Monthly Archives: September 2019

Sept 29, 2019 The Yellow Pine Times

Sept 29, 2019 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Note: The boil order and water restrictions are still in effect.

Community Calendar:

April 2 – Boil water order issued
Every Sunday – 11am Fire/SAR Training
May 10 to Oct 10 – Burn “permits” required
May 15 – Firewood Season opens
July 22 – Daytime closures on So. Fk road begin
Oct 5 – 8pm Dave Nudo playing at the YP Tavern
Oct 9 – Diamond Fuel delivery

(details below)
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Local Events:

Saturday October 5th YP Tavern

Coming back to the Tavern for the 4th year Dave Nudo. Catch him Saturday October 5th at 8pm. Always a good time!
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Fuel Delivery Oct 9

Diamond Fuel (and Feed) will be delivering fuel to Yellow Pine on Oct 9th. Please check your tanks and give them a call (208) 382-4430.
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Village News:

Smoke Sep 25 from Rx burn

20190925smoke-a
photo courtesy Eye n the Sky Yellow Pine cam

Prescribed Burning in Bald Hill and Four Mile Projects September 25 and 26
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Fish Fry at the Yellow Pine Tavern Sept 28

20190928FishFry-a
photo courtesy YP Tavern

There was a good turnout for our annual fish fry. About 50 people showed up in spite of the rain. We estimate this is our 15th year for this event. Thanks to Stu for his donation of the fish, Jeff, Willie and Steve for frying the fish, Ann for the set up and take down, Nicki for bar tending, Sue for the cleanup and all of the folks who brought desserts and other dishes.

– Yellow Pine Tavern

link to FB photo gallery:
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Get Ready for Winter Heating

* Inspect and clean the chimney. Contact the YPFD to borrow chimney brushes.
* Inspect and clean wood stoves, make sure dampers work properly and check for leaks.
* Check your carbon monoxide and smoke detectors – install fresh batteries.
* Check your fire extinguisher and make sure it is handy. Manually rotate them around, tip upside down and lightly shake them, thus keeping the fire fighting agent loose, and check that the needle is still in the green. If you need a new one please call, your fire commissioner or Jeff F.
* If you have an oil-powered furnace, replace your filter and nozzle and check the tank level.
* Check your propane tank levels (early morning when it is cool in case there is a wasp nest!)
* Test the igniter switch. On an old system, you might have to relight the pilot. Newer systems have electronic igniters.
* Lubricate and clean the blower motor. First check the owner’s manual to see if your motor is the kind that needs lubricating. If it does, turn off the power, open the cover and clean the caps covering the bearings. Then remove the caps and lubricate the bearings.
* Inspect the blower belt for cracks. Turn off the power to the furnace at the main circuit breaker. Use a screwdriver to remove the steel cover of the air handler. The blower belt is the largest rubber belt that you see. Replace the belt if it is cracked.
* Inspect the exhaust flue outdoors to ensure it is free of obstructions such as branches or animal nests.
* Keep the area around your furnace unit free of debris and clutter.
* Change the air filters. Clean your air vents and ducts. Remove the vent covers with a screwdriver. Use the extension hose of your vacuum to remove the dust.
* Open all your air vents. Remove furniture, boxes and clutter that get in the way of air flowing from the vents.

Local Fuel Suppliers
Propane
Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Heating fuel
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430
Furnace Service
Rocky Mountain Mechanical (208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett
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Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Report Sept 19th: Road to the dump is good. The bins were empty Thursday afternoon.

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

Yellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is located approximately 3 miles south on Johnson Creek Road.

The TRANSFER STATION is for household trash and yard waste:
* Household trash must be put inside (and fit) the dumpster;
* Yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, et.) goes in the burn pile on the south end of the turn-around;
* Cardboard boxes should be flattened before putting the in the dumpster,

The DUMPSTERS are NOT for:
* Furniture (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station).

The BURN PILE is NOT for:
* Cardboard boxes (flatten and put in dumpster);
* Furniture and appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Drywall and building material (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wire or fencing (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Foam Rubber (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wood with metal (like nails) attached (take to Donnelly Transfer Station.)

When closing the DOORS on the front of the dumpsters:
* Make sure the “U” brackets at the top and bottom of the door are engaged;
* The retaining bar at the middle of the door is slid into the pipe;
* And the “L” bars at the bottom of the doors dropped into place.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: 208/634-7176
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Roads

Snow in the high country

Photo of snow Profile Gap Saturday Sep 28th (courtesy Scott A)

Photo of snow Warm Lake summit Saturday Sep 28th (courtesy Dave P)
20190928WarmLakeSummitSnow-a

Photo of snow at Stibnite Sunday Sep 29th (courtesy Midas Gold)
20190929SnowStibnite-a

South Fork Road: Note: It is possible they may be done with the paving, if so, then the road closures will end for the season. Waiting on confirmation from the FS.
More info:

YP to Stibnite Road
Update from Valley Co. Road Dept Sept 25: Work is complete on the Stibnite road. I believe the contractor is still going to blade the road from Yellow Pine to Stibnite.
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Yellow Pine US Mail

The 6-day a week mail delivery started June 1st. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 55 cents
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Reminder for people living in bear country:

* Garbage should be stored inside the house or in a secure garage or storage building.
* If garbage cannot be stored in a secure location, a bear-resistant container approved by the Interagency Bear Committee is recommended.
* Avoid using bird feeders from March through November. Birds do not need supplemental feeding this time of year.
* Pet food should not be left outside.
* BBQ grills or anything with a strong odor should not be left out at night.
* Protect gardens, beehives, and compost piles with electric fencing.
* Never intentionally feed bears. A food-conditioned bear may pose a threat to human safety and usually results in the removal of the bear.
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Local Groups:

YPWUA News:

The yearly Yellow Pine Water Users Shareholders meeting was Sunday July 7th in the community hall. (No minutes yet)

Water Update Sept 21 (excerpted from VYPA 9/21 meeting notes):

Tests were conducted by Idaho Rural Water [July 19th] in an effort to locate the source of the major leak in the system. They will return October 3rd to continue the search for leaks. The line between Alpine Village and the Saleen property, which includes the bridge across the East Fork river is the line most suspected to be leaking. Cecil Dallman will stand by with a backhoe to dig in locations found. More digging work is needed at the tanks and pipes near the water facility. A second engineer is being consulted. Getting contractors to come to YP and replace seals is difficult. The previous grant money is tied to a timeline so some specified work must be done this fall.

The possibility for a large amount of grant money is very slim because we would have to take out a loan and use the borrowed money for the required matching money, and then there would be the loan payments. Money on hand must be used on required repairs to the contact tank. Because some water users do not have voting rights YPWUA does not qualify for some grants.

There are 56 shares available for purchase at $100/share. Each piece of land is entitled to own one share. Share holders are entitled to vote; water users that do not own a share may not vote, but do have access to water. The owners of the 56 lots are encouraged to purchase shares. Ownership of a share is shown on your annual water bill.

Anyone wanting to arrange a payment plan should contact Willie Sullivan.

– Steve Holloway/Willie Sullivan

Water Update Sept 8:

Still looking for the leak. Water restrictions and boil order still in effect.

Water Update June 7:

1. The “boil order” is still in effect.
2. There is still large water leaks in the system. We continue to look.
3. A grant for $39,000 was approved for improvements to the system.
3. Work is currently being done on the new contact tank.
4. Please, no lawn watering until we find and repair the major leaks.
– Steve Holloway

link to: #4430059 Yellow Pine Water Users Boil Water Notification 4-2-19

link to: 2018 September Water Department Update
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VYPA News:

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting Minutes for September 21, 2019
link to: 20190921 Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting Minutes for August 10, 2019
link to: 20190810 VYPA Minutes

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting Minutes for July 20, 2019
link to: 20190720 Yellow Pine Village Association Minutes

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting Minutes for June 8, 2019
link to: 20190608 Village of Yellow Pine Association

VYPA Meeting Dates 2019
June 8th; July 20th; August 10th; September 14th – 2pm at the Community Hall.
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YPFD News:

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice

The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.”

link to: 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation

Meeting minutes for Sept 14, 2019
link to: 2019-09-14 YPFD Meeting_final

Meeting minutes for July 13, 2019
link to: 20190713 YPFD Meeting Notes_final

Meeting minutes for June 16, 2019
link to: 20190615 YPFD Meeting Notes_Final

May 10th to Oct 10th Burn Permits – contact the YPFD

Pile burning: Dress appropriately, have enough help on hand (people, water and tools) and make a firebreak before you start. Call your local fire protection district chief to let them know you’ll be conducting a debris burn. This saves them from sending emergency responders to your property if they are not needed.

Bring it, Don’t Burn it

For us in Yellow Pine, Jake Strohmeyer, Dist. Ranger with the Boise NF said we can use the area at our transfer station for yard debris and the FS will burn it once a year. Please no furniture, mattresses, construction debris, metal objects, tires or personnel junk. Please only woody yard debris. When using the pile please be mindful of where you place the debris as it should be contained to a manageable burnable area and kept as clean as possible. – JF

Training: Sunday Fire/EMS training at 11am unless otherwise posted. All are welcome.

YP Helispot: We are working with Valley County Road Department and the Boise National Forest for the rock base for the road leading into the Helispot and the actual Helispot itself. We are also receiving rock for the Fire Hydrants, water tank foundations, etc. The rock will come from the Valdez pit and will be less expensive than having it trucked in from Cascade.

link to Cooking safety in the home:

link to Smoke Alarm Info:

-JF
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Biz Listings:

Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377

Call for reservations
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The Corner (208) 633-3325

Our hours will be 11-8 every day, except closed on Tuesdays. We are open for breakfast by request and always have good coffee starting at 6am.
The Corner has firewood permits in stock now. 4 cord minimum at $6.25 per cord. Please bring drivers license and cash is preferred, no CC.
The Corner Store will also be open with snacks, groceries, fresh produce, soda, ice and packaged beer. If you know you will be coming in over the summer and need special grocery orders, let me know and I will order it in for you while you are here, 2 deliveries a week. The best way to get a hold of me is to call or stop by and say hello.
Karaoke is back at The Corner! Choose your favorite songs from our online music library and entertain your friends up on stage through our professional sound system.
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Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233

Fall hours open 8AM to close
Full breakfast served starting at 8am with special arrangement for earlier breakfast as needed. 92 Octane non ethanol gas available, cubed ice, beer, pop and water sold by the 6 and 12 pack, snacks, ice cream and many supplies available. Burgers and Pizza, Beer and Wine on the evening menu. Football and other sports available on our TV. Wi Fi, Verizon phone service and information available.
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Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Tom & Sarah Lanham
156 Yellow Pine Ave, Yellow Pine Id 83677
website:
FB page:
It’s official starting June 2020 We will be doing trail rides out of Yellow Pine along with summer pack / camping trips to high mountain lakes in the area!

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
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Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430
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Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

The Star-News

subscribe:
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine

Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, will service Yellow Pine

B&T Safety Solutions LLC
208-271-1600 Based out of Donnelly
Snow removal, cleaning chimneys and stoves, we do cabin staining/chinking as well
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (Sep 23) our 24 hour low of 34 degrees was from Sunday morning, it was 39 degrees at sunrise, almost clear sky this morning – one cloud peeking over VanMeter to the north. Red-breasted nuthatches, jays, a pine skiskin and a couple of finches (and chipmunks) visiting. Partly cloudy before lunch time. Partly cloudy and mild breezes mid-afternoon, high of 71 degrees. Partly clear at sunset and just a slight breeze. Fall Equinox: sunrise just after 9am and sunset before 730pm. Absence of mosquitoes noted. Cloudy before midnight.

Tuesday (Sep 24) overnight low of 39 degrees, mostly dark clouds and nearly calm this morning. Crusher is running, small haze of dust. Herd of low loud airplanes flew over around 940am. Red-breasted nuthatches visiting. Bigger breaks in the clouds before lunch time and breezy. Warm, mostly clear and breezy mid-afternoon, high of 74 degrees. Female hairy woodpecker visiting. Mostly cloudy after sunset. Smell of burning garbage in the air. Cloudy before midnight.

Wednesday (Sep 25) overnight low of 36 degrees, mostly clear sky (high haze) and heavy dew. Crusher making high pitched whine, small haze of dust. Red-breasted nuthatches and steller jays visiting. A few clouds and breezy mid-day. Mail truck made it in on time. Small flock of finches flying around. Heavy smoke coming in from the west (Rx burn) mid-afternoon, breezy and no clouds in the sky, high of 71 degrees. By sunset the sun was a scarlet jewel in the west and the sky was orange, thick smoke almost obscured the hills. At dusk it was very smoky, unable to see the sky. A few hazy stars before midnight.

Thursday (Sep 26) overnight low of 33 degrees, mostly cloudy sky, dewy, light breeze and smoky air this morning. Noisy crusher running putting up small cloud of dust, traffic kicking up street dust as well. Red-breasted nuthatches visiting, raven flying and calling. A few noisy airplanes. Overcast and light breezes at lunch time, better air quality. Several chipmunks, a few finches and a pine squirrel visiting. A little extra traffic early afternoon. Dark overcast and light breezes mid-afternoon, high of 72 degrees. Started raining late afternoon, still raining lightly after sunset and cloudy.

Friday (Sep 27) overnight low of 36 degrees, mostly cloudy – peaks and ridges socked in. Nuthatches, hairy woodpecker and jays visiting. Clouds lifting and thinning by lunch time, light breeze. Light traffic, no dust. Partly cloudy and slight breeze mid-afternoon, high of 66 degrees. Power off/on at 540pm. Smoke settling in before sunset. Doe and 2 fat fawns munching around the neighborhood. At dusk it was mostly cloudy and smell of smoke in the air. Partly clear in the middle of the night.

Saturday (Sep 28) overnight low of 33 degrees, mostly cloudy and chilly light breeze this morning. Lots of nice tree color in the neighborhood. Evening grosbeaks are back! Hairy woodpecker, several nuthatches and a few jays also visiting. Pine squirrels and chipmunks are busy. Gusty breezes and rain shower right after lunch time. Extra traffic. Cool, cloudy and steady rain mid-afternoon, high of 46 degrees. Rained until late afternoon. Low foggy clouds just before sunset. Light misty sprinkle at dusk, very low clouds. Drizzles on and off until after midnight.

Sunday (Sep 29) overnight low of 34 degrees, low overcast and socked in this morning. Snow line looks below 6000 feet. Heard one grosbeak tweet, red-breasted nuthatches and jays busy at the feeders, dark-eyed juncos sheltering in the lilac bushes. Higher darker cloud cover at lunch time, high of 44 degrees. Flock of grosbeaks visiting and small flock of juncos out back. Gusty breezes and “grauple” (little snowballs) falling 3pm – enough to cover the ground in 15 minutes before melting, then large quarter sized flakes for about 10 minutes, then lighter snowfall which ended around 350pm. Breaks in the cloud cover before sunset. Partly clear at dusk and still above freezing.
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Photo to Share:

Wilbur’s grave marker, Idaho Veterans Cemetery, Boise, Idaho

RIPWilburWilesHeadstone-a

courtesy Sandy McRae
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Idaho News:

Proposed [Valley County] law would protect propane tanks from leaks

Snow slide blamed for March blast that killed McCall man

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News Sep 26, 2019

An ordinance aimed at preventing propane explosions like one that killed a McCall man and critically injured his granddaughter in March will be heard by Valley County commissioners on Monday.

A public hearing on the ordinance will be held at 2 p.m. in the Valley County Courthouse in Cascade.

The ordinance would require all propane systems in Valley County to be built with protective equipment that helps prevent leaks stemming from falling snow cracking outdoor propane pipes.

“The intent of the whole thing is to just build propane systems that are safe and maintenance-free for secondary homeowners and the like,” McCall Fire & EMS Chief Garrett de Jong said.

The ordinance, which was drafted by the McCall, Donnelly and Cascade fire districts and propane providers, is also expected to go before city councils in McCall, Donnelly and Cascade this fall, de Jong said.

The current draft would require second stage regulators to be placed on the gable end of roofs or a location approved by the local fire districts.

Second-stage regulators are installed along the edge of homes and manage propane flows to appliances.

The placement would help reduce the risk of snow shedding from roofs and damaging the regulators, de Jong said.

Snow shields would also be required over all regulators and piping to protect them from breaks caused by snow sliding or being shoveled off roofs and the pressure of built-up snow on the ground.

Instead of a solid metal regulator pipe, a flexible pipe would be required to allow the pipe to move under the weight of snow or other forces instead of shearing off.

Under the new ordinance, all new propane systems would be inspected and approved by the local fire district with jurisdiction over the property.

The new rules would apply only to new construction, while existing installations would not be required to be upgraded until a propane tank is replaced, according to the ordinance.

However, if the ordinance is adopted, de Jong anticipates many local propane providers would refuse to fill tanks without the safety equipment.

continued:
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Free woody debris collection to be held Oct. 4-16 at four sites

The Star-News Sep 26, 2019

Valley County residents can bring their woody debris to one of four free collection sites from Friday, Oct. 4, through Wednesday, Oct. 16, during the “Bring It, Don’t Burn It” event.

No construction waste or plastic bags will be accepted. Branches, needles, leaves and other organic materials will be accepted at the following collection sites:

• McCall Fire Station, 201 Deinhard Lane.

• Donnelly Fire Station, 244 W. Roseberry Road.

• Cascade Fire Station, 109 E. Pine St.

• Valley County Transfer Station, Spink Lane off Farm-to-Market Road in Donnelly.

The Valley County Transfer Station will accept debris until Saturday, Oct. 19.

source:

Note: The Yellow Pine woody debris pile is at the Transfer Station, please follow the rules listed in Village News.
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McCall Police crack down on city-wide TP’ing spree

by Ryan L Morrison Thursday, September 26th 2019


McCall Police Department

McCall, Idaho (CBS 2) — The McCall Police Department (MPD) is cracking down on a city-wide TP’ing spree as of Thursday.

What sounds like harmless pranks between students in the community, have now become an issue in what local authorities are calling a “city-wide free for all.”

“Businesses, streets, and entire blocks including, homes without kids, have all become the targets of both TP, eggs, and select produce items,” according to MPD.

continued:
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CPR, First Aid classes set for Donnelly on Oct. 16-17

The Star-News Sep 26, 2019

CPR/AED and First Aid classes will be offered on Wednesday and Thursday, Oct. 16-17, at 6 p.m. at the Donnelly Fire Station.

The CPR/AED portion will be held Wednesday, Oct. 16, and the First Aid portion will be held Thursday, Oct. 17.

Cost is $25, and space is limited. To register, call 208-325-8619.

The Donnelly Fire Station is located at 244 W. Roseberry Road.

source:
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GOP interviews two to replace Cruickshank

Governor will appoint new member to Valley commission

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News Sep 26, 2019

Two candidates for Valley County commissioner were interviewed by the Valley County Republican Central Committee last week.

