Monthly Archives: July 2019

Updated Road Reports July 31, 2019

Note 7/31 1234pm: the SF Road will be fully open this Friday – no closures.

South Fork road is closed from 7am to 4pm during the week. Johnson Creek road was bladed and oiled on the lower end. Back country road conditions can change quickly, be prepared for rocks and trees in the road, remember there is no cell phone service. Please share road reports.

Yellow Pine: Residential streets that did not get dust abatement are getting torn up and VERY dusty. Please respect your neighbors and slow down!
Click for Local Forecast.
Yellow Pine Webcam: (check date on image)

Warm Lake Highway: Clear
SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

Highway 55 Webcams Link:

South Fork Road: Closed Monday through Friday from 7am to 4pm on weekdays, with no closures over the weekends.
Note from the FS July 31st: We are sorry for the inconvenience, but due to the lack of construction materials on site, the road closure locations for the remainder of this week have changed. There may be a possibly for no road closures to take place this Friday, August 2. Stay tuned as this announcement will be made as soon as the determination can be made.
More info:
Updated Map w/info for 7/29-8/2:
Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
South Fork Stream Gauge:

EFSF Road: Wednesday (July 31) report the road is still in good shape, only a few wash boards.

Johnson Creek Road: Watch for extra traffic due to closures on the South Fork route.
Wednesday (July 31) mail truck driver (Robert) says the road grader is working the upper end of Johnson Creek road today, road is in good shape.
Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam:
Johnson Creek Stream Gauge:
The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Reported open June 23. No current report.
Report Tuesday (July 2 early morning) “The road wasn’t bad. Some wash outs and ruts but just bumpy.” AP
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Reported open June 23. No current report.
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcam: (check date on image)

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open Weekends only
No current report. Update from Midas July 18: The road is still closed Monday through Thursday and open Friday, Saturday and Sunday. Good progress is being made, but it is likely that we still have a few weeks of work ahead.
Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Reported open June 30. Plan weekend travel due to Stibnite road repairs.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: ATVs made it over the top July 13, was not advisable for passenger vehicles at that time. (Probably open by now.) No current report.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Secesh: Report June 3 The road from McCall to Secesh is open. Construction on Warren Wagon Road during the week.

Stanley to Landmark: Report July 4 “Road is graded and dust sealed from Hwy 21 to Bruce Meadows, modest washboard across Bear Valley.” -DP

Deadwood Summit: Reported Open June 16th
Update from BNF June 26th: Access to Deadwood Campgrounds is open along FS 579 road from State Highway 21. Access to Deadwood Campgrounds from FS 582 (Clear Creek Rd) to FS 579 is open. Cascade to Landmark access to Deadwood Campgrounds via FS 579 road is open. FS 555 road to Deadwood Campgrounds is too rough to travel and not a recommended route.
Note: The approx elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′
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Harmonica Festival – Boil Water Advisory

Harmonica Festival – Boil Water Advisory

Hello Yellow Pine,

In anticipation of the Harmonica Festival, I thought it appropriate to make sure everyone was on the same page regarding the Boil Water Advisory. Since its unfortunately still in place, efforts must be made to assure that everyone who might drink water from the system is advised of the circumstances. Posting notifications at places where the public will be using water is necessary and required by DEQ rule. A copy of the original notification is attached if needed.
– Warren Drake

link to notice:
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July 28, 2019 The Yellow Pine Times

July 28, 2019 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Note: The boil water order and water restrictions are still in effect.

Community Calendar:

April 2 – Boil water order issued
Every Sunday – 11am Fire Training
May 10 – Burn “permits” required
May 15 – Firewood Season opens
July 22 – Daytime closures on So. Fk road begin
Aug 10 – VYPA meeting 2pm Community Hall
Sept 14 – 10am YPFD meeting at the Fire Hall budget meeting
Sept 14 – Ride to Cinnabar
Sept 21 – VYPA meeting 2pm Community Hall

(details below)
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Local Events:

2019 Yellow Pine Escapades

The 2019 schedule for the Yellow Pine Escapades has been updated on the website!

Expect new escapades this coming year, including an ATV-UTV Photo Scavenger Hunt; two (yes, two) ATV-UTV rides, a golf tournament, and even a community yard sale. Other events will be added to the calendar as plans are finalized.

Join us for a great season of fun! The starting point for fun in Yellow Pine! The website includes information on the events hosted by the Yellow Pine Community Hall as well as the other “goings-on” in the village. Food, lodging and fuel are available in Yellow Pine. link:
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Village News:

“If it’s yellow let it mellow; if it’s brown flush it down.”

Tips for conserving water during fest weekend

Remember we are under a boil water order until further notice. Pass the word to visitors.

No outside watering, this means no car washes or spraying off decks either. No filling of visitors camper’s water tanks!

Avoid doing laundry, running a dishwasher or showering. Do not leave the water running while brushing teeth or washing dishes.

If we all conserve as much as possible, we can avoid running the village out of water.
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Power Outage

Idaho Power planned a maintenance outage on Thursday, July 25th, the power was off from 805am to 1230pm.
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Progress at the Heli-Pad

20190725_HeliPad1-a

Volunteers working hard on the helicopter landing pad

20190727_HeliPad5-a

Building a cement landing pad for Life Flight.
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Wally and Roberta Cory

Wally and Roberta celebrated their 60th Wedding Anniversary at the YP Tavern

20190721WallyRobertaAnniversary-a

link to Tavern’s FB photo gallery:
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Wilbur Wiles Remembered

There was large turnout for the celebration of life for Wilbur Wiles at the Big Creek Lodge on July 27th. Lunch catered by The Corner.

20190727BCWilburWilesRIP-a
photo courtesy Scott A
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Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Report Sunday (July 28) the dumpsters are about 3/4 full (they were 1/2 full on Friday.) The road to the dump has been dust abated.

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

Yellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is located approximately 3 miles south on Johnson Creek Road.

The TRANSFER STATION is for household trash and yard waste:
* Household trash must be put inside (and fit) the dumpster;
* Yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, et.) goes in the burn pile on the south end of the turn-around;
* Cardboard boxes should be flattened before putting the in the dumpster,

The DUMPSTERS are NOT for:
* Furniture (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station).

The BURN PILE is NOT for:
* Cardboard boxes (flatten and put in dumpster);
* Furniture and appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Drywall and building material (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wire or fencing (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Foam Rubber (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wood with metal (like nails) attached (take to Donnelly Transfer Station.)

When closing the DOORS on the front of the dumpsters:
* Make sure the “U” brackets at the top and bottom of the door are engaged;
* The retaining bar at the middle of the door is slid into the pipe;
* And the “L” bars at the bottom of the doors dropped into place.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: 208/634-7176
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Roads

South Fork
Starting July 22 the South Fork road will be closed Monday through Friday from 7am to 4pm on weekdays, with no closures over the weekends.
More info:
Map w/info:

YP to Stibnite Road
Update from Midas July 18: The road is still closed Monday through Thursday and open Friday, Saturday and Sunday. Good progress is being made, but it is likely that we still have a few weeks of work ahead.
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Yellow Pine US Mail

June 1st started the 6-day a week mail delivery. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 55 cents
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Wasp Season

Long legged wasps are out, invading sheds and seeking to come indoors.

Have not had a report of ticks since the hot dry weather arrived.
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Reminder for people living in bear country:

* Garbage should be stored inside the house or in a secure garage or storage building.
* If garbage cannot be stored in a secure location, a bear-resistant container approved by the Interagency Bear Committee is recommended.
* Avoid using bird feeders from March through November. Birds do not need supplemental feeding this time of year.
* Pet food should not be left outside.
* BBQ grills or anything with a strong odor should not be left out at night.
* Protect gardens, beehives, and compost piles with electric fencing.
* Never intentionally feed bears. A food-conditioned bear may pose a threat to human safety and usually results in the removal of the bear.
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Local Groups:

YPWUA News:

Water Update July 25:

On July 19th a crew from Idaho rural water came in and found a substantial leak on the east side of the east fork bridge. We are currently looking for a good time to shut the water down to town to make the repairs. It will definitely be after harmonica but seeing we will be shutting down the town, we want to be prepared. We are still on a boil order due to the large capacity of water lost and low chlorine contact time. We still request that everyone conserves water by not watering lawns because we are borderline to running the town out of water.
– Steve H YPWUA

Water Update June 7:

1. The “boil order” is still in effect.
2. There is still large water leaks in the system. We continue to look.
3. A grant for $39,000 was approved for improvements to the system.
3. Work is currently being done on the new contact tank.
4. Please, no lawn watering until we find and repair the major leaks.
– Steve Holloway

The yearly Yellow Pine Water Users Shareholders meeting was Sunday July 7th at 10am in the community hall.

link to: #4430059 Yellow Pine Water Users Boil Water Notification 4-2-19.pdf

link to: 2018 September Water Department Update.docx
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VYPA News:

Next meeting August 10th 2pm at the Community Hall

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting Minutes July 20, 2019
link to: 20190720 Yellow Pine Village Association Minutes.docx

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting Minutes for June 8, 2019
link to: 20190608 Village of Yellow Pine Association.rtf

VYPA Meeting Dates 2019

June 8th; July 20th; August 10th; September 14th – 2pm at the Community Hall.

Yellow Pine Harmonica Meetings 2019:

July 27, 2019 Saturday 2pm at the Community Hall
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YPFD News:

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice

The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.”

Link to: 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation.doc

Next Meeting Sept 14 at 10am YPFD meeting in the Fire Hall

Last meeting July 13 – minutes forthcoming.

YPFD June 16, 2019 Meeting minutes
link to: 20190615 YPFD Meeting Notes_Final

Meetings will be held at the fire station at 10am and everyone is welcome to attend. June 15th; July 13th; and Sept 14th (which will also be the budget meeting as well).

Every Sunday 11am – Training

May 10th Burn Permits – contact the YPFD

Pile burning: Dress appropriately, have enough help on hand (people, water and tools) and make a firebreak before you start. Call your local fire protection district chief to let them know you’ll be conducting a debris burn. This saves them from sending emergency responders to your property if they are not needed.

Bring it, Don’t Burn it

For us in Yellow Pine, Jake Strohmeyer, Dist. Ranger with the Boise NF said we can use the area at our transfer station for yard debris and the FS will burn it once a year. Please no furniture, mattresses, construction debris, metal objects, tires or personnel junk. Please only woody yard debris. When using the pile please be mindful of where you place the debris as it should be contained to a manageable burnable area and kept as clean as possible. – JF

Training: Sunday Fire/EMS training has begun. Sundays at 11:00 AM unless otherwise posted. If Jeff F is in town the trainings will be held. All are welcome.

YP Helispot: We are working with Valley County Road Department and the Boise National Forest for the rock base for the road leading into the Helispot and the actual Helispot itself. We are also receiving rock for the Fire Hydrants, water tank foundations, etc. The rock will come from the Valdez pit and will be less expensive than having it trucked in from Cascade.

Stop the Bleed Course: This course was well attended in the Fall and Jeff F and Ann F will be presenting another course when the new instructor material comes out. There are “Stop The Bleed” kits at the Tavern in an emergency.

Siren Testing: The YPFD siren will be tested only once this year on the first of May at noon. 3 blasts of the siren is a test, more than 3 is an Emergency.

-JF
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Biz Listings:

Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377

Call for reservations
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The Corner (208) 633-3325

Our hours will be 11-8 every day, except closed on Tuesdays. We are open for breakfast by request and always have good coffee starting at 6am.
The Corner has firewood permits in stock now. 4 cord minimum at $6.25 per cord. Please bring drivers license and cash is preferred, no CC.
The Corner Store will also be open with snacks, groceries, fresh produce, soda, ice and packaged beer. If you know you will be coming in over the summer and need special grocery orders, let me know and I will order it in for you while you are here, 2 deliveries a week. The best way to get a hold of me is to call or stop by and say hello.
Karaoke is back at The Corner! Choose your favorite songs from our online music library and entertain your friends up on stage through our professional sound system.
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Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233

Summer Hours Daily 8am to Close
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Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Tom & Sarah Lanham
156 Yellow Pine Ave, Yellow Pine Id 83677
Website:
Link to FB page:
It’s official starting June 2020 We will be doing trail rides out of Yellow Pine along with summer pack / camping trips to high mountain lakes in the area!

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
Link to website:
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Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430
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Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine

Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, will service Yellow Pine

B&T Safety Solutions LLC
208-271-1600 Based out of Donnelly
Snow removal, cleaning chimneys and stoves, we do cabin staining/chinking as well
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (July 22) stayed warm overnight, the low of 51F was recorded Sunday morning, mostly cloudy sky this morning and humid. Morning air and street traffic (noisy and dusty.) A few swallows calling. Dark clouds and a few drops of rain just before noon, not enough to wet anything. Decreasing clouds after lunch and warming up. Hot and mostly clear mid-afternoon, high of 95 degrees. Extra traffic thru the neighborhood most of the afternoon and very dusty. Still hot this evening before sunset, smoky/dusty haze in the air. Starting to cool off a little after sun down, mostly clear. Lots of stars out before midnight.

Tuesday (July 23) overnight low of 54 degrees, warming up quickly and mostly clear sky this morning. Finches and pine siskins visiting, tree swallows swooping and calling. Sounds like they are working on the crusher above the village. Lots of young columbian ground squirrels running about. Cloudy before lunch time, and not too hot yet. Dark clouds, occasional drop of rain and moderate temperatures mid-afternoon, high of 84 degrees. Cloudy and normal temperatures late afternoon. About a 30 minute light rain shower early evening, settled the dust and good air quality. Quiet evening. Overcast sky at dusk. Cloudy before midnight.

Wednesday (July 24) overnight low of 53 degrees, warming up quickly under clear sky and strong sunshine this morning. Finches, pine siskins and swallows calling. Lots of clanging and banging up on the hill at the gravel site, hazy air. Partly cloudy and warm mid-day, light breeze. Light traffic this afternoon. Clear sky and warm mid-afternoon, light breezes, high of 86 degrees. OHVs traveling at excessive speed down the hill on main street. Warm evening, breeze died down and skeeters out in droves.

Thursday (July 25) overnight low of 40 degrees, clear sky this morning. Planned power outage started at 805am. Tree swallows, an olive-sided fly catcher, finches and pine skiskins calling. Noisy morning: air and road traffic, generators and crusher. Clear and light breeze mid-day. Power on at 1230pm. Water pressure a bit low. Large low jet flew over at 149pm. Traffic and dust early afternoon, heavy equipment working. Clear, hot and light breeze mid-afternoon, high of 91 degrees. High wispy clouds over most of the sky by evening, warm and slight breeze. Lots of skeeters. Cooling off after dark.

Friday (July 26) overnight low of 43 degrees, mostly high thin wispy clouds and a nice breeze this morning. Northern flicker, swallows, finches and pine siskins calling, calliope hummingbird visiting. Extra traffic and dust in the neighborhood. Overcast before lunch time, clouds keeping temperatures down. Olive-sided flycatcher sounding off from the forest, ground squirrels not as active in the heat. Partly clear and hot mid-afternoon, high of 93 degrees. Warm evening, nearly calm and lots of skeeters out at sunset. Mostly cloudy at dusk, rose colored clouds to the west.

Saturday (July 27) overnight low of 51 degrees, clear sky and warming up fast this morning. A few noisy airplanes turning over the village, light morning traffic and haze of dust in the air. Mostly cloudy and breezy after lunch. Water pressure down a bit. Hot and mostly clear mid-afternoon and gusty breezes, high of 90 degrees. Haze of smoke to the west, reduced air quality. Breezy evening. Clear, warm and lighter breezes after sunset, skeeters coming out. Lots of stars out before midnight.

