Monthly Archives: August 2019

Fire Weather Watch Sept 1, 2019

Yellow Pine Forecast

Fire Weather Watch Sept 1, 2019

Fire Weather Watch

URGENT - FIRE WEATHER MESSAGE
National Weather Service Boise ID
302 PM MDT Sat Aug 31 2019

...GUSTY WINDS WITH VERY DRY CONDITIONS SUNDAY AFTERNOON...

.Well above normal temperatures will persist on Sunday while the
airmass continues to dry. Additionally, gusty southwest winds are
expected to develop Sunday afternoon. The combination of very low
relative humidities and gusty winds may lead to critical fire
weather conditions.

Eastern Payette National Forest-Northern Boise National Forest-
Southern Boise National Forest/Western Sawtooth National Forest-
302 PM MDT Sat Aug 31 2019

...FIRE WEATHER WATCH IN EFFECT FROM SUNDAY AFTERNOON THROUGH
SUNDAY EVENING FOR GUSTY WINDS AND LOW RELATIVE HUMIDITIES FOR
EASTERN PAYETTE NATIONAL FOREST...NORTHERN BOISE NATIONAL FOREST
AND SOUTHERN BOISE/WESTERN SAWTOOTH NATIONAL FORESTS...WHICH ARE
FIRE WEATHER ZONES 402...403 AND 421...

The National Weather Service in Boise has issued a Fire Weather
Watch, which is in effect from Sunday afternoon through Sunday
evening.

* WINDS...Sustained winds of 15 mph with gusts to 25 mph across
  ridges and upper slopes.

* RELATIVE HUMIDITY...9 to 15 percent across much of the area.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...

A Fire Weather Watch means that critical fire weather conditions
are possible. Listen for later forecasts and possible Red Flag
Warnings.

 

Road Reports Aug 28, 2019

Please share road reports on Lick Creek road. South Fork road is closed from 7am to 4pm Monday thru Friday. The Stibnite road between Yellow Pine and the mine is open with caution. Be prepared for rocks and trees in the road and remember there is no cell phone service. Please share road reports.

Yellow Pine: Dry this last week and very dusty streets. Please respect your neighbors and slow down!
Click for Local Forecast.
Yellow Pine Webcam: (check date on image)

Warm Lake Highway: Clear
SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

Highway 55 Webcams Link:

South Fork Road: Closed Monday through Friday from 7am to 4pm on weekdays, with no closures over the weekends. Note: The road will be closed until after 4pm on Aug 30th. The road will be fully open on Monday, September 2 for Labor Day.
Map w/info for August 26 through August 30:
More info:
Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
South Fork Stream Gauge:

EFSF Road: Report on Sunday (Aug 11) the road is still in good shape.

Johnson Creek Road: Watch for extra traffic due to closures on the South Fork route.
Sunday (Aug 25) “Johnson creek upper part is very wash boardy, the lower part is great were they oiled it.”
Wednesday (Aug 28) mail truck driver (Robert) reports Johnson Creek road is really rough in the Rustican and Halfway areas.
Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam:
Johnson Creek Stream Gauge:
The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Reported open June 23. No current report.
Last report Tuesday (July 2 early morning) “The road wasn’t bad. Some wash outs and ruts but just bumpy.” AP
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Reported open June 23.
Report Sunday (Aug 25) Yellow Pine to Big Creek turn off is great. Profile to the top is the same rocks and bumps everywhere. Watch out for the new ski jump culvert they put in down at the bottom after the turn off. Over the top of Profile to Big Creek is the same as always. Trees on the side of the road where people have cut them just enough to get thru.
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcam: (check date on image)

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open with cautions – expect delays in the work area.
Update from Valley Co. Road Dept Aug 28: They are hauling crush aggregate on it this week and should be done next week sometime.
Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Reported open June 30. Watch for gravel trucks between YP and Stibnite.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Open and rough.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Warren Wagon Road: West of Payette Lake road is closed for construction Monday-Friday from 8am to noon and from 1pm to 5pm.
Warren Wagon Road reopened in the fire area to the public Aug 16, please slow down for firefighters!
Burgdorf/French Creek road reported open Aug 20.
Netheker Fire InciWeb link:

Secesh: Road is open to Secesh, watch for fire traffic.

Stanley to Landmark: Forest road 579 temporary closure planned from September 16th – Sept. 29th for maintenance.

Deadwood Summit: Reported Open June 16th
Report Aug 11: from Landmark to Deadwood really good until the last 10 miles to the lake.
Report from VCSO Aug 14: Forest road 579, Landmark to Stanley Road, temporary closure planned from September 16th – Sept. 29th for maintenance.
Old report from BNF June 26th: Access to Deadwood Campgrounds is open along FS 579 road from State Highway 21. Access to Deadwood Campgrounds from FS 582 (Clear Creek Rd) to FS 579 is open. Cascade to Landmark access to Deadwood Campgrounds via FS 579 road is open. FS 555 road to Deadwood Campgrounds is too rough to travel and not a recommended route.
Note: The approx elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′
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Aug 25, 2019 The Yellow Pine Times

Aug 25, 2019 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Note: Reminder that the water department will shut the water off Monday, August 26th at 9am to check for leaks. The boil water order and water restrictions are still in effect.

Community Calendar:

April 2 – Boil water order issued
Every Sunday – 11am Fire Training
May 10 – Burn “permits” required
May 15 – Firewood Season opens
July 22 – Daytime closures on So. Fk road begin
Aug 26 – 9am Village Water Shut Down
Aug 31 – Welch Memorial Golf Tournament
Sept 4 – 2019 11am-12pm PNF meeting Rx burn YP Community Hall
Sept 14 – 10am 5EV Memorial Run and 4pm YP Community BBQ
Sept 14 – 10am YPFD meeting at the Fire Hall budget meeting
Sept 14 – Ride to Cinnabar
Sept 21 – VYPA meeting 2pm Community Hall
Sept 28 – 2pm Fish Fry at the YP Tavern

(details below)
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Local Events:

Welch Memorial Golf Tournament

Saturday August 31, 2019
Registration 1130am Start 12:00 Noon
$20.00 per player – Come join the fun!


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Prescribed Burn Information for Fall 2019 YP Community Meeting Sept 4

The Payette NF, Krassel RD is hosting a community meeting to provide information for the Fall 2019 prescribed burn season. I will have a short presentation and we will take questions. This is informal and conversation/ discussion will be welcome.

Time: Wednesday Sept 4, 2019 11:00-12:00
Place: Yellow Pine Community Hall

We are planning on implementing prescribed burns in both the Four Mile and Bald Hill project areas this fall, likely September or October. Maps are attached with burn blocks that are planned outlined in red. If you cannot attend and have any questions or concerns please feel free to call Laurel Ingram, Fuels Tech at 208-634-0622 or Patrick Schon, Fuels Specialist at 208-634-0623.

Thanks and hope to see you in Yellow Pine on Sept 4.

Laurel Ingram
Fuels Technician
Payette National Forest
Krassel Ranger District

link to: Bald Hill Fall 2019 Notifications.pdf

link to: FourMile_Notification Fall 2019.pdf
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5EV Memorial Run Wildland Firefighter Foundation Fund Raiser and Yellow Pine Community BBQ

Saturday, September 14, 2019 10am

Midas Gold Idaho and The Corner are proud to sponsor the 5EV Memorial Run.

This 3.6 mile trail run is a fund raiser for the 5EV Memorial Trail Fund and Wildland Firefighter Foundation. Donations are greatly appreciated. The race starts at 10:00 am at the Williams Peak Trailhead on the East Fork Rd. and ends at the summit of the trail; a 3021 ft. elevation change.

A Community BBQ will be held after the race at 4:00 pm, at The Corner in Yellow Pine, Idaho. The roasted pig is provided by Midas Gold Inc. with great food by The Corner and the volunteers of the Yellow Pine Community.

Proceeds from this event will be shared 50/50 between the 5EV Memorial Trail Fund and the Wildland Firefighters Foundation

For additional information or to sign up for the race, contact:
Matt Huber Matt @ ypcorner.com 208/633-3325
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2019 Yellow Pine Escapades

The 2019 schedule for the Yellow Pine Escapades has been updated on the website!

Expect new escapades this coming year, including an ATV-UTV Photo Scavenger Hunt; two (yes, two) ATV-UTV rides, a golf tournament, and even a community yard sale. Other events will be added to the calendar as plans are finalized.

Join us for a great season of fun! The starting point for fun in Yellow Pine! The website includes information on the events hosted by the Yellow Pine Community Hall as well as the other “goings-on” in the village. Food, lodging and fuel are available in Yellow Pine. link:
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Village News:

Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Aug 23 Dump Report: The dumpsters were 30% full. The road from YP to the dump is good.

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

Yellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is located approximately 3 miles south on Johnson Creek Road.

The TRANSFER STATION is for household trash and yard waste:
* Household trash must be put inside (and fit) the dumpster;
* Yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, et.) goes in the burn pile on the south end of the turn-around;
* Cardboard boxes should be flattened before putting the in the dumpster,

The DUMPSTERS are NOT for:
* Furniture (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station).

The BURN PILE is NOT for:
* Cardboard boxes (flatten and put in dumpster);
* Furniture and appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Drywall and building material (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wire or fencing (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Foam Rubber (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wood with metal (like nails) attached (take to Donnelly Transfer Station.)

When closing the DOORS on the front of the dumpsters:
* Make sure the “U” brackets at the top and bottom of the door are engaged;
* The retaining bar at the middle of the door is slid into the pipe;
* And the “L” bars at the bottom of the doors dropped into place.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: 208/634-7176
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Roads

South Fork
Starting July 22 the South Fork road will be closed Monday through Friday from 7am to 4pm on weekdays, with no closures over the weekends.
More info:
Map w/info for August 19 through August 23:

YP to Stibnite Road
Update from Valley County Road Dept. Aug 13: Open with cautions – expect delays in the work area. “we strongly advise people need to be very cautious of a few dump trucks working between Stibnite and Yellow Pine. The contractor will begin laying a crushed rock surface on the repairs probably next week.”
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Yellow Pine US Mail

Dean the driver has retired. It sounds like Robert and Ray will take turns delivering mail. The 6-day a week mail delivery started June 1st. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 55 cents
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Wasp Season

Yellowjackets are swarming hummingbird feeders, building nests and quite aggressive. Long legged wasps are invading sheds and seeking to come indoors. Grasshoppers are getting big enough to notice.
— — — —

Reminder for people living in bear country:

* Garbage should be stored inside the house or in a secure garage or storage building.
* If garbage cannot be stored in a secure location, a bear-resistant container approved by the Interagency Bear Committee is recommended.
* Avoid using bird feeders from March through November. Birds do not need supplemental feeding this time of year.
* Pet food should not be left outside.
* BBQ grills or anything with a strong odor should not be left out at night.
* Protect gardens, beehives, and compost piles with electric fencing.
* Never intentionally feed bears. A food-conditioned bear may pose a threat to human safety and usually results in the removal of the bear.
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Local Groups:

YPWUA News:

Update Aug 18:

Unfortunately the leak that Idaho Rural thought they found turned up no leak.

On Monday August 26th, the water will be shut down for a few hours beginning at 9 am. I am going to try to isolate the leak.

– Thanks for your patience Steve

Update Aug 9:

We are currently trying to coordinate a date that works to shut the town water supply down to repair the leak. When that date is set, everyone will be notified.
– Steve Holloway

Update Aug 7:

Donations to the Water Department

We have received two donations to the water department totaling $1,750.

