Monthly Archives: November 2019

Road Reports Nov 27, 2019

Watch for a bad icy spot about halfway down the South Fork road, there has been 2 wrecks and several near misses.
Don’t let this happen to you!

photo courtesy Nancy Bellman – November 10th

Please share road reports. Conditions change very quickly this time of year. High elevation roads may have several inches of snow. Be prepared for snow/ice, rocks and trees in the road and remember there is no cell phone service.

Yellow Pine: A trace of snow fell in Yellow Pine on both Tuesday and Wednesday mornings. Currently local streets are mostly bare. Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN.
link: Local Forecast.
Yellow Pine Webcam: (check date on image)

Warm Lake Highway: Wednesday (Nov 27) mail truck driver (Ray) reports an inch of new snow at Big Creek summit.
link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′ (sort of working)

Highway 55 Webcams Link:

South Fork Road: No current report
Tuesday (Nov 19) lots of small rocks on the road this morning- east Fork and South Fork all can be negotiated so far.
Wed (Nov 13) A report that a truck and trailer slid off at the icy spot and was pulled out.
Tuesday (Nov 12) “South Fork is bare except for BAD ICE FLOW with deep rut about milepost 14. There will be black ice from Warm Lake road to milepost 7 at night and early morning.” – LI
Monday (Nov 11) report that a low clearance car might have trouble with that deep icy rut, about halfway out the South Fork road.
Sunday (Nov 10) a truck slid off the road into the river near MP 15, slow down and watch for ice.
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Last report Tuesday (Nov 19) Watch for rocks in the road, so far they are small and easy to get around, otherwise the road is still in good shape.

Johnson Creek Road: Still open but travel at your own risk.
Wednesday (Nov 27) mail truck driver (Ray) said there about an inch of new snow at Landmark.
Reports that the road has pot holes between YP and the dump.
link: Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam
link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
Note: The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Open? No current report. Probably some snow up high. Travel at your own risk.
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Travel at your own risk. Probably ruts beat thru at the top.
Last report Saturday (Oct 26) going in with high clearance 4×4 required chains over the top, “was not easy”.
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcam: (check date on image)

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open.
Report from Stibnite Oct 29th: Following the end of the year grading, we’ve had a little rain & snow creating some muddy conditions. The temperatures are getting low enough to create a predominantly hard frozen running surface with patches of snow/ice in the shadows. Overall, the road is in pretty good conditions with the odd pothole here and there but should be traveled with caution.
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Probably closed by now at the summit? No current report on road conditions. Travel at your own risk.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Probably snowed closed by now. No current report. Travel at your own risk.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: Open? No current report. Probably some snow up high. Travel at your own risk.
Note: The approx elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′ (working sporadically)
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Winter Weather Advisory Nov 26, 11pm to Nov 27, 5pm

YP Weather forecast link:

Tonight A 30 percent chance of snow after 11pm. Cloudy, with a low around 20. East southeast wind 5 to 9 mph. New snow accumulation of less than a half inch possible.

Wednesday Snow. High near 32. East wind 7 to 9 mph. Chance of precipitation is 80%. New snow accumulation of less than a half inch possible.

Wednesday Night A 30 percent chance of snow showers before 11pm. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 14. East wind 3 to 6 mph. Little or no snow accumulation expected.

Thanksgiving Day A 40 percent chance of snow showers, mainly after 11am. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 32. East wind 3 to 5 mph. Little or no snow accumulation expected.

Thursday Night A 30 percent chance of snow showers. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 13. Little or no snow accumulation expected.

Winter Weather Advisory

URGENT - WINTER WEATHER MESSAGE
National Weather Service Boise ID
201 PM MST Tue Nov 26 2019

...HOLIDAY TRAVEL TO BE IMPACTED BY STRONG WINTER STORM TONIGHT
THROUGH WEDNESDAY...

.A powerful winter storm will impact Oregon and Idaho beginning
this evening. Conditions will deteriorate tonight as snowfall
intensifies, and impacts much of the area. Additionally, this
system will produce areas of strong winds, especially across
southwest Idaho. The combination of snow and wind will impact
travelers through Wednesday afternoon.

West Central Mountains-
201 PM MST Tue Nov 26 2019

...WINTER WEATHER ADVISORY IN EFFECT FROM 11 PM THIS EVENING TO
5 PM MST WEDNESDAY...

* WHAT...Snow expected. Total snow accumulations of 2 to 4 inches,
  except 4 to 10 inches over the mountains. Winds gusting 15 to 25
  mph with local blowing and drifting snow.

* WHERE...West Central Mountains zone.

* WHEN...From 11 PM this evening to 5 PM MST Wednesday.

* IMPACTS...Plan on slippery road conditions.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...

Slow down and use caution while traveling.

The latest road conditions can be obtained by calling 5 1 1.

Nov 24, 2019 The Yellow Pine Times

Nov 24, 2019 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Community Calendar:

Boil water order lifted Nov 22
May 15 – Nov 30 Firewood Season
Nov 25 – deadline to order 2020 YP calendar
Nov 28 – Thanksgiving potluck 2pm at the Tavern
Dec 25 – Christmas dinner at the Community Hall 2pm
(details below)
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Local Events:

Nov 28 – Yellow Pine Thanksgiving Dinner

Thursday, November 28, 2019 at 2pm Potluck at the Yellow Pine Tavern – Turkey and bread stuffing provided by the Tavern. Also prime rib, pumpkin pie, and deviled eggs promised
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Dec 25 – Christmas dinner at the Community Hall 2pm

Potluck with turkey provided. We may have a Bingo game afterward.
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Village News:

Boil Water Advisory Lifted Nov 22

Good news! We have received a noticed that the boil order has been lifted. (More info under YPWUA News below.)
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South Fork Ice Flow

Folks need to be aware of dangerous road conditions about half way out the South Fork. Water has been running down the middle of the road this fall, eroding the pavement and freezing into a thick layer of ice right up to the edge along the river side. Folks have said that low clearance cars may have trouble with the deep rut and ice.

There have been 2 slide-offs and a few near wrecks reported this month.

photo courtesy Nancy Bellman – November 10th

Kelly Collins posted on FB around 1130pm Nov 17th in response to the photo above: I [saw] this pickup when it was upside down in the river. There is a thick stretch of ice right there, it kinda sneaks up on you. I also pulled two guys from Washington with a Dodge 1-ton with a cargo trailer out from that same spot about 4 days ago.
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Valley County Road Meeting Notes

by Teri Norell

On Nov. 18 I attended the road workshop in Cascade offered by our County Commissioners.

Doug Miller (county clerk) opened the workshop by presenting information on present monies available and projected financial revenue and expenses.

In general the road department has @ $6 million dollars as to date and expenses $3-4 million per year for just basic maintenance. $4.2 million dollars have been appropriated for this year. A large portion of these expenses are for snow removal. Revenue for road maintenance is primarily obtained from user fees (gas tax and vehicle registration) which is @ $2 million/ year. There is potential revenue from federal SRS funds.These funds rely on Congressionally approval. Last years funds from SRS was $1.7 million. As of this year no SRS monies have been allotted. Senator Risch and Representative Crapo are hoping to introduce legislation to obtain these monies in the near future, but no promises. Obviously road maintenance expenditures are greater then income.

While there are funds to cover this years snow removal /road maintenance, following years would run into deficits.

Jeff McFadden presented information on all that is involved with maintaining road system in Valley County. There are approximately 731 miles of roads. These roads are classified as to their importance ie: bus route, main corridor etc. Priority for maintenance is related to that classification.

Following Jeff’s presentation, the workshop was open to questions and comments. The discussions centered around how to increase funding, what roads would be cut from snow removal when funds run low / out and how to improve public awareness on road concerns and up coming meetings etc.

Some of the ideas presented for funding: get recently failed road levy back on the ballot possibly as early as this coming May. This time doing a better job of informing the public as to its importance. At this time Valley county does not receive revenue for road maintenance from property taxes. Change the state gas tax calculation so as to be more favorable for those counties that have a road systems that encompass a large portion of public lands. Grants are another area of income discussed. It was mentioned that a part time grant writer had just been hired.

Ideas for improving Public knowledge of road concerns, meetings etc. include: A pamphlet having relevant county contact information will be coming out with upcoming property tax bills, Face Book site (to be set up as I understood) and county web site etc.
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Yellow Pine US Mail

The 3-day a week mail delivery started Nov 1st. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 55 cents Support our local post office and purchase your holiday stamps here.
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Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Report Saturday (Nov 23) the dump is very full. Others have reported the road is developing some pot holes to dodge.

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

Yellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is located approximately 3 miles south on Johnson Creek Road.

The TRANSFER STATION is for household trash and yard waste:
* Household trash must be put inside (and fit) the dumpster;
* Yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, et.) goes in the burn pile on the south end of the turn-around;
* Cardboard boxes should be flattened before putting the in the dumpster,

The DUMPSTERS are NOT for:
* Furniture (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station).

The BURN PILE is NOT for:
* Cardboard boxes (flatten and put in dumpster);
* Furniture and appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Drywall and building material (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wire or fencing (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Foam Rubber (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wood with metal (like nails) attached (take to Donnelly Transfer Station.)

When closing the DOORS on the front of the dumpsters:
* Make sure the “U” brackets at the top and bottom of the door are engaged;
* The retaining bar at the middle of the door is slid into the pipe;
* And the “L” bars at the bottom of the doors dropped into place.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: 208/634-7176
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Local Groups:

YPWUA News:

Boil Water Advisory Lifted November 22, 2019

With the sharp reduction in water demand due to the repair of the large pipeline leak and the successful cleaning of Filter #1, water production now exceeds demand. The flow restriction orifices are installed in each filter as is required, and both turbidity and chlorine residual values remain acceptable.

The combination of all of these factors has resulted in the restoration of sufficient treatment and as a result the Boil Advisory can now be lifted.

A few things to note:

1. As Boulder Creek water temperatures drop with winter conditions, chlorine dosing has to increase to maintain proper ratios. As usual, I will regularly provide a chlorine residual “target” value that corresponds with changes in water temperature. Maintaining the correct residual will be critical in order to avoid “Treatment Technique” violations with DEQ and the resulting required public notification.

2. Upon my last visit I observed the flow meter malfunctioning. It’s operation was intermittent and replacement of the meter should be considered.

3. A new Micro Switch for control of the chlorine dosing pump has been ordered and I plan to install it on the next regular visit.

4. Modification of the filter output piping and valving is planned for January. I will create and submit a drawing to DEQ for approval and once approved, the work can be completed. This modification will allow for “filter to waste” operation as is required after filter cleaning or maintenance. Currently no provision for filter to waste exists. Cost for fittings and valves is estimated at $350

5. Filter #2 should be cleaned and I’ve schedule that cleaning for mid January after filter to waste plumbing work is completed

6. Securement of the Boulder Creek “overflow culvert” needs to be completed. Please advise as to availability of the donated cable and clamps. Work needs to be completed before winter conditions set in so that the culvert is in place and secure for spring runoff.
– Warren Drake

The 2019 Yellow Pine Water Users Shareholders meeting was Sunday July 7th in the Community Hall.
Link to: 20190707YPWUAminutes.rtf
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VYPA News:

Cemetery – Tim Rogers: Marge Fields is researching the history of the log cabin now located at the cemetery, but formerly was in the center of the Yellow Pine village. A plaque will be placed at the cabin. The previous information sign showing names and locations of deceased buried in the cemetery will be repaired this winter and placed next year.