Sunday (July 28) overnight low of 46 degrees, clear sky this morning. A few noisy airplanes turning over the village, increased road traffic and dust. Swallows, finches and pine siskins calling. Ground squirrels active. Pretty warm mid day, dusty air. Hot by mid-afternoon, a few small clouds and light breezes, high of 91 degrees. Clear, warm and a bit of haze in the air before sunset. Seems like there are fewer swallows and song birds around, but plenty of columbian ground squirrels. Folks are starting to camp on the golf course.
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RIP:

John F. Lance
died February 15, 2019
Ashes to be scattered in Yellow Pine August 4, 2019
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Ron “The Sugar Mountain Strangler” Erickson
June 22, 1948 – July 13, 2019
Memorial video link:
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Idaho News:

Brake Dancing

Lick Creek Rd. homeowners thrilled with new radar speed signs

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News July 25, 2019

Blake Hanks is thankful speed limit radar signs were installed earlier this month on Lick Creek Road by the City of McCall, but he also had a backup plan in place to deter speeding cars.

“Until we got the signs, I was going to sit out here in a chair and use a hair dryer as a radar gun,” said Hanks, who has lived on Lick Creek Road for seven years.

One of the new signs was placed near Davis Avenue to face eastbound cars and another was placed near Spring Mountain Boulevard to face westbound cars.

So far, the two signs have made a drastic difference along the long, straight stretch of road with a speed limit of 25 miles per hour, Hanks said.

“To us that live here, I think you’d call it night and day,” said Hanks, 68. “It’s not that ‘pick up and race down the street’ anymore.”

Hanks began campaigning for the signs to be installed on the street last summer amid worries that speeding traffic would kill one of the many pedestrians and cyclists that frequent the road.

… Other residents along Lick Creek Road have also noticed fewer speeding cars since the signs were installed.

“Before, they used to drive like 50 miles an hour down this street,” said David Beckman, 65, a Lick Creek Road resident of 18 years. “I’ve been looking forward to (the signs) for a long time.”

Beckman still sees speeding cars pass by, but not as fast or as frequently. Beckman knows how dangerous speeding can be after having two dogs hit and seeing multiple deer killed by speeding cars on the road.

full story:
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Warren Wagon rebuild on track for October completion

$9.9 million project will rehab 5.5 miles of road

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News July 25, 2019

Work on a two-year, $9.9 million reconstruction of Warren Wagon Road remains on schedule to wrap up by the end of the October.

Daily road closures from 8 a.m. to noon and 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday will likely remain in place until work is complete, said Cody Brown, a spokesperson for M.A. DeAtley Construction of Clarkston, Washington, the general contractor for the federally-funded project.

Barricade locations change daily throughout the 5.5-mile project zone, which begins 2.2 miles north of West Lake Street (Idaho 55) and extends to the intersection of Warren Wagon Road and Eastside Drive.

Motorists will continue to be forced to detour around Payette Lake via Eastside Drive, which the Valley County Road Department has performed extra maintenance on this year to account for increased traffic.

Since work resumed on May 7, crews have focused on widening some sections of roadway, installing new drainage culverts and stabilizing land below the roadway to prep for paving work, Brown said.

Base layer paving is expected to begin on Aug. 12 moving from north to south and is expected to take about two weeks, before final paving work begins moving south to north, he said.

Final paving is expected to be complete around Sept. 20. Crews will then transition to striping the new roadway and installing guard rails and new signs, Brown said.

Once complete, Warren Wagon Road will have new pavement, guard rails along some sections and shoulders between three and four feet wide on either side to accommodate bicyclists.

continued:
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Semi rolls on Highway 55 near McCall, traffic clear

by CBS 2 News Staff Friday, July 26th 2019

McCall, Idaho (CBS 2) — A semi rolled onto its side on H-55 mp 140, near McCall and was blocking northbound traffic according to Valley County dispatch.

The incident was reported at 1:06 p.m. Friday.

source:
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Housing survey needs wide response

The Star-News July 25, 2019

A survey designed to gauge how local employees view housing in Valley and Adams counties deserves a few minutes of everyone’s time.

The 21-question survey, posted by the West Central Mountains Economic Development Council, aims to capture how secure employees feel with their current and future housing and whether the type, size, price and location of housing meets their needs. The target audience for the survey is people who live and work locally, but it is also open to business owners and employers. Breaking down responses by industry and income level will help surveyors identify housing needs specific to different segments of the workforce.

The survey will provide a thorough, regional accounting of perspectives from real people. Local government can use the data to tweak their housing policies, but the real value will be to private developers to tell them what kinds of housing projects people would want to live in and how much they would be willing to pay.

But the survey is only valid if enough people take it to be a true representation of the community. So open up that browser and go to (link):
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Letter to Share:

Americans Deserve Real Data Privacy

By U.S. Senator Mike Crapo July 15, 2019

Over the last decade, we have experienced a digital revolution that sees people using the Internet to manage more of their daily lives. Mobile applications, social media and search engines have become everyday tools, but their usage is accompanied by a shocking amount of hidden data collection without individuals’ knowledge or consent. A report from Cracked Labs on corporate surveillance notes “the behaviors, movements, social relationships, interests, weaknesses and most private moments of billions are now constantly recorded, evaluated and analyzed in real-time . . .” We need to balance maintaining America’s lead on the digital front while protecting our individual liberties and personal privacy.

Companies are collecting, processing, analyzing and sharing considerable data on individuals for all kinds of purposes. Data brokers play a central role in gathering vast amounts of personal information—many times without ever interacting with individuals—from a wide range of public and private sources, which is then sold or shared with others. The previously mentioned report broadly outlines examples of the information data brokers collect on individuals: “The profiles . . . include not only information about education, occupation, children, religion, ethnicity, political views, activities, interests and media usage, but also about someone’s online behaviors such as web searches. Data brokers also calculate scores that predict an individual’s possible future behavior, with regard to, for example, someone’s economic stability or plans to have a baby or to change jobs.” Companies will argue that this data is needed in order to provide customized, free services, but consumers will just as rightly argue that they were never fully informed of such data collection, nor consented to it.

continued:
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Scam Alerts:

‘Jury Duty’ Scam

Valley County Sheriff’s Office July 23, 2019

We have received several phone calls over the last hour asking if we have certain individuals working for the Sheriff’s Office. Several citizens in Valley County have gotten phone calls from “so-called” employees claiming that they have missed jury duty or some type of legal action against them is imminent. This is a scam, please do not give out any of your personal information or verify any personal data.
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Have you been hit with a Social Security scam call? Feds say it’s a growing problem

The Federal Trade Commission says complaints increased tenfold from 2017 to 2018.

Morgan Romero July 19, 2019 KTVB

Here’s a scenario that might sound familiar: a number that looks a lot like yours is calling, or maybe your caller ID says it’s the government ringing you.

So, you pick it up and on the other end, a recording says your Social Security number or benefits are suspended.

If that does sound familiar, you should know it’s the latest version of a government impostor scam – a common form of fraud in which scammers act as government officials and try to get you to give up personal and financial information or money.

continued:
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Prime day is past, but scams are just starting

Jul 22, 2019 By Natasha Williams KIVI TV

Amazon Prime Day is officially behind us, but experts say around 175 million items are now in the mail from all those orders!

With the onslaught of deliveries comes an onslaught of scams. Officials say the bad guys will pose as the post office, UPS, or Fed Ex, saying there’s a problem with your delivery. They’ll send you a text, an email, or will call you as a way to get your personal information.

continued:
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Tips & Advice:

Prepare for Fire Season

If you live in an area where the wildfire risk is high, take steps now to prepare for fire season. Being prepared for fire season is especially important for the health of children, older adults, and people with heart or lung disease.

continued (pdf):
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Evacuation Levels: What They Mean

Level 1 (Be Ready): You should be aware that a danger, such as a wildfire, exists near you. Officials recommend that you prepare to be evacuated. This includes packing essential items, water food and needed medications.

Level 2 (Get Set): There is a high risk of danger to you and your property and officials say you should be ready to evacuate at a moment’s notice.

Level 3 (Go Now): Officials say you should evacuate immediately. The danger to you and your property is imminent.

More detailed information about these levels can be found at this U.S. Forest Service page here.
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Heat Safety Tips and Resources

Warning Signs and Symptoms of Heat-Related Illness

link (image):
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Fire Season:

Shady Fire
Salmon-Challis National Forest
Two (2) miles east of Seafoam Guard Station in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness on the Middle Fork Ranger District.
InciWeb:

Canyon Fire
Boise National Forest
14 miles west of Stanley, Idaho
InciWeb:

Vader Fire
Salmon-Challis National Forest
14 miles northwest of Stanley, south of Highway 21 on the Middle Fork Ranger District.
InciWeb:

2 Idaho News
To keep you updated, safe and in the know, this page will provide the very latest news and updates throughout the summer. link:

NIFC:

Idaho Fires: 6 Acres: 126,611 New: 0 Contained: 1
Canyon Boise National Forest BLM 324 80 14 miles west of Stanley 208-373-4105
Lookout Point Twin Falls District BLM 9,432 50 16 miles northwest of Murphy
Shady Salmon-Challis National Forest FS 2,500 0 21 miles north of Stanley 208-756-7853
Sheep Idaho National Laboratory DOE 113,612 95 10 miles south of Mud Lake
Vader Salmon-Challis National Forest FS 443 88 12 miles west of Stanley 208-756-7853
Waterfall Salmon-Challis National Forest FS 300 0 37 miles west of Salmon
Marys Boise District BLM 182 100 15 miles northeast of Riddle

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Employees evacuated as 6,500-acre wildfire burns on Idaho National Lab site

The blaze, dubbed the Sheep Fire, started Monday with a lightning strike.

KTVB July 23, 2019

Idaho Falls, Idaho — Crews are working to contain a wildfire burning on the Idaho National Laboratory site near Idaho Falls.

The blaze, dubbed the Sheep Fire, started Monday evening with a lightning strike, according to the Bureau of Land Management. The area where it is burning is south of Highway 33 and north of Highway 20.

continued:
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Shady Fire grows to 2,681 acres 16 days after starting

by CBS 2 News Staff Friday, July 26th 2019

Shady Fire activity increased Thursday, growing to 2,681 acres after starting in the Salmon-Challis Forest 16 days ago on July 10.

The fire was active in the bottom of the Shady Creek drainage burning to the north. The fire is established in Shady and Casto Creeks, in an unnamed drainage east of Casto Creek, and in unnamed drainage north of Silver Creek and west of Shady Creek.

continued w/video:
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Highway 75 near Shoshone closed due to brush fire

by CBS 2 News Staff Tuesday, July 23rd 2019

Shoshone, Idaho (CBS 2) — A fast-moving brush fire near Shoshone has forced fire crews to shut down a stretch of Highway 75.

The Bureau of Land Management says Highway 75 has been closed north of Shoshone for fire suppression operations. The closure is between Highway 26 and 520 North Road about three miles north of town.

The BLM says the Lava fire has burned more than 500 acres about three miles north of Shoshone, and is growing quickly from west to east.

continued:
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Lightning strikes spark six fires in Malheur County

An overnight thunderstorm in eastern Oregon set a half-dozen new wildfire starts.

KTVB July 23, 2019

Malheur County, Ore. — An overnight thunderstorm in eastern Oregon set a half-dozen new wildfire starts.

Vale Bureau of Land Management said Tuesday morning that crews were either already fighting or en route to at least six fires in Malheur County. All were sparked by lightning strikes: “the number one cause of wildfires on the BLM Vale District,” according to officials.

continued:
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Public Lands:

South Fork Salmon River Road Rehabilitation Project Update

USDA Forest Service Region 4 Payette

The road closure will be in place Monday through Friday from 7:00 a.m. to 4:00 pm daily, with no closures over the weekends.

July 22-26 Newsletter.pdf

link (pdf):
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Outbreak of tree damaging caterpillar peaking in the Sage Hen area

Boise, Idaho, July 25, 2019 –The Boise National Forest is experiencing another outbreak of Douglas-fir tussock moths/caterpillars in and around Sage Hen Reservoir, a popular recreation area located 5 miles west of Smiths Ferry and forest visitors are reminded not to touch or pick it up.

The moth’s tree-damaging caterpillar has long bristly hairs that may cause allergic-like reactions for some individuals. A rash called tussockosis can persist from a few hours to several weeks. Individuals do not have to come in contact with the caterpillar to be effected as the hairs may be airborne. Reactions can worsen with exposure and can compromise airways for some individuals.

Tussock moth population began to increase in 2016 following with outbreaks typically lasting 3-4 years and subside when natural enemies such as a virus specific to the caterpillars and non-stinging parasitic wasps that kill the caterpillars. This year is expected to be the last year of the outbreak and caterpillar populations should crash by the end of August.

Defoliation is now visible and looks like reddish half-chewed needles and tends to be worse in the tops of trees. While the trees may look dead because the caterpillars feed on the needles, they are not, and should not be cut for fuelwood. If trees have any green needles, please do not cut.

Options for control are somewhat limited over a large areas. Dense stands of trees are impacted more severely than more open stands. Dry sites, ridges and dense stands tend to have more damage because trees have less water to recover from feeding damage. For more information:
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Decision signed for West Side Divide – Cottonwood Project

Dear Interested Party:

Forest Supervisor Cecilia Seesholtz has signed the decision for the Cottonwood Project located on the Emmett Ranger District of the Boise National Forest. A copy of the Decision Memo can be found on the Cottonwood project webpage (see the Decision tab).

Thank you for your interest in this project. If you have any questions, please direct them to Deb Lozinski, Project Leader, at 208-365-7019.

Sincerely, Tera Little (208-373-4157)
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Mining News:

Canada mine waste prompts calls for better water protection

7/22/19 AP

Towns, tribes and politicians in U.S. states bordering British Columbia are seeking better oversight and stricter regulations to protect them from hazardous pollution that flow downstream from coal mines in the Canadian province.

Leaders in Libby, Troy and Eureka, towns along the Kootenai River, wrote in separate letters to Montana Gov. Steve Bullock saying their livelihoods depend on the region’s rivers and lakes. But those waterways that support diverse wildlife and recreational interests are being compromised by contaminants from British Columbia coal mines, they said.

They and tribal leaders in Montana and Idaho want state and federal officials to fund better long-term water quality monitoring and to adopt a strict water quality standard for selenium.

continued:
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Critter News:

Pet Talk – When A Pet doesn’t have Testes

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt July 26, 2019

“Crypt” is a Latin word for hidden. “Orchid” is the Latin word for testicle. “Crypt orchid” is a failure of one or both testes to descend into the scrotum; descent usually occurs within six to eight weeks after birth but may take as long as six months. The undescended testicle may be located within the inguinal canal, called the groin, or in the abdominal cavity. Cryptorchidism usually involves only one testicle and is more likely to affect the right side. A testicle that is not in the proper location is termed an ectopic testis. This is a congenital anomaly that has a reported incidence of approximately 5 percent in dogs and 2 percent in cats. The anomaly is thought to be a trait that can be inherited. Small-breed dogs are more likely to have this problem.

There are usually no signs directly related to the retained testicle. Retained testicles are prone to tumor formation because of the increased temperature inside the abdomen compared to the temperature in the scrotal sac. Dogs with the retained testicle are 14 times more likely to develop a testicular tumor.

continued:
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Idaho Humane Society in need of cat food, blankets

The shelter is also in need of blankets for dogs.

KTVB July 25, 2019

Boise, Idaho — The Idaho Humane Society says they’re running low on small bags of dry cat food for their pet food pantry.

That pantry is used by those facing economic hardships, other animal non-profits and Meals on Wheels, which, in addition to delivering human food, also delivers pet food to homebound seniors.

continued:
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Cat calls BFD for own ‘rescue’ at the Idaho Humane Society

by Ryan L Morrison Friday, July 26th 2019

Cats and firefighters have always had a special bond and that was put to the test today after a cat pulled a fire alarm at the Idaho Humane Society.

