Monthly Archives: October 2019

Road Reports Oct 30, 2019

Please share road reports. Conditions change very quickly this time of year. High elevation roads may have several inches of snow. Be prepared for snow/ice, rocks and trees in the road and remember there is no cell phone service.
Note: Valley County has a road levy on the ballot on Nov 5th. If it does not pass, they will have to cut road maintenance to Yellow Pine and the back country.

Yellow Pine: We had an inch of snow fall Monday, about half melted (evaporated) on Tuesday. Wednesday morning low of Zero degrees. Local streets are frozen with a little snow in the shade. Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN.
link: Local Forecast.
Yellow Pine Webcam: (check date on image)

Warm Lake Highway: Saturday (Oct 26) Modest snow/ice at the top of Big Creek Summit.

Highway 55 Webcams Link:

South Fork Road: Saturday (Oct 26) Dry road all the way to Yellow Pine. Lots of hunters on the South Fork. – DP
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Saturday Oct 26, clear road all the way in to Yellow Pine.

Johnson Creek Road: Still open, 4×4 advisable, travel at your own risk.
Wednesday (Oct 30) mail truck driver said frozen ruts at Landmark and upper Johnson Creek road until about MM 6, then clear and dry all the way to Yellow Pine except in the shade.
link: Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam
link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Open? No current report. Probably snow up high. Travel at your own risk.
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Travel at your own risk.
Report Saturday (Oct 26) going in with high clearance 4×4 required chains over the top, “was not easy”.
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcam: (check date on image)

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open.
Report from Stibnite Oct 29th: Following the end of the year grading, we’ve had a little rain & snow creating some muddy conditions. The temperatures are getting low enough to create a predominantly hard frozen running surface with patches of snow/ice in the shadows. Overall, the road is in pretty good conditions with the odd pothole here and there but should be traveled with caution.
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Probably closed by now at the summit? No current report on road conditions. Travel at your own risk.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: No current report. Probably snowed closed by now. Travel at your own risk.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: Open? No current report. Probably several inches up high. Travel at your own risk.
Note: The approx elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
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Oct 27, 2019 The Yellow Pine Times

Oct 27, 2019 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Note: The boil order and water restrictions are still in effect.

Community Calendar:

April 2 – Boil water order issued
Every Sunday – 11am Fire/SAR Training
May 15 – Nov 30 Firewood Season
Oct 31 – Halloween
Nov 1 – 3-day a week mail service begins
Nov 2 – 8pm Halloween-End Of Hunting Season Party
Nov 3 – 2am Daylight saving time ends
Nov 6 – Amerigas propane delivery
(details below)
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Local Events:

Salmon Feed

There was a salmon feed at the Yellow Pine Tavern last Monday evening, October 21st.
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Halloween-End Of Hunting Season Party Nov 2nd

Halloween-End Of Hunting Season Party at the Yellow Pine Tavern Nov 2nd, 8pm.

Chili Dogs Provided by the Tavern, bring snacks if you wish. Costume Contest or come as you are.
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Fall Back Nov 3rd

Daylight savings time ends at 2am November 3rd this year. Don’t forget to change the batteries in your smoke alarms and CO2 detectors.
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Nov 6th – Amerigas propane delivery

Amerigas will be coming in November 6th to get everyone topped off for winter. If you are a “will call customer” you will need to order online or call us or you will not get fuel.

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
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Village News:

Plumbers visit Yellow Pine

P1000542-20191022Plumbers
Rocky Mountain Mechanical Plumbing Crew Keaton Hess and Levi Kurta

It is often difficult to find professionals willing to come all the way to Yellow Pine to work on projects in the hinterlands. Fortunately we found a company out of Emmett that will schedule time for Yellow Pine to work on both furnaces and plumbing. Rocky Mountain Mechanical (208) 365-PIPE (7473)

Their plumbing crew traveled from a job in Cascade to Yellow Pine Monday evening, Oct 21st, found accommodations at the Yellow Pine Lodge and dinner at the Yellow Pine Tavern. On Tuesday morning, bright and early, they went to work on a couple of projects for locals. Fortunately the rain let up in time for working outside in the trenches. After finishing up 2 jobs in the School Subdivision, they headed up to the orchard (in a borrowed UTV to get up the steep hill) and worked on fixing the leak in the main water line for the village, parts for which locals had made a quick trip to town and back.

It took coordination and planning from several people to get this all accomplished – as they say, “it takes a village.” Thanks to all involved.

P1000540-20191022Plumbers
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Last Fall Heating Fuel Delivery

Chris Gurney of Diamond Fuel and Feed came to Yellow Pine early Friday morning, Oct 25th, to top off fuel tanks for winter heating.
P1000547-20191025ChrisGDiamond
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Boil Water Order Still in Effect

Bring all water to a boil, let it boil for one minute, and let it cool before using, or use bottled water. Boiled or bottled water should be used for drinking, making ice, brushing teeth, washing dishes, and food preparation until further notice. Boiling kills bacteria and other organisms in the water.
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Get Ready for Winter Heating

* Inspect and clean the chimney. Contact the YPFD to borrow chimney brushes.
* Inspect and clean wood stoves, make sure dampers work properly and check for leaks.
* Check your carbon monoxide and smoke detectors – install fresh batteries.
* Check your fire extinguisher and make sure it is handy. Manually rotate them around, tip upside down and lightly shake them, thus keeping the fire fighting agent loose, and check that the needle is still in the green. If you need a new one please call, your fire commissioner or Jeff F.
* If you have an oil-powered furnace, replace your filter and nozzle and check the tank level.
* Check your propane tank levels (early morning when it is cool in case there is a wasp nest!) Check to make sure snow falling from the roof cannot impact your pipes!
* Test the igniter switch. On an old system, you might have to relight the pilot. Newer systems have electronic igniters.
* Lubricate and clean the blower motor. First check the owner’s manual to see if your motor is the kind that needs lubricating. If it does, turn off the power, open the cover and clean the caps covering the bearings. Then remove the caps and lubricate the bearings.
* Inspect the blower belt for cracks. Turn off the power to the furnace at the main circuit breaker. Use a screwdriver to remove the steel cover of the air handler. The blower belt is the largest rubber belt that you see. Replace the belt if it is cracked.
* Inspect the exhaust flue outdoors to ensure it is free of obstructions such as branches or animal nests.
* Keep the area around your furnace unit free of debris and clutter.
* Change the air filters. Clean your air vents and ducts. Remove the vent covers with a screwdriver. Use the extension hose of your vacuum to remove the dust.
* Open all your air vents. Remove furniture, boxes and clutter that get in the way of air flowing from the vents.

Local Fuel Suppliers
Propane
Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Heating fuel
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430
Furnace Service
Rocky Mountain Mechanical (208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett
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Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Oct 22nd “Bring It – Don’t Burn It” Pile Burned

Tim Dulhanty, Fuels Technician for the Cascade Ranger District, Boise National Forest reports they burned our woody debris pile at the Transfer station Oct 22nd at 2pm. He said it went well, “it was pretty clean, the signs really helped this year, thanks.” -TD

“Kudos to all that brought their woody debris to the transfer station. Cecil really worked the pile with his backhoe, he spent a lot of his time and energy to keep the pile looking good and free of non-burnables. Thanks to all the community members for helping to keep the pile as woody debris only and not furniture, building supplies, insulation, etc.” – JF

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

Yellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is located approximately 3 miles south on Johnson Creek Road.

The TRANSFER STATION is for household trash and yard waste:
* Household trash must be put inside (and fit) the dumpster;
* Yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, et.) goes in the burn pile on the south end of the turn-around;
* Cardboard boxes should be flattened before putting the in the dumpster,

The DUMPSTERS are NOT for:
* Furniture (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station).

The BURN PILE is NOT for:
* Cardboard boxes (flatten and put in dumpster);
* Furniture and appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Drywall and building material (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wire or fencing (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Foam Rubber (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wood with metal (like nails) attached (take to Donnelly Transfer Station.)

When closing the DOORS on the front of the dumpsters:
* Make sure the “U” brackets at the top and bottom of the door are engaged;
* The retaining bar at the middle of the door is slid into the pipe;
* And the “L” bars at the bottom of the doors dropped into place.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: 208/634-7176
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Yellow Pine US Mail

The 3-day a week mail delivery will start Nov 1st. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 55 cents
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Reminder for people living in bear country:

* Garbage should be stored inside the house or in a secure garage or storage building.
* If garbage cannot be stored in a secure location, a bear-resistant container approved by the Interagency Bear Committee is recommended.
* Avoid using bird feeders from March through November. Birds do not need supplemental feeding this time of year.
* Pet food should not be left outside.
* BBQ grills or anything with a strong odor should not be left out at night.
* Protect gardens, beehives, and compost piles with electric fencing.
* Never intentionally feed bears. A food-conditioned bear may pose a threat to human safety and usually results in the removal of the bear.
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Local Groups:

YPWUA News:

Yellow Pine Water Use 2019

2019VillageWaterUse-a
(click image for larger size)
[h/t Dave P]

The 2019 Yellow Pine Water Users Shareholders meeting was Sunday July 7th in the community hall. (No minutes yet)

Water Update Oct 23:

Thank you for all involved for getting the leak fixed [village water main]. For those in the hole on the first go round replacing the section of pipe. Getting correct parts for the fix. To lining up plumbers that were already in town on another project for someone else, to turning water off and on, and filling in the big hole.
– Nik

October 22nd – The crew from Rocky Mountain Mechanical repaired the main water line leak up near the orchard.

Water Update Oct 15th:

A major leak was found and a temporary fix was made until parts can be obtained. Once parts and people are available, that will be fixed. Fixing that leak doesn’t mean we will be off the boil order. The boil order was issued by the DEQ. They will not lift that order until the chlorine contact time meets the standard.
– Steve Holloway

Water Update (posted to FB Oct 4th 930pm)

Today (10/4) YPWUA worked on the section of pipe that had a number of leaks. Unfortunately we were unable to complete the repairs due to having a couple of incorrect parts. We will order the parts as soon as possible and complete the repairs. We had to do some creative Engineering today but cut 10 leaks to 2 small ones. Thank you to Jeff Forster and Dayle Bennett for working in the muck and water for two days without complaint, to Cecil Dallman for excellent excavation work, to Dave McClintock for parts and advice, to Layne Bennett, Ginny Bartholomew and Ann Forster for their support. Thanks to the community for your patience.
– Willie Sullivan

Water Update (posted to FB Oct 3rd 9pm):

YPWUA found the leaks today (above the orchard) and will be repairing them tomorrow. The water will be off from 10am till repairs and testing completed.

– Willie Sullivan

Water Update Sept 21 (excerpted from VYPA 9/21 meeting notes):

Tests were conducted by Idaho Rural Water [July 19th] in an effort to locate the source of the major leak in the system. They will return October 3rd to continue the search for leaks. The line between Alpine Village and the Saleen property, which includes the bridge across the East Fork river is the line most suspected to be leaking. Cecil Dallman will stand by with a backhoe to dig in locations found. More digging work is needed at the tanks and pipes near the water facility. A second engineer is being consulted. Getting contractors to come to YP and replace seals is difficult. The previous grant money is tied to a timeline so some specified work must be done this fall.

The possibility for a large amount of grant money is very slim because we would have to take out a loan and use the borrowed money for the required matching money, and then there would be the loan payments. Money on hand must be used on required repairs to the contact tank. Because some water users do not have voting rights YPWUA does not qualify for some grants.

There are 56 shares available for purchase at $100/share. Each piece of land is entitled to own one share. Share holders are entitled to vote; water users that do not own a share may not vote, but do have access to water. The owners of the 56 lots are encouraged to purchase shares. Ownership of a share is shown on your annual water bill.

Anyone wanting to arrange a payment plan should contact Willie Sullivan.

– Steve Holloway/Willie Sullivan

Water Update Sept 8:

Still looking for the leak. Water restrictions and boil order still in effect.

Water Update June 7:

The “boil order” is still in effect.
There [are] still large water leaks in the system. We continue to look.
Work is currently being done on the new contact tank.
Please, no lawn watering until we find and repair the major leaks.
– Steve Holloway

May 1st: Leak in alley repaired

link to: #4430059 Yellow Pine Water Users Boil Water Notification 4-2-19

link to: 2018 September Water Department Update
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VYPA News:

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting Minutes for September 21, 2019
link to: 20190921 Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting Minutes for August 10, 2019
link to: 20190810 VYPA Minutes

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting Minutes for July 20, 2019
link to: 20190720 Yellow Pine Village Association Minutes

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting Minutes for June 8, 2019
link to: 20190608 Village of Yellow Pine Association
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YPFD News:

District 1 Fire Commissioner

Per the Postings on the opening for Yellow Pine District 1 Fire Commissioner, Sue Holloway came forward to volunteer her time to represent YP Fire District 1. The Fire Commissioners have unanimously agreed to accept Sue as a Fire Commissioner representing the residents of District One, (The center of Yellow Pine Ave. West). This position will run for 4 years.

We look forward to having Sue as a Fire Commissioner. Sue brings a community commitment not only as a resident but also as a business owner. Thank You Sue for stepping up for the challenge.

YP Fire Commissioners:
Sue Holloway District 1
Dan Stiff, District 2
Merrill Saleen, District 3

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice

The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.”

link to: 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation

Meeting minutes for Sept 14, 2019
link to: 2019-09-14 YPFD Meeting_final

Meeting minutes for July 13, 2019
link to: 20190713 YPFD Meeting Notes_final

Meeting minutes for June 16, 2019
link to: 20190615 YPFD Meeting Notes_Final

Training update 10/24: “FD training is done for the year except for anyone wanting a one-on-one orientation session with the fire station and fire engine operations/pumping. Those that are interested can call me and I’ll make it happen.” – Fire Chief Jeff

YP Helispot update 10/24: “The Helispot is on it’s final stages of completion. The sidewalk to the pad needs to be concreted but everything else is complete. The gate and signs are up and Valley County Dispatch has the GPS coordinates. (44.95968 -115.49531) It’s listed as Yellow Pine Helispot. The gate is unlocked and will remain that way. There is a snow shovel there if needed. I’m asking that NO VEHICLES go beyond the gate. We already had a muddy ATV’er ride all over the pad and over the new paint with muddy tires marking up the pad. We’re planning on a dedication ceremony on the Wednesday or Thursday prior to the 2020 Harmonica Festival. More on that next year.”

YP Helispot update 10/26: “The concrete walkway to the Helispot was completed today 10/26/2019. Thanks to all who worked in the cold, rain and snow to accomplish this needed project. The stretcher can be rolled smoothly to the helicopter making it safer for the the patient and medical personnel making it more comfortable for the patient and safer for everyone. Job well done.” JF – AF
20191026HelispotSidewalk2-a

-Fire Chief Jeff
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Biz Listings:

Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377

Call for reservations. Open until the end of hunting season.
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The Corner (208) 633-3325

Our fall hours are open by request for the winter. Please call 208-633-3325, 970-379-5155 or email at matt@ypcorner.com
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Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233

Fall hours open 8am to close
Full breakfast served starting at 8am with special arrangement for earlier breakfast as needed. 92 Octane non ethanol gas available, cubed ice, beer, pop and water sold by the 6 and 12 pack, snacks, ice cream and many supplies available. Burgers and Pizza, Beer and Wine on the evening menu. Football and other sports available on our TV. Wi Fi, Verizon phone service and information available.
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Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Tom & Sarah Lanham
156 Yellow Pine Ave, Yellow Pine Id 83677
website:
FB page:
It’s official starting June 2020 We will be doing trail rides out of Yellow Pine along with summer pack / camping trips to high mountain lakes in the area!

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
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Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430
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Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

The Star-News

subscribe:
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine

Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, will service Yellow Pine

B&T Safety Solutions LLC
208-271-1600 Based out of Donnelly
Snow removal, cleaning chimneys and stoves, we do cabin staining/chinking as well
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (Oct 21) overnight low of 31 degrees, overcast sky this morning, patchy old snow in the open, about an inch or more remains in the shade. Clark’s nutcracker, nuthatches, a lone pine siskin, jays and lots of juncos visiting this morning. Old snow melting and dripping off the roof at lunch time. Pine squirrels visiting. A little warmer and overcast mid-afternoon, high of 44 degrees. Starling and a robin showed up late afternoon. Misting a little before sundown, steady light rain after dark. More rain before sunrise.