The interviews at the Valley County Courthouse were with candidates to replace current commissioner Gordon Cruickshank, who plans to step down next week.

Sherry Maupin of McCall and Furel Dummar of Lake Fork were interviewed for Cruickshank’s seat, which must be filled by another Republican under state law.

The committee will meet again on Wednesday in a closed session to rank the two candidates and make a recommendation to Gov. Brad Little, who must appoint a new commissioner within 15 days.

continued:
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ITD holds community meeting to discuss Banks Lowman Road intersection

by Haley Squiers Friday, September 27th 2019

Chances are, if you’re headed to Idaho’s backcountry during the summer, you’ve likely run into the long lines along the Payette River.

Highway 55’s intersection with Banks Lowman Road is often packed with cars, boats, campers, kayakers and rafters.

Idaho Transportation Officials are hoping to ease some of that congestion.

“They’re solutions, but it’s just trying to find the right one, that benefits everyone,” said Idaho Transportation Department employee, Caleb Lakey.

continued:
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Little ‘dubious’ about proposal to tap counties to pay for Medicaid expansion

Little told the counties group that there are still many unknowns, including how many people will sign up for Idaho’s expanded Medicaid program.

Betsy Z. Russell, Idaho Press September 24, 2019

Boise, Idaho — Idaho Gov. Brad Little said Monday that he’s “dubious” about a legislative proposal to make counties kick in up to $10 million to help fund Medicaid expansion next year.

“Our budget request will basically harvest the savings that we have in corrections, that we have in Health and Welfare, we have in the other areas, to fund the state’s 10% of that Medicaid match,” Little told more than 200 county officials gathered in Boise for the annual conference of the Idaho Association of Counties. “That’s going to be embedded into my budget, and that’s what we’re going to need to do.”

Medicaid expansion already is funded for its first six months, from Jan. 1 to July 1, 2020, at no cost to the state general fund, through a combination of savings and $10 million from the state’s Millennium Fund, a tobacco settlement fund. The discussion now is about how to fund the state’s 10% share — the federal government will pay 90% of the cost — for the fiscal year that starts July 1, 2020. That’ll be an estimated $41.9 million.

continued:
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Mining News:

Judge says Idaho mining company violates federal water rules

U.S. District Judge Mikel Williams in 2012 ordered Atlanta Gold to pay $2 million for repeated violations of the Clean Water Act.

Associated Press September 22, 2019

Boise, Idaho — An Idaho mining company has not complied with court orders and continues to violate clean water rules, according to a ruling by a federal judge.

U.S. Chief Magistrate Judge Ronald Bush of Boise in an order Thursday determined that Atlanta Gold had not achieved substantial compliance at its Montezuma Creek site above Atlanta in Elmore County, the Idaho Statesman reported.

Montezuma Creek is a tributary of the Middle Fork of the Boise River, a source of drinking, irrigation and recreational water for Boise and other Treasure Valley communities.

continued:
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Pollution found in US river downstream of Canada mines

By Matthew Brown – 9/23/19 AP

Billings, Mont. — U.S. government scientists found high levels of pollution that can be toxic to fish, aquatic insects and the birds that feed on them in a river that flows into Montana and Idaho from a coal mining region of Canada, officials said Monday.

Elevated levels of selenium were found in fish and fish eggs from the Kootenai River downstream of Lake Koocanusa.

The lake straddles the Canada border in northwestern Montana and southern British Columbia, and feeds into the Kootenai before the water flows downstream to Idaho.

continued:
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Public Lands:

IDL reminds Idaho hunters about fire season and public land

by CBS 2 News Staff Wednesday, September 25th 2019

Boise, Idaho (CBS 2) — Hunting season has started in Idaho has started, however, fire season is still going.

The Idaho Department of Lands wants to remind hunters that fire season will go through the end of October and that people cause most fires.

“Most wildfires today are not naturally occurring,” according to IDL. “People – not lightning – were responsible for more than half the fires this year, accounting for 98% of the acres burned on lands protected by the Idaho Department of Lands.”

If campfires are allowed where you plan to hunt, make sure your campfire is cool to the touch before leaving it so you do not unintentionally start a wildfire.

continued:
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Idaho agencies say state land agreement is a good deal

Sep 26, 2019 AP

Boise, Idaho (AP) – Idaho officials at two state agencies say an agreement a little over a year ago formalizing public access to state-owned lands has been a good deal for the agencies as well as a benefit to hunters, anglers and recreationists.

The Idaho Department of Lands and Idaho Department of Fish and Game said Thursday both sides are benefiting from the 2018 agreement.

Fish and Game is paying the Lands Department $580,000 annually, with about a fourth of that in law enforcement.

continued:
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Comments sought on 3,000-acre project to combat tussock moths

The Star-News Sep 26, 2019

A proposed 3,000-acre project designed to battle an infestation of tussock moths in trees is proposed for the New Meadows Ranger District of the Payette National Forest.

The Little Red Goose Forest Resiliency Project is located inside 8,000-acres in Upper Goose Creek, Sixmile Creek and Lower Goose Creek between New Meadows and McCall.

The Forest Service will also host a public meeting on the Little Red Goose project on Wednesday, Oct. 9, at 6:30 p.m. Details on the meeting, including location, will be posted on the project webpage.

Moths, in combination with other blights, are threatening the health of trees in the area with a high risk that additional trees could be killed if no actions are taken, New Meadows District Ranger Erin Phelps said.

The project includes logging, firewood removal, slash pile burning and other controlled fire burns, the project proposal said.

“We recognized a need to focus our efforts and do what we can to give the area a chance to bounce back from the high stressors related to insects and disease,” Phelps said.

The Little Red Goose project area is within the larger Granite Meadows project, which is an approximately 80,000-acre Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration project that will have additional restoration work completed in the future.

“Adequately responding to this insect issue is important enough that we need to move quickly and efficiently,” Phelps said. Comments are requested through Monday, Oct. 21 on the project webpage.

source:
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Local citizen rewarded for helping with illegal dumping case on BLM land

Sep 27, 2019 By Steve Dent KIVI TV

Boise, Idaho — Illegal dumping on public lands continues to be a problem in Idaho, but recently a local citizen was rewarded $500 for helping authorities solve a case.

The Boise BLM District stretches for four million acres, but there are only four rangers patrolling the district.

“The public is truly our eyes and ears out there, without them we can’t get timely reports or have successful investigations,” said Ranger Jay Brown with the Bureau of Land Management.

continued:
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Tips and Advice:

Be bear aware

* Camping in Bear Country
* Do not feed bears or other wildlife.
* Visit or call the local Forest Service office to learn about special requirements or guidelines for properly storing food while camping in the area.
* Keep a clean camp site.
* Do not store food or any scented items in a tent, including clothing with food residues.
* Do not leave food unattended at a campsite or in your vehicle.
* Use bear-resistant food lockers and dumpsters where provided or bring your own.
* Clean utensils and food prep area thoroughly after cooking.
* Do not store garbage at camp site. Use a designated dumpster.
* At an undeveloped camping location, cook and store food away from sleeping area.

Remember: You are responsible for your own safety and for the safety of those around you.

source:
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Critter News:

MCPAWS to move Oktoberfest to The Activity Barn Oct. 5

The Star-News Sep 26, 2019

MCPAWS Regional Animal Shelter will celebrate fall with its family friendly Oktoberfest on Saturday, Oct. 5, from noon to 6 p.m. at a new location at The Activity Barn near McCall.

The event will include horse-drawn hayrides, a costume contest, live music by Bottom Line Band and Bob Kasnik, craft vendors, dancing, local brews, traditional Oktoberfest games and a raffle.

Cost is $10 per person and includes one free beer ticket and an Oktoberfest koozie.

Raffle tickets are $5 each and will be available at the event. Prizes include a fat-tire mountain bike and a mini fridge filled with beer.

Proceeds from the registration and raffle will benefit the cats and dogs at MCPAWS.

There will be a free shuttle running from 11:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. from the McCall Post Office, 495 Deinhard Lane.

The Activity Barn is located at 141 Moonridge Dr. For more information, visit

source:
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FDA cautions against feeding your dog this food

Sample shows salmonella

By Madeline Holcombe, CNN Sep 29, 2019 Local News 8

The United States Food and Drug Administration is warning pet owners to stay away from Performance Dog frozen raw pet food produced on or after July 22, 2019, after a sample tested positive for Salmonella and Listeria monocytogenes.

Two samples of raw pet food — one of Performance Dog and the other of a beef variety — were taken by the FDA as a part of a routine inspection in the Bravo Packing, Inc. manufacturing facility in Carneys Point, New Jersey, the statement said.

The beef pet food tested positive for Salmonella and the Performance Dog tested positive for Salmonella and Listeria monocytogenes.

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Animal shelter says housing woes mean more pets surrendered

Sep 26, 2019 AP

Boise, Idaho (AP) – Idaho’s increasing cost of living is putting pressure on people and their pets.

Idaho Humane Society officials say they’re seeing an increase in the number of people surrendering their pets because of housing issues.

Kristine Schellhaas with the Idaho Humane Society tells KBOI television in Boise some owners can’t afford pet insurance or the higher rental rates they must pay with pets. So far this year the shelter has taken in more than 1,500 owner-surrendered cats and dogs.

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Washington authorizes killing of some wolves in Grouse Flats pack

Sep 24, 2019 AP

Spokane, Wash. (AP) – The state of Washington has authorized the killing of some wolves in the Grouse Flats pack in an effort to stop the pack from preying on cattle.

Kelly Susewind, director of the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, on Tuesday authorized the incremental killing of members of the pack located in southeastern Washington.

The agency says the Grouse Flats pack has been involved in two cattle depredations in the past 30 days, and four in the past 10 months.

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Man who shot wolf in Grand Teton given conditional license

Sep 23, 2019 AP

Jackson, Wyo. (AP) – A big game hunting guide who illegally killed a wolf in a Wyoming national park has been granted a probationary license.

The Jackson Hole News & Guide reported the Wyoming State Board of Outfitters and Professional Guides granted Brian Taylor a one-year, conditional outfitters license last month.

The board voted to approve the penalty proposed by a three-person investigative committee after members who participated in the investigation recused themselves.

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9/15/19: Wyoming Wolf Hunt

(By Cat Urbigkit) With the Sept. 1 opening of the wolf hunting season in many of western Wyoming’s trophy wolf hunt areas, here is an update of harvests as of Sept. 13… (Click this link for the complete story.)
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9/3/19: Wolf News Roundup, 9/3/19

(By Cat Urbigkit) Back in the 1960s, Alaska wildlife officials decided that Coronation Island with its high density of deer should have a wolf population, so four wolves were transplanted. What came next is a story of the wolves causing the decline of the deer population, and when the wolf population declined and was eventually eliminated, the deer population once again increased. The Capital Press reports that wolves killed a record number of livestock in Idaho in the last fiscal year, with 175 confirmed depredations – a 25 percent increase from the year prior. Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife officials have cancelled a series of wolf recovery planning open houses because of the volatility of public discourse… (Click on this link for the complete story.)
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8/22/19: WA removes OPT wolf pack

(By Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife) On the morning of Aug. 16, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) lethally removed the four known remaining members of the OPT wolf pack. A series of WDFW investigations had shown the pack responsible for 29 depredation incidents on federal grazing lands in the Kettle River range of Ferry County. In April 2019, the department reported 27 wolf packs in Washington….. (Click on this link for the complete story.)
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8/15/19: Wolf News Roundup: 8/15/19

(By Cat Urbigkit, Pinedale Online!) A wolf attacked a man who was sleeping in tent (one of four family members in the tent) at a busy campground in Canada’s Banff National Park. The injured man was hospitalized with serious injuries, and nearby campers helped to scare away the wolf. A new paper in the Journal of Wildlife Management examines the effects on wolf pack size and winter conditions on elk mortality, as well as the influence of mountain lion predation on elk. The Duluth News-Tribune has an article about the wolves of Voyageurs National Park, including details about the life of wolves in this unique environment – from prey encounters to social interactions….. (Click on this link for the complete story.)
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Male grizzly captured near Cody and moved

Sep 23, 2019 Local News 8

Jackson, Wyo. (KIFI/KIDK) – Wyoming Game and Fish personnel captured and relocated an adult male grizzly bear Saturday, September 21.

It was captured on private lands northwest of Cody, Wyoming for livestock depredation on private lands. The bear was relocated to Blackrock Creek drainage, about 20 miles east of Moran Junction.

Carnivore biologists said the relocation will minimize conflicts with humans.

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Another hunter attacked by grizzly in Montana

Sep 25, 2019 AP

Billings, Mont. (AP) – For the fourth time in just over a week a hunter has been attacked by a grizzly bear in the Gravelly Mountains in southwestern Montana.

Fish, Wildlife and Parks spokesman Morgan Jacobsen tells The Billings Gazette the victim of Tuesday’s attack was being treated in Sheridan.

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Montana wardens can’t located injured bear after mauling

Sep 26, 2019 AP

Bozeman, Mont. (AP) – Montana wildlife officials have been unable to locate a grizzly bear that mauled an Ohio hunter in southwestern Montana.

Fish, Wildlife and Parks wardens began investigating Tuesday, shortly after the attack was reported in the Gravelly Mountains.

FWP spokesman Morgan Jacobsen said Thursday the hunter reported he was walking through blown-down timber when he was attacked by a bear at close range. The hunter said he fired several shots at the bear until it left.

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Humans can get tuberculosis from deer, the CDC says

Disease carried in dead animal’s organs

By Scottie Andrew, CNN Sep 29, 2019 Local News 8

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has found another unusual way animals can get humans sick. Luckily, this one doesn’t involve kisses from your pet.

After two decades of hunting, a 77-year-old Michigan man came down in 2017 with a case of tuberculosis. The carrier, according to a new CDC report, was an infected deer.

The unnamed patient had hunted deer in the same area where two other hunters were infected more than 15 years earlier.

In his case, he likely inhaled infectious pathogens of bovine tuberculosis, a mycobacterium that can sicken humans, while removing a dead deer’s infected organs, the CDC said.

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Letter to Share:

Calling All Youth Bird Hunters!

The Game Bird Foundation and Idaho Fish and Game invite youth hunters 17 and under to the Palouse River Upland Game Area starting October 5, 2019 for special youth-only pheasant hunting. The Game Bird Foundation and IDFG will be releasing banded pheasants each week throughout the season on this special Access Yes property to make hunting even more exciting. Report any banded birds you bag to the IDFG to have your name entered to win a prize!

Youth hunters must be accompanied by an adult mentor and registration is required to hunt. You can register online at (link) or call the IDFG Lewiston office at 208-799-5010 to register over the phone. Good luck hunters!! We can’t wait to see photos of your hunt!

– The Game Bird Foundation (via FB 9/29/2019)
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Fish & Game News:

Idaho Fish and Game proposes new out of state hunting management plan

Sep 22, 2019 By Steve Dent KIVI TV

Boise, Idaho — Idaho hunters have spoken up and the Idaho Department of Fish and Game listened to concerns about non-Idaho residents overcrowding the hunting landscape in the Gem State.

Idaho has already sold out their out-of-state tags for deer and elk in the controlled hunt, but Idaho is one of five western states that allows a general big game hunt for both in-state and out-of-state hunters.

Wyoming and Montana recently put and end to their out of state general hunt and now Idaho Fish and Game has a proposal in the works that would help them manage where non-residents hunt.

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Idaho F&G: Know the trespassing laws when hunting and fishing

by Ryan L Morrison Monday, September 23rd 2019

Boise, Idaho (CBS 2) — The Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) wants Idaho fishers and hunters to remember one thing: you need permission to be on private lands.

Last year Idaho’s trespassing laws changed to include permission to hunt and fish on private property.

“No person shall enter or remain on private land to shoot any weapon or hunt, fish, trap or retrieve game without written permission or other lawful permission,” – IDFG website.

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Someone poached a moose in central Idaho and left it to waste

by CBS 2 News Staff Tuesday, September 24th 2019

Mackay, Idaho (CBS 2) — A moose was poached in central Idaho near the small town of Mackay.

It was left to waste about 70 yards away from a nearby campground.

The antlers and a small amount of meat had been removed with the majority of the edible meat left to waste. Idaho Fish and Game says the moose was found near the Park Creek Campground.

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Idaho F&G uses decoys to catch roadside poachers

by Ryan L Morrison Thursday, September 26th 2019

Boise, Idaho (CBS 2) — The Idaho Fish and Game (IDFG) is warning people to not shoot at animals from the road.

“That buck or bull standing next to the road might be a tempting target, but it might not be what you think it is, and it could be a very costly mistake,” said IDFG.

IDFG uses ASAs, or artificial simulated animals, in places well known for trespassing, spotlighting and road hunting to catch law-breaking hunters.

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Fish and Game Property Vandalized – Public’s Help Sought

By Evin Oneale, Regional Communications Manager
Tuesday, September 24, 2019


Payette County Sheriff’s Office

Fish and Game is asking the public for information regarding the recent vandalism of an access gate at the Birding Island North segment of the Payette River Wildlife Management Area (WMA). The segment is located about three miles north of New Plymouth, Idaho.

Citizens Against Poaching (CAP) is offering a reward for information in the case and callers can remain anonymous. Contact CAP at 1-800-632-5999 twenty four hours a day.

Deputies from the Payette County Sheriff’s Office discovered the badly damaged gate on Sunday, September 22nd and relayed their discovery to Fish and Game district conservation officer Mark Sands.

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More F&G News Releases

link:
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Fun Critter Stuff:

Deer in McCall finds itself tangled in Christmas lights

by CBS 2 News Staff Wednesday, September 25th 2019

McCall, Idaho (CBS 2) — Well, file this under “Something You Don’t See Every Day.”

A deer has been roaming around Payette Lake with Christmas lights stuck in its antlers. Idaho Fish and Game told CBS 2 that it started receiving reports of the jolly ol’ deer Sept. 19 in the Warren Wagon Road area west of Payette Lake.

“It looks like it’s healthy,” Fish and Game said. “The deer is fine — other than the lights.”

So what’s the plan?

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Seasonal Humor:

Fall1stSnowflake-a
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Idaho History Sep 29, 2019

Rocky Bar, Alturas (Elmore) County, Idaho

(part 2) Mining

Map Rocky Bar and Atlanta region

MapRockyBarAtlanta-a
Shows the names and geographic location of Rocky Bar and Atlanta mining areas

source: Idaho State Historical Society
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Gold Discovered and Claimed in the South Boise Region

by Evan Filby

On May 9, 1863, Captain George F. Settle discovered a gold-streaked quartz lode in what came to be called the South Boise mining region. He and a swarm of other prospectors had been tracing placer gold up the tributaries of the South Fork of the Boise River.

Born in Kentucky around 1830, Settle had over a decade of mining experience when he arrived in Idaho. He had emigrated to California in 1850-1852, where he supplemented his mining efforts by teaching school. He later moved to Oregon. There, he became a captain during the Indian wars, serving at least part of the time in the Oregon Volunteer regiment led by Colonel Thomas R. Cornelius.