“We hadn’t scheduled a drill, so we were all scratching our heads wondering what was happening,” said the IHS. “There was a faint smell of smoke hovering in the air, but we couldn’t be sure that it wasn’t smoke floating in from wildfires burning outside of the Treasure Valley.”

Firefighters arrived on scene and cleared the facility. CBS 2 reached out to the IHS about whether or not there was a fire, though we haven’t heard back.

The staff eventually discovered that the alarm had been triggered in a unique place: the cat holding room.

continued:
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Boise City Council member proposes change to city animal code

Jul 22, 2019 By Anna Silver KIVI TV

Boise city council member, TJ Thomson considers himself an animal lover. He is asking his fellow council members to join him in supporting a proposed change to the City of Boise’s animal code that he says is outdated.

“I’m no different than anyone else. Our city has consistently been shown one of the top dog loving cities in all of America,”said Thomson.

He says the Humane Society has to rely on Idaho code. He wants to change the definition of animal cruelty to include common sense practices which currently aren’t in the code.

continued:
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Wolf pack kills calves in southeast Washington

by Brian Morrin Saturday, July 27th 2019 Idaho News 2

Washington wildlife officials say wolves have killed two calves in southeast Washington in the past two and a half weeks.

Data from a collared wolf shows the wolves are part of the Grouse Flats Wolf Pack.

Washington Fish and Game policy says the department will consider killing two wolves after four attacks on livestock in ten months, or three attacks in thirty days.

Washington Fish and Game officers have never killed a wolf in the southeast part of the state.

source:
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Moose on the loose in Nampa caught, relocated to mountains

“Well that’s not the typical cow call we handle here in Nampa,” the department posted on Twitter.

KTVB July 23, 2019

Nampa, Idaho — A young female moose is on a journey to a new home – this time, one a little farther from the City of Nampa’s neighborhoods and cul-de-sacs.

The moose caused a stir early Tuesday morning, when a resident spotted her in town and dialed police.

… Nampa officers were eventually able to corral the large creature in someone’s backyard, and called in the Idaho Department of Fish and Game to tranquilize her.

continued w/video and more photos:
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Rabid bat found near Red Fish Lake

Jul 25, 2019 Local News 8

Custer County, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – A rabid bat has been identified in Custer County near Red Fish Lake.

This is the first rabid bat located in Public Health District 7 so far this season and the third in the state.

While most bats are harmless and do not carry rabies, they are the only animal in Idaho that is a natural reservoir for the virus. Rabies is a fatal viral illness in humans and other animals.

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Empty Nester: Osprey nest on crane at McCall home site found to be not used

By Max Silverson for The Star-News July 25, 2019

The appearance of an osprey nest on a construction crane on Payette Lake this summer caused a flurry of calls to the Idaho Department of Fish and Game.

However, the nest was found to be empty and there were no delays to the home being built at 305 W. Lake St.

Several weeks ago, ospreys began constructing a stick nest on the horizontal arm of the crane, Fish and Game Regional Wildlife Biologist Diane Evans Mack said.

The crane had been sitting idle for about two weeks, which allowed the birds time to construct the nest, Evans Mack said.

Ospreys and their active nests are protected under the federal Migratory Bird Treaty Act of 1918.

continued:
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Beekeepers scramble after truck hauling beehives goes off road

by CBS 2 News Staff Tuesday, July 23rd 2019

Dubois, Idaho (CBS 2) — Beekeepers scrambled to gather up bees after a truck carrying beehives went off the road.

The truck carrying the hives was forced off the road when a grain hauler, trying to pass another car, went back into the other lane.

Beekeepers were able to contain the bees and get them back on their journey according to Idaho State Police.

source:
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“Mormon crickets” invade Franklin County

By Max Cohan Jul 23, 2019 Local News 8

Dayton, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – Over the past several weeks, “Mormon crickets” have been causing quite the stir in parts of southern Idaho.

Millions of shield-backed katydids have made their way down from the mountains of the Bannock Range and invaded towns in Franklin County.

continued:
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Fish & Game News:

Newly deployed game cameras will improve statewide wolf population estimates

By Brian Pearson, Conservation Public Information Specialist
Monday, July 22, 2019

New survey methods will help produce the first estimate of total wolf numbers since 2015

How many wolves are on the landscape in Idaho? That’s an often-asked question that Idaho Fish and Game is aiming to answer using game cameras during a new statewide population monitoring program.

In recent months, Fish and Game staff have deployed over 800 game cameras in a high-density grid throughout the state, which will take millions of pictures. When Fish and Game staff collect the cameras at the end of September, researchers will download and analyze the photos and apply statistical modeling to estimate the population.

continued:
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Hunters must buy controlled hunt tags by Aug. 1, or tags will be forfeited

By Mike Demick, Staff Biologist
Monday, July 22, 2019

It’s the hunters’ responsibility to check if they drew and buy the controlled hunt tags no later than Aug. 1

Big game hunters who were successful in drawing controlled hunt tags for deer, elk, pronghorn, and black bear have until midnight Mountain Daylight Time Aug. 1 to buy their tags.

Tags may be purchased at any Fish and Game office, license vendor, by telephone at (800-554-8685), or online. Controlled hunt tags not purchased by Aug. 1, excluding unlimited tags, will be forfeited and combined with controlled hunt tags no one applied for and made available in a second drawing.

continued:
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Artificial beaver dams rebuild Boise streams

by Axel Quartarone Wednesday, July 24th 2019 Idaho News 2

Idaho Fish and Game have implemented a project on the Boise River Wildlife Management Area in order to restore stream bed and riparian zones near Lucky Peak reservoir that were damaged during the 2016 Mile Marker 14 fire. The project uses beaver dam analogs which is an artificial beaver dam that uses wooden posts and surrounding vegetation to help stream bed health through increasing wet zone areas.

This means the stream bed is widened by slowing flow and spreading it across a greater area. The goal of the project is to help increase riparian zones and provide more resources for local wildlife to thrive. Idaho Fish and Game has also implemented this strategy on streams in the Owyhees mountains.

link to video:
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More F&G News Releases

link:
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Fun Critter Stuff:

German firefighters rescue squirrel stuck in manhole cover

by Associated Press Friday, June 21st 2019


In this Thursday, June 20, 2019 photo provided by the fire department a squirrel is stuck in a gully cover in Dortmund, Germany. (Feuerwehr Dortmund/dpa via AP)

Berlin (AP) — Firefighters, police and a veterinary clinic combined forces to rescue a red squirrel that had gotten its tiny head stuck in a manhole cover in the western German city of Dortmund.

Dortmund’s fire department said Friday they responded Thursday morning to a call about the rodent in peril on a street next to a downtown park.

When rescuers arrived, they spotted the tufted-eared squirrel’s head poking out of a hole in the cover. Initial attempts to free the animal were unsuccessful, so the entire manhole cover was removed and taken to a nearby veterinary clinic, while police were called in to guard the open sewer.

Vets used anesthetic to calm the squirrel and then freed the animal. It was treated for superficial neck wounds and is expected to soon be released back into the wild.

source:
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Seasonal Humor:

AshesSpread-a


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Bird of the Week: Three-Toed Woodpecker

Three-Toed Woodpecker

(year around, not common)
Male
20121228-3-toed-male-web-a
Female
20121228-3-toed-woodpecker-fem-web-a
Photos by Local Color Photography

American Three-toed Woodpecker
Picoides dorsalis
Size and Shape: A medium-sized black-and-white woodpecker, more black than white.
Both Sexes
Length: 7.9 in (20 cm)
Weight: 2.3 oz (65 g)
Color Pattern: Head black with a white mustache stripe and a thin white line behind eye. Throat, breast, and belly white. Adult males (and juveniles of both sexes) have a yellow crown patch.
Learn more about this bird: The Cornell Lab of Ornithology
Link to Birds Page
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Idaho History July 28, 2019

Idaho Women on Jury Duty

1897

First Women on Jury Duty and in the Legislature in Idaho

by Evan Filby

WomanJury-a
All-woman Jury – Library of Congress

On October 4, 1897, Idaho saw its first trial in which women sat on the jury – they having been granted equal suffrage the year before. Quoting historian Hiram T. French: “The women who, with W. R. Cartwright and R. F. Cooke, served on this jury were Mrs. R. E. Green, Miss Frances Wood, Mrs. Boyakin, and Mrs. E. J. Pasmore.”

All the women included in that first jury had been active in the Idaho women’s suffrage campaign. Mrs. Richard E. Green owned the Meridian Creamery. Her husband was a trained civil engineer, managed the Ridenbaugh Canal for a time, and had business interests in Boise and Nampa.

Miss Frances Wood was very active in various Boise social and civic-improvement organizations, and served for many years as Deputy Clerk for Ada County. She also campaigned for the 19th Amendment, giving women the right to vote nation-wide.

Mrs. Boyakin’s husband was Adoniren J. “Jud” Boyakin. A long-time newspaperman, Jud had come to Idaho in 1864, originally working at the Idaho Statesman. From around 1877 until his death in 1899, he was owner and editor of the Idaho Democrat newspaper in Boise.

Mrs. Edward J. Pasmore worked in the advertising department for the Women’s Edition of the Idaho Statesman. Her husband, Professor Pasmore, taught music and singing, and had given speeches supporting women’s suffrage.

The trial they sat for involved a suit brought by Dr. Richard M. Fairchild against the Ada County Commissioners. He had billed the County $125 for an inquest and an autopsy he had performed. They had refused to pay the full amount, offering him just $25. An earlier trial had ended in an impasse, so the judge directed that a mixed jury be assembled for a new attempt.

The Idaho Statesman reported on the trial the next day, October 5, 1897. The panel selected Mrs. Green as their Foreman. The results showed their inexperience, but also a deep concern for law and justice. After over six hours of deliberation, they emerged and Green told the judge they could not agree. When she briefly described the problem, with some key details, the judge said, “You must not disclose the nature of your deliberations.”

Mrs. Green replied, “Well, that is the way we stand.”

According to the Statesman, “Miss Wood spoke up, saying it all hinged on one point.” There was some confusion about what evidence the county had actually presented. It seemed to boil down to the County Attorney’s opinion that “the services were not worth so much.” After some thought, the judge observed that “the county had introduced no witnesses” so there really was “no evidence on its side.”

Minutes later the panel returned from another session in the jury room and awarded the doctor the full amount.

Aside from immediately serving on juries, women quickly tested their newly-won vote. In 1898, three women – Clara Campbell, Hattie Noble, and Mary Wright – won election to the Idaho House of Representatives. They did not serve a second term, and it was not until 1915 that another female was elected.

source: South Fork Companion
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Women Pioneers, Silver City, Idaho

WomenPioneersSilverCity-a

Twelve women posed on a porch. They appear to be part of an organization or club as several are wearing similar jackets-perhaps to indicate rank within the organization-and ornamental pins. Three of the women are identified as Julie Allen, Maud Lewis (Carruthers) and Alice Townsend.

source: Idaho State Historical Society
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1907

The Owyhee Nugget, Silver City, Idaho, 1908-01-03

First Woman Jury Impaneled at De Lamar

The Weiser Signal copies a dispatch from Denver, reading as follows:

Dec. 21. [1907] – It took six good women and true just ten minutes in Justice Carlon’s court to find for plaintiff in the now celebrated case of Victor Porel against Mrs. James W. Wallwork. Besides being the first case ever tried before a woman jury, first in all the history of the world, the action had other highly interesting features.

The case was a suit case. Victor Porel, “tailor to gentlewomen,” as his sign says, made $60 suit for Mrs. Wallwork, which she alleged, did not fit and refused to pay for. He sued for his money and when the suit was fitted in court, the women jurors pronounced it a “lovely fit.”

The Signal then goes on to say:

The above dispatch sent out from Denver appeared in the Oregonian last Sunday. The main importance of the item is that it was the first woman jury ever impaneled to try a case, and this is a mistake. The first female jury that ever graced a court room was impaneled in Weiser on Monday, April 18, 1898, in Judge Mitchell’s court. The jury was composed of Mrs. J. H. Hanthorn, Mrs. N. M. Hanthorn, Mrs. Shaire, Mrs. N. B. Robertson, Mrs. Frank Hopkins and Miss Frances Galloway, and any of the ladies you ask about it will have a faint recollection of the matter.

The case itself was a difference between two neighbors who fell out about some fruit jars and some sewing. In the argument that followed one of the women, a Mrs Abshire, received an upper cut on the point of the jaw and had her assailant, a Mrs. Smith, arrested. She was hauled into court before Judge Mitchell and called for a jury. At the suggestion of I. F. Smith, Dan Kerfoot, the sheriff, secured a jury composed entirely of women. Frank Harris, the present prosecutor, prosecuted the prisoner and C. M. Stearns appeared in her defense. After a long and solemn deliberation the prisoner was declared not guilty by the jury who recommended that she and the complainant both be reprimanded. The case caused considerable stir at the time and many different stories were printed over the state concerning it.

Whoever sent out the Denver dispatch must certainly be very young or a new comer to the west, as any western paper of date will show it and a glance through their files will refresh them.

Both the Denver dispatch and the Weiser Signal are wrong.

The first case tried by a woman jury and where both the complaining witness and the defendant and all the jurors were women was tried at De Lamar, this county, November 18, 1897.

Mrs. M. G. Stiles was the complaining witness and Mrs. Litetia Reagan the defendent. The editor of Nugget was then a justice of the peace in De Lamar, and the trial was brought in his court.

The charge was for disturbing the peace. The two women had a quarrel about chickens in their adjoining door-yards in the lower town of De Lamar, then known as “Toughtown” which ended in the defendent being accused of throwing rocks and the complaining witness bringing out a rifle and admitting in court that she told the other woman she could “pick a hair out of her head with it.”

James W. Pascoe, the only one of the parties not now living, was deputy sheriff at the time, and when the trial came up and a jury trial was called for he was handed a summons, when he asked if women were eligible to serve and the J. P. said, “certainly.”

“Then I will get women’s righters,” he replied. Whereupon he summoned Mesdames Morgan Keltner, Francis Crosson, Mary Morgan, Grace Somerville, Verna Lee, and Catherine Franks, who all promptly came into court and were sworn in as jurors.

The little court room was literally packed with onlookers. The judge then called upon the sheriff and admonished him to see to it that the strictest order was maintained, and it was done. No trial ever was held when stricter decorum prevailed. Six witnesses – all women, were examined, and the complaining witness made a short plea, and the case was given to the jury.

There being no room to which they could retire to make up their verdict, the court room was cleared and they locked in and told to rap on the window for the sheriff when they reached a decision.

Forty minutes afterward court was again called and a verdict reading, “We the jury find the defendant not guilty as charged. The judge discharged the defendent, thanked the jury and made each of them out a certificate for their pay. Some of the ladies, we believe, still retain those certificates as souvenirs of the first women’s jury.

source: The Owyhee Nugget [h/t SMc]
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Idaho Pioneer Women

PioneerWomanSkis-a

unknown woman, unknown location or date.

courtesy Bruce Longmore on FB:
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1912

Twin Falls’ First Female Jury Decides 1912 Case

Twin Falls News September 26, 1912, December 5, 1912

Whether or not women could lawfully serve on Idaho juries was still unclear in the early 20th century. A holdover from Territorial law stated that a trial jury consisted of a “body of men.” Yet, the 1896 Suffrage Amendment to the Idaho Constitution held that women citizens were qualified electors, suggesting that they could also serve on juries. Individual women are known to have served on Idaho juries by 1897. In Twin Falls, the first recorded all-female jury was selected in 1912 in the court of Probate Judge James W. Shields.