Tuesday (Oct 22) probably stayed above freezing overnight, 37F at 930am, overcast and raining lightly. Jays, juncos, nuthatches and nutcrackers visiting. Ray Arnold driving mail truck today. Rain tapered off and ended a little after lunch time. Breaks in the clouds, warmer and light breeze mid-afternoon, high of 57 degrees. Water shut off this afternoon while plumbers repair leaks in the main water line (Rocky Mountain Mechanical out of Emmett.) Broken cloud cover at sunset. A few stars out before midnight, more stars out after midnight.

Wednesday (Oct 23) overnight low of 26 degrees, partly cloudy sky this morning and frosty. Red-breasted nuthatches and several jays visiting, chipmunks still running about. Heavy truck traffic on the back Stibnite road. Water pressure extra high on this end of the village. More clouds and gusty breezes just before 1pm. Chilly breezes and smaller clouds mid-afternoon, high of 50 degrees. Mostly clear and light chilly breeze at sunset.

Thursday (Oct 24) overnight low of 21 degrees, light frost and mostly cloudy sky this morning. White and red-breasted nuthatches, nutcracker, jays and hairy woodpecker visiting. Less clouds by lunch time. Clear mid-afternoon and mild, high of 54 degrees. Very light traffic. High water pressure at the bottom of the water system. Clear at sunset, golden glow at dusk. Lots of stars out before midnight.

Friday (Oct 25) overnight low of 26 degrees, clear sky and frosty this morning. Jays, nutcracker, hairy woodpecker and nuthatches visiting before sunrise. Diamond Fuel (and Feed) made their last fall delivery to top off tanks. Sunny and mild mid-day. Very light traffic for a Friday. Mostly cloudy (high wispies), warm and light breezes mid-afternoon, high of 67 degrees. Sun went down before 630pm. Mostly clear at dusk. Cloudy before midnight. Light skiff of snow fell before sunrise.

Saturday (Oct 26) tiny skiff of snow on the ground this morning, overnight low probably right at freezing (low of 26 from Fri morning) partly clear sky. Nutcrackers, nuthatches, jays, hairy woodpecker and a goldfinch in winter plumage visiting. Mostly cloudy and occasional flake of snow right after sunrise. Sounds of heavy equipment and back-up beepers. A few flakes of snow swirling around for a short time at noon. Pine siskins and goldfinches visited with the other birds this afternoon. Snow flurries, low clouds and gusty breezes on and off in the afternoon, high of 41 degrees, then temperature dropping below freezing. Partly cloudy at dusk and cold breezes. Blustery after midnight and partly clear.

Sunday (Oct 27) overnight low of 22 degrees, clear sky, breezy and frosty this morning. Several goldfinches in winter plumage along with the jays, nutcracker, nuthatches and starlings visiting. Sunny, breezy and cool at lunch time. Clear, breezy and cool mid-afternoon, high of 36 degrees. Rosy haze to the west at dusk, below freezing, clear and lighter breezes.
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RIP:

Karen Westfall

1-19-1956 to 10-21-2019

Karen Westfall passed away peacefully at home on Monday October 21, 2019.

Karen, beloved wife of Dan, was the grand daughter of Yellow Pine pioneers Faye and Iva Kissinger.

Karen Louise Westfall, 63, of Middleton, died Monday, October 21, 2019. Funeral Home: All Valley Cremation

Published in Idaho Press Tribune on Oct. 22, 2019
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Letter to Share:

Levy would provide sustainable revenue for Valley County roads

As a former Valley County road superintendent and commissioner, I have witnessed the reduction in revenue for our county road maintenance.

Historically the needed revenue has come from timber harvest dollars from national forests and fuel taxes for over 100 years. I personally made many trips to Washington D.C. to advocate for the Secure Rural Schools dollars to assist in funding the lost timber dollars, however each year Congress reduced the amount counties received.

Today, Valley County, when the funding is approved, there is not enough to provide basic services when added to the fuel tax revenue. With the reduction of timber harvest dollars the revenue is not sufficient to maintain the roads let alone the allow equipment upgrades, paying decent wages and purchasing needed materials.

On Nov. 5, the voters in Valley County will be asked if they want the county roads maintained sufficiently or allowed to continue to degrade. The maximum cost to the property owner will be $84 per $100,000 of the property market value to provide sustainable revenue so Valley County can provide the needed service to maintain the county roads.

In the event the road levy does not pass then snow removal will be limited to less than we have seen in the past, no major road projects would happen on a consistent basis, paved roads may have to return to gravel and staffing will be smaller than it is today. Additionally if the roads are not maintained to a graded and drained, standard the fuel tax dollars may be lost as they must be in a good condition to qualify per state standards.

Some question why Valley County maintains the roads into the national forest, and I would like to point out the funding collected from adding these miles to the fuel tax formula is what is used to fund this maintenance along with partnerships with the Forest Service and Nez Perce Tribe. If we don’t maintain these access routes. then there will be limited to no maintenance and Valley County loses $500,000 in revenue.

No one likes to have higher taxes, however I don’t believe anyone wants to pay higher costs for their own maintenance let alone higher cost of repairs on their vehicles due to rough roads.

We need to remember the Valley County commissioners do not have to impose the full levy if they determine not all the funding is needed to fund the road department.

So the decision, by state statue, is for the voters to decide whether to have decent county road maintenance or lose it all, which will place the burden on individuals or home owner associations to provide their own maintenance.

Gordon Cruickshank, McCall

source: The Star-News
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Idaho News:

Levy vote will set future of Valley County roads

(Note: This is the first of a two-part review of the proposed Valley County road levy that will be on the Nov. 5 ballot. Part 2 will appear next week.)

By Max Silverson for The Star-News Oct 24, 2019

Jeff McFadden scanned Spring Valley Road west of Donnelly, obviously deteriorated with crumbling edges, patches and potholes.

“This road is my nemesis,” said McFadden, who is Valley County road superintendent, noting the thousands of dollars that have been spent patching the road.

Spring Valley Road is one of several roads that could fall into greater disrepair if voters fail to pass a new, permanent property tax levy on Nov. 5.

“Some of these roads have more patch material on them than original asphalt,” McFadden said.

As it stands now, Valley County has no funds to properly maintain the road system. If the tax doesn’t pass, Spring Valley Road may end up being converted to a gravel road after all, along with several others.

Without the levy, Valley County will also have to eliminate up to half of its general road maintenance, bridge maintenance, culvert maintenance, backcountry road maintenance, and staff,” according to voter information put out by the county.

Historically, the road and bridge department received about $3 million per year from receipts from timber harvested on federal land within the county.

In 2000, the Secure Rural Schools and Community Self-Determination Act was passed by Congress to provide direct federal funding to counties and schools located near national forests.

Currently, no local tax dollars fund the road department. The remainder of the budget is from highway user funds.

The department received only about $75,000 in SRS funds in 2017, and about $1 million in 2018 and this year. However, the act has not been reauthorized for 2020.

Without the property-tax levy, county commissioners warn the road department’s annual budget will drop to around $2 million and lead to significant reductions in the services it provides.

Passing the levy, on the other hand, would boost the department’s annual budget to about $6 million.

The county is about 20 years and $50 million behind on road work due to years of funding shortage, McFadden said.

“Gravel roads are a problem right now because we do not have the funds to crush gravel for resurfacing,” he said.

Routine maintenance is barely keeping up in the summer months, and vital county equipment needs to be replaced.

“We have four water trucks and we could barely keep two of them running this summer because of the age and fatigue that these trucks take,” McFadden said.

Various other county vehicles need to be replaced, with several dump trucks now too rusted to haul anything heavier than snow safely, he said.

“A road network of our size should actually require $18 million annually,” Valley County Commissioner Dave Bingaman said.

“If the levy doesn’t pass, we’ll be forced to take what they’d call in the medical world a triage approach, where we try to help the most catastrophically hurt, write off the those who cannot be saved, and then work forward to help those with minor injuries,” Bingaman said.

That approach could include the halting of maintenance of roads that provide access to the backcountry, McFadden said.

Those roads could include Gold Fork Road, Lick Creek Road, High Valley Road and roads to Deadwood Reservoir and Yellow Pine, he said,

Snowplowing services would also see an unprecedented reduction without levy funding.

“If our road department’s budget gets cut in half, we may be forced to discontinue up to half of the snowplowing services Valley County provides,” Commissioner Elt Hasbrouck said.

“Priority would be given to main connectors like bus routes, emergency services, and main roads, but we may not have the staff and equipment to service some residential roads,” Hasbrouck said.

Snow removal may fall to individual homeowners or homeowners associations, he said.

The Nov. 5 levy would tax property at $84 for every $100,000 of assessed value, generating about $4 million in annual revenue for the department.

“A homeowner whose property in Valley County is worth $300,000 is going to pay around $250 more per year to help maintain a consistent, reliable road network,” Valley County Clerk Doug Miller.

“If a subdivision has to take on snowplowing because the county has to cut services, $250 extra per year in property taxes is relatively inexpensive,” Miller said.

“Taking this on independently, the homeowners would likely be looking at double, triple, or maybe even four or five times that amount depending on the amount of roadway needing to be cleared,” he said

Valley County maintains 245 miles of paved road and 486 miles of gravel road, with snow removal carried out on 407 total miles of road. There are 76 bridges that the county maintains and 3,443 culverts.

source: © Copyright 2009-2018 Central Idaho Publishing Inc.
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See what’s on your ballot for the November 2019 election

Tyson Miller October 23, 2019 KTVB

VALLEY COUNTY

Cascade
Mayor
Judith Nissula
City Council (Vote for two)
Ronald Brown
Rachel Huckaby
City Council (Vote for one)
William McFarlane
Denise Tangen
Cascade City Ordinance Proposal
Local Option Tax
1% tax on all sales, with exceptions
Ballot Question:

Shall the City of Cascade adopt proposed Ordinance No. 700?

Ordinance No. 700 provides for the imposition, implementation, and collection of non-property taxes (commonly referred to as a local option tax) for a period of two (2) years from its effective date. If approved, the tax will be assessed at the rate of one percent (1%) on all sales subject to taxation (sales tax) under Chapter 36 of Title 63, Idaho Code.

Single item purchase of $1,000 or more is exempt.

The Local Option Tax revenue will be used for the following purposes:

a) Streets, sidewalks, pedestrian crosswalks, pathways, and other public rights-of-way

b) Public parks maintenance, development, and beautification

Donnelly
Mayor
Susan Dorris
City Council (Vote for two)
Leslie D. Minshall
Chelsea Bergquist

McCall
City Council (Vote for two)
Michael Maciaszek
Colby Nielsen
Jordan Ockunzzi

Valley County Road Department
Funding Request
Permanent Override Tax Levy
Ballot Question:

Shall the Valley County Board of Commissioners be authorized and empowered to increase its budget for a permanent override tax levy at a rate of 0.084% multiplied by the current market value for assessment purposes of property in 2019 pursuant to Idaho Code 63-802(h) for the purpose of defraying road department personnel costs, conducting road maintenance, and for new road construction on all taxable property within the district beginning with the fiscal year commencing on October 1, 2021?

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Winter storm Saturday causes slide-off, power outages

The Star-News Oct 24, 2019

Stormy winter conditions on Saturday resulted in numerous cars sliding off the road and a brief closure on Idaho 55, the Valley County Sheriff’s Office reported.

There were no injuries from accidents during the storm, and the only closure on the highway, between Smiths Ferry Drive and Round Valley Road last about 15 minutes, the sheriff’s office said.

Snow weighing down branches and rubbing against power lines in McCall caused outages on Reedy Lane and Warren Wagon Road, according to McCall Fire and EMS.

One car slid off the road and another crashed into a pole in McCall due to the snow, although neither accident resulted in injuries, McCall Police Chief Justin Williams said.

Landmark east of Cascade received one to two feet of snow, according to the Yellow Pine Times online news service.

“There is probably at least that much at Profile Gap and Lick Creek summits – and even more on Monumental and Elk summits,” The Yellow Pine Times reported.

source: © Copyright 2009-2018 Central Idaho Publishing Inc.
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Barricades come down on Warren Wagon Road

Two-year $9.9M project nears completion

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News Oct 24, 2019

There will be no more road closures stemming from a two-year, $9.9 million reconstruction of Warren Wagon Road that is expected to be complete by Nov. 1.

The barricades came down on Wednesday after about five consecutive months of daily closures Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to noon and 1 p.m. to 5 p.m.

Crews are now working to install new road signs and raise old manholes to the level of the roadway, said Cody Brown, a spokesperson for M.A. DeAtley Construction of Clarkston, Washington, the general contractor for the federally-funded project.

Flaggers are still posted along the road as crews complete that work, but any delays would be 15 minutes at most, Brown said.

Work in the 5.5-mile project zone, which begins 2.2 miles north of Idaho 55 and extends to Eastside Drive, started in July 2018.

continued:
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Valley courthouse to limit access to one door

New security measure to start Nov. 4

By Max Silverson for The Star-News Oct 24, 2019

Public access to the Valley County Courthouse in Cascade will be limited to only the south door on Main Street starting on Monday, Nov. 4.

A security guard will be posted at the entrance and there are plans to install a metal detector, Valley County Clerk Doug Miller said.

The change in access to the building is being made to increase security for the public and the county’s employees, Miller said.

The public will be required to use the south entrance exclusively, with doors in the north end of the building reserved as emergency exits only.

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Idaho lawmakers considering property tax changes

Oct 21, 2019 By Associated Press

Boise, Idaho AP – Lawmakers are examining property tax options amid complaints that taxes are going up with rising property values, while also hearing concerns from cities and counties that they’re operating on tight budgets.

The Property Tax Working Group took no action Monday following a day of presentations that also included university and state financial experts.

Ultimately, the group aims to make recommendations and perhaps offer legislation to the full Legislature in January.

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Over 6,000 pounds of frozen meat sold at Walmart recalled

Recall due to possible salmonella contamination

By Scottie Andrew, CNN Oct 21, 2019 Local News 8

More than 6,400 pounds of a Walmart brand’s frozen meat have been recalled for possible salmonella contamination.

George’s Prepared Foods, the company that produces Walmart’s Great Value frozen, fully cooked meat, said that the products were meant to be disposed of after a small group of them tested positive for salmonella but were accidentally shipped nationwide.

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Mining News:

Midas Gold estimates $6 billion in precious metals lay under Stibnite

(Note: This is the first part in a series detailing Midas Gold Idaho’s operating plan for its proposed gold and antimony mine near Yellow Pine. Next week: Digging and Hauling)

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News Oct 24, 2019

Beginning at the surface of the Stibnite Mining District and extending down more than 1,000 feet lies an estimated $6 billion in gold, silver and antimony, according to estimates by Midas Gold.

About 4.5 million ounces of gold, 1.5 million ounces of silver and 68 million pounds of antimony would be harvested from three open pit mines proposed by the company.

The bulk of the project’s value stems from gold, which is currently priced at about $1,500 per ounce and would generate nearly $6.2 billion for Midas Gold.

However, Midas Gold would need to spend at least around $1.1 billion in infrastructure and equipment and about $2.7 billion in operating costs to recover the precious metals, according to company figures.

Since 2009, Midas Gold has spent about $182 million studying mineral deposits at Stibnite, conducting environmental studies and collecting data to confirm that the project is economically viable, said Mckinsey Lyon, vice president of external affairs for Midas Gold.

Within the 521-acre footprint of its three proposed open pit mines lie 390 boreholes from 10 years of Midas Gold drilling into the ground to extract cylindrical samples of the Earth from as far as 1,602 feet below the surface.

Historic exploration data from previous mining companies have also been incorporated into Midas Gold’s data, enabling the company to study more than 100,000 samples from the project site, Lyon said.

Studies have shown that gold is scattered relatively evenly throughout the first 1,000 feet of ground in tiny granular particles embedded among solid rock, she said.

High-grade deposits of gold have been taken by previous mining operations across the last century, leaving behind the scattered gold that was too risky or too costly to mine.

The capacity of modern haul trucks, gold processing mills and other equipment have increased greatly to allow the processing of more rock at lower costs, Lyon said.

“It’s all economies of scale,” she said. “Back in the 1950s, trucks had a 10 to 20 ton capacity. By the 1980s, they were 40 to 50 ton trucks. Now trucks carry 150 to 300 tons.”

Most of the gold particles lie within the Yellow Pine and West End pits, two of three open pit mines proposed by the company.