It not clear just when Settle followed the rush into Idaho. Still, by the spring of 1863, he had joined the bands looking for gold south of the Boise Basin. They found a fair amount of placer gold in the area. However, George recognized the potential value of the lode gold he uncovered on the slope above a creek bed. The location was about twenty-eight miles southeast of Idaho City, and about six miles north of the South Fork.

As soon as word got out, bands of hopeful prospectors – perhaps as many as fifteen hundred – swarmed into the area from Boise Basin. But that simply overwhelmed the supply of potential claims, so many of them trudged back to the Basin. Still, the census in September enumerated 560 men in the area. The town of South Boise (later renamed Rocky Bar) sprang up less than a mile southeast of Settle’s quartz find.

Settle himself stayed. Although he lost litigation about his first claim, he continued to develop and invest in mining properties in the area until his death in 1888.

source: South Fork Companion
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Streets, Rocky Bar, Idaho 2

StreetsRockyBar2-a
Pittsburgh & Idaho Mill buildings visible at the West end of Main street in 1866 or 1867. Nine structures are arranged along a primitive road in the bottom of the gulch at Rocky Bar.

source: Idaho State Historical Society
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Rocky Bar (Gold)

Prospectors trying to determine the extent of the Boise mining region set out from Boise Basin as soon as possible in the spring of 1863, and discovered placers on Feather River. Then a quartz prospect was located May 7 not far above Rocky Bar.

The South Boise gold rush followed just after the middle of May. Placers on Red Warrior and on Elk Creek at Happy Camp were of some consequence, but the South Boise mines primarily were quartz. During 1864, production with arastras gave very promising results. Stamp mills were brought in in 1865, but failures during 1866 and 1867 set the district back. Until about 1886 to 1888, and by 1892 it and all the other important properties were practically worked out.

Activity continued on a limited scale with something of a revival during the depression after the Featherville dredge had recovered 33,000 ounces of gold between 1922 and 1927.

With the suspension of gold mining during the war, the camp closed down entirely in 1942. Occasional minor production, including a Rocky Bar townsite placer in 1982, followed after 1946. Production reached approximately $6,000,000.

excerpted from: “Mining in Idaho 1860-1969” by Ernest Oberbillig, Idaho State Historical Society Number 9 1985
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Rocky Bar, Mines, Miners

1800sMinersRockyBar-a

Miners outside one of the camp buildings at a mine in Rocky Bar, [Alturas] Elmore County, ID, probably taken in late 1800s. The men are holding miners candlesticks with unlit candles, pipes, and other equipment.

source: Idaho State Historical Society
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Rocky Bar Mines

Anxious to ascertain just how large a region the Boise mines would cover, and always eager to find something even better than the rich ground already known in Boise Basin an impatient group of hardy prospectors set out to explore the country farther up the river long before the higher ridges and streams were free from snow. Rumors of rich placer possibilities at South Boise reached the Powder River mines of Auburn, Oregon, by April 1863, and in less than two months, by May 7, the placers had been traced up Feather River to some still more promising quartz leads in Bear Creek. Word of the new South Boise lodes, backed up with some “very rich” specimens, set off a stampede of some fifteen hundred Boise Basin miners on May 20.

After a hard trip over rough country to the new Eldorado, most of the fifteen hundred rushed right back again. Although they had found high-yield placers on Red Warrior Creek, where more than one hundred claims were taken up in May, and some good ground on Bear Creek near the quartz outcrops, the new placers were not nearly extensive enough to hold the horde that had joined the rush. Furthermore, the promising quartz prospects could not be developed for a season or two at best. The better Red Warrior claims were good for $20 to $25 a day in May. A few sluices actually in operation by the middle of June ranged from $16 to $60 per day per man. About one hundred miners were left to work there after the initial excitement had subsided. Those not carried away with the quartz mania were hard at it getting their placers ready for production.

The enthusiastic promotion of the new gold and silver lodes at South Boise started early. The Elmore, thought from the first to be the richest, had a notable publicist in H. T. P. Comstock, who sought to enhance his interest in the property by pronouncing it to be fully as rich as the lode that had been named for him in Nevada. Rich outcrops lent support to Comstock’s extravagant prophesy, and when arastra production commenced late that summer. South Boise quartz promoters had some high yields to talk about. Comstock’s Elmore turned out seven tons at $347 a ton, and another property did still better with a total of $1,480 from only four tons of ore. Shares in the Ophir then sold at $25 a foot, whereas the Idaho, the original lode discovery, was valued highly enough to be “not for sale at any price.” South Boise miners by that time looked forward with confidence to a rush of five to eight thousand newcomers in the spring of 1864, a misfortune from which the district happily was spared.

Placer mining accounted for by far the greatest part of South Boise gold produced in 1863. Before the season ended, several localities had contributed significantly to the region’s yield.

Besides the early activity of Red Warrior, Happy Camp–located on Elk Creek below the mouth of Bear Creek–was the scene of considerable effort during the summer. By fall thirty-five companies, ranging from one to five miners each, were hard at work, averaging $12 to $25 per man per day in Happy Camp alone. Some additional placering was in progress in Blakes Gulch, as well as on the lower Feather River in the area of the original South Boise discoveries that spring, on parts of Bear Creek which was regarded as rich at the time of original discovery, and perhaps to a limited extent in Hardscrabble Gulch on Elk Creek. Altogether, the South Boise mines had a population of 560 when the 1863 census was taken in September. South Boise was already as large as Pierce and Florence, and only slightly smaller than Warren and Silver City but larger than Elk City, Newsome, and the Salmon River camps. The one region which none of these remotely compared with in size and population was Boise Basin.

Surface prospecting of the South Boise mining region was adequate enough in the first season to disclose most of the better known mines, including the later big producers. Aside from the major properties near the Elmore, the Ophir on Elk Creek, the Bonaparte on Cayuse Creek, and a number of leads at Wide West Gulch on Red Warrior Creek had been discovered.

But the geologic structure of the Rocky Bar Basin was understood quite imperfectly at first. A confusing system of parallel veins, faulting transversely to the left, gave the early prospectors the notion that the mines ran generally north and south, and claims were taken up accordingly. When further examination disclosed that the claims ought to have run more like east and west, major adjustments were required.

By the fall of 1863, a total of “some 200 well-defined lodes” were thought to have been identified in the district. But values of these “well-defined lodes” at depth remained undetermined at the beginning of 1864. Development shafts had not been sunk by more than fifteen to twenty feet, and no one at that time could distinguish rich surface concentrations from veins that would continue to be productive when serious mining got under way. On top of that, arguments developed over the identity of new lodes. Claim disputes often arose when alleged discoveries might have been traceable to veins already taken up. The location of the Confederate Star on February 9, 1864, on a vein and claim thought by G. E. Settle to be the one he had found May 9, 1863, eventually led to a lawsuit won by the Confederate Star people. A number of litigations such as this soon plagued the district.

Complaints naturally were expressed against the indiscriminate promotion of surface pockets that looked for a time as if they might be rich ledges, of spurs of veins already included in known claims, of barren veins whose rich assays came from other mines, and even of known rich ledges. A cautious reporter protested on February 22, 1864,

that all too many of the good lodes were located and sold more than once, and that not one in ten of the ledges in the Recorder’s books. . . have yet been prospected enough to ascertain whether they are ledges at all, much less whether they contain gold. Hundreds of claims on all these ledges–both real and bogus–have been located and recorded, for which the claimants have not even troubled themselves to look: these are the cheap interests sold in rich ledges and new discoveries.

Even Comstock, whose arastra continued to grind out about $270 a ton from the Elmore, had to admit that his new lode, while rich, was “spotted” in its values. But interests in the Elmore were still valued at $50 a foot, and the future seemed bright.

The difficulty in transporting equipment and supplies to the remote South Boise mines retarded development of the district severely. In the summer of 1864, Julius Newburg’s South Boise Wagon Road Company began constructing a toll road to Rocky Bar. While the road was being built, the processing of high-grade quartz in primitive arastras expanded greatly. Arastras were made inexpensively from local materials and depended upon horse or water power, both of which were readily available in the region. By the end of the summer of 1864, the number of arastras had grown from ten to eighty, and the larger ones were capable of milling 1 to 1 ½ tons daily. With values ranging from $75 to $300 a ton in 1864, something like $130,000 to $160,000 came from the South Boise quartz mines that season.

High-grade ore had to be sorted out laboriously to supply the arastras, and recovery left much to be desired. The season’s arastra production from the Elmore (the major South Boise lode, but not quite the main producer in 1864), from which only 100 tons were milled in arastras in 1864, was $30,000 instead of the $50,000 that Dr. S. B. Farnham agent for the Idaho Company, had estimated the ore to contain.

H. T. P. Comstock was disturbed to recover $10 to the pan (an extremely high rate considering that a few cents to a pan would set off a gold rush) from tailings taken 100 feet below his arastra. The arastra process was so wasteful that operators were better off to ship some of the best ore out for testing and milling. Wilson Waddingham sent 3/4 ton of South Boise Comstock ore all the way to San Francisco where $600 was recovered from the lot showing that he had at least $800-a-ton ore. He also obtained assays as high as $7,112 on the same South Boise Comstock, $5,589 on the Confederate Star, and $7,434 on the Elmore. These came from extremely high grade specimens that were characteristic of the district but not present in anything remotely like commercial quantities.

The completion of Newburg’s road to Rocky Bar on September 5, 1864, was an occasion for great rejoicing. Except for a steam sawmill (rated at fifteen horsepower and capable of turning out 4,500 board feet a day in July) that Cartee and Gates had packed into Rocky Bar in the spring of 1864, heavy equipment had waited for the road to be completed. By the time the road was finished, Cartee and Gates had a five-stamp custom mill set up near Rocky Bar. This small mill could handle five tons a day, compared with l or 1 ½ tons for a large arastra. Crushing 150 tons of $100 Elmore ore the first thing that fall, Cartee and Gates’ mill suddenly increased the total production of the Elmore that season to $45,000.

Six more stamp mills were being brought in or were being erected during the fall of 1864. The most substantial of these, the twelve- stamp mill that the Idaho Company had freighted from St. Joseph, April 20, 1864, across the plains at a transportation cost of 30¢ a pound, or $8,400, reached Rocky Bar in November. Although complaints were already voiced against stock market manipulation on such notable properties as the Elmore, where the old Washoe “freezeout game” of letting a tunnel cave in to discourage stockholders so that the management could increase its interests at small expense, great profits were expected from the district as soon as stamp milling could get under way. After all, men had been making $20 a day just hand mortaring samples while prospecting the Ophir. Once a fast, efficient stamp recovery process could be installed, the mines were expected to prove their worth brilliantly.

To insure that the stamp milling of South Boise gold and silver ores would be efficient, Wilson Waddingham and J. W. McBride took advantage of Newburg’s road to haul another seven tons of ore from various mines at Rocky Bar out to Portland for testing. When the ore arrived there on November 27, they were prepared to send some of their large samples all the way to Swansea, Wales, if necessary to determine the best process for gold and silver recovery. Meanwhile, about half of the six hundred men who had been in South Boise that fall were ready to spend the winter preparing for a big season of stamp milling the next spring.

Except for erecting the buildings and doing the other work required for installing stamp mills, the South Boise miners left their properties idle. Development work to block out ore was not regarded as necessary then. Quartz miners simply worked down from the outcrops of the veins and hoped that ore sufficient to keep their mills busy would be available. Because arastras crushed ore slowly so that miners had little trouble in keeping sufficient ore supplies on hand, this process did not induce anyone to get far enough below the rich outcrops to notice whether the veins amounted to anything at depth.

Promoters in at least one case “salted and sold a blank ledge” to one South Boise stamp-mill company, and not until the mill had almost reached the district did anyone notice the entire lack of ore. Great care was exercised to make certain that a milling and recovery process proper for South Boise ores was used. If anything like the same care had been devoted to making sure that each of the stamp mills had sufficient ore on hand to work, large-scale production might have been possible much earlier.

With arastra production suspended in 1865, the quartz yield that summer came from two stamp mills that had been brought to the district late in 1864. Cartee and Gates found ready customers even though they charged $25 a ton, and the Idaho Company’s twelve-stamp mill also ran all summer, turning out $800 to $1,000 daily. The Pittsburgh and Idaho Gold and Silver Mining Company thought it profitable to invest $140,000 in purchasing the Idaho mine and mill. Wilson Waddingham, whose company was capitalized at $600,000, was busy investing recklessly in other mines so to consolidate enough property to justify a large stamp mill. With a paid up capital exceeding $400,000 in New York investment, Waddingham’s New York Gold and Silver Mining Company did not face the problem of having to manage on insufficient resources. (Less adequately funded companies had to try to operate from current proceeds, usually with disastrous results.) Waddingham arranged to bring in an eighty-horsepower, forty-stamp mill at a cost of $100,000 or more. Freight costs from the Oregon Steam Navigation Company’s dock at Wallula overland to Rocky Bar ran to $40,000 alone.

To haul the mill machinery, Waddingham required forty-five “mammoth wagons.” This great mill, intended for the Elmore, had a capacity for handling seventy-five to one hundred tons of ore a day. While it was on the way to Rocky Bar — a trip requiring all summer and fall — Waddingham purchased for $27,500 in gold James O’Neal’s ten-stamp mill that was capable of processing sixteen tons of ore a day. Used on the Confederate Star, which Waddingham acquired for $15,000, this smaller mill turned out $60,000 by March 1866, more than meeting expectations and justifying its cost.

Some of the other stamp-mill companies were less fortunate, however. Not anticipating the time and difficulty that would go into bringing expensive stamp mills from San Francisco or Chicago to this remote district, and not capitalized sufficiently to spend a year or two getting a mine ready to produce, a number of companies began to get into serious financial trouble. Labor costs were high — $7 a day per man, compared with $6 in the less remote Owyhee mines and with $3.50 on the Comstock; in those years of hand drilling, labor costs amounted to the greatest part of the expense of mining, once a mill was procured. Adversities arising from the serious difficulties in getting a quartz mill into production began to plague South Boise as early as the summer of 1865. S. B. Farnham’s New York and Idaho ten- stamp mill had barely begun to crush rock on August 13 before insufficient capital reserves and high operating costs were causing trouble. By fall, unpaid teamsters had imprisoned Farnham, and his crew had barricaded the mill pending back wage payments.

An illuminating example of inept mine administration by another New York company active in South Boise was to be found in the misadventures of the Victor concern, whose Red Warrior mill commenced operation shortly after Farnham’s failure. The Victor operation may be traced back to the summer of 1863 when Thomas J. Gaffney discovered some Red Warrior quartz lodes. That winter, Gaffney had gone to San Francisco to obtain capital for developing his discovery, and there he met Francis O. Nelson, whose experience was primarily as a ship’s captain. Nelson was also one of the very earliest stamp-mill operators in California and was highly regarded by the old Californians. Together they organized the Victor Gold and Silver Mining Company of California, to which Gaffney deeded twelve hundred feet in five of his claims.

Gaffney returned to South Boise in April to manage the property, and Nelson set out for New York in July to raise more capital. Nelson promoted well, although he never had seen the properties which the Victor Company owned. On December 5, 1864, six incorporators, including Nelson, organized another Victor Gold and Silver Mining Company, this one of New York, capitalized at a million dollars.

Nelson was appointed manager, January 16, on the assurance that he could bring in a mill and get it running on a self-sustaining basis for not more than a $40,000 investment. He was not limited to $40,000, however, and his actual expenses, including $9,300 for a fifteen-stamp mill in San Francisco, amounted to $36,500 before the mill finally began operations on August 28, 1865.

Cleanups, in which accumulated gold was retorted from mercury, were held every Sunday for sixteen weeks into that fall and winter. The first three did not amount to much, since granite and low-grade ore was used to get the mill into operating condition. After the mill began to produce, Nelson kept right on drawing upon the credit of his Victor Company in Portland. Before that source of funds was finally cut off after October 28, he had used an additional $16,000, presumably for operating expenses, which raised the company’s capital investment in the venture to $52,500.

For what the money was spent, aside from the $9,300 for the stamp mill or what his production totaled, the company never managed to find out. Captain Nelson seems to have run the enterprise personally, entirely too much as he might have run a ship. He never sent in vouchers to the company to account for more than the cost of the mill at San Francisco, and whether he was drawing upon the company’s credit for purposes other than the mine could not be ascertained. None of his employees knew how much was produced. Only the wildest guesses could be made from information that the company had gathered after sending another member from New York on October 7 to investigate.

Pending a report, the directors decided on October 19 to bond the mine and mill for $50,000 and to cut off any more credit to Nelson until his accounts were straightened out. Some of his employees, unable to collect payments on drafts that Nelson had made to them after the crackdown, learned that the company no longer was honoring checks. At last, on December 1, Nelson finally sent $2,367 (out of one $5,000 weekly cleanup) overland to New York as the initial return to the company on its investment. He seems to have been unable to continue milling very long. After he could no longer pay operating expenses out of company capital, the mill shut down on December 20, 1865. The reason given in 1866 for the long-continued shutdown was the need for parts which could not be obtained in the winter. That explanation may have been correct, although there was probably more to the story than that. Nelson’s method of handling the product of the Victor mill seemed to have been about as skillful as his method of conducting the company’s financial affairs.

Isaac Thompson, who worked in the mill while it was running, described the system in some detail in an affidavit. In it, Thompson refers to himself as the “deponent”:

. . . the first three cleanings up were not of much account, because a good deal of granite, quartz &c. Was crushed merely for the purpose of wearing down and smoothing the machinery and batteries. That the fourth and fifth cleaning up was good and that the subsequent cleanings up were very inferior, but deponent is unable to state the precise amount of yield. That on one Sunday a cleaning up yielded a wash basin full holding about one gallon and a half and four pint bowls almost full of amalgam and that the weight of this amalgam so obtained must have been between seventy and eighty pounds; that another clean up yielded the same wash basin full and four sized tumblers full of amalgam and that the weight of this amalgam must have been from seventy to eighty pounds; that the deponent on one occasion saw in the bedroom of the house occupied by said Francis O. Nelson and family a wash pan about two-thirds full of amalgam containing by measure about eight quarts of amalgam. That deponent is unable to state what became of the proceeds of the different cleanings up or the precise amount of the yield of the same, as the said Francis O. Nelson kept all his business to himself.

Nelson’s associates in the Victor Company, being unable to find out anything from Nelson or to determine in any other way what the mill had produced, concluded after an extended investigation that the cleanups ought to have averaged $4,000, and thus to have totaled $64,000. In assuming such a high average, they were almost certainly overly optimistic. Nelson found some witnesses to allege that the ore generally was poor or worthless, and his witnesses may have been right. In any event, the mine had failed, and Nelson was removed as superintendent on March 16, 1866. Whether he had put company money into his own projects, or whether he had applied the Victor funds in developing an unprofitable mine, cannot be ascertained. If he was an honest superintendent — and most likely he was — he certainly showed his utter incompetence in handling the company’s financial accounts. And if he was an authentic swindler, the very least he could have done would have been to supply his company associates with some false accounts.

