah and the USDA Forest Service are working together to identify and map priority landscapes that will guide activities across jurisdictional boundaries. Utah and the Forest Service will work in partnership to restore these priority landscapes using all tools available, including existing programs such as Utah’s Watershed Restoration Initiative and the Governor’s Catastrophic Wildfire Reduction Strategy.

“This agreement is about setting priorities together and combining resources to achieve healthier forests for the people of Utah,” said Secretary Perdue. “We will use every available authority and tool at our disposal to support partnership efforts to improve forest health and target treatments in areas with the highest payoffs. We want to leave America’s forests better than we found them and that means creating meaningful stewardship partnerships that proactively keep our forests healthy.”

This shared stewardship agreement establishes a framework that will allow the State of Utah to work collaboratively with the Forest Service to accomplish mutual goals and effectively respond to the increasing suite of challenges on National Forest System lands within Utah.

“Through programs like the Watershed Restoration Initiative, which is responsible for restoring over 1.6 million acres of priority watershed statewide, our state has developed a history of working collaboratively with our federal and local partners,” said Governor Herbert. “This new Shared Stewardship agreement offers us another tool in our toolkit to elevate cooperation with our federal partners. This added collaboration will help us address the most critical needs impacting the health of Utah forests and watersheds.”

Under the agreement, the State of Utah and the USDA Forest Service will focus on landscape-scale forest restoration activities that protect at-risk communities and watersheds. Shared Stewardship responds to the urgent and growing challenges faced by managers and owners of forests in Utah and across the nation, among them catastrophic wildfires, invasive species, drought, and epidemics of forest insects and disease. Of particular concern are longer fire seasons and the increasing size and severity of wildfires, along with the expanding risk to communities, water sources, wildlife habitat, air quality, and the safety of firefighters.

The agreement can be found at: Utah Agreement for Shared Stewardship.

link to Idaho Agreement:
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Letter to Share:

The Gamebird Foundation

May 20, 2019

Dale Rose just informed me that we have 6-7 more brooders built. They need some baby pheasant chicks in them.

The brooders are very portable and only require very little assembly when you get home. A screw driver and about 12 screws. You get free chicks and feed if you need. The Gamebird Foundation meets the first Tuesday of each month in the Community Center in Viola Idaho.

Jim Hagedorn
Executive Director
The Gamebird Foundation
thegamebirdfoundation.org
208-883-3423
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Critter News:

Fish & Game advises to keep dogs away from deer with fawns

The Star-News May 23, 2019

The Idaho Department of Fish and Game is warning residents and their dogs to watch out for adult doe mule deer who may be aggressively protecting their fawns.

“In several instances, adult doe mule deer charged toward walkers and threatened to kick or stomp dogs,” Regional Wildlife Manager Regan Berkley said.

Mule deer fawns are usually born between late May and early June, and during the first six weeks of life a fawn’s primary survival mechanism is hiding while the mother forages nearby.

Although generally docile, mule deer can become aggressive when protecting their young, Berkley said.

“Adult does can weigh over 100 pounds, and their sharp hooves can cause plenty of damage,” she said. “They can run faster than you can.”

Residents are advised to keep their dogs leashed while walking in town as well as to give deer a wide berth.

People who find a hidden fawn are asked to move away quickly and to not pick up the fawn.

“It is natural for deer to leave their young alone for extended periods of time,” Berkley said. “Removing a hidden deer fawn can cause the mother to abandon the area.”

source:
https://www.mccallstarnews.com/
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Pet Talk – What is a ‘false pregnancy’?

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt May 24, 2019 IME

A false pregnancy is called a pseudocyesis. It occurs when an unspayed and nonpregnant female dog goes through a phase of breast enlargement, production of milk and behavior similar to that of pregnant bitches. The affected bitch often allows nursing and displays mothering tendencies.

All bitches produce the hormone progesterone for two months after ovulation, which results in mammary gland development. When progesterone decreases abruptly, it stimulates the release of another hormone called prolactin. Prolactin causes mothering behavior and lactation.

A false pregnancy can also occur from the sudden withdrawal of progesterone therapy in an intact bitch or following an ovario-hysterectomy (spay) during the later phases of a female dog’s heat cycle.

continued:
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Grizzlies are on the hunt

May 21, 2019 Local News 8

Island Park, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – Grizzly bears have become increasingly active.

Idaho Fish and Game Department biologists have been watching a female grizzly with cubs near Harriman State Park. One has been seen digging gopher caches for an easy food source.

Bear biologist Jeremy Nicholson said this is the third year in a row bears have been observed in the same area. He thinks a grizzly mother is returning to a known food source.

continued:
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Grizzly numbers steady as hunting plans tied up in US court

by Associated Press Friday, May 24th 2019

Wildlife officials say grizzly bear numbers are holding steady in the U.S. Northern Rockies as plans to hunt the animals remain mired in a legal dispute.

A Friday U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service report said there are more than 700 bears in the Yellowstone region of Wyoming, Montana and Idaho.

More than 1,000 occupy northwestern Montana including Glacier National Park.

continued:
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US challenges part of ruling that blocked grizzly bear hunts

By Matthew Brown – 5/24/19 AP

U.S. officials asked a federal appeals court on Friday to overturn part of a judge’s ruling that blocked the first grizzly bear hunts in the Lower 48 states in almost three decades.

The case before the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals involves more than 700 grizzly bears in and around Yellowstone National Park. It comes after a judge in Montana restored protections for the animals last September.

U.S. Justice Department attorneys said the judge was wrong to require officials to review the status of grizzlies everywhere before lifting protections for bruins in the Yellowstone region. They also rejected the notion that the bears’ long-term genetic health was in doubt.

continued:
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KWVR Oregon Wolf Education weekly Wolf Report

Fourth week in May 2019
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Wolves attack dog near Observation Road in Duluth

By John Myers on May 25, 2019 Deluth News Tribune


Paul Moore and his chocolate Labrador, Rad Venom, were looking for deer antlers when the dog was attacked by two wolves on May 15. Tyler Schank

Paul Moore often runs his chocolate Labrador retriever off leash when he’s training the dog to look for sheds — deer antlers on the ground.

So there was nothing unusual when the owner and eager dog left Moore’s parked truck off Observation Road in Duluth earlier this month and headed into the woods.

“I try to keep him about 10 yards out so I can watch what he’s doing. He’s pretty good for that,” Moore said, adding that he had just given the dog the command to start looking for antlers when their outing turned bad. It was just after 7 p.m.

That’s when Moore saw two wolves running full speed toward his dog.

continued:
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Busy time of year at Boise’s only bird rehab facility

May 20, 2019 By Karen Lehr KIVI TV

Boise, Idaho — To say the Ruth Melichar Bird Center in Boise is busy this time of year would be an understatement.

Hundreds of concerned Treasure Valley residents have been stopping by over the past few weeks to drop off injured and abandoned ducklings, swallows and robins.

Staff – made mostly of volunteers – rehabilitate more than 2,500 wild birds every year and release them back into the wild. A vast majority of those birds come to their care between mid-April and September. Just since the beginning of May, they’ve taken 400 ducklings under their wings.

continued:
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‘It was insane:’ Boise fisherman catches massive sturgeon in Parkcenter Pond

Ryan Peterson thought the stories of monster fish in the pond were all made up.

Joe Parris May 21, 2019 KTVB

Boise, Idaho — Ryan Peterson had heard the stories about sturgeon in Boise’s Parkcenter Pond – monster fish gliding beneath the murky water in downtown Boise.

“I didn’t believe them,” he said. “It’s always been a myth, with everyone I’ve spoken to.”

The Boise fisherman was hoping to catch some catfish when he headed down to Parkcenter Pond Sunday. He reeled in several, he said, before something bigger – much bigger – took the bait.

continued:
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Idaho waterways could hold key to saving orcas

May 22, 2019 By Steve Liebenthal KIVI TV

Boise — In the Pacific Ocean, killer whales are at the top of the food chain — preying on seals, sea lions and even sharks. But one Pacific orca species is on the brink of extinction. Whale researchers say the endangered southern resident orcas which live in and around the Puget Sound, face three main challenges: pollution, underwater noise and food supply.

The southern resident orcas have a much smaller range than other killer whales and they have a much more specific diet. Unlike the orcas which swim farther down the coast and farther up the coast, the mainstay of the southern resident orcas is Chinook salmon.

But Chinook numbers have plummeted and whale advocates say the key to keeping the southern residents from going extinct lies in the clear cool water of Idaho’s mountains.

continued:
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It’s the time of year to check for ticks, and they’re popping up all over the Treasure Valley

May 20, 2019 By Natasha Williams KIVI TV

Spring brings wildflowers, warming weather, later sunsets, and ticks.

It’s the time of year to start checking for ticks! The wood ticks in Idaho rarely transmit scary diseases like Lyme disease, but people can catch Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever and other illnesses from the insects.

Make sure you check yourself and your pets for ticks after you spend time outdoors, because it only takes 24 to 36 hours to transmit a disease.

You can also talk to your vet about using a flea and tick preventative treatment on your pets.

source:
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Fish & Game News:

Idaho Fish and Game Commission seats open

May 24, 2019 Local News 8

Boise, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – The appointed terms of Idaho Fish and Game Commissioners Derick Attebury of Idaho Falls and Dan Blanco of Moscow both expire at the end of June.

Governor Brad Little said he is now accepting applications for the two potential openings. Attebury, who served as Chairman of the Commission for the past year, represents the Upper Snake Region and Blanco represents the Clearwater Region.

Both men are eligible for reappointment.

continued:
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Spring bear hunters reminded of baiting rules

By Mike Demick, Staff Biologist
Wednesday, May 22, 2019

With spring black bear hunting season well underway, Idaho Department of Fish and Game reminds hunters that using bait comes with easy to follow rules. Yet each spring, some run afoul with the law when their blunders could easily be avoided.

Here are a few reminders every bear baiter should follow:

continued:
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See a summary of the mule deer plan and learn how to review and comment

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Supervisor
Friday, May 24, 2019

Complete draft mule deer and white-tailed deer plans will be available for comment in early June

Idaho Fish and Game is asking deer hunters to look at its draft management plans for mule deer and white-tailed deer and provide feedback to the department on the overall concepts of the plans and whether topics are missing that might improve them. The plans describe statewide management directions and strategies.

The mule deer plan focuses on a variety of topics that include population management and also frameworks and concepts for hunting seasons that will maintain sustainable deer herds and strive to meet hunters’ expectations.

continued:
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Free Fishing Day is June 8, see events throughout the state

By Brian Pearson, Conservation Public Information Specialist
Wednesday, May 22, 2019


Brian Pearson/IDFG

Fish and Game will host statewide events to help beginners get started

Saturday, June 8 is Free Fishing Day, and the Idaho Department of Fish and Game invites veteran and novice anglers of all ages, residents and nonresidents alike, to celebrate the day by fishing anywhere in Idaho without a license. Though fishing license requirements are suspended for this special day, all other rules, such as limits or tackle restrictions, remain in effect.

continued:
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More F&G News Releases

https://idfg.idaho.gov/press
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Fun Critter Stuff:

Eagle with 8-foot wing span crashes into Alaska home

by The Associated Press Wednesday, May 8th 2019


(Stacy Studebaker via AP)

Kodiak, Alaska (AP) — Many are familiar with uninvited guests unexpectedly crashing at the house, but an eagle took such a scenario to new heights in Kodiak.

An eagle grabbed a piece of freezer-burned halibut that someone had thrown out, and apparently misjudged its climb up a cliff with the 4-pound (1.8-kilogram) piece of fish while likely being chased by another eagle, the Kodiak Daily Mirror reported Tuesday.

The wrong trajectory led the eagle to smash through a front window of Stacy Studebaker’s home Saturday.

continued:
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Memorial Day:

MemorialDay-a
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Bird of the week: Lewis’s Woodpecker

Lewis’s Woodpecker

(summer breeding, not common)
20160510-lw5-web-a
(click image for larger size)

links to more photos: here and here
Photos by Local Color Photography

Lewis’s Woodpecker
Melanerpes lewis

Size & Shape: Lewis’s Woodpeckers are hefty with an elongated body, long wings, and a long tail. The bill is woodpecker-like, but thinner than most.
Both Sexes
Length: 10.2-11.0 in (26-28 cm)
Weight: 3.1-4.9 oz (88-138 g)
Wingspan: 19.3-20.5 in (49-52 cm)
Color Pattern
This woodpecker often appears all dark, especially from a distance, but in good light its unique color pattern shows. It has a pink belly, a gray collar, a dark green back, and a dark red face.
Learn more about this bird: The Cornell Lab of Ornithology
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Idaho History May 26, 2019

Daisy Erma Paulsen Tappan

Middle Fork Salmon River, Yellow Pine, Challis Idaho

March 5, 1908 – April 24, 1984

DaisyTappan-a
caption: Daisy prepares to resume splitting kindling at her ranch in the Pahsimeroi Valley, Idaho in 1980. Photograph c. Molly O’Leary 1980

Daisy was born in Prineville, Oregon, to Alex and Fannie Watson Paulsen. Her family moved to the Middle Fork of the Salmon River when she was a young girl and she and her brother Fred spent their childhood years living in what is now the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness near Indian Creek.

In 1925, Daisy married Fred Tappan. They reportedly bought this homestead from Willis Jones for $1,200 and lived in this cabin with their two sons, Stanley Charles Tappan and James Howard Tappan, on what has been known ever since as the Tappan Ranch. The Tappans raised cattle and Daisy grew a big garden with strawberries, watermelons, blackberries, raspberries and muskmelons, as well as corn for her chickens. When she wasn’t growing and preserving food for the family’s subsistence, Daisy looked after her sons and fought off the bears that frequently swam the river to feast on the bounty of her orchard.

The Tappans were forced to move from their Middle Fork home, circa 1933 (?), when their federal grazing permit was discontinued.

Joe Anderson, an early pioneer of boating on the Middle Fork, recalled at the time of Daisy’s passing that “Daisy loved the great outdoors. She loved her animals, especially a good horse. She could handle a pack string of horses or mules better than most. And she could break, train and ride a horse with the best of them. When it came to handling a gun, she was a crack shot. I believe Daisy could outwork, outshoot and outride most men, and she didn’t mind telling them.”

Marker Marker donated by Molly O’Leary.
— — — — — — — — — —

Daisy’s Family

Husband: Fred Tappan
Sons: Stanley Charles and James Howard Tappen
Brother: Fred H Paulsen and wife Mary
Parents: Alex Paulsen and Fannie Watson
Maternal Grand Parents: Eleck (Alex?) and Martha Watson from TX

sources: Family Search, Find a Grave, Middle Fork book (see below)
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Watsons, Paulsens and Tappans on the Middle Fork of the Salmon River

Daisy Paulsens Tappan lived with her family on the Middle Fork from 1912 through 1940.
(Remington, see below)
— — —

Eleck and Martha Watson from TX [were] maternal grandparents of Fred Paulsen and Daisy Tappan
(pg 52)

MF57-a
Eleck Watson’s cabin at Pistol Creek about 1914. L to R: Bessie Watson (Cameron), Mamie Watson (Nethkin Pierce), Martha Watson.

Mile 25.1 Indian Creek Campground.

Indian Creek Bar was first occupied by Mr. Watson, grandfather of Daisy Tappan and Fred Paulsen. He first tried the area across the river, then decided he preferred the Bar. He built several small cabins there about 1914.

Fred and Daisy were the only children along that whole section of the river. Miners often left them wild pets. They tamed chipmunks and broke them to pull match-box wagons which they made, sometimes even holding “wagon races.”

The children trapped ground squirrels for the penny bounty on their tails. The squirrels or “picket pins” were considered a nuisance in horse country.
(pg 55)

Lured by descriptions from a passing prospector, Watson pulled out in 1919 for Green River, Utah. The kids went to school there, but didn’t stay long. (One of Daisy’s schoolmates was Arthur Ekker of Robbers Roost Ranch fame.) They finally all returned to the Middle Fork country.

Fred Paulsen worked a mining prospect up behind Indian Creek Bar.

Eventually the site was withdrawn by the Forest Service for administrative purposes. The old cabins were burned.
(pg 57)

MF55-a
Fred Paulsen with his pack string.
(pg 55)

Mile 36.1 Little Creek Bridge

The Forest Service asked Fred Paulsen if he would pack in the materials for this bridge. He agreed to handle the job. The Service put on a summer cerw to widen the trail all the way to the river.

When spring arrived there was 15 feet of snow in places, which should have been expected. Instead of waiting for the melt, they hired Bob Johnson to fly the materials in with his tri-motor Ford.

… Fred Paulsen’s folks started the second cabin at Little Creek [Middle Fork] but it was never finished. … These cabins are now part of the Middle Fork Lodge property today.
(pg 86)

Fred Paulsen

Mile 43.7 Fred Paulsen’s cabin is up the hill on the right.