The case involved a female defendant, Mrs. Edward Bolts, who lived on a ranch northwest of Twin Falls. She was charged with drawing a revolver on fellow rancher Arthur J. Requa and striking him with the gun. Requa had purchased the Bolts farm and was preparing to assume possession in early 1913.

On the day of the incident, he went to the farm with his wife and son to drop off some produce, which he intended to store at his new property. As he headed for the root cellar with a box of apples, Mrs. Bolts came from the house brandishing a revolver. She was adamant that he could not store goods on the property, while he claimed they had an agreement allowing him to store his belongings at the farm until he took possession. In the ensuing argument, Bolts struck Requa with the gun, but later denied that she pointed the gun at him. Requa left the scene, went into town, and filled a complaint against Bolts.

The case came to trial in the court of Judge Shields and was prosecuted by County Attorney Alden R. Hicks. Bolts was represented by William P. Guthrie, and claimed self-defense. The most notable aspect of the case, however, was the jury of six local women who found Bolts guilty of the charges. In honor of the auspicious occasion, the Amos Studio took a photograph of the court scene with the female jurors. The photo was planned “to hang in the halls of justice” as a memorial to the woman jurors.

1912FemaleJury-a
Idaho Legal History Society Newsletter, Summer 2013

source: ID AHGP [h/t SMc]
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Jury of Women Hearing Case in Justice CourtChickenThieves1-a

Evening Capital News, Dec. 17, 1912

The Fate of Two Men Charged With Stealing Chickens to Be Decided by Six Women.

Woman’s Jury Selected.
Mrs. Caddie M. Bates.
Mrs. Eva Hunt Dockery.
Mrs. Gralow.
Mrs. W. S. Chipp.
Mrs. John Fackson.
Mrs. John W. Veatch.

By dinner time this evening, the fate of F. J. Robinson and Fred D. Meilcke, charged upon complaint of Ernest L. Avery with the theft of two fowls on the morning of Dec. 15, will be in the hands of the above women, who comprise the first women’s Jury to try a case In the city of Boise in many years.

Promptly at 2 o’clock the six women, who had been summoned for jury duty on the case, were in their seats. Mrs. Emily Savidge and Mrs. John Driscoll were among the number, but both wore dismissed by J. B. Eldridge, attorney for the defendant, and in their places Mrs. Caddie Bates and Mrs. Eva Hunt Dockery, the latter being in the court room when the case was called, were taken and the jury accepted.

The women were quick in answering the questions of the attorneys and declared that while they had read something of the case, none of them had formed any opinion and stated that because the charge was that of chicken stealing it would not in any way affect their verdict.

In his opening statement to the jury, Tom Coffin, deputy prosecuting attorney, stated that the state would show that the chicken house of Mr. Avery had been broken into the morning of Dee, 15, and that a Plymouth Rock rooster and a white hen had been stolen; that Avery had found where both had been killed near the coop, and had traced the blood and feathers to the gravel office near the river, where the defendants were found picking the fowls, and an officer had been sent for. He further stated that the state would show that the defendants had made contradictory statements relative to securing the chickens which were found in their possession.

The case then opened with Mr. Avery as the first witness, his testimony being similar to the statement made by the prosecuting attorney.

The women seem to be paying the strictest attention to all questions asked the witness, and all seemed alert to the situation and ready to deal out justice when the case would be finally submitted to them.
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Women on Jury Refuse Pay for Their ServicesChickenThieves2-a

Evening Capital News, Dec. 18, 1912

Decline to Increase Costs of the Case After Finding Two Men Guilty of Petit Larceny.

After deliberating 25 minutes in the, petit larceny case of F. J. Robinson and Fred D. Meilcke charged with stealing chickens, the jury of women, hearing the case returned a verdict of guilty last evening and then touched with pity and a spirit of the Christmas season, in the next breath offered to pay the fines of the defendants with the money they received for jury services. Three votes were taken by the jury after being locked up to consider the case. The first vote stood three for conviction and three for acquittal. A short argument was then held, a second vote taken in which the jury stood five for conviction and one for acquittal and the next vote resulted in an unanimous verdict guilty, which was signed by the foreman, Mrs. Eva Hunt Dockery.

None of the women jurors was aware that they were to receive pay for their services and when Judge Bower announced that he would have their jury certificates ready in a few minutes entitling each to $2.25 for sitting on the jury, they immediately re-assembled, held a whispered consultation and then offered to pay the fines of the men they had convicted with the money, but Judge Bower refused to permit them to do so.

At 10 o’clock this morning the court pronounced judgment, fining the defendants $15 each to cover the costs of the prosecution, except the Jury fees, which were not included. Judge Bower wishing to carry out the spirit of the jury in his decision.

A remarkable instance in the case was the fact that the women jurors were all on time and there were no delays as is often the case when men jurors are summoned.

source: ID AHGP [h/t SMc]
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Twin Falls County Courthouse in Twin Falls 1915

TwinFallsCourthouse-a

Copyright Idaho State Historical Society
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Proposed Legislation
By the Idaho State Federation of Women’s Clubs.

5. A bill amending the present laws so that women and men shall be equally eligible for service on juries. This is simply an offer by the women to serve on juries, not an application for the job.

source: Payette enterprise. (Payette, Canyon Co., Idaho), 14 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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March 6, 1943 Governor Signs Jury Bill

1943IdahoWomenJury-a

While a delegation from Idaho Business and Professional Women’s clubs looked on, Saturday, March 6, Governor Bottolfsen signed House Bill 162, granting Idaho women the privilege of serving on juries if they so desire. Left to right are Mrs. Myrtle Enking, Idaho state treasurer; Miss Margaret Sinclair, president of the Boise BPW; Mrs. Maud Cosho of Boise; Mrs. Lloyd Fenn of Kooskia, member of the Orofino club; Mrs. Mabel Adamson, chairman of the legislative committee of the state BPW; and Mrs. Gordon Lee of the Boise club.

source: Idaho State Historical Society courtesy Idaho Statesman [h/t SMc]
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Women in United States Juries

The idea of women sitting on juries in the United States was subject to ridicule up until the 20th century.

1902WomenJuryCharlesDanaGibson-a
(click image for larger size)
Original drawing for “Studies in expression. When women are jurors” cartoon by Charles Dana Gibson. First published 23 October 1902 in Life on pages 350–351

Some states allowed women to serve on juries much earlier than others. States also differed on whether women’s suffrage implied women’s jury service.

History

The jury of matrons was an early exception to the exclusion of women from juries. Stemming from English common law, matrons in the American colonies were occasionally called upon in cases involving pregnant women to offer expertise on pregnancy and childbirth. William Blackstone spearheaded the idea of women’s exclusion as a result of “propter defectum sexus” (based on the defect of sex), and his beliefs were integrated into the legal systems of the United States, including the ideals of coverture. Women’s place on the jury would be challenged for decades with arguments including their lack of intelligence, emotional stability, and need to tend to home life. Women would find themselves in between the two ends of the spectrum: full legal right to participate on a jury or barred from participation.

Most arguments for exclusionary policies relied on the belief that women had other preceding duties in the home. The belief that women were too sensitive or incompetent to be jurors was also widespread. Some opponents of female jurors sought to shield women from the unpleasant content of many court cases. At a time when women were beginning to assert their sameness with men, the movement for jury rights often required them to emphasize their differences, arguing that men and women were not interchangeable.

1902WomantoosentimentaljurydutyChamberlain-a
(click image for larger size)
“Woman are too sentimental for jury duty” (1915)

The movement to include women on juries largely coincided with the women’s suffrage movement. However, when women gained the right to vote, it was not automatically clear that women also had the right to serve on juries. In fact, with federal women’s suffrage came many questions about women’s citizenship like whether women could remain citizens after marrying a foreigner, hold a political office, or serve on a jury. The movement for women’s jury rights has been described as “something very like a second suffrage campaign.”

As jury trial is guaranteed by the Sixth Amendment to the United States Constitution by the phrase “a speedy and public trial, by an impartial jury” and the Equal Protection Clause in the Fourteenth Amendment, gender representation in American juries have mainly been decided by Supreme court rulings.

With current state legislation, all-female juries are possible.

“The jury of the future–One that might temper justice with mercy” (1903)
1903TheJuryoftheFutureGibson-a
(click image for larger size)
Charles Dana Gibson (American illustrator, 1867-1944) 1903 pen and ink on paper illustration for Collier’s Weekly; published in the artist’s collection The Weaker Sex (1903)

Portrayals of women as jurors

The media portrayed female jurors in both positive and negative ways as women throughout the country pushed to gain the right to serve on juries. This mirrors the ways in which women’s suffrage was displayed in the media. Many of the same arguments both for and against women’s suffrage were used in the case of women’s jury service. For example, an argument against both suffrage and jury service was that both would be disruptive to women’s’ responsibilities in the home. In addition to this, it was believed that jury duty might not be suitable for women and their perceived delicate nature. Some media portrayals claimed that women would be swayed by handsome male criminals and allow guilty men to walk free. The opposite argument was that men were already being swayed by the beauty of some women criminals, and that women on juries would temper this occurrence.

“Women juries for women criminals.” (1914)
1914WomenJuriesforWomenCriminals-a
(click image for larger size)
Editorial cartoon that depicts the possible difference between how a male jury would convict a woman criminal versus how a female jury would convict a female criminal. Date 7 March 1914, Source The Chicago Daily Tribune, Author John T. McCutcheon

excerpted from: Wikipedia
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Rockwell Video Minute: The Holdout

Norman Rockwell admired men and women who fearlessly stood by their convictions. Nowhere was that more evident than in his portrayal a jury’s lone dissenter.

source: Saturday Evening Post
[h/t Sandy McRae]
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page updated July 2, 2020

Road Reports July 28, 2019

South Fork road is closed from 7am to 4pm during the week. Johnson Creek road was bladed and oiled on the lower end. Back country road conditions can change quickly, be prepared for rocks and trees in the road, remember there is no cell phone service. Please share road reports.

Yellow Pine: Residential streets that did not get dust abatement are getting torn up and VERY dusty. Please respect your neighbors and slow down!
Click for Local Forecast.
Yellow Pine Webcam: (check date on image)

Warm Lake Highway: Clear
SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

Highway 55 Webcams Link:

South Fork Road: closed Monday through Friday from 7am to 4pm on weekdays, with no closures over the weekends.
More info:
Map w/info:
Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
South Fork Stream Gauge:

EFSF Road: Last report Friday (July 12) report the road is excellent between the So Fk and YP, only a few wash boards.

Johnson Creek Road: Watch for extra traffic due to closures on the South Fork route.
Wednesday (July 24) Road grader and water truck caused a bit of a delay today, they were within 10 miles of Warm Lake Hwy. Dust abatement was applied to Johnson Creek road from Wapiti Meadow Ranch towards Yellow Pine.
Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam:
Johnson Creek Stream Gauge:
The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Reported open June 23. No current report.
Report Tuesday (July 2 early morning) “The road wasn’t bad. Some wash outs and ruts but just bumpy.” AP
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Reported open June 23. No current report.
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcam: (check date on image)

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open Weekends only
No current report. Update from Midas July 18: The road is still closed Monday through Thursday and open Friday, Saturday and Sunday. Good progress is being made, but it is likely that we still have a few weeks of work ahead.
Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Reported open June 30. Plan weekend travel due to Stibnite road repairs.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: ATVs made it over the top July 13, was not advisable for passenger vehicles at that time. (Probably open by now.) No current report.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Secesh: Report June 3 The road from McCall to Secesh is open. Construction on Warren Wagon Road during the week.

Stanley to Landmark: Report July 4 “Road is graded and dust sealed from Hwy 21 to Bruce Meadows, modest washboard across Bear Valley.” -DP

Deadwood Summit: Reported Open June 16th
Update from BNF June 26th: Access to Deadwood Campgrounds is open along FS 579 road from State Highway 21. Access to Deadwood Campgrounds from FS 582 (Clear Creek Rd) to FS 579 is open. Cascade to Landmark access to Deadwood Campgrounds via FS 579 road is open. FS 555 road to Deadwood Campgrounds is too rough to travel and not a recommended route.
Note: The approx elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′
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Weather Reports July 21-27, 2019

Note: it is very dry in the back country, only a trace of rain this week.

July 21 Weather:

At 9am it was 51 degrees and clear. Clear, warm and dry mid-day. At 320pm it was 90 degrees, clear sky and slight breeze. At 7pm it was 88 degrees and mostly clear. At 830pm it was 75 degrees and clear. At 930pm it was 68 degrees and clear.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time July 22, 2019 at 10:00AM
Mostly cloudy and humid
Max temperature 93 degrees F
Min temperature 51 degrees F <– yesterday morning
At observation 62 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

July 22 Weather:

At 10am it was 62 degrees, mostly cloudy and humid. Dark clouds and starting to sprinkle lightly at 1256pm, lasted less than 5 minutes. Decreasing clouds after lunch. At 330pm it was 90 degrees and mostly clear. At 7pm it was 90 degrees and mostly clear. At 9pm it was 76 degrees and mostly clear. At 10pm it was 70 degrees and clear. Stars out at 11pm.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time July 23, 2019 at 09:00AM
Mostly clear
Max temperature 95 degrees F
Min temperature 54 degrees F
At observation 66 degrees F
Precipitation Trace
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July 23 Weather:

At 10am it was 66 degrees and mostly clear. At 1130am it was 75 degrees and overcast. Breaks in the clouds at 1215pm, dark clouds to the south and little breezes. At 3pm it was 77 degrees, overcast, light breeze and a couple drops of rain. At 7pm it was 76 degrees and overcast, slight breeze. Started raining aroun 720pm, lasted not quite 30 minutes. About 3 drops of rain at 815pm. At 845pm it was 66 degrees and overcast. Breaks in the clouds at 230am.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time July 24, 2019 at 09:00AM
Clear
Max temperature 84 degrees F
Min temperature 53 degrees F
At observation 62 degrees F
Precipitation 0.01 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

July 24 Weather:

At 9am it was 62 degrees and clear sky (low haze to the east.) Partly cloudy and a little breezy by 11am. At 1215pm it was 82 degrees, partly cloudy and light breezes. At 315pm it was 84 degrees, clear sky and light breeze. At 830pm it was 70 degrees and clear. At 1030pm it was 58 degrees, some haze.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time July 25, 2019 at 09:30AM
Clear
Max temperature 86 degrees F
Min temperature 40 degrees F
At observation 57 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
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July 25 Weather:

At 930am it was 57 degrees and clear. Clear and light breeze mid-day. At 315pm it was 89 degrees, clear and light breeze. At 730pm it was 82 degrees, mostly high thin wispy clouds and light breeze. At 840pm it was 73 degrees, mostly cloudy and slight breeze.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time July 26, 2019 at 09:00AM
Mostly high thin wispy clouds
Max temperature 91 degrees F
Min temperature 43 degrees F
At observation 57 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
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July 26 Weather:

At 9am it was 57 degrees, mostly high thin wispy clouds and a nice breeze. Almost solid overcast by 11am. Solid overcast some with dark bottoms at 1pm. At 3pm it was 91 degrees, partly clear and light breeze. At 710pm it was 82 degrees, mostly cloudy – thin haze and wisps. At 845pm it was 75 degrees, flat gray sky. At 930pm it was 72 degrees, mostly cloudy – rose colored sunset.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time July 27, 2019 at 09:00AM
Clear
Max temperature 93 degrees F
Min temperature 51 degrees F
At observation 63 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
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July 27 Weather:

At 9am it was 63 degrees and clear. At 150pm it was 87 degrees, mostly big chunky clouds and gusty breezes. At 450pm it was 88 degrees, mostly clear and breezy. At 630pm it was 84 degrees, mostly clear sky (thin smoky haze) and gusty strong breezes. At 845pm it was 77 degrees, clear and lighter breezes.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time July 28, 2019 at 09:00AM
Clear
Max temperature 90 degrees F
Min temperature 46 degrees F
At observation 58 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
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Road Reports July 24, 2019

South Fork road is closed from 7am to 4pm during the week. Back country road conditions can change quickly, be prepared for rocks and trees in the road, remember there is no cell phone service. Please share road reports.