Some such method, at least, is how William M. Tweed, one of the six organizers of the Victor and vice-president of the company, would have handled it, if his accomplishments in defrauding in New York City through the machinations of the notorious Tweed ring are any index at all. But compared with the Tweed scandals (not yet revealed in 1866), Nelson’s defalcation in the Victor case is entirely unworthy of mention.

Tweed and his New York Victor associates had been clever or slippery enough to arrange things so that by the end of October 1865, when they had bonded the company’s property with a $50,000 mortgage, their loss would be slight indeed. And after Nelson’s one remittance was taken into account, they had salvaged $52,367 out of the $52,500 which Nelson had spent before they cut off his credit in Portland. So unless they lost from assuming some of Nelson’s later obligations, in the end they were out only the cost of investigating Nelson’s incompetence and the mine’s failure. Later in 1866, the mortgage holders foreclosed, and the Victor mill and property were auctioned at sheriff’s sale. Thus, the Victor creditors and the mortgage holder assumed the main losses in this whole operation.

Understandably, Rocky Bar merchants resented such a method of financing unsuccessful lode operations. A South Boise promoter warned of hazards to local suppliers who might advance credit to distant companies in a letter from New York, March 25, 1867:

The stockholders and directors of the N.Y. & Idaho and the Victor mining companies have resolved to worry out the creditors by protracted litigation. The members of these companies are men of wealth and can easily keep the suits in court for years. Judgement is not very swift or certain in New York, so I learn from attorneys here. From present appearances it seems as though the creditors have but a slim chance of contesting their suits through the courts of New York. A want of concert of action by the creditors in obtaining their judgments and prosecuting their claims has worked to their disadvantage. Let the mining communities of Idaho take warning and not trust these N.Y. companies for one dollar hereafter, for these New York rascals are worse by far than our own, and they live a long distance from Idaho.

In happy contrast to Farnham’s and Nelson’s disasters, several more mills began production by the spring of 1866. By then, South Boise had more stamp mill capacity than any other Idaho district.

Rasey Biven’s Wide West property milled $1,000 a day, and another company recovered $5,000 in twelve days of February 1866. Wilson Waddingham did still better, with a $7,200 run of $82 ore in thirteen days, and by March, 1866, his Confederate Star, wisely keeping a stabilizing reserve of 150 tons, had ground out about $60,000 in four months.

When Waddingham put his ten-stamp mill into operation, he learned that he really did not need his $100,000 large forty-stamp mill at all. His small mill could handle both the Elmore and the Confederate Star. Mining from the Elmore (the major Rocky Bar lode) proved difficult. As soon as any depth was attained on the lode, his steam power plant had to be used to pump water from Bear Creek out of the Elmore, rather than to run a sawmill, as was planned.

Twenty years went by before the Elmore could be developed profitably.

Meanwhile, Waddingham concealed his massive blunder. With a useless forty-stamp mill at Rocky Bar, he began to invest in the enormous Atlanta lode. Here his $100,000 mill could be transported over a high ridge “at a trifling cost.” That way, he managed to declare a 1 1/2-cent dividend on $600,000 capitalization on December 1, 1865, and had a number of handsomely profitable (but relatively small) mill runs to report. With the best properties around Rocky Bar Waddingham was recognized as a respectable, legitimate operator. At a Rocky Bar testimonial dinner early in December, “in variety and style never before seen in the territory,” Waddingham received a well- deserved tribute: “There is no doubt that to Waddingham’s moral worth, strict business habits, and to his representations, the community of these regions are mainly indebted.”

Waddingham himself spent the winter in New York with other South Boise agents of capital. But he found the mining market there badly depressed. New York investors had little way of distinguishing the legitimate mining companies in the West from the frauds. Because of failures, even with the serious companies such as Farnham’s New York and Idaho, investors were becoming distrustful. Unfortunately for those reliable companies getting into production, the recent failures made investors fearful of putting up enough additional capital to meet the unexpected delays and higher cost involved in starting a mining operation. The series of failures of New York companies in South Boise continued after the announcement of the collapse of the Victor in May 1866.

A legacy of embarrassing debts, litigation, worthless stock, and adverse publicity afflicted the region with each failure. By June 2, 1866, more South Boise companies were in trouble, and even Wilson Waddingham’s Confederate Star faced litigation for not paying dividends. Only two companies operated during the summer of 1866.

Waddingham ran his mill through much of 1867, but he found it much more profitable to sell out his interest in the Elmore for $50,000 and to withdraw from the region. The Pittsburgh Company tried to sink a deep shaft to develop the Elmore but failed to figure out how to pump an abundance of water from Bear Creek out of the shaft; anything like large-scale development of the Elmore had to wait twenty-four years for British capital and more advanced technology.

Confidence in the future of the South Boise mines, as well as in the other Idaho quartz districts plagued by early stamp-milling disasters, survived undiminished by the setbacks to large-scale mining. No one doubted the richness of the mines, even of seemingly unproductive operations. That the mines had great potential was shown in the bitter, and sometimes violent, clashes over claim jumping or alleged claim jumping. Litigation between G. F. Settle’s Idaho No. 2 and the Confederate Star had bedeviled the major quartz area around rocky Bar through 1866. No sooner was the case settled on September 29 by a jury in favor of the Confederate Star, than another contest arose when claim jumpers built Fort Emmett on the Idaho lode. The Emmett Company mined the fort with quicksilver flasks of balls and power, which were fused into the Emmett tunnel. Somehow the whole thing blew up on September 29, 1866. Fort Emmett was vacant at the time, and no one was injured when it was demolished. All of this tumult, though, revealed that the properties were not regarded as valueless.

Blame for the stamp-milling failures was usually put on the New York and other outside companies for mismanaging their enterprises and thereby casting aspersions on the integrity of the district. “Idaho has suffered many things from successive crops of knaves and fools who have dabbled in her mines; and the stockholders of the East have reaped a rich harvest of assessments and lawsuits in consequence of sending them here.” That, at least, was the opinion of James S. Reynolds of the Idaho Statesman, September 10, 1867.

Naturally, there was more to the story than that. Many of the outside investors objected to having been beset by frauds and swindlers. And some of the other causes of difficulty, already indicated, were appreciated by them. Discussion of stamp-milling failures dwelt at the time around the South Boise disasters.

Regardless of the explanations given for stamp-milling collapse, the conclusion was universally the same: the mines were good, and proper development would make them pay. In fairness, perhaps too much was expected of the mines initially, but in the end they did produce.

For many years after 1866 and 1867, unpretentious arastra operations and a few modest stamp-milling enterprises were about all that survived the failure of early, large-scale quartz mining in South Boise. The placers, likewise, seemed by 1867 to be mainly suitable for Chinese operations. A small, cooperative company on Red Warrior was able to work economically and profitably that year. The five- stamp mill at the Bonaparte ran with some success in 1867 and 1868.

In 1869, Rocky Bar was described as “dull and looking rather dilapidated very much in need of repair.” Many arastras were still going, and in that respect, times seemed almost like the big days of 1864. But there was an important difference. Early arastra operations were regarded as preliminary to large-scale stamp milling; by 1869, such operations were regarded as a substitute for unsuccessful stamp milling. Exceptions to the stamp-milling failures were few. By superior management and by working better grade ore, John McNally was able to keep his Wide West mine and mill on Red Warrior in operation through 1869. By the end of the year, his was the only stamp mill going.

Thus the failure of stamp milling in South Boise in 1866 and 1867 had proved to be a serious setback for the quartz mines there, though some compensations came with the failures. Expensive mills and equipment had been brought into the country and were available at rather low costs when auctioned at sheriffs’ sales. In the lean years before railroad transportation, additional capital, and improved technology had brought big production to South Boise, some of these abandoned mills did much to tide over the mines which struggled along.

Not until 1886 could the district be developed satisfactorily. In the interval, much that was done was called gouging, whereby miners unable to develop their properties in full took out some of the higher grade ore, which if anything, set back the mine because of the way they went about their work. During those years systematic mining and adequate recovery processes were neglected in favor of getting out what could be handled easily. Although all kinds of efforts, along with gouging, were made during the two decades to get big quartz mining enterprises successfully under way, unquestionably the initial South Boise gold rush and excitement had ended by the summer of 1866.

Many small operators, returning to arastras after stamp milling had failed, managed to maintain a modest level of production around Rocky Bar during the decade or more when gouging provided most of the mineral recovery. A revival of large-scale mining seemed possible after 1869, when the transcontinental railroad was completed across Nevada and Utah. The introduction of dynamite at this same time reduced the costs in hard rock drilling. Better hoists, engineers, and pumps became available with technological progress.

John McNally’s well-managed mine on Wide West Gulch brought a substantial increase in production in 1870. The next year a Pittsburgh company introduced superior hoisting and pumping devices, which made possible the development of the Elmore mine under Bear Creek. Rather than spend excessive sums buying out the interests of the many owners of linear feet along the Elmore vein (because they owned claim footage instead of stock in a company.) F. F. Oram invited anyone who held small segments to join his Pittsburgh Company in putting up development costs. After production got under way, these minor associates continued to participate in whatever profits — or losses — were realized. That way his pumping and hoisting service could handle the entire vein, rather than having several adjacent pumping plants operating on separate properties.

A fifty-ton test run in 1872 yielded $4,000 from selected high-grade ore. This system would have worked still better if the superintendent had not sneaked off with the proceeds, leaving his miners unpaid and his participating associates with no return on their investments.

The next year a new manager of the Elmore mine succeeded in milling another forty-five-ton test run worth $5,000, after another pump was installed. This success led to considerable development in 1874. Trying to operate during the Panic of 1873 upon milling returns worked out poorly, both for the Pittsburgh Company and for Warren Hussey who employed the same system after taking over the Wide West from John McNally for $22,000 in 1874. Hussey had no way to continue production when his mill broke down, and he could no longer pay his miners. Trouble with the Pittsburgh’s hoist foundation and with its recovery equipment forced the company to shut down in 1875 after sinking the Elmore shaft to a depth of 225 feet. Gouging failed to work effectively for either of these major South Boise producers.

When they contrived to produce gold, they naturally had to start paying returns to outside investors or lessors at a time when they lacked capital sufficient for effective mine development. Superintendents, who were paid a percentage of their production, had more incentive to gouge out a small amount of high-grade ore rather than develop their properties for large-scale mining. Aside from some small arastra operations, little lode production could be accomplished until after 1880.

The construction of the Oregon Short Line across southern Idaho in 1882 and 1883 eventually brought prosperity to lode districts such as Rocky Bar and Silver City, which also had to shut down in 1875.

While the railway was being built, True W. Rollins, who had purchased from 1876 to 1879 much of the Elmore and associated properties with New York capital, got equipped to develop his mine up to a depth of fifteen hundred feet by 1882. The settlement of fifteen years of Idaho and Vishnu litigation in 1880 ended a wasteful era of leasing and gouging. In 1883, these companies finally managed serious production with a $100,000 yield. Then they got back into litigation, and Rollins (after investing $150,000 in developing the Elmore) found that he could not operate after all.

Finally British capitalists acquired Rollins’ property along with other important Rocky Bar mines aside from the Vishnu. By completing a fifty-stamp mill on November 16, 1886, they were equipped to operate the Elmore efficiently. Their initial year returned a profit of $320,000 out of a $460,000 yield. They continued a steady production with the best modern equipment until March 5, 1889. After a long, expensive effort at developing more ore, they gave up in May 1892, having sunk their shaft seven hundred feet to prove that Rocky Bar did not have good ore at depth.

By 1892, other companies had also realized most of their production. Limited mining continued for another half century. Yet most of Rocky Bar’s mineral yield came in a short period after 1886, following more than two decades of effort to solve problems of mining.

If British investors had known to stop production in the spring of 1889, their mines would have shown an acceptable return. But as their enterprise finally worked out, they learned more than they really wanted to know about the lack of ore in the lower levels of the Elmore.

Production around rocky Bar did not end entirely in 1892.

Although a disastrous fire on September 1 left over half of Rocky Bar’s 200 to 300 residents homeless, reconstruction provided a new town that lasted for more than another generation.

About thirty Elmore and Vishnu miners continued to explore those properties until 1896, when a firm from Scotland undertook a bedrock flume project on Bear Creek to recover amalgam lost from earlier stamp mills. Over $40,000 (about half enough) was invested in this project, which included 2,200 feet of constructed flume and a steam derrick to remove boulders. Additional funds were needed to bring water from the upper part of Roaring River over a high ridge to Red Warrior. This overly ambitious project could not be completed, and Rocky Bar declined still more.

Another scheme to start up a twenty-stamp Bonaparte mill failed to accomplish much in 1904. But Junction Bar placers were tested with favorable results in 1906, and some unsuccessful efforts at Bonaparte (which claimed a previous $600,000 production), at Elmore (with a $3,000,000 record), and at Vishnu followed a year later. Finally, a stationary dredge at Feather River, powered by a 175-foot head of water from Cayuse Creek, was used from 1910 to 1915. Eventually a standard floating dredge commenced production there on August 21, 1922. By 1927, 33,000 ounces of gold came from that operation, which required an initial $500,000 investment in equipment.

Low operating costs after 1929 encouraged a number of modest efforts to reopen Rocky Bar mines before wartime restrictions forced all gold mining companies to suspend work in 1942. Aside from an Ophir promotion that led to a $17 sheriff’s sale of that old property, which had only an $80,000 production record from a vein that looked like a major lode, another forty years of inactivity followed, and Rocky Bar almost disappeared. Then in 1982 mining resumed right on the townsite of Rocky Bar. A large backhoe and loader operation, capable of handling a thousand yards a day, was employed to overcome a previously unmanageable problem of moving large boulders (for which Rocky Bar is named) so that the deep placers could be mined.

(This information has not been edited.)

source: Idaho State Historical Society Reference Series Number 199 September 1996
Publications-450 N. 4th Street, Boise, ID 83702-208-334-3428
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Chinese placer miners at work

RockyBarChineseMiners-a
Unidentified miners working at the Royal Placer at Rocky Bar, [Alturas] Elmore County, Idaho. The picture shows gold panning in progress. Note the variety of hats and clothing worn by the men. Circa 1900.

source: Idaho State Historical Society
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Rocky Bar Spanish Legend

Signs of early placer mining and rock remains of old arastras (a Mexican variety of mill used for crushing quartz ore) still are to be found near Rocky Bar at the forks of Big and Little Elk Creeks. This site now is known as Spanishtown. The name derives from activity of Spaniards or Mexicans who are known to have mined there shortly after discovery of the South Boise mines early in the spring of 1863. Arastras, constructed primarily from wood and rock available locally in the mining region, were used in large numbers in the Rocky Bar area in 1864 by all kinds of miners—not just by Spaniards and Mexicans. In the case of the Spanishtown arastras and mining, however, newspaper references to Spanish-speaking miners in that locality are to be found as early as 1866. A decade later, abandoned cabins of Spanish occupants were noticed at Spanishtown by newcomers to the Rocky Bar area. And in later years, a well-developed story of early Spanish mining at Spanishtown grew up in Rocky Bar.

As the later tradition has it, Spaniards came to run a large mine at Spanishtown long before the California gold rush. Where they came from or how they got to such a remote spot as Spanishtown is not too clear in the legend. When Alexander Ross brought a Hudson’s Bay Company expedition through some of those imaginary mining traces in 1824, any such evidence was absent. If mining had been carried on there before 1860 (when mining actually began in Idaho), and if traces of very old mining at Spanishtown were visible late in the nineteenth century, those who prospected there in 1863 ought to have noticed such evidence. No such reports have turned up on the early accounts of the South Boise gold rush, however. By the time that this tradition of old Spanish mining actually developed, the work of Spanish-speaking miners known to have been there in 1866 was visible. Presumably this was the Spanish activity which led to the tradition about old Spanish workings at Spanishtown.

To suppose that a colony of Spaniards came from an extremely distant base in something like the sixteenth (or even the eighteenth) century in order to mine for a time at Spanishtown – as the legend has it – is fantastic. As a matter of fact, Spaniards who lived in California did not bother to discover or develop the far more extensive mines of that area during those years. But the Rocky Bar Spanish tradition frequently is repeated even though positive evidence to support such a supposition of pre-nineteenth century mining at Spanishtown is lacking entirely. This same kind of legend has sprung up in some other parts of the mining West. In some places, the old Spanish mining legend is more plausible than others. The Rocky Bar-Spanishtown area is one of the least reasonable places that could be found to develop an old Spanish legend.

See Ference Morton Szasz, ed., “Great Mysteries of the West” (Golden, CO: 1993), 219-231, for additional information.

source: Idaho State Historical Society Reference Series Number 19 Revised November 1996
Publications – 450 N. 4th Street, Boise, ID 83702 – 208.334.3428
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Rocky Bar, Mines

1884RockyBarMines-a
Photo shows the Pittsburg, Confederate Star, and other properties in the Rocky Bar Mining District in Elmore County prior to 1884. The Elmore Mine mill was later built in this area. Note the man in the foreground.

source: Idaho State Historical Society
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The Geology and Mineral Deposits of Part of the Western Half of the Hailey 1°×2° Quadrangle, Idaho

U.S. Geological Survey Bulletin 2064-W by Earl H. Bennett

Abstract

Rocks in the western half of the Hailey 1°×2° quadrangle of south-central Idaho include various units of the Atlanta lobe of the Idaho batholith (biotite granodiorite to two-mica granite) of Cretaceous age and plutons and dikes of Tertiary (Eocene to Miocene) age that intrude the batholith. Eocene plutonic rocks consist of a bimodal suite of anorogenic granite and tonalite-granodiorite and hypabyssal rhyolite and rhyodacite dikes. Rocks of the Eocene Challis Volcanics are scarce in the map area but are widespread to the east. Rhyolite ash flows of the Miocene Idavada Volcanics and basalt of the Snake River Plain crop out in the southern part of the area. Lacustrine rocks of probable Eocene to Holocene age are present in the vicinity of Anderson Ranch Reservoir. Quaternary basalts and gravels are widespread on the South Fork of the Boise River, and alluvial deposits are common along active drainages. Metasedimentary rocks of unknown age crop out on House Mountain, Chimney Peak, and on the ridges east of Anderson Ranch Reservoir.

Older structures in the Idaho batholith include a major fault beneath House Mountain that may be a decollement for one of the large thrust sheets in eastern Idaho or part of an extensional core complex. The southern part of the Atlanta lobe of the Idaho batholith is cut by northeast-striking faults (parallel with the Trans-Challis fault system) that are related to Eocene extension and by northwest-oriented faults that formed during basin and range extension in the Miocene. The basin and range faults have prominent scarps typical of basin and range topography. The combination of northeast and northwest faults has broken the batholith into a series of rhomboid blocks. Some of these northeast and northwest faults are older structures that were reactivated in the Eocene or Miocene, as indicated by Ar40/Ar39 dates on mineralized rock contained in some of the structures.