Fred was the brother of Daisy Tappan. He spent most of his life packing, mining, haying and working in the Middle Fork canyon. In his prime he stood 6’2″ and weighed about 275 pounds. His feats of strength were legendary. He could hold a hay wagon while someone changed a wheel, or tuck the leg of an ornery mule under his arm and hold it while he shod it.

Fred, as much as any man, symbolized the best characteristics of the old-time settlers. He worked against every kind of hardship: bad weather, hard times, frequent tragedies, long hours—yet through it all he remained good-natured and always ready to drop what he was doing to help someone else. In his later years, Fred lived in a cabin on the outskirts of Challis. He remained active until his death in 1978 at age 72.

MF93-a
Fred Paulsen at his cabin about six years before he died.
(pg 93)

Mile 56.5 Grouse Creek-Tappan Ranch-Campground.

Grouse Creek is the favorite campground of many boatmen. It was one of the two campsites used by President Jimmy Carter on his three-day Middle Fork trip in August, 1978.

The cabin on the upstream side of the creek was built by Willis Bill Jones, who homesteaded the place October 5, 1927. Jones had followed oil well drilling work, and spent some time in the Hollywood movie-making business. He was suffering from tuberculosis but got along pretty well at the creek. He would send out once a year to Meyers Cove for 50 pounds of good southern tobacco – he liked to smoke natural leaf. That would see him through the year.

Bill had only three horses, but he did ranch the place. He planted peaches, apples, grapes and currants. Some of the trees had just begun to bear when he decided to sell out. He was nearly 70 years old. He went down to Arizona and died a few years later near Salt River.

Fred and Daisy Paulsen Tappan bought the place for $1,200. Fred was from Iowa, and Daisy was born in Pineville, Oregon. Her father had hunted geese and egrets for the markets there. Daisy had first come into the Middle Fork when she was a child of seven. She was every bit as competent in the backcountry as any man who ever lived there.

The Tappans extended the cabin by enclosing the porch. That became the kitchen. They built a barn, chicken house, and corral out on the flat in front of the house, next to the big ponderosa pine tree.

They planted additional fruit trees and put in a large garden. Daisy grew strawberries, blackberries, raspberries, peanuts, musk-melons, and watermelons. She said the rock chucks would make a little hole in the melons next to the ground and then proceed to hollow out the entire fruit. She thought the melons were fine until she tried to pick them. Daisy grew corn for her chickens, and canned all her fruits and vegetables. Deer were a plentiful source of meat.

Between chores she looked after their boys and fought the bears that swam the river to attack the orchard.
(pg 103)

MF107-a
Daisy and her boys haying the field below Grouse Creek.

The Tappans had a few cattle, some horses, and cows. The stock could not be left out for the winter so they packed in a hay rake. They ditched water out of Grouse Creek to irrigate hay in the upper and lower field behind the cabin. While the snow didn’t get too bad, the hillsides were dangerous with ice. It was usually the 10th of March before they could let the cows out again.

Self-sufficient as they were, Daisy said they still had to buy horseshoes, leather, and clothes. Three hundred dollars would easily see them through the year. To get the money Fred could work look-out or trail crew for the Forest Service, or work in the Yellowjacket mines.

In later years the Forest Service cut off their cattle range, so when the boys were old enough to go to school the Tappans moved out. After they left, Daisy said, “You know it was three years before I could sleep without the sound of that river and creek. It was just too darned quiet.”

You might think life was easier once they left Grouse Creek. But consider this: the Tappans lived at a mine near Yellow Pine – halfway between the town and the airport. There were two dog teams to haul mail and freight between the town and the airstrip, and Daisy ran one. She would sled the boys three miles to school in Yellow Pine each morning, pick up mail and supplies, sled six miles up to the airport on Johnson Creek to make delivery, pick up mail, freight and groceries from the pilot, and mush six miles back to Yellow Pine. There she would pick up the children and sled home to make dinner.

At this writing [1980] Daisy lives on her ranch in the Pahsimeroi Valley of Idaho, still looking after cattle and felling her firewood with a chainsaw – at 73 years of age. What a remarkable woman!

Fred Tappan died in California in 1975.

Bob Simplot acquired the Tappan Ranch and sold all but the five acres with the cabin to the Fish and Game Department. When he got around to surveying it, he found the Fish and Game Department had left him only 3 1/2 acres. He still uses the cabin as a vacation spot, often packing in with his son in the fall.

The highest peak looking west across the river is Bear Creek Point, 8,629 feet.
(pg 105)

MF104-a
The Jones-Tappan cabin today [1980], after the Tappans enclosed the front overhang.
(pg 104)

MF106-a
Fred and Daisy at Meyers Cove, ready for a trip to Grouse Creek.
(pg 106)

MF87-a
The Tappens and their boys pose with a vintage plane at the Thomas Creek strip.
(pg 87)

Mile 13.1 Sheepeater Hot Springs and Camp on the left.

There were cabins on the upper and lower flats here. Gene Hussey and Charles Smith, who worked the mill up at Waterwheel, wintered down here. They built the cabins and used them as headquarters for their winter trapping operations. The logs around the hot spring are all that remain of a cabin that enclosed it. It was used for washing clothes and bathing. Water was taken by small ditches to the other cabins. Evidence of the foundations can still be seen on the flats.

Daisy Tappan recalls that a colony of beaver dammed the outflow of the springs creating a large pond on the upper flat. Her boys used it as a swimming pool in the Forties.

MF45-a
The Tappan boys swimming in the pool behind the beaver dam at Sheepeater Hot Springs.
(pg 45)

… In the spring and fall elk are often attracted to the minerals deposited by the spring waters.
(pg 43)

excerpted from: “Middle Fork and the Sheepeater War” by Johnny Carrey & Cort Conley 1980
Amazon link:
— — — — — — — — — —

Daisy Erma Paulsen Tappan

Author: Molly O’Leary

… Another strong, capable woman I had the good fortune of meeting was Daisy Erma Paulsen Tappan. I met Daisy in her early seventies, when she lived on and single-handedly worked a ranch property in the Pahsimeroi Valley of east-central Idaho.

Daisy was born in Prineville, Oregon in 1908 but her family moved to the Middle Fork of the Salmon River when she was a young girl. She and her brother Fred spent their childhood years living in what is now the Frank Church-River of No Return Wilderness near Indian Creek.

Daisy later returned to the Middle Fork area with her husband Fred Tappan to raise their two sons in a small log cabin on what has been known ever since as the Tappan Ranch, at the mouth of Grouse Creek. Together they raised cattle, horses and a few milk cows, and put up hay to feed their stock through the long winters. As if raising hay in such rough country wasn’t daunting enough, Daisy and Fred had to pack the haying equipment into the back country by horses when they set up their home.

In addition to tending to the ranching chores, Daisy grew a big garden with strawberries, watermelons, blackberries, raspberries and muskmelons, as well as corn for her chickens. She canned all of their fruits and vegetables. When she wasn’t growing and preserving food for the family’s subsistence, Daisy looked after her sons and fought off the bears that frequently swam the river to feast on the bounty of her orchard.

After several years of investing their sweat equity to improve the hand-hewn homestead, the Tappans were forced to move from the Middle Fork when their grazing permit was discontinued. From there, they moved on to Yellow Pine, Idaho, where Daisy transported her sons three miles to school each day by dogsled team in the winter, and then mushed six miles out to the nearby landing strip to pick up the day’s mail, before returning to Yellow Pine to deliver the mail and retrieve her sons from school for the sled-ride home.

Joe Anderson, an early pioneer of boating on the Middle Fork, recalled at the time of Daisy’s passing that “Daisy loved the great outdoors. She loved her animals, especially a good horse. She could handle a pack string of horses or mules better than most. And she could break, train and ride a horse with the best of them. When it came to handling a gun, she was a crack shot. I believe Daisy could out-work, out-shoot and out-ride most men, and she didn’t mind telling them.”

Sources:
Daisy Erma Paulsen Tappan Obituary, published April 38, 1904, The Challis Messenger.
Daisy Tappan – The Legend Lives on, published May 3, 1984, The Challis Messenger.
The Middle Fork – A Guide, by Johnny Carrey & Court [sic] Conley, 3rd Edition, Backeddy Books. C. 1992.
Photograph c. Molly O’Leary 1980

excerpted from: Whats Past Is Prologue by Molly O’Leary March 24, 2014
[h/t CG]
— — — — — — — — — —

1940 (Sun Valley Job) Middle Fork of the Salmon River

by Emma Cox

That Spring we received a letter from Sun Valley asking if Lafe would be interested in contract packing for for the Sun Valley Lodge. It sounded exciting for both of us and the folks urged us to try it. We would learn more of the country. Most of the packing would be on the Middle Fork of the Salmon River and would be a summer job.
(pg 87)

EC89-a
Lafe (and Emma) Cox in 1940 above the Middle Fork on the way to Sun Valley job.
(pg 89)

… We arrived at Fred and Daisy Tappan’s place on the Middle Fork. Lafe knew them and their two boys well, so he told Daisy about the tick bite and how I was feeling. We had tried not to show or say anything to the fishermen or the chief of parties.

Daisy insisted we stay in one of the heated cabins. The dudes stayed in stove heated tents. The doctor was sure I had tick fever and kept an eye on me, supplying us with aspirin. I was so relieved when the Good Lord showed he was on my side by bringing a downpour of rain that kept us inside for two days. With that the fishermen decided to stay over a few days and just fish in the river there. I remained in bed until I quit chilling and the fever broke.

Daisy prepared good homecooked meals and the dudes were amazed at her ability. She was the first woman I had ever seen roll her own cigarettes, sometimes in just one hand. She never spilled a drop! I believe she was smoking Bull Durham tobacco that came in little white sacks which she always kept in her shirt pocket. She was really a neat little woman.

One fellow in the party who had a movie camera enjoyed taking movies of Daisy rolling her cigarettes.

She told me she came into that country as a very small girl with her parents.

We were surely grateful for our stay. When the weather settled, we moved on up to Loon Creek at Sam Lovell’s place. Stanley Tappen (sic), who was in his late teens, rode with us on his horse part way, as he wanted to ask Lafe if he thought there was a chance for employment at the dude ranch. We called Clark and Beulah by Forest Service telephone from the Lovell’s. Clark said he surely could use Stan if he wanted to work trail and do a lot of riding. Stanley was one happy boy as he turned around, went back home to get his bedroll, clothes and some food, and headed for the dude ranch.
(pgs 92-93)

from: “Idaho Mountains Our Home” by Lafe and Emma Cox
Order from: VO Ranch Books, P O box 173, Emmett, Idaho 83617
— — — — — — — — — —

Fred H. Tappan

1942 Fred H. Tappan is listed as a Patrolman Middle Fork Challis National Forest

source: History of the Challis National Forest
— — — — — — — — — —

Grouse Creek C&H

Located around Tappen [sic] Ranch, closed in 1947 for game and recreation use. Tappen had a temporary permit for 25 head C&H 5/1-11/15. The Jones Ranch was the commensurate ranch property used in connection with this allotment. The early records of the use of this allotment seem to be somewhat clouded. Undoubtedly the homesteader, Willis Jones, grazed some free use stock on this allotment prior to 1911 for about this time R. L. Ramey seems to have been issued a permit to use this allotment, probably with his ranch at the mouth of Loon Creek. However, we find that in 1940, Fred Tappen apparently acquired the Jones Ranch at the mouth of Grouse Creek and was issued a permit to graze 5 cattle and 10 horses for a season of 5/1 to 11/15 under a temporary permit. It is probable, however, that this range was also used by William Wilson in connection with his Meyers Cove Ranch long before this. Tappen had held temporary permit for about 25 head of stock from 1940 to 1944, and in 1945 the ranch was leased by L. L. Anderson who held temporary permit for about the same number.

source: History of the Challis National Forest
— — — — — — — — — —

Daisy Paulsen Tappan

DaisyPaulsenTappanHeadstone-a

Birth: 5 Mar 1908
Death: 24 Apr 1984 (aged 76)
Burial: Challis Cemetery, Challis, Custer County, Idaho

source: Find a Grave

Obit: Dated 3 May 1984

Daisy E. Tappan, 76, dies

Funeral services for Daisy Erma Tappan, 76, were held at the Challis Community Church on Saturday, April 28, at 2 p.m. with Rev. Harry Boughey officiating.

Mrs. Tappan died April 24, 1984, in Challis.

She was born March 5, 1908, in Prineville, Ore., the daughter of Alex and Fannie Watson Paulsen.

Her family moved to the Middle Fork country while she was a young child. She and her brother, Fred, grew up in the back country and this is where she gained her deep respect of wildlife and the great outdoors.

In 1925 she was married to Fred Tappan and to this union two sons were born and they were raised on the ranch in the Middle Fork. Daisy was well-known for her horsemanship and packer experience.

She could out-work, out-ride, and out-shoot most men and didn’t mind telling them so. She had the pioneer spirit deep in her veins and there was no such thing as: “it can’t be done.”

She was an early riser and loved her animals but her greatest joy was working which is what she was doing when she died.

There are few left like Daisy Tappan and she will be greatly missed by those who knew her. If you missed knowing her, you missed one of lifes’ great pleasures.

She also lived at the mouth of [Tower Creek and was presently residing north of Challis at the old stagecoach stop.]

Her two sons Stanley Charles and James Howard Tappan [preceded her in death.] … (unintelligible) …

Burial took place in the Challis Cemetery under direction of the Jones & Casey Funeral home.
— —

Funeral
DaisyTappanObit

Daisy Tappan

Challis – Funeral services for Daisy Erma Tappan, 76, were held at the Challis Community Church Saturday [April 28] with Rev. Harry Boughey officiating.

She died April 24, 1984.

She worked with horses and helped her husband ranch in the Middle Fork area.

She was born March 5, 1908 in Prineville. Ore., to Alex and Fannie Watson Paulsen. Her family moved to the Middle Fork area when she was a young child.

In [1925], she married Fred Tappan. They ranched in the Middle Fork area.

She also lived at the mouth of Tower Creek and was presently residing north of Challis at the old stagecoach stop.

She is survived by grandchildren and great-grandchildren.

Burial was in the Challis Cemetery under the direction of the Jones & Casey Funeral Home.

source: Family Search
— — —

Divorced Fred Howard Tappen

Date: 09 Mar 1950
Place: Custer, Idaho

Fred Howard Tappan and Daisy Erma Tappan, 09 Mar 1950; citing Divorce, Custer, Idaho, United States, certificate 00462, Idaho Bureau of Vital Records and Health Statistics, Boise.

citation: “Idaho Divorce Index, 1947-1963,” database, FamilySearch 27 December 2014, 

Married Orvil Arthur Westergard

Date: 14 Jul 1951
Place: Roberts, Jefferson, Idaho
Orvil Arthur Westergard and Daisy Paulsen Tappan, 1951.

citation: “United States Western States Marriage Index”, database, FamilySearch 19 October 2018 
— — — — — — — — — —

Brother Fred H Paulsen

Birth: 27 August 1907 Crook, Oregon
Death: 22 July 1978 Challis, Custer, Idaho

source: Family Search
— — —

Sons

Stanley Charles Tappan

US Navy World War II
Birth: 3 Feb 1926 Crook County, Wyoming
Death: 13 Jun 1976 (aged 50) Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah
Burial: Challis Cemetery, Challis, Custer County, Idaho

source: Find a Grave (w/photo of headstone)
— —

Stanley Tappan

StanleyTappanObit-aChallis – Services for Stanley Charles Tappan, 50, were held at the Challis Community Church 2pm Thursday with Rev. Harry Boughey officiating.

Mr. Tappen died June 13 [1976] in a Salt Lake City hospital. He had been ill the past four months.

He was born Feb. 3, 1926, in Saratoga, Wyo., the son of Fred and Daisey [sic] Paulsen Tappan.

He married Ruby Piva and about 1950 started packing out of Stanley into the Middle Fork area.

He married Helen Wambolt in February, 1962, in Reno, Nev.

He continued to operate his pack outfit until 1970 when he moved to the Ketchum area.

He was a member of the Idaho Outfitters and Guides Assn.

Survivors include his mother, Daisy Tappan, May; children, Scot Tappan, American Falls; Sue Duke, Challis, and Judy Ann Tappan, Salmon; one grandson.