Road & Ditch Committee has been created. Clayton Egbert, Chairman. Tim Rogers and Tom Lanham have volunteered. This group and will need more volunteers.

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting Minutes for September 21, 2019
link to: 20190921 Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting
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YPFD News:

YP Fire Commissioners:
Sue Holloway – District 1
Dan Stiff – District 2
Merrill Saleen – District 3
Fire Chief – Jeff Forster

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice

The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.”

link to: 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation

Stop the Bleed Class: We will do another class this spring/summer [2020] depending on interest.

Training update 11/18: Training will resume in the spring.

-Fire Chief Jeff
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Biz Listings:

Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377

Closed for Winter.
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The Corner (208) 633-3325

The Corner is closed for the winter, opening again next spring. I can be reached at matt @ ypcorner.com or at 970-379-5155. Thanks, have a great winter!
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Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233

Fall hours open 8am to close
Full breakfast served starting at 8am with special arrangement for earlier breakfast as needed. 92 Octane non ethanol gas available, cubed ice, beer, pop and water sold by the 6 and 12 pack, snacks, ice cream and many supplies available. Burgers and Pizza, Beer and Wine on the evening menu. Football and other sports available on our TV. Wi Fi, Verizon phone service and information available.
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Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Tom & Sarah Lanham
156 Yellow Pine Ave, Yellow Pine Id 83677
website:
Facebook:
It’s official starting June 2020 We will be doing trail rides out of Yellow Pine along with summer pack / camping trips to high mountain lakes in the area!

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
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Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430
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Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

The Star-News

subscribe:
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine

Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, will service Yellow Pine

B&T Safety Solutions LLC
208-271-1600 Based out of Donnelly
Snow removal, cleaning chimneys and stoves, we do cabin staining/chinking as well
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (Nov 18) overnight low of 27 degrees, mostly cloudy sky and light breeze this morning. First measurable precipitation in November on Sunday = 0.02″. Jays, nuthatches and nutcracker visiting, chickadee calling from the trees. Overcast by lunch time, light breezes. Not many birds around today. Thicker clouds, mild and light breezes mid-afternoon, high of 51 degrees. Golfers out enjoying a nice day at the Yellow Pine Country Club. Overcast at dusk and calmer. A few stars out before midnight. Rain shower before 5am, more rain before 9am.

Tuesday (Nov 19) probably didn’t get below freezing last night, low dark clouds and steady rain this morning. A few jays and nuthatches visiting. Rain/snow mix, then back to rain at lunch time, stopped before 1pm then breaks in the clouds letting in a little sunshine. Partly clear/cloudy mid-afternoon, cool and a light chilly breeze, high of 43 degrees. Patches of new snow on the very top of Golden Gate, low cloud on VanMeter Hill hiding new snow up there. Almost full dark by 530pm now, looked partly clear. A few stars out before midnight.

Wednesday (Nov 20) overnight low of 27 degrees, mostly cloudy sky and bit of sunshine, light breeze and wet with dew and melting frost after sunrise. Jays and red-breasted nuthatches visiting. Almost overcast at lunch time, thicker darker clouds and rather chilly. Mail truck was nearly on time. Gusty breezes kicking up early afternoon. Partly clear to partly cloudy mid-afternoon, gusty chilly breezes, high of 45 degrees. Breezy at dusk and flat sky. High haze and a few stars out before midnight.

Thursday (Nov 21) overnight low of 16 degrees, almost clear sky this morning – a few little wispies and frosty. In addition to the jays and nuthatches a female cassins finch visited at lunch time. Strong sunshine at noon, but chilly. Clark’s nutcracker joined the jays and nuthatches at the feeders along with a resident pine squirrel. Partly cloudy (high wispies) and chilly breeze mid-afternoon, there is still frost on the ground in the shade, high of 41 degrees. Looked like some high haze at dusk. Lots of stars out before midnight.

Friday (Nov 22) overnight low of 16 degrees, mostly clear sky this morning – a handful of ‘popcorn’ clouds in the sky, slight chilly breeze and frosty. The female cassins finch is back along with half a dozen red-breasted nuthatches, noisy jays and nutcrackers. Sunny, clear and chilly at lunch time. A lone chipmunk visited. Clear and slight chilly breeze mid-afternoon, high of 45 degrees, sun is down behind the ridge by 345pm. The western sky was blushing pink at dusk, otherwise clear and calm. Lots of stars out before midnight.

Saturday (Nov 23) overnight low of 16 degrees, overcast sky and frosty this morning. A female cassins finch is still here (should have gone south by now), nuthatches, jays and nutcracker also visiting. Clearing off and sunny by lunch time, but cool. Mostly clear mid-afternoon, just a tiny cold breeze, high of 47 degrees. The frost on the ground on the north side has not melted in the last few days, it has built up and now looks like snow. Looked mostly clear at dusk. Dropped below freezing after dark.

Sunday (Nov 24) overnight low was just under freezing, a bit of frost and snow pellets on the ground, overcast and a very light breeze this morning. Jays, red-breasted nuthatches and clark’s nutcrackers visiting. Cloudy and cool at lunch time. Quiet day so far. Cracks in the clouds and cold light breeze mid-afternoon, high of 42 degrees. A few starlings have invaded. Big patches of clear sky late afternoon. Partly cloudy just before dark.
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RIP:

Jerome “Jerry” Schwarzhoff

Schwarzhoff, Jerome “Jerry”, 103, of Boise, died on November 21, 2019. A memorial service will be held at 2 p.m. on Tuesday, November 26, 2019 at Wright Community Congregational Church, 4821 W Franklin Rd, Boise, ID 83705.

Published in Idaho Statesman on Nov. 23, 2019
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Idaho News:

Valley, public ponder how to plow

Levy defeat puts winter of 2020-21 in doubt

By Max Silverson for The Star-News Nov 21, 2019

Valley County commissioners and the public on Monday swapped ideas on future funding and projects like snow plowing for the winter of 2020-21 in light of the defeat of the recent roads levy.

Monday’s workshop focused on changes that would affect services next winter, as the budget for the coming winter is already set.

County residents should not see a significant reduction in services this winter, Superintendent Jeff McFadden said at the meeting held at the Valley County Courthouse in Cascade.

County voters on Nov. 5 failed to pass a property tax levy to fund county roads. The measure received 50.7% “yes” votes, but 66.7% was needed for passage.

Without the levy, the road department will have a deficit of about $4 million by 2023 if no other funding sources are found, Valley County Clerk Douglas Miller said.

The county looked at what roads could be cut from plow routes, which are classified as major and minor collectors, local roads and private roads, commission Chair Elt Hasbrouck said.

Private and local roads would be the last priority for plowing, Hasbrouck told about 60 people who attended the meeting.

“If we have to go a mile or a mile and a half to get to one residence versus a mile and a half to get to 20 residences then we’re going to have to prioritize which road we’re going to do, and I think that’s a pretty easy decision,” he said.

Roads serving year-round residents would be prioritized over second homes.

The county averages about 21 storms per year, with 10 days of snow cleanup needed on over 235 miles of road, McFadden said.

It costs about $1.58 per minute to operate a snowplow, and $2.25 per minute for a road grader. Every time it snows, eight to 18 pieces of equipment are out for up to 12 hours a day, McFadden said.

Straight stretches take less time and money to plow, where roads with intersections, curves and cul-de-sacs are more time consuming and expensive to plow, he said.

Not plowing seven roads would save about $20,000 per year, he said.

One member of the audience asked if a member of the public could plow a county road, to which McFadden said they could with an agreement with the county.

Other audience members said they were worried about emergency access to homes if they’re not plowed.

Others wanted to know how to alert second homeowners of the reduction in services and what happens if there is another month with heavy snowfall like this past February.

Hasbrouck said that there is no law requiring the county to plow any roads at all, but the county plows several roads specifically to maintain access for residents with medical needs.

Several funding sources were suggested by audience members, including toll booths, lobbying the state and federal legislatures for funding and using deferred property taxes.

Toll booths would need state approval and were unlikely, commissioners said.

The county cannot depend on state and federal funding, and deferred property taxes estimated at $1.1 million per year need to be saved for emergencies, they said.

“The past commissioners for the last hundred years have been running this road department without any property taxes and it’s finally come down to where we’re out of luck; now we’ve got to start paying our own bill,” Hasbrouck said.

Those attending and commissioners agreed the best way to move forward was to continue to educate the public on why a road tax is needed and try again to pass a similar levy.

Another road levy could be on the ballot in May 2020 or November 2020 but would require more effective public communication in order to pass, commissioners said.

source: © Copyright 2009-2018 Central Idaho Publishing Inc.
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Free Thanksgiving dinners set for McCall, Cascade, NM

The Star-News Nov 21, 2019

McCall
Quaker Hill Camp will host its 10th annual free community Thanksgiving Dinner with turkey and all the trimmings on Monday from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Reservations are helpful but are not required.

Cascade
The American Legion Auxiliary of Cascade will host its annual free Community Thanksgiving Dinner from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.

New Meadows
A free Thanksgiving dinner will begin at 1 p.m. Thanksgiving Day at New Meadows United Methodist Church Education Building located at 201 N. Heigho St. in New Meadows.

full story:

Note: Thanksgiving pot-luck in Yellow Pine will be at 2pm at the Yellow Pine Tavern.
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CPR, First Aid classes to be offered Dec. 3-4 in Donnelly

The Star-News Nov 21, 2019

CPR/AED and First Aid classes will be held at the Donnelly Fire Station on Tuesday and Wednesday, Dec. 3-4, at 6 p.m.

The CPR/AED portion will be Tuesday, Dec. 3, and the First Aid portion on Wednesday, Dec. 4.

Cost is $25, and space is limited. For more information or to register, call 208-325-8619.

The Donnelly Fire Station is located at 244 W. Roseberry Road.

source:
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Police in McCall seek public’s help finding graffiti vandal

Several incidents have been reported to police in the past two weeks.

KTVB November 19, 2019

McCall, Idaho — Someone has been defacing public property in McCall.

The McCall Police Department posted three photos of the damage on their Facebook page and put out a call for help in finding the responsible parties.

The photos show two utility boxes and a Big Payette Lake sign that have been tagged with graffiti.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Highway 55 back open after semi truck carrying logs overturns

The road reopened in both directions by 2:43pm Friday.

Nyla Gennaoui November 22, 2019 KTVB

Banks, Idaho — Highway 55 was blocked in both directions for several hours Friday after a semi-truck carrying logs overturned near a sharp bend in the road north of Horseshoe Bend.