The Idaho batholith and associated rocks in the map area host several hundred mines and prospects in 18 mining districts. The deposits range in age from Cretaceous to Eocene, and many were developed for precious metals. Most of the deposits are in quartz veins in shear zones in granitic rocks of the batholith. Several districts were actively being explored for low-grade, bulk-minable, precious-metal deposits in the late 1980s and early 1990s.

link: U.S. Geological Survey Bulletin 2064-W
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Rocky Bar mine locations

Rocky_Bar_map-a
Rocky Bar map with mine locations, depicting the following mines: 7-Atlanta Hill, 13-Avalanche-Richmond, 14-Vibrator, 15-Vishnu, 16-Morning Star, 17-Ada-Elmore, 18-Independence, 19-Mountain Goat, 20-Ophir, 21-Spanish Town, 22-Wide West, 23-Bonaparte

source: (Wikipedia)
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Rocky Bar Area

(Rocky Bar, Spanish Town, Bear Creek, and Red Warrior Mining Districts)

Anderson (1943) described the geology and ore deposits in the Rocky Bar area in detail. Readers are referred to this publication and to Ballard (1928) for an early history of the area. The following discussion updates Anderson’s work.

Production

Anderson (1943) noted that peak production from mines in the Rocky Bar area was from 1875 to 1885 and had all but ceased in the next decade. Ballard (1928) estimated production from discovery to 1881 as $5,380,000 from lodes and $2,000,000 from placers. The U.S. Bureau of Mines noted minimal production from 1902 to date.

Geologic Setting

Mines in the Rocky Bar area account for most of the lode production discussed in this paper, most of which was occurred before 1900. The geology of all of the deposits is similar; fissures in granodiorite contain gold-bearing quartz veins. The area from Red Warrior Gulch to Spanish Town is now being actively explored for bulk minable gold deposits.

The age of mineralization in Rocky Bar area has been argued over the years; geologists are divided as to whether the deposits formed in the Cretaceous, Paleocene, Eocene. The same arguments apply to the gold deposits in the Atlanta area. There are very few dikes of Eocene age in the Rocky Bar area. Recent Ar40/39 plateau dates (58–57 Ma) on sericite from mineralized samples from the Vishnu dump indicate a Paleocene age.

History

Readers are referred to Anderson (1943) and Ballard (1928) for a review of the early development and history of the mines in the Rocky Bar area. There has been very little significant work in the Rocky Bar area from 1943 to recent times. In 1986, a placer operator found several large blue-quartz cobbles containing thick bands of native gold in a test pit just west of the area. These samples are similar to the descriptions of ore mined at Rocky Bar before 1900 (Anderson, 1943). If the samples are typical, then the rich ore necessary to account for the early gold production in the district is believable, in spite of the lack of mineralized samples on the mine dumps today.

Marsh Creek Mine

The Marsh Creek mine, south of the Rocky Bar area shown on figure 24, is described in Ballard (1928). The principal working was a 400-foot-long adit that cut a large quartz vein about 30 ft wide inside the adit. In 1941, Marsh Creek Mining Company patented two claims on Marsh Creek. About 30 ft of crosscut was done in 1944. In 1947, the total workings consisted of two tunnels (150 ft and 180 ft long). A sample of adularia collected at the mine by R.F. Sanford in 1987 gave an Ar40/Ar39 date of 39.3 Ma that indicates an Eocene age for this deposit.

Prospects North of the Bonaparte Mine

The Bonaparte mine is described in Anderson (1943). In 1986, trees about 8 in. in diameter were growing on the old dumps of the mine and there was no sign of recent activity. North of the mine, at the end of the mine road, two open adits appeared to be relatively recent, but no further information on the property was available.

Ophir Mine

In 1952, Western Mines Inc., rehabilitated 400 ft of tunnel and 200 ft of shaft at the Ophir group in Blakes Gulch north of Rocky Bar. Four men were employed. At the time, the property was developed by 5 tunnels (the longest was 500 ft long) and a 300-foot-deep shaft. There was a mill at the site. All assets of Western Mines, Inc. were transferred to Western Consolidated Mines in April 1952. In 1954, Western Consolidated Mines, Inc., employed 7 men at the Ophir who completed 110 ft of drifting and 60 ft of crosscuts and made surface improvements. There was little work after this.

Other Occurrences in the Rocky Bar Area

In the early 1980’s, Galli Exploration optioned a large claim block in the Red Warrior, Rocky Bar, and Hardscrabble Gulch area. In 1986, the company drilled about 20 holes in Hardscrabble Gulch. Later that year, Royal Apex Silver, Inc., acquired Galli. In 1987, when Coeur d’Alene Mines Corporation merged with Royal Apex Silver, what was Galli Exploration was spun off as a separate company called GEXA Gold. An additional 26 reverse circulation holes totalling 7,450 ft were drilled in 1987 and 25 more holes were drilled in 1988. Most of this work was in Hardscrabble Gulch. Estimated reserves at this time were 275,000 tons of 0.037 ounces per ton gold in Hardscrabble Gulch and 313,000 tons of 0.046 ounces per ton gold in Wide West Gulch for a total of about 0.5 million ounces of gold.

In 1989, GEXA signed an agreement with Newmont Exploration Limited to evaluate and develop the GEXA’s 179 claims in the Rocky Bar area. Newmont drilled 19 reverse circulation holes in 1989, 30 holes in 1990, and 11 holes in 1991, including a deep hole at the Ophir mine. The drilling program increased both open-pit and underground reserves but not enough for Newmont’s needs and the property was returned to GEXA in 1991.

from: pg 31-32 U.S. Geological Survey Bulletin 2064-W
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see also:
More Rocky Bar Photos at the Idaho State Historical Society
Link to Alturas County, Idaho 1864 to 1895
Link to Esmeralda, Alturas (Elmore) County, Idaho
Link to Annie “Peg Leg” McIntyre Morrow (part 1)
Link to Annie “Peg Leg” McIntyre Morrow (part 2)
Link to Rocky Bar, Alturas (Elmore) County (part 1 general)
Link to Rocky Bar, Alturas (Elmore) County (part 3 Transportation)
Link to Rocky Bar, Alturas (Elmore) County (part 4 Newspaper clippings)
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page updated Aug 26, 2020

Road Reports Sep 29, 2019

High elevation roads receiving snow this weekend. Be prepared for snow, rocks and trees in the road and remember there is no cell phone service. Please share road reports.

Yellow Pine: Wet weather has settled the dust again. Please respect your neighbors and wildlife – slow down!
link: Local Forecast.
Yellow Pine Webcam: (check date on image)

Warm Lake Highway: Report of slushy snow on Big Creek summit Saturday (Sep 28) afternoon.
link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′ (currently offline)

Highway 55 Webcams Link:

South Fork Road: Waiting for an update from the FS. If they finished the paving then the road will be open for winter.
More info:
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Report Friday (Sep 20) the road is still in good shape.

Johnson Creek Road: Report during the storm Saturday (Sep 28) “road report – I left YP around noon via Johnson Creek snow/sleet started spitting as I left town. Heavy wet snow past Wapiti – covering the road as I climbed. Pavement was wet from the junction – slushy snow floor at Landmark (and Big Creek).” – DP
Multiple reports Friday (Sep 27) that the washboards are coming back on the upper end (better going out than coming in.) Lower Johnson Creek road is good.
link: Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam
link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Last report Sept 12: Rough. Probably snow up high Sept 28.
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Report Saturday (Sep 28) snowing and sticking to the road at Profile Gap.
20190928ProfileSummitSnow-a
photo courtesy Scott A
The culvert replacement project near the turn off has been completed.
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcam: (check date on image)

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open. Probably snow above 6000′
Update from Valley Co Road Dept Wed (Sep 25) “Work is complete on the Stibnite road. I believe the contractor is still going to blade the road from Yellow Pine to Stibnite.”
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: \No current report on road conditions. Probably snow above 6000′.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Open and rough. Probably snow above 6000′.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Warren Wagon Road: West of Payette Lake road is closed for construction Monday-Friday from 8am to noon and from 1pm to 5pm.

Secesh: Road is open to Secesh.

Stanley to Landmark: Forest road 579 temporary closure planned from September 16th – Sept. 29th for maintenance.
map link:

Deadwood Summit: No current report. Probably snow above 6000′.
Report Aug 11: from Landmark to Deadwood really good until the last 10 miles to the lake.
Report from VCSO Aug 14: Forest road 579, Landmark to Stanley Road, temporary closure planned from September 16th – Sept. 29th for maintenance.
Old report from BNF June 26th: Access to Deadwood Campgrounds is open along FS 579 road from State Highway 21. Access to Deadwood Campgrounds from FS 582 (Clear Creek Rd) to FS 579 is open. Cascade to Landmark access to Deadwood Campgrounds via FS 579 road is open. FS 555 road to Deadwood Campgrounds is too rough to travel and not a recommended route.
Note: The approx elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′
——————————-

Weather Reports Sept 22-28, 2019

Sept 22 Weather:

At 9am it was 34 degrees, clear sky and light frost. A few high wispy clouds by noon. At 250pm it was 71 degrees, mostly high thin hazy clouds and rather breezy. At 8pm it was 58 degrees, mostly cloudy and nearly calm. Dry at midnight.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time September 23, 2019 at 09:00AM
Almost clear
Max temperature 74 degrees F
Min temperature 34 degrees F <– yesterday morning
At observation 39 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

Sept 23 Weather:

At 9am it was 39 degree and almost clear (one cloud peeking over VanMeter to the north.) Increasing clouds, partly cloudy before noon. At 430pm it was 69 degrees, light breeze and bigger clouds. At 730pm it was 58 degrees, partly clear and slight breeze. At 11pm it appeared cloudy.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time September 24, 2019 at 09:00AM
Mostly cloudy (dark)
Max temperature 71 degrees F
Min temperature 39 degrees F
At observation 50 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

Sept 24 Weather:

At 9am it was 50 degrees, mostly dark clouds. Bigger breaks in the clouds and breezy by 11am. At 230pm it was 72 degrees, mostly clear (a few cottonballs) and breezy. Mostly clear at 6pm. At 750pm it was 60 degrees and mostly cloudy. At 945pm it was 53 degrees. Looks cloudy at 11pm.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time September 25, 2019 at 09:00AM
Mostly clear (high haze) and heavy dew
Max temperature 74 degrees F
Min temperature 36 degrees F
At observation 37 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

Sept 25 Weather:

At 9am it was 37 degrees, mostly clear (high haze) and heavy dew. A few clouds mid-day and breezy. At 315pm it was 68 degrees, the sky was cloudless, but heavy smoke coming in from the west (Rx burn) and breezy. At 8pm it was 50 degrees and very smoky (unable to see the sky.) A few stars overhead thru the smoke at 1030pm.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time September 26, 2019 at 09:00AM
Mostly cloudy, light breeze, smoky
Max temperature 71 degrees F
Min temperature 33 degrees F
At observation 36 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

Sept 26 Weather:

At 9am it was 36 degrees, mostly cloudy, light breeze and smoky (from Rx burn down the EFSF.) Overcast and light breezes mid-day, better air quality. At 4pm it was 66 degrees, dark overcast, light breezes and fairly good air quality. Started raining around 515pm, overcast. At 730pm it was 49 degrees, overcast and still sprinkling. At 9pm it was 49 degrees and not raining. Cloudy at 11pm.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time September 27, 2019 at 09:00AM
Mostly cloudy, ridges and peaks socked in
Max temperature 72 degrees F
Min temperature 36 degrees F
At observation 43 degrees F
Precipitation 0.10 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

Sept 27 Weather:

At 9am it was 43 degrees and mostly cloudy – ridges and peaks socked in. Decreasing clouds by lunch time and light breeze. At 4pm it was 63 degrees, partly cloudy and slight breeze. At 8pm it was 51 degrees, haze of smoke and mostly cloudy. At 245am quite a few stars out.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time September 28, 2019 at 09:00AM
Mostly cloudy, light breeze
Max temperature 66 degrees F
Min temperature 33 degrees F
At observation 36 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

Sept 28 Weather:

At 9am it was 36 degrees, mostly cloudy and light breeze. Gusty breezes 1230pm followed by rain shower. At 140pm still raining, low clouds, appears the top of Golden Gate is getting some snow. At 3pm it was just under 38 degrees, low overcast and steady rain. At 330pm just a tiny sprinkle. Not raining at 530pm. At 730pm it was 40 degrees, low overcast – socked in midway, just starting to sprinkle a little mist. Still drizzling at 920pm. Not raining and almost calm at 11pm. Light misty drizzle at 1220am. Probably done raining by 3-4am.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time September 29, 2019 at 09:00AM
Low overcast, socked in, snow line approx 6000′
Max temperature 46 degrees F
Min temperature 34 degrees F
At observation 35 degrees F
Precipitation 0.32 inch
————————-

Road Reports Sep 25, 2019

Check the weather forecast, much cooler and rain (and possible snow) this coming weekend. Reminder the South Fork road is closed from 7am to 4pm Monday thru Friday (this may be the last week.) Be prepared for rocks and trees in the road and remember there is no cell phone service. Please share road reports.

Also Rx burns start today, (smoky in YP this afternoon) on the west side of the South Fork Salmon river between Poverty Flat Campground and Reed Ranch and another on the East Fork near the confluence of the East Fork and South Fork Salmon River in Williams, Dutch Oven, Telephone and Deadman Creek drainages.

Yellow Pine: Drier weather means dusty streets again. Please respect your neighbors and slow down!
link: Local Forecast.
Yellow Pine Webcam: (check date on image)

Warm Lake Highway: Clear
link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

Highway 55 Webcams Link:

South Fork Road: Closed Monday through Friday from 7am to 4pm on weekdays, with no closures over the weekends.
Report Monday (Sept 23) Multiple closure points will occur throughout the week as paving is taking place. If paving goes as planned, this will be the last week of work for this fall. Operations will shut down for the winter and resume next spring.
Map w/info for September 23 through 27 Newsletter:
More info:
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Report Friday (Sep 20) the road is still in good shape.

Johnson Creek Road: Watch for extra traffic due to closures on the South Fork route.
Tuesday (Sep 24) report the upper end washboards fixed, but lots of loose rocks. Lower end in great shape.
Wednesday (Sep 25) mail truck driver (Robert) reports upper Johnson Creek road has been bladed.
link: Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam
link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Reported open June 23. Report Sept 12: Rough.
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Reported open June 23.
The culvert replacement near the turn off has been completed. No current report on road conditions.
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcam: (check date on image)

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open.
Update from Valley Co Road Dept Wed (Sep 25) “Work is complete on the Stibnite road. I believe the contractor is still going to blade the road from Yellow Pine to Stibnite.”
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Reported open June 30.
No current report on road conditions.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Open and rough.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Warren Wagon Road: West of Payette Lake road is closed for construction Monday-Friday from 8am to noon and from 1pm to 5pm.

Secesh: Road is open to Secesh.

Stanley to Landmark: Forest road 579 temporary closure planned from September 16th – Sept. 29th for maintenance.
map link:

Deadwood Summit: Reported Open June 16th
Report Aug 11: from Landmark to Deadwood really good until the last 10 miles to the lake.
Report from VCSO Aug 14: Forest road 579, Landmark to Stanley Road, temporary closure planned from September 16th – Sept. 29th for maintenance.
Old report from BNF June 26th: Access to Deadwood Campgrounds is open along FS 579 road from State Highway 21. Access to Deadwood Campgrounds from FS 582 (Clear Creek Rd) to FS 579 is open. Cascade to Landmark access to Deadwood Campgrounds via FS 579 road is open. FS 555 road to Deadwood Campgrounds is too rough to travel and not a recommended route.
Note: The approx elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′
——————————-

Prescribed Burning Bald Hill and Four Mile Projects Sept 25-26

Prescribed Burning in Bald Hill and Four Mile Projects September 25 and 26

(email Sept 23, 2019 640pm)

We are planning on burning on Wednesday and Thursday of this week, September 25 and 26. Ignitions will take place in both Bald Hill and Four Mile project areas.

Areas targeted in Bald Hill will be Units A and B, near the confluence of the East Fork and South Fork Salmon River in Williams, Dutch Oven, Telephone and Deadman Creek drainages.

Areas targeted in the Four Mile Project Area will be units D, E, F on the west side of the South Fork Salmon river between Poverty Flat Campground and Reed Ranch, including Holdover and Martin Creek drainages.

Smoke and fire should be expected in these areas until the next significant precipitation, as of now predicted for this weekend.

Maps are attached, Bald Hill A and B (in red) are on the west side of the project area, Four Mile D,E,F are the 3 outlined in red in the middle of the project.

Any questions please call or email myself at 208-634-0622, laurel.ingram@usda.gov or Patrick Schon at 208-634-0623, patrick.schon@usda.gov

Thanks,
Laurel Ingram
Fuels Technician
Payette National Forest
Krassel Ranger District

Maps:

link to: Bald Hill Fall 2019 Notifications.pdf

link to: FourMile_Notification Fall 2019.pdf
————————-

Sept 22, 2019 The Yellow Pine Times

Sept 22, 2019 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Note: The boil water order and water restrictions are still in effect.

Community Calendar:

April 2 – Boil water order issued
Every Sunday – 11am Fire/SAR Training
May 10 to Oct 20 – Burn “permits” required
May 15 – Firewood Season opens
July 22 – Daytime closures on So. Fk road begin
Sept 28 – 2pm Fish Fry at the YP Tavern

(details below)
———-

Local Events:

Annual Community Pig Roast was Sept 14 at The Corner

20190914PigRoast-a
photo courtesy Midas Gold

5EV Memorial Run Wildland Firefighter Foundation Fund Raiser and Yellow Pine Escapades Ride to Cinnabar also on Sept 14th.
— — — —

YPFD Sunday Trainings

We’ve had 3 Sunday training days with Valley County Search & Rescue (VCSAR) and their K-9 Team.

It has been great working together on anything from training with their team including VCSAR’s K-9 members. This has included: repelling to repelling over the side, to an actual staged search and rescue with a medical scenario.

Three of our Yellow Pine residents who are members of VCSAR, along with three other YP residents, one playing the part of the patient, participated in these events. Four members of VCSAR made the trip to YP for the trainings along with two K 9 members.

We look forward to continuing training with VCSAR as well as other agencies in the future.

A huge thanks to everyone who was a part of this fun and exciting time!

20190915VCSARtraining-a
-AF
— — — —

Stop the Bleed Course

On September 14th a total of 8 YP residents were Certified in a “Stop the Bleed” course. 4 attended the course while 4 others took the course online. Thanks to everyone for participating and helping the The American College of Surgeons Committee on Trauma in trying to educate and empower the 300+million citizens in the United States.