Yellow Pine: Residential streets that did not get dust abatement are getting torn up and VERY dusty. Please respect residents and slow down!
Click for Local Forecast.
Yellow Pine Webcam: (check date on image)

Warm Lake Highway: Clear
SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

Highway 55 Webcams Link:

South Fork Road: closed Monday through Friday from 7am to 4pm on weekdays, with no closures over the weekends.
More info:
Map w/info:
Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
South Fork Stream Gauge:

EFSF Road: Last report Friday (July 12) report the road is excellent between the So Fk and YP, only a few wash boards.

Johnson Creek Road: Watch for extra traffic due to closures on the South Fork route.
Tuesday (July 23) Mail truck driver (Robert) reports the county is grading Johnson Creek road from Yellow Pine out to MM 13 today.
Wednesday (July 24) Road grader and water truck caused a bit of a delay today, they are working within 10 miles of Warm Lake Hwy. Dust abatement was applied to Johnson Creek road from Wapiti Meadow Ranch towards Yellow Pine.
Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam:
Johnson Creek Stream Gauge:
The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Reported open June 23. No current report.
Report Tuesday (July 2 early morning) “The road wasn’t bad. Some wash outs and ruts but just bumpy.” AP
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Reported open June 23. No current report.
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcam: (check date on image)

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open Weekends only
Update from Midas July 18: The road is still closed Monday through Thursday and open Friday, Saturday and Sunday. Good progress is being made, but it is likely that we still have a few weeks of work ahead.
Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Reported open June 30. Plan weekend travel due to Stibnite road repairs.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: ATVs made it over the top July 13, was not advisable for passenger vehicles at that time. (Probably open by now.) No current report.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Secesh: Report June 3 The road from McCall to Secesh is open. Construction on Warren Wagon Road during the week.

Stanley to Landmark: Report July 4 “Road is graded and dust sealed from Hwy 21 to Bruce Meadows, modest washboard across Bear Valley.” -DP

Deadwood Summit: Reported Open June 16th
Update from BNF June 26th: Access to Deadwood Campgrounds is open along FS 579 road from State Highway 21. Access to Deadwood Campgrounds from FS 582 (Clear Creek Rd) to FS 579 is open. Cascade to Landmark access to Deadwood Campgrounds via FS 579 road is open. FS 555 road to Deadwood Campgrounds is too rough to travel and not a recommended route.
Note: The approx elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′
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July 21, 2019 The Yellow Pine Times

July 21, 2019 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Note: The boil water order and water restrictions are still in effect.
July 22 – Daytime closures on So. Fk road begin
July 25 – 8am – noon planned power outage
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Community Calendar:

April 2 – Boil water order issued
Every Sunday – 11am Fire Training
May 10 – Burn “permits” required
May 15 – Firewood Season opens
July 22 – Daytime closures on So. Fk road begin
July 25 – 8am – noon planned power outage
July 27 – Festival meeting Saturday 2pm at the Community Hall
July 27 – 12pm Memorial and potluck for Wilbur Wiles in Big Creek
Aug 10 – VYPA meeting 2pm Community Hall
Sept 14 – 10am YPFD meeting at the Fire Hall budget meeting
Sept 14 – Ride to Cinnabar
Sept 21 – VYPA meeting 2pm Community Hall

(details below)
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Local Events:

Celebration of Life – Wilbur Wiles July 27

Celebration at Big Creek lodge July 27th at noon. Lunch catered by The Corner.
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2019 Yellow Pine Escapades

The 2019 schedule for the Yellow Pine Escapades has been updated on the website!

Expect new escapades this coming year, including an ATV-UTV Photo Scavenger Hunt; two (yes, two) ATV-UTV rides, a golf tournament, and even a community yard sale. Other events will be added to the calendar as plans are finalized.

Join us for a great season of fun! The starting point for fun in Yellow Pine! The website includes information on the events hosted by the Yellow Pine Community Hall as well as the other “goings-on” in the village. Food, lodging and fuel are available in Yellow Pine. link:
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Village News:

Power Outages

Idaho Power will have a maintenance power outage on Thursday, July 25th from 8am – noon.

The power went off at 417pm July 14, back on at 917am July 15 – off a total of 17 hours. Then power went off again at 243pm July 15 until 617pm – a total of 3 hours and 31 minutes. Wednesday (July 17) power blipped off and on some time before 250pm.
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Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

Yellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is located approximately 3 miles south on Johnson Creek Road.

The TRANSFER STATION is for household trash and yard waste:
* Household trash must be put inside (and fit) the dumpster;
* Yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, et.) goes in the burn pile on the south end of the turn-around;
* Cardboard boxes should be flattened before putting the in the dumpster,

The DUMPSTERS are NOT for:
* Furniture (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station).

The BURN PILE is NOT for:
* Cardboard boxes (flatten and put in dumpster);
* Furniture and appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Drywall and building material (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wire or fencing (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Foam Rubber (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wood with metal (like nails) attached (take to Donnelly Transfer Station.)

When closing the DOORS on the front of the dumpsters:
* Make sure the “U” brackets at the top and bottom of the door are engaged;
* The retaining bar at the middle of the door is slid into the pipe;
* And the “L” bars at the bottom of the doors dropped into place.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: 208/634-7176
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Roads

Johnson Creek
July 24th dust abatement will be applied to Johnson Creek from Wapiti Meadow Ranch to Yellow Pine.

South Fork
Starting Monday, July 22, the South Fork road will be closed Monday through Friday from 7am to 4pm on weekdays, with no closures over the weekends.
More info:
Map w/info:

YP to Stibnite Road
Update from Midas July 18: The road is still closed Monday through Thursday and open Friday, Saturday and Sunday. Good progress is being made, but it is likely that we still have a few weeks of work ahead.
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Yellow Pine US Mail

June 1st started the 6-day a week mail delivery. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 55 cents
— — — —

Wasp Season

Long legged wasps are out, invading sheds and seeing to come indoors.

Have not had a report of ticks since the hot dry weather arrived.
— — — —

Reminder for people living in bear country:

* Garbage should be stored inside the house or in a secure garage or storage building.
* If garbage cannot be stored in a secure location, a bear-resistant container approved by the Interagency Bear Committee is recommended.
* Avoid using bird feeders from March through November. Birds do not need supplemental feeding this time of year.
* Pet food should not be left outside.
* BBQ grills or anything with a strong odor should not be left out at night.
* Protect gardens, beehives, and compost piles with electric fencing.
* Never intentionally feed bears. A food-conditioned bear may pose a threat to human safety and usually results in the removal of the bear.
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Local Groups:

YPWUA News:

Water Update July 5:

The Boil Order is still in effect.

Idaho Rural Water water will be in on the 19th to look for leaks. Water usage in town is in excess of 57,000 gallons per day. Some have been reminded of the No Lawn Watering request. If we get too much above the 60,000 gallons per day, the town is running the risk of draining the tanks and being out of water.

The yearly Yellow Pine Water Users Shareholders meeting was Sunday July 7th at 10 am in the community hall. (no minutes yet)

Water Update June 7:

1. The “boil order” is still in effect.
2. There is still large water leaks in the system. We continue to look.
3. A grant for $39,000 was approved for improvements to the system.
3. Work is currently being done on the new contact tank.
4. Please, no lawn watering until we find and repair the major leaks.
– Steve Holloway

link to: #4430059 Yellow Pine Water Users Boil Water Notification 4-2-19.pdf

link to: 2018 September Water Department Update.docx
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VYPA News:

Next meeting August 10th 2pm at the Community Hall

Last meeting was July 20, 2019 – minutes forthcoming.

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting Minutes for June 8, 2019

link to: 20190608 Village of Yellow Pine Association Minutes

VYPA Meeting Dates 2019

June 8th; July 20th; August 10th; September 14th – 2pm at the Community Hall.

Last Yellow Pine Harmonica Meetings July 27, 2019 Saturday 2pm at the Community Hall
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YPFD News:

Next Meeting Sept 14 at 10am YPFD meeting in the Fire Hall

Last meeting July 13 – minutes forthcoming.

YPFD June 16, 2019 Meeting minutes

link to: 20190615 YPFD Meeting Notes_Final.docx

Meetings will be held at the fire station at 10am and everyone is welcome to attend. June 15th; July 13th; and Sept 14th (which will also be the budget meeting as well).

Every Sunday 11am – Training

May 10th Burn Permits – contact the YPFD

Pile burning: Dress appropriately, have enough help on hand (people, water and tools) and make a firebreak before you start. Call your local fire protection district chief to let them know you’ll be conducting a debris burn. This saves them from sending emergency responders to your property if they are not needed.

Bring it, Don’t Burn it

For us in Yellow Pine, Jake Strohmeyer, Dist. Ranger with the Boise NF said we can use the area at our transfer station for yard debris and the FS will burn it once a year. Please no furniture, mattresses, construction debris, metal objects, tires or personnel junk. Please only woody yard debris. When using the pile please be mindful of where you place the debris as it should be contained to a manageable burnable area and kept as clean as possible. – JF

Training: Sunday Fire/EMS training has begun. Sundays at 11:00 AM unless otherwise posted. If Jeff F is in town the trainings will be held. All are welcome.

Safety Message: The best place to be during an avalanche, rock fall or a tree fall due to the wind is not there, please use extreme caution and common sense when conditions exist for these scenarios.

“If you are an Adventurist, please do not go out alone in steep areas. The spring thaw is an extremely dangerous time for Avalanches. The freezing and thawing create layers that break away from each other with the slightest disturbance. Scree fields are especially dangerous this time of year because of hidden ice that makes them even more unstable. Please be careful out there.”

YP Helispot: We are working with Valley County Road Department and the Boise National Forest for the rock base for the road leading into the Helispot and the actual Helispot itself. We are also receiving rock for the Fire Hydrants, water tank foundations, etc. The rock will come from the Valdez pit and will be less expensive than having it trucked in from Cascade.

Stop the Bleed Course: This course was well attended in the Fall and Jeff F and Ann F will be presenting another course when the new instructor material comes out. There are “Stop The Bleed” kits at the Tavern in an emergency.

Siren Testing: The YPFD siren will be tested only once this year on the first of May at noon. 3 blasts of the siren is a test, more than 3 is an Emergency.

-JF
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Biz Listings:

Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377

Call for reservations
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The Corner (208) 633-3325

Our hours will be 11-8 every day, except closed on Tuesdays. We are open for breakfast by request and always have good coffee starting at 6am.
The Corner has firewood permits in stock now. 4 cord minimum at $6.25 per cord. Please bring drivers license and cash is preferred, no CC.
The Corner Store will also be open with snacks, groceries, fresh produce, soda, ice and packaged beer. If you know you will be coming in over the summer and need special grocery orders, let me know and I will order it in for you while you are here, 2 deliveries a week. The best way to get a hold of me is to call or stop by and say hello.
Karaoke is back at The Corner! Choose your favorite songs from our online music library and entertain your friends up on stage through our professional sound system.
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Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233

Summer Hours Daily 8am to Close
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Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Tom & Sarah Lanham
156 Yellow Pine Ave, Yellow Pine Id 83677
Website:
Link to FB page:
It’s official starting June 2020 We will be doing trail rides out of Yellow Pine along with summer pack / camping trips to high mountain lakes in the area!

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
Link to website:
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Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430
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Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine

Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, will service Yellow Pine

B&T Safety Solutions LLC
208-271-1600 Based out of Donnelly
Snow removal, cleaning chimneys and stoves, we do cabin staining/chinking as well
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (July 15) overnight low of 53 degrees, partly cloudy sky this morning. Early air traffic. Hummingbirds visiting. Power on at 917am (was off for a total of 17 hours.) Mother hairy woodpecker brought her baby, feeding it bits of suet. Increasing traffic before lunch time. Dark clouds and a rumble of thunder early afternoon. Power off again at 243pm (it had been on for 5 hours and 26 minutes today.) Cloudy and warm mid-afternoon, high of 84 degrees. Power back on at 614pm (off a total of 3 hours and 31 minutes this time.) Mostly cloudy this evening, warm, a bit muggy and slight breeze. A couple dozen juvenile tree swallows perched on the power line calling to the adults flying above. Lightning, thunder, gusty wind and rain at dusk, storm lasted about 20 minutes. Bright almost full moon before midnight.

Tuesday (July 16) overnight low of 48 degrees, low overcast this morning – top of VanMeter socked in. Tree swallows swooping and calling, mother hairy woodpecker w/juvenile and a few finches and pine siskins visiting. Gun shot on the golf course at 1154am. Breaks in the clouds mid-day, partly sunny and mild breezes. Quiet afternoon, very little traffic. Mostly cloudy, mild temperatures and breezy mid-afternoon, high of 81 degrees. Juvenile swallows flying around with the adults. Mostly clear and cooling off after sunset. Young swallows were going in and out of the old nest boxes or perching on top of them, then at dusk they were on the power line. Two does wandering down the side of the road at dusk, looking sleek (no fawns.) Mostly clear at dusk.

Wednesday (July 17) overnight low of 43 degrees, thin overcast sky this morning. Finches, pine siskins, tree swallows and a northern flicker calling. Pine and ground squirrels active. Mostly cloudy and mild temperatures mid-day. Light traffic. Power blipped off and on some time before 250pm. Mostly cloudy and a bit breezy mid-afternoon, high of 83 degrees. Northern flicker calling from various trees in the neighborhood. It was cooling off under mostly cloudy skies early this evening and breezy. Traffic kicking up dust in the neighborhood. After sundown it was partly clear and light breezes.

Thursday (July 18) overnight low of 51 degrees, mostly cloudy this morning. Heavy air traffic early, extra loud planes at 842am, and 920am. Increased traffic and dust in the neighborhood. A hummingbird, some finches and pine siskins visiting. Mostly cloudy mid-day and a little breezy. Young tree swallows landing on the birdhouses and begging for food. Mostly clear, breezy and mild temperatures mid-afternoon, high of 80 degrees. Lots of afternoon traffic (and dust.) Doe with spotted fawn in the neighborhood. YP Ambulance went by early evening, then Life flight landed at the new heli-pad at 730pm, took off at 750pm. Mostly clear and cooling off after sundown.

Friday (July 19) overnight low of 42 degrees, mostly clear sky this morning. Young pine squirrel sounding off from the edge of the forest, young swallows practicing flying, finches and pine siskins visiting. Light breezes, clear and mild temps mid-day, high of 79 degrees. Dusty air from increased traffic this afternoon and evening (loud dirt bike on main street.) Brown-headed cowbirds visiting early afternoon. Lots of juvenile ground squirrels out, appear to be gathering dried grasses for winter. Clear evening, light cool breeze. Red-breasted nuthatch and mama woodpecker with her baby visited after sunset. Clear and cool at dusk.

Saturday (July 20) overnight low of 37 degrees, clear sky this morning. It has been very dry this month, the forest floor is “crunchy”. Cassins finches, little pine siskins and a couple of cowbirds visiting, young pine squirrels calling, tree swallows swooping around catching bugs. Clear and mild mid-day. Calliope hummingbird stopped by. Warming up by mid-afternoon, clear and light breezes, high of 82 degrees. A few cowbirds visiting, later the mama hairy woodpecker and fledgling. Smoky sky to the south and haze of dust in the air this afternoon. Clear at dusk and cooling off. Saturn rising over the ridge to the south east just after dark.