Burial was in the Challis Cemetery under direction of the Jones Casey Funeral Home of Salmon.

source: Family Search
— — — —

James Howard Tappan

AIC US Air Force World War II Korea
Birth: 10 Sep 1927 Midas, Elko County, Nevada
Death: 29 Jan 1976 (aged 48) Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah
Burial: Challis Cemetery, Challis, Custer County, Idaho

source: Find a Grave (w/photo of headstone)
— — — —

Mother

Fannie Watson (Paulsen) Richardson

Birth: 25 Apr 1888 Colorado
Death: 26 Jun 1928 (aged 40) Lovelock, Pershing County, Nevada
Burial: Mountain View Cemetery Reno, Washoe County, Nevada

source: Find a Grave
— — — —

Grand Mother

Martha “Mattie” Reeves Watson

Birth: 1 Aug 1865
Death: 10 Apr 1931 (aged 65) Gem County, Idaho
Burial: Riverside Cemetery Emmett, Gem County, Idaho

Note: Messenger Index newspaper in 1931: “Mrs. Martha Watson died Thursday of pneumonia at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Mayme Pierce of South Washington Street. Another daughter, Mrs. Grey of Nevada, came in response to a message telling her of the death of her mother.” Mrs. Grey is probably Fannie, who died with the surname of Richardson in Nevada.

source: Find a Grave
— — —

Grand Father

Alex (Eleck?) Calvin Watson

Birth: 31 Jan 1862 Coryell County, Texas
Death: 3 May 1930 (aged 68) Custer County, Idaho
Burial: Challis Cemetery, Challis, Custer County, Idaho

Note: Husband of Mattie in Riverside Cemetery, Gem County. Married 1884. No stone apparently.

source: Find a Grave
— — — — — — — — — —

Census Records

United States Census, 1930 Idaho Challis Precinct, Custer County

Fred Tappan Male 31 Married Head 1899 Iowa
Daisy Tappan Female 22 Married Wife 1908 Oregon
Stanley Tappan Male 4 Single Son 1926 Wyoming
James Tappan Male 2 Single Son 1928 Nevada

Willard Pierce Male 38 Married Head 1892 Utah
Mamie E (Watson) (Nethken) Pierce Female 26 Married Wife 1904 Oregon
Lloyd N Nethken Male 11 Single Stepson 1919 Idaho
Lewis W Nethken Male 8 Single Stepson 1922 Idaho
Chester R Nethken Male 6 Single Stepson 1924 Idaho
Martha Watson Female 64 Married Mother-in-law 1866 Texas

United States Census, 1940 Idaho Singiser Precinct, Lemhi County

Fred Tappen Male 43 Married Head 1897 Iowa Same House
Daisy Tappen Female 32 Married Wife 1908 Oregon Same House
Stanley Tappen Male 13 Single Son 1927 Wyoming Same House
James Tappen Male 12 Single Son 1928 Nevada Same House

United States Census, 1940 Idaho Challis Precinct, Custer County

Fred H Paulsen Male 34 Married Head 1906 Oregon
Mary Paulsen Female 36 Married Wife 1904 Utah

source: Family Search US Census Records
— — — — — — — — — —

Middle Fork Wolves?

… Budell believed wolves were rare in the Middle Fork country (pers. commun.), as did Daisy Tappan who lived with her family on the Middle Fork from 1912 through 1940. Tappan believed wolves were extremely scattered and rare through much of the Middle Fork country, occurring primarily alone but at times in pairs. The only sign she observed were tracks of a lone wolf near the mouth of Pistol Creek during 1915 (D.Tappan, pers. conmun.).

source: Tom Remington
— — — — — — — — — —

Middle Fork Map

MapTappanRanch-a

source: Topozone
— — — — — — — — — —

Modern Middle Fork

Tappan Ranch

TappanRanch-a

… First up on Day Three was a visit to the Tappan Ranch at Grouse Creek. The ranch house is still maintained by the Forest Service. Next we walked by Tappan Falls Rapids–happy that we were not floating the river.

excerpted from: Middle Fork Backpack April 1995 © Copyright Tom Lopez; Idaho: A Climbing Guide
— — — — — — — — — —

Daisy Tappan was a legendary figure in the Salmon River area.

The Tappan cabin faced Grouse creek. The cabin was situated between the Middle Fork River and Grouse Creek.

There was precious little flat ground, and all of it rocky. It would seem difficult to grow anything or to graze cattle.

Daisy sounded like quite a woman! and it did not escape my notice that she was just 25 years old when she moved away from the Middle Fork cabin.

excerpted from: Notes from the Cabin….and beyond by Sue and Fred September 21, 2015
— — — — — — — — — —

Tappan Rapids on the Middle Fork

Mile 57: Grouse Creek Rapid (II+) is a fun S-turn rapid and a good warm up for the Tappan Rapids downstream.

Mile 58.2: Tappan I (III-) is the first of the Tappan Rapids.

Mile 58.5: Tappan Falls is the biggest rapid in the Tappan Rapids.

Mile 59: Cove Creek Rapid (or Tappan 2 1/2) changed Tappan III and part of Tappan II after the Cove Creek landslide in 2008. Since this rapid was formed by a recent landslide it changes each season.

excerpted from: Whitewater Guidebook
— — — — — — — — — —

Middle Fork Day 4 – Canyon Description

Matt Leidecker

Typically, the fourth day on a six-day Middle Fork trip will take boaters through a variety of increasingly dramatic landscapes. As the landscape transitions from the sloping hillsides of the middle canyon the river flows through the dramatic Tappan Canyon and into steeper and lower canyons of the Middle Fork.

Tappan Canyon

A significant geologic change occurs at the mouth of Grouse Creek and continues through Tappan Canyon. A small window of ancient and resistant metamorphic rock crops out along the right wall of the canyon. Attentive floaters will notice some interesting folds in the wall just above the Grouse Creek Camps. The less geologically aware can’t help but notice the series of rapids formed downstream where the river pours over ledges and boulders of this resistant rock.

Over time, the Middle Fork appears to have eroded down and along the contact between the Tappan Canyon metamorphics that slope toward the river from the right canyon wall and the more easily eroded pink granite of the Casto pluton. In addition, a large alluvial fan emanating from the mouth of Grouse Creek (river right) also pushes the river into the granites along the left bank. The result is an impressive rampart of pink granite towers on the left bank at the mouth of Grouse Creek that mark the entrance to Tappan Canyon.

Further downstream, the river splits around Tappan Island and weaves along the contact, exposing the grey-green metamorphic rock on the right bank and more crumbly pink granite cliffs on the left. Several significant rapids clog this stretch of stunningly pretty canyon.

The river leaves the metamorphic rock after Tappan IV Rapid and makes a sweeping 180-degree turn at the mouth of Camas Creek (another great side hike possibility). For the next 6 miles to the Flying B Ranch (mile 68) the landscape is very similar to the stretch upstream of Tappan Canyon. The banks are lined with beautiful 200- to 300-year-old ponderosa pine trees that throw large patches of needles in the campsites. The narrow constriction at Aparajo Rapid (mile 63.1) stands out as one of the more scenic spots.

The Flying B Ranch offers a small store with a selection of gifts, ice cream, beer, and other boating essentials. The irrigated lawn and shade trees can offer a respite from the heat in mid August. Fires in 2000 roared down Brush Creek onto the ranch. While most of the buildings were spared, the firestorm eradicated nearly every living thing for miles on both sides of the canyon. While the grass and sage have fully recovered, the wide and open feeling of the canyon combined with the charred forests a thousand feet overhead can make this stretch feel a little desolate and oppressive during a slow, hot August afternoon.

excerpted from: Adventure Guides United States Idaho Rafting Kayaking (Whitewater)
——————–

page updated August 10, 2022

Road Reports May 26, 2019

The only way to get to Yellow Pine right now is via the South Fork route. There is still a lot of snow in the high country. Travel at your own risk and remember there is no cell phone service. Trees and/or rocks may be down in the road. Higher elevation roads are closed. Conditions change VERY quickly this time of year. Please share road reports.

Yellow Pine: We have had some rain this weekend to settle the dust. Please respect residents and slow down!
Click for Local Forecast.
Yellow Pine Webcam: (check date on image)

Warm Lake Highway: Clear
SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

Highway 55 Webcams Link: Note – there will be flaggers at the Banks to Lowman road junction for the holiday.
Work to repave Idaho Highway 55 from milepost 91 to milepost 97 near Smiths Ferry will begin Thursday, May 9th and continue until the end of June, according to Idaho Transportation Department officials.
During the work, traffic will be reduced to a single lane, controlled by flaggers and a pilot car. Motorists should plan for delays of up to thirty minutes. Work will not be done after 12 noon Fridays through the weekends.

South Fork Road: No recent reports.
May 22 report: mail truck driver sayd the FS is doing some road work. No trees or rocks to move.
Note: The maintenance by Valley County has ended for the season and turned back to the USFS.
Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
South Fork Stream Gauge:

EFSF Road: No recent reports.
May 22 report: mail truck driver says the County is working on the road, no rock or trees to move.
May 18: Report that the road is getting rough and washboardy.

Lower Johnson Creek Road: No recent reports.
Road is bare between Yellow Pine and Halfway as of May 15th.
Report May 15: “I rode Johnson Creek last night to Halfway and was blocked by snow there, county road graders are working on this end cleaning ditches. No major slides or sluffs between YP and Halfway.” – Matt
Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam:
Johnson Creek Stream Gauge:

Upper Johnson Creek Road: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcam: (check date on image)

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Road is still closed. Report that work was stopped last week while they assessed the situation.
May 17 photo courtesy Midas Gold

Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Closed to wheeled vehicles (snow and the Stibnite Slide.)
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The approx elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′
——————————-

Weather Reports May 19-25, 2019

May 19 Weather:

At 930am it was 49 degrees and mostly cloudy. Overcast by mid-day, getting breezy. Spatters of rain around 3pm, 52 degrees and blustery. Sprinkling a little at 4pm and quite breezy, at 430pm it was 48 degrees and steady light rain. Still raining at 5pm (not sure when it quit) not raining at 630pm. At 750pm it was 48 degrees and overcast. At 940pm it was 46 degrees and overcast. Cloudy and calm at 11pm.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time May 20, 2019 at 09:50AM
Mostly cloudy
Max temperature 61 degrees F
Min temperature 39 degrees F
At observation 49 degrees F
Precipitation 0.03 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

May 20 Weather:

At 950am it was 49 degrees and mostly cloudy. Overcast by noon. At 330pm it was 52 degrees, occasional drops of rain on and off. Breaks in the clouds at 430pm, light breezes and a couple drops of rain. Blustery at 6pm. At 8pm it was 48 degrees, dark lowering clouds and windy. At 930pm it was 42 degrees, steady light rain. Rain at 2am, probably on and off most of the night.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time May 21, 2019 at 09:30AM
Overcast, ridges socked in, breezy
Max temperature 58 degrees F
Min temperature 38 degrees F
At observation 42 degrees F
Precipitation 0.31 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

May 21 Weather:

At 930am it was 42 degrees, low overcast – ridges socked in and breezy. Splatters of rain 940am. Very light sprinkle at 10am. Steady light rain all morning and early afternoon. Barely sprinkling at 215pm. Probably quit raining around 3pm, but started misting again at 325pm. At 350pm it was 49 degrees, overast and light rain. Not raining at 4pm. Breaks in the clouds at 530pm. At 730pm it was 48 degrees and cloudy. At 930pm it was 42 degrees and cloudy. Steady rain at 940pm. Cloudy, calm and not raining at 11pm.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time May 22, 2019 at 09:30AM
Mostly cloudy, breezy
Max temperature 52 degrees F
Min temperature 37 degrees F
At observation 48 degrees F
Precipitation 0.20 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

May 22 Weather:

At 930am it was 48 degrees, mostly cloudy and breezy. At 1230pm it was 50 degrees, overcast and quite breezy. At 4pm it was 55 degrees, mostly cloudy and gusty strong breezes. At 9pm it was 51 degrees and mostly cloudy. Partly clear at 11pm, patches of stars.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time May 23, 2019 at 09:30AM
Partly cloudy, light breezes
Max temperature 57 degrees F
Min temperature 34 degrees F
At observation 53 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

May 23 Weather:

At 930am it was 53 degrees, partly cloudy and light breezes. Overcast with dark clouds and breezy mid-day. At 330pm it was 57 degrees, mostly cloudy and breezy. At 4pm it was 60 degrees, partly cloudy (blue sky to the north, dark clouds to the south) and breezy. At 8pm it was 55 degrees, overcast and breezy. At 9pm it was 51 degrees, cloudy and lighter breezes. Cloudy and calm at 11pm.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time May 24, 2019 at 09:30AM
Mostly clear
Max temperature 62 degrees F
Min temperature 36 degrees F
At observation 50 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

May 24 Weather:

At 930am it was 50 degrees and mostly clear. Overcast, breezy and raining at 1pm. At 3pm it was 48 degrees, dark overcast and little tiny sprinkles. Not raining at 4pm. Breaks in the clouds at 520pm. Overcast at 7pm. At 8pm it was 49 degrees, cloudy and a couple rain drops. At 9pm it was 47 degrees and cloudy. Cloudy and calm at 130am.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time May 25, 2019 at 09:30AM
Overcast
Max temperature 60 degrees F
Min temperature 43 degrees F
At observation 47 degrees F
Precipitation 0.04 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

May 25 Weather:

At 930am it was 47 degrees and overcast. Dark clouds and getting breezy at 130pm. Starting to rain at 140pm (didn’t last long.) At 4pm it was 47 degrees, dark clouds and a little breezy. Sprinkling at 610pm, lightly raining at 7pm. At 8pm it was 48 degrees, overcast and sprinkling lightly. At 915pm it was 45 degrees, steady light rain and low clouds – socked in. Not raining at 1045pm.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time May 26, 2019 at 09:30AM
Low overcast, ridges socked in
Max temperature 62 degrees F
Min temperature 39 degrees F
At observation 43 degrees F
Precipitation 0.14 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
—————————

Road Reports May 22, 2019

The only way to get to Yellow Pine right now is via the South Fork route. Travel at your own risk and remember there is no cell phone service. Trees and/or rocks may be down in the road. Higher elevation roads are closed. Conditions change VERY quickly this time of year. Please share road reports.

Yellow Pine: We have had some rain since the weekend to settle the dust, it is rather windy today, watch for trees falling down. Please respect residents and slow down!
Click for Local Forecast.
Yellow Pine Webcam: (check date on image)

Warm Lake Highway: Clear
SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

Highway 55 Webcams Link:
Work to repave Idaho Highway 55 from milepost 91 to milepost 97 near Smiths Ferry will begin Thursday, May 9th and continue until the end of June, according to Idaho Transportation Department officials.
During the work, traffic will be reduced to a single lane, controlled by flaggers and a pilot car. Motorists should plan for delays of up to thirty minutes. Work will not be done after 12 noon Fridays through the weekends.

South Fork Road: May 22 report: mail truck driver says the FS is doing some road work. No trees or rocks to move.
Note: The maintenance by Valley County has ended for the season and turned back to the USFS.
Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
South Fork Stream Gauge:

EFSF Road: May 22 report: mail truck driver says the County is working on the road, no rock or trees to move.
May 18: Report that the road is getting rough and washboardy.

Lower Johnson Creek Road: Road is bare between Yellow Pine and Halfway as of May 15th.
Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam:
Johnson Creek Stream Gauge:

Upper Johnson Creek Road: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcam: (check date on image)

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Road is still closed. Valley County subcontractor OK Gravel is working on cleaning up the mess and rebuilding the road.
May 17 photo courtesy Midas Gold

Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Closed to wheeled vehicles (and the Stibnite Slide.)
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The approx elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′
——————————-

May 19, 2019 The Yellow Pine Times

May 19, 2019 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Community Calendar:

April 2 – Boil water order issued
Every Sunday – 11am Fire Training
May 10 – Burn “permits” required
May 15 – Firewood Season opens
May 23 – Festival meeting 2pm at the Community Hall
Memorial Weekend – The Corner opens
May 25 – ATV-UTV Scavenger Hunt Memorial Day Weekend
May 25 – Willie and the Single Wides at The Corner
May 26 – Celebration of Life 2pm-5pm YP Tavern
June 8 – VYPA meeting 2pm Community Hall
June 11 – Yellow Pine Vet Clinic
June 15 – 10am YPFD meeting at the Fire Hall
June 20 – Festival meeting Thursday 2pm at the Community Hall
June 27 – (confirmed) Noxious Weed Spray day
June 29 – Highland Games
July 2 – Ice Hole Campground opens
July 6 – Golf Tournament & Breakfast
July 13 – 10am YPFD meeting at the Fire Hall
July 13 – Ride to Big Creek
July 20 – VYPA meeting 2pm Community Hall
July 27 – Festival meeting Saturday 2pm at the Community Hall
July 27 – Memorial and potluck for Wilbur Wiles (Big Creek/Edwardsburg)
Aug 10 – VYPA meeting 2pm Community Hall
Sept 14 – 10am YPFD meeting at the Fire Hall budget meeting
Sep 14 – Ride to Cinnabar
Sept 21 – VYPA meeting 2pm Community Hall

(details below)
———-

Local Events:

Memorial Weekend

May 25 – ATV-UTV Scavenger Hunt Memorial Day Weekend

The Corner will be opening up on Memorial Day Weekend with Willie and The Singlewides playing Saturday, 5/25.