The Yellow Pine pit and West End pits have been previously mined. The Yellow Pine pit is probably best known because of the large lake that has filled it and is visible from Stibnite Road.

The Yellow Pine pit contains the highest grade ore and would produce about two grams of gold for each ton of rock excavated, or an ounce of gold per 17 tons of rock, according to Midas Gold.

“To put this in perspective, this would be the fourth-highest grade open pit deposit in the United States,” Lyon said.

Antimony also would come from the Yellow Pine pit and a new pit called Hangar Flats.

Another 10,000 pounds of antimony is expected to come from historic tailings that Midas Gold plans to reprocess as part of the Stibnite Gold Project.

Antimony is used in fire retardants for electronics and is considered a “critical” mineral by the United States government, but generally is not profitable enough to mine on its own.

“In this case, the presence of gold makes getting to the antimony feasible,” Lyon said.

The 68 million pounds of antimony at Stibnite would generate about $169 million for Midas Gold, or about 3% of the project’s estimated $6 billion in precious metals.

More than half of the project’s estimated silver reserves are within the Yellow Pine pit, which is currently a lake.

At current prices, Midas Gold would generate nearly $26 million from the estimated 1.5 million ounces of silver to be mined. Silver is mostly used for jewelry, electronics and batteries.

Harvesting all of the company’s estimated mineral reserves within the projected 12-year to 15-year life of the mine would require Midas Gold to process between 20,000 and 25,000 tons of ore per day.

source: © Copyright 2009-2018 Central Idaho Publishing Inc.
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Public Lands:

Cascade Ranger District Pile burning

Oct 21, 2019

The Cascade Ranger District on the Boise National Forest is planning to complete some of our pile burning tomorrow the 22nd of October, we hope to burn the debris pile at Crawford Work Center and the debris pile at the Yellow Pine transfer site. If you have any questions or concerns feel free to contact me, Tim Dulhanty at 208-382-7445.

Tim Dulhanty
Fuels Technician
Boise National Forest, Cascade Ranger District
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Logging starts on dying trees hit by moth outbreak in Idaho forests

by Ryan L Morrison Tuesday, October 22nd 2019

Boise, Idaho (CBS 2) — Logging has started on the dead and dying trees hit by the tussock moth outbreak in Idaho forests.

The Idaho Department of Lands sold nearly 2,000 acres of dead and dying timber as part of two salvage sales.

The tree harvest reduces fire risk, addresses safety concerns to the recreating public, and clears the way to plant trees that are less preferred by tussock moth.

The salvage sales also generate money to help fund public schools in Idaho and other beneficiaries to endowment lands.

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Decision Signed for Ola Summit Project

Forest Supervisor Cecilia Seesholtz has signed the decision for the Ola Summit Project located on the Emmett Ranger District of the Boise National Forest. A copy of the Decision Memo can be found on the Ola Summit project webpage (see the Decision tab). Thank you for your interest in this project. If you have any questions, please direct them to Katie Wood, Emmett District Ranger, at 208-365-7000.

Sincerely, Tera Little, Forest Planner
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Decision Signed for Tripod Project

Oct 25, 2019

Forest Supervisor Cecilia Seesholtz has signed the decision for the Tripod Project located on the Emmett Ranger District of the Boise National Forest. A copy of the Decision Memo can be found on the Tripod project webpage (see the Decision tab). Thank you for your interest in this project. If you have any questions, please direct them to Katie Wood, Emmett District Ranger, at 208-365-7000.

Sincerely, Tera Little, Forest Planner
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Study finds US public land workers facing assaults, threats

By Matthew Brown – 10/21/19 AP

Federal employees overseeing U.S. public lands were assaulted or threatened at least 360 times over a five-year period marked by heightened tensions with anti-government groups and dwindling ranks of law enforcement officers, a congressional watchdog agency said Monday.

The Government Accountability Office in a new report highlights anti-government tensions that at times have boiled over, including a six-week armed occupation of a federal wildlife refuge in Oregon in 2016 and other standoffs with armed protesters in Montana and Nevada.

The clashes have been rooted in a deep distrust of government on the part of the protesters, who view the federal bureaucracy as unlawfully impeding people from using public land for grazing, mining and other economic purposes.

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Letter to Share:

Mystic Farm Wildlife Rescue, Inc.

Oct 22, 2019

Happy Fall From Mystic Farm Wildlife Rescue, Inc.

Things are winding down here on the farm. Fawns are all released and we are now in the “clean up and fundraising stage”… Please click on the link in the information below and Vote to Nominate Mystic Farm Wildlife Rescue, Inc.! If we make the nomination cut, there will then be the final vote in November.

Also, Mystic Farm will once again be a part of the Ponderay Arts and Crafts Festival on November 23rd. I’ve been busy making the wonderful, handmade, Mystic Farm candles, creating “antler art”, and so many other goodies to have available at the event.

Remember, Mystic Farm operates 100% on donations and volunteers. We depend on you for support (like voting in the Findlay Post Falls Charity below) and purchasing goodies. Thanks…and the fawns thank you!

Mystic Farm Needs Your Help! Please go to this link:
Scroll down to the “Nominate” section and VOTE for Mystic Farm Wildlife Rescue, Inc. to be nominated to be in the running for the November Charity of the Month! DO IT NOW! We are getting in way late, so only a few days left in this month to be nominated for NEXT month. If we are one of the top three (we can do this!) we are entered into the November running to win $2000! Please Share… We Can Do This! Do it for the fawns.
-Dory
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Critter News:

PNF Seeking Winter Boarding for Pack Stock

The Payette National Forest is looking for a location to contract a stock boarding facility or pasture for the Forest Service pack stock during the winter months and shoulder seasons on either side of the field season. The time period would be annually from approximately late October to early May, starting in 2020.

The preferred location would be lower elevation, experience mild winters, and be within 100 miles of McCall. The facility shall make available adequate feed and provide for the safety, security, and health and well-being for the pack stock. The pack stock herd consists of 18 mules and horses. The Forest Service would prefer to enter into a 5 year contract with the option of renewal.

Please contact the Krassel Ranger District at 208-634-0600 with interest or for more information.

(via Facebook Oct 22, 2019)
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Fish and Game confiscates captured bear cub

Managers assessing next move

Oct 21, 2019 By Steve Liebenthal KIVI TV

Boise, Idaho — A Boise man who thought he was rescuing a dying bear cub from the wild says he was blind-sided when Fish and Game officers confiscated it.

Charles Erickson says he found the bear during a hunting trip.

He says the cub appeared to be sick and dying, so he captured it and brought it to his home in Boise where he and his family kept it warm and bottle fed it.

Erickson says he contacted two bear rehabilitation centers hoping they could nurse the bear back to health, but before he was able to make that happen, Fish and Game officers contacted him and took the bear.

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A Day In The Sun

Oct 25, 2019 IME


Courtesy photo by Nicholas Coletti

A cow and calf moose take a drink in a Wood River Valley wetlands on Sunday. People and animals alike enjoyed a sunny, blue-skies day after a snowstorm passed through the region on Saturday.

source:
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Challis wild horse “gather’ to start November 5

Oct 25, 2019 Local News 8

Challis, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – The U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM) plans a helicopter-assisted method to gather 365 wild horses from the Challis Herd Management Area beginning Nov. 5. It’s expected to last 5 to 9 days.

The “gather” is aimed at reducing the overpopulation of wild horses by approximately 244 horses. Any mares released back to the range will be treated with fertility control. Once complete, approximately 185 wild horses will remain in the management area.

BLM managers says the herd size reduction will balance it to what the 168,700 acre area can support. The reduction will protect habitat for wildlife species like sage grouse, pronghorn antelope, mule deer and elk. BLM says its objective is between 185 to 253 horses. Right now there are about 429 horses in and directly outside the management area.

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Fish & Game News:

F&G finalizes agreements to allow public access on corporate timberlands in North Idaho

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Supervisor
Wednesday, October 23, 2019

Corporate timberland agreements are part of F&G’s programs that provides millions of acres for public access

With final agreements now signed, hunters, anglers, trappers and other recreationists have access to 336,630 more acres of private timberland through an agreement between the landowners and Fish and Game.

You can see locations of the parcels on Fish and Game’s Map Center.

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Two mule deer bucks left to waste south of Idaho Falls

By James Brower, Regional Communications Manager
Monday, October 21, 2019

F&G seeks information from the public in deer case

Fish and Game is investigating two mule deer bucks that were wasted and dumped south of Idaho Falls. They were discovered on Thursday Oct. 17 south of the Sand Creek Golf Course on Henry Creek Road.

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Mule deer doe & fawn wasted near North Tom Beall Road near Lapwai

By Jennifer Bruns, Regional Communications Manager
Tuesday, October 22, 2019

On Thursday October 17, 2019 a mule deer doe and fawn were found wasted near North Tom Beall Road east of Lapwai, ID. Investigation by Idaho Fish and Game conservation officers showed both deer had been shot and no meat taken from either animal. It is believed that both deer were killed at separate locations and dumped where they were discovered.

Anyone with any information about this incident is encouraged to call IDFG Sr. Conservation Officer Tony Imthurn at (208) 716-8099 or call the Citizens Against Poaching (CAP) hotline 1-800-632-5999. Callers can remain anonymous and may be eligible for a reward.

source:
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Only antlers and ivories taken from bull elk shot and wasted near McKown Road north of Potlatch

By Jennifer Bruns, Regional Communications Manager
Tuesday, October 22, 2019

On Thursday October 17, a bull elk was found wasted in a wheat field near McKown Road north of Potlatch, ID. The elk had been shot one time with only the antlers and ivories removed from the animal. All of the meat was left to waste from the elk. It is believed the elk was killed sometime between Sunday October 13, 2019 and Wednesday October 16.

“Someone has information regarding who killed this elk and we would be very interested in talking to them and solving this case” says Moscow Sr. Conservation Officer Tony Imthurn.

Anyone with any information about this incident is encouraged to call IDFG Sr. Conservation Officer Tony Imthurn at (208) 716-8099 or call the Citizens Against Poaching (CAP) hotline 1-800-632-5999. Callers can remain anonymous and may be eligible for a reward.

source:
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Tiny tags and antennas help track juvenile Chinook in Lemhi and Salmon rivers

By Brent Beller, Fisheries Technician
Friday, October 25, 2019

Tracking the lives of thousands of tiny salmon is no easy task. But knowing where they prefer to live and how far they move and survive is invaluable for fish managers


Radio tag (at bottom) compared to passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags.

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More F&G News Releases

link:
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Fun Critter Stuff:

Rare yellow cardinal spotted in Florida

Expert says it’s ‘one in a million’ sighting

By Elizabeth Wolfe and Saeed Ahmed, CNN Oct 16, 2019 Local News 8

An extremely rare yellow northern cardinal was spotted in Port St. Lucie, Florida, exciting bird enthusiasts and drawing in anyone who can appreciate a good bird photo.

While there is no precise number for how many yellow cardinals are spotted a year, Geoff Hill, a professor and a self-described “curator of birds” at Auburn University, estimates the chances of seeing a yellow cardinal are “one in a million.”

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Tips & Advice:

Remember to clear your devices before disposing them

Personal information may be stored on printers

Oct 21, 2019 KIVI TV

Boise, Idaho — Sending and receiving information digitally is the norm in society today, but forgetting to clear your personal information from devices before disposing them could leave you susceptible to hackers.

Better Business Bureau reports printers are commonly forgotten about when it comes to clearing personal information. Printer hard drives can store some of the most sensitive data, including birth certificates, income tax forms, and bank statements. Keeping that information secure is essential.

Personal home printers generally have smaller storage space, but it’s important to wipe it clean before selling or getting rid of it. Make sure to check for any external storage like SD card readers. You can also unplug your printer for 60 seconds or more to purge temporary memory. Long-term memory is typically erased after more jobs are completed. You should also check your printer manual on steps to perform a factory reset.

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Winter Trivia:

Winter Precipitation Types

Snow is small white ice crystals formed when supercooled cloud droplets freeze. Snow crystals can have different shapes usually dictated by the temperature at which they form.

Snow pellets, also called graupel, are white, opaque ice particles round or conical in shape. They form when supercooled water collects on ice crystals or snowflakes. They typically bounce when they fall on a hard surface and often break apart.

Snow grains are very small, white opaque particles of ice, more flattened and elongated than snow pellets. Snow grains can be thought of as the solid equivalent of drizzle, or as I like to call it, “snizzle”.

Ice pellets, or sleet, are small balls of ice. They form from the freezing of raindrops or the refreezing of melting snowflakes when falling through a below-freezing layer of air near the earth’s surface.

Freezing rain occurs when rain occurs and the surface temperatures is below freezing. The raindrops become supercooled as they fall through the layer of cold air near the surface and freeze upon impact with surfaces below freezing.

source: CoCoRaHS
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Seasonal Humor:

FallingRockSign-a

FallWeather-a
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Idaho History Oct 27, 2019

Annie “Peg Leg” McIntyre Morrow part 2

Atlanta and Rocky Bar, Alturas (Elmore) County

PegLegAnnie1-headline

Peg Leg Annie Tragedy’s Child
by L.C. Auer

PegLegAnnie1photo

Orphaned and widowed, tragedy never eluded Annie Morrow. Caught in a raging blizzard, Annie was finally rescued, but it was to late to save her legs.

The story of Annie Morrow of Atlanta and Rocky Bar is one of the most colorful legends of early Idaho history. It is also the story of frontier courage and resourcefulness.

When Annie was a beautiful black-eyed child it seemed as if the tapestry of her life was woven of dazzling hues, as brilliantly picturesque as the multi-colored design of a Joseph’s coat.

But the year that her father was killed in the mining camp of Rocky Bar, there came into focus a tiny ebon thread which was, as the years marched on, to enlarge in length and breadth, gradually marring the overall radiant pattern and finally to eclipse it entirely with death’s own somber pigment, — black!

Where Annie was born is shrouded in mystery but it has been. definitely established that on the fourth of July 1864, her father, Steve McIntyre, carried her in a pack on his back into the booming mining camp of Rocky Bar. The camp was to be her home for the major portion of her life.

When Annie was growing up her father became partners with George W. Jackson, owner of one of the richest gold mines in the vicinity, the Gold Star. The two men quarreled, there was a shoot-out and McIntyre was killed, leaving Annie an orphan.

At the age of fourteen Annie was mature and the most beautiful girl in Rocky Bar. It was at that age that she married a man by the name of Morrow. The marriage was not a happy one, for Morrow beat his child bride.

With her husband, Annie left Rocky Bar but returned a few years later as a widow. Whether her husband died or whether she left him is not known. She began operating a boarding house in Atlanta, Idaho, fourteen miles from Rocky Bar over a four-mile mountain summit. Several times a week a mail carrier traveled on snow shoes to the mountain top and exchanged mail with a carrier from Rocky Bar.

Like famed Nellie Cashman of Tombstone, Annie was an angel of mercy in the mining camp. She never turned down a hungry man or one without money. Her boarding house was a haven to those who were down on their luck.

PegLegAnnie2photo
Atlanta, Idaho at the turn of the century, in a mountain pass on the way to Rocky Bar, Annie Morrow almost froze to death.

Annie’s best friend was a German woman, Emma Van Losh, known in the mining camp as Dutch Em. Em spoke seven languages fluently. She had saved up a nest egg from her earnings and decided to return to her home in Bavaria. She persuaded Annie to go with her.

Early in May on a Friday night the two women started on the first lap of the journey on foot. The trail between Atlanta and Rocky Bar lay around Bald Mountain, a height of some 7000 feet. The next morning Bill Tate, the mail carrier from Atlanta, started to Hog Back to make the exchange at the summit with Bob Jackson, the carrier from Rocky Bar. Tate reported passing the two women on the way up, but a mountain blizzard swept down before he made his descent and he failed to see them in the thick curtain of snow that engulfed the whole mountain side.

The raging blizzard lasted for two days and everyone in the two mining camps of Atlanta and Rocky Bar were worried over Dutch Em and Annie. The third day after their departure, when the mail packer, Jackson, went on his run, he began a search for the two women. Three feet of fresh snow had fallen during the storm and all the bushes and trees were covered with a mantle of white. Finally, in a deep canyon on the Atlanta side of the mountain, the mail man came upon Annie crawling about in the snow, jabbering in delirium. Her feet were frozen. Jackson carried her back to Atlanta and sent for Dr. M.J. Newkirk in Mountain Home eighty miles distant.