Sunday (July 21) overnight low of 39 degrees, clear sky this morning. Quiet enough to hear the river before the traffic started. Lots of juvenile swallows perched on the power lines calling and adults flying around. Finches, pine siskins, steller jays and pine squirrel visiting. Clear and warm mid-day. Almost constant traffic all afternoon and dusty air. Mid-afternoon it was clear, hot, dry and light breeze, high of 93 degrees. Calliope hummingbird and red-breasted nuthatch visited. Warm mostly clear evening.
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RIP:

Bud Tracy

Buddy Bruce Tracy, 77, of Reno, Nevada, formerly of Yellow Pine, passed away May 18, 2019 in Reno. A Memorial Graveside Service will be held at 10:30 a.m. on Wednesday, July 24, 2019 at the Emmett Cemetery.

Published in Idaho Press Tribune on July 21, 2019
— — — — — — — — — —

Don Caward

December 23, 1940 ~ July 10, 2019

Donald Caward 78, of Cambridge, ID (formerly of Yellow Pine) passed away July 10, 2019. Cremation under the direction of Cremation Society of Idaho.

Published in Idaho Press Tribune on July 18, 2019
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Correction:

John Lance’s ashes will be scattered in Yellow Pine on Aug. 4, not Aug. 3.
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Idaho News:

South Fork Salmon River Road to have closures for roadway rehabilitation project

by CBS 2 News Staff Thursday, July 18th 2019

McCall, Idaho (CBS 2) — The South Fork of the Salmon River Road rehabilitation project will begin July 22, 2019, and run through the 2020 field season, with a winter shutdown on the Boise and Payette National Forests.

The roadway is paved and in need of repairs to include the replacement of broken asphalt, surface drainage issues, and subgrade stability problems.

Beginning July 22, 2019, a point road closure will be in place Monday through Friday from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. on weekdays, with no closures over the weekends.

continued:
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Adams dispatchers step up to aid Valley County

911 staffers to take shifts in Cascade

By Max Silverson for The Star-News July 18, 2019

Five of the six Adams County 911 dispatchers have said they are willing to help fill in at the critically understaffed Valley County Sheriff’s Office Dispatch, Valley County commissioners were told Monday.

Sheriff Patti Bolen also told commissioners that two dispatchers from elsewhere in Idaho, including one from Idaho County, have offered assistance if needed.

The added help means that Valley County will be able to maintain adequate 911 dispatch staff to keep the service running until permanent staff can be hired.

Dispatchers from Adams County will be paid their regular wage plus $2 per hour and travel expenses to make the 67-mile drive to the Valley County Courthouse in Cascade to fill shifts.

The assisting dispatchers will be hired as part time Valley County employees, she said.

Bolen and commissioners hope a long-term solution can be found to replace the stopgap measure of paying outside dispatchers. The proposed 2019-2020 county budget could see a 6% increase in 911 dispatcher pay, commissioners said.

A pay increase may help attract applicants, but the cost of housing in the area is an continuing concern, Bolen said.

“This is the third time since I’ve been sheriff, since 2005, that we’ve been in this position with dispatch,” Bolen said. “This is pretty critical.”

The starting wage for dispatchers in Valley County is $16.77 per hour, while starting dispatchers in Adams County earn $14.97 per hour.

The sheriff’s office is in the process of reviewing three applications for dispatchers. The department needs eight dispatchers to be fully staffed and will be down to one part time and three full time employees at the end of the month, Bolen said.

Valley County dispatch handles calls for the Valley County Sheriff’s Office, McCall Police Department, Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Forest Service, Valley County Search and Rescue, and fire districts in McCall, Donnelly, Cascade and Yellow Pine.

In 2018, Valley County dispatch received about 35,000 calls, generating about 11,000 calls for service.

source:
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Hazards to watch out for on rivers in Idaho

Jul 15, 2019 By Steve Dent KIVI TV

Boise — This summer has already proven deadly on Idaho’s most popular rivers for recreating, with deaths reported on the Boise, Payette and Snake Rivers.

One recent drowning on the Payette River system involved a 27-year-old man who died after his raft went through Big Falls on the South Fork of the Payette Canyon section.

“The population in Boise is going up, kayaking popularity is getting bigger, and I think people underestimate the river,” said Kyle Little of Idaho River Sports.

Every river in Idaho has hazards; some are more dangerous than others, but all should be taken seriously.

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VA Health offers new urgent care benefit for veterans

Jul 18, 2019 By Madeline White KIVI TV

Calling all veterans enrolled in VA Healthcare: getting your urgent care visit covered may have just gotten a whole lot easier.

“We don’t want any veterans not to get the care that they earned the right to get… When you’re sick, you’re sick, and you need to be seen timely,” said Stacie Burtis, Chief, Health Administration Service, Boise VA Medical Center.

… Visit missionact.VA.gov to learn more.

full story:
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Scam Alert:

Beware of scam calls from “Medicare Assistance”. Medicare will not cold call you or ask for personal info.
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BBB explains recent fraud alert on genetic testing scam

Jul 15, 2019 KIVI TV

Genetic testing is rising in popularity. With a few swabs of the cheek, we are learning more than ever about our health and potential risks, but the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has issued a fraud alert on a new genetic testing scam.

“Scammers are popping up across the country, offering Medicare beneficiaries cheek swabs for genetic testing through telemarketing calls, booths at public events, health fairs, and door-to-door visits. They claim this is at no-cost to them and attempt to obtain their Medicare information for identity theft or fraudulent billing purposes,” said Better Business Bureau’s Rebecca Barr.

Barr says this scam is happening in Idaho.

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Mining News:

State officials update Idaho’s 50-year-old mining laws

The rules take effect immediately and come ahead of an Aug. 1 deadline set by the Legislature earlier this year.

Keith Ridler Associated Press July 16, 2019

Boise, Idaho — State officials have approved a rewrite of Idaho’s 50-year-old mining law.

Republican Gov. Brad Little and other members of the Idaho Land Board voted Tuesday to adopt rules intended to give mining companies the financial leeway to mine but also avoid leaving Idaho taxpayers paying for cleanup costs if a mining company goes bankrupt.

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Former Idaho governor seeks investigation of mining company

by Associated Press Monday, July 15th 2019

Boise, Idaho (AP) – Former Idaho Gov. C.L. “Butch” Otter has asked the Trump administration to investigate possible Chinese involvement in a mining company that could compete in Idaho with a Canadian-based company that tapped Otter to serve on its board of directors.

The Idaho Statesman reports in a story on Friday that Otter in a July 9 letter to U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin says he’s concerned cobalt mined in Idaho will be shipped to China.

Otter, a Republican, left office in January after serving 12 years as governor. In February he joined the board of Toronto-based First Cobalt Corp.

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Tips & Advice:

Heat Safety Tips and Resources

During a Heat Wave

How to Respond to Excessive Heat Events

* Slow down: reduce, eliminate or reschedule strenuous activities until the coolest time of the day. Children, seniors and anyone with health problems should stay in the coolest available place, not necessarily indoors.
* Dress for summer. Wear lightweight, loose fitting, light-colored clothing to reflect heat and sunlight.
* Eat light, cool, easy-to-digest foods such as fruit or salads. If you pack food, put it in a cooler or carry an ice pack. Don’t leave it sitting in the sun. Meats and dairy products can spoil quickly in hot weather.
* Drink plenty of water (not very cold), non-alcoholic and decaffeinated fluids, even if you don’t feel thirsty. If you on a fluid restrictive diet or have a problem with fluid retention, consult a physician before increasing consumption of fluids.
* Use air conditioners or spend time in air-conditioned locations such as malls and libraries.
* Use portable electric fans to exhaust hot air from rooms or draw in cooler air.
* Do not direct the flow of portable electric fans toward yourself when room temperature is hotter than 90°F. The dry blowing air will dehydrate you faster, endangering your health.
* Minimize direct exposure to the sun. Sunburn reduces your body’s ability to dissipate heat.
* Take a cool bath or shower.
* Do not take salt tablets unless specified by a physician.
* Check on older, sick, or frail people who may need help responding to the heat. Each year, dozens of children and untold numbers of pets left in parked vehicles die from hyperthermia. Keep your children, disabled adults, and pets safe during tumultuous heat waves.
* Don’t leave valuable electronic equipment, such as cell phones and gps units, sitting in hot cars.
* Make sure rooms are well vented if you are using volatile chemicals.
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Fire Season:

Idaho Fire Info

link:
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NIFC

July 19, 2019

Nationally, 99 large fires have burned more than 1.7 million acres in 10 states. Large fire activity continues in Alaska where 70 large fires are burning. Many fires in Alaska were active yesterday and burned thousands of acres. Large fire activity picked up in Arizona where four new ones were reported. Firefighters contained five large fires yesterday.

link:
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Vader Fire

Salmon-Challis National Forest
14 miles northwest of Stanley, south of Highway 21 on the Middle Fork Ranger District.
InciWeb:
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Forest fire near Stanley burns over 200 acres, shuts down parts of Highway 21

by CBS 2 News Staff Saturday, July 20th 2019

Stanley, Idaho (CBS 2) — Many people were stranded on the side of the road Friday night after a forest fire caused fire crews to close off portions of Highway 21, near Stanley.

A spokeswoman from the US Forest Service in Salmon, Idaho stated the Vader Fire was reported Friday afternoon and is located about 14 miles northwest of Stanley, south of Highway 21 on the Middle Fork Ranger District.

The fire is estimated at 231 acres, as of Saturday morning.

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Canyon Fire

Boise National Forest
14 miles west of Stanley, Idaho
InciWeb:
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Firefighters Continue to Gain on the Canyon Fire

Lowman, Idaho, July 21, 2019 — After yesterday’s effective burn operation along Idaho State Highway (SH) 21, firefighters are continuing to secure the east side, and monitor the area for hot spots. Today, crews are conducting burn operations on the northern perimeter of the fire. The fire is 303 acres and 18 percent contained. Crews are hopeful for larger containment gains this weekend with favorable wind conditions and weather outlook. The fire is expected to remain active within the perimeter for several days as flames move through unburned fuel pockets.

Both lanes of SH 21 between milepost 101- 103 will be open to traffic. Forest Officials are asking drivers to please slowdown in that area as fire traffic will continue to be on the road.

Smoke from the Canyon Fire and other nearby fires may affect the overall air quality of this area. For information on smoke impacts to air quality, visit link.

The Canyon Fire is located southeast of Bull Trout Campground and 14 miles west of Stanley, Idaho, within the Lowman Ranger District. It was reported at approximately 5 p.m., July 14, 2019. Currently, there are 202 personnel on scene.

Fire danger in Central Idaho is high due to high temperatures and drying fuel conditions. Forest Officials encourages the public to be careful with anything that could start a fire and to ensure campfires are completely out and cold to the touch. We can all make a difference in reducing human-caused fires.
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Lightning adds five new fires to Idaho forest, nine total in Salmon-Challis

by CBS 2 News Staff Monday, July 15th 2019

Idaho (CBS 2) — The Salmon-Challis National Forest has detected five new lightning fires over the weekend moving the total up to nine fires that are currently being monitored.

… The Waterfall Fire is located on the east side of the Middle Fork Salmon River, about one mile southeast of the confluence of the Middle Fork Salmon River and Big Creek in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness, in steep, inaccessible terrain. The fire is inactive at this time. The fire has had no significant fire activity in the last four days. Logs and brush in the interior of the fire have burned and the exterior edges of the fire are inactive. Very little smoke, if any, is apparent on the fire; the Middle Fork Peak lookout will continue to monitor the fire area for smoke.

… The Central Idaho Dispatch Zone is at HIGH Fire Danger. There are no fire restrictions at this time. While the SalmonChallis National Forest looks green, fire danger is a concern.

full story:
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Shady Fire

Salmon-Challis National Forest
Two (2) miles east of Seafoam Guard Station in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness on the Middle Fork Ranger District.
InciWeb:
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Thousands of acres burning in Payette County wildland fire

Jul 14, 2019 By Natasha Williams KIVI TV

Fire crews are working to fight two fires in Payette County.

Dispatchers received a call about a fire in the area of Little Willow Road and Dry Creek Road around 11:45 Sunday morning.

Crews say the smaller of the two fires is located off Dry Creek Road and is about 100 acres, but the percent of containment is unknown.

The larger of the two fires is on the west side of Little Willow Road and is estimated to be 5,000 acres and growing. Fire officials have not yet been able to contain the larger fire.

There are nine fire departments and air support working to fight both fires.

source:
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Boise District BLM Fire Update

July 15, 2019 Jared Jablonski 208-384-3378

Four of the seven wildfires ignited over the past few days have been controlled and fire crews have made substantial progress on the remaining three. This will be the last news release for these fires unless significant activity occurs.

Canmay Fire
Location: approximately eight miles north of Mountain Home, Id near the intersection of Canyon Creek and Mayfield roads
Size: mapped at 1,010 acres
Containment: 7/13 at 11:59 p.m.
Control: estimated 7/15 at 6 p.m.
Resources: two Boise BLM engines
Fire behavior: smoldering
Structures threatened: none
Cause: lightning

Heart Fire
Location: approximately fifteen miles southeast of Weiser, Id near Heart Gulch
Size: mapped at 1529 acres
Containment: estimated 7/15 at 8 p.m.
Control: estimated 7/16 at 8 p.m.
Resources: three Boise BLM engines, two Vale BLM engines, two Boise BLM dozers, SRV-1 hand crew, SRV-9 hand crew, Payette Engine 421 and FS Engine 413
Fire behavior: smoldering
Structures threatened: none
Cause: lightning

Alkie Fire
Location: approximately 20 miles southeast of Weiser, Id near Dry Creek
Size: mapped at 86 acres
Containment: 7/15 at 12 noon
Control: estimated 7/15 at 8 p.m.
Resources: two Boise BLM engines
Fire behavior: smoldering
Structures threatened: none
Cause: lightning
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Public Lands:

South Fork Salmon River Road to have Closures for Roadway Rehabilitation Project Beginning July 22

McCall, ID, July 18, 2019 – The South Fork of the Salmon River Road rehabilitation project will begin July 22, 2019 and run through the 2020 field season, with a winter shutdown on the Boise and Payette National Forests. The roadway is paved and in need of repairs to include the replacement of broken asphalt, surface drainage issues, and subgrade stability problems.

Beginning July 22, 2019, a point road closure will be in place Monday through Friday from 7:00a.m. to 4:00 pm on weekdays, with no closures over the weekends. Access to all sites along the river will remain open, but the route to reach those sites will be determined by the point closure location. The first point closure location will be just south of Reed Ranch beginning July 22nd.

The Payette National Forest will produce and distribute a weekly newsletter to help travelers determine the location of the point closure, and which route to use to reach desired sites along the river. Additionally, a webpage has been developed to convey this same information. Self-subscribe to the newsletter by singing up at (link), and visit the project web site at (link)

Things to know about the point closure site:

· The point closure location will dictate if the Warm Lake route, or the Lick Creek route to the South Fork of the Salmon River is to be taken to access sites along the river.

· The closure sites will change on a weekly basis, and will not always be adjacent to the last closure site. Refer to the current weekly newsletter or the project website to determine the closure point and access for each week.

· Use the existing mile post markers to become familiar with the road. These mile post markers will be used to note where the current point closure is located.

The South Fork Salmon River Road was paved in 1993 as a single track road in order to assist in the prevention of sediment getting into the river and creating problems for ESA Listed Summer Chinook Salmon. Minor road work, and periodically, major road reconstruction following a road damaging event, has been conducted since 1993, but this is the first full rehabilitation project that will take place on the road.