The accident happened around 11:30am.

continued:
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Tips & Advice:

Reduce your risk of catching the cold and flu

Nov 20, 2019 KIVI Staff

Boise, Idaho — It’s official: cold and flu season is underway across the U.S. The CDC says flu season is getting an early start with 30 states already reporting cases.

Dr. Adam Saperston serves as Medical Director for Blue Cross of Idaho. He says there are ways to tell the difference between a cold and the flu. First, they’re caused by different viruses. Second, the flu makes people sicker through a higher fever, making someone feel more weak, and other symptoms. The flu can also continue to become worse, causing someone to develop pneumonia and can be fatal.

Dr. Saperston says the number one way to avoid catching the flu remains getting your flu vaccine.

continued:
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Scam Alert:

Police: Avoid scams, don’t take Facebook quizzes

Nov 18, 2019 By WTMJ Staff (KIVI TV)

Facebook quizzes help identity thieves learn personal information, increasing people’s risk of being scammed, according to Prevention.com.

Some quizzes ask questions that are similar to security questions when setting up an account, such as where you were born, the name of the street you lived on, your favorite pet and more. When you answer these questions on the quizzes, you could be giving scammers the answers to hack your accounts.

Additionally, some posts mean well, but prompt people to comment or post information. For example, the following post is likely intended to simply be a fun holiday game, but scammers can use the information you provide, combined with the information on your profile, to scam you.

continued: (h/t Valley County Sheriff’s office)
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Mining News:

Pressure cooker would squeeze gold, silver from Stibnite slurry

(Note: This is the fifth part in a series detailing Midas Gold Idaho’s operating plan for its proposed gold and antimony mine near Yellow Pine. Next week: Cyanide Leaching)

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News Nov 21, 2019

Particles of gold and silver would be freed from other minerals like tender meat falls off the bone of a pressure-cooked pot roast, according to Midas Gold’s operating plan for the Stibnite Gold Project.

A massive pressure cooker for minerals, called an autoclave would be used to speed up the natural process of oxidation, or the weathering of rocks due to water, oxygen and pressure.

Most of the gold and silver at Stibnite is contained within the crystal structure of other minerals like pyrite.

Freeing the gold would require applying extreme pressure and heat to about 3,000 tons of ore per day in the autoclave, which would be about 16 feet wide and as long as a basketball court.

A slurry of gold and silver-bearing minerals generated during the flotation process would be pumped into the autoclave, where a chemical reaction would be induced by adding liquid oxygen into the chamber. The chemical reaction would result in the slurry being heated to about 430 degrees Fahrenheit and subjected to pressure equivalent to that of being about 1,000 feet beneath the ocean’s surface.

The force of water, pressure and heat bearing down on the slurry would cause gold-bearing pyrite minerals to break down and free gold in individual particles.

After an hour in the autoclave, a slurry of individual particles of gold, silver and pyrite would be cooled and neutralized using lime and ground limestone.

This process, called pressure oxidation, is the most commonly used modern method for freeing gold and silver from within ore, according to Midas Gold’s operating plan.

Pressure oxidation can take hundreds or even thousands of years in nature because without extreme forces, gold particles remain locked within other minerals until the surrounding material is slowly eroded away.

The autoclave would be housed in a steel building capable of containing 10% more than the capacity of the autoclave in case of a spill. The outer shell of the autoclave would be made from steel and lined with at least two layers of brick to help it withstand the extreme heat.

Bricks would be inspected and replaced as needed annually, according to Midas Gold. Building the oxidation circuit would cost Midas Gold about $70 million

source: © Copyright 2009-2018 Central Idaho Publishing Inc.
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Sho-Ban Tribes win FMC lawsuit

November 18, 2019 Local News 8

The 9th Circuit Court of Appeals has affirmed a district court judgment which affirmed a Shoshone Bannock Tribal Court of Appeals decision regarding a long-running dispute with the FMC Corporation.

In it, the court ruled FMC must pay an annual use permit fee for storage of hazardous waste on fee lands within the Shoshone Bannock Fort Hall Reservation. The requirement was laid out in a consent decree settling a prior suit brought against FMC by the Environmental Protection Agency.

The Circuit Court concluded the FMC’s storage of millions of tons of hazardous waste on the Reservation “threatens or has some direct effect on the political integrity, economic security, or the ‘health and welfare’ of the Tribes..”

continued:
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Public Lands:

USDA Forest Service Taylor Outfitting LLC. DBA McCall Angler Special Use Permit Reissuance Update

November 21, 2019

The Forest Service is seeking scoping comments for the proposed renewal of the special use authorization for Taylor Outfitting on the McCall and New Meadows Ranger Districts of the Payette National Forest. The enclosed scoping document provides more detailed information about the project. The scoping document is also available on the project’s webpage at (link)

The Forest Service is contacting interested individuals, groups, and agencies to make them aware of the project and to gather pertinent feedback. To be most helpful, please submit your scoping comments by December 19, 2019, and make your comments as specific as possible.

The project webpage provides you tools to engage this process as you wish. From “Get Connected” on the right hand side of the page, click on “Subscribe to Email Updates” if you wish to receive electronic communication about this project. Use the “Comment/Object on Project” link to access a simple webform to submit your comments on this project. The “Public Comment/Objection Reading Room” are the published comments received on this project.

Webform submission is preferred but written comments concerning this project will be accepted by mailing to the McCall Ranger District 102 West Lake Street McCall, ID 83638. Hand delivered comment letters may be delivered during regular business hours of 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday-Friday, excluding holidays. Electronic comments may be submitted electronically through the project web page listed above.

Comments received in response to this request will be available for public inspection and will be released in their entirety if requested pursuant to the Freedom of Information Act. Comments received in response to this request will also be available for public inspection on the “Public Comment Reading Room” on the project webpage.

For further information on this project, please contact acting Recreation Program Manager (detail), Emily Simpson at 208-634-0415, or emily.simpson@usda.gov

Sincerely,
Ann Hadlow
Acting McCall District Ranger
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Forest Supervisor signs decision memo for the Little Red Goose Forest Resilience Project on the Payette National Forest

McCall, Id., November 19, 2019 Payette National Forest

Tawnya Brummett, the Acting Forest Supervisor for the Payette National Forest, signed the decision memo today for the Little Red Goose Forest Resilience Project on the New Meadows Ranger District.

This project area is roughly 8,800 acres in the Little Salmon River subbasin in Upper Goose Creek, Sixmile Creek, and Lower Goose Creek between McCall and New Meadows, and is visible from Highway 55, Highway 95 and Brundage Ski Resort. The area has been heavily impacted by Douglas fir tussock moth as evidenced by the large areas of red needled trees this summer and fall.

According to a recent USDA Forest Health and Protection report, this area is also being impacted by the western spruce budworm, Balsam woolly adelgid, mistletoe, and root and butt rots which is compounding the effect on trees in the area.


Dwarf Mistletoe – William Jacobi, Colorado State University


Western spruce budworm larva – USDA Forest Service

This decision authorizes treatments on up to 3,000 acres identified within the larger 8,800-acre area, and includes commercial thinning, non-commercial thinning, commercial firewood removal, slash treatments (lop and scatter or pile burning), and broadcast prescribed burning. Hazard tree removal in Last Chance Campground as well as commercial treatments west of FSR 453 could begin as early as January 2020.

“[Little Red Goose] is an excellent example of how we can quickly respond to our changing forest conditions, and the importance of engaging with our communities and local officials to address insect and disease issues that have the potential to affect a much larger area,” says Brummett in her decision. “Much like wildfire, insects and disease do not recognize jurisdictional boundaries, and managing the National Forest to increase its resiliency to such disturbances is critical to being good stewards of the land and responsible neighbors.”

The project is categorically excluded from documentation in an EA or EIS because it fits within the Insect and Disease Infestation category authorized by the Healthy Forest Restoration Act, specifically section 603 (16 U.S.C6591b)(FSH1909.15, 32.3(3)). This project adheres to the specifications of that authority.

More information about the project can be found on the Little Red Goose project webpage at: (link) or you can contact Erin Phelps, New Meadows District Ranger at 208-347-0301.
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Lawsuit filed to stop big US Forest Service project in Idaho

Nov 20, 2019 Associated Press

Boise, Idaho — The U.S. Forest Service is ignoring a 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruling by restarting a giant forest project in Idaho, say environmental groups that have filed another lawsuit seeking to stop the project a second time.

The Alliance for the Wild Rockies and the other groups filed the lawsuit Monday in U.S. District Court in Idaho challenging the 125-square-mile (325-square-kilometer) project on the Payette National Forest.

The Forest Service and environmental groups agree the Lost Creek-Boulder Creek Landscape Restoration Project that includes logging, habitat restoration and recreational improvements is precisely the same as the one halted by the 9th Circuit Court’s ruling against the Forest Service in August 2018.

continued:
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Forest Service to review water diversions in Sawtooth Valley

by Associated Press Saturday, November 23rd 2019

Boise, Idaho (AP) — The U.S. Forest Service has agreed to complete environmental reviews of 20 water diversions in central Idaho that a conservation group says could be harming imperiled salmon.

A U.S. District Court judge on Thursday signed off on the agreement between the Forest Service and Idaho Conservation League involving the water diversions in the Sawtooth Valley.

continued:
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BLM to conduct fall, winter timber pile burning

Date: November 20, 2019
Contact: (Jared Jablonski) (jjablonski@blm.gov) (208-384-3210)

Boise, Idaho – The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Boise District will conduct three prescribed timber pile burns on projects within Boise, Valley and Adams Counties between Nov. 27 and Feb. 1, depending on weather, fuel and ground conditions. The main objective of these burns is to reduce 245 acres of slash accumulated during past timber treatments, reducing hazardous fuels and the potential for harmful fire behavior.

K-Round Pile Burning – The K-Round Prescribed Pile Burn is located in Valley County, approximately 17 miles northeast of Banks. Prescribed fire managers will be targeting 21 machine piles located on 145 acres of BLM land.

Mile Marker 73 Pile Burning – The Mile Marker 73 Prescribed Pile Burn is located in Boise County, approximately 9 miles northeast of Horseshoe Bend. Prescribed fire managers will be targeting six machine piles located on 28 acres of BLM land.

Fort Hall Pile Burning –The Fort Hall Prescribed Pile Burn is located in Adams County, approximately 1.5 miles east of Fruitvale. Prescribed fire managers will be targeting 15 machine piles located on 72 acres of BLM land.

Fire managers will be waiting for adequate moisture levels in project areas before initiating ignition operations in order to ensure minimal fire spread outside of designated piles. Once initiated, prescribed burning operations are expected to last up to one week in each area. Personnel and equipment will be in the project areas for the duration of the burning operations. Smoke from the burns has the potential to be visible from long distances due to location, fuel type and burning conditions.

For more information, contact the Boise District Fire Information Line at (208) 384-3378.
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BLM to conduct prescribed burning in southwest Idaho

Date: November 20, 2019
Contact: (Jared Jablonski) (jjablonski@blm.gov) (208-384-3210)

Boise, Idaho – The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) will be conducting the Trout Springs Jackpot Prescribed Burn in Owyhee County between late November and January depending on weather, fuel and ground conditions. The Trout Springs Jackpot Prescribed Burn is located on Juniper Mountain, 36 miles southeast of Jordan Valley, Oregon. The planned prescribed fire will target 137 acres of downed juniper trees remaining from past cutting treatments.