First one came from Tom Keffer of the Bald Mountain Knuckle Draggers. They donated $1,150. Tom and the Bald Mountain Knuckle Draggers brought in the Highland Games to Yellow Pine. Last year they raised money for the Helipad. The Highland Games will be coming back to Yellow Pine next June 27th. Thank you Tom and the highland family.

The second one was from Keith and Delta Holloway. They raised $600 from the sales of corn dogs during this year’s Harmonica Festival. Thank you Mom and Dad for your continued support of Yellow Pine.
– Steve Holloway

Water Update July 25:

On July 19th a crew from Idaho rural water came in and found a substantial leak on the east side of the east fork bridge. We are still on a boil order due to the large capacity of water lost and low chlorine contact time. We still request that everyone conserves water by not watering lawns because we are borderline to running the town out of water.
– Steve H YPWUA

Water Update June 7:

1. The “boil order” is still in effect.
2. There is still large water leaks in the system. We continue to look.
3. A grant for $39,000 was approved for improvements to the system.
3. Work is currently being done on the new contact tank.
4. Please, no lawn watering until we find and repair the major leaks.
– Steve Holloway

The yearly Yellow Pine Water Users Shareholders meeting was Sunday July 7th in the community hall. (No minutes yet)

link to: #4430059 Yellow Pine Water Users Boil Water Notification 4-2-19

link to: 2018 September Water Department Update
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VYPA News:

If you have interest in being the chairman of the Music and Harmonica committee, please contact one of the VYPA council members. The 2020 chairman will be selected by August 30th.

Next meeting September 14th – 2pm at the Community Hall.

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting Minutes August 10, 2019.
link to: 20190810 YPVA Minutes

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting Minutes July 20, 2019
link to: 20190720 Yellow Pine Village Association Minutes

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting Minutes for June 8, 2019
link to: 20190608 Village of Yellow Pine Association

VYPA Meeting Dates 2019

June 8th; July 20th; August 10th; September 14th – 2pm at the Community Hall.
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YPFD News:

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice

The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.”

link to: 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation

Next Meeting Sept 14 at 10am YPFD meeting in the Fire Hall

Last meeting July 13 – minutes forthcoming.

YPFD June 16, 2019 Meeting minutes
link to: 20190615 YPFD Meeting Notes_Final

Meetings will be held at the fire station at 10am and everyone is welcome to attend. June 15th; July 13th; and Sept 14th (which will also be the budget meeting as well).

Every Sunday 11am – Training

May 10th Burn Permits – contact the YPFD

Pile burning: Dress appropriately, have enough help on hand (people, water and tools) and make a firebreak before you start. Call your local fire protection district chief to let them know you’ll be conducting a debris burn. This saves them from sending emergency responders to your property if they are not needed.

Bring it, Don’t Burn it

For us in Yellow Pine, Jake Strohmeyer, Dist. Ranger with the Boise NF said we can use the area at our transfer station for yard debris and the FS will burn it once a year. Please no furniture, mattresses, construction debris, metal objects, tires or personnel junk. Please only woody yard debris. When using the pile please be mindful of where you place the debris as it should be contained to a manageable burnable area and kept as clean as possible. – JF

Training: Sunday Fire/EMS training has begun. Sundays at 11:00 AM unless otherwise posted. If Jeff F is in town the trainings will be held. All are welcome.

YP Helispot: We are working with Valley County Road Department and the Boise National Forest for the rock base for the road leading into the Helispot and the actual Helispot itself. We are also receiving rock for the Fire Hydrants, water tank foundations, etc. The rock will come from the Valdez pit and will be less expensive than having it trucked in from Cascade.

Stop the Bleed Course: This course was well attended in the Fall and Jeff F and Ann F will be presenting another course when the new instructor material comes out. There are “Stop The Bleed” kits at the Tavern in an emergency.

Siren Testing: The YPFD siren will be tested only once this year on the first of May at noon. 3 blasts of the siren is a test, more than 3 is an Emergency.

-JF
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Biz Listings:

Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377

Call for reservations
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The Corner (208) 633-3325

Our hours will be 11-8 every day, except closed on Tuesdays. We are open for breakfast by request and always have good coffee starting at 6am.
The Corner has firewood permits in stock now. 4 cord minimum at $6.25 per cord. Please bring drivers license and cash is preferred, no CC.
The Corner Store will also be open with snacks, groceries, fresh produce, soda, ice and packaged beer. If you know you will be coming in over the summer and need special grocery orders, let me know and I will order it in for you while you are here, 2 deliveries a week. The best way to get a hold of me is to call or stop by and say hello.
Karaoke is back at The Corner! Choose your favorite songs from our online music library and entertain your friends up on stage through our professional sound system.
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Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233

Summer Hours Daily 8am to Close
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Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Tom & Sarah Lanham
156 Yellow Pine Ave, Yellow Pine Id 83677
Website:
FB page:
It’s official starting June 2020 We will be doing trail rides out of Yellow Pine along with summer pack / camping trips to high mountain lakes in the area!

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
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Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430
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Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

The Star-News

subscribe:
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

Rocky Mountain Mechanical
Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine

Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, will service Yellow Pine

B&T Safety Solutions LLC
208-271-1600 Based out of Donnelly
Snow removal, cleaning chimneys and stoves, we do cabin staining/chinking as well
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (Aug 19) overnight low of 45 degrees, clear sky and strong sunshine this morning. Haze of dust in the air from the rock crusher. A few finches and red-breasted nuthatches, plenty of chipmunks. Yellowjackets building nests. A few clouds, warm and breezy mid-day. Red-breasted nuthatches visiting. Hot, sunny and breezy mid-afternoon, high of 93 degrees. Hairy woodpecker visited. Warm evening, slow to cool down, a few high wispy clouds and very light breezes, haze of smoke in the air. Rosy haze to the west at dusk. Hazy moon after midnight.

Tuesday (Aug 20) overnight low of 46 degrees, mostly clear sky and poor air quality this morning. Huge clouds of dust rising from the crusher on the hill. A few finches and red-breasted nuthatches visiting. Some clouds mid-day and breezy. Helicopter at 238pm – headed towards Stibnite. Hot, breezy and mostly cloudy mid-afternoon, high of 97 degrees. Calliope hummingbirds visiting. Mostly cloudy and still quite warm before sundown. Some stars out before midnight.

Wednesday (Aug 21) overnight low of 58 degrees, partly cloudy sky and poor air quality this morning. Noisy crusher putting up a very large cloud of dust over the village. A few finches, a juvenile jay, and a couple of red-breasted nuthatches visiting. The yellowjacks are swarming the hummingbird feeders, calliope hummers fighting for a sip. Increasing clouds mid-day (mostly to the south) warm and light breezes. Mail truck made it in on time. Heard a flicker calling in the neighborhood. Hot, mostly cloudy and light breezes mid-afternoon, high of 96 degrees. A pair of evening grosbeaks joined the finches at the feeders. Overcast, calm and quite warm before sunset. Mostly cloudy at dusk and calm. Gusty breezes and little sprinkles on and off during the night.

Thursday (Aug 22) overnight low of 51 degrees, partly clear sky this morning. Only 0.01″ of rain from last night, not enough to settle the dust. Crusher belching dust again this morning. Red-breasted nuthatches, a few finches, a couple pine siskins and a jay visiting. Partly cloudy and light breezes mid-day. Yellowjackets are very active. Warm, partly cloudy and breezy mid-afternoon, high of 81 degrees. Not many birds around late in the afternoon, pine siskin and a red-breasted nuthatch. Partly cloudy and cool breezes before sunset. Partly cloudy at dusk. Yellowjackets inactive at full dark.

Friday (Aug 23) overnight low of 42 degrees, clear sky this morning. A few airplanes shattering the early morning quiet. Crusher putting up a cloud of dust over the village again. Red-breasted nuthatches, a couple evening grosbeaks, a few finches and pine siskins and a jay visiting. High wispy clouds mid-day and light breezes. Warm and mostly clear mid-afternoon and light breezes, high of 86 degrees. Yellowjackets dominating the hummingbird feeders. Extra traffic and dust. Mostly clear and calm at sunset. Mostly clear (some high haze) and calm at dusk.

Saturday (Aug 24) overnight low of 47 degrees, mostly cloudy – high thin “bubble-wrap” clouds – this morning. A few evening grosbeaks, finches, pine siskins, red-breasted nuthatches and a couple of jays visiting. Better air quality this morning (crusher day off.) Increasing traffic and dust during the day. Small clouds and breezy mid-day. Yellowjackets and long-legged wasps active. Warm, gusty breezes and mostly cloudy mid-afternoon, high of 88 degrees. Mostly cloudy – high wispies – and light breeze at sunset. At dusk some high haze, bright Saturn low to the south.

Sunday (Aug 25) overnight low of 42 degrees, mostly clear sky this morning. Pretty good air quality (crusher day off.) Evening grosbeaks calling, nuthatches, finches and pine siskins visiting, lots of chipmunks scurrying about. Shooting at 1234pm, sounds like they are down by the river. Mostly cloudy and breezy mid-day. Busy afternoon for traffic and dust. Cooler, mostly cloudy and gusty breezes mid-afternoon, high of 81 degrees. At sunset it was cooling off, the sky was mostly clear and light breezes. Rosy haze at dusk, lots of bats and a nighthawk flying around.
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Idaho News:

Cruickshank to step down as Valley commissioner

Long-time official to leave with one year left on term

By Max Silverson for The Star-News Aug 22, 2019

Valley County commissioner Chair Gordon Cruickshank will step down on Sept. 30 after serving on the commission since 2007.

Cruickshank submitted his letter of resignation to the Valley County Republican Central Committee on August 12.

Cruickshank will leave with 15 months remaining on his term of office, which ends in December 2020.

“(I will) hopefully have some down time to relax and enjoy my family more as they have sacrificed their time so I could do my level best for the citizens,” he said.

“I have had a great 28 plus years working for the citizens of Valley County and hope I have found the balance of all issues even when folks will disagree with the results,” Cruickshank said.

Cruickshank began working for Valley County in 1991 in the road department, eventually being named road superintendent. He was appointed to a vacant seat on the commission in 2007.

continued:
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Valley commissioners propose 40% raise for themselves

$62,000 salary called needed due to heavier work load

By Max Silverson for The Star-News Aug 22, 2019

Valley County commissioners are set to receive a roughly 40% raise in both pay and time commitment if the 2020 county budget is adopted as proposed on Monday.

Commissioners currently make about $44,000 per year, but the new budget would raise commissioners’ wages to about $62,000.

A public hearing on the 2020 budget, which includes the higher commissioners wages, will begin at 1 p.m. Monday at the Valley County Courthouse in Cascade.

The current wage assumes commissioners Gordon Cruickshank, Elt Hasbrouck and Dave Bingaman work about 20 hours per week, a figure that is regularly exceeded, Cruickshank said.

The new wage will assume a time commitment of about 30 hours per week, he said.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Valley County employees would get 6% raises under proposed 2020 budget

By Max Silverson for The Star-News Aug 22, 2019

The proposed 2020 Valley County budget includes a 6% salary increase for all employees.

A public hearing for the proposed 2020 budget is scheduled for Monday at 1 p.m. in the Valley County Courthouse in Cascade.

The proposed operating budget for 2020 is about $11.4 million for the county.

The county would take the maximum allowed 3% increase in taxes and new construction under the proposed budget.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Valley solid waste fee proposed to go up $25 per year

Fees for dumping certain items would increase 20%

By Max Silverson for The Star-News Aug 22, 2019

The annual fee charged to Valley County property owners to operate the county’s waste transfer station would go up $25 under a proposal to be aired Monday.