To learn more about the history of the South Fork of the Salmon River, and stewardship efforts visit this link:

Brian Harris
Public Affairs Officer
Payette National Forest
p: 208-634-0784
c: 208-634-6945
brian.d.harris@usda.gov
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Critter News:

Pet talk – Chewing Disorders In Dogs

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt July 19, 2019

There is a common chewing disorder in dogs involving the muscles that are used in chewing. These muscles are called the muscles of mastication, and the disease is called masticatory myositis. The muscles of the head that are used for chewing are inflamed and attacked by the immune system. The main muscles involved are the temporalis muscles, which are in the forehead region above and beside the eyes, and the masseter muscles, which are in the cheek area. The inflammation is usually of sudden onset and causes severe pain.

Masticatory myositis is in immune-mediated disease. The dog’s own immune system attacks various components of the muscles. This group of muscles has unique origin in the embryo and is different from other skeletal muscles.

Acute myositis usually causes symmetrical swelling and pain of the muscles. If the muscles become terribly swollen, one or both eyes may bulge. The dog will always be in severe pain and reluctant to open the mouth. Fever, lethargy, decreased appetite and enlargement of nearby lymph nodes may also occur. Signs may last two to three weeks.

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Camera catches grizzly bear foraging with cubs in Idaho wilderness

KTVB July 18, 2019

Cameras operated by the Idaho Department of Fish and Game caught a grizzly bear and her two cubs foraging in the Island Park area of eastern Idaho.

The female adult bear can be seen investigating a scent in a small tree, while her young cubs attempt to help.

Fish and Game officials – curious if the bear had cubs – say they placed a scent on top of the tree, hoping to draw her out of her den.

The area where the camera is located is on Forest Service lands far from any human interaction, according to IDFG, and researchers had to hike several miles to get there.

video:

source:
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Mountain lion relocated from public park

July 19, 2019 Local News 8


On July 18, a young male mountain lion ran up a tree in a public park in Banida , Idaho, after being spooked out of some cover on an adjacent property by a landowner and his dog. The healthy mountain lion was tranquilized and transported to a remote location in southeast Idaho where it was released.

Banida, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – Idaho Department of Fish and Game personnel removed a mountain lion from a public park in the small community of Banida in Franklin County Thursday.

At approximately 12:30 p.m., Fish and Game conservation officers responded to a report of a mountain lion in a tree in a 3-acre park in Banida.

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CDC: Backyard chickens, pig ear dog treats still making people sick

Two people have died, hundreds ill

By Theresa Waldrop Jul 19, 2019 Local News 8

Two people have died and hundreds more have become ill in an ongoing outbreak of salmonella linked to backyard chickens, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Friday.

The news came as the CDC also said a salmonella outbreak traced to pig ear dog treats continues to sicken people in multiple states.

Since the illnesses related to backyard poultry began January 1, more than 768 people in 48 states have become ill, the CDC said. That number includes 489 who were diagnosed since June 13, the agency said in a release. One death was reported in Ohio, and one in Texas.

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Gem County mosquitoes test positive for West Nile Virus

by CBS 2 News Staff Monday, July 15th 2019

Gem County, Idaho (CBS 2 News Staff) — Mosquitoes trapped in Gem County have tested positive for the West Nile virus. The mosquitoes carrying the virus in Gem County were trapped outside of the Gem County Mosquito Abatement District near the Payette County border.

This area is not located inside a mosquito abatement district.

Residents are encouraged to take extra precautions to avoid being bitten. Precautions include draining any standing water on your property and wearing repellent when outdoors.

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Fish & Game News:

Escape the summer heat by fishing in the mountains

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Supervisor
Wednesday, July 17, 2019

https://idfg.idaho.gov/files/mountain-lake-fishingq345jpeg
Roger Phillips/Idaho Fish and Game

There are thousands of mountain lakes in Idaho that offer cool temperatures and great fishing

Distant mountain peaks loom in the summer heat and stand like a cool oasis for anglers. Hidden in the bowls, basins and valleys are many lakes brimming with trout and waiting for intrepid anglers.

Idaho has many mountain ranges, nearly all of which have lakes that contain fish. Idaho Fish and Game has long been committed to keeping those lakes stocked with fish by a variety of methods, including aircraft, horseback and backpack.

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Check out summer birding in Idaho’s sagebrush country

By Hilary Turner, Road Ecology Wildlife Technician
Wednesday, July 10, 2019

https://idfg.idaho.gov/files/sage-thrasher-robert-l-kothenbeuteljpg
sage thrasher Robert L Kothenbeutel

Sagebrush country is home to a variety of songbirds and other birds

Southern Idaho is a wonderful place to spend the summer as a birder. With diverse habitats there is no shortage of places to explore the avifauna. A few of my favorite places to watch birds during the summer are in the sagebrush steppe, juniper foothills, and Snake River riparian corridors.

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More F&G News Releases

link:
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Fun Critter Stuff:

Deer spotted with ‘rare batch of triplets’ – one of them is albino

by Brandon Bailey Monday, July 1st 2019


Photo Credit: Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks

Miles City, MT — Tracy Baker spotted a truly rare sight recently when she captured a mother deer with triplets in Montana.

A deer having triplets is rare by itself, but one of the triplets was albino.

“Only two fawns are visible in the picture, but in the span of a few minutes, the doe had a third fawn, making for a rare batch of triplets,” said Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks – Region 7 on Facebook.

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Seasonal Humor:

SummerCampingGhosts-a
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Idaho History July 21, 2019

Wilbur Wiles

(part 2)

Big Creek / Edwardsburg

Wilbur Wiles and Maurice G. Hornocker

Stalking the Mountain Lion – to Save Him

Article and photographs by Maurice G. Hornocker, Ph.D.
National Geographic Society November 1969

1969NatGeo2-a
Sharpening his skills, a cub cuffs his litter mate in mock battle. As an adult, the mountain lion – also known by such names as panther, puma, and cougar – hunts with cunning, strength, and agility. Yet man’s encroachment on his wild domain takes alarming toll. To help save the species, the author – leader of the Idaho Cooperative Wildlife Research Unit – set out to bare the secrets of the big predator’s solitary way of life.

Still panting from the chase through the snow of Idaho’s Salmon River Mountains, I pulled the gun out of my backpack. The barrel stung my hands in the cold, and my breath frosted the breech as I sighted into a fir tree 30 feet away.

“Careful!” gasped my companion, Wilbur Wiles. “Don’t rush!”

Poised on a branch, staring down at her pursuers, was our target – a hundred-pound mountain lion.

We had struggled after the lion on snowshoes all morning, and now her baleful gaze was fixed upon us, anticipating our next move. Wilbur’s two redbone tracking hounds bawled in a frenzy of excitement at the base of the tree.

When the big cat shifted position on the branch, I held my breath and fired. The lion jerked at the shot, bolted headfirst down the trunk, and then leaped far out over the clamoring hounds. She hit the ground, bounded down a steep brushy ravine, and was gone, the dogs in barking pursuit.

“You hit her!” Wilbur shouted. “She won’t get far!”

We knew the lion couldn’t escape because my gun had fired not a bullet but an aluminum dart containing a tranquilizing drug. It would, in a few minutes, render the animal completely manageable. The drugging was part of a long-term study of the mountain lion (Felis concolor), one of America’s most mysterious and fascinating animals.

For five years, starting in 1964, Wilbur and I have tranquilized, examined, weighed, marked, and released 46 different lions, many of them again and again, to learn about their lives, their movements, and their habits. We have trekked more than 5,000 miles, much of the time on snowshoes, to follow the big cats deep into the Idaho Primitive Area, a 1.2-million-acre federal preserve of wilderness just south of the Salmon River in the central part of the state.

1969NatGeo5-a
Once at home across the continent, the mountain lion now hangs on in areas where man rarely ventures. Zoologists estimate 4,000 to 6,500 roam fastnesses of the western United States; 100 to 300 prowl Florida’s Everglades. For his study, the author chose a 200-square-mile region in the Idaho Primitive Area. The team trekked more than 5,000 miles, searching for the lion in winter months.

1969NatGeo6-a
Snowshoes ready and tracking dogs at his heels, Mr. Wiles slogs across a snowy slope.

Flashing Claws Wound a Pursuer

“I hear the dogs!” Wilbur yelled. That meant they had caught up with the lion and were holding her at bay.

I half-climbed, half-leaped off the rocky outcrop where I had fired the shot, and we plunged into the ravine after the dogs. Fighting our way through hip-deep snow, we finally reached the two hounds, Red and Ranger. One was baying at the base of a cliff; the other was about 15 feet above him on a ledge, barking at the mouth of a small cave.

“The lion must be up there in the cave,” I said to Wilbur. “I don’t think she’ll come out, but she may.”

I slipped off my pack, caught Red, and tied him to a tree. Afraid that the more aggressive Ranger would enter the cave and be killed, I climbed to the ledge and crawled out on it to snap a chain on the still-baying hound.

A low growl came from the darkness of the cave. Backing slowly away, I led Ranger along the ledge and down to the ravine’s brushy floor. As I tied him, I noticed that the side of his head and one of his ears were covered with blood. He had barely escaped death from a swipe of slashing claws.

All our experience with mountain lions, before this incident and since, has indicated that they rarely attack men, but almost invariably try to escape instead.

Not sure my shot had taken effect, I loaded my dart gun before climbing to the cave again. I also took a flashlight with me.

Cautiously I lifted myself over a rim and peered inside – to see the lion crouched a few feet away. The amber eyes glared out at me. When I turned on my flashlight, however, I could see that her gaze was unsteady, that saliva was dripping from her lips. Both were signs that my shot had gone true and the befuddled female was under the delayed effects of the tranquilizer.

1969NatGeo3-a1
Benevolent hunter, the author loads a tranquilizer dart after spotting the mountain lion cornered in a rocky niche (below).
1969NatGeo4-a

1969NatGeo3-a2
Each wool-tufted dart slips into a shell for firing from a specially designed gun. When the drug takes effect, the still-conscious but indifferent lion will allow himself to be examined, weighed, and tagged – another step in a five-year-old study of North America’s great cat. In the rugged mountainland of Idaho, Dr. Hornocker and his assistant Wilbur Wiles have recorded the hunting, traveling, and social habits of 46 individual mountain lions. Wilbur Wiles Author Maurice G. Hornocker © N.G.S.

Lioness Awake During Tagging

“She’s ready to handle,” I called down to Wilbur. “Come on up.”

While Wilbur struggled up to the ledge with the marking kit, tape measure, and weighing scales, I crawled into the cave and, gripping the big animal by the scruff of the neck and a foreleg, laboriously dragged her to the cave’s entrance.

We weighed her (104 pounds) and took a series of measurements: her length, nose to tip of tail (6 feet 3 inches); her standing height at the shoulders (2 feet 6 inches). We marked her with numbered metal ear tags and with brightly colored plastic ear streamers. In addition, we slipped a collar bearing a colored, numbered pendant around her neck. Finally, we tattooed both ears, using a clamp that left numbers permanently etched on her skin – just in case the other markers were lost.

Throughout the process, the female remained awake; she managed to stand, peered about, and even tried to walk away. All the tranquilizer did was make her groggy, so we could work on her without fear that she would attack. When we finished, we half-pushed, half-led her back into the warmth and dryness of the cave and left her there. The drug would wear off in another 20 minutes or so with no ill effects.

The primitive area was ideal for our study. Remote and roadless, it sustains a healthy lion population relatively undisturbed by human intrusion, partly because its granite crags and deep-slashed valleys represent the greatest topographical relief in all of Idaho. Place names reflect the plight of early settlers in this harsh country: Disappointment Creek … Starvation Creek … Hungry Creek.

To get the most seclusion, I had chosen the Big Creek drainage – a territory of about 200 square miles in the middle of the primitive area. This wilderness became our laboratory for concentrated research.

We worked during the winter, from late November to early May. The tracks were easier to follow in the snow, and deep snow at higher elevations confined the lions and their prey – mainly deer and elk – to a smaller sector of their total range.

Shadows were deepening by the time we had finished examining the mountain lion and returned her to the cave. At least five miles lay between us and our camp at Waterfall Creek, at the eastern edge of our study area.

It was long after dark when we arrived at camp. Men and dogs had to be feel and equipment cleaned for the next day. At midnight, when we crawled into our down-filled sleeping bags, I wondered which lion or family of lions we might capture tomorrow – and thus fit another piece of information into the puzzle of their life history.

Mother and cub take to a tree

1969NatGeo8-a
Frightened by pursuing hounds, a lioness scrambled 60 feet up this pine, leading her cub who climbed to a branch even higher.

1969NatGeo7-a1
Frenzied baying of Ranger, one of two redbone tracking hounds on the research team, trees a big cat for the tranquilizing gun of Mr. Wiles (above). Barking dogs so terrify mountain lions that they have been known to leap to limbs 18 feet from the ground. In their eagerness to get to the cats, the hounds sometimes suffer cuts from slashing claws.
1969NatGeo7-a2

Mountain lions may breed at any time of year. After mating, the male goes his way, and some 90 days later the female gives birth; she may produce as many as six kittens in a single litter. To the mother alone goes the responsibility of protecting, feeding, and training the young.

Snug in a den, the mother suckles her cubs and affectionately eyes their early antics – spitting, growling, hissing, scratching, and tumbling about. When the rambunctious youngsters grow older, the mother takes them, one at a time, on training hunts.

Both male and female mountain lions stake out their own hunting territories, marking boundaries with mounds of pine needles or brush scented with urine. Offspring strike out on their own at about two years of age, seeking a private range for forays as lone hunters.

Project Sparked by Grizzly Study

My interest in the mountain lion began during my long association with Drs. John and Frank Craighead. John was my adviser when I attended the University of Montana, and I worked with them both on a study of grizzly bears in Yellowstone National Park.

Experience gained on that difficult and demanding research project seemed to make a thorough study of the mountain lion a fitting sequel. I was enthusiastic, therefore. when officials of the Idaho Fish and Game Department and the University of Idaho asked me if I would conduct such a project in their state.

Dr. Ian MacTaggart Cowan of the University of British Columbia was interested in the research, and with his enthusiastic support a United States-Canadian cooperative project was arranged. Other organizations, notably the American Museum of Natural History, the Boone and Crockett Club, and the New York Zoological Society, helped from the beginning. The research is currently being carried out at the University of Idaho under the auspices of the Idaho Cooperative Wildlife Research Unit, which I have served as leader since January 1968.

Range Once Spanned Two Continents

The need for a scientific study of this animal and its relationship to its environment was obvious. The “American lion” once ranged over much of North and South America. In this country. records show that it lived in nearly every state and the District of Columbia.

Indeed, the lion formerly had the widest distribution of any single species of mammal in the Western Hemisphere. And it was, and is, the most adaptable. Lions were found in mountains, deserts, coastal forests, subalpine forests, swamps. and in prairie environments, from British Columbia in Canada to Patagonia near the tip of South America.

From all those wanderings came the mountain lion’s many names: cougar, a French corruption of a Tupi Indian word: puma. from the Incas of Peru; catamount (from cat-a-mountain), a twangy New England expression; panther, the Greek word for leopard: painter, a U. S. colloquialism for panther; and leon, used through much of Spanish America.

Big Cats Flee From Barking Dogs

Because it sometimes killed livestock, early settlers regarded the big cat as an enemy to be destroyed at every opportunity. Even Theodore Roosevelt, an avid conservationist. wrote of the “big horse-killing cat, the destroyer of the deer, the lord of stealthy murder, facing his doom with a heart both craven and cruel.” In fact, individual animals sometimes learn to kill domestic stock and must be destroyed. But as a species, the lion poses little threat to the livestock industry.