The fire is part of a larger project intended to move pastures toward meeting rangeland health standards. Fire managers will be targeting weather and fuel conditions that minimize fire spread such as snow, high fuel moistures, and new grass growth. Containing the fire spread to individual tree debris zones reduces the risk of live vegetation mortality and allows for faster vegetation recovery.

Fire managers will perform ignitions over a multiday period, with subsequent mop-up and patrol of the prescribed fire occurring for several days. The public can expect to see smoke from the vicinity of Juniper Mountain during ignitions and for several days afterward.

This burn is a separate entry in the Trout Springs project and is adjacent to, not within, the 21-square-mile Trout Springs Prescribed Burn that took place in September 2019.

For more information, contact the BLM Boise District Fire Information Line at (208) 384-3378.
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Critter News:

Santa Paws to take photo with pets Dec. 7 at Barn Owl

The Star-News Nov 21, 2019

Santa Paws is coming to town to take pictures with local pets and their human friends on Saturday, Dec. 7, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Barn Owl Books and Gifts.

Pets must be secured in a carrier or on a leash. Furry friends may pose alone or with their family.

Cost is $5. Proceeds from the event will benefit the dogs and cats at MCPAWS Regional Animal Shelter.

For more information, call 208-634-3647. Barn Owl Books and Gifts is located at 616 N. Third St., Suite 110, in McCall.

source:
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Pet owners should be aware of traps and snares in Idaho

by CBS 2 News Staff Wednesday, November 20th 2019

Boise, Idaho (CBS 2) — Pet owners should be aware of traps and snares in Idaho.

Idaho Fish and Game says most fur trapping seasons are open during late fall and winter, but some go year-round.

Owners should be careful letting pets run off-leash and unsupervised. They run the risk of having their pet’s toes pinched or worse – trapped by snares intended for large wildlife.

Know that one trap usually means there are more in the area. If you find one trap, avoid the rest of the area.

continued:
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Forest Service opposes bear-baiting ban in Idaho, Wyoming

Keith Ridler Associated Press November 18, 2019

Boise, Idaho — Federal authorities say a lawsuit seeking to ban black bear hunting using bait in national forests in Idaho and Wyoming to protect grizzly bears should be dismissed.

The U.S. Forest Service and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in documents filed Friday say the decision to allow using bait to attract bears should continue to be made by the states in which the national forests are located.

Western Watersheds Project, WildEarth Guardians and Wilderness Watch filed the lawsuit in June, contending the federal agencies are violating environmental laws because black bear hunters using bait have killed at least eight threatened grizzly bears since 1995 in national forests.

continued:
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Another moose poached near Idaho City

The young bull was illegally killed and left to rot on the Cottonwood Creek/Thorn Creek divide.

KTVB November 19, 2019

Idaho City, Idaho — Idaho Department of Fish and Game officers are searching for answers after a bull moose was illegally killed and left to rot near Idaho City.

The remains of the young moose were found over the weekend on the Cottonwood Creek/Thorn Creek divide, although investigators believe it was shot sometime in early November.

The discovery marks the second moose poaching incident near Idaho City this month, and the eighth total in three years. The head of a young cow moose was found on Rocky Ridge Yurt Road earlier in November.

continued: [WARNING – sad photo]
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Study: Yellowstone bison mow, fertilize their own grass

“It’s almost like the bison become this giant fleet of lawnmowers moving back and forth across the landscape.”

Associated November 21, 2019

A study of grazing in Yellowstone National Park found that bison essentially mow and fertilize their own food, allowing them to graze in one area for two to three months during the spring and summer while other ungulates have to keep migrating to higher elevations to follow new plant growth.

Hundreds of bison grazing in an area stimulates the growth of nutritious grasses, in part because their waste acts as a fertilizer, according to research published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

continued:
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Boise Fire: Chicken coop fires rise with colder weather

by Haley Squiers Friday, November 22nd 2019

Boise, Idaho (CBS 2) — Just like house fires, Boise firefighters say they see an increase in chicken coop fires when it gets cold.

Backyard chicken owners want to keep their flock warm, but firefighters say that can be dangerous.

The issue is heat lamps falling where they’re not supposed to.

“It’s very easy for those heat lamps, they’re hot enough, they produce enough heat, that they could ignite that straw or hay and then burn down your chicken coop,” said Boise’s Deputy Chief Romeo Gervais.

continued:
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Over 150 waterfowl dumped and left to waste along Highway 46

by CBS 2 News Staff Tuesday, November 19th 2019

Boise, Idaho (CBS 2) — Over 150 geese and ducks were dumped Friday along Highway 46 north of Gooding and left to rot.

Idaho Fish and Game officers are seeking information on the dumping of 154 snow and Canada geese and mallard ducks along Highway 46 on Nov. 15. All of the birds were left to rot, with no attempt to remove any meat.

“The birds were dumped prior to November 15th. This is an egregious situation of wasting waterfowl,” said Trevor Meadows, conservation officer. “If anyone witnessed a vehicle in the pull-off just north of the Camas and Gooding county line, please let us know a description of the vehicle or the occupants.”

continued:
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Fish & Game News:

Traps, snares and pets can be a bad combination, and here’s how to avoid a problem

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Supervisor
Wednesday, November 20, 2019

Pet owners should know the basic functions of traps so they can release their pets if they’re caught

Pet owners are reminded fur trapping seasons are open during late fall and winter, and pets running off leash unsupervised could risk having their toes pinched – or worse – by traps and snares intended for wildlife.

While traps and snares are rarely encountered by bird hunters or hikers, pets can be attracted to them and become trapped, and people who allow their dogs to roam should be prepared to act quickly if it occurs.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Releasing your Dog from a Trap

link to video:
— — — — — — — — — —

New wild turkey hunts slated to begin in Southwest Idaho

By Evin Oneale, Regional Communications Manager
Thursday, November 21, 2019

December hunts are intended to relieve property owners from turkey damage

Four new wild turkey Landowner Permission hunts (LPH) are now on the books and slated to begin December 1 in areas with chronic turkey depredations. The hunts will give landowners, hunters and Fish and Game staff another tool to deal more effectively with private property damage caused by wild turkeys.

Approved by the Fish and Game Commission in August, these four new hunts are designed to alleviate depredation issues and increase social tolerance for wild turkey populations on private land.

continued:
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More F&G News Releases

link:
———————————-

Fun Critter Stuff:

Pardoning the Thanksgiving Turkey


President John F. Kennedy pardoned a turkey on November 19, 1963, stating “Let’s Keep him going.” John F. Kennedy Presidential Library/NARA

The official “pardoning” of White House turkeys is an interesting White House tradition that has captured the imagination of the public in recent years. It is often stated that to a turkey recorded in an 1865 dispatch by White House reporter Noah Brooks was the origin for the pardoning ceremony.

Reports of turkeys as gifts to American presidents can be traced to the 1870s, when began sending well fed birds to the White House. The First Families did not always feast upon Vose’s turkeys, but the yearly offering gained his farm widespread publicity and became a veritable institution at the White House. At Thanksgiving 1913, a turkey-come-lately from Kentucky shared a few minutes of fame with the fine-feathered Rhode Islander. Soon after, in December, Horace Vose died, thus ending an era.

By 1914, the opportunity to give a turkey to a President was open to everyone, and poultry gifts were frequently touched with patriotism, partisanship, and glee. In 1921, an American Legion post furnished bunting for the crate of a gobbler en route from Mississippi to Washington, while a Harding Girls Club in Chicago outfitted a turkey as a flying ace, complete with goggles. First Lady Grace Coolidge accepted a turkey from a Vermont Girl Scout in 1925. The turkey gifts had become established as a national symbol of good cheer.

continued:
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Seasonal Humor:

Thanksgiving Showdown – Farmer vs. Turkey


TurkeyStuffing-a
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Idaho History Nov 24, 2019

Back County Mail Carriers

Valley (formerly Idaho) County, Idaho

This post will highlight some of the mail carriers, the difficulty of transporting mail in the back country from McCall (Lardo) to Burgdorf (Resort) to Warren (Washington) across the South Fork of the Salmon River (Comfort) over Elk Summit to Edwardsburg (Logan) down Big Creek and beyond to Thunder Mountain (Roosevelt).

1909 Map Central Idaho

Map showing Lardo, Resort, Warrens, Comfort, Yellow Pine, Logan and Roosevelt

1909-Idaho-MailRoutes-a(click map for larger size)
source to full sized 1909 Idaho Map (17megs): American Geographical Society Library Digital Map Collection
— — — — — — — — — —

Early Post Offices

Washington (later Warren)

Established January 28, 1868 James Cronan
Discontinued April 28, 1868
Re-established July 27, 1870 C. Sears
December 6, 1870 Benjamin Morris
December 19, 1873 Aaron Friedmincke
August 19, 1880 Herman Segall
March 28, 1881 Victor Hexter
August 14, 1885 Renamed Warren

source: © Idaho County IDGenWeb Project
— — —

Warren (was Washington first)

Established January 28, 1868
August 14, 1885 Victor Hexter Renamed Warren
December 6, 1888 Edwin Robinson
October 10, 1889 Walter Brown
November 1890 Bailey Chamberlain (this from a note in the Lewiston Teller)
April 28, 1893 Fred Morris
November 28, 1893 George Patterson
August 5, 1916 Marjorie Wood
September 15, 1917 Walter Martin
July 29, 1920 Jesse Root
April 6, 1926 Otis Morris
45 miles N.E. of McCall

source: © Idaho County IDGenWeb Project
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1897 Warren

1897Warren-aWarren, Idaho Territory 1897 (courtesy McCall Public Library)

source: Visit McCall
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1897 (Warren to Thunder Mountain)

Bill Borden

Mail Warren to Thunder Mtn Skis and Skiing, Warrens, Idaho

William Borden “Sheepherder Bill” carried mail from Warrens to Thunder Mountain. Bill Patterson storekeeper & postmaster at right, 1897.

Publisher Idaho State Historical Society

“[He] could pack more on his back than anybody. More than limber Carl Brown. Once he carried a cookstove over the summits to Big Creek for Mrs. Edwards.”

quote from: “The King’s Pines of Idaho; a story of the Browns of McCall” by Grace Edgington Jordan 1961 (21 megs)

Link to: “Sheepherder” Bill Borden story
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Warrens, Idaho

WarrensIdaho-aPhotographer J. A. Hanson

A group of men and women can be seen in the foreground of this view down Main Street in Warrens, Idaho. The stores and structures are constructed of logs. The street is rough and muddy.

source: Idaho State Historical Society
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1901 (Warrens to Thunder Mountain)

Curley Brewer


Idaho Historical Society Photo

“(FP December 26, 1901) Curley Brewer, of Warrens, is packing the mail into Thunder Mountain this winter, the miners paying him each two dollars per month for semi-monthly trips, and the Dewey company contributing enough to pay [him] $100 per month for the arduous task. He takes the old Elk Creek trail by way of Logan creek.”