For five days Annie waited for the doctor. She drank whiskey to kill the intense pain she was suffering from her frozen feet. Tate had made the mistake of building a fire in her room and as Annie’s feet thawed, her agony was almost unendurable. As she was alone the miners took up a collection and hired a Mrs. Prey who had done practical nursing to take care of her.

During the five days it took the doctor to reach Annie, various people of the camp suggested remedies to alleviate Annie’s suffering. Mrs. Prey even tried poultices of grated potatoes. The entire camp was sympathetic and tried to help in every possible way. When Dr. Newkirk finally arrived, gangrene had set in. He placed Annie on the kitchen table, gave her an anesthetic and amputated both legs just below the knee.

After a time Annie’s delirium left her and she was able to relate her experiences on the tragic trip across the blizzard-held mountain. Search parties were dispatched to Bald Mountain to locate Dutch Em, and her frozen body was found about a mile from where Annie had been rescued. The men who found her saw that she was covered with Annie’s underclothes.

Annie said that she was sure that she could have made it to safety after the blizzard struck but she would not desert Em who collapsed. The two women found a huge boulder and huddled against it. Annie tried to build a fire but the snow had wet her matches, so the two lay close together in an effort to keep from freezing. Annie removed her underclothes and covered Em but after twenty-four hours the German woman froze to death. After that Annie could remember no more.

After her legs healed Annie made woolen pads for her stumps and started doing the laundry for the miners of Rocky Bar. These kind-hearted men paid her much more than her work was worth.

Annie worked hard and saved her money. Then she met an Italian named Henry Longheme. Annie took her savings of twenty years, some $12,000, and gave it to Henry to deposit in a bank in San Francisco. She received a letter from Henry in New York. He advised that he was on his way to Italy. She never heard from him again. Nor did she ever hear of her money. She inquired of the bank in San Francisco and leaned that her money had never been deposited there.

For a short time after prohibition came into effect, Annie bootlegged in a little cabin near Rocky Bar. Toward the last years of her life she was broke. The tenderhearted miners bought her groceries and carried wood to her cabin.

Then when she was old and alone, tragedy struck again. Annie suffered from cancer of the face. It was that disease that finally brought about her death, She was buried in Morris Hill cemetery in Boise.

Though Annie’s story is one of tragedy, it is also a story of courage, the kind of courage that made the West.

Reference Sources: Records of the Idaho Historical Society RW 17

courtesy Jim Bartholome
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Pioneers, Atlanta, Idaho

PioneersAtlantaIdaho-a

Group of three women and two men posed with shovels against pile of loose earth. Only one person is looking toward the camera. (date undetermined)

source: Idaho State Historical Society
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Peg Leg Annie

For a while Peg Leg Annie lived at Rocky Bar in a cabin which is still standing. Reportedly she sold whiskey to anyone with the money to pay for it. Being incapacitated, however, she lined up whiskey bottles under cover along one side of a building near her cabin. With a shotgun across her knees, she would direct the would-be purchaser to the spot where the booze bottles were hidden. The story goes that she always paid for her liquor – in advance.”
(also quoted from Ghost towns of Idaho by Donald C. Miller)

Submitted by: Angelia Heeb
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Rocky Bar, Mines, Miners

Miners outside one of the camp buildings at a mine in Rocky Bar, [Alturas] Elmore County, ID, probably taken in late 1800s. The men are holding miners candlesticks with unlit candles, pipes, and other equipment.

source: Idaho State Historical Society
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AnniesOrdealHeadline

Pegleg Annie’s Ordeal
(1896)

It was the silence that finally awakened Annie. For a moment she wasn’t sure she was alive, didn’t believe it could have been possible, given what she and Em had endured. But it seemed the three-day blizzard had stopped. It felt as though someone were prying her eyelids open with a dull steel blade. Frozen shut, just like everything else, she thought. Her jaw barely moved, even with the greatest effort, and before she began she abandoned the idea of unwrapping herself from her friend’s cold body.

And that sudden thought stopped her: Em was cold. Surely that couldn’t mean that she … died? Sometime the night before, Annie had given Dutch Em her own jacket, blouse, scarf, hat, skirt – nearly all her clothes, just before she herself succumbed to the sickly allure of sleep, huddled there between the two coarse, gray boulders. The great lumps had barely offered protection from the slicing wind. By the time she finally forced one of her eyes open, she wished she hadn’t made the trip, wished all over again that she could take it back.

Annie finally managed to slide her arms from around Em. She leaned back and looked at her friend’s face in the bright glare of the snow-reflected light. A peeling breeze, sharp as a skinning knife, cut straight through her. I was foolish to think we could traipse up here with nothing but light woolens and snow-shoes. And all for what, Annie? All for money.

She’d been eager to check on her other “house” and her girls. And Em, or Dutch Em as most folks called her, had wanted a change of scenery. Wanted to set to work over the hill, as they called it. “Should have told her no, should have left her there.” She spoke the words between the stuttery jabs of wind and the shivers wracking her voice. Nothing mattered now. She knew she would soon join Em in death.

The blizzard had blown out days before, leaving behind crusted, drifted remnants, as with so many spring storms. It made the going fairly smooth for the search party. But soon, what the men saw stopped them from venturing higher up the pass. The man in the lead shook his head and squinted upslope. The wind whipping the snow had played a mind trick on them. Surely the body before them hadn’t moved. It had been more than three days since anyone had heard from the ladies, so they never expected to see either of them alive. Especially not after that late-season blizzard. And yet something was there, just ten yards off, crawling side-slope. It moved again – they clambered forward.

“By God, it’s Annie Morrow! She’s alive!” The man in the lead dropped to his knees and bent low to lift the clawing, prone form from the snow. The other men crowded close. It was not possible that anyone could have survived such vicious weather, and yet here she was.

They busied themselves with building a fire and swaddling her with extra clothing. She was clad in nothing more than a slip, a pair of flimsy undergarments hardly worth the fabric it took to make them, and little else. Not even socks.

“Annie, Annie, can you hear me? What’s happened? Where are your clothes, girl? Where’s Em? Annie, where’s Dutch Em?”

She made no response.

“Hold her down, she’s out of her mind. And hurry up with that fire.”

A short while later, as they warmed Annie by the fire, she revived enough to tell them that Em had died. The rescuers decided that several of them would head back to town with Annie, three others would stay behind to look for Dutch Em.

One of the men bent low, speaking quietly to a companion. “Did you see Annie’s feet before we bundled her up?”

The other man nodded and kept his eyes on Annie’s sleeping face. She had severe frostbite. They had all seen enough of such things, living as they did in the high mountains of Idaho, but never had any of them seen such a bad case. They’d wrapped her feet well in layers of socks and someone’s sweater but then had packed the feet in snow in hopes of slowing the damage. When they found her, howling and dragging herself along the snow-crusted ground, Annie’s feet had been swollen, blackening things.

“I don’t get why she would give nearly all her clothes to Dutch Em?” the youngest of the group asked.

“You have to ask that, boy, then you probably ain’t got too much in the way of friends, wager.”

“Huh?”

The older man smiled and sighed. “It’s what you do for a friend, you dippus.”

“I reckon,” said the young man.

It took another day of heavy, hard work to get Annie back to Rocky Bar, the mine camp she’d lived in since she was four, when she’d been carried into it in her father’s pack basket. Now she was carried back to that town by men. The other members of the search crew would also soon return to town, carrying Dutch Em’s dead, frozen body, pulled from her crevice in the rocks.

“I’ll need more whiskey than that! And you all had best take good care of my kids. If I die, I want them well tended. You hear me?”

The few men and women who had gathered to lend a hand during the operation wore fearful looks. Annie was doing her best to keep it light, but she knew there was a good chance she’d not make it through this operation – being as there was no doctor in attendance. She upended the whiskey bottle again, glugged back a few pulls, as some of it leaked down her cheeks and trickled along her chin and around the back of her neck.

“This is for you, Dutch Em, a better woman I never knew.” Her lips began to quiver, and tears coursed out of her eye corners. “I only wish it could have been me and not you, girl.” She wept and whispered inaudibly a moment more, then her head slipped to the side.

Someone grabbed the nearly empty bottle before it dropped from her loosened grasp.

The man charged with the operation was the best butcher in town. He was also the one who owned the best meat saw. Someone else had sharpened an array of hunting knives and joint boning knifes [sic]. Beyond him, on the dresser, stood three full bottles of whiskey, to help prevent more infection.

He checked to make sure Annie was unconscious before flipping back the blanket covering her legs. There were two stout men on either side whose job it was to hold the legs still so he could get a good purchase. Cutting through the flesh would pose no problem, but the bone, thick as it was between the knee and ankle, would be slower going. He also wanted to leave enough flesh to help the nub heal over on itself. It would be a tricky task, to be sure. Butchering was easier, as you didn’t have to worry about such things.

The flesh had blackened even farther up the legs than they expected. Instead of taking them off at the ankle, they had to go well above the blackened skin to healthy flesh, in hopes that the decay wouldn’t continue to travel upward and kill her with an infection. Which could still happen, anyway.

“Right,” said the butcher. “Nothing ventured…” He bit his bottom lip and nodded to the men who clamped tight to the poor woman’s leg. Several more men were at the ready and held Annie down by her shoulders, should she awaken in the midst of the gruesome task. He used the sharpest, thinnest knife blade first, dumping whiskey on it as he went, to clear the blood from the clean, new wound and to keep the infection from taking hold.

Once the flesh was sliced through all around, he wasted no time and set to work on the bone with the meat saw. He had sharpened it earlier that morning, and the keen blade and sure, tight strokes made quick work of Annie’s leg bones. The rotted feet were put in a canvas gunnysack and tied off. They would be buried later. Two women, one a midwife, helped bandage the poor woman’s stumps.

“Keep the whiskey handy,” said the butcher. “She’s going to need all that and more. The pain ahead of her isn’t something a human body should have to endure.”

Though it has been reported that the operation to remove Annie Morrow’s feet was performed in the maw of the storm, atop a mountain, with nothing more than a hunting knife and to bottle of whiskey, other sources state the more realistic claim that Annie was carried down the mountain to the mining town of Rocky Bar, where she was then operated on. Her feet and lower legs were removed, below the knees and ankles, and she was thereafter known as Pegleg Annie.

Born Annie McIntyre, she arrived at the new gold camp of Rocky Bar on July 4, 1864, as a four-year-old in her father’s pack. She grew up in the gold camp and later married, raised children, and owned her own mining claims and several “houses of entertainment” in Rocky Bar and over the mountain at another mine camp called Atlanta.

Annie was thirty-six years old when her life-changing journey with Dutch Em took place in the late spring of 1896. Unstoppable despite a new nickname and a distinct lack of fleet, the irrepressibly vigorous Annie Pegleg” Morrow continued with her career as a successful businesswoman. She raised five children and wore a pistol while crawling around her popular restaurant and boardinghouse. Various friends crafted artificial limbs for her, but she preferred crawling. Annie lived another thirty-eight years after her ordeal and died of cancer in 1934 at St. Al’s Hospital in Boise. She was seventy-five years old.

In her later years she had taken up with an Italian who ran a saloon next door to her restaurant. He planned a trip for himself back to Italy to visit his family, so Annie gave him her life savings, to be deposited in a bank in San Francisco before his departure. She never saw or heard from the man again, nor did she ever receive word that her money had been deposited. Despite this unfortunate turn of events, and ever the optimist, Annie continued to tell people that he had most likely been waylaid by bandits and killed.

from Chapter 39 “Pegleg Annie’s Ordeal”, pages 210-215, “Sourdoughs, Claim Jumpers & Dry Gulchers: Fifty of the Grittiest Moments in the History of Frontier Prospecting” by Matthew P. Mayo 2012
— — — — — — — — — —

Ambulance Service, 1918 Rocky Bar Idaho

shared by Leiana Rogers Knight‎
— — — — — — — — — —

“Peg Leg Annie” McIntyre

One sunny morning in May 1896, Annie and her friend “Dutch Em” von Losch set out on foot from Atlanta for the neighboring mining town of Rocky Bar, some 14 miles distant. Unfortunately, the weather changed dramatically and they were caught in a spring blizzard near James Creek Summit, at 7,500 feet elevation. The storm raged for two days. When it finally let up, a search party found Em frozen to death and a maniacal Annie crawling through the snow. Annie survived, but her feet were so badly frostbitten that they had to be amputated.

A century ago, prostheses were not what they are today. But “Peg Leg Annie” lived to be an old woman. She remained in Rocky Bar for several years, selling whiskey and doing laundry; she died in Boise in 1934. Her cabin is one of several structures still standing amid the abandoned mining equipment in Rocky Bar.

from page 153 “Idaho” By John Gottberg (Google Book)
— — — — — — — — — —

St. Alphonsus Hospital, Boise, ID.

St-Alphonsus-hosp-Richards-a
April 29, 1899

courtesy John T. Richards
— — — — — — — — — —

Felicia Anna “Peg Leg Annie” McIntyre Morrow


Added by Kat Carter

Birth: 13 Sep 1858 Van Buren County, Iowa
Death: 13 Sep 1934 (aged 76) Boise, Ada County, Idaho
Burial: Morris Hill Cemetery Boise, Ada County, Idaho


Added by David M. Habben

Gravesite Details During the gold rush, Annie owned “houses of entertainment” in Atlanta, ID and Rocky Bar, ID. She lost her feet from frostbite after being caught in a snowstorm. She owned businesses and mining claims.

source: Find a Grave
— — — — — — — — — —

Emma “Dutch Em” Von Losh

DutchEmHeadstone-a

Birth: unknown Bavaria (Bayern), Germany
Death: 16 May 1896 Atlanta, Elmore County, Idaho
Burial: Atlanta Cemetery Elmore County, Idaho

source: Find a Grave
———————

Link to Annie “Peg Leg” McIntyre Morrow (part 1)
Link to Alturas County, Idaho 1864 to 1895
Link to Esmeralda, Alturas (Elmore) County, Idaho
Link to Rocky Bar, Alturas (Elmore) County (part 1 general)
Link to Rocky Bar, Alturas (Elmore) County (part 2 mining)
Link to Rocky Bar, Alturas (Elmore) County (part 3 Transportation)
Link to Rocky Bar, Alturas (Elmore) County (part 4 Newspaper clippings)
Link to Atlanta, Alturas (Elmore) County, Idaho
———————–

Road Reports Oct 27, 2019

Please share road reports. Conditions change very quickly this time of year. High elevation roads may have several inches of snow. Be prepared for snow/ice, rocks and trees in the road and remember there is no cell phone service.

Yellow Pine: We had snow flurries on Saturday, no accumulation here. Local streets are damp/frozen. Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN.
link: Local Forecast.
Yellow Pine Webcam: (check date on image)

Warm Lake Highway: Saturday (Oct 26) Modest snow/ice at the top of Big Creek Summit.

Highway 55 Webcams Link:

South Fork Road: Saturday (Oct 26) Dry road all the way to Yellow Pine. Lots of hunters on the South Fork.
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Wednesday Oct 23, clear road all the way in to Yellow Pine.

Johnson Creek Road: Still open, 4×4 advisable, travel at your own risk.
Friday (Oct 25) fuel truck driver said it was ‘beat down to pavement’ at Landmark, quite a bit of snow on upper Johnson Creek road until about MM 6.
link: Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam
link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Open? No current report. Probably snow up high. Travel at your own risk.
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Open? No current report. Probably snow up high. Travel at your own risk.
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcam: (check date on image)

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open, no current report. Probably some snow on the road.
From Midas Gold Sept 30: [A drilling] program is expected to take 3 weeks and will result in a small increase in traffic to and from Stibnite, starting on October 2nd, to bring the necessary equipment to and from site.
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: No current report on road conditions. Probably snow up high. Travel at your own risk.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Open?? Probably snow up high. Travel at your own risk.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Warren Wagon Road: West of Payette Lake road is closed for construction Monday-Friday from 8am to noon and from 1pm to 5pm. Possibly thru Nov 1st.
Link to more info:

Secesh: No current report.