Indiscriminate killing, aggravated by a now-disfavored bounty system, has taken a fearful toll. Today, lions in the United States are confined largely to rugged mountainous areas in our Western and Southwestern States. The New York Zoological Society. in a recent report, placed the total in the West at between 4,000 and 6.500 – and there is evidence that the number may be dwindling even further. since 1965, however, five Western States – Colorado, Washington, Utah, Nevada, and Oregon – have classified the mountain lion as a game animal and offered it some protection. The same is true in British Columbia.

Mountain lions are extremely secretive; they have aptly been termed the “ghosts of North America.” Now they inhabit rugged, inaccessible wilderness country. They cannot be observed from a distance or from a blind, as can many other wild species, and certainly they cannot be approached readily, as can some of the big cats in Africa and Asia. Only by tracking the lions long distances on foot, much of it on snowshoes, and by capturing and recapturing them, could we learn the facts of mountain lion life.

In preliminary investigations in Montana, I satisfied myself that the big cats could be followed and captured alive with the aid of trained hounds. Lions have an inherent fear of dogs – barking dogs – and while adults are apable of killing a single dog quite easily, they will climb a tree to escape this noisy tormentor. Though they can outrun the average dog for short distances, they are no match for his staying power in a long chase.

Kodachromes by Wilbur Wiles and Maurice G. Hornocker

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Armful of defused dynamite, a 52-pound lion kitten rests placidly in the author’s grip. He lugs it to a nylon net for weighing on spring scales hung from a tree.

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Formidable weapons in the lion’s arsenal, the powerful jaws of this adult male can snap the neck of a deer with a single bite. The canines of an enormous 227-pounder killed by Theodore Roosevelt in 1901 measured 1 1/2 inches long.

Search for a Skilled Woodsman

With the means of capturing and handling the lions worked out, I turned my attention to finding an assistant. I realized that this choice could make or break the project. He had to be a man accomplished in woodcraft and willing to share weeks and months of loneliness and hardship.

Early in my search I heard of Wilbur Wiles, whose skill as a woodsman and lion hunter was common knowledge in central Idaho. I decided to seek him out.

In July 1964, I headed my pickup truck east from the mountain resort of McCall, which was to become my home, into the jumble of rugged ranges. My destination was Wilbur Wiles’s home near Big Creek Ranger Station, where he had a small opal mine.

It was late in the day when I reached Wilbur’s cabin. A tall, slender man in his late forties opened the door at my knock. Almost before I could introduce myself, he said, “C’mon in. The coffee’s about ready.” Over steaming mugs of it I outlined my ideas for the study. He enthusiastically agreed to assist me, and we talked far into the night, making plans for the first winter.

Five long winters of study have gone by since that initial meeting with Wilbur Wiles. Our preparations for each season have been arduous. Because we had to work on foot, we set up several camps along Big Creek and its tributaries. Wall tents sheltered us at Rush Creek, Cave Creek, and Waterfall Creek. Beside Coxey Creek we renovated a dilapidated cabin once used by prospectors. Wilbur’s own cabin on Monumental Creek was our other camp in the upper Big Creek watershed.

We made our headquarters at the Taylor Ranch, a 65-acre private property on lower Big Creek. That way we could cover the entire study area, and never be more than a few miles from a camp when darkness fell.

I flew winter supplies and research equipment in ahead of the snow each year, landing at Big Creek Ranger Station and the Taylor Ranch. Wilbur used three packhorses to carry the tents, stoves, pots and pans, tools, and sleeping bags to the campsites.

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Earmarked for study, a lion wears a tattooed number. Metal ear tags, colored ear streamers, and numbered collars may fail to provide permanent identification; some lions marked one winter lost all tags by the next.

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Drowsy under examination, a mature female has her feet measured by Mr. Wiles. The team kept careful records of size and weight as they captured and recaptured the same cats.

The feet of mountain lions, like those of their domestic cousins, are well padded for silence when stalking their prey. Often they place their hind feet in the imprints of their forefeet, thus lessening the possibility of snapping a twig or dislodging a stone.

Frozen Meat Supply Prepared

Every year we laid in more than a ton of dog food, caching it carefully against weather, rodents, and marauding bears. We put dried foods in waterproof bags and hung them from poles tied between trees, buried canned goods to prevent them from freezing, and stored cords of firewood.

In late autumn of each year, we shot two deer and an elk and distributed the meat among the camps; wrapped securely in canvas, it would hang frozen through the winter, ready to be thawed whenever we needed it.

By the end of our fifth season, the story of the mountain lion was taking form. We found that the population was stable and that no more than 10 adults were full-time winter residents in the 200-square-mile study area. Of the 36 other lions we studied, 27 were kittens and 9 were transients. Every year two or three new litters, numbering two or three kittens each, were born.

The resident adults were firmly established on territories, and each had a home range to which it confined itself. The data suggest that this winter home-range size varies from 5 to 25 square miles for females; males utilize an area of 15 to 30 square miles.

Each winter half a dozen additional lions might enter the study area, but not to stay. Wandering lions of both sexes appear to know when they are in another lion’s home ground. The resident scrapes together leaves, twigs, or pine needles into mounds four to six inches high, then urinates on them, to make sight and scent markers delineating its territory.

We found such “scrapes” under trees, on ridges, and at lion crossings, where the markers act as traffic lights on regularly traveled paths. Whenever we tracked a newcomer to one of the scrapes, the trail showed that the lion had abruptly changed its course, knowing that another lion or family was in the vicinity, and retraced its route for two or three miles before trying a different area.

I call this cooperative behavior “mutual avoidance,” and believe its purpose is to protect the mountain lion as a species. Because they are solitary predators, lions have to depend on their physical well-being, their agility, to survive; consequently, fighting in defense of their territory, as do some gregarious species such as wolves, is a luxury lions cannot afford. An injured wolf may survive because he is a member of the pack; an injured solitary lion most likely would starve.

Our technique of capturing and recapturing individual lions, combined with tracking them for hundreds of miles, told us many things about the habits of these great predators. We found that mature females averaged about 100 pounds and males in the neighborhood of 150. The males varied more in weight; the lightest male we weighed was 130 pounds; the heaviest, 181.

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Crouched at cliff edge, a tagged lion appears resigned after his ninth capture. Winterized with the warmth of his luxuriant fur, he will brave the iciest streams in pursuit of prey. In summer the cougar sheds this thick pelage in favor of a sleeker, cooler coat.

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Power in motion, a mountain lion lopes through the snow. One of the fastest animals for a short stretch, the cougar reaches blurring speed almost the second he springs. His stealth and powerful leap enable him to bring down animals the size of elk. Deer and elk provide the bulk of his winter food in the Idaho Primitive Area, but he also dines on snowshoe hares, wood rats, mice, squirrels, and porcupines – quills and all.

Adults Scorn the Social Life

We learned that mountain lions are strictly solitary creatures, with social tolerance being exhibited by males and females only during the brief breeding periods, and by females and young during the longer period of juvenile dependency.

The big cats, like their small domestic cousins, are capable of breeding at any season of the year. In central Idaho, however, breeding is limited largely to winter and early spring. A male and female will pair and remain together for two weeks or perhaps longer. They then part, and the male plays no further role in the family life.

After a gestation period of about 90 days the spotted young, numbering one to a maximum of six (the largest litter we observed was three) are born in a cave or in a den under a windfall. They are helpless at birth, but grow quite rapidly. The mother brings food to them in addition to providing milk.

I am not certain when they leave the den in which they were born, but it is probably at about two months of age. After this they may utilize different temporary dens and caves while the mother forages for food, but they never again depend upon a home den.

Drugging Can Be Deceptive

Our work was not accomplished without incident. Once we had completed the arduous physical task of tracking down, treeing, and drugging an animal, we usually had to climb to it, tie a rope around a back leg, and lower it to the ground. At first I had experimented with immobilizing drugs, but these presented too much danger to the mountain lions – immobilized cats fell from the trees and were subject to injury. The tranquilizing drug I settled on merely calmed the animals, instead of immobilizing them, and they remained in the trees.

Sometimes it was difficult to tell if a cat actually was drugged and safe to approach.

Usually they gave some telltale indication – drooling, jerky head movements, unsteady eyes—but sometimes we were fooled. Early in the study, in an unnamed valley adjacent to Cave Creek on the northern side of the study area, we treed a large tawny male in a half-rotten fir that leaned far out over a cliff. I fired a drug-laden dart into his hip and after ten minutes or so was sure he was ready to lower to the ground.

Strapping on the tree-climbing spurs, I began to approach him. Fully occupied with climbing, I could not keep watch on the big cat 30 feet above me. And I tried not to notice the cliff face that fell away below.

I could hear the lion breathing as I got near. Just as I started to glance up, Wilbur shouted, “Watch out, he’s coming down!”

By hugging the trunk, I managed to move to my left at his warning – only to find myself staring into the face of the lion no more than three feet away. He had half-slipped, half-leaped to a lower limb while I was climbing. I stared into his chilling, amber eyes, then realized that his gaze was unsteady. The animal was partially drugged.

I dug a spur into the tree and pushed myself up. At that, the big cat literally dived down the trunk, tearing off chunks of bark with his gripping claws. He sprang from the tree and sailed like a huge flying squirrel seven feet long onto the snow at the cliff’s edge. With another bound, the lion swung into a labyrinth of rocks behind us.

“Turn the dogs loose,” I yelled to Wilbur. Red and Ranger lined out on his trail, and soon their baying told us they had treed him again. Later, as we worked over the cat now fully drugged by the dart, Wilbur chuckled, “Looked as though you two were trying to stare each other down.”

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Docile as a lamb, a drooling 151-pound cat swings down from a tree after receiving a tranquilizing drug some ten minutes earlier. Mr. Wiles, wearing tree-climbing spurs, attached the rope, looping it over a limb, and literally pushed the animal off its perch. Now he moves at top speed to prevent injury to the lion, controlling the rope with one hand and lowering the big male to the ground in a matter of seconds.

Herds Benefit From Predation

One of the important objectives of our work has been to determine the effects of lion predation on their main sources of winter food – in this area, elk and mule deer. By examining carcasses and bones, we have found that the lions kill a greater proportion of the young and the very old – the easiest prey. Seventy-five percent of the elk killed were under 1 1/2 years of age or over 9 1/2. Sixty-two percent cent of the deer were in these age classes.

This information indicates that lions cull the poorest specimens from herds – the infirm and the aged – with the result that the strongest, the best examples survive. Further, the very young and the very old are the first to show the effects of malnutrition, and our studies revealed that half of the animals killed by lions were suffering nutritional deficiencies, and thus were more vulnerable.

Our painstakingly established facts – a stable lion population, increasing elk and deer populations, overused winter food supply for elk and deer, particularly the most important plants (bitter brush and mountain mahogany) – allow us to reach but one conclusion: Lion predation is beneficial to the herds in such an environment. Grazing animals tend to increase in numbers to the point of eating themselves out of food; when this occurs, catastrophic winter die-offs result. Many years are required to restore the vegetation and, in turn, the animal populations.

Predation by mountain lions may not be able to control or hold down these populations, but it is an age-old force which tends to lessen the frequency of violent fluctuations in the number of animals the lions prey upon.

The lions’ predation has one other effect; it keeps the deer and elk herds on the move, a desirable result when food is scarce on the limited winter ranges. When a kill is made, the reaction of a herd is striking, as we have often seen. The deer and elk immediately abandon that area and move to new feeding grounds, reducing the chances of their eating themselves out of available food.

Not all lions are winners in their encounters with deer and elk. When you consider the relative sizes of an elk, which may weigh as much as 1,000 pounds, and a lion, it is not surprising that some attacking lions are injured, even killed.

In December 1967 near Rush Creek, ‘Wilbur came upon a female which had been injured by an elk. Tracks showed that she had stalked a herd of four or five elk before attacking what was probably a young bull. The two had skidded down a steep slope and crashed into a tree. The elk escaped. When Wilbur treed the female, she had blood on her mouth and head from the collision, but appeared to be all right otherwise.

Three weeks later he captured her again, about four miles away beside Big Creek. It was obvious something was wrong with her. She was terribly thin and could hardly climb. Wilbur drugged her and took her from the tree. To his horror he found that she had a broken jaw and that her lower canines had been torn out. In addition she had severe puncture wounds in a shoulder and hind leg from the elk’s antlers. For three weeks the animal had suffered and starved. He had to shoot her to end the suffering.

The lions hunted as much in daylight as they did at night, if not more, and their diet was not limited to big-game animals. From their droppings, we discovered that they killed and ate snowshoe hares, wood rats, mice, squirrels, raccoons, coyotes. and, in one case, an entire meal of nothing but grasshoppers! So it became increasingly apparent that the lions, like most predators, were eating what was most easily obtainable.

Twin Cubs Join Family Circle

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Polka-dotted kittens, 1 1/2 months old, romp with the author’s daughter Karen. The Division of Wildlife Services office in Boise, Idaho, presented the two males to the Hornocker family to aid in the lion research. Named Tommy and Flopsy, the orphans flourished on a diet of baby formula and, later, horse meat. Distinct spots and tail rings last about four months.

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Rumbling purrs greet Karen as she pets Tommy and Flopsy. At 15 months of age their spots barely show. The “talk” of the kittens helped the author discover how mountain lions communicate in the wild. Various whistle-like sounds, resembling bird calls, indicated alarm or pleasure.

While in the field, I ordinarily called my wife Shirley in McCall about every two weeks by radiotelephone. She surprised me on one call with the announcement, “We have two baby lions!” The state office of the Division of Wildlife Services, United States Bureau of Sport Fisheries and Wildlife, had presented them to us for study.

The kittens, both males, grew and flourished as Shirley fed them baby formula, oatmeal, and vitamins. Our three daughters promptly named the orphans Tommy and Flopsy (preceding pages). After they reached 2 1/2 months, we moved both of them into an outdoor enclosure and changed their diet to raw horse meat, hide, and bone.

Tommy and Flopsy taught me how mountain lions communicate. They started using different whistle-like sounds to greet me or call each other. A warbling note was a greeting: a piercing one, an alarm; and short, intense tones meant “Come here!”

I am certain lions “talk” in the wild by means of these whistle-like sounds produced with their vocal cords. It had been a mystery to us how pairs or families, hunting together, could separate – one dropping into a basin, the other circling a ridge – and then join each other at some seemingly predetermined spot to continue the hunt. Since Wilbur and I first recognized this sound, we have heard it in the wild a number of times. The captive lions did not “scream,” and we have never heard anything like a scream in the wild. Lions make many sounds similar to those of house cats but, of course, much louder.

Next Goal: To Wire Lions for Sound

One day last April we climbed out of a canyon and, unshouldering our packs, leaned back in the soft sunshine. Spring had come early this year to the primitive area, and our season’s work was coming to an end.

The south-facing slopes were green with new grass, and far up the ridge we heard the hooting of a male blue grouse. High above a cliff across the canyon, a pair of ravens courted. diving and rolling over and over against the azure sky. The golden eagles that had soared in courtship on bright February afternoons were now nesting, and soon steelhead trout would enter the stream to spawn, ending their long journey up the Columbia, Snake, and Salmon Rivers from the sea.

As we dropped off the ridge into our lower Rush Creek camp, I found myself looking forward to next season’s work. I hope to attach tiny radio transmitters to our established residents and follow them throughout the year. For while we have learned much about these great animals in winter, we need to learn more about them and their year-round relationships with other species. As Wilbur put it, “The more a man learns, the more he learns he doesn’t know.” And we need to know in order to preserve and manage this splendid animal – an integral and important part of the wilderness environment and a true vestige of primitive America.

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THE END

source: 1969 National Geographic (10 meg file, article starts on page 4)
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Link to Wilbur Wiles (part 1)
Link to Wilbur Wiles (part 2)
Link to Wilbur Wiles (part 3)
Link to more Big Creek / Edwardsburg stories
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page updated September 11, 2022