Link to: Curley Brewer story
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Roosevelt (Thunder Mountain)


Two log cabin structures at Thunder Mountain, Idaho. One is being used as a saloon and the other as a post office. The post office has a canvas roof.

source: Idaho State Historical Society
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Extinct Post Offices

Roosevelt

Established February 19, 1902 William L. Cuddy
September 6, 1902 Joseph B. Randall
June 9, 1905 Warren M. Dutton
December 15, 1906 Harry Austin
March 20, 1907 Benjamin Frances (declined)
September 27, 1907 Gertrude Wayland
July 1, 1908 Tirza Wayland
December 21, 1911 Esther Busby
Discontinued September 30, 1915
Mail to Yellow Pine
23 miles N.E. of Yellow Pine

source: © Idaho County IDGenWeb Project
— — —

Comfort

Established October 7, 1903 Lawrence Phelan
June 15, 1904 Ernest Heath
March 22, 1906 Charles Smith
Discontinued June 29, 1907
Mail to Warren
8 miles S.E. of Warren

source: © Idaho County IDGenWeb Project
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1907 (Warren to Edwardsburg)

Chester Stephens

by Ida Brown

Chester had lost his mother when he was small, and when his father remarried he seemed to have no home. Taking over his own life, he became a kind of child bum. At 22 he was tending bar in Council. Two years later, in 1907, he came to McCall and for three years freighted into Edwardsburg. There he would often hear William Edwards say bitterly, “You Northerners ruined my father!” Figuring there was nothing much he could do about this, and being by nature gentle and unargumentative, Chester let it ride.

He did more freighting with wagons than with sleds; most of the freight could wait for wagon weather anyhow. He used two wagons and if the going got too tough, he put all the horses on one wagon and came back later for the other. Six horses could move 7000 pounds over most any kind of road. He carried grain for his horses, always wiring some in a tree to pick up on the return trip. With a grub box and a bed-roll he slept out in all weathers.

In Warren it took quite a lot of whiskey to assuage public thirst. Once Chester took in a load of 54-gallon barrels that six horses could barely pull. A load meant as many as eight such barrels, with case goods and bottled beer besides.

The wood barrels permitted a good trick. With a chisel one raised the metal hoop, then drove a nail through where the hoop had been. With one man to blow through the bung at the top and another to hold coffeepot or waterbucket at the nail hole, good results could be obtained. Then the nailhole was plugged and the hoop replaced.

Once when he was using sleds, Stephens was snowed in at the Halfway house, one of his stops. He probably had shelter for his 16 horses, but the storm kept on, and after playing poker until nearly morning Chester went out to find his sleds just high places in the cold white.

Sometimes it took two tries, one on foot, to get even himself through. Once he was from seven in the morning until three the next morning making 15 miles. Then he gave up, put the locked mail sack in a tree and walked the rest of the way to Burgdorf. Here the mineral pools were always hot and a man could thaw out his stiffness. By this time there was a woman at the place. Fred Burgdorf, now past middle age, had married. His place, still the only stop-over on the only route to Warrens and the country beyond, probably netted him and big Jeannette an exceedingly good income from its various services.

Though Chester Stephens often saw bear and elk, he never carried a gun. Young elk wasn’t bad eating, but bear steak was not his choice. Once he took refuge from the storm in a cabin where no one seemed to be at home. Half starved, he found a kettle of stew still warm on the stove. He was eating stew with relish when the owner returned.

“What d’ye think you’re eating there?” the man asked.

Chester tasted slowly, pleasurably again. It still seemed mighty good. “It must be elk,” he said.

“Nope. It’s bear.”

To Chester it still tasted good but not quite so much so.

source: (pgs 54-56) “The King’s Pines of Idaho; a story of the Browns of McCall” by Grace Edgington Jordan 1961 (21 megs)
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Discontinued Post Offices

Logan

established August 17, 1904, William E. Edwards
renamed Edwardsburg February 25, 1909
6 miles SW of Big Springs
NW Sec. 9, T20N, R9E

source: Valley County GenWeb Copyright © 2009
— — —

Edwardsburg

established August 17, 1904, as Logan, William F. Edwards
renamed Edwardsburg February 25, 1909
discontinued January 14, 1918, mail to Warren.

source: Valley County GenWeb Copyright © 2009
— — —

Postcard from Edwardsburg, Idaho, March 26, 1912


Contributed by Marvin Housworth

Letter on the back:

“A picture of the cabin as it was in the early days when Napier was a little boy – I suppose you met him when he was South – Father wrote me of your sorrow and I have thought of you but as my days are full of work at night I have so much writing for Mr. Edwards I don’t have much time for myself – The (ore ?) at (ditch?)* is fine & at last things are coming our way. Write when you feel inclined- give my Love to the girls – especially Elizabeth.”
– Annie Napier Edwards

photo source: Valley County GenWeb
— —

Edwardsburg

The Routsons, “Boston” Brown and Dan McRae were some of the mail carriers from 1900 to 1918. Mail came into the area, every year by a different contract and mail carrier. Elliots, Wallaces and many others carried it to Werdenhoff, down to Clover, and Cabin Creek, most going down Big Creek via horses or back pack.

Edwardsburg lost the post office in 1918 and the post office at Warren hired Joe Davis to pack it out. The mail route from Warren went over Elk Summit then down Smith Creek to Cowman’s Lodge at Big Creek. If mail went to Cowman’s, then Edwards got it there. Mail also came from Crawford, later Cascade, to Yellow Pine and to Profile to Sam Wilson’s. Then Edwards went to Profile for their mail.

The first and only road into the Big Creek area went over Elk Summit, splitting at the top, one fork going down to the Edwards and Moscow Mine on Logan Creek and the second fork went down Smith Creek to the mines. There was only a trail from Smith Creek up to Big Creek. In the 1930’s, the CCC built the road from Yellow Pine past Edwardsburg to Big Creek and on down to Smith Creek, connecting all of these places, and the mail then was hauled in by vehicle and flown into the airport when the road was closed. Carl Whitmore and Johnson’s Flying Service had these early contracts.
(personal correspondence)
— —

Helmers included the following account:

Joe Davis has contracted to pack the post office at Edwardsburg out to Warren. He had the horses tailed together, no halters, just ropes around their necks. When he was coming around the grade from Elk Creek, high on the hillside, one horse pulled back. That started the whole string to pull back and the third horse from the rear broke loose and went over the bank end over end, all three rolling until they came to a tree and wrapped around that. Joe went to Tom Carrey’s place on the river for help. One horse was dead, choked, and U. S. Post Office was scattered all over the hillside. They gathered what they could and Joe said the Department in Washington could come get the rest.

source: Valley County GenWeb Copyright © 2009
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1909 (Warren to Edwardsburg)

Carl Brown

by Ida Brown

Carl Brown was convinced that mining was not his future. And he was resolved not to go back to New Hampshire and the store. He pondered this ranch, where they were spending the night, not alone for what it produced, but as a base. He was sure he could get the mail contract from Warren to Edwardsburg, and it could be run from here. The government paid $75 a month for one weekly round trip, in the summer $150 for two such trips. He could also pack freight for miners at three cents a pound. It would mean dog- sleds in winter, the rest of the year packhorses. The 80-mile round trip took four days now, three in summer. The summits went up to 9000 feet; the snows got 22 feet deep. But he already knew these heights and depths.

… When they bought the horses and equipment Carl would need, they were in business, Carl as postman and freighter, Ida as innkeeper, gardener and cook. To be ready for emergencies in the house or out, Ida shortened her dresses and braided her hair down her back. Wayfaring strangers would assume that she was somebody’s young daughter, unless they saw Betty, who now ran about as free as the dogs and kittens, not in dresses but in rompers.

… Ida Brown’s life was full of hard work, she could take it. The high cold of the Crown cabin had actually brought her to a peak of health that stayed with her now when she went from dawn to dark with little time to rest. However, Carl’s life was more than hard. It was grinding, with no respite at all. Except in mid-summer his day began in the dark and ended that way. He always had to hurry with the mail, especially on the Big Creek end, and he strove to make the forks of Elk creek by two in the afternoon so as to feed his dogs, cook a camp meal, and be in bed by six or seven. If he did this and got an early start the next morning for Edwardsburg, he could deliver his mail on time and Mrs. Edwards would not be sharp. As postmistress she insisted on to-the-minute deliveries.

The first winter brought the problem of snowshoes for horses. A horse had to be taught to wear them, and since the horse must not interfere and must also set his feet wide apart, it was better to start the training on a young, gentle animal. At first Carl used wood shoes, later a malleable cast-iron shoe introduced from Minnesota. The wood shoe was made of two 1 inch slabs bolted together with the grain opposed. A clamp around the horse’s pastern held the shoe on, and if he was sharp-shod, his calks sat in holes bored in the wood and gave further leverage. Horses not only learned to walk fast in their snowshoes, they learned to trot.

SnowshoeHorse-aA metal horse-showshoe like Carl Brown used on his winter mail run.

When the snow piled too deep for horses, Carl turned to dogs. His first were a Dane and a mastiff, but most of the time he drove four. A dog needed to weigh between 100 and 140 pounds. The harness was simple, a collar with traces that attached to a singletree. As the snow pack increased, Carl went ahead of the team, breaking the trail. They didn’t need to be led, they followed. Only when the 10-foot steel-shod sled was empty did Carl ride. Standing at the back he could reach a step-on brake that kept the sled off the dogs if they struck a steep down-pitch. He used no whip, guided by Gee, Haw and Whoa. At night he shut the dogs in or tied them, to discourage secret excursions abroad. On hard-packed snow his dogs pulled from 300 to 400 pounds and kept this up for miles. Deep soft snow cut the payload in half, and twenty miles a day was a good pull.

One thing people along the mail route soon saw was that if horses couldn’t make it through, and if dogs wore their hearts or their feet out, still the mail went on. It went on Carl’s back. Second class mail he might have to tie high in a tree until he could pick it up again, but all he could load on himself went.

It was merely chill here on the South Fork, but before he saw his wife again he would spend a good many hours in below-zero cold, the cold that is treacherous because it is so quiet. It is a time when things seem to hang suspended in the crystaline air, waiting, waiting for the tiny shock, the muted vibration that triggers the roar. He might breast howling summits. Certainly all day he would be subject to the myriad mischances a man faces when he travels alone through empty reaches of ice and snow, where Nature’s cynicism can wipe out a man quite casually.

He wore his usual wool outfit, coat, mittens, cap and outerclothing. His underclothes were wool and his socks. His high boots were rubber and canvas. He wore nothing bulky for he must be able to move instantly, unhampered, and to keep warm by keeping active.

He carried no gun on this day or any other, for he never shot deer and didn’t count on having to defend himself from men. He carried matches and a pocket knife, little else. On this trip he didn’t anticipate any gold bricks in the registered mail. One brick was more than a man cared to drop on his foot, three or four of them making a hefty lift. As usual the first class mail sacks were locked, only the postal people having keys. All his sacks were of waterproof canvas, yet they would sink if he toppled his load into a stream.
(pgs 30-32)

1910 (McCall to Warren)

… When the mail contract expired, Carl confidently submitted his bid for a new one. He had figured very closely.