Background: Motivated by the 2012 tragedy in Sandy Hook and multiple tragedies that have occurred in the ensuing years, what has become known as the Hartford Consensus was convened to bring together leaders from law enforcement, the federal government, and the medical community to improve survivability from manmade or natural mass casualty events. The resulting injuries from these events generally present with severe bleeding which, if left unattended, can result in death. The participants of the Hartford Consensus concluded that by providing first responders (law enforcement) and civilian bystanders the skills and basic tools to stop uncontrolled bleeding in an emergency situation, lives would be saved. The first responder program has received very good response and is widely being used across the country. The next step is to focus on needs of civilian bystanders.

Need: Civilians need basic training in Bleeding Control principles so they are able to provide immediate, frontline aid until first responders are able to take over care of an injured person. Due to many situations, there may be a delay between the time of injury and the time a first responder is on the scene. Without civilian intervention in these circumstances, preventable deaths will occur.

Mission/Objective: The American College of Surgeons Committee on Trauma is leading the effort to save lives by teaching the civilian population to provide vital initial response to stop uncontrolled bleeding in emergency situations. This will be accomplished by the development of a comprehensive and sustainable bleeding control education and information program targeted to civilians that will inform, educate and empower the 300+million citizens of the United States. Copyright © 2017 by the American College of Surgeons

20190914StopTheBleedClass-a
-AF
———-

Village News:

Flu Shots

Cascade Medical Center’s CEO Tom Reinhardt brought up some flu shots for Village Residents. We have 1 adult super strength left and 10 regular flu shots available for anyone who would like one. They will be available till Wednesday September 25th. If interested, please contact Jeff or Ann.
-AF
— — — — —

Wildlife Sightings

Several reports in the last couple of weeks of a bear wandering around the upper part of the village. So far no reports of problems, the bear seems to want to avoid people. Update: recent report a bear was killed up by the apple orchard.

Sandhill Crane flying around the village on Friday afternoon Sep 20th. Reports from the Cox Ranch of 3 cranes hanging out there this summer.

photo by Ann F
link to bird info:

Peregrine Falcon chasing Steller Jays down here by the school for several hours on Saturday and again on Sunday (Sep 21-22.)
link to bird info:
— — — —

Sept 4 PNF Rx burn meeting notes YP Community Hall

Brian Anderson, Acting Payette Forest, Krassel District Ranger; Laurel Ingram, Fuels Tech; and Patrick Schon, Fuel Specialist, represented the Payette National Forest at a public meeting in Yellow Pine September 4th. to explain, and answer questions regarding the planned prescribed burns that may affect the Yellow Pine area. They provided maps with the areas to be affected to each person attending and left large maps in the Community Hall. The five areas off the South Fork Salmon River will be the first portions of the project followed by the Yellow Pine area. This is an on-going project over the course of several years, with each area expected to take two to four days. Fires will be commenced by helicopter and ground crews as has been done in the past.

Prescribed burns are planned to remove excessive build up of dry debris in order to minimize the intensity of any future fires. As in past prescribed burns the roads near the areas will have caution signs, and the fires will be monitored. Shown on the map are five drainages West of the South Fork Road and four locations off of the East Fork of the South Fork of the Salmon River Road that will be burned, weather permitting. At the time of the meeting the specialists were monitoring the weather for storms and cooler temperatures that would provide adequate rain or increased humidity, which are needed before the operation can begin. If the weather conditions permit, the first fires will be started about mid-September; the project will be delayed until Spring if the weather conditions are not safe.

In response to a questions the specialists replied;

1. Two to three days advance notice would be given, and if possible they will provide up to one week of advance notice, so people who may have compromised breathing conditions can plan to leave the area or stay indoors if the air quality is questionable. Hunters should be aware that their areas may be affected. If area residents call Laurel Ingram (208-634-0622) they can sign up for a personal alert for advance warning.

2. Laurel Ingram explained the policy of not keeping manpower on the scene all night. The weather prediction, with attention to the humidity, are analyzed the crew leaves the location for the night.

Local residents emphasized concern that the Boulder Creek area should be safe-guarded because that drainage is the water source for the community of Yellow Pine. The locations that may directly affect Yellow Pine are located from the Deadman Creek down stream to the South Fork of the Salmon River. This area is adjacent to the road so drivers must be cautious. The smoke may be pushed upstream to the Village of Yellow Pine. The area closer to Yellow Pine is north of the village on the east side of the Quartz Creek drainage and the area commonly known as Bald Hill. The smoke from this area could affect Yellow Pine. Fires will be close to the road along the East Fork Road (toward Stibnite) to Profile Creek and Profile Creek Road (toward Big Creek) from the junction to Camp Creek area.

Questions and concerns: call Laurel Ingram, Fuels Tech (208) 634-0622 or Patrick Schon, Fuel Specialist (208) 634-0623

Maps:

link to: Bald Hill Fall 2019 Notifications.pdf

link to: FourMile_Notification Fall 2019.pdf

[h/t LI for notes]
— — — —

Get Ready for Winter Heating

* Inspect and clean the chimney. Contact the YPFD to borrow chimney brushes.
* Inspect and clean wood stoves, make sure dampers work properly and check for leaks.
* Check your carbon monoxide and smoke detectors – install fresh batteries.
* Check your fire extinguisher and make sure it is handy. Manually rotate them around, tip upside down and lightly shake them, thus keeping the fire fighting agent loose, and check that the needle is still in the green. If you need a new one please call, your fire commissioner or Jeff F.
* If you have an oil-powered furnace, replace your filter and nozzle and check the tank level.
* Check your propane tank levels (early morning when it is cool in case there is a wasp nest!)
* Test the igniter switch. On an old system, you might have to relight the pilot. Newer systems have electronic igniters.
* Lubricate and clean the blower motor. First check the owner’s manual to see if your motor is the kind that needs lubricating. If it does, turn off the power, open the cover and clean the caps covering the bearings. Then remove the caps and lubricate the bearings.
* Inspect the blower belt for cracks. Turn off the power to the furnace at the main circuit breaker. Use a screwdriver to remove the steel cover of the air handler. The blower belt is the largest rubber belt that you see. Replace the belt if it is cracked.
* Inspect the exhaust flue outdoors to ensure it is free of obstructions such as branches or animal nests.
* Keep the area around your furnace unit free of debris and clutter.
* Change the air filters. Clean your air vents and ducts. Remove the vent covers with a screwdriver. Use the extension hose of your vacuum to remove the dust.
* Open all your air vents. Remove furniture, boxes and clutter that get in the way of air flowing from the vents.

Local Fuel Suppliers
Propane
Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Heating fuel
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430
Furnace Service
Rocky Mountain Mechanical (208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett
— — — —

Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Report Sept 19th: Road to the dump is good. The bins were empty Thursday afternoon.

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

Yellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is located approximately 3 miles south on Johnson Creek Road.

The TRANSFER STATION is for household trash and yard waste:
* Household trash must be put inside (and fit) the dumpster;
* Yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, et.) goes in the burn pile on the south end of the turn-around;
* Cardboard boxes should be flattened before putting the in the dumpster,

The DUMPSTERS are NOT for:
* Furniture (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station).

The BURN PILE is NOT for:
* Cardboard boxes (flatten and put in dumpster);
* Furniture and appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Drywall and building material (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wire or fencing (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Foam Rubber (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wood with metal (like nails) attached (take to Donnelly Transfer Station.)

When closing the DOORS on the front of the dumpsters:
* Make sure the “U” brackets at the top and bottom of the door are engaged;
* The retaining bar at the middle of the door is slid into the pipe;
* And the “L” bars at the bottom of the doors dropped into place.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: 208/634-7176
— — — —

Roads

South Fork
Starting July 22 the South Fork road will be closed Monday through Friday from 7am to 4pm on weekdays, with no closures over the weekends.
Note from Friday evening (Sep 20) the pavement has been cut for repairs and there is a 2-3″ dropoff to watch for. Slow drive out.
Map w/info for September 16 through 20:
More info:

YP to Stibnite Road
Update from Valley Co. Road Dept Aug 13: Open with cautions – expect delays in the work area. “we strongly advise people need to be very cautious of a few dump trucks working between Stibnite and Yellow Pine. The contractor will begin laying a crushed rock surface on the repairs probably next week.”
Update from Valley Co. Road Dept Aug 28: “They are hauling crush aggregate on it this week and should be done next week sometime.”
Update from Valley Co. Road Dept Sept 4: “Last Thursday the crew was fixing the damage at Profile Creek intersection. They should be done with that this week. I took the road closed sign down going towards Stibnite. As soon as they are done with the riprap at Profile Creek they will start laying the crush material on the repairs. Sam, from Midas, said the crews will also be getting started blading the road from Yellow Pine to Stibnite shortly. Midas will also be applying road stabilizer from Yellow Pine to Stibnite as soon as it is bladed.”
— — — —

Yellow Pine US Mail

The 6-day a week mail delivery started June 1st. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 55 cents
— — — —

Reminder for people living in bear country:

* Garbage should be stored inside the house or in a secure garage or storage building.
* If garbage cannot be stored in a secure location, a bear-resistant container approved by the Interagency Bear Committee is recommended.
* Avoid using bird feeders from March through November. Birds do not need supplemental feeding this time of year.
* Pet food should not be left outside.
* BBQ grills or anything with a strong odor should not be left out at night.
* Protect gardens, beehives, and compost piles with electric fencing.
* Never intentionally feed bears. A food-conditioned bear may pose a threat to human safety and usually results in the removal of the bear.
———-

Local Groups:

YPWUA News:

The yearly Yellow Pine Water Users Shareholders meeting was Sunday July 7th in the community hall. (No minutes yet)

Update Sept 8:

Still looking for the leak. Water restrictions and boil order still in effect.

Update Aug 27:

Yesterday [Aug 26th] we shut down the water in town and up by Merle place. Conclusion, our main water leak is somewhere between Alpine Village and Merle’s place.

Next plan of action is to dig up and check the pipe on the west side of the East Fork bridge. I know there has been a spring there for years but the amount of water we are seeing [at the] surface seems too high for this time of year.

– Steve Holloway

Update Aug 18:

Unfortunately the leak that Idaho Rural thought they found turned up no leak.

Water Update June 7:

1. The “boil order” is still in effect.
2. There is still large water leaks in the system. We continue to look.
3. A grant for $39,000 was approved for improvements to the system.
3. Work is currently being done on the new contact tank.
4. Please, no lawn watering until we find and repair the major leaks.
– Steve Holloway

link to: #4430059 Yellow Pine Water Users Boil Water Notification 4-2-19

link to: 2018 September Water Department Update
— — — —

VYPA News:

Last VYPA meeting was Saturday September 21st at the Community Hall. (no minutes yet.)

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting Minutes August 10, 2019.
link to: 20190810 YPVA Minutes

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting Minutes July 20, 2019
link to: 20190720 Yellow Pine Village Association Minutes

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting Minutes for June 8, 2019
link to: 20190608 Village of Yellow Pine Association

VYPA Meeting Dates 2019

June 8th; July 20th; August 10th; September 14th – 2pm at the Community Hall.
— — — —

YPFD News:

There was a Yellow Pine Fire District Budget meeting for Fiscal Year 2019 – 2020 Sept 14th at 10am at the Fire Hall (no minutes yet.)

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice

The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.”

link to: 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation

Meeting minutes for July 13, 2019
link to: 20190713 YPFD Meeting Notes_final

YPFD June 16, 2019 Meeting minutes
link to: 20190615 YPFD Meeting Notes_Final

Meetings will be held at the fire station at 10am and everyone is welcome to attend. June 15th; July 13th; and Sept 14th (which will also be the budget meeting as well).

Every Sunday 11am – Training

May 10th to Oct 20th Burn Permits – contact the YPFD

Pile burning: Dress appropriately, have enough help on hand (people, water and tools) and make a firebreak before you start. Call your local fire protection district chief to let them know you’ll be conducting a debris burn. This saves them from sending emergency responders to your property if they are not needed.

Bring it, Don’t Burn it

For us in Yellow Pine, Jake Strohmeyer, Dist. Ranger with the Boise NF said we can use the area at our transfer station for yard debris and the FS will burn it once a year. Please no furniture, mattresses, construction debris, metal objects, tires or personnel junk. Please only woody yard debris. When using the pile please be mindful of where you place the debris as it should be contained to a manageable burnable area and kept as clean as possible. – JF

Training: Sunday Fire/EMS training at 11am unless otherwise posted. All are welcome.

YP Helispot: We are working with Valley County Road Department and the Boise National Forest for the rock base for the road leading into the Helispot and the actual Helispot itself. We are also receiving rock for the Fire Hydrants, water tank foundations, etc. The rock will come from the Valdez pit and will be less expensive than having it trucked in from Cascade.

link to Cooking safety in the home:

link to Smoke Alarm Info:

-JF
——–

Biz Listings:

Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377

Call for reservations
— — — —

The Corner (208) 633-3325

Our hours will be 11-8 every day, except closed on Tuesdays. We are open for breakfast by request and always have good coffee starting at 6am.
The Corner has firewood permits in stock now. 4 cord minimum at $6.25 per cord. Please bring drivers license and cash is preferred, no CC.
The Corner Store will also be open with snacks, groceries, fresh produce, soda, ice and packaged beer. If you know you will be coming in over the summer and need special grocery orders, let me know and I will order it in for you while you are here, 2 deliveries a week. The best way to get a hold of me is to call or stop by and say hello.
Karaoke is back at The Corner! Choose your favorite songs from our online music library and entertain your friends up on stage through our professional sound system.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233

Fall hours open 8AM to close
Full breakfast served starting at 8am with special arrangement for earlier breakfast as needed. 92 Octane non ethanol gas available, cubed ice, beer, pop and water sold by the 6 and 12 pack, snacks, ice cream and many supplies available. Burgers and Pizza, Beer and Wine on the evening menu. Football and other sports available on our TV. Wi Fi, Verizon phone service and information available.
— — — —

Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Tom & Sarah Lanham
156 Yellow Pine Ave, Yellow Pine Id 83677
website:
FB page:
It’s official starting June 2020 We will be doing trail rides out of Yellow Pine along with summer pack / camping trips to high mountain lakes in the area!

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
— — — —

Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430
— — — —

Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

The Star-News

subscribe:
https://www.mccallstarnews.com/pages/subscribe.php
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Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine

Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, will service Yellow Pine

B&T Safety Solutions LLC
208-271-1600 Based out of Donnelly
Snow removal, cleaning chimneys and stoves, we do cabin staining/chinking as well
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
https://www.facebook.com/The-Yellow-Pine-Times-278419589262862/
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Local Observations:

Monday (Sep 16) overnight low of 41 degrees, mostly cloudy sky this morning. Raven calling while flying over the village. Crusher putting up a small cloud of dust. Wonky sounding airplane circling over the village at 1120am. Cloudy and breezy mid-day. Light traffic. Very nice mid-afternoon, cloudy and a little breezy, high of 78 degrees. Partly cloudy at sunset. Female hairy woodpecker visiting at dusk. Days are getting shorter, dark by 830pm. Rain started after 1am and rained all night.

Tuesday (Sep 17) overnight low of 41 degrees, overcast and sprinkling this morning. Grosbeaks, finches and nuthatches visiting. Light traffic. Crusher making noise but no dust. Cloudy and breezy mid-day. Breaks in the clouds and chilly breezes mid-afternoon, high of 56 degrees. Mostly cloudy and cool light breeze at sunset. Cloudy before midnight. Early morning rain shower.

Wednesday (Sep 18) overnight low of 41 degrees, overcast and chilly light breeze this morning. Crusher running and putting up a small cloud of dust. Lots of pine siskins, finches, several nuthatches, a few grosbeaks and a jay visiting. Chipmunks scurrying about, watched one grab a feather off the ground, roll it up and run off with it – nest insulation? Occasional drops of rain after 11am. Mail truck made it in on time, upper Johnson Creek has been graded. Dark overcast, chilly and steady light rain for a couple hours mid-afternoon, high of 51 degrees. Breaks in the clouds and colorful sunset.

Thursday (Sep 19) overnight low of 40 degrees, low clouds and ridges socked in this morning. Crusher running, no visible dust. A few chipmunks running around and a pine squirrel gathering seeds. Sprinkles on and off early afternoon, high of 56 degrees. A few finches and a jay visiting, female hairy woodpecker in the neighborhood. Short little showers early evening, not enough to get wet. Breaks in the clouds at sunset. Mostly cloudy at dusk. Robins calling.

Friday (Sep 20) overnight low of 42 degrees, dark overcast and sprinkles on and off this morning. Crusher running, no visible dust. Robins calling. Short little rain showers after lunch time. Female hairy woodpecker visited. Blustery and rain showers mid to late afternoon, high of 56 degrees. Report of a sandhill crane flying around the village (see photo in village news and Bird of the Week.) Breaks in the clouds and calmer at sunset. Dark clouds at dusk. Cloudy before midnight.

Saturday (Sep 21) overnight low of 40 degrees, mostly cloudy sky and light breeze this morning. Day off at the Crusher. Jays and robins calling. Falcon chasing jays around the feeders for nearly half the day (photo did not turn out.) Breaks in the clouds at noon. Female hairy woodpecker and red-breasted nuthatches visiting. Chipmunks and pine squirrels running about. Mostly cloudy, mild and light breezes mid-afternoon, high of 64 degrees. Cassins finches and a trio of jays visiting. Partly clear at sunset. Mostly cloudy at dusk. Partly clear (patches of stars) before midnight.

Sunday (Sep 22) overnight low of 33 degrees, clear sky and light frost on metal roofs and in the shade this morning. Jays, hairy woodpecker, several nuthatches, a few finches and a couple of cowbirds visiting. No pine siskins or evening grosbeaks. Some wispy clouds moving in by lunch time. Falcon was here early in the afternoon chasing song birds again. Mostly high thin haze and quite breezy by mid-afternoon, high of 74 degrees. Mostly hazy at sunset and calmer. Doe and 2 big fawns grazing along the street at dusk, all fat and healthy looking and the fawns have lost their spots.
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Idaho News:

Valley puts road tax on November ballot

Advisory vote last year called not enough

By Max Silverson for The Star-News Sept 19, 2019

Valley County will try again in November to pass a ballot measure that would institute a new tax to fund the road department at about $3.8 million per year.

Valley county commissioners on Monday voted to put the measure on the Nov. 5 ballot.

Taxpayers would see an increase of about $84 per $100,000 in property value if passed. The additional taxes would be collected starting in December 2020.

continued:
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Cascade puts 1% sales tax on Nov. 5 ballot

Funds would be used for streets, sidewalks

By Max Silverson for The Star-News Sept 19, 2019

Voters in Cascade will go to the polls on Nov. 5 to decide whether or not to institute a new, two-year 1% local option tax.

If passed, funds from the tax would be spent on streets, sidewalks, crosswalks, pathways and other public rights-of-way as well as the development, beautification and maintenance of public parks.

The Cascade City Council voted in a special meeting last Friday to place the measure on the ballot.