A public hearing to raise the annual assessment from $85 to $110 for residential properties will be presented to Valley County commissioners starting at 1:45 p.m. Monday at the Valley County Courthouse in Cascade.

The fee is levied on nearly 12,000 residential parcels to pay for operations of the transfer station on Spink Lane northeast of Donnelly.

Annual assessments for commercial properties would go from $255 per year to $330 per year under the proposal.

The fees are separate from monthly charges charged for trash collection in the county done under contract by Lake Shore Disposal.

continued:
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Donnelly fire district to pull $121K from property tax reserve

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News Aug 22, 2019

About $121,000 in deferred property taxes from 2010 to 2015 would be added to the Donnelly Rural Fire Protection District’s 2020 budget under a current proposal.

The extra money is needed to hire three new full-time firefighter/EMTs and one new full-time firefighter/medic, Chief Juan Bonilla said.

Public hearings on the base budget and the addition of the deferred taxes will be held on Wednesday at 6 p.m. at the Donnelly Fire Station at 244 W. Roseberry Rd.

Under the base budget, the district would collect about $774,000 in property taxes in 2020, up from the $732,000 it collected in 2019. The total budget for 2020 would be about $1.1 million.

That number includes about $22,000 from a property tax increase of 3% and about $21,000 for the value of new construction in the district.

If the deferred taxes, also known as foregone taxes, are approved the total property tax draw would jump to about $895,000.

continued:
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Possible water contamination in Silver City

Joey Prechtl August 20, 2019 KTVB

Silver City, Idaho — Don’t drink the water. That’s the message from Silver City officials to the residents of the town.

Clarence Orton, the chairman of the town’s water committee, said tap water has turned cloudy.

He isn’t sure what’s causing it, or if the water poses any sort of health risks.

… The town gets its water from a spring on Florida Mountain, according to Orton. That’s also where the Delamar mining project is. Orton says he contacted the company, which then began collecting samples of water from around town to test.

full story:
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Couple rescued after UTV crash in the Sawtooths

KTVB August 20, 2019

Rescue UTV

Blaine County, Idaho — An elderly couple needed a rescue after rolling their UTV in the Sawtooth National Recreation Area Monday.

According to the Blaine County Sheriff’s Office, the pair was about five miles up Boulder Creek from Highway 75 when the crash happened at about 2:47 p.m.

Officials say the UTV had tipped over onto its side. The people inside were not hurt, but needed help getting out. Blaine County Sheriff’s deputies and a US Forest Service law enforcement officer responded out to the Boulder City historical area with a rescue UTV.

continued:
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Idaho officials OK $84.5 million endowment distribution

by Associated Press Tuesday, August 20th 2019

Boise, Idaho (AP) – State officials have approved a 4.5 percent increase in payouts to public schools and other beneficiaries from money generated from the state’s 3,750 square miles (9,700 square kilometers) of endowment lands.

Idaho Republican Gov. Brad Little and four other statewide elected officials on the Idaho Land Board voted 5-0 Tuesday to approve the record $84.5 million distribution.

Most of that money, $52.5 million, will go to public schools. The rest will be split up between universities, state hospitals for the mentally ill, state veterans homes, the Idaho School for the Deaf and Blind, Idaho’s juvenile correction system and Idaho’s prison system.

The $84.5 million comes from timber sales, leases on state lands and earnings from investments in the $2.3 billion land grant endowment fund.

Idaho received the endowment lands in 1890 when it became a state.

source:
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Tips and Advice:

New warning about common mistake home cooks make with chicken that could make you sick

by WKRC Tuesday, August 20th 2019

It’s a big debate among home cooks – should you wash raw chicken before you cook it? Now the USDA is weighing in with a clear “NO”!

A new report from the USDA finds rinsing raw chicken can actually boost the chances you pick up a nasty food-borne illness like salmonella. Researchers had 300 people prepare chicken and salad in test kitchens. They found in about a third of the cases where the cooks rinsed raw chicken their salads were contaminated with bacteria.

Rinsing chicken means you’re spreading any bacteria on it to your sink. So when you accidentally drop that carrot while peeling it a few minutes later, it’s now contaminated. Same goes for the lettuce you rinsed off in a colander resting in that sink.

continued:
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Scam Alerts:

Scam Alert from McCall Police Department

via Valley County Sheriff FB page Aug 22, 2019

Earlier today a male approached a home in McCall and gave one of the residents a letter that stated “Confidential”. The letter instructed the homeowner to contact their mortgage service. The letter included a phone number that when called asked for a social security number as verification. This is a scam.

If you are approached at your home or find a letter in your door concerning your mortgage please do not call the number.

The male was described as short, tan, and in his 40’s. he may be driving a grey/blue station wagon.

If you see or have contact with this male please call us immediately at 208-382-5160.

Please contact the Valley County Sheriff’s Office dispatch center if you have contact or information regarding this scam. 208-382-5160
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Better Business Bureau warns customers to watch for email hacks

Local business emails spoofed to trick consumers

Aug 19, 2019 KIVI

Boise, Idaho — Better Business Bureau is warning you to keep a close eye on your inbox after local businesses experience an email hack.

Idaho businesses have reported the hack that led to mass phishing emails being sent to their client lists. The emails can appear to be from services you know and trust, including your local plumber, dentist or spa. Businesses of all types–from construction to technology, big and small–are susceptible to data breaches.

Hackers know that every business has its weak spots, and they search for those open doors and raid them. Once hackers have credentials to gain access, they go to work. Hackers take the time to copy contact lists, mimic past email messages and copy company signature lines. By impersonating a local company you’ve worked with previously, con artists hope you’ll fall for their tricks.

continued:
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Mining News:

Midas Gold plans to keep road open through mine area

Original plan would have detoured traffic around Stibnite

(Note: This is the second in a series of stories detailing changes proposed by Midas Gold to its Stibnite Gold Project. Next Week: Tailings Storage).

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News Aug 22, 2019

Hikers, campers, hunters and other recreationists would be able drive through Stibnite during Midas Gold Idaho’s mining operations under changes proposed by the company.

The change was one of several proposed to the Payette National Forest in May by Midas Gold to the operating plan submitted in 2016.

The Payette forest is now reviewing the proposal and is expected to issue a draft environmental study of the project by the end of the year.

The changes were made in response to public comments from Yellow Pine residents expressing a desire for public travel through the mine site to be allowed during operations to maintain access to lands east of the site, Midas Gold Idaho Permitting Manager Dale Kerner said of the change.

Allowing public travel through the site would cost Midas Gold more money and require several additional measures to maintain public safety, Kerner said.

“A public access route through the mine site is a challenge. However, it is not insurmountable,” he said.

Public traffic could continue to travel to hiking trails, campgrounds and other area east of the mine site via Stibnite Road, the current access road, for the majority of the 20-year project.

But a 12-foot-wide gravel roadway through the site would not be built until after the first year of mining operations, or about four years after construction at the mine site begins.

The new roadway would connect to the existing Thunder Mountain Road, which would be linked to the proposed Burntlog Road east of the project site as the primary mine traffic access.

Midas Gold’s original proposal would have forced public traffic from Yellow Pine to detour around the mine site via Johnson Creek Road and Midas Gold’s proposed upgraded and extended Burntlog Road.

The detour would add about 43 miles to a trip of normally about 18 miles to reach Monumental Summit and other land east of the mine on existing Forest Service roads, Kerner said.

Travel through the site would be limited to protect the public from dangerous mine operations like blasting, he said.

Restrictions would remain in place for about 20 years until mine operations and site clean-up is complete.

The road could be closed for hours or even days at a time during mining operations that could threaten public safety, Kerner said.

Plans call for gates at each end of the project site that would be manned by guards to prevent public traffic from entering at dangerous times.

Pilot cars also could be used to ensure public traffic would not linger on the project site during blasting or other dangerous mining operations, according to the modified plan.

Berms and fencing would also be added along the sides of the roadway to screen views of mining operations to avoid distracting motorists.

The road would not be plowed during the winter, Kerner said.

Midas Gold’s modified plan proposes changes to the alignment of about a five-mile section of the Burntlog Road near the Riordan Creek drainage.

The realignment would straighten the roadway and reduce the overall length while also moving the road away from wetlands and flattening steep grades.

The change would move the road closer to the Frank Church – River of No Return Wilderness, but would remain at least 100 feet away, Kerner said.

source: (used with permission) © Copyright 2009-2018 Central Idaho Publishing Inc.
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Payette suggests moving tailings storage at Stibnite mine

Midas Gold resists plan, citing damage to environment

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News Aug 22, 2019

The East Fork South Fork Salmon River could be re-routed around Midas Gold’s 100 million-ton tailings storage pile under an alternative to the proposed mine being weighed by the Payette National Forest, a Midas Gold official told The Star-News.

Relocating the tailings storage facility from Meadow Valley to the East Fork South Fork Valley is being considered by the Payette forest as it reviews Midas Gold’s proposed mine near Yellow Pine, Midas Gold Idaho Permitting Manager Dale Kerner said.

The tailings are neutralized before being placed in a lined storage area designed to prevent lingering metals from leaching into the ground or neighboring streams.

Kerner has been provided with documentation about the Payette’s alternative, which he presented last month to the Stibnite Advisory Council, the citizens panel that receives monthly briefings on the project.

Midas Gold does not want the tailing storage facility in the East Fork South Fork drainage because it has been unaffected by previous mining operations and forest fires.

“We’d rather not touch this drainage,” Midas Gold Idaho Permitting Manager Dale Kerner said. “It’s got cool water, it’s got good shading, good vegetation and great fish habitat.”

Moving the tailings to the East Fork South Fork would also potentially harm the environment, he said.

The relocation would make it difficult to reprocess and properly store tailings from past mining operations that currently lie in Meadow Valley, which is where Midas Gold proposes to put tailings.

Instead, the existing uncontained tailings would continue to leach toxic metals into the ground and nearby streams.

“Relocating the tailings storage facility is a missed opportunity to utilize an area that’s been previously disturbed,” Kerner said.

The Payette’s proposed relocation would also involve re-routing more streams, including the East Fork South Fork Salmon River, around the tailings storage to prevent contamination.

About 98 acres would be added to the project’s footprint by moving the tailings storage facility from Meadow Valley to the East Fork South Fork Valley, according to Midas Gold officials.

The Payette forest has not released the alternative plan and will not discuss it until a draft study of Midas Gold’s plan is released at the end of the year, Payette Public Affairs Officer Brian Harris said.

The Payette is required to evaluate alternatives for the mine according to the federal review process, Harris said.

Kerner told The Star-News that Payette officials have not stated a reason for revisiting the East Fork South Fork tailing storage location.

source: (used with permission) © Copyright 2009-2018 Central Idaho Publishing Inc.
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Fire Season:

Updates posted Aug 25, 2019

link:
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Public Lands:

Prescribed Burn Information for Fall 2019 YP Community Meeting Sept 4

The Payette NF, Krassel RD is hosting a community meeting to provide information for the Fall 2019 prescribed burn season. I will have a short presentation and we will take questions. This is informal and conversation/ discussion will be welcome.

Time: Wednesday Sept 4, 2019 11:00-12:00
Place: Yellow Pine Community Hall

We are planning on implementing prescribed burns in both the Four Mile and Bald Hill project areas this fall, likely September or October. Maps are attached with burn blocks that are planned outlined in red. If you cannot attend and have any questions or concerns please feel free to call Laurel Ingram, Fuels Tech at 208-634-0622 or Patrick Schon, Fuels Specialist at 208-634-0623.