Deadwood Summit: Open, no current report. Probably several inches up high. Travel at your own risk.
Old report Aug 11: from Landmark to Deadwood really good until the last 10 miles to the lake.
Note: The approx elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
——————————-

Weather Reports Oct 20-26, 2019

Oct 20 Weather:

At 930am it was 32 degrees, overcast w/breaks – top of VanMeter socked in, measured 2″ snow on the board. Breaks in the clouds at noon, trees dumping snow loads. At 330pm it was 39 degrees, snow melting, overcast and almost calm. Light snow started falling some time before 630pm. At 7pm it was 33 degrees, low overcast and light snow falling, didn’t last long, no accumulation. Not snowing at 8pm. Cloudy at 1130pm.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time October 21, 2019 at 09:30AM
Overcast
Max temperature 41 degrees F
Min temperature 31 degrees F
At observation 33 degrees F
Precipitation Trace
Snowfall Trace
Snow depth Trace (patchy snow in the open, 1″ in the shade)
— — — — — — — — — — — —

Oct 21 Weather:

At 930am it was 33 degrees and overcast, patchy old snow out in the open, an inch or more still in the shade. Overcast and old snow melting at noon. At 345pm it was 43 degrees and overcast. At 625pm it had been misting long enough the roofs were damp but not wet. At 650pm it was 39 degrees, overcast and misting lightly. Light steady rain at 8pm. Lightly misting at 1130pm. Not raining at 130am. Rained started before 9am.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time October 22, 2019 at 09:30AM
Overcast, light rain
Max temperature 44 degrees F
Min temperature 33 degrees F <- yesterday morning
At observation 37 degrees F
Precipitation 0.20 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth Trace
— — — — — — — — — — — —

Oct 22 Weather:

At 930am it was 37 degrees, overcast and raining lightly. Low overcast and light rain falling at noon, tapering off and not raining at 1225pm. Sucker hole and sunshine at 1230pm. At 345pm it was 56 degrees, mostly cloudy/scattered sunshine and light breeze. At 640pm it was 46 degrees, broken cloud cover. Breaks in the clouds at 11pm, a few stars. More stars out at 2am.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time October 23, 2019 at 09:30AM
Partly cloudy and frosty
Max temperature 57 degrees F
Min temperature 26 degrees F
At observation 26 degrees F
Precipitation 0.03 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

Oct 23 Weather:

At 930am it was 26 degrees, partly cloudy and frosty. More clouds and gusty breezes just before 1pm. At 330pm it was 47 degrees, partly cloudy (fewer smaller clouds) and chilly breezes. At 630pm it was 39 degrees, mostly clear and light chilly breeze. Lots of stars out at 11pm.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time October 24, 2019 at 09:30AM
Mostly cloudy, light frost
Max temperature 50 degrees F
Min temperature 21 degrees F
At observation 23 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

Oct 24 Weather:

At 930am it was 23 degrees, mostly cloudy and light frost. Mostly clear around 1pm. At 4pm it was 53 degrees, slight breeze and clear. Lots of stars out at 11pm (and 2am.)

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time October 25, 2019 at 09:30AM
Clear and frosty
Max temperature 54 degrees F
Min temperature 24 degrees F <- yesterday morning
At observation 26 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

Oct 25 Weather:

At 930am it was 26 degrees, clear and frosty. Sunny and mild at noon. At 4pm it was 64 degrees, mostly cloudy (high wispy) and light breeze. At 645pm it was 51 degrees and mostly clear. Cloudy at 11pm. A trace of snow fell before 9am.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time October 26, 2019 at 09:30AM
Partly clear
Max temperature 67 degrees F
Min temperature 26 degrees F <- yesterday morning
At observation 33 degrees F
Precipitation Trace
Snowfall Trace
Snow depth Trace
— — — — — — — — — — — —

Oct 26 Weather:

At 930am it was 33 degrees, partly clear and a tiny trace of snow on the ground in the shade. At 1045am it was 37 degrees, mostly cloudy, light breeze and occasional flake of snow. Flaking snow just before 12pm for a few minutes. Flaking snow at 1250pm for about 10 minutes, dark clouds to the south. Light steady snow 330pm to 350pm, temp dropped to 32 degrees, low overcast and gusty breezes. Snowed for about 10 minuntes around 530pm, no accumulation. At 630pm it was partly cloudy, 30 degrees at 7pm. At 11pm patches of clear – some stars and breezy. Blustery at 1230am. Quite a few stars at 2am.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time October 27, 2019 at 09:30AM
Clear, breezy, heavy frost
Max temperature 41 degrees F
Min temperature 22 degrees F
At observation 22 degrees F
Precipitation Trace
Snowfall Trace
Snow depth Trace
—————————

Road Reports Oct 23, 2019

No current reports, Monday it snowed in higher elevations with rain in Yellow Pine. Conditions change very quickly this time of year. High elevation roads may have several inches of snow. Be prepared for snow/ice, rocks and trees in the road and remember there is no cell phone service. Please share road reports.

Yellow Pine: We had rain on Tuesday, melted most of the old snow, streets are wet. Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN.
link: Local Forecast.

Warm Lake Highway: Wednesday Oct 23 dry all the way in except a little snow/ice on the Cascade side of Big Creek summit.

Highway 55 Webcams Link:

South Fork Road: Wednesday Oct 23, dry road all the way to Yellow Pine.
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Wednesday Oct 23, clear road all the way in to Yellow Pine.
Wednesday (Oct 16) the road is still in good shape.

Johnson Creek Road: Probably still open for 4×4, travel at your own risk.
Last report Sunday afternoon (Oct 20) of 14-24 inches of snow at Landmark.

Landmark Summit: About 14 inches of snow with drifts over two feet in places.
link: Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam
link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Probably still open with snow at the summit, no current report.
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Open, no current report. Could be several inches to a foot in the gap.
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open, no current report. Probably some snow on the road.
From Midas Gold Sept 30: [A drilling] program is expected to take 3 weeks and will result in a small increase in traffic to and from Stibnite, starting on October 2nd, to bring the necessary equipment to and from site.
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: No current report on road conditions. Probably several inches to a foot on the summit by now. Travel at your own risk.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Open?? Probably a foot or more by now. Travel at your own risk.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Warren Wagon Road: West of Payette Lake road is closed for construction Monday-Friday from 8am to noon and from 1pm to 5pm. Possibly thru Nov 1st.
Link to more info:

Secesh: No current report.

Deadwood Summit: Probably still open and snow at the summit, no current report.
Note: The approx elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
——————————-

Oct 20, 2019 The Yellow Pine Times

Oct 20, 2019 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Note: A report there was over a foot of snow on the road above 6500 feet Sunday afternoon, see road reports for photo.
The boil order and water restrictions are still in effect.

Community Calendar:

April 2 – Boil water order issued
Every Sunday – 11am Fire/SAR Training
May 15 – Nov 30 Firewood Season
Oct 31 – Halloween
Nov 1 – 3-day a week mail service begins
Nov 2 – 8pm Halloween-End Of Hunting Season Party
Nov 3 – 2am Daylight saving time ends
(details below)
———-

Local Events:

Halloween Party Nov 2nd

Halloween-End Of Hunting Season Party at the Yellow Pine Tavern Nov 2nd, 8pm.

Chili Dogs Provided by the Tavern bring snacks if you wish. Costume Contest or come as you are.
———-

Village News:

Snow in the High Country Oct 20th

P1000538-20191020VanMeterSnow
(Low clouds hiding the top of Van Meter Hill this morning 10-20-2019)

It snowed pretty good Saturday night here in Yellow Pine, measured 2″ of snow on the board this morning. About half of it melted by late this afternoon.

Heads up to Travelers and Hunters: Received a report this afternoon of 1 to 2 Feet of snow on the road above 6500 feet at Landmark. There is probably at least that much at Profile Gap and Lick Creek summits – and even more on Monumental and Elk summits.


(photo and report courtesy Scott A)
Report Sunday afternoon (Oct 20) of 14″ to 2 feet of snow at Landmark.
— — — —

Boil Water Order Still in Effect

Bring all water to a boil, let it boil for one minute, and let it cool before using, or use bottled water. Boiled or bottled water should be used for drinking, making ice, brushing teeth, washing dishes, and food preparation until further notice. Boiling kills bacteria and other organisms in the water.
— — — —

Fuel Delivered Oct 15

After a delay due to last week’s snow storm, Diamond Fuel (and Feed) came up to deliver fuel to Yellow Pine on Tuesday, Oct 15th. They will return next week with another load.
— — — —

Get Ready for Winter Heating

* Inspect and clean the chimney. Contact the YPFD to borrow chimney brushes.
* Inspect and clean wood stoves, make sure dampers work properly and check for leaks.
* Check your carbon monoxide and smoke detectors – install fresh batteries.
* Check your fire extinguisher and make sure it is handy. Manually rotate them around, tip upside down and lightly shake them, thus keeping the fire fighting agent loose, and check that the needle is still in the green. If you need a new one please call, your fire commissioner or Jeff F.
* If you have an oil-powered furnace, replace your filter and nozzle and check the tank level.
* Check your propane tank levels (early morning when it is cool in case there is a wasp nest!) Check to make sure snow falling from the roof cannot impact your pipes!
* Test the igniter switch. On an old system, you might have to relight the pilot. Newer systems have electronic igniters.
* Lubricate and clean the blower motor. First check the owner’s manual to see if your motor is the kind that needs lubricating. If it does, turn off the power, open the cover and clean the caps covering the bearings. Then remove the caps and lubricate the bearings.
* Inspect the blower belt for cracks. Turn off the power to the furnace at the main circuit breaker. Use a screwdriver to remove the steel cover of the air handler. The blower belt is the largest rubber belt that you see. Replace the belt if it is cracked.
* Inspect the exhaust flue outdoors to ensure it is free of obstructions such as branches or animal nests.
* Keep the area around your furnace unit free of debris and clutter.
* Change the air filters. Clean your air vents and ducts. Remove the vent covers with a screwdriver. Use the extension hose of your vacuum to remove the dust.
* Open all your air vents. Remove furniture, boxes and clutter that get in the way of air flowing from the vents.

Local Fuel Suppliers
Propane
Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Heating fuel
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430
Furnace Service
Rocky Mountain Mechanical (208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett
— — — —

Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

Yellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is located approximately 3 miles south on Johnson Creek Road.

The TRANSFER STATION is for household trash and yard waste:
* Household trash must be put inside (and fit) the dumpster;
* Yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, et.) goes in the burn pile on the south end of the turn-around;
* Cardboard boxes should be flattened before putting the in the dumpster,

The DUMPSTERS are NOT for:
* Furniture (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station).

The BURN PILE is NOT for:
* Cardboard boxes (flatten and put in dumpster);
* Furniture and appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Drywall and building material (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wire or fencing (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Foam Rubber (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wood with metal (like nails) attached (take to Donnelly Transfer Station.)

When closing the DOORS on the front of the dumpsters:
* Make sure the “U” brackets at the top and bottom of the door are engaged;
* The retaining bar at the middle of the door is slid into the pipe;
* And the “L” bars at the bottom of the doors dropped into place.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: 208/634-7176
— — — —

Yellow Pine US Mail

The 3-day a week mail delivery will start Nov 1st. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 55 cents
— — — —

Reminder for people living in bear country:

* Garbage should be stored inside the house or in a secure garage or storage building.
* If garbage cannot be stored in a secure location, a bear-resistant container approved by the Interagency Bear Committee is recommended.
* Avoid using bird feeders from March through November. Birds do not need supplemental feeding this time of year.
* Pet food should not be left outside.
* BBQ grills or anything with a strong odor should not be left out at night.
* Protect gardens, beehives, and compost piles with electric fencing.
* Never intentionally feed bears. A food-conditioned bear may pose a threat to human safety and usually results in the removal of the bear.
———-

Local Groups:

YPWUA News:

The 2019 Yellow Pine Water Users Shareholders meeting was Sunday July 7th in the community hall. (No minutes yet)

Water Update Oct 15th:

A major leak was found and a temporary fix was made until parts can be obtained. Once parts and people are available, that will be fixed. Fixing that leak doesn’t mean we will be off the boil order. The boil order was issued by the DEQ. They will not lift that order until the chlorine contact time meets the standard.
– Steve Holloway

Water Update (posted to FB Oct 4th 930pm)

Today (10/4) YPWUA worked on the section of pipe that had a number of leaks. Unfortunately we were unable to complete the repairs due to having a couple of incorrect parts. We will order the parts as soon as possible and complete the repairs. We had to do some creative Engineering today but cut 10 leaks to 2 small ones. Thank you to Jeff Forster and Dayle Bennett for working in the muck and water for two days without complaint, to Cecil Dallman for excellent excavation work, to Dave McClintock for parts and advice, to Layne Bennett, Ginny Bartholomew and Ann Forster for their support. Thanks to the community for your patience.
– Willie Sullivan

Water Update (posted to FB Oct 3rd 9pm):

YPWUA found the leaks today (above the orchard) and will be repairing them tomorrow. The water will be off from 10am till repairs and testing completed.

– Willie Sullivan

Water Update Sept 21 (excerpted from VYPA 9/21 meeting notes):

Tests were conducted by Idaho Rural Water [July 19th] in an effort to locate the source of the major leak in the system. They will return October 3rd to continue the search for leaks. The line between Alpine Village and the Saleen property, which includes the bridge across the East Fork river is the line most suspected to be leaking. Cecil Dallman will stand by with a backhoe to dig in locations found. More digging work is needed at the tanks and pipes near the water facility. A second engineer is being consulted. Getting contractors to come to YP and replace seals is difficult. The previous grant money is tied to a timeline so some specified work must be done this fall.

The possibility for a large amount of grant money is very slim because we would have to take out a loan and use the borrowed money for the required matching money, and then there would be the loan payments. Money on hand must be used on required repairs to the contact tank. Because some water users do not have voting rights YPWUA does not qualify for some grants.

There are 56 shares available for purchase at $100/share. Each piece of land is entitled to own one share. Share holders are entitled to vote; water users that do not own a share may not vote, but do have access to water. The owners of the 56 lots are encouraged to purchase shares. Ownership of a share is shown on your annual water bill.

Anyone wanting to arrange a payment plan should contact Willie Sullivan.

– Steve Holloway/Willie Sullivan

Water Update Sept 8:

Still looking for the leak. Water restrictions and boil order still in effect.

Water Update June 7:

1. The “boil order” is still in effect.
2. There is still large water leaks in the system. We continue to look.
3. A grant for $39,000 was approved for improvements to the system.
3. Work is currently being done on the new contact tank.
4. Please, no lawn watering until we find and repair the major leaks.
– Steve Holloway

link to: #4430059 Yellow Pine Water Users Boil Water Notification 4-2-19

link to: 2018 September Water Department Update
— — — —

VYPA News:

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting Minutes for September 21, 2019
link to: 20190921 Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting Minutes for August 10, 2019
link to: 20190810 VYPA Minutes

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting Minutes for July 20, 2019
link to: 20190720 Yellow Pine Village Association Minutes

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting Minutes for June 8, 2019
link to: 20190608 Village of Yellow Pine Association
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YPFD News:

District 1 Fire Commissioner

Per the Postings on the opening for Yellow Pine District 1 Fire Commissioner, Sue Holloway came forward to volunteer her time to represent YP Fire District 1. The Fire Commissioners have unanimously agreed to accept Sue as a Fire Commissioner representing the residents of District One, (The center of Yellow Pine Ave. West). This position will run for 4 years.

We look forward to having Sue as a Fire Commissioner. Sue brings a community commitment not only as a resident but also as a business owner. Thank You Sue for stepping up for the challenge.

YP Fire Commissioners.
Sue Holloway District 1
Dan Stiff, District 2
Merrill Saleen, District 3

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice

The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.”

link to: 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation

Meeting minutes for Sept 14, 2019
link to: 2019-09-14 YPFD Meeting_final

Meeting minutes for July 13, 2019
link to: 20190713 YPFD Meeting Notes_final

Meeting minutes for June 16, 2019
link to: 20190615 YPFD Meeting Notes_Final

Bring it, Don’t Burn it

For us in Yellow Pine, Jake Strohmeyer, Dist. Ranger with the Boise NF said we can use the area at our transfer station for yard debris and the FS will burn it once a year. Please no furniture, mattresses, construction debris, metal objects, tires or personnel junk. Please only woody yard debris. When using the pile please be mindful of where you place the debris as it should be contained to a manageable burnable area and kept as clean as possible. – JF

Training: Sunday Fire/EMS training at 11am unless otherwise posted. All are welcome.