May 26 – Celebration of Life 2pm-5pm Yellow Pine Tavern
— — — —

June 11 – Vet Day

On Tuesday June 11th the Cascade Vet clinic will be coming to Yellow Pine. Please call (208) 382-4590 to get on the list.
— — — —

June 29 – Highland Games

For the second year, Bald Mountain Knuckle Draggers will bring the Highland Games to Yellow Pine on June 29th. Last year they donated over $2,600 to the Helipad and this year money will be raised for the water department. Come see these fantastic athletes and support the water department.
— — — —

Golf Tournament July 6

It’s time to plan for the annual 4th of July Yellow Pine Golf Tournament. This year the proceeds will support the Community Hall and road repair.

The event will begin July 6th at 11am at the golf course, where the fairways aren’t fair and the greens aren’t green. The cost will remain the same at $50 per couple for sponsoring a hole with a sign displayed. $20 for individuals, each person playing will get a ticket for beer, additional tickets can be purchased for $3. Soda and water are free. Checks can be written to VYPA (Village of Yellow Pine Association)

There will be prizes for first, second and third places for men’s women’s and mixed. Also, there will be a prizes for closest to the pin. Spots go quickly, so be one of the first!

There will be a hearty breakfast at the museum from 8-10. The cost is $6 and all proceeds benefit the upkeep of the museum.
— — — —

Noxious Weed Spray day June 27

We have a confirmed date of Thursday, June 27th for the Yellow Pine Noxious weed spray day. Mark your calendars, hope to see you there.

Hello Yellow Pine,

I’m beginning my transition from snow plowing to noxious weed control. Yellow Pine is 1st on my list to start talking about dates to schedule our 2nd annual noxious weed Homeowners assistance spray day. Last year we got together on Thursday, July 19, 2018. I have June 27, 2019 marked on my calendar.

We had really good participation last year but we can do better, lets start talking now and get more people involved as it is “Everyone’s responsibility to control Noxious and Invasive plants”. I think last years event went very well, we will try and be a little more organized this year, if we missed someone put them on top of the priority list. I will bring my entire crew, all of our equipment, PPE, and mixed herbicide, you provide the volunteers, we’re here to help you not do it for you.

I misplaced 1-backpack sprayer last year, please keep your eyes peeled in case we laid it down someplace or forgot to pick it up.

Spread the word, save the date. I look forward to hearing from you. The best way to contact me this time of year is through e-mail, I will be in and out of the office until May, I check my e-mails daily but I can’t always respond until I get back into the office.

Thank you,
Steve Anderson
Valley County Weed and Pest Control
SAnderson@co.valley.id.us
— — — —

Celebration of Life – Wilbur Wiles

Potluck celebration of life at his cabin 27 July.
— — — —

2019 Yellow Pine Escapades

The 2019 schedule for the Yellow Pine Escapades has been updated on the website!

Expect new escapades this coming year, including an ATV-UTV Photo Scavenger Hunt; two (yes, two) ATV-UTV rides, a golf tournament, and even a community yard sale. Other events will be added to the calendar as plans are finalized.

Join us for a great season of fun! The starting point for fun in Yellow Pine! The website includes information on the events hosted by the Yellow Pine Community Hall as well as the other “goings-on” in the village. Food, lodging and fuel are available in Yellow Pine.

link:
———-

Village News:

Dust Abatement

I am in process of obtaining cost and date information. Please let me know if you are interested in dust abatement this year.

Deb Filler, fillerd2@live.com, 208.633.6945
— — — —

Firewood Permits May 15

The Corner has firewood permits in stock now. 4 cord minimum at $6.25 per cord. Please call to make sure I’m around before Memorial Day, bring drivers license and cash is preferred, no CC.
— — — —

Spring Fuel Delivery

Diamond Fuel & Feed will be going to the back country soon. They are waiting for Johnson Creek to open up and dry out enough for their truck to travel on. If you would like to be put on the schedule for fuel delivery please call the office at 208-382-4430 and let them know.

Thanks, Megan 5/15/2019
— — — —

The Corner

The Corner will be open Friday, May 24. For the opening weekend special, we will have smoked brisket with our sweet bourbon sauce and grilled onions served on a toasted bun with fries. On the lighter side a smoked chicken salad with black bean corn salsa. The Corner Store will also be open with snacks, groceries, fresh produce, soda, ice and packaged beer. If you know you will be coming in over the summer and need special grocery orders, let me know and I will order it in for you while you are here, 2 deliveries a week. The best way to get a hold of me is to call or stop by and say hello.

Matt, The Corner
208-633-3325
— — — —

Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Received a report on May 17 that the Transfer Station was emptied last week. We have started having an issue with the burn pile already. READ the SIGNS!

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

Yellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is located approximately 3 miles south on Johnson Creek Road.

The TRANSFER STATION is for household trash and yard waste:
* Household trash must be put inside (and fit) the dumpster;
* Yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, et.) goes in the burn pile on the south end of the turn-around;
* Cardboard boxes should be flattened before putting the in the dumpster,

The DUMPSTERS are NOT for:
* Furniture (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station).

The BURN PILE is NOT for:
* Cardboard boxes (flatten and put in dumpster);
* Furniture and appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Drywall and building material (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wire or fencing (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Foam Rubber (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wood with metal (like nails) attached (take to Donnelly Transfer Station.)

When closing the DOORS on the front of the dumpsters:
* Make sure the “U” brackets at the top and bottom of the door are engaged;
* The retaining bar at the middle of the door is slid into the pipe;
* And the “L” bars at the bottom of the doors dropped into place.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: 208/634-7176
— — — —

Update on Bald Hill Prescribed Fire

I received reports of smoke in Yellow Pine over the [last] weekend attributed to the Bald Hill Prescribed fire project and would like to provide an update. The area that we treated in Reegan Creek is continuing to burn heavy fuels inside the planned burn area and producing moderate amounts of smoke intermittently. We are continuing to monitor the fire and its effects, either on the ground or from aerial observations. It is meeting our objectives and progressing as planned. There is a good chance of rain and much cooler weather in the forecast at least through the weekend, this should significantly decrease or eliminate any smoke impacts to Yellow Pine. Thanks for the continued observations and feel free to contact Laurel Ingram at 208-634-0622 or District Ranger Anthony Botello at 208-634-0601 with any questions or concerns.

Thanks, Laurel Ingram 5/15/2019
Fuels Technician
Payette National Forest
— — — —

Roads

Johnson Creek Road

I rode Johnson Creek last night [5/14] to Halfway and was blocked by snow there, county road graders are working on this end cleaning ditches. No major slides or sluffs between YP and Halfway. – Matt

Stibnite Road Update

Update: May 17, 2019 from Mckinsey Lyon

Unfortunately, vehicle travel along Stibnite Road is likely still a few weeks out. However, we are encouraged by the progress the contractor for Valley County, OK Gravel, has made in clearing about 75% of the avalanche. Melt conditions have also been favorable and most of the snow has melted from the avalanche. Once crews are able to clear the slide entirely, they will begin re-building the road base back up. Timing for road surfacing is contingent upon when Valley County can start crushing material from the Yellow Pine quarry this summer and we anticipate a final gravel cap will be added to the road in mid-to-late summer.

The following photos, taken from the same location over the last few weeks, show the progress.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Photo credit Midas Gold. Photo 1: slide on April 17. Photo 2: April 25 melting out, foot trail well established. Photo 3: May 17 County contractor about 75% completed cleared avalanche debris and re-establishing road corridor. Will need a few more weeks to build road base back up above river.

link to more info:
— — — —

Tick Season

Please check your pets (and kids) for ticks, a tick bite paralysed a local dog recently, removal of the tick led to full recovery.


— — — —

History of the log cabin at the Cemetery

The Cemetery Committee is interested in any information on the cabin that is located by the cemetery. We know that it had been on the property that was known as “Mary’s Cabins”. It was moved by Tom Richter while the Filler’s were building their house. Donna Valdez said that the people who ran the cafe and bar slept there, before the Tavern was built.

Do people have pictures or any information they can share? We’d love to put a plaque up on the cabin while we repair it.

– Marj Fields
— — — —

Come Spring…

“To Yellow Pine residents. I will be making several trips next spring and summer hauling out metal, appliances, etc. . If you need anything hauled away please get on the list. Vehicles require a title. I will be hauling gravel back if anyone is interested.”

Contact Mike Amos
— — — —

Yellow Pine US Mail

We are still on 3-day a week mail delivery from Cascade. Staring in June we will have 6-day a week delivery. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 55 cents
— — — —

Predators

Watch for mean mamma does this time of year – they will stomp your dogs!

Bears are out of hibernation and hungry. Please do not leave pet food outdoors and remember to keep trash secured, it will draw bears, foxes, coyotes and loose dogs.

Bald Eagle attacked a duck decoy near Westside Ave on May 17th.

20190517EagleAttack-a

photo by Ann F.
— — — —

Ice Hole Campground Will open July 2nd

The Campground has been temporarily closed to provide for public safety during reconstruction. This order will be in effect from September 27, 2018 through July 2, 2019, unless rescinded earlier by the Forest Supervisor. (0402-04-80)
———-

Local Groups:

YPWUA News:

Water Update May 19th

The refurbished and rebuilt altitude valve and control valve were successfully reinstalled today restoring automatic control of the level in the water storage tanks. There is plenty of water available, there should be no supply concern for the holiday weekend. As of today, water plant output capacity exceeds 60,000 gallons per day.

The boil water advisory will need to remain in effect due to continued high water demand. Non-approved filter maintenance continues to be required to keep water flowing at such a high rate. Water demand is estimated at more than 30,000 gallons per day. The ongoing concern is reducing water usage due to leaks. Clearly citizens are not using that much water day to day. The water is going somewhere, the best explanation is additional leaks in the system.
– Warren Drake

link to: #4430059 Yellow Pine Water Users Boil Water Notification 4-2-19.pdf

link to: 2018 September Water Department Update.docx
— — — —

VYPA News:

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting Agenda

June 8, 2019; 2pm; at the Community Hall

1 Call to Order
2 Approval of the prior meeting minutes
3 Treasurer’s Report
4 Annual Community Hall Committee Written Report
5 Cemetery Committee Oral Report
6 Harmonica Festival Committee Oral Report
7 Nominations Committee Selection (Chairman, Treasurer, Member-At-Large)
8 Old Business:
– a. Transfer Station signage
– b. Update from Midas Gold
– c. Update on Community Hall Toilet Progress
– d. Update from YP Water Assn (if representative is available)
– e. Update from YPFD/Heli-spot (if representative is available)
9 New Business:
– a. Dust Abatement
– b. Discussion – Options for 2019 Midas Gold Community Agreement Payment – (Suggestions received so far: Give to Heli-Spot; Repair Abstein Road as identified in 2014; Resurfacing & Fixing holes in Village roads; Survey of Village property lines; Dust Abate all village roads; Install a permanent outhouse downtown to reduce impact on businesses; Give to Water Users Association for replacing water lines; Give to Community Hall Toilet committee; Purchase road-sized canopy to provide shade to audience during festival; build a playground for kids)
10 Adjournment

VYPA Meeting Dates 2019

June 8th; July 20th; August 10th; September 14th – 2pm at the Community Hall.

Note that the July 20th meeting is not on the second Saturday due to a conflict with a planned ATV rally involving many residents and visitors.

Yellow Pine Harmonica Meetings 2019:

March 30, 2019 Saturday 2pm at the Tavern
April 23, 2019 Tuesday 2pm at the Tavern *Cancelled*
May 23, 2019 Thursday 2pm at the Community Hall
June 20, 2019 Thursday 2pm at the Community Hall
July 27, 2019 Saturday 2pm at the Community Hall
— — — —

YPFD News:

Fire Training May 19th

YPFD training today was well attended! Thanks to all for participating as Jeff staged a traumatic injury scenario needing all levels of service.

20190519FireTraining2-a

There was a YPFD meeting on May 18th at the Fire Hall

20190518YPFDMeeting-a

Meetings will be held at the fire station at 10:00am and everyone is welcome to attend. June 15th; July 13th; and Sept 14th (which will also be the budget meeting as well).

Every Sunday 11am – Training

May 10th Burn Permits – contact the YPFD

Pile burning: Dress appropriately, have enough help on hand (people, water and tools) and make a firebreak before you start. Call your local fire protection district chief to let them know you’ll be conducting a debris burn. This saves them from sending emergency responders to your property if they are not needed.

Bring it, Don’t Burn it

For us in Yellow Pine, Jake Strohmeyer, Dist. Ranger with the Boise NF said we can use the area at our transfer station for yard debris and the FS will burn it once a year. Please no furniture, mattresses, construction debris, metal objects, tires or personnel junk. Please only woody yard debris. When using the pile please be mindful of where you place the debris as it should be contained to a manageable burnable area and kept as clean as possible. – JF

Training: Sunday Fire/EMS training has begun. Sundays at 11:00 AM unless otherwise posted. If Jeff F is in town the trainings will be held. All are welcome.

Safety Message: The best place to be during an avalanche, rock fall or a tree fall due to the wind is not there, please use extreme caution and common sense when conditions exist for these scenarios.

“If you are an Adventurist, please do not go out alone in steep areas. The spring thaw is an extremely dangerous time for Avalanches. The freezing and thawing create layers that break away from each other with the slightest disturbance. Scree fields are especially dangerous this time of year because of hidden ice that makes them even more unstable. Please be careful out there.”

YP Helispot: We are working with Valley County Road Department and the Boise National Forest for the rock base for the road leading into the Helispot and the actual Helispot itself. We are also receiving rock for the Fire Hydrants, water tank foundations, etc. The rock will come from the Valdez pit and will be less expensive than having it trucked in from Cascade.

Stop the Bleed Course: This course was well attended in the Fall and Jeff F and Ann F will be presenting another course when the new instructor material comes out. There are “Stop The Bleed” kits at the Tavern in an emergency.

Siren Testing: The YPFD siren will be tested only once this year on the first of May at noon. 3 blasts of the siren is a test, more than 3 is an Emergency.

-JF

Fire/Rescue Polaris Ranger

The YPFD purchased a basic Polaris Ranger 4×4 from Donnelly Fire Department in mid 2018

20190519FireRescuePolarisRanger-a

The Polaris has been transformed into a Quick Emergency Response Unit, capable of fighting fire, EMS and Over-the-Side Rescue responses.

The onboard equipment is all professional grade and certified to the highest Fire/Rescue standards:

* 75 gallons of water with pump
* 5 gallons of firefighting foam auto mixed with the pump
* Drafting capable with 12’ suction hose
* Hose Real with 75 foot of 1” hose with auto rewind
* 500’ of additional 1” hose
* Can Support 1.5” discharge hose as well
* 300” of ¾ inch hose
* Thermal Imaging Camera
* Firefighting Rake, Pulaski and McCloud
* Fire Extinguisher
* Drip Torch
* Chain Saw
* Full size Rigid Rescue Litter
* SKED Rescue Litter/Sled
* Rescue Harness
* 150’ Rescue Rope with assorted anchor and rescue gear
* Paramedic level Medical/Trauma equipment
* Oxygen
* Portable Repeater for back country communications with Valley County 9-1-1 Dispatcher and/or other emergency responders and Medical/Rescue Helicopters
* Winch
* Light Bar
* Cab Heater
* Custom Built suspension by Walker/Evans Racing
——–

Biz Listings:

Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377

Maybe open by Memorial weekend
— — — —

The Corner (208) 633-3325

Opening Memorial Weekend, Firewood Permits available
— — — —

Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233

Winter Hours at the Tavern: 9am-2pm and 4-8pm Mon, Wed, Fri, Sat and 9am-2pm Sun. Or call 208 633-2233 the phone rings into the house.
— — — —

Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Tom & Sarah Lanham
156 Yellow Pine Ave, Yellow Pine Id 83677
Website:
Link to FB page:

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
208-315-3554 cabin rentals
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
Link to website:
— — — —

Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed (208) 382-4430 – Wild Bird Seed 50LB Bag for $25.58
— — — —

Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, Will service Yellow Pine

B&T Safety Solutions LLC
208-271-1600 Based out of Donnelly
Snow removal, cleaning chimneys and stoves, we do cabin staining/chinking as well
— — — —

Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
———————–

Local Observations:

Monday (May 13) overnight low of 36 degrees, clear sky this morning. Beautiful bird chorus – swallows, finches, robins and a raven. Partly cloudy mid-day, light breezes. Dandelions are starting to bloom. Hummingbirds very active. Stronger breezes and more hazy clouds mid-afternoon, river sounds louder, high of 80 degrees. Hummingbirds active. Male goldfinch visited the hummingbird feeder. Nearly overcast and breezy early evening. Lots of hummingbirds this evening, a few robins chirping. Mostly cloudy at dusk and calmer. Hazy, some stars and filtered moonlight before midnight.

Tuesday (May 14) overnight low of 38 degrees, clear sky this morning. Swallows, finches and a raven calling. Pretty warm mid-day, light breezes, gusting at times, increasing clouds. Raven, finches and hummingbirds visiting, a red-naped sapsucker was drumming on the power pole. Partly cloudy and gusty breezes mid-afternoon, river sounds loud, high of 78 degrees. Fat golden mantel squirrel visited. Windy and overcast by early evening. Fat sleek doe in the neighborhood, hungry hummingbirds draining the feeders and a pine squirrel sounding off. At dusk it was mostly cloudy, breezy but not windy, fuzzy faint waxing moon high in the sky. Hummingbirds still active just before dark.