Thanks and hope to see you in Yellow Pine on Sept 4.

Laurel Ingram
Fuels Technician
Payette National Forest
Krassel Ranger District

link to: Bald Hill Fall 2019 Notifications.pdf

link to: FourMile_Notification Fall 2019.pdf
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Boise Forest Coalition

Boise Forest Coalition Field Day on September 10th

by Elizabeth Spaulding on 08/22 6:32 PM

Please join the Boise Forest Coalition and the Boise National Forest on Tuesday, September 10th for a Citizen Science Field Day near the Sage Hen area of the Boise National Forest. Participants will learn how to conduct a variety of monitoring activities, including:

* Photo monitoring plots
* Hydro meter stations
* Unauthorized route assessments
* Wildlife monitoring with game cameras
* Legacy tree surveys

The goal of the field day is to train interested individuals on the role of monitoring and how to use associated equipment and tools. Participants will then be prepared to assist volunteers at the Boise Forest Coalition’s Volunteer Work Day next spring. All are welcome!

continued:
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Stanley to Landmark Road

Forest road 579 temporary closure planned from September 16th – Sept. 29th for maintenance.
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Temporary closures planned for roads to Red Mountain and within the Rock Creek area of the Lowman Ranger District

Lowman, Idaho, August 22, 2019 — The Boise National Forest wants to inform the public that a number of roads in the Lowman Ranger District will have temporary closures planned for hazard tree felling beginning the second week in September through the end of the month. The worked will be completed by a private contractor.

The contractor is expected to begin the felling work on National Forest System (NFS) 515 and then move into the Rock Creek area. They will work on NFS road 594 and then continue through the Rock Creek road system and end with NFS road 551. When a road is completed the Forest is expected to reopen it for public access.

Temporary National Forest System road closures scheduled include:

* NFS road 515 which leads to the Red Mountain trailhead north of Lowman: Sept. 9 – Sept. 23 The road closure will also temporarily restrict access to the west end of the Red Mtn. trailhead.
* NFS roads 594, 594A road system and 551 within the Rock Creek drainage west of Lowman: Sept. 9-Sept. 30. Work is expected to begin on NFS road 594 first.

“We want to give enough notice to the public, particularly archery hunters, who may have plans to hunt in this area of unit 33 (Sawtooth Zone). They need to plan their hunt accordingly because these forest roads are expected to be closed for public safety,” said John Kidd, Lowman District Ranger. “Once the work begins we encourage folks to call the District office or check our website for specific area information.”

While some of these trees where commercially salvaged after the Pioneer Fire, there are still some hazard trees remaining in locations were commercial harvest did not meet restoration objectives.

The North Pioneer Fire Salvage and Reforestation Project decision signed in 2017 recommended this treatment to provide for public safety and reduce future maintenance needs over multiple years by forest personnel.

Once the closures are in place they will be posted here:
Lowman Ranger District: 208-259-3361.

link to: 0402-05-82 NFS Road 515 Closure Timber MAP.pdf

link to: 0402-05-81 NFS Roads 594-551 Closure – Timber MAP.pdf
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USDA Forest Service Sinker Creek Project Post-scoping Update on Sinker Creek-Boise Ridge Forest Health Project

In August 2018, the Mountain Home Ranger District of the Boise National Forest conducted scoping for two projects (Sinker Creek Project and Boise Ridge Forest Health Project). As communicated in the scoping cover letter, these projects were anticipated to be completed using a categorical exclusion (CE) for each project. Based on the comments received during scoping and additional considerations brought forward by the interdisciplinary team, the Forest Supervisor has decided to combine the proposed actions for both projects and conduct one Environmental Assessment (EA) instead of two CEs. The project is now referred to as the Sinker Creek-Boise Ridge Forest Health Project. link:

The Forest intends to complete the EA using the provisions found in the Healthy Forest Restoration Act (HFRA), Title VI, as amended by the Agricultural Improvement Acts of 2014 and 2018. It has been determined that all proposed treatment areas are within the wildland urban interface (WUI) and within 1.5 miles of an at-risk community, as defined by HFRA (Section 101). Because the project meets the WUI and at-risk community analysis criteria outlined in HFRA (Section 104(d)), the Forest is only required to analyze the proposed action and does not need to develop and analyze an action alternative. The proposed actions have also already been modified, as described in the next paragraph, in response to comments received during initial scoping. Even without considering the HFRA provisions regarding alternative development, no other issues have been identified that would drive development of an alternative to the proposed action.

Other changes in response to the comments received, which will be evident in the EA, include:

* Substantially reducing the miles of new temporary road construction (from 15.3 miles [for both projects, as described in the scoping letter] to 7.1 miles for the combined project); and
* Better describing the Riparian Conservation Area (RCA) delineation process and clarifying no treatments are proposed in RCAs.

There will still be no miles of permanent road construction and there have been relatively no changes to vegetation management actions (e.g. treatment types, acreages) as described in the previous scoping letter – though minor adjustments to treatment boundaries have been made to address resource concerns identified after additional field work.

HFRA requires public notice of authorized hazardous fuel reduction projects in accordance with applicable regulations and administrative guidelines (Section 104 (e)(1)) and this letter satisfies the requirement. HFRA requires a public meeting during the preparation stage of the project (Section 104(e)(2)).The Boise National Forest is hosting a public meeting on September 5, 2019 from 6:00-8:00pm at the Collister Library located at 4724 W State St, Boise, ID 83703.

HFRA also requires an opportunity for public comment during development of an EA (Section 104 (g)). Scoping of the proposed actions, even though initially proposed under CEs, satisfies the opportunity for comment as these comments helped inform modifications to the proposed action and the need to do an EA instead of a CE. While comments may be submitted at any time, for the purposes of this project the responsible official is not seeking additional written comments.

By changing from a CE to an EA, the project is also now subject to a pre-decisional objection process (36 CFR 218). Because this is a HFRA project, subparts A and C of 36 CFR 218 apply. Notification of the beginning of the pre-decisional objection period will be provided via publication of a legal notice in the newspaper of record (Idaho Statesman) and to those who provided comments in response to scoping.

Thank you for taking the time to review the updates to this project, which were made in large part based on the comments received during scoping. If you have any questions, please direct them to Josh Newman, Project Leader, at 208-559-3087.
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Tips and Advice:

Be bear aware

Being outdoors means being with wildlife. Many people never encounter a bear. But if you do, here’s some simple advice: A graphic with a grey bear icon. it reads bear country

* DO NOT RUN.
* Remain calm.
* Group together and pick up small children.
* Continue to face the bear and back away slowly, talking calmly to identify yourself as a human.
* If the bear continues to approach, try to scare it away by making yourself as large and imposing as possible by stretching your arms overhead and making loud noises.
* Carry and know how to use bear spray, which is available at many outdoor retailers and can be used to deter a charging bear.

source:
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Letter to Share:

Chronic Wasting Disease/Mystic Farm Wildlife Rescue, Inc.

Many of my Mystic Farm followers/supporters have been asking me about Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) and what it means for the future of the rescue. Honest answer? I don’t know. This subject has been weighing heavy on my mind for some time. The future of Mystic Farm is in the hands of the outcome of future findings in the state of Idaho. There has NOT been a documented case in our state…yet. IDFG will be stepping up their testing of harvested game this hunting season. There is presently no field test to be used on fawns/deer – a sample of the brain must be submitted for testing and can take weeks for results. There have been two recent documented cases just over the border in Libby, Montana. Deer know no borders… So, in the meantime – while we wait – here is an article with information and a map showing the areas of the U.S. most affected.

Dory McIsaac

link to story in the UK’s Daily Mail:
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Critter News:

Valley County Bat tests positive for Rabies

A bat recently found in a Valley County yard has tested positive for rabies. If you or your pet come into contact with a bat, work to capture and save the bat in a container (without touching it!) and contact your local health department to arrange for testing. In Valley County, call CDH at 208-634-7194. For more on how to safely capture a bat you or your pet came into contact with, visit:
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Pet Talk – Acute leukemia in dogs and cats

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt Aug 23, 2019 IME

Acute leukemia in dogs and cats is usually a cancer of young lymphocytes, a type of white blood cell. The lymphocytes involved are formed in the bone marrow and other lymphoid organs such as the liver and the spleen and other lymph nodes. Young lymphocytes are called blast cells. Often, these blast cells are released into the bloodstream, where they can be seen under the microscope. If blast cells are seen, then acute leukemia is diagnosed. Many different types of leukemia are possible, but we will deal primarily with the common lymphocytic leukemia in this article.

With leukemias, so many blast cells are released into the blood that the white-blood-cell count becomes very elevated. This is called leukocytosis. There are other reasons for leukocytosis besides leukemia. Leukemia differs from other forms of leukocytosis in that the white blood cells being produced are abnormal, and are primarily these immature blast cells. Lymphocytic leukemia may be acute or chronic. In general, acute leukemia is a more aggressive disease than chronic leukemia. Acute lymphocytic leukemia can be a dangerous, rapidly progressive cancer that can affect all ages of dogs and cats.

continued:
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Study: Dogs help owners maintain heart health

Study published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings Friday

By Leah Asmelash Aug 23, 2019 Local News 8

Dog’s aren’t just our best friends, they’re also good for our health, new research suggests.

A study published Friday in the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings says that owning a pet, especially a dog, may help maintain a healthy heart — in case you needed any more reason to head to your local animal shelter.

… The researchers compared the cardiovascular health scores of pet owners with those of petless people. In general, people who owned a pet were more physically active than those who did not, with healthier diets and blood sugar levels.

full story:
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West Valley Humane Society receives 63 cats in a day following program announcement

by CBS 2 News Staff Wednesday, August 21st 2019

Caldwell, Idaho (CBS 2) — The West Valley Humane Society received an overflow of cats following the Community Cat Program announcement.

This program will prioritize spaying/neutering and vaccinating all cats that come into shelter care and returning them back into their communities.

Following the announcement, community members brought 63 cats into the shelter in one day.

continued:
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4 last wolves in Washington pack killed by state hunters

By Nicholas K. Geranios – 8/19/19 AP

Spokane, Wash. — The last four members of a wolf pack that preyed on cattle in a rural Washington state area bordering Canada have been killed by state hunters, prompting protests from environmental groups.

The four wolves were part of a pack that originally had seven members and attacked cows, killing or wounding them 29 times since 2018 and nine times over the last month, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife said in a statement last Friday. Agency director Kelly Susewind authorized the killings of the remaining pack members on July 31.

Environmental groups opposed the killings, which they contended benefited one ranching operation in Ferry County in the remote Kettle River Range of mountains that stretches into the Canadian province of British Columbia.

continued:
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Nonresident, second elk tags selling out for 2019 Idaho hunting

by CBS 2 News Staff Monday, August 19th 2019

Idaho – Nonresident elk tags sold out Friday, and nonresident elk and deer tags have sold out the past two years, and are selling faster this year.

Nonresident hunters who plan to buy a deer tag, or resident hunters interested in buying a second tag, should do so quickly.

Of the 15,500 nonresident deer tags available this year, less than 3,000 are left.

source:
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Idaho hunters warned of game meat in warmer weather

by CBS 2 News Staff Saturday, August 24th 2019

Boise, Idaho (CBS 2) — Idaho Fish and Game are warning Idaho hunters to take extra precautions with game meat in warmer weather.

“Have a plan in place to take care of game meat if you’re hunting during hot or warm weather,” says Mike Demick, staff biologist.