But the contract went to another bidder.

When Carl and Ida got the word, they were dumb-founded. Without the mail job they would have to leave the ranch – it would never by itself provide for their needs and hopes. They must move again.

… While they pondered, there came a chance to sell the ranch, and Carl jumped at it. Also, another mail contract was being awarded, the McCall-Warren, and if he lost no time he might be able to tie this one up. In haste he completed the ranch deal, trading the place and everything on it for a two-room house and six lots in McCall, with $500 cash to boot. Then he hurried off his careful bid.

This time he was low man. Immediately he went to Ross Krigbaum, a long-time freighter and mail carrier living near Old Meadows. From Krigbaum he arranged to buy an outfit. Ross took his note for most of the debt, and Carl got the Halfway House, 12 miles north of McCall around the lake, saddle and pack horses, unbroken stock, pack gear, harness, a stout wagon, and whatever else the good-natured Krigbaum thought to throw in.
(pgs 37-38)

… Again Carl Brown was a carrier of the United States mails, and again a freighter. Up the west side of the lake ran the road he would use, a road that dodged and sometimes climbed. At Lightning point, where a blasted snag stood, it swung high and overhung the water. When alternate thaws and freezes made this piece of road a glass slide, it was no joke. At times the whole road became impassable, and then Carl rowed a boat up the lake. In time he would secure a 20-foot steel boat with a “kicker,” with which he could carry passengers and also pull a freight barge. His passengers would often include prospectors, who always seemed to be broke after a holiday in McCall. However, most of them paid later. At the head of the lake his station could offer overnight shelter and there was a Forest phone. Here he also stored grain for his horses.

Such roads as he had were pretty much his to maintain, except during fire season. If storms uprooted trees or piled slides in his way, that was his problem. Through Secesh Meadows lay a stretch of corduroy, for which he was thankful. It was bumpy, but it kept him out of the swamp.

The heavy freighting was a blessing, although it meant hiring extra help. Many different men would work for him, for long or short periods, and in most cases this founded enduring friendships. They had to be pretty young, tough and determined to keep up with Carl.
(pgs 41-42)

c. 1912

On a cold, gray afternoon while Warren was still small, this calmness got a stiff jolt. From the station at the head of the lake came a phone call.

“Where’s Carl? His team ran in just now. They’re still hitched to the sled, but there’s no load on, and we can’t see Carl anywhere.”

Ida said in a tight voice that she didn’t know. Carl had left several hours earlier, intending to follow the road along the west side . . .

Suddenly she realized she was talking into emptiness – the line had gone dead.

Through the cold, whipping breeze Carl drove two horses, with Roy Stover’s wagon box fastened to the sled, and over him Roy’s wagon sheet to keep out some of the wind. In addition he wore a long, old fur coat. Nobody else had cared to undertake the trip; he was quite alone.

Almost from the start the road had been glassy. Freezes, light thaws, another freeze had made the layer of ice ever thicker and smoother. For the first few miles the sled kept upright, but Carl, perched on the load, rode tense and alert. Now the horses approached the lake face where the road climbed to go around Lightning point, the jutting shoulder that dropped straight into the water. The horses themselves appeared nervous, but they kept going and they neared the top. Here the sheet ice sloped out suddenly. The sled began to skid, Carl sticking to the load, the load swaying. The horses skidded too, everything heading for the edge.

The load teetered, Carl felt himself going.

The sled caught, and with the weight gone, the horses clawed their way around the turn and shot down the other side. Still frightened they began to run, gradually calming, but keeping on toward the place where shelter and grain always rewarded them. When they stopped, two men ran out. Then one ran back to the telephone.

The men started out through the sunless afternoon, down the road between high snowbanks. Presently against the confusing all-white they spied an apparition. It staggered toward them, Carl Brown in his frozen fur sheath.

They got him to the station and warmed up with everything they had, liquid and solid.

The wagon sheet and the old coat had probably cushioned his fall and actually helped keep him afloat amid the lake ice. Anyhow he had scrambled ashore, and kept on around the road. It was a matter of keeping on the move or freezing.

Somebody was sent to McCall to tell Ida. By the next morning Carl was nearly as good as ever, but Roy Stover never forgot his lost wagon sheet.

It was simpler when the lake froze solid and Carl could drive a loaded toboggan across, avoiding the road. Toward spring a long used lane of lake ice would compress under hoofs and runners until it was stronger than the ice on either side. One morning Carl drove along this thicker lane, when a sudden wind, an almost balmy wind, snatched his hat away. He stopped the team, got off the load and started after the hat. An ominous crack! It came from all directions, seemed to focus right under him. Carl changed his mind about needing his hat.

On a wintry late afternoon he was approaching one of his camps on the shallow North Payette on snow- shoes, leading a packhorse that carried lock sacks. To let the horse go to the ice-filled stream for a drink, he looped up the rope and gave it a slap on the rump. The horse went down to the water, but it didn’t stop to drink – it plunged in.

The mail, the holy mail! Carl Brown dropped everything and plunged in after the horse, but it kept just too far ahead to seize, and when it climbed out on the opposite side it kept going. Down through frozen brush and timber, Carl running after, the horse running faster. Then some obstacle stopped it.

Jerking angrily at the rope, Carl hurried back, fought his way across the stream. On the other side, just for an instant, he dropped the rope. The horse took off again, this time along the bank. Though his clothes were freezing, Carl pursued. Again he caught the horse, didn’t drop the rope for anything.

Somehow he got to shelter, built a fire and dried out. If he said anything to the horse, it was probably his one supreme epithet, in clipped New England English, you bastahd!

Two years after the Browns’ destiny was altered by the loss of the Warren-Edwardsburg contract, this was readvertised by the government. The man who had underbid Carl had drawn harsh winters and was unused to a job with such desperate demands. From his bondsmen Carl bought his outfit and assumed the contract. To carry it out meant more of everything, including more help. It would mean depending on more men and further developing a gift he had already demonstrated of securing loyalty and cooperation in tough times as well as good.
(pgs 57-60)

1914

… It was now April 1914, and with Carl’s mail contracts to be completed in a few months, a new chapter in the lives of the Browns was preparing to unfold. Carl was ready for it because he had waited so long.
(pg 63)

source: “The King’s Pines of Idaho; a story of the Browns of McCall” by Grace Edgington Jordan 1961 (21 megs)
— — — — — — — — — —

Lardo (McCall)

Lardo-Boydstun-Store-aIn 1886, Lardo sprang up as a small gold mining town that boasted two blacksmiths, a stable, a meat market, a restaurant, a harness maker, two hotels and a post office and general store. In addition, the first newspaper in the area, the “Long Valley Advocate,” was located in Lardo. Daily stage service ran between Lardo and Meadows for a fare of $1.75.

source: Visit McCall
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c. 1920 (McCall to Warren)

Jack Fernan

John (Jack) and Ethel Fernan came to the Secesh Meadows area in 1920 with daughters Pearl, Amie and Irene. Twin boys were born to them in 1920 in Secesh Meadows but one died at birth and the other 2 years later. Their first cabin was a 2 story structure built just across from what is now known as the Secesh Stage Stop. Jack and his brother Frank Fernan built the cabin. Jack drove the stage between McCall, Burgdorf, Secesh and Warrens. The stage would stop there to change horses on their way in to Warrens.

1920 Fernan House
1920Fernanhouse-a

The original cabin burned in November of 1931. They think it started upstairs by the stove pipe. Nothing was saved.

Fernan Team
FernanHorses-a

Jack was a teamster and hauled freight, mail, ore and passengers with 4, 6 and 8 horse teams. He graded the road during the summer months and plowed it during the winter.

FernanStuck1-a
FernanStuck2-a

In 1930 John Fernan filed mining claims on the 4th of July No. 1 Placer Claim and Balsam Placer Claim. At least 6 buildings were located on the Fernan Ranch. They raised chickens sheep and cows and sold milk and eggs. The walls were covered with newspapers for insulation. Water and outhouse were outside. John would take his dog Spot to the bar in Warrens. Both would drink a little beer and sing the night away.

1933 Fernan built a bridge over the Secesh River for the Forest Service.

1940 Fernan Cabins
1940Fernancabins-a

Many thanks to Janice Chapman for providing the information used to put together this piece of Secesh history.

excerpted from: Secesh History compiled by Becky Johnstone
— — — — — — — — — —

Past and Present Post Offices

Lardo

established November 30, 1889, John R. Lane
July 2, 1890, George F. T(?)rouch
Thomas McCall, September 19, 1894
William B. Boydstrum, January 12, 1903
Edward W. Cole, March 8, 1912
Sophia M. Cole, May 5, 1915
discontinued October 15, 1917, mail to McCall
on Payette Lake, 1 m. W. of McCall
NW SW Sec. 8, T18N, R3E

source: Valley County GenWeb Copyright © 2009
— — —

McCall – present day zip code 83638

established March 31, 1905 as Elo
moved about a mile N. & renamed McCall
July 13, 1909, Jacob Kaanta
Helga M. Cook, April 1, 1914
S. end of Payette Lake, 27 m. N. of Cascade, 13 m. SE of Meadows, on UP Ry., W Sec. 9, T18N, R3E.

Nellie Ireton Mills writes:

The Thomas McCall family, like others bound for Long Valley, in April 1890, followed those well-worn wagon tracks that Cal Baird had made to Ola so many years before, and then climbed the five-mile hill beyond, to camp in the snow. Near the top they found ten other families there ahead of them, waiting for the snow to melt enough for them to go on into Long Valley. . . . The sawmill Thomas McCall built, eventually was sold to Hoff and Brown interests, the hotel materialized and the town that Tom McCall, Newt Williams, and others, helped to build was given the family name.”

source: Valley County GenWeb Copyright © 2009
— — —

Resort

Established June 1, 1898 Fred Burgdorf
November 5, 1914 Jeannette Burgdorf
November 16, 1915 Renamed Burgdorf

This was also called Fred’s Warm Springs Resort

source: © Idaho County IDGenWeb Project
— — —

Burgdorf

Established June 1, 1898 Fred Burgdorf (first est. as Resort)
November 5, 1914 Jeanette Burgdorf
November 16, 1915 Jeanette Burgdorf (renamed Burgdorf)
March 6, 1917 Grace Exum
January 7, 1920 Helen Luzaden
Closed September 20, 1922
Mail to McCall
Reopened November 6, 1925 Oliver Manis
November 18, 1927 Andrew Craig
October 3, 1930 J. Harris
Discontinued July 31, 1945
Mail to McCall
32 miles N.E. of McCall

source: © Idaho County IDGenWeb Project
— — — — — — — — — —

Dog team hauling mail to the Big Creek country in 1929


Photo courtesy of Margaret and Ken Twiliger in “The Middle Fork and the Sheepeater War” by Johnny Carrey and Cort Conley – copyright 1977
— — — — — — — — — —

Skis and Skiers (Carrying the Mail)

by Harry Whithers

In the mining boom days, skiing as a sport in this part of the country wasn’t considered at all. … Skiing was only a very necessary mode of travel. Some of those old timers were the real experts when it came to making arduous trips such as getting mail into the back country…

They all carried mail from Long Valley to Roosevelt, a distance of almost a hundred miles. They generally traveled alone and had to take into consideration the possibility of an accident that might end in a broken bone or bad sprain that would put a man in bad trouble.