Wednesday (May 15) overnight low of 44 degrees, the sky is overcast this morning. Swallows flying high and a few finches and hummingbirds. Several colombian ground squirrels and 2 chipmunks running around. The red-naped sapsucker is back drumming on the power pole. Mail truck made good time. A few drops of rain before noon, dark clouds and a little breezy. Finches, hummingbirds and red-breasted nuthatches visiting. Little sprinkles on and off mid-afternoon, dark clouds and variable breezes, high of 60 degrees. Black-headed grosbeak and American goldfinch sighting. Shower mid-evening. Elk on the eastern edge of the golf course grazing undisturbed for quite a while. Shower after dark. Partly starry after midnight.

Thursday (May 16) overnight low of 38 degrees, mostly hazy sky this morning. Swallows, finches and hummingbirds active, so are the ground squirrels. Mostly cloudy mid-day, mild breezes. Finches, ground squirrels, pine squirrel and chipmunks active. Mostly cloudy (thicker haze and clouds) mid-afternoon and warm, very light breezes, high of 70 degrees. Robins calling late evening. Overcast and breezy at dusk. Rain after midnight, probably rained all night.

Friday (May 17) overnight low of 40 degrees, overcast and light rain this morning. Lots of finches, male and female evening grosbeaks, male and female black-headed grosbeaks and hummingbirds, pine squirrel gathering seeds in the rain. Light sprinkles mid-day and overcast. Pinesiskins have arrived. Sprinkles on and off after lunch, then steady light rain and a little breezy mid-afternoon, cooler, high of 48 degrees. Shooting stars are blooming in the undisturbed areas of the golf course. Large flock of brown-headed cowbirds visited late afternoon. Still raining at dusk, low misty clouds. Robins calling.

Saturday (May 18) overnight low of 38 degrees, mostly cloudy and light breezes this morning. Swallows, finches and robins calling, hummingbirds, black-headed grosbeaks and steller jay visiting. Overcast by mid-day. Lots of finches visiting. Still overcast mid-afternoon and almost calm, high of 55 degrees. Golden mantel and ground squirrels running about. Breaks in the clouds and breezy early evening. Mostly cloudy and short little sprinkle at dusk. Robins calling, doe out on the golf course. Cloudy at moon rise.

Sunday (May 19) overnight low of 36 degrees, mostly cloudy sky this morning. Lots of tree swallows flying and finches calling, ground squirrels ‘eeeping’. Overcast and a little breezy mid-day. Black-headed grosbeaks, hummingbirds and finches visiting. Blustery and spatters of rain mid-afternoon, high of 61 degrees. Overcast just before dusk. Robins calling. Doe on the golf course at dusk.
—————————-

Idaho News:

Repaving causes delays on Highway 55 near Smiths Ferry

by Scott Logan Tuesday, May 14th 2019

Smiths Ferry, Idaho (CBS 2) — Work started in earnest this week on repaving a several mile stretch of Highway 55 from milepost 91 to milepost 97 near Smiths Ferry, a stretch that’s in pretty rough shape.

In fact, the section of Highway 55 was deteriorating so quickly, the Idaho Transportation Department (ITD)moved the project up from 2021 when it was originally scheduled to be done.

“We’ve definitely heard from the travelling public that the conditions on that road are not great,” said ITD spokesman Jake Melder. “We see it ourselves, our maintenance guys have been out there since last fall making repairs.”

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

US 95 to close for overnight bridge construction between New Meadows, Council

by CBS 2 Staff Tuesday, May 14th 2019

New Meadows, Idaho (CBS 2) – Ongoing bridge construction over the Weiser River will require a series of nighttime closures of US-95 between Council and New Meadows near milepost 146 throughout the summer and fall.

During overnight closures on US-95, no official detour will be available.

Motorists needing to travel at night should find an alternate route.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Voters to cast ballots Tuesday on McCall-area rec district

The Star-News May 16, 2019

Voters in and around Donnelly will get to decide on Tuesday whether to create the Northern Valley Recreation District.

Polling places are the Donnelly Bible Church and the basement of Idaho First Bank on Deinhard Lane in McCall from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.

A majority plus one vote is required to create the district.

The district would have the same boundaries as the McCall-Donnelly School District, which extends from north of McCall to south of Donnelly. The recreation district would not be affiliated with the school district.

If approved, the new district would be a separate government agency with an independent board of directors.

… The district would collect about $1 million per year in property taxes, or about half of the maximum amount allowed, Steering Committee Chair Sherry Maupin of McCall said.

The $1 million levy amount was determined after gathering community comment, Maupin said.

A tax of $30 per $100,000 of taxable value on real estate would be levied by the district.

full story:
— — — — — — — — — —

‘The idea is to make things accessible to everyone’: Study recommends 70 miles of trails in Valley County

The year-long feasibility study found that the county needs more than 70 miles of pathways to connect communities for non-motorized travel.

Joey Prechtl May 16, 2019 KTVB

Valley County, Idaho — Two Valley County groups are trying to connect communities with singletrack sidewalks. A singletrack sidewalk is a dirt trail that runs parallel with a road. These would allow walkers, runners, and cyclists a safe route to and from communities.

A year-long feasibility study conducted by the International Mountain Biking Association recommends more than 70 miles of those sidewalks for Valley County.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Firefighters douse two controlled burns whipped by winds

The Star-News May 16, 2019

McCall Fire & EMS responded to two brush fires in the McCall area last weekend after winds caused controlled burns to ignite nearby dead grass.

Firefighters were able to quickly douse flames on the two fires on Elo Road and Rio Vista Boulevard before any damage to structures or injuries were incurred, Chief Garrett de Jong said.

Lingering snow piles do not signal safe burning conditions, and smoldering ash piles should be extinguished with water and “cool to the touch,” de Jong said.

“People need to be very thoughtful when they decide to burn and need to take into account the fuels that they are burning, the time of day, and how the wind can affect their fire,” he said.

source:
— — — — — — — — — —

Archaeologist to discuss Valley County culture May 28

The Star-News May 16, 2019

A Boise National Forest archaeologist will discuss the history of ancient cultures in Valley County during an Outdoor Conversations event on Tuesday, May 28, from 6:30 to 8 p.m. at Barn Owl Books.

Archaeologist Lucy Harris will also talk about efforts to prevent destruction of these historical sites from erosion and people.

“The western margin of Cascade Reservoir … contains an impressive archaeological record that documents a human history of the valley that spans 11,000 years,” Harris said. “These sites represent an invaluable and irreplaceable archaeological record.”

Displays will include informative maps of the area and samples of stone tools recovered from sites. The discussion will be the final Outdoor Conversation event of the season sponsored by the Selway-Bitterroot Frank Church Foundation.

Barn Owl Books and Gifts is located at 616 N. Third St., Suite 110, in McCall.

source:
— — — — — — — — — —

New Roseberry exhibit depicts early residents in their own words

By Max Silverson for The Star-News May 16, 2019

During the Great Depression, Gold Fork resident Charlie Pratt went into the local bank, laid his revolver on the counter and did something he’d never done before – he requested a $10 line of credit to buy groceries.

“I gave him the 10 dollars,” said Blair Armstrong, the man behind the counter that day.

The not-so-subtle “request” for credit is one of many stories from Valley County’s history now on display at the Methodist-Episcopal Church at Historic Roseberry east of Donnelly.

From photos of hearty homesteaders building log homes by hand to scenes of the McCall sawmill engulfed in flames, the exhibit, called “Voices,” chronicles the life and times of early Valley County residents.

The exhibit will be open this Sunday and May 26 from 1-5 p.m. and then be open 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. Fridays through Sundays during the summer.

The exhibit includes stories, quotes and context partnered with photos, often depicting the surprisingly difficult conditions that came with life in the mountains.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

MV students to dedicate Packer John’s Cabin Park signs Tuesday

The Star-News May 16, 2019

Meadows Valley students are inviting the public to celebrate the dedication of their historical interpretive signs on Tuesday at Packer John’s Cabin park east of New Meadows.

The ceremony will begin at 1 p.m. Tuesday with speeches from the students and will wrap up with a meet-and-greet with the 15 students from Sue Weber’s fifth-grade class that crafted the signs.

Students spent about a year researching, designing and installing their own 24-by-18-inch sign detailing the history of Meadows Valley at each campsite in the park.

The Adams County Commissioners were convinced by students to grant a budget of up to $14,000 to create the signs.

The Adams County Historical Society and the McCall Outdoor Science School also assisted students throughout the process.

Efforts were made by students last spring to clean the park up in anticipation of installing the signs.

source:
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WICAP plans annual yard sale May 23-25 in Cascade

The Star-News May 16, 2019

The Western Idaho Community Action Partnership will host its annual Yard Sale Fundraiser Thursday through Saturday, May 23-25, at the Valley County Fairgrounds in Cascade.

The event will take place from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily at the first red barn at the fairgrounds. Donations will be accepted starting on noon next Tuesday.

Items for sale will include clothing, furniture, housewares and appliances. Featured this year will be “Dale’s Corner,” featuring artwork, jewelry, silver, crystal, old china odds and ends.

WICAP is nonprofit corporation established in 1965 to promote the power and self-sufficiency of people experiencing economic and related problems.

Services include assistance with heating costs and USDA Commodity Foods to qualifying individuals or those experiencing hardships.

WICAP also has a back-to-school fund which provides low-income students with a backpack, shoes for physical education, and school supplies.

The group offers chimney cleaning for low-income seniors and disabled people as well as other types of assistance such as job search assistance and budgeting.

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Letter to Share:

NWS Boise needs enhanced spotter reports May 27 – Jun 14

Spotters,

To ensure that the National Weather Service Doppler Radar in Boise lasts for many more years to come, we need to do some significant refurbishment of physical parts in the radar, such as gears, bearings, etc. To do that, we need to take the radar offline for about three weeks, from May 27 through June 14. This process will be taking place at all radars across the country over the next few years, and this is our scheduled time to go through the refurbishment.

During that radar downtime, we will only have very limited radar coverage from neighboring office radars. We will be more dependent than ever on reports of significant weather from our network of trained weather spotters – that’s you! We have other tools, like Satellite, and lightning detection equipment – but nothing really compared to getting reports from spotters like you – with what you are experiencing on the ground in your area.

During those weeks (May 27 – June 14), please be “extra aware” of significant weather in your area (thunderstorms, strong winds, hail, etc.) and call us on the usual spotter hotline number (1-800-882-1428) with your reports. We really appreciate your help!

Here is a link to a nice video with information about the radar refurbishment project:

Thanks so much,
Your National Weather Service Team
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Trivia:

Memorial Day: A Brief History

by Suzanne G May 1, 2019

This Memorial Day, AmeriGas is proud to play a big part in cookouts across the nation. But more importantly, it’s a time to remember the brave men and women who made the ultimate sacrifice while serving in our armed forces.

Did you know that Memorial Day didn’t start out the way we celebrate it today? Do you know when, where, or how Memorial Day even began? Read on to learn more…

* It started over 150 years ago. On May 5, 1866 in Waterloo, NY, a ceremony honored local veterans who fought in the Civil War (which had just ended a year earlier). Businesses closed and residents flew flags at half-staff.

* Two years later, it gets a name. On May 5, 1868, the head of the Grand Army of the Republic (an organization of Union veterans) created Decoration Day, a day for Americans to decorate the graves of the war dead with flowers.

* Flower power influences the date. It’s believed that Maj. Gen. John A. Logan declared Decoration Day to be May 30 because flowers would be in bloom all over the country.

* It wasn’t always for all fallen soldiers. It was only after World War I that Memorial Day expanded to honor those who died in all American wars.

* LBJ makes the birthplace official. In 1966, President Lyndon Johnson, with the support of Congress, declares Waterloo the birthplace of Memorial Day.

* No longer a date, but a day. In 1971, Congress declared Memorial Day a federal holiday and that it would no longer take place on May 30, but rather the last Monday in May.

* A new millennium brings a new moment. In 2000, President Bill Clinton signs an act which asks Americans to observe a Moment of Remembrance on Memorial Day at 3:00 p.m. Many organizations observe this moment, including Amtrak (who blasts their train whistles), Major League Baseball, and NASCAR.

On behalf of the AmeriGas family, we honor the U.S. service men and women this Memorial Day who gave their lives for our country and our freedom.

source: AmeriGas newsletter
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Scam Alert:

Social Security Scam

From Gem County Sheriff’s Office via FB

Fraudsters have long been calling Social Security benefit recipients and telling them their Social Security number is being suspended for criminal or fraudulent activity — and that the government is taking action against them. The action ranges from an arrest warrant to an active lawsuit.

To end this supposed action, victims are told to call another number. When they do, folks running the scam will ask them to pay a fine (often through gift cards). They will also be asked personal information, such as their bank account numbers, date of birth, and so on. If they supply it, fraudsters can utilize it to take money from their accounts.

With a Social Security number and a date of birth, it’s even possible to sign up for benefits (if the rightful Social Security account holder hasn’t yet) or, if they have, to divert benefits to another address and bank account. Scam artists can simply contact the Social Security Administration (SSA) and ask to change the address or bank account. The first indication the rightful recipient would have is the failure of their benefits to arrive.

A new spin

But a new wrinkle in this venerable scam was recently reported. In this one, recipients of a call are told that their Social Security number has been suspended due not to their own actions but to more general “suspicious activity.”

Instead of being given another number to call, the victims are told to simply press 1, and they’ll be connected with a Social Security agent. Instead, they are connected to a fraudulent agent, who may ask them to verify their Social Security number. Once they verify it, the fraudster has it. Fines and bank account numbers are part of this one, too.

Senior citizens are targets

Unfortunately, Social Security fraud is all too frequently perpetrated against senior citizens. Most senior citizens rely on Social Security for at least part of their income, and many rely on it for a sizable percentage of it. They may be very frightened of a possible suspension of the number and hence the benefit.

Senior citizens also often don’t realize how easy it is to imitate even an agency of the U.S. government. In the past, scam artists have set up phone numbers with 202 area codes (the one used in Washington, D.C.) and email accounts with ssa.gov as part of the address — which is part of the actual online address of the SSA. They have set up fake SSA websites that look very convincing.

This time of year, there may be a third wrinkle. Tax returns, refunds, and the Internal Revenue Service (IRS), another federal agency, are in the minds, computers, and mailboxes of many people. Senior citizens and the rest of the population might be more likely to believe that someone from the U.S. government is actually contacting them about suspicious activity during this period than any other.

Take precautions if you’re contacted

It’s important not to react if someone contacts you saying they’re from the SSA by phone or email. Instead, take three precautions.

1. Know the SSA’s policies

In general, the SSA and its agents will not suddenly call or email someone. The SSA, like the IRS, communicates by letter. It may at times call or email to follow up on an issue, but the original contact will come by letter.

2. Don’t give out any information

Once you know that the real SSA is not going to make such a serious charge as fraud or suspicious activity over the telephone, the next step is easy.

Don’t engage with the caller. Don’t give out any information of any kind. Don’t fall for one of their favorite tricks — verifying a Social Security or bank account number they already have part of. They can use it once they have it.

It’s a good idea, in fact, to hang up on the call. Some fraudsters record and use the victim’s voice, particularly saying “yes.” They can then use the recording to verify and authorize transfers from bank and other accounts.

3. Report the incident

If this scam happens to you, report it to the SSA. The SSA maintains a Fraud Hotline at 1-800-269-0271. If you’re hearing impaired, call 1-866-501-2101 (TTY). The government alerts people to these scams based partly on the number of reports. It’s important to public safety to keep the public aware.
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Mining News:

Stibnite Foundation Established, Ethical Quandary Persists

By Monica Gokey May 15, 2019 Boise State Public Radio


Courtesy Midas Gold Corp.

The Stibnite Foundation was recently established with nearly $1 million from Midas Gold, the company hoping to reopen the Stibnite mine in west-central Idaho. But there’s an ethical quandary over whether or not the foundation ties local cities and counties too closely to the mine’s success or failure.

Each of the eight regional communities that signed Midas Gold’s community agreement got to place a member on the board of the foundation, which was formally established in mid-April.

Midas Gold provided the Stibnite Foundation with $100,000 cash, nearly $900,000 in company shares.

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USDA Forest Service Dewey Mine Sediment Stabilization Update

May 13, 2019

The Forest Service is seeking scoping comments for the proposed Dewey Mine Sediment Stabilization Project on the Krassel Ranger District of the Payette National Forest. The scoping document provides more detailed information about the project and is available on the project’s webpage at
http://www.fs.usda.gov/project/?project=55927

The Forest Service is contacting interested individuals, groups, and agencies to make them aware of the project and to gather pertinent feedback. To be most helpful, please submit your scoping comments by June 12, 2019 and make your comments as specific as possible.