Early season big game hunts have started, which means they may be harvesting animals during hot weather.

Hunters can be cited for wasting game. They have a legal (and ethical) obligation to properly care for the game meat they harvest.

continued with tips and advice:
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Idaho works to identify pronghorn migration patterns

by Colin Tiernan (Associated Press) Sunday, August 25th 2019


(Idaho Department of Fish and Game)

Bellevue, Idaho (AP) – The helicopter banked left and tracked its quarry over the field for about 10 seconds before the net gun went off with a distant pop. The chopper touched down abruptly and two men, helmeted and clad in orange, leaped out and bolted toward the captured pronghorn.

It was an unwelcome surprise for an animal that had been calmly grazing in a green-gold field, back dropped by the Sawtooths. But the Idaho Fish and Game Magic Valley Regional Office had good reasons Aug. 8 for descending on pronghorn from the sky and capturing them with nets fired from guns. Compared to other big game species, like elk and mule deer, pronghorn in Idaho are understudied.

“We know they summer in one place and winter in another,” Magic Valley Region Fish and Game Wildlife Manager Mike McDonald said. “What we don’t know is how they get there.”

continued:
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Massive juniper tree-cutting project aims to aid sage grouse

By Keith Ridler – 8/21/19 AP

Murphy, Idaho — The largest-ever project in the U.S. to remove thousands of juniper trees to help imperiled sage grouse has started in Idaho.

Junipers provide perches for raptors that attack and kill sage grouse. Junipers also force out sagebrush and other plants that produce bugs that sage grouse eat. Sage grouse also feed on the sagebrush during the winter.

Overall, sage grouse numbers have dwindled from an estimated 16 million before European settlement of the West to no more than 500,000 today in 11 western states.

continued:
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Resource advisors help protect Chinook Salmon during Idaho fire

by Ryan L Morrison Monday, August 19th 2019

McCall, Idaho (CBS 2) — Terrestrial wildlife; deer, elk, squirrels, and birds, they all usually manage to escape large wildfires like the Nethker Fire.

Fish, on the other hand, can’t make it out quite as easy.

When big wildfires break out, officials find resource advisors to help fire teams prevent further damage.

Resource advisors, “reads” for short, work with firefighters on different areas advising for wildlife, streams, burn scars and fish.

continued:
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Fish & Game News:

Second controlled hunt draw results now online

By Brian Pearson, Conservation Public Information Specialist
Thursday, August 22, 2019

Results of the elk, deer, pronghorn, fall turkey and black bear second controlled hunt drawing have been posted through Fish and Game’s licensing system.

continued:
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Public’s help sought in pronghorn poaching near Stanley

By Mike Demick, Staff Biologist
Monday, August 19, 2019

Citizens Against Poaching (CAP) is offering a reward for information

An illegally killed pronghorn buck was discovered recently near Stanley, and Idaho Department of Fish and Game is asking the public for information to bring the poacher to justice.

continued: Warning – disturbing photo
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Mule deer killed with pellet gun in Pocatello

By Jennifer Jackson, Regional Communications Manager
Friday, August 16, 2019

The Idaho Department of Fish and Game is seeking information regarding the illegal killing of a mule deer doe in Pocatello.

At approximately 9:00 am on August 1, Idaho Fish and Game received a call about an injured deer in a south Pocatello neighborhood. The deer was reported to be lying in a backyard of a residence located on Fruitwood Lane off of Bannock Highway, motionless with labored breathing. The deer died before Fish and Game arrived at the scene.

continued:
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Roadkill research to continue with new mission

Aug 20, 2019 Local News 8

Idaho Falls, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – An Idaho Fish and Game Department study focusing on roadkill incidents on US Highway 20 and State Highway 87 in Fremont County will continue, but with a slightly different mission.

The department received a $25,000 Citizen Science Grant in February to pay for volunteer mileage and fund a wildlife technician to coordinate the study through December.

One of the goals of the initial grant was to gather information for the Idaho Transportation Department as it made decisions about wildlife crossings. Since then, however, Fremont County Commissioners and citizens have made it clear they are not interested in constructing wildlife crossings there.

continued:
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IDFG uses giant net, 60 people to round up salmon

by CBS 2 News Staff Wednesday, August 21st 2019


Idaho Fish and Game uses giant net, 60 people to round up salmon. (Brian Pearson, IDFG)

Idaho Fish and Game gathered more than 60 staff and volunteers to round up Chinook salmon using a very, very large net.

Most years IDFG waits for the fish to naturally return to hatcheries, but this summer nearly 250 fish were downstream and couldn’t make the final swim.

So, they helped them out at the Sawtooth Hatchery near Stanley.

With a variety of nets strung together, the team made a giant loop across the river.

continued:
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More F&G News Releases

link:
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Fun Critter Stuff:

Dogs take over the pool at the Natatorium in the Boise tradition

Aug 20, 2019 Steve Dent KIVI

Boise, Idaho — Every year when kids go back to school, the Boise Parks & Recreation Department opens up the Natatorium for the See Spot Splash event.

Dog owners bring their pooches to the pool and let them frolic in the water.

continued w/video:
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Seasonal Humor:

SummerAdventure-a
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Bird of the Week: Black-backed Woodpecker

Black-backed Woodpecker
(year around, not common)

male
IMG_2330-Black-Backed-Woodpecker-2web-a
(click image for full size)

More photos by Local Color Photography

Black-backed Woodpecker
Picoides arcticus
Size and Shape: Medium-sized woodpecker.
Both Sexes
Length: 9.1 in (23 cm)
Weight: 2.1-3.1 oz (61-88 g)
Color Pattern: Back entirely black. Sides barred black-and-white. Throat, chest, and belly white. Face black with white and black mustache marks. Male with yellow cap.
Learn more about this bird: The Cornell Lab of Ornithology
Link to Birds Page
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Fire Updates Aug 25, 2019

Nethker Fire

Payette National Forest
Location 30 miles northeast of McCall, ID
Total Personnel 98
Size 2,355 Acres
Percent of Perimeter Contained 98%
Estimated Containment Date Tuesday October 01st, 2019 approx. 12:00 AM
InciWeb:

Nethker Fire contained; roads reopen

Warmer weather may flare up isolated pockets

By Max Silverson for The Star-News Aug 22, 2019

Forest Service firefighters this week contained the Nethker Fire north of McCall blaze despite hot and dry weather.

As of Tuesday, the fire had grown to 2,355 acres and was listed as 98% contained fire managers said.

Isolated pockets of fire are expected to flare up within the perimeter causing an increase in smoke, but the fire is not expected to spread outside of containment lines, managers said. The fire was started on Aug. 4 by lightning and was burning 30 miles northeast of McCall near Burgdorf Hot Springs.

Warren Wagon Road was opened Wednesday with the Burgdorf/French Creek Road expected to open later on Wednesday.

The Jeanette Campground, Burgdorf Guard Station and all trails leading into the burned area remained closed on Wednesday.

Crews this week began removing equipment and repairing fire lines as the firefighting effort wound down.

As of Wednesday, there were 98 personnel assigned to the fire. Two helicopters, five fire engines and three crews of about 20 people each were still assigned to the fire, Payette National Forest Public Affairs Officer Brian Harris said.

“The complexity of the Nethker Fire is decreasing, but our commitment to quality work to put this fire out has not,” said Incident Commander Trent Vonderheit.

The cost of fighting the Nethker Fire was $11.4 million as of Tuesday.

continued:
— —

Nethker Fire Update, August 25, 2019, 7:30am

Inciweb Address Information:
Email:
Phone: 208-634-0820

The Nethker Fire remains 98 percent contained and is still 2,355 acres in size – it has not increased in size for several days.

The closure area is the perimeter of the burned area and the immediate area of the fire that is not burned – fire wood cutting is not allowed in the burned area at this time. If helicopters are making bucket drops near roads, please do not park in the immediate area as this could shut down flight operations.

Warren Wagon Road and Burgdorf/French Creek Road are open for public travel, however Crystal Mountain Road (FS Road 247) is closed as it is needed for firefighter access. Stay on the main roads while traveling through the burned area. All trails that lead into the fire area remained closed, as does Jeanette Campground, Burgdorf Campground and the Burgdorf Guard Station. Please use caution while traveling in the area as firefighters and aviation resources continue to work on the fire.

An interior island burned yesterday near the Burgdorf/French Creek Road intersection. These isolated torching of tree events are to be expected and firefighters, along with helicopter assistance will continue to fight these events to prevent spreading of the fire. Firefighters continue to work on hot spots, but the fire is not expected to grow outside current containment lines. Fire suppression repair work is ongoing. Aviation resources remain assigned and will be used as needed to assist ground based firefighters in preventing flare-ups from causing spot fires.

Smoke has been settling into Burgdorf, Secesh Meadows and Warren in the evenings and then clears out in late morning of each day. If members of the public see fire activity, there is no need to call it in as firefighters are on site.

A local Type 3 incident management team is managing the fire with the Incident Command Post located at the Burgdorf Guard Station.

A TFR (Temporary Flight Restriction) is still being implemented over the fire area – which means recreational drones and private aircraft may not be operated over the fire. The TFR can be found here:

Please check the Nethker Fire’s page on Inciweb or the Payette National Forest Facebook page for updated information, along with the latest maps and photos.

Nethker Fire Closure Order Map, Aug 20,2019


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Shady Fire

Salmon-Challis National Forest
Location Two (2) miles east of Seafoam Guard Station in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness on the Middle Fork Ranger District.
Size 4,722 Acres
Estimated Containment Date Thursday October 31st, 2019 approx. 05:00 PM

InciWeb:

Shady Fire Update (8/23/19)

The Central Idaho Dispatch Zone is at HIGH Fire Danger.

Fire Update: Fire activity has increased due to the warming and drying trend but activity remains moderate. The fire is creeping and smoldering with uphill runs observed. Fire activity is in the no name drainage to the west of Shady Creek and in Bernard Creek. The Forest will provide fire updates and information as significant changes occur.

Due to heavy fuel loading, active fire behavior, and the presence of numerous snags, firefighters have been unable to directly engage the fire. The Shady Fire is being managed with a point protection strategy (a wildfire response strategy, which protects specific assets or highly valued resources from the wildfire without directly halting the continued spread of the wildfire) to minimize exposure to fire personnel while protecting identified values. The strategy takes in to account exposure to firefighters, values at risk, impacts to area user groups, and wilderness values. Firefighters are monitoring fire progression towards values, with the priority of fire mangers being to provide for firefighter and public safety while defending the identified values at risk. Specific values potentially threatened with this fire include mining and Forest Service infrastructure.

Weather: Quiet weather is forecast today. Drier conditions arrive for Saturday, with lower elevations around 15 percent. Gusty winds return as well, but the stronger winds look to be at higher elevations. Even stronger winds are possible for Sunday, which may be the next chance for more widespread critical fire conditions. Breezy winds and dry humidities continue into midweek.

Closures: The Salmon-Challis National Forest has implemented the Shady Fire Emergency Road and Trail Closure, Order Number: 04-13-19-613. The road and trail closure is described as road #40012 (Sheep Mountain Road) beginning at the junction with FS Road #40008 at Seafoam Guard Station ending at Road #40172, forest trail #4005 (Sheep Creek Trail) entire trail, forest trail #4012 (Duffield Trail) entire trail, and forest trail #4023 (Bernard Creek Trail) entire trail.

The above-described road and trails are located within the administrative boundaries of the Middle Fork Ranger District, Salmon-Challis National Forest, Custer County, Idaho. This closure is necessary to provide protection to forest visitors from the current fire safety hazards associated with the Shady Fire.