Most all skiers used a single pole of red fir about 2 inches in diameter at the big end, 8 or 10 feet in length, with a flexible wheel a few inches from the big end. It was used as a sort of balance, but mostly as a brake on the steep downgrades. It was also a great help in climbing upgrade. Their skis were usually made of native timber, lodge pole or black pine, but sometimes of red fir or tamarack. They were from 9 to 12 feet in length and from 4 1/2 to 5 inches in width. They weren’t as maneuverable as present-day skis, but they would keep a man on top of deep and powdery snow, which was important. The harness was sometimes a canvas boot.

… The skiers usually carried a can of ski dope that they would heat and apply to their skis to keep them from sticking. They also carried a pair of boots made of deer hide that could be slipped over the back end of their skis and tied to the harness to keep the skis from sliding back when climbing steep grades.

… Some trailmen preferred snowshoes. The type used were called “herring” because of their fish shape. They were narrow compared to the bear-paw type, running from 6 inches to as much as 12 inches. The length varied from about 4 feet to as long as 6 feet, although I found the longer variety more difficult to manage.

Once the catgut webbing in mine broke and I had to manage in soft snow falling through the one snowshoe. The next days the cramps in that leg muscle were as hard as wood.

excerpted from page 42-43 “Yellow Pine, Idaho” compiled by Nancy G. Sumner
— — —

(Meadows to Warren)

Enos Smith

by Harry Whithers

One man I knew, Enos Smith, who pioneered the Warren country and carried mail from Meadows (known now as Old Meadows) to Warren. I heard it from others as well as from him that he made trips quite frequently from Warren to Meadows, a distance of 60 miles in one shift.

excerpted from page 42 “Yellow Pine, Idaho” compiled by Nancy G. Sumner
— — —

Early 1900s (mail to Roosevelt)

Albert S. Hennessey

by Harry Whithers

Al carried mail on skis to Roosevelt and built up quite a “rep” as a fine skier. After Roosevelt’s demise, Hennessey came to the Yellow Pine area. He built a hay press and bailed hay at Hennessey Meadow. … Later (1933) he built a house in Yellow Pine and prospected in the surrounding country.

excerpted from page 18 “Yellow Pine, Idaho” compiled by Nancy G. Sumner
— — —

1919 (Cascade to Stibnite)

John Croco

by Harry Whithers

Just before Christmas 1919, when John Croco was carrying the mail from Cascade to Stibnite, he had two men with him, Morris Corbet and another man going out. They planned on making it to Knox Lodge, owned and operated by Ben and Ruth Seaweard. Knox Lodge was Located 2 1/2 miles west of Warm Lake a quarter mile off the road to Cascade.

excerpted from page 22 “Yellow Pine, Idaho” compiled by Nancy G. Sumner
— — —

1920-1921 (Cascade to Yellow Pine)

Henry T. Abstein

by Harry Whithers

In 1920 and 1921 he had the mail contract from Cascade to Yellow Pine via Knox and over Cabin Creek Summit. During the open season he used a buckboard wagon and team; a toboggan drawn by two dogs was used during the snowed-in months.

excerpted from page 13 “Yellow Pine, Idaho” compiled by Nancy G. Sumner
— — —

Dead Horse Canyon

By Ted Abstein

My brother, Russell, used to carry the mail at times. At one point the old road forded Johnson Creek several times. One place where the water was too deep, the wagon tipped over and one of the horses became tangled in the traces and drowned. The other horse got away. The one that drowned then went on down the river and lodged down in the canyon. They named it Dead Horse Canyon because of that incident.

excerpted from page 100 “Yellow Pine, Idaho” compiled by Nancy G. Sumner
— — —

1926 (Deadwood Mail Route)

In 1926 I had a cabin on Big Creek fourteen miles east of Cascade at a place that was called Johnson Station in [the] Thunder Mountain days. I was hacking railroad ties for a contractor. The lodge poles being frozen, it was too tough to make any money, so when the Deadwood mail carrier, Johnny Croco, who I have mentioned before, asked me to help him on the mail route with my two potlickers that were broke to harness, I took him up. He promised me $5.00 per day, saying we would take turns breaking trail and driving the dog team.

As it turned out, he took the turns and I the trail breaking.

I can remember a lot of those trips, but one in particular stands out in my memory. We stopped overnight in a cabin 1 1/2 miles east of Warm Lake and were to meet James Gwinn, the mine superintendent, at the tie camp at the western foot of Big Creek Summit and escort him to Deadwood mine.

I broke the trail the 14 miles to the tie camp and back to Warm Lake that day. Gwinn stayed at Warm Lake Lodge while we went on to the cabin. Next day, we went back the 1 1/2 miles, picked up Gwinn and proceeded on our way the 26 miles to Deadwood.

There were three of us to break trail and guide the sled with Gwinn aboard, but it was tough on us and tougher on the dogs. Mr. Gwinn would sit on the sled until he got cramps, then have us stop while he stood up and stretched the cramps out, while we grew a little more disgusted each time. He could have strapped on some snowshoes and followed a mile and got rid of the cramps and helped the dogs tremendously.

I knew of an air hole in the head of Deadwood River, 15 feet deep and told Croco that if I was guiding the sled at this spot I would lose my footing and dump our cargo down this hole. I was only kidding but Croco took me seriously.

When Mr. Gwinn made a slurring remarks about the quality of our dogs is when he really heard from me. That was after 18 hours of the hardest labor for us and our dogs.

I got a pair of skis, two Irish setter pups, and a lot of experience for my winter’s work. One of the pups followed Croco off while I was away one day after they were grown. Oh well!

excerpted from pages 44-45 “Yellow Pine, Idaho” compiled by Nancy G. Sumner
— — —

Harry Whithers and John Croco c 1929

WhithersCrocoDogTeamMcRae-a(click image for larger size)

(back of photo) Harry Whithers w/ pole, John Croco, about 1929, lead dog named Streak

photo from Sandy McRae
— — — — — — — — — —

1942 Mail Run down Big Creek

by Emma Cox


Hopeless point – the mail run up Big Creek

Photo from “Idaho Mountains Our Home” by Lafe and Emma Cox – Copyright 1997 by V.O. Ranch Books

That spring [1942] Lafe subcontracted a mail contract. The mail was to be delivered from Yellow Pine to the Big Creek post office, then on down Big Creek to the Snowshoe Mine and on down a trail from there to Cabin Creek. The contract was for 45 miles, to be traveled by auto when accessible, in summer and early fall. In the winter mail was flown in by Penn Stohr from the airfield at Cascade to Big Creek, to be taken the rest of the way by horseback, dog team or team and sleigh.

We purchased a pickup to deliver from Yellow Pine to the Snowshoe Mine. The baby and I rode along with Lafe so I could learn the route, as he had to deliver up a few side roads to places I had never seen. We knew I would have to be the substitute driver when hunting season opened.

When Lafe was hunting, I drove to Yellow Pine to pick up the mail, … I delivered mail and freight from the Yellow Pine post office to the Big Creek post office, where it was sorted and put in mail sacks for each of the individuals along the way, and for the 12 to 18 employees at the Snowshoe Mine.

The road was narrow. At one point, above the transfer camp, was an incline where you could not see over the hood of your pickup. You had to know which way the road turned. I also had to drive across two bridges, that I often think about today. The bridges had very little railing and the logs were laid crosswise. When the first frost came, this was dangerous. It was always bumpy — rough driving over. About the only time the baby was disturbed was when we crossed these two bridges, due to the roughness and noise. The stream at Big Creek was almost the size of some rivers. I always breathed a sigh of relief when I reached the other side.

The miners always knew when I was coming. If their trucks were coming out with loads, they always waited at a turnout for me.

The caretaker at Mile High met me at the mine to pick up the ongoing mail down Big Creek, which was only accessible by horses. He delivered to the Phil Beal ranch, Cabin Creek and Mile High, which at one time was a designated post office called Clover. In early days settlers came there for their mail. When we sold the ranch many years later, the post office pigeonhole cabinet was still hanging on the wall.

In the summer we delivered the mail every Tuesday and Friday; the rest of the time it was just once a week.

In November the snow on the summit got too deep for the pickup. Even though we had a compound gear, it was too hard on the vehicle.

Johnson’s Flying Service based in Cascade had the contract to fly the mail directly to Big Creek airfield. Penn Stohr did the flying. He was not only a great pilot, he was a wonderful person.

Before the snow got too deep …, Lafe picked up the mail by auto. On the way to the mine he had to make a stop at Copper Camp and Little Ramey cabin. The others who lived along the route had gone out for the winter.

It was typical snow country and each day we watched it pile up. Some days a real blizzard would blow. As the snow accumulated, we knew it was set in for the winter.

The next trip, Lafe got as far as Little Ramey, where he had to leave the sleigh. It would stay where he left it until spring, as there was too much snow. He loaded the outgoing mail onto one of the work horses and rode the other, continuing his trip to the Big Creek Post Office.

Soon it was time for Lafe to make another mail run. He started out by riding one of the work horses and packing the other, but after several tries, he could see he couldn’t make it. So he took the horses back to the mouth of Crooked Creek and started them back up the road to our cabin at the mine. He left the riding and pack saddles at the Little Ramey cabin to be picked up later. He put a pack sack with the outgoing mail on his back and webbed up to Big Creek. The trip took him two days. It was real arduous going with snow falling hard. In places the drifted snow was three to four feet deep.

From Copper Camp, Lafe phoned to tell me the team would be coming in sometime that night. I put hay and grain in their feed boxes in the barn, thinking they would go right in to the hay.

For Lafe’s next return trip back, he had rented three dogs and their harness from an old timer living near Big Creek. With so much snow, he needed a dog team to travel. He also called his dad, asking Clark to try to locate some good dogs with harness and have them flown in with the coming mail plane.

Clark sent a good lead dog and two others. With the dogs the old timer had given him, and his own dog, that gave Lafe seven dogs, which were what he needed for some of the loads that went to the mine.

On the crank Forest Service phone in our cabin, I could talk to Lafe in Big Creek. He called real often to check on the baby and me.

With lots of snow, Lafe made weekly trips by dog team. Sometimes the weather would warm up and cause snow slides. You had to keep an eye on the mountain above the trail in case a slide came in. That year there were several small slides and two or three large ones. The dogs all worked well together, and each knew their duty.

excerpted from: “Idaho Mountains, Our Home: The Life Story of Lafe and Emma Cox” – Copyright 1997 by V.O. Ranch Books pgs. 99-108
— — — — — — — — — —

The mail had to be delivered, no matter what

January 27, 2013 By Arthur Hart — Special to the Statesman

Delivering the mail to Idaho’s mountain mining camps in the 1860s was lonesome work, often dangerous, and sometimes deadly. In winter, when snow could be as much as 10 feet deep, men carried the mail on snowshoes. If caught in a blizzard they sometimes died.