The project webpage provides you tools to engage this process as you wish. From “Get Connected” on the right hand side of the page, click on “Subscribe to Email Updates” if you wish to receive electronic communication about this project. Use the “Comment/Object on project” link to access a simple webform to submit your comments on this project. The “Public Comment/Objection Reading Room” are the published comments received on this project.

Webform submission through the project webpage is preferred but written, comments concerning these projects will be accepted. Comments for the project may be submitted to the Krassel District Office 500 North Mission Street Building 1 McCall, Idaho 83638. Hand delivered comment letters may be delivered during regular business hours of 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday-Friday, excluding holidays.

Comments received in response to this request will be available for public inspection and will be released in their entirety if requested pursuant to the Freedom of Information Act. Comments received in response to this request will also be available for public inspection on the “Public Comment Reading Room” on the project webpage.

For further information on this project, please contact Andrew Stonebreaker, Hydrologic Technician, at (208)-634-0806.

Sincerely,
Anthony B. Botello
Krassel District Ranger
Payette National Forest
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Payette seeks comment on Dewey Mine sediment project

The Star-News May 16, 2019

The Payette National Forest is seeking comments on a sediment stabilization project for the Dewey Mine about 17 miles east of Yellow Pine.

Proposed work on the mine includes installing dams in a gully and excavating a drainage route to direct runoff from the mine around a breached settling pond.

Work would improving drainage, road access and reinforce the closure of the mine.

The goal of the project is to reduce the amount of sediment flowing into Mule Creek, according to the proposal.

The gold mine, located within the Krassel Ranger District, is abandoned.

Contact Hydrologic Technician Andrew Stonebreaker at 208-634-0806 for questions.

Comments can be submitted by June 12 to the Krassel District Office at 500 Mission Street in McCall, or through project webpage at
http://fs.usda.gov/project/?project=55927

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Impact Statement for Proposed Caldwell Canyon Phosphate Mine Available for Review

BLM Identifies Mining Alternative One as its Preferred Alternative

Soda Springs, Idaho – Today the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Idaho Falls District released a Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) analyzing a mine and reclamation plan (M&RP) submitted by P4 Production, LLC for the proposed Caldwell Canyon Mine. P4 Production, a subsidiary of Bayer, would like to develop several phosphate leases they hold located on Schmidt Ridge about 13 miles east northeast of Soda Springs, Idaho. The BLM seeks public review prior to releasing a Record of Decision on the proposal later this summer. BLM has identified its preferred alternative as Alternative 1 in the FEIS.

In keeping with the Administration’s priorities, the preferred alternative would find a balance between responsible resource extraction and conservation, while providing opportunities for high paying jobs in the local community. If approved, the Caldwell Canyon Mine would sustain approximately 185 mining jobs and support 585 plant jobs for an additional 40 years, and would aid the region by providing $122 million annually for payroll, taxes, royalties, purchases, as well as sustaining support and service jobs.

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Public Lands:

Memorial Day weekend campground openings planned

Contact: Boise National Forest Venetia Gempler (208) 373-4105

Boise, Idaho, May 17, 2019 — Boise National Forest visitors headed to the Forest in celebration of Memorial Day can expect cool temperatures with a chance of rain. Temperatures in higher elevations are much cooler and conditions can change very quickly. Please call the District for updates. Many campgrounds and roads in the higher elevations are closed due the remaining snow pack including Deadwood Reservoir, Bull Trout Campground and Trinity Recreation area. Forest managers ask everyone to be extremely careful near waterways because of spring run-off conditions. River banks may be unstable and roads are easily damaged in muddy conditions.

District list of anticipated campground openings – weather and conditions permitting.

Check the Alerts & Notices site for road and area closures:
https://www.fs.usda.gov/alerts/boise/alerts-notices

Please call the Districts for further information. All cabins are reservation only.
Visit: https://www.recreation.gov/ for reservations. 1-877-444-6777

Emmett Ranger District – Please note: The RD has moved and due to events outside the District’s control, phones may not be operational until late June or early July.

Recreation Area Tentative Opening / Closing dates

Hot Springs Campground May 3 – Oct. 14
Tie Creek Campground May 3 – Oct. 14
Rattlesnake Campground May 10 – Oct. 14
Peace Valley Campground May 24 – Oct. 14
Hardscrabble Campground Closed until Aug. 1, 2019 (renovations)
Trail Creek Campground May 10 – Oct. 14
Boiling Springs Campground May 24 – Oct. 14
Boiling Springs Cabin May 24 – Oct. 14 – reserve only
Big Eddy Campground May 24 – Sept. 9
Swinging Bridge Campground May 24 – Sept. 9
Canyon Creek Campground May 24 – Sept. 9

Emmett Ranger District

Tentative Opening / Closing dates
Cold Springs Campground May 24 – Sept. 9
Third Fork Cabin May 13 – Oct. 27 – reserve only
Deadwood Lookout Cabin June 21 – Oct. 6 – reserve only
Silver Creek Campground May 24 – Nov. 1

Sage Hen Area (managed by Emmett Ranger District)

Reminder: Tussock Moth Outbreak ongoing, hairs from caterpillars may cause irritating rash.

Recreation Area Tentative Opening / Closing dates
Sage Hen Picnic Campground May 17 – Sept. 9
Cartwright Campground May 17 – Oct. 14
Antelope Campground May 17 – Oct. 14
Antelope Annex Campground May 17 – Oct. 14
Sage Hen Creek Campground May 17 – Oct. 14
Hollywood Campground May 17 – Sept. 9
Eastside Campground May 17 – Sept. 9
Big Eddy Campground May 17 – Sept. 9

Cascade Ranger District 208-382-7400

Recreation Area Tentative Opening / Closing dates

*All Cascade District campgrounds are scheduled to open May 23 through Sept. 13.

Ponderosa State Park and the State Parks along Cascade Reservoir are open for Memorial weekend.

Ice Hole Campground – Closed until July 2, 2019, for renovations.

The gate on Snowbank Road #446 with access to Blue Lake opens June 1 and remains open through September or until closed by snow.

Idaho City Ranger District 208-392-6681

Recreation Area Tentative Opening / Closing dates
Bad Bear Campground May 24 – Sept. 25
Hayfork Campground May 24 – Sept. 25
Ten Mile Campground May 24 – Sept. 25
Black Rock Campground May 24 – Sept. 25
Deer Park Cabin May 24 – Sept. 25 – reserve only
Barber Flat Campground May 22 – Sept. 25

Idaho City Ranger District 208-392-6681

Recreation Area Tentative Opening / Closing dates
Beaver Creek Cabin – reservation only Remains open all year
Grayback Campground May 18 – Sept. 25
Grayback Campground Group Site May 18 – Sept. 25
Edna Creek Campground May 24 – Sept. 25
Whoop Um Up Campground and Trails May 24 – Sept. 25
Jenny Lake Trail From 384 road onto the trail – may need snowshoes to access lake area.
Atlanta Cabin May 24 – Sept. 25 – reserve only
Graham Cabin – reserve only Fly in ONLY. ( July 1 – Sept. 18)
Crooked River Trail May 15 – Sept. 30 (or closed by snow)
Riverside Campground May 24 – Sept. 25
Power Plant Campground May 24 – Sept. 25

Lowman Ranger District 208-259-3361

Recreation Area Tentative Opening / Closing dates
Pine Flats Campground May 23 – Sept. 5 (may extend through Sept.)
Little Deadwood Campground May 23 – Sept. 5 (may extend through Sept.)
Mountain View Campground May 23 – Sept. 5 (may extend through Sept.)
Park Creek Campground May 23 – Sept. 5 (may extend through Sept.)
Kirkham Hot Springs Campground May 23 – Sept. 5 (may extend through Sept.)
Helende Campground May 23 – Sept. 5 (may extend through Sept.)
Warm Springs Rental Cabin Open year-round
Bonneville Campground May 23 – Sept. 5 (may extend through Sept.)

There is no road access to Deadwood Reservoir this Memorial Weekend. Campgrounds are scheduled to open June 28

Bull Trout / Martin Lake June 28 – Sept. 5 (may extend through Sept.)
Deer Flats Campground June 28 – Sept. 5 (may extend through Sept.)
Bear Valley Campground June 28 – Sept. 5 (may extend through Sept.)
Elk Creek Guard Station Nov. 1 – April 30
Fir Creek Campground June 28 – Sept. 5 (may extend through Sept.)
Deadwood Reservoir Campgrounds including Barney’s, Cozy Cove, Hower’s and Riverside June 28 – Sept. 5 (may extend through Sept.)

Lowman Ranger Trailheads Tentative Opening / Closing dates
All major trailheads Memorial Day – Labor Day

Mountain Home Ranger District 208-587-7961

Anderson Ranch Area Tentative Opening / Closing dates
Most campgrounds open May 15 – Oct. 1
Dog Creek Campground is anticipated to be open June 1 – Oct. 1
Trailheads – Lower Lava, Pine Gulch and Camp Creek – open May 15 – Oct. 1
Trailheads – Elk Creek, Cross Cut and Devil’s Creek – open June 1 – Oct. 1

Anderson Ranch and Arrowrock Reservoirs concrete ramps are available. Please use caution as floating debris has been spotted in the reservoirs. Water levels on Anderson Ranch and Arrowrock Reservoirs are controlled by the Bureau of Reclamation. View image and more information about reservoir water levels at:

http://www.usbr.gov/pn/hydromet/ramps/anderson/anderson.html

https://www.usbr.gov/pn/hydromet/ramps/arrowrock/arrowrock.html

https://www.usbr.gov/pn/hydromet/boipaytea.html

Idaho Fish & Game – Stocking
https://idfg.idaho.gov/fish/magic-valley/stocking

South Fork Boise River Area Tentative Opening / Closing dates

Floatboat access ramps along South Fork Boise River are open May 15 – Oct. 1

Blacks Creek (Danskin Trail Area) Tentative Opening / Closing dates

Danskin Trail system is normally open April 11 – Jan. 1

Middle Fork Boise River Area

Tentative Opening / Closing dates

Campgrounds and Trailheads in Mid. Fork Boise River area open May 15 – Oct. 1

William Pogue NRT Trail 122 -There is a closure on a portion of this trail system – reference Order # 0402-01-059 https://www.fs.usda.gov/alerts/boise/alerts-notices

Wilson Creek Trail system is anticipated to be open in spring of 2019

Lower Roaring River trail 045 – There is a closure on a portion on this trail system – reference Order # 0402-01-059 https://www.fs.usda.gov/alerts/boise/alerts-notices

Shafer Butte and Trinity Mountain Recreation Areas Tentative Opening / Closing dates

These high elevations areas are currently closed due to snow. Shafer Butte Campground opens June 15 and Trinity area opens July 15 – Oct. 1 (or when closed by snow) Call the District for updates.
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S. Idaho grazing plan that destroyed sagebrush is rejected

May 17, 2019 AP

Boise, Idaho (AP) – A federal administrative law judge has rejected a plan for public land grazing allotments in south-central Idaho that would have destroyed re-emerging sagebrush in favor of non-native plants to increase forage for cattle and sheep.

The ruling last week directs the U.S. Bureau of Land Management to set aside its final grazing decisions for about 80 square miles of allotments in Twin Falls County.

The administrative law judge in the Interior Department’s Office of Hearings and Appeals concluded that destroying sagebrush and rabbitbrush to increase livestock forage on public lands couldn’t be justified.

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USFS Regional Intermountain Wildfire

May 15, 2019 Newsletter

The Right Kind of Fire in the Right Place at the Right Time

Almost 95% of all fires are stopped in the initial attack phase of firefighting. Firefighters are very good at stopping fires in the early stages. After 100 years of fire suppression activities, with every fire put out as quickly and safely as possible, we are faced with new challenges. Restoring natures balance by incorporating the important role and value fire has on ecosystem health is essential for land managers.

Fire is necessary. It is better if we determine the right kind of fire, in the right place, at the right time. Conducting a prescribed burn requires following a prescription meaning everything has to be up to standards to move forward. Fire burning at lower intensity has shorter impacts to air quality, achieves the desired effect of reducing vegetation, revitalizes habitats for wildlife and creates landscapes that can better withstand wildfire and provide for a safer more effective wildfire response.

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Critter News:

Pet Talk – Achilles tendon injuries in dogs

Dr. Karsten Fostvedt May 17, 2019 IME

Achilles tendon injuries are extremely common in people but are also common in our athletic dogs. The Achilles tendon is also known as the calcaneal tendon. It is formed by the termination of several muscles and attaches to the heel, or calcaneus. The Achilles tendon is critical for normal walking.

The cause of Achilles tendon rupture is usually a traumatic event, such as a fall from a height or laceration of the tendon. Chronic degeneration of the tendon can occur in excessively sporting breeds of dogs.

Rupture of the tendon causes the ankle to drop toward or almost touch the ground. The ankle, or “hock,” may be swollen and painful. When trauma is the cause, usually only one leg is affected. In chronic forms of tendon degeneration, both rear legs may be affected.

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Bonneville K9 deputy memorialized in Meridian

May 16, 2019 Local News 8

Meridian, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – As part of the Police Officers Memorial observation in Meridian last night, a contingent of Bonneville County Deputies took part in the unveiling of a new K-9 Officers Memorial.

The story of each K9 on the memorial was recited. Bonneville County Sheriff Paul Wilde told the story of K9 Deputy Rik. Wilde said that on June 5, 2002, Rik was shot by a suspect who was intent on killing deputies.

He said Rik saved the lives of human deputies that day and helped stop the suspect.

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Idaho Chukar Foundation teaches dogs and owners how to avoid snakes

May 18, 2019 By Steve Dent KIVI TV

Boise — The Idaho Chukar Foundation held a training session at Julia Davis Park to help dogs and their owners avoid dangerous animals.

The class taught dogs to not go up to snakes and smell them, the course featured five stations and live bull snakes that even struck at some of the dogs who were in the class.

During the training the dogs were taught to run after discovering a snake, they used a shock collar to reinforce that snakes are bad, it was the owners job to run with the dog and then comfort their animal after they made it a safe distance away.

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KWVR Oregon Wolf Education weekly Wolf Report

Second week of May 2019
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Rift exposed among Oregon leaders on wolf protections

Slapping down a stance taken by the director of Oregon’s wildlife department, Gov. Kate Brown declared Wednesday that the state and its agencies oppose the federal government’s proposal to take the gray wolf off the endangered species list.

Associated Press By Andrew Selesky May 16, 2019

Salem, Ore – Slapping down a stance taken by the director of Oregon’s wildlife department, Gov. Kate Brown declared Wednesday that the state and its agencies oppose the federal government’s proposal to take the gray wolf off the endangered species list.

Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife Director Curtis Melcher had written on May 9 to a federal agency in support of the proposal, saying that in the Lower 48 states and Mexico, the gray wolf no longer meets the definition of an endangered or threatened species under the federal Endangered Species Act.

Conservation groups and an Oregon congressman blasted Melcher’s position after the letter, which had not been publicly announced, came to light this week. Then Brown herself weighed in on Wednesday in a letter to U.S. Interior Secretary David Bernhardt, saying she wanted to “clarify and correct” Melcher.

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Wolf’s comeback in US triggers debate on protection levels

by Andrew Selsky Associated Press Friday, May 17th 2019

Salem, Ore. (AP) – The gray wolf is on track for a remarkable comeback after being almost exterminated in the contiguous United States, but a Trump administration proposal to take the iconic symbol of the wild off the endangered species list has exposed divisions among states.

California says it opposes delisting the wolf, while Washington state said it agrees. The federal proposal also exposed a rift among top officials in Oregon – one of several states where wolves have established breeding packs after wandering across state lines.

The debate highlights clashing interests and differing philosophies, with ranchers fearing more livestock will fall prey to wolves and conservationists worrying that wider hunting of the predators might be around the corner. Hunting and trapping wolves is already allowed in Montana and Idaho.

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Wolf Education International

Newsletter May 13, 2019

Letter: Wolf recovery process ‘off the rails’
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Tribal groups seek permanent ban on grizzly bear hunting

May 15, 2019 AP

Billings, Mont. (AP) – Native American groups are pressing for permanent protections for grizzly bears, a species some tribes consider sacred but that has been proposed for hunting in Wyoming and Idaho.

Tribal representatives were scheduled to appear Wednesday before Congress in support of legislation to block grizzly hunting in the Lower 48 states, regardless of the species’ population size.

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Don’t Become a Fawn Napper

May 22, 2018 Bonner County Daily Bee


If you see a fawn in the wild, leave it alone. In almost all case, the doe is nearby and the fawn is not orphaned. Every year, Mystic Farm Wildlife Rescue receives numerous phone calls about “abandoned” fawns or takes in fawns that were “rescued” by well-meaning folks.

Every year, fawns are reported by the caring public as being orphaned or abandoned.