YP Helispot: We are working with Valley County Road Department and the Boise National Forest for the rock base for the road leading into the Helispot and the actual Helispot itself. We are also receiving rock for the Fire Hydrants, water tank foundations, etc. The rock will come from the Valdez pit and will be less expensive than having it trucked in from Cascade.

link to Cooking safety in the home:

link to Smoke Alarm Info:

-JF
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Biz Listings:

Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377

Call for reservations. Open until the end of hunting season.
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The Corner (208) 633-3325

Our fall hours are open by request for the winter. Please call 208-633-3325, 970-379-5155 or email at matt@ypcorner.com
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Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233

Fall hours open 8am to close
Full breakfast served starting at 8am with special arrangement for earlier breakfast as needed. 92 Octane non ethanol gas available, cubed ice, beer, pop and water sold by the 6 and 12 pack, snacks, ice cream and many supplies available. Burgers and Pizza, Beer and Wine on the evening menu. Football and other sports available on our TV. Wi Fi, Verizon phone service and information available.
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Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Tom & Sarah Lanham
156 Yellow Pine Ave, Yellow Pine Id 83677
website:
FB page:
It’s official starting June 2020 We will be doing trail rides out of Yellow Pine along with summer pack / camping trips to high mountain lakes in the area!

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
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Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430
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Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

The Star-News

subscribe:
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine

Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, will service Yellow Pine

B&T Safety Solutions LLC
208-271-1600 Based out of Donnelly
Snow removal, cleaning chimneys and stoves, we do cabin staining/chinking as well
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (Oct 14) overnight low of 26 degrees, a few small clouds and some haze before sunrise. Evening grosbeaks and pine siskins are still around, resident jays, hairy woodpecker, white and red-breasted nuthatches along with our winter visitors dark-eyed juncos and clark’s nutcrackers. Almost clear sky mid-day and mild breezes. Partly hazy to the southwest mid-afternoon and mild breezes, high of 62 degrees. Quiet enough at times to hear the river. Partly cloudy (high and thin) at sunset and nearly calm. Gun shot out in the forest at 726pm (dark.) Bright moon before midnight with a rainbow halo around it.

Tuesday (Oct 15) overnight low of 25 degrees, mostly clear sky this morning. White and red-breasted nuthatches, clarks nutcracker, hairy woodpecker, pine siskins, jays and juncos visiting. An eastern blue jay showed up! Diamond fuel truck arrived before noon, ran out and will have to come back. Sunny and mild mid-day. Cowbirds showed up, eastern blue jay departed. Increasing high thin clouds. Partly clear and warm mid-afternoon, light breezes, high of 70 degrees. Nearly overcast by late afternoon. Fuzzy moon rise (hazy sky). Partly clear after midnight.

Wednesday (Oct 16) overnight low around 29 degrees, mostly clear sky this morning. Clark’s nutcracker, hairy woodpecker, nuthatches, juncos and jays visiting. Also several chipmunks and a pine squirrel. Sunny and warm mid-day, a few clouds. Warm, mostly cloudy and quite breezy mid-afternoon, high of 71 degrees. At dusk it was still a little breezy and flat looking sky. Thin hazy clouds before midnight, fuzzy moon.

Thursday (Oct 17) it was 49 degrees this morning before sunrise, no frost, dark clouds covering the sky and gusty breezes. An evening grosbeak, a hairy woodpecker and a pine siskin visited along with the usual nuthatches, jays and nutcracker. The temperature rose to 50F before falling with the rain mid-day. Dark clouds and light sprinkles mid-afternoon and calmer, high of 50 degrees. Rain ended late afternoon, then breaks in the clouds and chilly at dusk. Bright waning moon peeking out between clouds before midnight, then cloudy after 2am.

Friday (Oct 18) overnight low of 32 degrees, breaks in the cloud cover and almost calm. A few drops on and off before sunrise. Nuthatches, hairy woodpecker, an evening grosbeak, 4 nutcrackers and a 6-pack of jays visiting. Mostly cloudy w/sucker holes leaking sunshine at lunch time, then snow flurries early afternoon (no accumulation.) Little short sprinkle of rain late afternoon and mostly cloudy, high of 46 degrees. Chilly and mostly cloudy at sunset. Partly clear before midnight, bright moon and a few stars.

Saturday (Oct 19) overnight low of 25 degrees, low clouds – socked in nearly to the valley floor, breezy and snowing this morning. About 1/4″ of snow by 11am, then rain/snow mix and melting a little for a short while, then big flakes falling before noon. Jays, nuthatches, nutcrackers and hairy woodpecker visiting. By early afternoon we had 1/2″ of snow on the board, and starting to melt, high of 36 degrees. Short snow flurries and/or misty rain showers late afternoon and evening and calmer. Van Meter Hill socked in at sunset and misting. Snowing after dark. Additional 1″ new snow by midnight and snowing pretty good.

Sunday (Oct 20) overnight low of 31 degrees, breaks in the overcast – top of Van Meter socked in. Measured 2″ heavy wet snow on the board, snow (and rain) melted to 0.49″ of water. Jays, juncos, nuthatches, nutcrackers and hairy woodpecker visiting, no ‘summer’ birds around. Sucker hole let in some sunshine before noon and snow starting to melt. Chilly and overcast mid-afternoon, snow continues to melt, high of 41 degrees. Light snow falling before dusk, patches of open ground. Doesn’t appear to be snowing at 815pm.
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Idaho News:

Maupin named to Valley commission to replace Cruickshank

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News Oct 17, 2019

Sherry Maupin was named last week by Gov. Brad Little to serve on the Valley County commission for the last year of the term of former commissioner Gordon Cruickshank.

Maupin, 59, of McCall, was sworn in during the commissioners’ regular meeting on Tuesday at the Valley County Courthouse in Cascade.

She joins Dave Bingaman and Elt Hasbrouck on the three-person panel.

Maupin told The Star-News that she plans to seek a full-term in the November 2020 county election.

“I look forward to working with the other commissioners and the county team to envision a bright and prosperous future for our region,” Maupin said in a statement.

Maupin was one of three candidates interviewed on Sept. 19 by the Valley County Republican Central Committee, which was tasked with interviewing and ranking eligible replacements for Cruickshank, a Republican.

continued:
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Valley County revises application process for tax exemption

By Max Silverson for The Star-News Oct 17, 2019

Valley County commissioners have approved substantial changes to a property tax exemption ordinance intended to bring new businesses to the county.

The new ordinance institutes a scoring system to evaluate proposals and changed rules to make them more specific to Valley County.

The ordinance gives up to five years of tax relief to qualifying, non-retail businesses investing over $500,000 in a new facility in the county.

The previous version was first adopted in 2018 following adoption of enabling legislation by the Idaho Legislature in 2017.

The new version of the ordinance was drafted by officials from the Valley County Assessor’s Office, the county planning and zoning department and Valley County Emergency Manager Juan Bonilla, who is also Donnelly Fire & EMS chief.

The goal of the new ordinance is to encourage businesses to come to Valley County, something the previous version did not, Valley County Assessor June Fullmer said.

continued:
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The Star-News to host election forums in Cascade, McCall

The Star-News Oct 17, 2019

The Star-News will host public forums in Cascade and McCall this month for candidates and issues that will appear on the Nov. 5 general election ballot.

The Cascade forum will begin at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 24, at American Legion Hall, 105 E. Mill St.

Topics will include the election for Cascade City Council, a proposal for a local-option sales tax in Cascade, and a proposal by Valley County to raise property taxes for county roads.

The McCall forum will begin at 6:30 p.m. Monday, Oct. 28, at a new location, the Holiday Inn Express and Suites, 210 N 3rd St.

Candidates for McCall City Council have been invited and a proposal by Valley County to raise property taxes for county roads will be presented.

The forums will be moderated by The Star-News Co-Publisher Tom Grote. The format will consist of opening statements or presentations followed by the asking of written questions submitted from the audience.

source: © Copyright 2009-2018 Central Idaho Publishing Inc.
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Winds blow off portions of Horseshoe Bend High School roof

Oct 19, 2019 by KIVI Staff

Horseshoe Bend, Idaho — Emergency roof repair crews are on their way to Horseshoe Bend High School after strong winds blew off portions of the school’s roof.

Boise County dispatch says some debris hit a transformer and other pieces landed on Highway 55.

Crews were able to clear debris off the road, and the highway remains open. Banks-Lowman Road, however, is closed due to downed power lines.

Storms that moved through southern and central Idaho Saturday afternoon downing trees and prompting at least 50 power outages.

source:
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Banks-Lowman Road back open to traffic after downed power lines prompted closure

Oct 19, 2019 By KIVI Staff

Garden Valley, Idaho — Banks-Lowman Road is back open to traffic after downed power lines prompted closures.

Crews worked to clear the area Saturday afternoon and opened the highway to traffic around 2:10 p.m.

Idaho Power is aware of 50 power outages in the Treasure Valley as of 2:10 p.m. as a result of strong, gusty winds associated with a line of passing thunderstorms early Saturday afternoon.

continued:
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Wilder cemetery damaged

Oct 19, 2019 By Anna Silver KIVI TV

Wilder, Idaho — Saturday’s storms hit one of the most sacred places in one Treasure Valley town, leaving behind extensive damage. Larry Cooper, the Wilder Cemetery Sexton, says he was devastated.

“I take this very seriously, and I took this over two years ago, and I love my cemetery, and I love my people out here and have close relationships with them, and this hurts a lot.”

He estimates 18 trees fell, and numerous headstones were damaged.

continued:
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City of Hailey lifts boil water advisory, drinking water clean

by CBS 2 News Staff Saturday, October 19th 2019


City of Hailey

Hailey, Idaho (CBS 2) — Hailey’s drinking water is safe to drink after officials lift the boil water advisory, Saturday morning.

The City Water Department followed Idaho Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) regulations, taking several samples of water from the repaired water pressure zone, with at least a 24-hour gap between samples.

Previously, Hailey officials had been warning residents not to drink water until they boil it.

continued:
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Wendell residents need to boil water after power outage shuts down well

KTVB October 19, 2019

[Wendell], Idaho — The town of Wendell is now under a boil water order after Saturday’s storm knocked out power to one of their water wells.

Cindy Woodard, the supervisor of public works in Wendell, told KTVB that one well has lost power, forcing the town to boil its water to make sure it’s safe to use.

Woodard also asks area residents to reduce their water usage, as the town’s wastewater stations could overflow without enough power to them. She said there is a plan set if the waste stations do overflow.

continued:
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Western governors want nuclear testing compensation expanded

By Keith Ridler – 10/15/19 AP

Boise, Idaho — Atmospheric nuclear weapons testing exposed more states and more people to radiation fallout and resulting cancers and other diseases than the federal government currently recognizes, Western governors said.

The Western Governors’ Association on Friday sent letters to the U.S. Senate and U.S. House urging passage of proposed changes to a law involving “downwinders.”

The U.S. between 1945 and 1992 conducted more than 1,000 nuclear weapons tests, nearly 200 in the atmosphere. Most were conducted in Western states or islands in the Pacific Ocean.

The changes to the 1990 Radiation Exposure Compensation Act would add all of Nevada, Arizona and Utah, and include for the first time downwinders in Colorado, Idaho, Montana, New Mexico and the island territory of Guam.

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Mining News:

Our Phased Approach to Restoration

Midas Gold Blog

The Stibnite Mining District has a long history of mining, spanning more than a century. For most of the time the site was in operation, regulatory and environmental laws were limited and expectations around reclamation were very different than they are today. That, combined with the critical mining for the war effort at Stibnite, has resulted in a legacy of environmental damage.

Today, the United States has some of the strictest mining and environmental laws and regulations in the world. There is heavy oversight of the mining industry and stringent requirements that every company must meet if they want their projects to move forward. These regulations help to protect the environment and require modern mining companies to approach projects differently than their predecessors.

Reclaiming the environment is a must for mining companies. However, when we were designing the Stibnite Gold Project, we wanted to take care for the environment a step further. From the outset, our philosophy has been to use responsible mining as a tool to repair the damage left behind and restore the site, not just reclaim it to the standards required by law.

continued:
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Hundreds protest proposed Midas Gold project

Speakers fear mine would harm salmon, rivers

By Max Silverson for The Star-News Oct 17, 2019

Gary Dorr asked a crowd of about 300 people in downtown McCall on Saturday to get angry and alarmed about what he said was a threat to native salmon and treaty rights by the proposed Stibnite Gold Project near Yellow Pine.

Dorr, a member of the Nez Perce Tribe and Nimiipuu Protecting the Environment, was one of several speakers at a protest rally called the Gathering of Peoples to Protect our Sacred Water and Fish, at Art Roberts Park in McCall.

The event was organized by the tribe and the Save the South Fork group. Participating organizations include Earth Works, Nimiipuu Protecting the Environment, Idaho Conservation League, Idaho Rivers United and Better Neighborhoods.

Participants in the event rallied against the building the proposed gold and antimony mine by Midas Gold on the grounds that the project would be disastrous to the South Fork of the Salmon River watershed.

Before the event, protestors gathered at three locations in downtown McCall, walking in large groups toward the park to symbolize the confluence of people coming together and the journey that native fish undertake. Some participants also arrived via boat, paddling from Brown Park.

Protestors carried signs reading, “Save Our Salmon,” “Too Precious to Risk,” “Water is More Important Than Gold,” “Sacred Waters,” and “Sacred Fish,” among others.

Dorr outlined how the development of the mine would violate the Nez Perce Treaty of 1855.

“The U.S. constitution states that treaties are the supreme law of the land,” he said. “You can’t make any laws that are against what’s in the treaty.”

He also chastised Midas Gold, saying the company is misrepresenting its business and the project.

Midas Gold Idaho is a subsidiary of a Canadian company and beholden to both Midas Gold Corp. and Barrick Gold Corp., another Canadian company which owns 20% of Midas Gold.

He mocked the company’s advertising to portray the company as environmentally friendly.

“They think you’re stupid . . . they think we believe their grade school media campaign,” he said to hoots and cheers from the audience.

Idaho Rivers United Executive Director Nic Nelson said the mine is the greatest threat to Chinook salmon and steelhead beyond the dams on the lower Snake River.

“Idaho is the most important spawning habitat for Chinook salmon anywhere in the world,” Nelson said.

“We are vitally important to the perpetuation of this species globally; not even Alaska can offer what Idaho has with our high elevation and spawning habitat,” he said.

Retired Forest Service fish biologist Mary Faurot-Peterson told a story of three fishes, the Chinook salmon, steelhead and bull trout, all of which she said would be threatened by the Stibnite Gold Project.

“I worked in the 90s to help enforce the promises of Stibnite miners to adhere to their operation and restoration plans,” Faurot-Peterson said.

“I saw firsthand how easy it was for the mining company to walk away, leaving the taxpayers in charge of cleaning up destroyed fish habitat and other environmental messes,” she said.

John Robison, Public Lands Director for the Idaho Conservation League, said that the Forest Service plan does not account for a disastrous accident and assumes that mining operations go according to plan.

“We need to start questioning the underlying assumption that mining is the highest and best use of our public lands and rivers,” Robison said.

“Right now it is ranked as more important than drinking water, or salmon or our quality of life,” he said.

source: © Copyright 2009-2018 Central Idaho Publishing Inc.
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Public Lands:

Campground improvements at Horsethief Reservoir opened to public

By Nicole Blanchard for The Star-News Oct 17, 2019

The Kings Point campground at Horsethief Reservoir east of Cascade has reopened after being shuttered for the summer for renovations.

The campground now boasts regraded campsites, new asphalt pads for recreational vehicles, new compacted sand tent pads with fire rings, and regraded and blacktopped boat ramps and fishing areas, according to Scott Gill, a member of the Y Camp advisory board.

“It rivals any state park,” Gill said. “It rivals any national site at Redfish Lake.”

Though they’re on Idaho Department of Fish and Game property, the campsites surrounding Horsethief Reservoir have been managed by the Treasure Valley Family YMCA, whose Y Camp: Horsethief Reservoir site is nearby.

The YMCA and IDFG struck the deal in 2017 in an attempt to cut down on Fish and Game expenditures at the site and improve the area surrounding the Y Camp, which at times was blighted by rowdy campers and inadequate bathroom facilities.

“There was no fee (to camp there) and people were abusing the use of the public campgrounds,” Gill said. “There were a significant number of calls to the Valley County Sheriff’s Office.”

continued:
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Lowman Ranger District of the Boise National Forest Intend to Submit Grant Proposal to Idaho Department of Parks and Recreation

Lowman, Idaho, October 17, 2019 — The Lowman Ranger District of the Boise National Forest is applying for grant funding from the Idaho Department of Parks and Recreation to help with trail improvements and maintenance.