The ballot initiative requires 60% plus one vote in favor in order to pass.

The tax would be levied on all items, goods and services subject to current sales taxes in Idaho. Items costing more than $1,000 would be exempt from the new tax.

The city council felt putting a cap on the amount to be taxed would help balance the burden across all retailers within the city, Cascade Mayor Judith Nissula said.

If passed, the tax would take effect January 1, 2020.

continued:
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ITD to address public concerns about ID-55, Banks Lowman intersection

by Ryan L Morrison Thursday, September 19th 2019

Boise, Idaho (CBS 2) — The Idaho Transportation Department will hold a public meeting to address concerns about the Highway 55, Banks Lowman Road intersection.

ID-55 is an access point to a popular outdoor recreational area and gets a lot of traffic during the weekends and summer months.

The highway is used to get to Garden Valley, Crouch, Cascade, Donnelly, McCall, and New Meadows, as well as other communities.

continued:
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Idaho senators support PILT legislation

Sept 17, 2019 Local News 8

Washington D.C. (KIFI/KIDK) – Idaho republican Senators Jim Risch and Mike Crapo have joined a bi-partisan coalition in support of legislation reauthorizing the “Payments in Lieu of Taxes” (PILT) program for ten years.

PILT provides resources to nearly 1,900 counties across 49 states in which the federal government owns property for which it does not pay property taxes. Counties have used the payments for more than 40 years to pay for things like law enforcement, fire fighting, emergency response, and other essential county services.

“The federal government does not pay local property taxes, which makes rural counties containing large swaths of federally-owned land face tough financial decisions,” said Crapo. “Our legislation would provide much-needed stability to these counties so they can budget appropriately according to expected revenue and provide these essential services to local citizens and taxpayers. I look forward to continue working in a bipartisan manner to end the financial uncertainty thousands of rural counties face nationwide.”

continued:
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Valley County Gun Club shooting range progresses

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News Sept 19, 2019

A bead of sweat dripping down his brow, Craig Meinburg’s hand twitched before unholstering a revolver and rapidly firing five shots into a series of cowboy figures staring at him 20 yards away.

Meinburg, also known as “Jughandle Jack,” and three other Valley County Gun Club members were taking part in a Cowboy Shoot last weekend at the club’s newly built range on Warm Lake Road about six miles east of Cascade.

Saturday’s shoot was the culmination of more than $100,000 and two years of work poured into the 44-acre site that is now home to Valley County’s first proper gun range.

“It’s been a long time coming,” said Jim Roters, 74, of Boise, who participated in Saturday’s Cowboy Shoot as “Jimmy R” and is a member of the gun club.

The range was unveiled at a barbeque last September, but was not functional until about April, said Meinburg, of Lake Fork, a founding member of the gun club.

continued:
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Texas oil company facing Idaho lawsuit files for bankruptcy

The filing means the federal lawsuit in Idaho is on hold.

Keith Ridler – Associated Press September 17, 2019

Boise, Idaho — A Texas company that made Idaho a natural gas and oil-producing state but is facing a federal lawsuit from disgruntled royalty recipients as well as an investigation by Idaho authorities involving production records has filed for bankruptcy protection.

Alta Mesa Resources and associated companies filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection last week in U.S. Bankruptcy Court in Texas, where the company is based.

continued:
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Agency could keep Three Mile Island nuclear debris in Idaho

By Keith Ridler – Associated Press – 9/16/19

Boise, Idaho — The partially melted reactor core from the worst nuclear accident in U.S. history could remain in Idaho for another 20 years if regulators finalize a license extension sought by the U.S. Energy Department, officials said Monday.

The core from Three Mile Island in Pennsylvania partially melted in 1979, an event that changed the way Americans view nuclear technology.

The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has determined there would be no significant impact from extending the license to store the core at the 890-square-mile (2,305-square-kilometer) site that includes Idaho National Laboratory.

continued:
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Letter to Share:

Program provides needed funds to Idaho counties

To the Editor:

I have joined a bipartisan group of Western senators in introducing legislation to reauthorize the Payment in Lieu of Taxes program to provide long-term financial security for rural counties.

The legislation would reauthorize the PILT program for 10 years. The program provides critical resources to nearly 1,900 counties across 49 states.

Counties have used these payments for more than 40 years to fund law enforcement, firefighting, emergency response, and other essential county services.

The PILT program impacts every single county in Idaho. Without PILT funding, many rural communities throughout our state and much of the West would face economic devastation. Our rural communities need a lasting solution, and we owe it to them to fulfill our obligation and reauthorize PILT.

Additional sponsors of the legislation include Sen. Mike Crapo (R-Idaho), Sens. Ron Wyden (D-Ore.) and Jeff Merkley (D-Ore.), Cory Gardner (R-Colo.), and Michael Bennet (D-Colo.).

Earlier this year, myself and Sens. Crapo, Wyden and Merkley also introduced the bipartisan Forest Management for Rural Stability Act to make the Secure Rural Schools program permanent by creating an endowment fund to provide stable, increasing and reliable funding for county services.

In 61 percent of the nation’s counties, the federal government is a major landowner. The PILT program represents the federal government’s commitment to these and many other services.

This bill ensures the long-term certainty we need, instead of being susceptible to the whims of unpredictable federal funding and shifting the burden to local taxpayers and businesses.

James Risch, R-Idaho, United States Senate

posted in The Star-News Sept 19, 2019
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Public Lands:

Boise National Forest announces new Emmett District Ranger

Boise, Idaho, September 16, 2019—The Boise National Forest welcomes Katie Wood, as the new District Ranger in Emmett.

Katie served as the Boise District, Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Support Services and Operations Chief since February 2017. She has overseen a wide diversity of areas including: emergency stabilization and rehabilitation, engineering, heavy equipment, GIS, administration and noxious and invasive weeds.

“I look forward to working in cooperation with the public while serving in this role. My goal is to ensure the Emmett Ranger District is managed in a way that takes into account the needs of current users without losing sight that future generations will need, and rely on, public lands as much as we do. This is particularly relevant given the Emmett Ranger District’s proximity to Idaho’s largest population center and the mixed uses which occur on this land.” Said Katie Wood, Emmett District Ranger.

Her tenure as Challis-Yankee Fork District Ranger (Salmon-Challis National Forest) provided her critical experience in managing challenging natural resource issues including: threatened and endangered species, forest and rangeland management, restoration, recreation, and special uses.

Katie has completed a variety of details over the past 10 years including Assistant Field Manager, Planning and Environmental Coordinator, Forest Headwaters Reserve Manager, and Disaster Program Specialist for the United States Forest Service in Washington D.C.
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Public Scoping Period Open for the Little Red Goose Forest Resiliency Project – Closes October 21

New Meadows, ID, September 20, 2019 – The Payette National Forest is seeking public comment on the Little Red Goose Forest Resiliency Project on the New Meadows Ranger District of the Payette National Forest.

A recent USDA Forest Health and Protection report identified the need to “adequately address the Douglas-fir tussock moth outbreak” currently impacting the proposed Little Red Goose project area. This project area is 8,800 acres in the Little Salmon River subbasin in Upper Goose Creek, Sixmile Creek, and Lower Goose Creek between McCall and New Meadows. According to the report, this area is also being impacted by the western spruce budworm, Balsam woolly adelgid, mistletoe, and root and butt rots which is compounding the effect on trees in the area.

“In order to quickly address this insect outbreak and the impacts to our forest, this project would focus vegetation treatments in the areas of high insect activity and tree mortality, as well as adjacent stands that are at risk,” said Erin Phelps, News Meadows District Ranger. “Treatments would be designed to increase the resiliency of the remaining trees and also to reduce hazard tree risk to forest visitors and infrastructure found in the Goose Creek area along roadways and the Last Chance Campground.”

Proposed treatments would occur on up to 3,000 acres identified within the larger 8,800-acre area with activities including commercial thinning, non-commercial thinning, commercial firewood removal, slash treatments (lop and scatter or pile burning), and broadcast prescribed burning.

“We recognized a need to focus our efforts and do what we can to give the area a chance to bounce back from the high stressors related to insects and disease,” added Phelps.

A preliminary assessment of the project has determined it falls within a Categorical Exclusion as authorized by the Healthy Forest Restoration Act, specially section 603 regarding insect and disease to reduce the extent of, or increase resilience. This project will adhere to the specifications of that authority.

Interested parties should submit issues pertinent to this proposal in writing by October 21, 2019. Comments will help inform the environmental analysis and decision making process. For more information on the project, including more details on the proposal and how to comment, visit the Little Red Goose project webpage at:

The Forest Service will also host a public meeting on the Little Red Goose project October 9 at 6:30 p.m. Details on the meeting, including location, will be posted on the project webpage.

Brian Harris
Public Affairs Officer
Payette National Forest
p: 208-634-0784

Goose Creek drainage

Douglas-fir Tussock Moth
link:
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Boise National Forest plan prescribed burns near Lowman

by Ryan L Morrison Friday, September 20th 2019


Boise National Forest

Boise, Idaho (CBS 2) — The Boise National Forest is planning prescribed burns in the Lowman Ranger District.

Weather and conditions permitting, the district will ignite hand and landing slash piles.

Slash piles are made up of limbs, leaves, pine needles and other fire fuel left by natural debris and forest management activities, such as thinning, pruning, and timber harvesting.

These burns will happen throughout the district on Saturday, Sept. 21.

continued:
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Cooperative effort improves safety at Bogus Basin

Clearing hazardous trees will also open new terrain

Sep 18, 2019 By Steve Liebenthal KIVI TV

Bogus Basin, Idaho — If you’ve spent much time at Bogus Basin, you might have noticed some oddly shaped trees, some that look almost like something out of a Dr. Suess cartoon.

But there’s nothing funny about the hazards created by the unusual growth that is caused by mistletoe. It’s not the kind of mistletoe you stand under at Christmas. It’s a parasite that infects trees like these. Botanists say the parasite mis-routes water and nutrients, causing bunchy growth.

The mistletoe itself doesn’t kill the trees, but it does make them more susceptible to deadly bugs. It also makes the forest more hazardous for people who use the trail system here, especially in winter.

continued:
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BLM plans to remove Salmon River revetment made of tires, car parts

by Ryan L Morrison Friday, September 20th 2019


Courtesy BLM

Salmon, Idaho (CBS 2) — The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) plans to remove tires, car parts, and woven wire cable used to create an armored riverbank revetment on the Salmon River.

The BLM Salmon Field Office will be in charge of the project which is about 6 miles downstream from the City of Salmon.

It was built in the 1950’s downstream of the Morgan Bar campground and Boat launch.

continued:
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US approves releasing non-native insect to control thistle

By Keith Ridler – 9/18/19 AP

Boise, Idaho — Federal officials have approved turning loose a non-native insect to feed on an invasive thistle that sprouts in everything from rangelands to vineyards to wilderness areas, mainly in the U.S. West.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture said Tuesday it will permit use of the weevil native to Europe and western Asia to control yellow starthistle, which is from the same areas.

“Its flowers have inch-long spines that deter feeding by and cause injury to grazing animals and lower the utility of recreational lands,” the agency said.

continued:
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Critter News:

MCPAWS to move Oktoberfest to Activity Barn Oct. 5

The Star-News Sept 19, 2019

MCPAWS Regional Animal Shelter will celebrate fall with its family friendly Oktoberfest on Saturday, Oct. 5, from noon to 6 p.m. at a new location at The Activity Barn near McCall.

The event will include horse-drawn hayrides, a costume contest, live music by Bottom Line Band and Bob Kasnik, craft vendors, dancing, local brews, traditional Oktoberfest games and a raffle.

Cost is $10 per person and includes one free beer ticket and an Oktoberfest koozie.

Raffle tickets are $5 each and will be available at the event. Prizes include a fat-tire mountain bike and a mini fridge filled with beer.

Proceeds from the registration and raffle will benefit the cats and dogs at MCPAWS.

There will be a free shuttle running from 11:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. from the McCall Post Office, 495 Deinhard Lane.

The Activity Barn is located at 141 Moonridge Dr. For more information, visit

source:
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Snowdon Wildlife Sanctuary plans open house Sept. 28

The Star-News Sept 19, 2019

The Snowdon Wildlife Sanctuary will host its annual open house with tours of the grounds, wildlife displays and demonstrations on Saturday, Sept. 28, from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.

Attendees are encouraged to bring a picnic lunch. Desserts and beverages will be provided.

The event will also include a drawing for the bear carving that is on display at Salmon River Brewery, 411 Railroad Ave. in McCall. Tickets are $10 each or 3 for $25.

Tickets for the drawing will be available online through Friday, Sept. 27, and will also be available at the open house.

Snowdon’s mission is to rehabilitate and return injured and orphaned wildlife to the wild as well as to provide hands-on education to promote a healthy coexistence with wildlife and the ecosystem.

The 35-acre facility has a number of animal pens and enclosures and a clinic equipped to care for ill and injured birds and animals.

Snowdon is located seven miles out Lick Creek Road at the end of the pavement.

For more information or to purchase a ticket for the drawing, visit

source:
https://www.mccallstarnews.com/
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Pet Talk – Blood transfusions in dogs

Sep 20, 2019 Dr. Karsten Fostvedt IME

Transfusion therapy is an effective replacement of blood or one of its components. Transfusions are indicated for anemia, platelet disorders, clotting disorders and acute and excessive blood loss. Fresh and stored whole blood is the most commonly used transfusion agent in veterinarian medicine.

Blood types are genetic markers on the surfaces of red blood cells and are specific for each species. Dogs have 13 blood types known as dog erythrocyte antigens or DEAs. The frequency of each blood type varies considerably among breeds. There are three clinically significant blood types in dogs. These include DEA 1.1, DEA 1.2 and DEA 7. Dogs that test negative for these three blood types are considered universal blood donors. It is easy for us to send off your dog’s blood to the lab to determine its blood type. This would be important in the situation where your dog would need to receive blood or to give blood.

continued:
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Rattlesnake bites dog south of Kuna

Despite being bitten five times, “Toad” is expected to make a full recovery.

Shirah Matsuzawa September 18, 2019

Meridian, Idaho — It’s been a long few days for Debbie and Fritz Brownell after their German shorthaired pointer was bit last week by a rattlesnake.

The dog, named Toad, was running in an area south of Kuna when a rattlesnake bit him five times.

“As I approached him, I saw a snake cartwheeling in the air and when I got up to him, I kept him between me and the snake and when I went to grab him, big mistake, there were multiple snakes,” Fritz said.

continued:
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First rabid cat detected in Idaho since 1992

Sept 18, 2019 Local News 8

Owyhee County, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – A cat from Owyhee County has tested positive for rabies.

It was tested at the Idaho Bureau of Laboratories last week after it was behaving aggressively and bit its owner.

This is the first rabid cat detected in Idaho since 1992 and the first rabid animal from Owyhee County in 2019.

continued:
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For Fat Cats, The Struggle Is Real When It Comes To Losing Weight And Keeping It Off

September 21, 2019 Robbie Harris Weekend Edition Saturday

… Megan Shepherd, a clinical nutrition professor at the veterinary school, has heard all about these kinds of struggles between pet owners and their pets and knows who usually wins.

“It’s not hard to overfeed them in a ‘food is love’ culture,” Shepherd says.

While some felines can self-regulate when it comes to food, most indoor cats need help keeping the pounds off. It’s estimated that more than half of the indoor cats in the U.S. are overweight. The Virginia-Maryland study — sponsored by Purina — tested how best to do that.

full story:
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3 hunters injured in 2 Montana grizzly attacks

Sept 18, 2019 AP

Bozeman, Mont. — Three hunters were injured in two separate grizzly bear attacks in the same area of southwestern Montana less than 12 hours apart, wildlife officials said.

Investigators were trying Tuesday to determine if the same bear was involved in the surprise encounters in the Gravelly Mountains, an area frequented by grizzlies about 70 miles southwest of Bozeman, said Morgan Jacobsen, a spokesman with Fish, Wildlife and Parks.

Other hunters in the area were being asked to leave pending the outcome of the investigation. It would be unusual but not unprecedented for a single bear to be involved in back-to-back attacks.

continued:
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All nonresident elk and deer tags sold out

Sept 18, 2019 Local News 8

Idaho Falls, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – The Idaho Fish and Game licensing section reported on Friday all regular nonresident deer and elk tags have sold out.

Limits apply only to nonresident deer tags.

There is no limit on the number of resident deer tags available.

To hunt and fish in Idaho, you will need a license, and you may need a tag or permit as well. You can view a full list of licenses, tags and permits and how much they cost for an Idaho resident HERE.

source:
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CDC warns: ‘Don’t kiss backyard poultry or snuggle them’ in the midst of salmonella outbreak

Sep 17, 2019 By McKenna King KIVI TV

Boise, Idaho — Do not kiss or snuggle your chickens. You read that right. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is issuing guidance, as it deals with an ongoing salmonella outbreak.

There have been over 1,003 cases of salmonella reported to the CDC nationwide just this year; and at least 9 of those cases are here in Idaho. The CDC says contact with backyard poultry and improper hygiene are likely to blame.

“The CDC estimates that for every confirmed diagnosis of, um, salmonella in a human, there are probably upwards of thirty, um, cases that don’t get reported,” said Dr. Bill Barton, State Veterinarian for the Idaho State Department of Agriculture.

continued:
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Where have the wild birds gone? 3 billion fewer than 1970

‘One of the scary things about the results is that it is happening right under our eyes. We might not even notice it until it’s too late,’ a Cornell scientist says.

Seth Borenstein and Christina Larson AP Science Writers September 19, 2019

North America’s skies are lonelier and quieter as nearly 3 billion fewer wild birds soar in the air than in 1970, a comprehensive study shows.

The new study focuses on the drop in sheer numbers of birds, not extinctions. The bird population in the United States and Canada was probably around 10.1 billion nearly half a century ago and has fallen 29% to about 7.2 billion birds, according to a study in Thursday’s journal Science .

“People need to pay attention to the birds around them because they are slowly disappearing,” said study lead author Kenneth Rosenberg, a Cornell University conservation scientist. “One of the scary things about the results is that it is happening right under our eyes. We might not even notice it until it’s too late.”

continued:
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Clearwater steelhead seasons to close

Sept 20, 2019 Local News 8

Boise, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – The Idaho Fish and Game Commission has voted to close all steelhead seasons on the Clearwater River.

The action came after determining the number of adult hatchery fish is less than the number needed for brood stock and there is no surplus to provide a fishery.