Sometimes it is a case of death of the doe, leaving the fawn obviously orphaned. Sometimes it is a case of an injured fawn, causing the doe to abandon her baby. But, unfortunately, it is often a case of not being orphaned at all, but rather the mother just being out of sight, said Dory McIsaac of Mystic Farm Wildlife Rescue in Sagle.

“Nothing pleases my heart more than knowing a fawn is back with its mom,” McIsaac said. “Each season Mystic Farm receives phone calls regarding ‘abandoned’ fawns. Our pat response — if no blatant death of a doe is observed — is to please put the fawn back where you found it.”

They advise callers that it doesn’t matter if they touched it but, if it makes them feel better, rub some grass on it, put the fawn down, and leave the area.

“I can almost guarantee that if you go back and check in 24 hours, the fawn will be gone,” McIsaac said. “Nearly every situation ends with the ‘fawn napper’ calling Mystic Farm back the next day to let us know the mama came back to get the fawn. That is truly the desired happy ending of wildlife rehabilitation.”

Some facts to know:

• Mother deer will leave their fawn for hours while they go off to feed nearby. The mother does this so predators will not see a vulnerable fawn when they see her. She can be gone many hours, leaving the camouflaged and scent free fawn motionless, avoiding detection by predators.

• Is it injured? If a fawn is seen lying upright, eyes wide open, but flattened to the ground, do not touch it. This is a fawn’s camouflage position to blend in with its surroundings. When the fawn is picked up, it will allow its body to become limp and dangle in your hands. The legs are not broken. Put the baby down, walk away, and leave the area.

• If a fawn is obviously ill or injured — lying on its side, kicking and crying, bleeding, etc. — gently pick it up and place in a safe, quiet place. A light cloth placed over the eyes will often calm it. Keep the fawn away from pets and other human activity. Touch, odors, and the sound of the human voice will only add to the stress of the situation and may cause additional harm. Keep the fawn free from cold drafts or keep it cool if the weather is warm. Please do not feed the fawn. Call Mystic Farm immediately.

• The fawn is on the road. Mystic Farm receives many calls regarding fawns in the middle of the road. Why are they there? Because the mom is nearby. If the fawn is in danger of being hit by cars, gently pick it up and place it about 20 feet off the side of the road and leave the area.

• Is it too late to return to the mother if the fawn has been handled by humans? Will she then reject it? No, that is an “old wives tale.” The mother doesn’t care — she just wants her baby back. She is around human scent all the time. Her maternal instinct is much stronger than her ability to rationalize human scent on her baby.

• What happens to the fawn if a rescue is warranted? After arrival at Mystic Farm, the fawn is evaluated and checked for any injuries, dehydration, etc. Wounds are treated either on the premises or through the services of local veterinarians. The fawn is put on an appropriate diet and feeding schedule. Once the fawns gain strength and can nurse from a bottle on their own, the ‘blind feeding method’ is utilized using “hands off” bottle racks. Human contact is kept to a minimum. The fawns are kept in an isolated area — free from predators and forming their own little “herd.” They are free to browse and live in a large, safe, enclosure. Over the course of the season, the fawns are slowly introduced back into the wild.

Information: Mystic Farm Wildlife Rescue, Inc., 208-241-7081

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BLM to release wild horses in Hardtrigger Herd Management Area

Release marks return of final group of wild horses to their home range in the Owyhees

Contact: Heather Tiel-Nelson, (208) 736-2352 May 16, 2019

Boise, Idaho – The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) will disperse 45 wild horses (24 studs, 21 mares) in three different locations within the Hardtrigger Herd Management Area (HMA) south of Marsing at the end of May. The BLM Owyhee Field Office invites members of the public interested in watching one of the releases to meet at the I-O-N Truck Plaza, 5644 Buntrock Rd., Marsing, at 10 a.m. on May 29 to caravan to the release location.

Just two trailer loads containing 12 horses will be released at this location within the HMA, which is the most accessible area to accommodate members of the public while providing the best viewing opportunity. This release marks one of the final groups of wild horses to return to their home range in the Owyhees.

The entire Hardtrigger HMA was burned by the 279,144-acre Soda Fire in 2015. The BLM gathered 279 wild horses from all three HMAs (Black Mountain, Hardtrigger and Sands Basin) in the Owyhees directly following the fire, placing over 80 into private care through adoption. As the 69,910-acre Hardtrigger HMA is the largest of the three, the wild horses will be released in multiple locations to disperse the horses throughout the HMA. The horses destined to return to the range were cared for at both the Boise Wild Horse Corrals and Bruneau Off-Range Corrals while the rangeland recovered from the burn.

“We were glad to offer people the opportunity to watch the release of wild horses to the Sands Basin HMA last year,” said Lara Douglas, BLM Boise District Manager. “We recognize how important it is to maintain viable wild horse herds on healthy public rangelands, and are pleased to see these wild horses return to Hardtrigger.”

Visitors will need to provide their own transportation. As the roads to the viewing area are narrow, rough and dusty, it is recommended that vehicles be high clearance, 4-wheel drive, and contain a spare tire. Additionally, it will be most helpful if visitors carpool to limit the number of vehicles at the release location. The BLM encourages those interested in attending the release to RSVP by May 28 to Ruby Kyle at 208-473-9868.

For more information about the release, please contact Heather Tiel-Nelson, (208) 736-2352.
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War of Will has crossed the finish line first in the Preakness Stakes

by The Associated Press Saturday, May 18th 2019

Baltimore (AP) — War of Will has won the 144th Preakness.

After finishing well out of the money in the Kentucky Derby from the No. 1 post, War of Will charged to victory after again starting from the rail on Saturday.

Everfast finished second and Owendale took third.

continued:
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World Migratory Bird Day – May 25, 2018 at Ponderosa State Park

Contact: Brian Harris (208) 634-0784 cell: (208) 634-6945
May 17, 2019

McCall, Idaho – “Protect Birds: Be The Solution To Plastic Pollution” is the theme for this year’s World Migratory Bird Day (WMBD), an international celebration of the hundreds of bird species that migrate between their nesting habitats in North America and wintering grounds in Latin America, Mexico, and the Caribbean. Every year we unify our voices for bird conservation and share ways to protect birds 365 days of the year.

The accumulation of plastic and plastic pollution has become a world-wide epidemic and a primary threat to birds across all environments. Twelve bird species that represent diverse groups, habitats and foraging behaviors have been selected for WMBD 2019. All selected species, along with many others world-wide, are being impacted by plastic pollution.

There are many actions people can take to help birds throughout the year, and across habitats. Everyone can help by participating in habitat restoration activities, such as trash clean ups, supporting local recycling and living an ecofriendly life style.

We will explore some of these ideas with fun, interactive events, including a scavenger hunt, on our local Bird Day, May 25, hosted by Ponderosa State Park in cooperation with the Payette National Forest and Idaho Department of Fish and Game.

Join us for the following activities:

* 8:00 a.m. to 10:00 a.m.: Meet at the Lily Marsh Trail head for bird walk / scavenger hunt / trash pick-up hikes lead by local wildlife biologists and master naturalists. Supplies for our ‘solution to plastic pollution’ trash pick-up will be provided.

* 10:30a.m. to 1:00p.m. Meet at the Activity Center for a variety of activities, this will be the Junior Ranger program for the day.

All participants are reminded to wear appropriate clothing for hiking and/or outdoor activities. There is a $5.00 Motor Vehicle Entrance Fee to the park, unless you have a valid Idaho Passport or Idaho Annual Pass attached to your vehicle.

For more information visit Ponderosa State Park, Payette National Forest, and IDFG Region 3 Facebook pages.

Brian Harris
Public Affairs Officer
Payette National Forest
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Idaho inspectors intercept 14 boats with invasive mussels

Officials found 50 boats with mussels of the nearly 110,500 vessels inspected last year.

Associated Press May 14, 2019

Coeur d’Alene, Idaho — Idaho officials say inspectors have already intercepted 14 boats carrying invasive mussels into the state nearly a month into inspection season.

The Coeur d’Alene Press reported Tuesday that the state has inspected more than 7,000 watercraft so far this year.

continued:
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Bonneville Power Struggles as salmon runs decline

Economists say Snake River Dams are losing money

May 15, 2019 By: Steve Liebenthal KIVI TV

Columbia River Basin — Salmon seasons have been open in Idaho since April, but you wouldn’t know it. Not a single spring Chinook has been caught according to Fish and Game records, and Tuesday the Idaho Fish and Game Commission voted to close the season on all rivers in the Clearwater Basin. Fisheries managers are projecting that the number of spring Chinook returning to hatcheries in the Clearwater Basin will not meet brood stock needs.

The closure comes in the midst of a salmon crisis for Idaho Anglers, and a financial crisis for The Bonneville Power Administration

BPA has thirty-one power-generating projects in the Columbia Basin. The dams on the Columbia and Lower Snake Rivers are major suppliers of carbon-free energy to the northwest, especially Oregon and Washington.

continued:
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Fish & Game News:

Some Horsethief Reservoir Campgrounds Now Closed

By Evin Oneale, Regional Communications Manager
Friday, May 17, 2019

West side campgrounds remain open

Only days after opening, the east side campgrounds at Horsethief Reservoir are closed until further notice, following the abrupt resignation of the camp host. A contractual agreement between the department and the YMCA requires that a camp host be on site while the campground is open.

Campers can still find that special campsite on the west side of Horsethief, where Ospreys Bay, Easters Cove, Timber Bay and Bear Knob campgrounds all remain open.

continued:
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Hunters will soon get a look at new deer management plans

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Supervisor
Wednesday, May 15, 2019

Wildlife managers will host open houses in each region to talk with hunters about the deer plans

The statewide management plans for mule deer and white-tailed deer are being revised, and hunters will want to take note of upcoming opportunities to review and comment on the plans and talk to wildlife managers about them.

Fish and Game officials will present drafts of the management plans to the Fish and Game Commission during its May 16-17 meeting in Grangeville.

continued:
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Here’s your fishing guide for Memorial Day weekend and beyond

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Supervisor
Thursday, May 16, 2019

These spots offer plenty of fish, many are stocked for the weekend, and most have camping nearby

Summer is almost here, and Memorial Day weekend for many Idahoans is the unofficial kick off to the summer camping and fishing season. If you’re doing the first and not the latter, you’re missing out on a fantastic opportunity. May is among the best months for Idaho’s ponds, lakes and reservoirs, and some rivers will also be good for fishing, although many will be running high and cold with snow-melt run off.

continued:
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Avoid high water this Memorial Day by fishing a local pond or lake

By Mike Demick, Staff Biologist
Friday, May 17, 2019

Ponds and lakes provide a safe bet for catching fish

High water this Memorial Day weekend will likely put a temporary damper on fishing many local rivers and streams, but fortunately, local ponds and lakes are a good bet for anxious anglers.

continued:
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Chinook salmon fishing in the Clearwater River basin is closed until further evaluation

By Joe DuPont, Fisheries Regional Manager
Tuesday, May 14, 2019

Biologists will reassess the fishery later in May and decide whether to reopen fishing

Chinook salmon fishing in the Clearwater River basin will remain closed May 18-19 due to lower than expected returns of adult Chinook, which includes the following rivers: Clearwater River, North Fork Clearwater River, Middle Fork Clearwater River, and South Fork Clearwater River. If more fish return, the fishing season may reopen later in May.

continued:
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More F&G News Releases

https://idfg.idaho.gov/press
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Fun Critter Stuff:

Bear bribes ‘guard dog’ with deer bones so it can go through man’s trash

A rogue bear has bribed a Northern Ontario man’s dog with deer bones three times in order to go through his trash.

Suzanne Nuyen, TEGNA May 12, 2019


This Canadian man’s guard dog has not been a good boy.

In a series of tweets, Jesse Jordan revealed that his “idiot furry son” Brickleberry has been slacking off on the job. Jordan raised the mastiff/hound/beagle mutt by hand after his mother died shortly after giving birth to him. After Brickleberry, or Brick for short, grew up, Jordan was hoping he could keep away unwanted visitors at night.

Unfortunately, one clever bear has found a way to bribe Brick. The bear, according to Jordan, has been giving Brick deer bones in exchange for access to Jordan’s trash. According to Jordan, this has happened three times already, but it’s unclear whether or not its the same bear or multiple bears bribing his dog.

continued:
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Seasonal Humor:

TeenBear-a
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Idaho History May 19, 2019

Thunder Mountain Gold Rush

(part 6)

Salmon City to Thunder Mountain Route

1909 Map Thunder Mountain route Salmon to Roosevelt

1908-Idaho-EastRouteA(click for larger size)
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Thunder Mountain Story

by Marilyn Afford

While Thunder Mountain is not a part of Lemhi County, its history is enmeshed with ours. The trails to Thunder Mountain and the old town of Roosevelt were heavily traveled and many Lemhl County people were involved with the short but hectic story of that area. Thunder Mountain is located on the Payette National Forest near the head of Monumental and Marble Creeks, both western tributaries of the Middle Fork of the Salmon River.

In 1991, as a part of the National celebration of the centennial of the first Forest Reserves in the United States, the Salmon National Forest began maintaining and reconstructing a segment of one of the historic trails to Thunder Mountain for use by recreationists. While the location of parts of the old trail are unknown, or have been obliterated by roads or other activity, the segment from Williams Lake to China Springs is still largely intact and recognizable.

The gold rush was intense, involving thousands of people from all walks of life. To supply their needs, horse and mule strings found their way through the rugged terrain of the Salmon River Mountains from several directions, including Salmon City. One of the routes used involved travel from Salmon, up Lake Creek. past Williams Lake, to China Springs. then southwest to Yellowjacket on the way to the Middle Fork and Thunder Mountain. It was a long and arduous trip of over one hundred miles through some of the most rugged terrain in the state of Idaho. The trail from Salmon City to China Springs was steep and largely dry. At China Springs, teamsters and their animals could stop and refresh.

The gold rush began in the Thunder Mountain District in 1901, spawning the boom towns of Roosevelt, Thunder [Mountain] City, and Belleco. On December 11, 1901 an item appeared in the local newspaper that indicates the excitement that existed over the Thunder Mountain area:

The Red Rock and Salmon River Stage Line is preparing for the rush to Thunder Mountain. and has ten 4-horse Concord coaches and four 6–horse Concords in readiness. This will handle Twenty-five to fifty passengers daily, conveying them within fifty miles of Thunder Mountain at Yellow Jacket, from which point the journey must be made by pack outfits. It will require three days to make the trip in, one day being used to travel from Red Rock to Salmon, and two days from Salmon to Thunder.

Another item from the “Lemhi Herald” of November 20. 1901 reads:

Salmon to Leesburg, 14 miles – Leesburg to Leacock Station on Big Creek, 9 miles – Up Big Creek to Forney, 12 miles – Forney to Three Forks (which form Camas Creek), 14 miles – Down Camas Creek to the Middle Fork, 14 miles – Up the Middlefork to the mouth of Marble Creek, 8 miles Up Marble Creek to Mouth of Mule Creek, 20 miles — You are now in Thunder Mountain Country, but not the heart of it. Up Mule Creek 9 miles and we are in the land of wealth.


Card addressed to: Mrs. Roy J. King, Grass Valley, California.
“Darling, this is where I stopped for the night of July 2nd. The town consists of one house and three individuals. Lovingly, Roy”
“Homestead of Abner C. Leacock, at confluence of Nappias and Big Creek.”
From “Centennial History of Lemhi County, Idaho,” compiled by Lemhi County History Committee, Hon. Fred Snook, Chairman; 1992; p. 168f

The combined population of Roosevelt and Thunder [Mountain] City grew to over five thousand, but some sources indicate that in 1902 there were as many as 22,000 men at work there on 11,000 claims. About fifty mining stock companies had formed, but only two had any money to work with.

Roosevelt 1902 (?)

The boom was short-lived, as the town of Roosevelt was drowned by a landslide–formed lake in 1909. Water seeping through the workings, true to the predictions of many experienced miners, caused the slide. The mountain slid 2.5 miles down Mule Creek to the mouth of Monumental Creek Canyon in twenty six hours, damming Monumental Creek.

Today, the waters of this remote lake ripple over the remains of a ghost town that was perhaps the most isolated mining town in Idaho.

References. “Recorder Herald” August 1991, and Research notes of Marjorie B Sims

source: Idaho AHGP / SMc
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The Eastern Route

Salmon City tried to promote an eastern route, claiming it was shorter — although it lay on the other side of both the Salmon River and Yellow Jacket ranges, as well as the Salmon Middle Fork. Herndon says that “a wild and enthusiastic meeting” was held in this little mountain town, with Al Mahoney of Leesburg contracting to build a bridge across the Middle Fork. However, the people hadn’t figured on “the influence and power of the state capital.”