The application will request funding through the Departments Off-Road Motor Vehicle (ORMV)

* MBR/ ORMV funds would be used to maintain trails on the North Zone of the Boise National Forest. These trails receive heavy summer usage from motor bike enthusiasts. This grant proposes to address culvert placements, signage, brushing and heavy tread maintenance needs.

All grant proposals will improve the visitor experience and mitigate public health and safety hazards. This will also help sustain the capital investment of the trail treads. If received, implementation of the projects would begin in late summer of 2020.

Comments or requests for more information should be submitted to Charles A Jarvis, Lowman Ranger District, 7539 Highway 21, Lowman, ID 83631, or by calling 208-259-3361.

Contact: Lowman Ranger District
Charles A. Jarvis
208-259-3361
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Proposed wildfire fuel breaks plan released for 3 states

Oct 14, 2019 AP

Boise, Idaho (AP) – Authorities have released plans to stop devastating wildfires in southwestern Idaho, southeastern Oregon and northern Nevada with one option creating 1,500 miles of fuel breaks up to 400 feet wide along existing roads.

The U.S. Bureau of Land Management on Friday released a draft environmental impact statement for the Tri-State Fuel Breaks Project and is taking public comments through the end of November.

The BLM says creating fuel breaks by clearing vegetation will help firefighters stop wildfires and protect key habitat for sage grouse and other wildlife on land also used by ranchers and outdoor enthusiasts.

continued:
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Critter News:

Animal rescuer saves dog stranded on steep cliff in Idaho

Associated Press October 16, 2019

Boise, Idaho — Nobody knows how long the skinny white dog was trapped on the side of a steep, rocky cliff in rural Idaho, but when Dave Wright heard about the pup’s plight he knew he had to get the animal down.

Wright, the founder of Friends Furever Animal Rescue, told the Idaho Statesman he saw a Facebook post about the dog’s precarious position on Sunday. He got the coordinates, did some research and with the help of rock climber Richard Jensen scaled the cliff face to rescue the dog.

The trio made it down safely, and the dog — covered in fleas, with some bruises and sores — was whisked away for vaccinations and treatment. Wright says the Great Pyrenees, now named “Clifford,” is sweet and gets along with both dogs and cats. Wright is trying to find his owner, but if that fails he says the rescue group will work to find him a new home.

source:
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Pet Talk – Intestinal obstructions in dogs and cats

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt Oct 18, 2019 IME

For the intestinal tract to work properly, fluid and food material must be able to pass through its entire length. When the passage of material is obstructed, nutrients cannot be absorbed, fluids are lost from the body and the animal can rapidly become severely ill. Obstructions may be partial or complete, with the latter being more serious.

The most common causes of foreign body are a toy or piece of string or fabric. Sometimes an indigestible food item such as a bone or rock has been swallowed by the animal. This type of obstruction tends to be more common in younger animals. There are other diseases of the intestines that can lead to obstructions, including tumors and telescoping of the bowel into itself.

The main signs of an intestinal obstruction are vomiting and loss of appetite. Fever is also common, from complicating bacterial infections. Abdominal pain is usually present, but not always.

continued:
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Fish and Game doubts bear rehab prospects

Facility claims they have been successful

Greg Moore Oct 18, 2019 IME

The killing of an orphaned black bear cub by an Idaho Department of Fish and Game officer in Hailey last week raised questions about the viability of rehabilitation of bear cubs.

At least three organizations in Idaho are licensed to rehabilitate black bears. Idaho Black Bear Rehab in Garden City deals solely with black bears and Snowden Wildlife Sanctuary near McCall and Earthfire Institute in Driggs take in a variety of wildlife, including black bears.

However, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game is reluctant to send bears there.

continued:
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6 grizzly bears killed in single week in northwest Montana

Early snowstorms in northwest Montana have contributed to the deaths of five grizzly bears in one week on the Rocky Mountain Front.

Associated Press October 14, 2019

Missoula, Mont. — Early snowstorms in northwest Montana have contributed to the deaths of five grizzly bears in one week on the Rocky Mountain Front.

The Missoulian reports that a sixth grizzly was put down east of Rogers Pass for killing cattle, pushing the one-week death toll to six and the unofficial annual mortality count to 38 in the Northern Continental Divide Ecosystem.

continued:
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Idaho’s too friendly elk is heading to the Lone Star state

by CBS 2 News Staff Thursday, October 17th 2019


Bob Shindelar

Boise, Idaho (CBS 2) — A bull elk that was illegally removed from the Idaho woods in early 2018 and grew to show no fear of humans has found a new home.

Texas A&M University.

Idaho Fish and Game says the 400-pound elk, which roamed the streets of Sweet, was for the most part, raised in captivity its entire life. The elk was captured and released in Bear Valley with the hope that it would integrate with wild elk herds in the area. Instead, the animal sought out humans, resulting in its recapture.

continued:
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Grand Teton to hunt, relocate non-native mountain goats

Oct 16, 2019 AP

Jackson, Wyo. (AP) – Grand Teton National Park officials have announced plans to begin removing non-native mountain goats from the park by lethal and non-lethal means.

The Jackson Hole News & Guide reported Tuesday the final plan from park officials includes hunting, capturing and relocating the goats.

Park officials say the goats migrated from the Snake River Range into the range of native bighorn sheep and could spread diseases that could kill off the native herd.

continued:
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World Center for Birds of Prey offers up-close encounters with raptors

The Fall Flights demonstration south of Boise is your best opportunity to get up-close to a hawk, falcon or owl as they soar inches from your head.

KTVB October 16, 2019

Boise, Idaho — The World Center for Birds of Prey south of Boise is one of the premiere conservation facilities in the world for raptors.

… “When you come to see Fall Flights, you get the opportunity to have birds fly up close,” said Birds of Prey spokesperson Erin Katzner. “Some of our hawks are complete acrobats, and they love to be daredevils. They’ll fly very close to the audience, and it’s not uncommon for one to brush you with its wing feathers as it goes by.

… The Fall Flights program takes place at 3 p.m. every Friday, Saturday and Sunday through Nov. 3, weather permitting. The shows last about 30 minutes.

full story w/cool video:
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Fish & Game News:

Sweet, Idaho Elk Headed for the Lone Star State

By Evin Oneale, Regional Communications Manager
Thursday, October 17, 2019


Evin Oneale, IDFG

A human-habituated bull elk from the Sweet, Idaho area has found a “forever” home in Texas.

After six weeks at a Fish and Game facility, the elk left Idaho early Thursday morning, ultimately bound for Texas A&M University where it will become part of the school’s wildlife management and veterinarian programs.

The elk will join a number of native and exotic wildlife species which roam the university’s animal paddock including white-tailed deer, fallow deer, zebra, addax antelope and ostrich. “Of the alternatives available, A&M was the best place for this elk to land,” Fish and Game wildlife veterinarian Dr. Mark Drew noted. “He will be well cared for and enjoy a good life at this world-class facility.”

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Hunters: If your tag isn’t properly notched, it’s invalid

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Supervisor
Wednesday, October 16, 2019

This applies to all permits that require you to notch the month and date

Reminder for hunters, after you harvest your animal, you must validate your tag by completely removing the correct day and month – just like in the picture – and attaching it to the largest portion of the carcass.

source:
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It’s time to hunt pheasants in the Magic Valley

By Terry Thompson, Regional Communications Manager
Thursday, October 17, 2019


IDFG

Pheasant hunting will open in the Magic Valley Region on Saturday October 19th.

The much awaited season opener for ring-necked pheasants opens across the Magic Valley this Saturday, October 19th and will continue until December 31, 2019. Regional wildlife biologists are expecting this year’s season to be very similar to last year, in terms of the number of birds available to hunters. Pheasant populations in Zone 3, which includes the Magic Valley, have struggled since the mid-1980s because of changes in farming practices and the resultant loss of habitat. The 10-year average, from 2009 – 2018 for pheasant populations across Zone 3 have continued to trend downward.

The daily bag limit for pheasants is 3 roosters per day, with a possession limit of 9. There is no season on hen (female) pheasants.

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Oct. 14: Upper Salmon River Steelhead fishing report

By Brent Beller, Fisheries Technician
Thursday, October 17, 2019


M. Koenig IDFG

Steelhead were caught over the past week on the upper Salmon River. Angler effort increased but remained light overall. The majority of bank angler effort was observed downstream of North Fork while boat anglers were spread out throughout the area.

Anglers interviewed between the Middle Fork and North Fork in location code 15 averaged 86 hours per steelhead caught, and no steelhead were harvested. Anglers interviewed in the other upper Salmon River location codes did not report catching a steelhead. Check the Harvest Report for more details.

River conditions remained good throughout the week. Water temperatures were in the mid-40’s and the clarity was clear. Currently, the Salmon River is flowing at 1,320 cfs through the town of Salmon, which is 103 percent of average for today’s date.

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Windows to Wildlife Newsletter

Idaho Fish & Game

link:
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More F&G News Releases

link:
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Fun Critter Stuff:

Rare zebra with ‘polka dots’ spotted in Kenyan wildlife reserve

by Ida Domingo, WSET Staff Friday, September 20th 2019

Kenya (WSET) — A zebra with a dark coat and white polka dots has been spotted in Kenya’s Masai Mara National Reserve.

According to the New York Post, its the first of its kind for the park.

The Maasai Mara National Reserve also took to their Facebook page to share the picture of the polka dot foal. They wrote, “The dotted zebra foal which has been spotted in the Maasai Mara Game Reserve causing excitement among tourists.”

continued w/photos and video:
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Seasonal Humor:

FallBugsDying-a

“To tell the truth – we get a little nervous along this stretch ourselves.”
MountainTrailRide-a
by Frank Owen September 16, 1950 Saturday Evening Post [h/t Sandy]
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Idaho History Oct 20, 2019

Atlanta, Alturas (Elmore) County, Idaho

Atlanta City, Alturas County 1876-78

23 miles North East of Rocky Bar, is a small but promising mining hamlet, having several very rich veins of gold and silver bearing ore. The mines are but slightly developed. The storms of winter render access difficult at that season.

Post Office and Businesses
Davis Nelson, postmaster and liquor saloon
Emerson William, butcher
Fillman John L, blacksmith
Young H D, lumber manufacturer

source: “Pacific Coast Business Directory for 1876-78,” Compiled By Henry G. Langley, Editor of the California State Register, Pacific Coast Almanac, San Francisco, 1875. Gazetteer and Business Directory of Idaho Territory American History & Genealogy Project Idaho
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Appendix 3: Towns and Mining Camps

The following is a partial list of towns and mining camps in and near the Boise National Forest during the mining boom or before 1900.

Some were post offices for a time, and some still exist.

ATLANTA CITY

Middle Fork of the Boise River. Post office 1867. Name changed to Atlanta in 1870.

CHINA BASIN

North side of the Boise River in the Atlanta area. A camp of Chinese placer miners.

YUBA CITY

On old road from Rocky Bar to Atlanta in 1860’s.

excerpted from: pages 144-146, History of the Boise National Forest 1905-1976, By Elizabeth M. Smith
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Atlanta, Idaho

Atlanta is an unincorporated community in Elmore County, Idaho, United States.

It was founded in 1864 during the Civil War as a gold and silver mining community and named by Southerners after a rumored Confederate victory over General Sherman in the Battle of Atlanta, which turned to be wholly false, but the name stuck. Mining activity near Atlanta preceded its establishment as a mining community. The John Stanley party discovered gold on the nearby Yuba River on July 20, 1864, just two days prior to the battle back in Georgia. That November, John Simmons made the discovery of the Atlanta lode which contained both gold and silver.

Atlanta is at an elevation of 5,383 feet (1,641 m) above sea level surrounded by the Boise National Forest, located near the headwaters of the Middle Fork of the Boise River, approximately 2 miles (3 km) east of the mouth of the Yuba River. The Sawtooth Mountains are directly north, the Sawtooth Wilderness starts about a mile (1.6 km) north of Atlanta, at the base of Greylock Mountain, which summits at 9,363 feet (2,854 m).

Idaho City is approximately 35 miles (56 km) due west, as the crow flies. Galena Summit on State Highway 75 is about 25 air miles (40 km) to the east-northeast.

Atlanta is about 40 miles (64 km) from two paved highways. It is east of State Highway 21, accessed on unimproved U.S. Forest Service roads. Atlanta is north of U.S. Highway 20, which is accessed from Atlanta by heading south on USFS roads through Rocky Bar, Featherville, and Pine. The junction with US-20 is just east of the Anderson Ranch Reservoir on the South Fork of the Boise River Atlanta can also be accessed by following the unimproved road from Arrowrock Dam which climbs with the Middle Fork of the Boise River.

Though founded as a mining community, and a number of private claims remain in the area, no significant commercial mining has occurred in the area for over 50 years, though more recently inquiries into opening a new plant have seen some headway. In place of mining, Atlanta has diversified into areas such as tourism, back-country activities, and preservation of the town’s lengthy historic legacy. In the summer months The Atlanta School offers arts and architecture workshops and artist residencies.

The Atlanta Historic District, a 10-acre historic district including 12 contributing buildings was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1978.

Gold mining history

Gold was discovered in 1863, and placer mining started along the Yuba River in 1864. The Atlanta Lode quartz outcrop was discovered in Nov. 1864. Discovery of the Minerva, Tahoma, Last Chance, and Big lodes, with the development of the Buffalo, Monarch, General Pettit and other mines, soon followed. The Monarch Gold and Silver Mining Co. operated from 1866 until 1869.

Arastras initially processed the gold ore, neglecting the silver, as did the early stamp mills. Even the introduction of the Washoe process in 1969 at the Monarch, only resulted in the recovery of 20%.

Lantis & Company took over the Monarch property in 1874. The Buffalo mill achieved 55% recovery in 1877. This led to a building boom, as the Buffalo mill and the Monarch employed 60 employees in total, the Atlanta community grew to 500, and a road was constructed to Rocky Bar.

Yet, by 1884, most high-grade ore had been processed, and by 1885, Lantis & Company had sunk the Monarch mine shaft to a depth of 600 feet. The Atlanta Mines Co. purchased the Monarch Mine in 1902, followed by the Buffalo and Last Chance mines. The company built a 150-ton mill connected to the mine via an aerial tramway, and powered by a hydroelectric plant west of Atlanta.

In 1932, the Saint Joseph Lead Company improved the recovery process by introducing an amalgamation-flotation concentrator, ushering in an era of modern production.

The Middle Fork road connected Boise with Atlanta in 1938. Talache Mines, Inc., acquired all of the mining operations along the Atlanta Lode in 1939. Mining operations ceased in 1953. The Atlanta Gold Corporation of America acquired the lease in 1985.

source: Wikipedia
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Location of Atlanta, the Atlanta Lode, and Monarch Mine (left). Atlanta Lode cross section with mine shafts (right).

Atlanta_Lode_location-a
(click image for larger source image)
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Atlanta, Idaho

by Bob Hartman

Named after the ledge found in 1864 by a group of prospectors who were southern sympathizers, Atlanta is about 35 miles east, as the crow flies, from Idaho City. It is close to 60 miles by the present day roads.

The Monarch was discovered in the summer of 1864, and the first quartz claim developed in the district, and was probably the best on the vein. It consisted of 1,600 feet along the vein, and was owned by the Monarch Mining Company, of Indianapolis, Indiana. At the point of discovery a veritable treasure of ruby silver was found, which, in the space of 20×50 feet, yielded $200,000.

From W. W. Elliott’s – History of Idaho Territory (1884):

“Gulch mining in Quartz Gulch (Atlanta) has been carried on successfully ever since 1864. In this way the Atlanta vein was found, $100 having been taken from a single pan of its decomposed croppings, and the miners naturally soon reaching the solid ledge itself.”Oliver’s Summit” near Atlanta, has paid $80.00 to the man, and is being mined every summer. Quartz Creek claims have yielded $100 per day to the man. In July, 1881, a $40-nugget was found.