Fire Restrictions: There are no fire restrictions at this time. Forest officials are asking the public to be extremely careful when camping and to remember that it is your job and responsibility to properly maintain and extinguish all campfires. Remember, if it is too hot to touch, it is too hot to leave; pour water and add dirt to your campfire until it is cold.

If you are recreating near the Shady Fire, firefighters are urging the public to be aware of the many blind corners on the roads and please slow down.

Shady Fire Map; August 14


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Cove Creek Fire

Salmon-Challis National Forest
Location 23 miles SW of North Fork, north of the Salmon River between Owl and Cove Creeks.
Total Personnel 85
Size 5,315 Acres
Percent of Perimeter Contained 65%
Estimated Containment Date Monday September 30th, 2019 approx. 12:00 AM

InciWeb:

Cove Creek Fire Udpate (8/25/19)

Fire Update: Yesterday, fire managers observed minimal fire activity; the fire is creeping and smoldering with limited growth to the fire perimeter over the last two days. The fire is established on the ridges above the East Fork Owl Creek. Firefighter and public safety is a priority for this fire. The fire is burning in steep inaccessible terrain therefore; opportunities to engage the fire directly are limited. A spike camp is in place to decrease driving hazards and increase the amount of time firefighters spend working on fire objectives. Today, firefighters will continue to monitor the fire’s forward progression within the Owl Creek Drainage and along Colson Creek. Aerial resources will be used as needed to limit perimeter growth.

Weather: Gusty west to northwest winds are expected across the region today with slightly cooler temperatures and higher humidity. Warmer and drier conditions follow Tuesday and Wednesday as the ridge rebounds across the region.

Closures: The Salmon-Challis National Forest has implemented the Cove Creek Fire Emergency Trail Closure, Order Number: 04-13-19-614. The trail closure is described as Forest Trail #152 (Owl Creek Trail), beginning at the junction with FS Road 030 (Salmon River Road) at Owl Creek to the Junction with FS Road #123 (Colson Creek Road), and Forest Trail #153 (East Fork Owl Creek Trail), beginning at the junction of Trail #152 (Owl Creek Trail) to the Junction with FS Road #043 at Horsefly Spring.

The above-described trails are located within the administrative boundaries of the North Fork Ranger District, Salmon-Challis National Forest, Lemhi County, Idaho. The closure is necessary to provide protection to forest visitors from the current fire safety hazards associated with the Cove Creek Fire.

Fire Restrictions: There are no fire restrictions at this time. Forest officials are asking the public to be extremely careful when camping and to remember that it is your job and responsibility to properly maintain and extinguish all campfires. Remember, if it is too hot to touch, it is too hot to leave; pour water and add dirt to your campfire until it is cold.

If you are recreating or live near an ongoing wildfire suppression operation, please keep your distance – do not congregate in the area and allow the firefighters to do their job safely and efficiently. If you are driving on the Salmon River Road (#030), please SLOW DOWN, but DO NOT STOP in and around the fire area. Additionally, for the safety of firefighters and the public, helicopters cannot dip from spots where cars are parked too close, or where rafters are lingering in the river.

Cove Creek Fire Map August 23


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Geothermal Fire grows quickly in southern Idaho

by CBS 2 News Staff Tuesday, August 20th 2019
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Idaho Fire Info
link:

NIFC

August 23, 2019

Fire activity continues in 14 states where 51 large fires have burned more than 327,000 acres. New large fires were reported in Arizona, California, New Mexico, and Utah.

Idaho Fires: 5 Acres: 12,383 New: 0 Contained: 0
Barren Hill Nez-Perce-Clearwater National Forest FS 581 0 50 miles east of Kamiah 208-820-1799
Cove Creek Salmon-Challis National Forest FS 5,063 65 27 miles northwest of Salmon 208-756-7853
Crab Nez-Perce-Clearwater National Forest FS 198 40 22 miles west of Stevensville 208-820-1799
Nethker Payette National Forest FS 2,355 98 30 miles northeast of McCall 208-634-0820
Shady Salmon-Challis National Forest FS 4,186 0 21 miles north of Stanley 208-756-7853

link:
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Idaho History Aug 25, 2019

Pearl, Gem County, Idaho

(part 2)

Pearl, Idaho

PearlIdahoHHartman-a

source: Hugh Hartman
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Mining Pearl (Gold)

Discovered December 7, 1867, the Pearl district remained largely inactive until the Panic of 1893. Most production came from 1894 to 1908, when the Lincoln mine went into receivership. Pearl is still active, although work since 1945 has centered almost entirely at the Dewey mine. Total production has been estimated at $2,000,000.

excerpted from: Mining in Idaho Number 9 1985, by Ernest Oberbillig and the Idaho State Historical Society
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1899

1899MinePearl-a

Idaho State Historical Society

Miners standing near the headframe at a mine near Pearl, Gem County, ID, ca. 1899. Note the miners candlesticks and candles in some of the miners hands. Candles were used for lighting underground before the invention of the carbide light. Idaho State Historical Society

source: Building in the Past
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Gem County Idaho Gold Production

By A. H. Koschmann and M. H. Bergendahl – USGS 1968

Westview District

The gold production of Gem County is virtually equivalent to that of the Westview (Pearl-Horseshoe Bend) district, which sprawls across the Boise-Gem County line, about 18 miles north-northwest of the city of Boise.

Gold was mined chiefly from lodes in the Westview district. According to Anderson (1934, p. 17-18), the first development of note was at the Red Warrior in 1870, although greatest activity occurred between 1900 and 1907. Thereafter, interest waned as the easily milled oxidized ores were depleted. Lindgren (1898, p. 708) estimated that the district produced $80,000 in gold (about 4,000 ounces) to 1896, but Anderson (1934, p. 18) listed an estimate (by R. N. Bell) of ores worth more than $1 million. Including Lindgren’s estimate for the early production, the minimum total gold production for this district was about 20,000 ounces.

Country rock in the Westview district consists of a batholithic mass of quartz diorite and granodiorite (Anderson, 1934, p. 5-12). An elongate mass of diorite cuts the granodiorite and a large number of porphyry dikes cut both the granodiorite and diorite. These dikes, which are in a belt that trends east-northeast, are composed of dacite porphyry, granite porphyry, syenite porphyry, and rhyolite porphyry; some are moderately mafic in composition. The ore deposits are mineralized fissures in the dike zone, and they may be in granodiorite, diorite, or in or along the dike contacts (Anderson, 1934, p. 18). The deposits are stringers of arsenopyrite and pyrite and contain subordinate sphalerite and galena and small amounts of chalcopyrite, tetrahedrite, boulangerite, and stibnite. Small amounts of quartz, dolomite, and calcite gangue accompany the ore minerals, but the chief gangue component is broken and altered wallrock. Gold accompanies the sulfides and is extremely fine grained (Anderson, 1934, p.19).

source: Western Mining History [h/t AGHP]
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Red Warrior Mine Pearl Idaho 3

RedWarriorMinePearlIdaho3Fritz-a

from the Mike Fritz Collection
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Pearl Steam Shovel

PearlSteamshovelHHartman-a

This is my Great Grandfather John Henry Hermo, with his steam shovel at the mine at Pearl, Idaho.

source: Hugh Hartman
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Newspaper Clippings

The Idaho Daily Statesman Sept. 30, 1890

“The tranquility of Main Street was slightly disturbed last Sunday morning by a fight between Mr. K.P. Plowman and Doc Rankin, in which the latter came off second best. It appears that Mr. Plowman was standing at the counter in one of the saloons talking to the barkeeper when Mr. Rankin entered, and hot words ensued, in the course of which Plowman accused Rankin of stealing an anvil. They came to blows and before the barkeeper could interfere Mr. Rankin had received two black eyes and other facial blemishes. Friends interfered and each went out swearing he would have the other arrested, but up to going to press nothing has been done by either party.”

source: Arthur Hart Special to the Statesman May 17, 2015 “Frontier violence was often induced by alcohol”
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Plowman’s, Payette River, Montour

Plowmans-a

source: AHGP Idaho
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W. P. Kissinger Murders His Sister-In-Law and Then Suicides

The Emmett Index July 3, 1902

Tragedy at Pearl

J. C. Shepherd, the Pearl stage driver, brought to Emmett Saturday morning news of the murder of Mrs. W. A. Garner, wife of a well known miner of that place, by W. P. Kissinger, of Pendelton, Oregon. He shot his victim twice in the head, killing her instantly, holding her in his arms while doing the shooting. He then laid her down and put the gun to his own head, falling by her side.

Kissinger in his statement said the woman, as Ada Horn, loved him passionately in Oregon and begged him repeatedly to leave his wife, her sister, Mattie. He finally did so, for the purpose of marrying Ada. He said he did not learn of Ada’s marriage to Garner until shortly before he got his divorce, which was obtained about 10 days ago.

source: AHGP [h/t SMc]
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The Idaho Statesman (Boise City, Idaho) 05 Sep 1900

PearlHotel4Sale-a

source: Mike Sudduth

The Idaho Statesman (Boise City, Idaho) 09 May 1902

PearlCookWanted-a

source: Mike Sudduth

The Idaho Statesman (Boise City, Idaho) 29 Mar 1902

PearlWorkWanted-a

source: Mike Sudduth
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A New Stage Line

The Emmett Index May 29, 1902

E. H. Beggs to Run Daily Stage from Emmett to Centerville

E. H. Dewey has made arrangements with E. H. Beggs to run a daily stage from Emmett to Centerville via Pearl and Placerville. This new line will begin operation on July 1st.

Such things as the above demonstrates that Mr. Dewey is exerting every effort to make business for his road and to build up our town. The liveliest place in all Idaho this summer, outside of Thunder Mountain itself, will be Emmett.

source: Idaho AHGP
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History Pearl Idaho

PearlIdaho2Fritz-a

from the Mike Fritz Collection
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Pearl

by Sharon McConnel

1894 Discovery, production

Robert N. Bell, former Idaho Inspector of Mines, writing in a 1935 article in the “Boise Capital News” describes the discovery as follows:

The original ore discovery of the Pearl district was made in the 70’s by the early day placer miners who, however, did not find anything to justify more than a few scattered prospects cut in rather lean ore. In 1894 the camp consisted of one cabin under a grove of cottonwood trees, occupied by cowboys as summer cattle range headquarters. During that year a section boss by the name of Dan Levan wantered into camp with a wife and two or three small children, looking for a summer camp. . . the cowboys taking kindly to him encouraged him settling there, pointing out to him some rusty streaks on the side hill where they had found some good gold panning. . . Levan took to prospecting; ran a cut on the discovery shown him; found rich ore from which he could make wages with a hand motar; soon expanded his operation to a horse arrastra. . . Levan’s claim became the first mining title suit in Pearl district and was settled out of court when attorney William Edgar Borah found a buyer in Colonel E. H. Dewey and the sales proceeds were divided by all concerned.

Merle Wells in “Gold Camps and Silver Cities” writes that Pearl gold mines became productive in 1894 yielding $30,000, followed by $80,000 in 1896.

In September 1896 Robert Minton and Margurite Jury bought a newly constructed two-story, 20’x 50′ boarding house “on the south side of the road, between a storeroom on the east and the Checkmate ore house on the west.” J. E. Griggs filed a mechanics lien against the builder for $96.70, which included freight charges on 13,608 feet of lumber. Another contractor filed a lien for unpaid labor at the rate of $3.50 per day and materials in the amount of $75 for the construction of a store. Other mechanics liens at that time included “labor as a miner at rate of $3.00 per day,” one at the rate of $3.50 per day and another at the rate of $4.00 per shift.