Excerpted from: The Ghosts Walk Under the Water by Faith Turner from “Scenic Idaho”, Winter 1954
[h/t SMc Back Country History Project]
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Stage Coach Salmon City, Idaho

SalmonLastStage-a
Last Stage Coach to Leave Salmon, Idaho. 1900s
source: Building in the Past
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1901 Thunder Mountain Rush

During the rush to Thunder Mountain in 1901, the following appeared in the Recorder-Herald:

F. W. Vogler, general manager of the Redrock, Salmon City and Gibboasville stage line, was in town Monday and states that his line is making all arrangements for the handling of the great crowd of people which, it is expected, will rush to the wonderful quartz discoveries recently made in the Thunder Mountain district in Idaho, about 100 miles front Salmon City. He can easily handle 25 – 50 passensers each day, having ten four-horse Concord coaches and four six-horse Concords to do it with. He will be able to land passengers within 50 miles of Thunder Mountain at Yellow Jacket, from which point the journey must be made by pack outfits.

excerpted from: pgs 51-52 The History of the Salmon National Forest 1973
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Salmon, Idaho stage to Red Rock, Montana

source: Hugh Hartman
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January of 1902

Unable to go to Thunder Mountain, impatient miners began to pile up in Warrens, ready to dash on in as soon as an opportunity should offer. Stage lines from Union Pacific stations in Ketchum, Mackay, and Red Rock, Montana (operating via Salmon) also prepared in January of 1902 to offer service over non-existent roads (through country in which roads still have not been completed eighty years later) when winter might break. Seventeen Concord coaches were procured for a line from Red Rock alone.

excerpted from: Idaho State Historical Society Reference Series Number 20 1966
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Thunder Mountain Trail

ThunderMountainTrailMap-aphoto of an old map the USFS put out in the 70’s from a historical map from 1918. The trail went from Salmon Idaho to Thunder Mountain mine.

Shared by Diana Rackham Nielson
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Union Pacific Railroad – Routes to Thunder Mountain

UPRRroutesThunderMountain-a

Great Thunder Mountain gold fields, Idaho Co., Idaho
Description Blueprint. Inset: Map showing routes to Thunder Mountain. Scale [1:1,647,360]. “Thunder Mountain gold fields are reached only via Boise, Ketchum, Mackay, Red Rock or Weiser, all good outfitting points on the Oregon Short Line R.R.”
Date 1905

source: Idaho State Historical Society
(Go to source link, zoom in, it also shows townsite of Roosevelt and the mining claims around it.)
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Jan 21, 1902 The Silver Messenger, Challis Idaho

1902ChallistoThunderMountain-a

Mr. C. C. Tautphaus, who has been a prominent stage man on the Pacific Coast for many years, and who was one of the first to enter the Klondike gold fields, arrived in Challis last Tuesday in company with Mr. Sid. Roberts, to ascertain the best and most direct route to Thunder Mountain.

Mr. Tautphaus is a man of experience in the stage business, and is backed by a company with plenty of capital who intend to put on a fast stage line from Mackay, the present terminus of the Salmon River Railroad, via Challis to Thunder Mountain. It is the aim of this company to put on one of the best-equipped stage lines known, and have it in operation by March 1st.

A new route from Challis to the famous gold fields has been discovered and which will easily shorten the distance 35 miles. Instead of going by Morgan creek, the new route proposed is to follow the wagon road up Challis creek for a distance of 8 eight miles in a Northwesterly direction, and then cross the Challis creek pass over onto Middle Fork. This route will be in direct line with the Thunder Mountain country and easy of access. To make a survey of this new route last Thursday in the neighborhood of one hundred dollars was raised by the citizens of Challis within a few hours, and on Friday, the following morning, Mr. Tautphaus and Mr. Roberts, with horses and the necessary camp equipment, departed over the new route for Thunder Mountain. On their return, which will probably be within about two weeks, we hope to give a complete account of their trip over the most direct route known to Thunder Mountain.

Following is a very close and conservative estimate of the distances from Mackay to Thunder Mountain via the Challis creek route. Half of this distance is surveyed — not estimated, and a portion of the distance — nearly one-half — over one of the best wagon roads in Idaho:

FROM MACKAY TO CHALLIS, 50 MILES
FROM CHALLIS TO THUNDER MT. 90 MLLES
TOTAL DISTANCE, 140 MILES

This not only being the most direct, quickest, cheapest and most feasible route to Thunder Mountain, but it is the earliest road in the Spring to reach the great gold fields on account of tho extremely light snow fall, and it is a road that can be kept open the year around with little expense.

This is the BEST ROUTE for the gold-seeker, because the entire distance it passes through a rich mineral region.

This is the BEST ROUTE for the prospector.

This is the BEST ROUTE for the capitalist.

This is the BEST ROUTE for the tourist and pleasure-seeker, for the lakes, rivers and streams abound in trout, and deer, bear and other animals roam at will through the mountains. On this route the grandest mountain scenery can be seen.

This is the BEST ROUTE for the public who desire to go to Thunder Mountain, for it is the quickest and most direct.

From all indications the Salmon River Railroad will extend its Mackay branch to Salmon river next Spring, and from this point will be the outfitting place for the great gold fields, and then the distance by stage will be cut down 50 miles, making it only 90 miles from Challis, the nearest railroad point, over an easy stage road to Thunder Mountain.

From all maps thus far published, one can see at a glance that the Mackay-Challis route to Thunder Mountain is the shortest and most direct. It is on a direct line and no one can well dispute this fact, regardless of all prejudices in the matter.

source: Idaho AHGP [h/t SMc]
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April 4, 1902

ThunderMtnRace-a
Miners To Start A Race For Thunder Mountain

Will Travel by Different Routes to Determine Which Is the Shortest

Boise, Idaho, April 4 [1902] – A couple of miners from Wood River made the statement in a hotel lobby today that the Ketchum route was the best. They were willing to wager, they said, that if two men left Boise for Thunder Mountain, one going by way of Weiser, Council and Warren and the other by way of Ketchum and Cape Horn, the latter would get into camp first. Within fifteen minutes $2000 was raised by Thunder Mountain miners who had come out by the Weiser route. The Ketchum men have sent home for money to cover the bet. The Boise money is on deposit in the Overland Hotel safe. If the Ketchum pot is raised one of the most unique races in the history of the Northwest will take place.

source (broken link): San Francisco Call, Volume 87, Number 126, 5 April 1902
[h/t JTR]
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April 8, 1902 The Silver Messenger, Challis Idaho

1902MckaytoThunderMountain-aThunder Mountain

From Mackay, present terminus of Salmon River Railroad, to Challis by daily stage 50 miles. From Challis to Singiser or Three Forks, by wagon road 40 miles. From Singiser or Three Forks to Thunder Mountain, by good trail, 50 miles. Total 140 miles.

source: Idaho AHGP [h/t SMc]
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Thunder Mountain Map used by Zane Grey


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The Stampede to Thunder Mountain: The New Idaho Gold Camp

london-4-aJack London / Collier’s May 3, 1902

Not since Klondike has there been such a stampede as that now underway to Thunder Mountain. Despite the warning that it is no poor man’s country, at least one hundred “sooners” are going in daily on snowshoes, packing their outfits on their backs or dragging them on toboggan-sleds. Further, all the towns adjacent to the gold field–such as Boise, Ketchum, Council, Red Rock, Lewiston, Weiser and Salmon–are jammed with an army of cooler-headed gold-seekers, waiting the opening of the trails. And each train swells these towns to overflowing, with more men hastening eagerly from the north, south, east and west.

Boom times are on and stampede prices are up. Railroad transportation for seventy-five thousand people has been already bespoken; and as regards the finish, the rush will outrival Klondike; for every man who starts will get there, and there will be more men on the ground than were on the Yukon five years ago.

Thunder Mountain is one of the blank spaces on the map which will no longer be blank. The Thunder Mountain country is as large as the states of Massachusetts, Rhode Island and Connecticut combined, and has long been known as a very rich, though largely unprospected, mining country. Thunder Mountain, in particular, is in the southern portion of Idaho County, Idaho, and is situated not far south of Vinegar Hill of the maps. To the south lie the Sawtooth Mountains, which extend from the Seven Devils region, along the Snake, to the main Salmon River. It is a rough and jagged country, of volcanic formation, with a general elevation of from 7,000 to 9,000 feet, and promises to become one of the world’s greatest treasure houses.

The Caswell brothers are responsible for this rush. In 1804, Ben and Dan Caswell made their way into Thunder Mountain and located several claims. Notwithstanding it was entirely a quartz formation, they panned the decomposed porphyry, which had become air-slacked, and washed out $260 in gold. They were joined by another brother, Luman Caswell, and by W. T. Ritchey and Mr. Huntley, and each year for seven years they returned to the spot. Their efforts were crude; water from the melting snow permitted but two weeks’ worth; yet in the fourteen weeks all told they secured $20,358.00 in gold, as shown by the receipts of the United States Assay Office at Boise.

But Thunder Mountain was a quartz proposition, absurd to work as a placer and too big to work without capital. In 1901 Colonel W. H. Dewey, the well-known Idaho millionaire mining and railroad man, bonded the claims for $100,000 and incorporated the Thunder Mountain Gold Mining and Milling Company with a capital stock of $5,000,000, Pittsburg, Pa., capitalists being chiefly interested. Then began the proper development of the deposit. Last fall a ten-stamp mill was freighted in on mule-back and set up. Tunnels and cross-cuts were run and the astonishing value of the deposit discovered. Not only as the mountain itself determined to be a huge ore body of free milling gold running from seven dollars to the ton upward, but rich chutes were found, as wide as seven feet, carrying $2,000 to the ton and penetrating the mountain an unascertainable distance. Recent reports go to show that the value of these chutes has been underestimated.

Thus Thunder Mountain becomes another Treadwell. It is not a fissure vein, but simply a mountain of ore, a first-class quarry scheme, capable of busying two hundred stamps for an interminable period. But, whereas Treadwell is low-grade ore, Thunder Mountain is not only much higher but very much higher grade ore. In addition (and this is the secret of the rush) prospects go to show that the contiguous ground is likewise rich, and that the possibilities are large for a second Cripple Creek, while the very sanguine are not at all backward in proclaiming a second Transvaal. Incidentally, the real Cripple Creek men have achieved a great faith in Thunder Mountain, and every third man is either on the way or talking of going.

And so, because of the Caswells, miners from all the Americas are gathering up their outfits and stampeding to Idaho. The “sooners” are taking the chances of snow and famine in order that they may miss no chances on the spot. Since the ground is covered with many feet of snow, perforce they stake the snow. Later on, when the snow melts, they will find other sets of stakes beneath. Then there will be trouble. But a gold rush without trouble is like a pneumatic tire without punctures.

It never happens.

There are two main reasons for the magnitude of this stampede. Thunder Mountain is the only excitement of the year, and money is easy. Which is to say that the chronic stampeders and adventurers have no where else to go and work off their unrest, and that the good times of the last several years have put the money in their pockets wherewith they may go. That there are all the possibilities for a new Eldorado goes without saying. Idaho has already added $250,000,000 to the world’s gold supply, while thousand of square miles of mineral territory remain practically unexplored. As Thunder Mountain is to-day likened to Cripple Creek, who knows but in some future day new bonanzas may be likened to Thunder Mountain? Anyway, 75,000men are hitting the high places to find out.

The historic works of Jack London and other major journalists are freely available from The Archive of American Journalism:

source: Historic American Journalism
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June 10, 1902 The Silver Messenger, Challis Idaho

1902ChallisThunderMountain-a“In a letter dated May 26, received by Miss Pearl McGowan of Challis, from her brother, George, in which he states that he is within three miles of Thunder Mountain, and his pack-train was the first to reach the new Eldorado. He also states that he rode the first horse to the Dewey mine this year.

source: ID AHGP [h/t SMc]
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Thunder Mountain Pack String

ThunderMtnPackString-a

Sam Hopkin’s pack string loaded for a trip down Camas Creek trail and up to Thunder Mountain.

Photo from “The Middle Fork and the Sheepeater War” by Johnny Carrey and Cort Conley – copyright 1977
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Middle Fork of the Salmon River

MF1-a(click image for larger size)
Left to right: Jim Hash, Jenney Laing Lewis, Belle Hash, 1903, crossing the Middle Fork on a bridge built a year earlier.

Mile 36.3

Jim and Belle Hash cabin on the right. Jim Hash was raised on his father’s ranch at Idaho Falls. He had all his front teeth knocked out in a fight — when someone hit him with a chair. After that he always carried two guns.

When he was 25 he married Belle, who was 15. They never had any children, but they were so busy they could scarcely have had time for any. They settled on six acres near the junction of Mayfield and Loon Creeks for several years. Then they moved down below Little Creek.

Jim and Belle raised vegetables and kept a packstring of 20-30 burros. They would loose-herd the burros along the trail, selling their produce from Custer to Thunder Mountain. Packing charges for supplies ran 5-15 cents a pound. Everyone liked and respected the Hashes.

When the Thunder Mountain boom was over, the Hashes left and John Sader filed a homestead on the place. Sader acquired title and sold out to Nethkin. The Hashes’ cabin was nicely restored by Harrah’s.

Fred Paulsen’s folks started the second cabin at Little Creek, but it was never finished. It is the building, since roofed, which stands behind the Hash cabin. These cabins are part of the Middle Fork Lodge property today.

from: pgs 85-86 “The Middle Fork and the Sheepeater War” by Johnny Carrey and Cort Conley – copyright 1977

link to Amazon:
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Middle Fork Salmon River

The Middle Fork has long been a popular recreation area of the Salmon National Forest but the numbers of people visiting it were limited by its inaccessibility until later years. In the days of mining at Yellowjacket, Loon Creek, and Thunder Mountain, the Middle Fork was crossed by main thoroughfares of travel, and several homesteaders settled there in the early 1900’s to raise food for the nearby miners.

The lower part of the canyon, below the mouth of Big Creek, was labeled “Impassable Canyon” by those who came in to find the Sheepeater Indians during the Sheepeater War.
(pgs 114-115)

Graves Associated with Thunder Mountain

Moyer, for whom Moyer Creek is named, was killed along the Thunder Mountain trail, and is buried on a ridge near Moyer Creek.

Near Middle Fork Peak is the grave of a Mr. Armstrong, who died of mountain fever during the Thunder Mountain boom.

Graves at the mouth of Musgrove Creek include Charles O. Scott, a hunter shot by a hunting companion, and Neal Stewart, a miner who fell to his death.
(pgs 127-128)

excerpted from : The History of the Salmon National Forest 1973
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Link: Thunder Mountain / Roosevelt History index page

page updated October 31, 2020

Road Reports May 19, 2019

The only way to get to Yellow Pine right now is via the South Fork route. Travel at your own risk and remember there is no cell phone service. Trees and/or rocks may be down in the road. Higher elevation roads are closed. Conditions change VERY quickly this time of year. Please share road reports.

Yellow Pine: We have had some rain recently to settle the dust. Please respect residents and slow down!
Click for Local Forecast.
Yellow Pine Webcam: (check date on image)

Warm Lake Highway: Clear
SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

Highway 55 Webcams Link:
Work to repave Idaho Highway 55 from milepost 91 to milepost 97 near Smiths Ferry will begin Thursday, May 9th and continue until the end of June, according to Idaho Transportation Department officials.
During the work, traffic will be reduced to a single lane, controlled by flaggers and a pilot car. Motorists should plan for delays of up to thirty minutes. Work will not be done after 12 noon Fridays through the weekends.

South Fork Road: May 14 report: lots of trees down, but they had all been cut out by late afternoon.
May 15: Mail truck driver (Dean) reports the road is clear, nothing to cut or move.
May 18: Report of more trees down, but they had been cut out.
Note: The maintenance by Valley County has ended for the season and turned back to the USFS.
Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
South Fork Stream Gauge:

EFSF Road: May 15 report: Road is clear, no rocks or trees, getting a little rough.
May 18: Report that the road is getting rough and washboardy.

Lower Johnson Creek Road: Road is bare between Yellow Pine and Halfway now.
Report May 15: “I rode Johnson Creek last night to Halfway and was blocked by snow there, county road graders are working on this end cleaning ditches. No major slides or sluffs between YP and Halfway.” – Matt
Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam:
Johnson Creek Stream Gauge:

Upper Johnson Creek Road: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcam: (check date on image)

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Road is still closed.
Update from Midas Gold May 17
Unfortunately, vehicle travel along Stibnite Road is likely still a few weeks out. However, we are encouraged by the progress the contractor for Valley County, OK Gravel, has made in clearing about 75% of the avalanche. Melt conditions have also been favorable and most of the snow has melted from the avalanche. Once crews are able to clear the slide entirely, they will begin re-building the road base back up. Timing for road surfacing is contingent upon when Valley County can start crushing material from the Yellow Pine quarry this summer and we anticipate a final gravel cap will be added to the road in mid-to-late summer.
The following photos, taken from the same location over the last few weeks, show the progress.

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photo credit Midas Gold. Photo 1: slide on April 17. Photo 2: April 25 melting out, foot trail well established. Photo 3: May 17 County contractor about 75% completed cleared avalanche debris and re-establishing road corridor. Will need a few more weeks to build road base back up above river.
link to more info: 
Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The approx elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′
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