A number of mines are located on this ledge. The largest, perhaps, is the Atlanta. It has large hoisting and pumping works, a shaft 400 feet deep, a mile or more of drifts and tunnels, two mills, and has taken out more than $1,500,000 in gold and silver ore of a high grade.”

link to FB post:
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Atlanta Photos

from Bob Hartman’s collection

1908

1909


Jan. 17, 1909


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Atlanta District

The Atlanta district, which includes Hardscrabble Mine, Middle Boise Mine and Yuba Mine, produced around 385,000 ounces of gold. The area creeks all contain placer. There are numerous old mines that produced lode gold. The Atlanta Hill Mine was the major producer in this district.

excerpted from: Idaho AHGP Elmore County (more info on Elmore Co. mines)
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Gold & Silver Mining in Atlanta, Idaho

Gold and silver mining in Atlanta, Idaho, dates back to 1863, when a team of prospective miners led by John Stanley discovered gold along Yuba River. Despite attempts to conceal this discovery, word got out and a small gold rush to the area happened in August of 1863 that failed to yield any significant discoveries. Some miners stayed in the area, and continued exploring the placer deposits around the area.

In 1864, there was a second gold rush that was much more substantial than the first. Most of the mining activity extended from the Yuba River downstream along the Middle Fork of the Boise River. Additional discoveries were soon made to the south at Rocky Bar on Bear Creek and within the Feather River drainage.

This was during the height of activity taking place to the west in the Boise Basin, and thousands of men were exploring the rugged mountains in this area in search of new gold deposits.

The discovery of the Atlanta lode in 1864 established this area as rich in mineral wealth.

Until 1867, placer mining was the primary mining methods used along the Yuba and Boise River. This was attributed to extreme remoteness of the mining district and difficulties in bringing milling facilities to the district.

The remote location of the lode was a challenge. Refractory ores also stalled production of gold. When stamp milling began in 1867 the production really began.

In 1868, investors from all round the world started flocking to Atlanta. First on the scene were British investors. They were followed by Monarch, a company owned by investors from Indiana.

It was primarily gold that was being mined at Atlanta. Improvements to save silver by both investors proved unsuccessful. There was little that could be done, and the failure of stamp milling didn’t help matters.

The Atlanta silver was refractory to a point where attempts to recover gold were uneconomical. As a result, all the mills ground to a halt by the end of 1869.

Failure in major attempts to extract minerals at the Atlanta Lode didn’t deter other investors. The ore was rich enough to attract many other large mining companies.

Monarch was the most profitable company operating in Atlanta operating at the head of Quartz Gulch. While there were other promising producers, the owners held on to them in the hopes of finding a solution to the recovery problem. Other mines around Atlanta include the Minerva and Tolache Mines.

What Atlanta needed was improved transportation and infrastructure to increase mining activities. This, however, was nearly impossible without more capital investment. In 1874, investors from Buffalo acquired a discovery lode that was an extension of the Atlanta Lode. The new discovery was later named Buffalo in 1874.

Mining activity didn’t start on the extension lode until 1877 after a ten stamp mill was shipped to the area in 1876. This marked the beginning of a booming industry in Atlanta without most of the challenges faced before.

This is despite of the fact that only high grade ore milling had good returns. Between 1877 and 1884, gold production was at its peak. At one time, the Buffalo mill produced $14 million in gold.

Atlanta eventually began being plagued by economic collapse when creditors began suing one another. With the richest ores becoming worked out and the economic boom coming to an end, mining activity in the camp stalled until the early 1900’s.

Major improvements, such as the set-up of an amalgamation-floatation concentrator in 1932 and the construction of a road that ran from Boise to Atlanta in 1936 marked the beginning of modern mining in Atlanta, The problem of refractory ore was finally solved and the area could be assessed without much difficulty.

Today, there is still a decent amount of mining activity in Atlanta and there are still many private mineral claims in the area, major mining activity. Some prospective companies have taken a renewed interest in Atlanta, using modern techniques to rework tailings from past mining operations. They are in the process of acquiring permits to revive mining.

Atlanta gets a fair amount of tourism in the summers, due to its relatively close proximity to Boise. It can be accessed by a long drive up the Middle Fork of the Boise River starting at Lucky Peak Reservoir, but it is much easier to access it from the south side from the Anderson Ranch road up through Pine and Featherville.

source: Gold Rush Nuggets
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Atlanta (Gold)

A party of prospectors led by John Stanley left Warren’s, July 4, 1863, and tried Bear Valley and Stanley Basin before crossing to the middle fork of the Boise River where they struck gold on Yuba River. Although an effort to conceal this discovery succeeded at least partially, a rush from Idaho City after August 8 attracted a host of eager prospectors who failed to find anything valuable there. Not until well after a Yuba mining district was organized, July 20, 1864, did a second rush follow from Rocky Bar to Yuba River, September 19. Only two months remained in the season, but the Atlanta lode was found that winter.

Stamp milling, however, did not get started until the summer of 1867, because of the extreme difficulty in getting machinery into the district. Refractory ores posed a problem also, and although the lode was known to be rich, production was limited for some years to arastra and occasional small-scale stamp milling.

London investors introduced important capital to the district in 1868, and British investment in Atlanta continued for more than twenty years in spite of repeated failure in management and technology. Indiana capitalists also organized the Monarch in 1869, but all three stamp mills at Atlanta failed that year. Finally in 1877, the Buffalo mill began to operate with partial success.

Construction of a road from Rocky Bar helped in 1878, and much of the richer ore in Atlanta was worked in the nineteenth century. A cyanide plant operated with limited success, 1908 to 1910, but the recovery problem for much of the ore was not licked until a modern amalgamation-flotation concentrator began production in 1932.

Atlanta produced through the depression and the war, continuing uninterrupted until 1954. About $300,000 in antimony from Swanholm Creek was processed in Atlanta from 1947 to 1953.

The district probably should be credited with a production of about $16,000,000 in the ninety years after 1864.

excerpted from: “Mining in Idaho 1860-1969” by Ernest Oberbillig, Idaho State Historical Society Number 9 1985
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Overlook Mine, Atlanta, Idaho

OverlookMineFritz-a

From the Mike Fritz Collection Heather Heber Callahan
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Atlanta Pioneer Cemetery

Atlanta, Elmore County

Bostwickatlantacemetery-a
(click image to go to larger source image)
Pictured above: Gravesite of Riley Bostwick.

A total of 116 graves have been documented on this small rise southwest of town. The first grave is dated 1870 and the most recent 1985, but the yard reflects the heaviest years of mining activity in the district, 1875-1885; 1902-1912; and 1931-1953. Many graves are enclosed in wooden picket fences, each with a unique design. The conservation of these fascinating fences and markers is a long difficult process because the original material is often lying on the ground. Workers have dissembled and cleaned the salvaged materials and, when necessary, milling replacements.

source:
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Atlanta Cemetery Memorials

at Find a Grave
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Newspaper clipping…

Atlanta Aug 17, 1889

The road leading from Rocky Bar to Atlanta is truly a hard one to travel. yet the splendid mountain scenery along the route should repay any one for the hardships endured. But if not, when the weary traveler’s eyes rest upon the beautiful little city nestled between high mountains on the banks of the Middle Boise river, and he partakes of the hospitality of a generous people, then indeed will he or she exclaim “I have no kick coming.”

We made a hasty visit to this noted mining camp last Saturday – too hasty to gain much news, but while there we were royally entertained by Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Casey in particular and the people generally.

We visited the Tahoma mill, and found that able superintendent, C. W. Miller, busily sampling ore from the various settlers, and carefully looking after the interests of his company in general. After spending a pleasant hour looking around this model mill – a model of perfection in its line – we then visited the great Tahoma mine, situated in a gulch about three-quarters of a mile above the town.

Through the courtesy of Colonel Miller and the guidance of himself and Wm. Davis, his mine foreman, we were enabled to see all the works of the Tahoma property – giving the third level the greatest attention, from the fact that the most stoping is going on from this level. On the third level, for a distance of over 500 feet at both east and west ends of the claim, a large vein of quartz averaging 25 feet in width has been uncovered leaving a space of 400 or 500 feet of virgin ground intervening. The ledge has been explored and worked in places from this point to the surface, and on each level an equal width and abundance of good ore is in sight.

The lower tunnel, on the fourth level, is 800 feet in length, and at its face is 400 feet from the surface. This tunnel follows the ledge its entire length, and the vein all along maintains its width and value in silver. Upraises have been run to the third level, and consequently connection is had from the lowest level to the surface.

Col. Miller has established beyond a doubt that he could, with but few men, keep 100 – yes, 200 stamps constantly dropping on rich ore from this mine for the next ten years.

The ledge stands almost perpendicular, and is easily and securely timbered. Everything in and about the mine and mill denotes systematic management. They have a blacksmith shop and storehouse at the mouth of the tunnel, and a good boarding and lodging house near by. Before leaving the mine the Bulletin man secured some specimens that plainly show native silver, and which will be placed in his cabinet of minerals.

We took a hasty run through Judge Heath’s Washington claim and found it all that it had been represented – a large, well defined ledge with a 3-foot vein that is rich in gold. The Judge informed us he had had many assays made and not one went less than $200 in gold per ton. One mile above the Washington he has two other locations, called the Golden Nugget and Silver Wave – both rich in gold. We hope Judge Heath’s dreams of opulence may soon be fully realized.

Rudolph Behren is managing things at the Buffalo splendidly. About eight men are extracting ore from the mine, and as soon as the mill receives its new vanners Rudolph will show the outside world what he can do with Buffalo ore.

We regret very much that our stay at Atlanta could not be prolonged. It would require a week’s time to properly examine and report upon her wonderfully rich mining properties.

Suffice it to say that the old camp is moving upward again, and if we do not mistake the signs of the times Atlanta will be booming ere another six months have passed.

from page 3 Elmore Bulletin in Rocky Bar, Idaho on Aug 17, 1889
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link to Alturas County, Idaho
Link to Annie “Peg Leg” McIntyre Morrow (part 1)
Link to Annie “Peg Leg” McIntyre Morrow (part 2)
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page updated Oct 27, 2019

Updated Road Report October 20, 2019

Update: More snow come down in the high country than estimated. See below for photo of 14″ of snow at Landmark.
No current reports, snowed Saturday. Conditions change very quickly this time of year. High elevation roads may have several inches of snow. Be prepared for snow/ice, rocks and trees in the road and remember there is no cell phone service. Please share road reports.

Yellow Pine: We received 2″ of snow in the last 24 hours, local streets have some snow that is starting to melt. Please respect your neighbors and wildlife – slow down!
link: Local Forecast.
Yellow Pine Webcam: (check date on image)

Warm Lake Highway: Probably snow cover at the summit. No recent report.

Highway 55 Webcams Link:

South Fork Road: Open, no current report, snow in upper elevations.
Mail truck driver reports good travel before the storm, no trees or rocks down.
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: No current report, probably a little snow on this end.
Wednesday (Oct 16) the road is still in good shape.

Johnson Creek Road: Report Sunday (Oct 20) afternoon of 14″ to 2 feet of snow at Landmark.
20191020LandmarkSnow-a
link: Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam
link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Open? No current report. Probably a lot of snow up high.
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Open? No current report. New estimate of 1-2 feet at  Profile Gap.
The culvert replacement project near the turn off has been completed.
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcam: (check date on image)

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open, no current report. Probably half a foot or more snow on the road.
From Midas Gold Sept 30: [A drilling] program is expected to take 3 weeks and will result in a small increase in traffic to and from Stibnite, starting on October 2nd, to bring the necessary equipment to and from site.
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Open?? No current report on road conditions. Probably over 2 feet at the summit.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Open?? Probably a couple of feet of snow by now.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Warren Wagon Road: West of Payette Lake road is closed for construction Monday-Friday from 8am to noon and from 1pm to 5pm. Possibly thru Nov 1st.
Link to more info:

Secesh: No current report.

Deadwood Summit: Open, no current report. Probably at least a foot of new snow by now.
Old report Aug 11: from Landmark to Deadwood really good until the last 10 miles to the lake.
Note: The approx elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
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Weather Reports Oct 13-19, 2019

Oct 13 Weather:

At 930am it was 26 degrees and mostly cloudy. High thin haze at noon. At 315pm it was 61 degrees, overcast with thin haze, very light breezes. At 715pm it was 47 degrees and mostly cloudy. At 11pm partly cloudy, beautiful full moon. At 2am it appeared cloudy.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time October 14, 2019 at 09:30AM
Partly cloudy
Max temperature 64 degrees F
Min temperature 26 degrees F
At observation 27 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
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Oct 14 Weather:

At 930am it was 27 degrees and a few small clouds and haze. Mostly clear and noon. At 430pm it was 60 degrees and partly hazy to the south west. At 7pm it was 46 degrees, partly cloudy (high and thin) and almost calm. Bright moon at 11pm with a rainbow ring around it. Lots of stars at 2am.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time October 15, 2019 at 09:30AM
Mostly clear
Max temperature 62 degrees F
Min temperature 25 degrees F
At observation 26 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
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Oct 15 Weather:

At 930am it was 26 degrees, light frost and mostly clear. Sunny and mild at noon. At 3pm it was 69 degrees and partly clear, light breeze. At 5pm it was 63 degrees, mostly cloudy and light breeze. At 7pm it was 51 degrees. At 11pm fuzzy looking moon – hazy. At 2am partly clear.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time October 16, 2019 at 09:30AM
Mostly clear
Max temperature 70 degrees F
Min temperature 26 degrees F <- yesterday morning
At observation 30 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
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Oct 16 Weather:

At 930am it was 30 degrees and mostly clear. At noon it was 60 degrees, a few small clouds and light breezes. Getting rather breezy by 120pm and mostly cloudy. At 4pm it was 68 degrees, mostly cloudy and rather breezy. At 7pm it was 53 degrees, still a little breezy and flat sky (got the impression it was mostly clear and/or thin haze.) At 11pm bright fuzzy moon up shining thru haze. At 2am partly clear, a few stars.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time October 17, 2019 at 09:30AM
No frost, dark overcast and gusty breezes
Max temperature 71 degrees F
Min temperature 30 degrees F <- yesterday morning
At observation 49 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
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Oct 17 Weather:

At 930am it was 49 degrees, no frost, dark overcast and gusty breezes. Temp rose to 50F before falling with the rain. Starting to sprinkle at 1234pm, overcast and breezy, didn’t last long but enough to make things damp. Sprinkling again at 150pm. At 320pm it was 43 degrees, still sprinkling lightly and dark overcast. Quit raining before 530pm (may have quit before 5pm?) At 645pm it was 37 degrees, breaks in the cloud cover and nearly calm. Snow on top of VanMeter. Partly clear at 11pm (fat waning moon peeking between clouds.) Looked cloudy at 2am.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time October 18, 2019 at 09:30AM
Broken cloud cover
Max temperature 50 degrees F
Min temperature 32 degrees F
At observation 36 degrees F
Precipitation 0.13 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
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Oct 18 Weather:

At 930am it was 36 degrees and broken cloud cover. A few drops fell around 945am. Bigger breaks in the clouds and a bit of sunshine by 1120am. Broken dark clouds, bits of sunshine, breezy and snowing at 109pm. Not snowing at 130pm. Low clouds, breezy and light sprinkles of rain started around 330pm and lasted 10-15 minutes. At 4pm it was 39 degrees, broken cloud cover and light breezes. At 715pm it was 36 degrees and mostly cloudy. Bright moon at 11pm, partly clear. Started snowing before 9am.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time October 19, 2019 at 09:30AM
Low overcast – socked in, breezy, snowing and sticking
Max temperature 46 degrees F
Min temperature 25 degrees F
At observation 34 degrees F
Precipitation 0.01 inch
Snowfall Trace
Snow depth Trace
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Oct 19 Weather:

At 930am it was 34 degrees, low overcast – socked in almost to valley floor, breezy, snowing and sticking. About 1/4″ by 11am, then changing over to rain/snow mix and melting a little. Back to all snow (big flakes) by 1130am and breezy. Steady snow at 12pm, gusty breezes, low clouds. At 1225pm clouds lifting a little, light snow falling. Done snowing around 1pm, higher clouds (can see the top of Golden Gate.) At 230pm it was 36 degrees, measured 1/2″ snow, low clouds again, spitting half melted snow drops on and off 245pm. At 355pm it was 35 degrees, low clouds and light snowfall for about 15 minutes. At 630pm it was 34 degrees, misting lightly, fairly calm and socked in to the North (VanMeter.) At 8pm it was snowing lightly, almost calm. Still snowing at 11pm and sticking. Still snowing at midnight, looks like 1″ new since dark. Not snowing at 230am.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time October 20, 2019 at 09:30AM
Overcast w/breaks
Max temperature 36 degrees F
Min temperature 31 degrees F
At observation 32 degrees F
Precipitation 0.49 inch
Snowfall 2.5 inch
Snow depth 2 inch
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