The post office was established November 12, 1895 with Oakley C. Wylie named as first postmaster. He served until July 1904, undoubtedly assisted by his wife Minnie, since he was counted as a miner in the 1900 census. George A. Sprague followed Wylie as postmaster.

1900 – Optimism

The 1900 census counted 243 people in Pearl, fifty-one were women and seventy-two were children, thirty of whom were in school. Five households were headed by women. Single men outnumbered single women, 75 to 8, and women did not stay single long. Of the ten single women, at least five were married within five years.

All occupations necessary to keep a village running were found in Pearl – mercantile, drug store, livery stable, barber shop, shoemaker, butcher shop, saloons. Eight teamsters, plus veteran stage driver Joseph Shepherd, all lived in Pearl indicating the volume of freight traveling the Willow Creek road. Even firewood needed to be freighted in. The other men were miners, millwrights, engineers, machinists, laborers, carpenters, farmers, washman, and stenographer. Besides the three hotels, five households took in boarders. People came from the mining towns of Ruby Hill and Cortez in Nevada and from Silver City, Delamar, Quartzburg and Placerville in Idaho, as well as from Boise City, which was about twenty miles away.

The first of April 1902, the “Emmett Index” reported that the Checkmate mill was nearly full of concentrates, but due to the bad condition of the roads, it was almost impossible to ship to Boise. The same month Colonel Dewey’s First Idaho Northern Railroad arrived in Emmett. The following month it was announced that E. H. Dewey had arranged for a new daily stage, to run from Emmett to Centerville via Pearl and Placerville. In June the paper reported “”the Pearl district has had a black eye because of the lack of energy, capital and management.” A week later it reported that “The Checkmate mine, the famous producer of the Pearl district, has been sold to a syndicate of Spokane capitalists for a price said to be $200,000. . .”

Optimism was evident on Main Street. That year, the “Ladies Aid Society of Pearl” bought a “two story house, one wood shed and a cellar located on Main Street” which they sold thirteen months later to Union Congregational Church. The IOOF Pearl Lodge bought a building. Rush VonHarten, a stationery store keeper from Boise, bought the Pearl Drug Store. A year later Rene Hazelton, an innkeeper from Ada County, bought the Gem Saloon, which, the deed tells us, was “on the south side. . facing Main Street. . . between the building now owned by Frank Demant as a store and the building occupied by the Idaho Dress Beef Company,” the northeast corner of the ground being about “fifty feet westerly from the town well.”

A year later, in April 30, 1903, the “Emmett Index” reported “the power plant (four miles north of Pearl on the Payette River, Boise County) has poles set and wires run and is now ready to transmit power to Pearl and install electric lights” . . . “the town has a good school, union Sunday school, two first-class general stores, a meat market, barber shop, two hotels, two saloons, a feed and livery stable and dairy. There is daily mail excepting Sunday and two telephone lines. . It can be reached by wagon from Boise or Caldwell in four hours time or from Nampa to Emmett by the Idaho Northern thence by state in two hours time.

“This district is comparatively a new one, as while placer mining has been carried on for a number of years, not until the year 1895 were even the crude methods of quartz operations undertaken. Within the past two years concentrators have been introduced into several of the mills of the district with the most satisfactory results. The camp now has a few steady producers and has shipped more ore and bullion than any mines of Southern Idaho. Hitherto all this ore has been hauled to Boise, but since the completion of the Idaho Northern railway to Emmett, this place has become the distributing point of the Pearl district. Already one carload of concentrates is shipped each third day from the Checkmate mine via Emmett and Nampa. The arrival of the railroad is timely for the productions of the mines of this district will be many times large this year than ever before.”

1910 – Decline

By the 1910 census, Pearl’s population had decreased by roughly half and the occupational diversity was gone. Twenty-seven of the 123 residents were gold miners and three others were mine-related: engineer, millwright, and one handyman. The number of businesses had dwindled. Rush VonHarten still had the store he had bought eight years earlier and his wife Luella was the postmistress. Seventy-five year old Lewllyn Walter, former Walter’s Ferry ferrymaster, still had his store. During the past decade both men had served in the state senate. Rene Hazelton was managing the hotel and Fred Crawford from Quartzburg was the only saloon keeper. Former saloon keeper Sam Birdwell had turned to mining.

Four men from Pearl registered for the WWI draft. John McLean, son of the Dave McLeans of Pearl, was the first Gem County WWI casuality.

1920 – Further Decline

At the time of the 1920, only 40 people were counted in the village of Pearl, with the total for the entire precinct being sixty-nine. Farmers outnumbered miners almost three to one. Farmers outnumbered miners. William VonHarten, presumably Rush’s brother, was running the store. Rush’s son-in-law Jules Delamater was post master. George O’Neil, Pearl’s last post master, died December 1928, within one mile of home, while on his way to Boise in an automobile, and an era ended. Joseph Dunbar, who moved to Pearl in 1899 as a miner and stayed until his death in 1950, at which time he was managing the Idaho Power substation, probably lived in Pearl longer than anyone else. The last remaining buildings were razed in the spring of 2004.

Legends

Today legends circulate about Pearl. One legend is of shootouts and victims buried in “boothill” yet a study of the obituaries of the people buried in the Pearl cemetery does not show that. Working from J. B. McKenney’s 1921 cemetery plat, there are forty-five known burials in Pearl, twenty were babies and two were suicides, plus one man who presumably died from a prolonged drunk. The John McKenneys moved to Pearl around 1903, so he was there during the boom.

Another legend is that Pearl was one-time an incorporated town, yet there is no evidence to support that. Again a study of Pearl obituaries does not reveal any mayors or city councilmen. Another is of documents not transferred from Idaho City to Emmett when Gem County was formed in 1915, but no one can say exactly what documents are supposedly missing. The village sat on patented mining claims and the deeds for those claims can be found in courthouse in Emmett. Some of what we know today about the Pearl businesses has been gleaned from leases and bills of sales found in the public record.

Estimates of the number of people and dwellings vary greatly. The 1900 census shows 243 people – men, women and children. A 1903 museum photograph looking west from water tower hill shows less than fifty roofs, including outhouses. No tents are visible in the photograph, so presumably the population was somewhat stable.

Now as early in last century, the small mining camp of Pearl captures people’s imagination. And evidence may still come to light that gives credence to some of the stories.

Pearl 1991

1991PearlSMc-a

The property owner razed the last remaining buildings in the spring of 2004. Mine portals remain, including The Gem State Consolidated (with a car body over the portal), north of the road at the west end.

source: Gem County, Idaho GenWeb [hat tip to SMc]
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Pearl Maps and Plats

Book 1, page 33, public records. map showing old Boise/Canyon county line and Westview Mining District (Pearl). The map was filed in Canyon County Oct. 27, 1897, at 3 PM and certified Nov. 11, 1915 when we became Gem County.

1897-bk1p33-a

(click image for source – larger size)

Pearl Map 1902

1902-pearl-plat-a
(click image for source – larger size)

reconstruction by Sharon McConnel
source: Gem County Museum Idaho AGHP

Pearl 1902

Gem County Historical Society and Village Museum

Looking west from “water tower hill” down Willow Creek

source w/more info: Gem County Historical Society and Village Museum
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Pearl Cemetery

The Pearl Cemetery is on private property on a hill west of the Pearl townsite. It is described as “approximately 125 feet by 150 feet . . . as evidenced by a surrounding steel fence” in the easement granted by the state of Idaho to Fred Turner in August 1962 and recorded in Gem County Records October 2004. Fred Turner was a grandson of Don and Emma MacAskill. His descendants live in the Star area. The surrounding property passed from state ownership to private ownership in 1962.

The cemetery consists of seven rows aligned north and south, with a lane running east and west from the gate, down the middle, and is fenced by wire mesh “hog wire.” Presumably at one time some of the unmarked graves were marked with wooden markers which have not survived. In 1921 J. B. McKenney prepared a plat of the cemetery. John McKenney and his wife Mabel MacAskill McKenney moved to Pearl in 1903 and they lived there for the next forty years. (Photo)

In 1992 the Gem County Historical Preservation Commission1 inventoried, cleaned up the site and attempted to place it on the historical register. Some of the stones were re-set and the historical marker was errected. These photos are from that project. The information below is an expansion and continuation of the research done at that time. In the summer of 2009 MacAskill descendants cleaned and cleared extensively.

My great-grandparents (Donald and Emma MacAskill) are buried in this cemetery and I have been visiting it since I was a child. – Sharon McConnel

Historical Marker

PearlCemetery-a
Gem County Historical Preservation Commission

link to 1921 plat of Pearl Cemetery:

link to cemetery page with names and lots of info:
AHGP Copyright © 2013 – 2018 Sharon McConnel. All Rights Reserved.
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Pearl Cemetery – Gem County

pearl-cem-a
Photo contributed by Sharon McConnel

Left to right: Alice Ringold grave [in fence], Arthur Turner stone, Thomas S. Grimes & Florence C. Baldwin Grimes stone

Pearl cemetery 1991 – [stones have since been reset]

source: Gem County Archives Gem County IDGenWeb Project
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Gem County Township 6 N. Range 1 E., Pearl, Willow Creek

1939MetskerPearl-a

source (and full plat):

[h/t Gem County Historical Village Museum] FB page link:
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PearlSinksDustHeadline

Pearl, Former Gem County Ghost Town, Sinks Further into the Dust

Jan 22, 1981 Messenger-Index

A person visiting the townsite of Pearl today would have difficulty believing that at the turn of the century 1200 souls filled the town with bustle and gold boom.

Today the only permanent resident of the town is Joe Burkhart, although there are some temporary residents who are employees of Moneka Mine Development Ltd. of Boise.

Along Willow Creek which runs through the townsite, gold was first discovered in late 1867. The first load development was at the Red Warrior Mine operated in 1870, however no major deposits were developed until 1894.

Major development occurred during 1900 – 1907 which saw Pearl blossom into an incorporated town boasting a gravity feed running water system supplied from a tank on, what else, Water Tank Hill and electrical power supplied by the Idaho Power Plant on the current Horseshoe Bend highway.

There were 2 hotels, the Black Pearl and the Bramlee, as well as four saloons, several general merchandise stores, a boarding house, a barber shop, a butcher and a slaughter house.

Hester Woody of Emmett lived at the Bramlee Hotel in 1921 while she taught school for 23 youngsters, in a building which had been a church. That school house burned down and was replaced with another school built in 1934 which is one of the few older buildings left at Pearl.

The Black Pearl hotel survived until this past March when Moneka mine workers tore mast of it down fearing it would collapse on a nearby power line.

Records of mining output are sketchy and incomplete before 1915. According to Bureau of Miners and Geology records, the value of metals from the Pearl mines from 1915-1959 was $534,000.

In comparison, the records of State mine Inspector Bell advise that by 1907 one million dollars in gold had been recovered from the Checkmate stake alone.

The Checkmate mine descended 600 feet and had 6 levels. Rich ores often yielded 5 ounces of gold and 5 ounces of silver to the ton according to the records of a geographer in 1898.

In an average yield the ore contained .25 to .50 ounces of gold per ton. At that time the average yield could not sustain operation. According to another geographer named Anderson, the early operations closed down because ore drilling methods were inadequate to make good recoveries.

Starting with the closure of Checkmate in 1907, mining operations slowly closed down and the town dwindled away. Intermittent mining operations started back up only to close again after generally making either small or feasible returns.