The closure takes effect at midnight, September 29 and includes the Clearwater River upstream to the confluence of the Middle Fork and South Fork, along with the North Fork, Middle Fork, and South Fork tributaries. A section of the Snake River, downstream from the Cuse Creek boat ramp, to the Idaho Washington state line will also be closed to protect Clearwater-bound steelhead.

continued:
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Tips & Advice:

Bat-Proofing the Living Space:

During the maternity season, or when bats are suspected to be hibernating in the building, the best option for protecting concerned homeowners and public health is to bat-proof the living space, or provide “interior seals”. This work consists of locating openings (typically areas where air flows) leading into the living space from attics, garages, walls, or any place that bats are roosting. Entry/exit points can be as small as 5/8-inch round or 1/4-inch wide and 3/4-inch long that open into the living space. Likely openings may include:

* Attic hatches and doors
* Chimneys
* Fireplaces
* Around piping or plumbing
* Open windows or loose windowsills
* Openings around air conditioners and ducts
* Louver fans
* Screens in disrepair
* Pet doors

source w/more info:
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Fish & Game News:

Grizzly bear mistaken for black bear by hunter in Panhandle

By Kara Campbell, Wildlife Regional Biologist
Friday, September 20, 2019

On September 17, a nonresident (Montana) hunter shot and killed a grizzly bear that he mistook for a black bear. He was hunting in Idaho’s Panhandle near the Canadian border (Smith Creek). After identifying the bear as a grizzly at the scene, the hunter contacted Fish and Game and is cooperating with the investigation.

Grizzly bears are protected under State and Federal law, and Fish and Game reminds hunters that grizzly bears may be encountered in northern Idaho and in the Greater Yellowstone area. Black bear hunters are responsible for proper identification of their target. Fish and Game’s web site provides training to hone hunter’s bear identification skills: link

source:
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What hunters can do to prevent introducing chronic wasting disease into Idaho

By Terry Thompson, Regional Communications Manager
Monday, September 16, 2019

Chronic wasting disease could someday change how some of Idaho’s deer, elk and moose populations are managed. Luckily, the disease has not been found in Idaho wildlife – yet, and hunters can help prevent human introduction of the disease by properly handling deer, elk, and moose harvested in other states and Canadian provinces. Many surrounding states have confirmed cases of chronic wasting disease, or CWD, which is a fatal neurological disease that can directly impact the health of their deer, elk and moose populations. While Idaho has not yet detected the disease, Fish and Game is actively monitoring hunter-harvested wildlife, as well as road-killed and suspect animals that might be sick, to ensure that the disease is found early, should it show up.

What is chronic wasting disease?

Chronic wasting disease is a contagious disease among deer, elk, and moose that affects the nervous system. CWD is believed to be caused by abnormal, misfolded forms of the prion protein, which leads to fatal neurological diseases due to brain damage. When infection occurs in wildlife, it can take up to 10 months for wildlife to show symptoms. There is no cure if Idaho’s wildlife becomes infected.

Hunters will probably be the first to notice if Idaho’s deer, elk or moose are infected. CWD symptoms can include excessive salivation, drooping head or ears, tremors or shaking and extremely low body weight. The animals may also show no fear of humans or lack coordination. But, the only way that CWD can be confirmed is to sample lymph nodes from the animal.

continued:
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Bird hunters encouraged to donate their wings

By Brian Pearson, Conservation Public Information Specialist
Wednesday, September 18, 2019

Wings provide information used to better understand population trends and improves management of the species.

With many upland game bird seasons opening soon, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game is asking hunters to donate a fully feathered wing for each bird they harvest.

Because juvenile and adult birds molt their wing feathers differently, biologists can use this information to estimate chick production that year.

continued:
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More F&G News Releases

link:
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Fun Critter Stuff:

Watch: 2 elk decide to settle their differences on the golf course

by KOMO News Staff Thursday, September 19th 2019

Cle Elum, Wash. — Butting heads on the golf course with a member of your group is not all that unheard of, but it usually doesn’t go quite like this…

A herd of elk were spotted roaming the Suncadia Golf Course in Cle Elum Tuesday evening when things got testy as two elk engaged in a battle.

“They were out there for about 20 minutes bugling to each other herding the females around before the fight,” says Kathylea Gibson, who was there to watch it all. “Then they finally made contact.”

continued w/video:
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Seasonal Humor:

SummerShower-a
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Bird of the Week: Sandhill Crane

Sandhill Crane

(not common)
20190920SandhillCraneAnn-a
photo by Ann F 20190920 in Yellow Pine
20150329-Sandhill-Cranes-aa
photo by Local Color Photography 20150329 near Cascade

Sandhill Crane
Antigone canadensis
Size and Shape: Sandhill Cranes are very large, tall birds with a long neck, long legs, and very broad wings. The bulky body tapers into a slender neck; the short tail is covered by drooping feathers that form a “bustle.” The head is small and the bill is straight and longer than the head. About the same size, but considerably bulkier, than a Great Blue Heron. Smaller than a Whooping Crane.
Both Sexes
Length: 47.2 in (120 cm)
Weight: 119.9-172.8 oz (3400-4900 g)
Wingspan: 78.7 in (200 cm)
Color Pattern: These are slate gray birds, often with a rusty wash on the upperparts. Adults have a pale cheek and red skin on the crown. Their legs are black. Juveniles are gray and rusty brown, without the pale cheek or red crown.
Sandhill Cranes breed in open wetland habitats surrounded by shrubs or trees. They nest in marshes, bogs, wet meadows, prairies, burned-over aspen stands, and other moist habitats, preferring those with standing water. Breeders gravitate toward the edges between wetland and upland habitats, while nonbreeders may prefer open, grassy sites. Sandhill Cranes winter in the southern U.S. and northern Mexico, roosting on shallow lakes or rivers at night and spending the day in irrigated croplands, pastures, grasslands, or wetlands.
Learn more about this bird: The Cornell Lab of Ornithology
Link to Birds Page
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Idaho History Sept 22, 2019

Rocky Bar, Alturas (Elmore) County, Idaho

(part 1) General Info

Rocky Bar, Idaho oldest Mining camp in the State

RockyBarFritz-a

From the Mike Fritz Collection shared by Heather Heber Callahan
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1864

“South Boise,” soon to be renamed Rocky Bar, was the latest Boise Basin boom town.

source: Evan Filby South Fork Companion
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Rocky Bar, Idaho

Rocky Bar is a ghost town in Elmore County, Idaho, United States. At its height in the late 19th century Rocky Bar boasted a population of over 2,500 and served as county seat of Alturas County from 1864 to 1882. It was also the original county seat of Elmore County when it was created in 1889.

Rocky Bar was founded in December 1863 soon after gold was discovered along the nearby Feather River. Within two years it became the main settlement in the area and was even considered as a possible capital for Idaho Territory. The town was destroyed by fire in 1892. Although it was rebuilt, afterwards it began a slow decline. Rocky Bar has not had a permanent population since the 1960s.

Rocky Bar is located 62 miles northeast of Mountain Home.

source: Wikipedia
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HB12ActLocatingCountySeatAlturasCounty-aHB 12

An Act

Locateing [sic] the County seat of Alturas County

Be it enacted by the Legislative Assembly of the Territory of Idaho, as follows:

Section 1st That the County seat of the County of Alturas be, and the same is hereby located at Rocky Bar.

Sec. 2. That all Acts or parts of Acts in consistent with the provisions of this Act are hereby repealed.

Sec. 3. This Act to take effect, and be infull force, from and after its passage and approval by the Governor.

Passed the House of Representatives November 29th 1864
(signed) Alex Blakely
Speaker House Representatives

Passed the Council December 2nd 1864
(signed) John Cummins
President of the Council

Approved Dec 3rd A.D. 1864
(signed) Caleb Lyon
The Governor of Idaho

An Act locating the County Seat of Alturas County at Rocky Bar. Signed by Governor Caleb Lyon of Lyonsdale, Speaker of the House of Representatives Alex Blakely, and John Cummins, President of the Council. House Bill 12.
Date 1864-12-03
Copyright: Idaho State Historical Society 2012.
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Rocky Bar Public Buildings (Courthouse) Elmore

CourthouseRockyBar2-a
[Alturas] Elmore County Courthouse in Rocky Bar 1866 or 1877

Copyright: Idaho State Historical Society
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Alturas County Warrant 1868

1868RockyBarNote-a
Rocky Bar, Idaho Territory – Treasurer of Alturas County Warrant $10 Aug. 26, 1868

source: Heritage Static
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Rocky Bar

The discovery of gold on the Feather River in 1863 touched off a new rush to what became known as the South Boise Diggings. A toll road was built in 1864 and freight wagons started to roll in from the railhead at Kelton, Utah. From Mountain Home the toll road led to Dixie, Pine Grove, (which is located under the Anderson Ranch Dam waters) Junction Bar, and finally to Rocky Bar.

With the largest mines nearby on Bear Creek, Rocky Bar quickly became the leading settlement of the South Boise miners. In 1864, with a population of nearly twenty-five hundred, it became the county seat of Alturas County. And along with Idaho City, Rocky Bar was a contender for the site of the territorial capital. When Alturas County was created in 1864, the first Territorial Legislature designated Esmeralda as the County seat. But since Esmeralda wasn’t much of a village and Rocky Bar was starting to boom, the county officials quietly moved their office up to Rocky Bar. This honor was held by Rocky Bar until 1881, when Hailey won the election and became the seat of Alturas County.

One account states that a twelve stamp mill was hauled by ox team from Omaha to Rocky Bar for thirty cents a pound. In 1892 much of Rocky Bar was wiped out by fire, but the town was soon rebuilt and mining continued. A large Chinese settlement hugged the banks along Steel Creek. There are still a few summer residents in town and one cafe and bar, or Saloon. The old mills have been pretty much torn down. With the death of Charley Sprittles, Rocky Bar’s last winter-time resident, the deep snows and wintry winds have this old camp all to themselves.
– (Quoted from Southern Idaho Ghost Towns by Wayne Sparling)

Rocky Bar is located about eight miles north of Featherville, at the confluence of Bear and Steel creeks.

Rocky Bar was the first county seat of Alturas and Elmore Counties.

The town was established in December 1863 by H.T.P. Comstock, the namesake of the Comstock Lode in Nevada.

For a brief period – June 1, 1889, to June 4, 1892 – the newspaper, Elmore Bulletin, was published at Rocky Bar.

On September 1, 1892, the town was mostly destroyed by fire, but was rebuilt by the citizens.

Rocky Bar was the setting for a spur-of-the moment decision which may have had repercussions on mining in the region for some time.

It seems that the president of the Alturas Mining Company was an easterner with no mining knowledge. He did however have a knowledge of western whisky, and stopped in Rocky Bar for a few snorts to make the trip to Yuba City easier. The executive managed neither the company mining interests nor whiskey well. For some reason he ordered teams and wagons that were hauling a mill to the Atlanta Lode to stop at nearby Featherville, while lumber meant for buildings at Yuba City was left to rot in keeping with the booze-inspired orders of the mining company’s president.

What motivated the man to stop delivery of mill and lumber is anybody’s guess.
– (Quoted from Ghost Towns of Idaho by Donald C. Miller.)

excerpted from: Ghost Towns – Rocky Bar – Submitted by Roy Sloan – Grandson of Charles Sprittles
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Geo. Golden Store, Rocky Bar, Idaho, 1891

1891GeoMercantileStoreRockyBar-a
Geo. Golden Store 1891.

A large group of men and children are posed on the wooden sidewalk in front of the store. A commercial wagon and horses are standing on the street. The wooden building features a prominent second floor balcony. There are two other buildings to the side and rock walls.

source: Idaho State Historical Society
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Charles Sprittles

… Please be advised that most of the following information was gathered by his son George Albert Sprittles “Sloan” upon his visit to Rocky Bar in August 1997 after discovering that year that his father had lived there as he had not known his whereabouts since 1920.

Charles Sprittles born Wakefield, England Nov. 25th 1881 and was a coach maker apprentice at age 14 Charley worked the mines in Casper, Wyoming 1916 till ??? 1920 the last time my father saw Charles Sprittles until learning of his past home in Rocky Bar in 1997.

Charlie met and married Lulie Deane Wiley in Wyoming and had 3 daughters and 2 step daughters from her previous marriage. Charley left Wyoming and Lulie went to California with the girls. He came to Rocky Bar sometime around 1932. Worked at the Triumpth Mine and the Hailey Mine in Sun Valley and also was also a fight promoter. Charlie’s store in Rocky Bar was called the “White Front Store” which included one gas pump.

Charlie never mentioned having a son only his daughters. Charley walked everywhere had no automobile. He was known as a miner and also known as the “Mayor of Rocky Bar”. This is also listed on his death certificate.

Charlie’s death: In late November or early December 1963 Charley went to Boise to the doctors. He hitched a ride back to Featherville where his companions tried to get him back to Rocky Bar but the snow was too deep and could only get too within 5 miles of Rocky Bar. He told his friends that he wanted to continue on foot on his snow shoes but they didn’t want him too. He went on anyway.

His Air Force “fly-boy” friends from Mountain Home Air Base used to check on him by flying over during the long winter months. They would also drop him food and supplies. Anyway, they soon discovered there was no smoke coming from his cabin. Accordingly the sheriff began the search for Charlie.

It snowed like crazy that winter. On one search for Charley in March the crew had stopped, with along with there large snowmobile to have lunch. They also built a fire. The following month on April 14, 1964 the search was over.

The search crew led by his Deputy sheriff friend, Buster “George” Taylor came across the spot where they had stopped earlier to have lunch, (about 2 1/2 miles east of Rocky Bar) a snowshoe had now protruded from the snow as the snow had now somewhat melted. Charlie was there with his shoes off and a sock in one hand and the orange peels they left the month before scattered right where they had left them during their lunch. Charlie was right beneath them the whole time.

His death was listed as heart attack. Charlie had always wanted to be buried above his cabin in Rocky Bar but it wasn’t allowed because it was National Forest land. A memorial was erected by the citizens in Rocky Bar: “To Charlie Sprittles Pioneer 1881-1964”. He was buried on April 24th 1964 in Mountain View Cemetery in an unmarked grave.

Upon learning that there was no grave marker my father purchased a grave stone. It states “Charles Sprittles” Pioneer Rocky Bar 1881-1964.

excerpted from: Ghost Towns – Rocky Bar – Submitted by Roy Sloan – Grandson of Charles Sprittles
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Dwellings, Rocky Bar, Idaho 1880

1880AkeFamily-a
Frank Ake and family at Rocky Bar, Idaho, 1880. Nine men and one woman are posed outside the log cabin at the base of a hill.

source: Idaho State Historical Society
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Post Offices

The following is a partial list of towns and mining camps in and near the Boise National Forest during the mining boom or before 1900. Some were post offices for a time, and some still exist.

Red Warrior. Near Rocky Bar. Post office (Warrior) 1889-1890.
Rocky Bar. On Bear Creek near Feather River. Post Office 1868-1964.

excerpted from pgs 144-146 Appendix 3: Towns and Mining Camps, “History of the Boise National Forest 1905-1976”, By Elizabeth M. Smith
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1920 Star Route Carrier

Frank E. Stevens poses on skis with a 80-pound bag of mail on his back. Rocky Bar to Atlanta Idaho Route was one of the most dangerous in winter.

1920MailRockyBar-a

USPS Collection

Frank Stevens contract mail carrier between Rocky Bar and Atlanta – 16 miles. This was taken in 1920. Between 1892 and 1913 [seven] carriers lost their lives on this route due to avalanches.

shared by Kevin Norwood
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More Rocky Bar Photos at the Idaho State Historical Society
Link to Rocky Bar, Alturas (Elmore) County (part 2 mining)
Link to Rocky Bar, Alturas (Elmore) County (part 3 Transportation)
Link to Rocky Bar, Alturas (Elmore) County (part 4 Newspaper clippings)
Link to Alturas County, Idaho 1864 to 1895
Link to Esmeralda, Alturas (Elmore) County, Idaho
Link to Annie “Peg Leg” McIntyre Morrow (part 1)
Link to Annie “Peg Leg” McIntyre Morrow (part 2)
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page updated Aug 25, 2020

Road Reports Sep 22, 2019

Reminder the South Fork road is closed from 7am to 4pm Monday thru Friday. Be prepared for rocks and trees in the road and remember there is no cell phone service. Please share road reports.

Yellow Pine: We have had some rain in the last few days to settled the dust. Please respect your neighbors and slow down!
link: Local Forecast.
Yellow Pine Webcam: (check date on image)

Warm Lake Highway: Clear
link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′ (currently off line)

Highway 55 Webcams Link:

South Fork Road: Closed Monday through Friday from 7am to 4pm on weekdays, with no closures over the weekends.
Report Friday afternoon (Sep 20) the pavement has been cut out in many places leaving a 2-3″ drop off. Very slow travel time, not recommended. Lots of archery hunters.
Map w/info for September 16 through 20:
More info:
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Report Friday (Sep 20) the road is still in good shape.

Johnson Creek Road: Watch for extra traffic due to closures on the South Fork route.
Wednesday (Sept 18) mail truck driver (Robert) reports upper Johnson Creek road has been bladed and in great shape.
link: Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam
link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Reported open June 23. Report Sept 12: Rough.
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Reported open June 23.
Note: Valley County Road Dept. is fixing the damage at Profile Creek intersection.
Report Sunday (Aug 25) Yellow Pine to Big Creek turn off is great. Profile to the top is the same rocks and bumps everywhere. Watch out for the new ski jump culvert they put in down at the bottom after the turn off. Over the top of Profile to Big Creek is the same as always. Trees on the side of the road where people have cut them just enough to get thru.
Report Tuesday (Sept 17) “Big Creek residents report light snow at Profile summit area, but it did not stick on the road.” – LI
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcam: (check date on image)

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open with cautions – expect delays in the work area.
Update from Valley Co. Road Dept Sept 4: “Last Thursday the crew was fixing the damage at Profile Creek intersection. They should be done with that this week. I took the road closed sign down going towards Stibnite. As soon as they are done with the riprap at Profile Creek they will start laying the crush material on the repairs. Sam, from Midas, said the crews will also be getting started blading the road from Yellow Pine to Stibnite shortly. Midas will also be applying road stabilizer from Yellow Pine to Stibnite as soon as it is bladed.”
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Reported open June 30. Watch for gravel trucks between YP and Stibnite.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Open and rough.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Warren Wagon Road: West of Payette Lake road is closed for construction Monday-Friday from 8am to noon and from 1pm to 5pm.
Netheker Fire 100% contained

Secesh: Road is open to Secesh.

Stanley to Landmark: Forest road 579 temporary closure planned from September 16th – Sept. 29th for maintenance.
map link:

Deadwood Summit: Reported Open June 16th
Report Aug 11: from Landmark to Deadwood really good until the last 10 miles to the lake.
Report from VCSO Aug 14: Forest road 579, Landmark to Stanley Road, temporary closure planned from September 16th – Sept. 29th for maintenance.
Old report from BNF June 26th: Access to Deadwood Campgrounds is open along FS 579 road from State Highway 21. Access to Deadwood Campgrounds from FS 582 (Clear Creek Rd) to FS 579 is open. Cascade to Landmark access to Deadwood Campgrounds via FS 579 road is open. FS 555 road to Deadwood Campgrounds is too rough to travel and not a recommended route.
Note: The approx elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′ (currently off line)
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