Currently two companies are active in the Pearl area, Moneka Mine and Sunshine Mine. Geographer Dave Hembree, project manager for Moneka Mine, reported that his crew drilled 14 test holes from March through December.

Some of the samples yielded .5 ounces of Role’ per ton and according to Hembree the company could make $150 profit per ton of mined ore at that yield. Hembree also said that they would have to conduct further testing for the next year before any final decisions on restarting mining operations could be made.

Pearl’s revival as a mining center seems to be possible however its days as a boom town belong to those disolutive spirits lingering in the abandoned mine shafts, still searching for the [g]lint of that elusive mother load.

source: Jan 22, 1981 Messenger-Index courtesy of Gem County Historical Society [h/t SMc]
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Credits

Gem County Historical Society and Village Museum
501 E. First St, Emmett, Idaho 83617
The museum’s photo collection includes a Gem Saloon street scene, Lincoln Mine crew plus others.
[very big hat tip to SMc]
————————

link to: Pearl, Gem County, Idaho (part 1)

page updated September 11, 2020

Road Reports Aug 25, 2019

Please share road reports on Profile Creek and Lick Creek roads. South Fork road is closed from 7am to 4pm Monday thru Friday. The Stibnite road between Yellow Pine and the mine is open with caution. Be prepared for rocks and trees in the road and remember there is no cell phone service. Please share road reports.

Yellow Pine: Dry this last week and very dusty streets. Please respect your neighbors and slow down!
Click for Local Forecast.
Yellow Pine Webcam: (check date on image)

Warm Lake Highway: Clear
SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

Highway 55 Webcams Link:

South Fork Road: Closed Monday through Friday from 7am to 4pm on weekdays, with no closures over the weekends.
Report Sunday (Aug 11) the curve at Goat Creek has been straightened. Construction zones are cleaned up and smooth dirt road on weekends.
Map w/info for August 19 through August 23:
More info:
Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
South Fork Stream Gauge:

EFSF Road: Report on Sunday (Aug 11) the road is still in good shape.

Johnson Creek Road: Watch for extra traffic due to closures on the South Fork route.
Wednesday (Aug 21) mail truck driver (Robert) reports the road is really rough in the Rustican and Halfway areas.
Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam:
Johnson Creek Stream Gauge:
The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Reported open June 23. No current report.
Last report Tuesday (July 2 early morning) “The road wasn’t bad. Some wash outs and ruts but just bumpy.” AP
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Reported open June 23. Reported to be rough Aug 3. No current report.
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcam: (check date on image)

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open with cautions – expect delays in the work area.
Update from Valley Co. Road Dept. Aug 13: “we strongly advise people need to be very cautious of a few dump trucks working between Stibnite and Yellow Pine. The contractor will begin laying a crushed rock surface on the repairs probably next week.”
Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Reported open June 30. Watch for gravel trucks between YP and Stibnite.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Open and rough.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Warren Wagon Road: West of Payette Lake road is closed for construction Monday-Friday from 8am to noon and from 1pm to 5pm.
Warren Wagon Road reopened in the fire area to the public Aug 16, please slow down for firefighters!
Burgdorf/French Creek road reported open Aug 20.
Netheker Fire InciWeb link:

Secesh: Road is open to Secesh, watch for fire traffic.

Stanley to Landmark: Forest road 579 temporary closure planned from September 16th – Sept. 29th for maintenance.

Deadwood Summit: Reported Open June 16th
Report Aug 11: from Landmark to Deadwood really good until the last 10 miles to the lake.
Report from VCSO Aug 14: Forest road 579, Landmark to Stanley Road, temporary closure planned from September 16th – Sept. 29th for maintenance.
Old report from BNF June 26th: Access to Deadwood Campgrounds is open along FS 579 road from State Highway 21. Access to Deadwood Campgrounds from FS 582 (Clear Creek Rd) to FS 579 is open. Cascade to Landmark access to Deadwood Campgrounds via FS 579 road is open. FS 555 road to Deadwood Campgrounds is too rough to travel and not a recommended route.
Note: The approx elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′
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Weather Reports Aug 18-24, 2019

Aug 18 Weather:

At 9am it was 50 degrees and clear. Mostly clear and warm mid-day. At 3pm it was 86 degrees, partly cloudy and light breezes. At 720pm it was 80 degrees, clear and light breezes. At 9pm it was 68 degrees clear sky with rosy haze to the west.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time August 19, 2019 at 09:00AM
Clear
Max temperature 88 degrees F
Min temperature 45 degrees F
At observation 55 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

Aug 19 Weather:

At 9am it was 55 degrees and clear. A few clouds, mostly sunny and breezy mid-day. At 3pm it was 92 degrees, almost clear and breezy. At 745pm it was 80 degrees, mostly clear – a few high thin clouds and light breezes. At 9pm it was 70 degrees, looks clear – maybe thin haze and almost calm.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time August 20, 2019 at 09:00AM
Mostly clear, poor air quality (dust)
Max temperature 93 degrees F
Min temperature 46 degrees F
At observation 53 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

Aug 20 Weather:

At 9am it was 53 degrees, mostly clear and poor air quality (dust.) Some clouds and breezy mid-day. At 330pm it was 93 degrees, mostly cloudy and hot breezes. At 720pm it was 89 degrees, mostly cloudy and slight breeze. At 820pm it was 82 degrees. At 10pm it was 71 degrees and mostly cloudy. Partly clear at 11pm.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time August 21, 2019 at 09:00AM
Partly cloudy, poor air quality (dust)
Max temperature 97 degrees F
Min temperature 48 degrees F
At observation 55 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

Aug 21 Weather:

At 9am it was 55 degrees, partly cloudy and poor air quality (dust.) Increasing clouds mid-day, light breezes. At 320pm it was 93 degrees, mostly cloudy and light breezes. At 730pm it was 84 degrees, overcast and calm. At 9pm it was 75 degrees, mostly cloudy and calm. Breezy after 1am. Drops of rain at 2am for about 10 minutes. Probably a few more sprinkles during the night.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time August 22, 2019 at 09:00AM
Partly clear
Max temperature 96 degrees F
Min temperature 51 degrees F
At observation 58 degrees F
Precipitation 0.01 inch
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Aug 22 Weather:

At 9am it was 58 degrees and partly clear. Partly cloudy and light breezes mid-day. At 3pm it was 80 degrees, partly cloudy and light breezes. At 730pm it was 69 degrees, partly cloudy and cool breezes. At 9pm it was 65 degrees, partly cloudy and almost calm.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time August 23, 2019 at 09:00AM
Clear
Max temperature 81 degrees F
Min temperature 42 degrees F
At observation 47 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

Aug 23 Weather:

At 9am it was 47 degrees and clear. Partly cloudy – high wispies – and light breezes mid-day. At 315pm it was 83 degrees, mostly clear and light breezes. At 730pm it was 77 degrees, mostly clear and calm. At 9pm it was 69 degrees, some high haze.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time August 24, 2019 at 09:00AM
Mostly cloudy – high thin bubble-wrap
Max temperature 86 degrees F
Min temperature 47 degrees F
At observation 54 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

Aug 24 Weather:

At 9am it was 54 degrees and mostly cloudy – high thin “bubble-wrap” looking clouds. At 245pm it was 86 degrees, mostly cloudy and gusty breezes. At 740pm it was 78 degrees, mostly cloudy – high wispies – and light breeze.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time August 25, 2019 at 09:00AM
Mostly clear
Max temperature 88 degrees F
Min temperature 42 degrees F
At observation 49 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
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Prescribed Burn Information for Fall 2019 YP Community Meeting Sept 4, 2019

Prescribed Burn Information for Fall 2019 YP Community Meeting Sept 4

The Payette NF, Krassel RD is hosting a community meeting to provide information for the Fall 2019 prescribed burn season. I will have a short presentation and we will take questions. This is informal and conversation/ discussion will be welcome.

Time: Wednesday Sept 4, 2019 11:00-12:00
Place: Yellow Pine Community Hall

We are planning on implementing prescribed burns in both the Four Mile and Bald Hill project areas this fall, likely September or October. Maps are attached with burn blocks that are planned outlined in red. If you cannot attend and have any questions or concerns please feel free to call Laurel Ingram, Fuels Tech at 208-634-0622 or Patrick Schon, Fuels Specialist at 208-634-0623.

Thanks and hope to see you in Yellow Pine on Sept 4.

Laurel Ingram
Fuels Technician
Payette National Forest
Krassel Ranger District

link to: Bald Hill Fall 2019 Notifications.pdf

link to: FourMile_Notification Fall 2019.pdf
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Road Reports Aug 21, 2019

Asking for recent reports on Profile Creek and Lick Creek roads. South Fork road is closed from 7am to 4pm Monday thru Friday. The Stibnite road between Yellow Pine and the mine is open with caution. Be prepared for rocks and trees in the road and remember there is no cell phone service. Please share road reports.

Yellow Pine: Dry this last week and very dusty streets. Please respect your neighbors and slow down!
Click for Local Forecast.
Yellow Pine Webcam: (check date on image)

Warm Lake Highway: Clear
SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

Highway 55 Webcams Link:

South Fork Road: Closed Monday through Friday from 7am to 4pm on weekdays, with no closures over the weekends.
Report Sunday (Aug 11) the curve at Goat Creek has been straightened. Construction zones are cleaned up and smooth dirt road on weekends.
Map w/info for August 19 through August 23:
More info:
Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
South Fork Stream Gauge:

EFSF Road: Report on Sunday (Aug 11) the road is still in good shape.

Johnson Creek Road: Watch for extra traffic due to closures on the South Fork route.
Wednesday (Aug 21) mail truck driver (Robert) reports the road is really rough in the Rustican and Halfway areas.
Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam:
Johnson Creek Stream Gauge:
The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Reported open June 23. No current report.
Last report Tuesday (July 2 early morning) “The road wasn’t bad. Some wash outs and ruts but just bumpy.” AP
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Reported open June 23. Reported to be rough Aug 3.
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcam: (check date on image)

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open with cautions – expect delays in the work area.
Update from Valley Co. Road Dept. Aug 13: “we strongly advise people need to be very cautious of a few dump trucks working between Stibnite and Yellow Pine. The contractor will begin laying a crushed rock surface on the repairs probably next week.”
Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Reported open June 30. Watch for gravel trucks between YP and Stibnite.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Open and rough.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Warren Wagon Road: West of Payette Lake road is closed for construction Monday-Friday from 8am to noon and from 1pm to 5pm.
Warren Wagon Road reopened in the fire area to the public Aug 16, please slow down for firefighters!
Burgdorf/French Creek road reported open Aug 20.
Netheker Fire InciWeb link:

Secesh: Road is open to Secesh, watch for fire traffic.

Stanley to Landmark: Forest road 579 temporary closure planned from September 16th – Sept. 29th for maintenance.

Deadwood Summit: Reported Open June 16th
Report Aug 11: from Landmark to Deadwood really good until the last 10 miles to the lake.
Report from VCSO Aug 14: Forest road 579, Landmark to Stanley Road, temporary closure planned from September 16th – Sept. 29th for maintenance.
Old report from BNF June 26th: Access to Deadwood Campgrounds is open along FS 579 road from State Highway 21. Access to Deadwood Campgrounds from FS 582 (Clear Creek Rd) to FS 579 is open. Cascade to Landmark access to Deadwood Campgrounds via FS 579 road is open. FS 555 road to Deadwood Campgrounds is too rough to travel and not a recommended route.
Note: The approx elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′
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