The Idaho World printed this letter from Silver City on May 6, 1865: “Myers Body Found — J.T. Myers, the man who was lost in the snow in December last, while carrying the mail at Reynolds Creek, was found about three fourths of a mile from Boonville. He was in a sitting posture; doubtless he had become fatigued, sat down and froze to death. The mail bag, as yet, has not been found. A dog first discovered his body; persons from Boonville were in search at the time.” (Boonville was on Jordan Creek a few miles below present Silver City. It was later developed into the town of Dewey by Col. William Dewey of Nampa.)

On the lighter side, the Idaho Tri-weekly Statesman noted on May 15, 1866, that “There is a letter in the Boise City Post Office directed to ‘Mr. Wm. Johnson, Boyse River, Idaho Oregon, Colorado Territory.’ The letter has evidently had difficulty in finding all those places at once, for it has been since February traveling from Chandlerville, Illinois. Some indignant clerk has endorsed it: ‘If you know where this letter belongs, for God’s sake send it!’ Postal clerks have their own amusement.”

Mail contracts were eagerly sought by stagecoach and express companies, and in 1866 Greathouse & Co. was delivering the mail between Boise and Idaho City. On Dec. 15 the World reported that Greathouse had “furnished gratuitously a daily mail communication between this and Boise City, as their contract provides only for a tri-weekly service. They have got tired of doing extra mail service without pay, and who can blame them? Our people are grateful to them for past favors. It now rests with the Postal Department to give us a daily mail between here and Boise City.”

Also in December 1866, the World reported that a Wells Fargo & Co. messenger had arrived in Idaho City eight days late “by reason of the impassable condition of the roads in the Grande Ronde and Powder River valleys. Good time cannot be made until better roads and better weather.”

In November 1868, the Statesman severely criticized Wells Fargo & Co. “We have always been slow to accuse the stage companies in this territory or on the overland routes of remissness or fault in carrying the mails … but there is a case of complaint now on hand which has every appearance of being genuine.” The editor noted that Wells Fargo had a virtual monopoly and that, “The outrageous manner in which they are performing the service has become notorious.” (On the evidence of a number of witnesses the company was overloading its coaches with mail sacks so severely that there was barely room for passengers. Sacks stowed under the coaches were worn through from rubbing against the wheels and their contents spilled onto the road).

As new discoveries of gold and silver were made and new towns were created, postal service to them was established. The sheer number of such post offices, nearly all later discontinued, is surprising. By Jan. 1, 1901, Idaho had 461 post offices. Here are just a few of them. How many of their names sound familiar? Ako, Alpha, Arbon, Avon, Bannister, Bates, Blackbird, Blanche, Bourne, Brynne, Canfield, Chapin, Chub Springs, Coltman, Crane, Darby, Dent, Dudley, Echo, Emida, Farnum, Forest, Freese, Goff, Grouse, Hart, Hump, Ilo, Kippen, Lodi, Lund. … I’m sure that is enough to make the point that wherever a few people started a town and asked for a post office, they usually got one.
— — — — — — — — — —

Snowshoes for Horses

(this bit is not from Idaho, but very informative if you are wondering about equine snowshoes.)

2/13/2018 by Pans4au

Snowshoes1-a
Team of horses on snowshoes leaving Forest City, California

During the winter months of January, February, and March, one of the unique methods used by the stage lines in the Sierras was to place snowshoes on their horses. This practice started in 1865 as a way for the stage to travel the deep winter snows that covered the early California trails from Marysville to Downieville without the need to wait for spring. These early horse snowshoes were invented by a Sam Wollever Who is buried at Cherokee Flat in Butte County.

Snowshoes2-aHorse snowshoe displayed in Downieville museum.

Snowshoes3-aVery early wooden horse snowshoe

Snowshoes4-aHorse snowshoe found at Mountain House, Ca

As described in a New York Times article dated January 12th, 1874, the snowshoes were made of malleable iron squares, nine by nine inches with rubber riveted to the bottom of the plate to prevent snow build up. On the other side of the plate a commonly sized horseshoe with a sharp heel and toe with the corks set through holes in the center of the plate with rivets or screws. The snowshoe is fastened to the horse by a clasp with swivel screw holding the riveted horseshoe tightly under the hoof of the horse. The shoes were custom fit for each sized hoof and a team of four horses would take a man two hours to put the shoes on. Earlier shoes were also made of square wooden plates as shown in the middle photo above but were later abandoned due to the snow build up on the wood.

Snowshoes5-a

It was said that when the plates were first attached some horses cut themselves but soon learned to spread their feet so as not to interfere. Some would become good snow horses at once while others were incapable of learning how to navigate with the plates. The very first photo above is a picture of a snow-shoe team in action pulling a sled out of Forest City, Ca in the winter with a hotel in the background.

Snowshoes6-aTeamster Pike Solara mounting horse snowshoes in 1937

According to the San Fransisco Call of February 1, 1906, Horses on snowshoes were also used to haul mail in and out of Bodie, Ca. Snowshoes were used at least up to 1937 by the last teamster, Pike Solara, serving the snow Tent to Graniteville run in Nevada County, California.

Snowshoes7-a

source: Back Country Explorers
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Link to: Valley County Back Country Post Offices

Link: Thunder Mountain / Roosevelt History index page

updated September 2, 2022

Road Reports Nov 24, 2019

Watch for a bad icy spot about halfway down the South Fork road, there has been 2 wrecks and several near misses.
Don’t let this happen to you!

photo courtesy Nancy Bellman – November 10th

Please share road reports. Conditions change very quickly this time of year. High elevation roads may have several inches of snow. Be prepared for snow/ice, rocks and trees in the road and remember there is no cell phone service.

Yellow Pine: A trace of snow fell in Yellow Pine this morning, more on the way. Currently local streets are bare. Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN.
link: Local Forecast.
Yellow Pine Webcam: (check date on image)

Warm Lake Highway: Wednesday (Nov 20) mail truck driver reports a couple inches of snow at Big Creek summit, a little icy in the shade early morning.
Tuesday (Nov 19) a couple inches snow packed on Big Creek Summit.

Highway 55 Webcams Link:

South Fork Road: Tuesday (Nov 19) lots of small rocks on the road this morning- east Fork and South Fork all can be negotiated so far.
Wed (Nov 13) A report that a truck and trailer slid off at the icy spot and was pulled out.
Tuesday (Nov 12) “South Fork is bare except for BAD ICE FLOW with deep rut about milepost 14. There will be black ice from Warm Lake road to milepost 7 at night and early morning.” – LI
Monday (Nov 11) report that a low clearance car might have trouble with that deep icy rut, about halfway out the South Fork road.
Sunday (Nov 10) a truck slid off the road into the river near MP 15, slow down and watch for ice.
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Tuesday (Nov 19) Watch for rocks in the road, so far they are small and easy to get around, otherwise the road is still in good shape.

Johnson Creek Road: Still open but travel at your own risk.
Wednesday (Nov 20) mail truck driver said there is snow from Landmark to Rusty Can, then wet road the rest of the way to Yellow Pine.
Reports that the road has pot holes between YP and the dump.
link: Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam
link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
Note: The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Open? No current report. Probably some snow up high. Travel at your own risk.
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Travel at your own risk. Probably ruts beat thru at the top.
Last report Saturday (Oct 26) going in with high clearance 4×4 required chains over the top, “was not easy”.
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcam: (check date on image)

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open.
Report from Stibnite Oct 29th: Following the end of the year grading, we’ve had a little rain & snow creating some muddy conditions. The temperatures are getting low enough to create a predominantly hard frozen running surface with patches of snow/ice in the shadows. Overall, the road is in pretty good conditions with the odd pothole here and there but should be traveled with caution.
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Probably closed by now at the summit? No current report on road conditions. Travel at your own risk.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Probably snowed closed by now. No current report. Travel at your own risk.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: Open? No current report. Probably some snow up high. Travel at your own risk.
Note: The approx elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
——————————-

Weather Reports Nov 17-23, 2019

Nov 17 Weather:

At 10am it was 40 degrees, overcast and starting to sprinkle (lasted about 10 minutes.) Sprinkles started at 1212pm. Not raining at 1240pm. At 350pm it was 43 degrees and overcast. At 535pm it was 41 degrees, overcast and had been sprinkling long enough to make things wet. Still sprinkling lightly at 645pm (not sure when it quit.) Cracks in the clouds spilling moonlight at 1130pm.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time November 18, 2019 at 10:00AM
Mostly cloudy, light breeze
Max temperature 44 degrees F
Min temperature 27 degrees F
At observation 31 degrees F
Precipitation 0.02 inch <- 1st precip in Nov
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

Nov 18 Weather:

At 10am it was 31 degrees, mostly cloudy and light breeze. Clouds thinning and partly clear by 1030am. Nearly overcast at noon, light breeze. At 4pm it was 49 degrees, thicker clouds and light breeze. At 530pm it was 43 degrees, overcast and calmer. Thinner clouds, a few stars out at 11pm. Rain shower before 5am (probably around 3am?) More rain before 930am (probably started around 730am?)

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time November 19, 2019 at 10:00AM
Low overcast, steady rain
Max temperature 51 degrees F
Min temperature 31 degrees F <- yesterday morning
At observation 38 degrees F
Precipitation 0.15 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

Nov 19 Weather:

At 10am it was 38 degrees, low overcast and steady rain. Snow blobs mixed with rain falling at 1115am. Mostly snow at 1125am. Back to mostly rain at 1140am. Barely sprinkling at 12pm, socked in halfway to valley floor. Stopped raining before 1250pm, breaks in the clouds a little after 1pm and bits of sunshine. At 3pm it was 41 degrees, partly clear/cloudy and light chilly breeze, cloud sitting down on VanMeter hiding the new snow. At 540pm it was 33 degrees and looked partly clear. A few stars out at 11pm, probably mostly hazy.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time November 20, 2019 at 10:00AM
Mostly cloudy, light breeze, heavy dew/frost
Max temperature 43 degrees F
Min temperature 27 degrees F
At observation 30 degrees F
Precipitation 0.07 inch
Snowfall Trace
Snow depth 0 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

Nov 20 Weather:

At 10am it was 30 degrees, mostly cloudy w/bits of sun, light breeze and heavy dew/frost. At 1230pm it was 37 degrees and almost overcast (darker thicker clouds.) Gusty breezes around 145pm. At 320pm it was 42 degrees, partly clear/cloudy and gusty cool breezes. At 6pm it was 36 degrees, light chilly breeze and got the impression there was high thin haze. Probably high haze at 10pm, a few of the brightest stars out.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time November 21, 2019 at 10:00AM
Mostly clear
Max temperature 45 degrees F
Min temperature 16 degrees F
At observation 17 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

Nov 21 Weather:

At 10am it was 17 degrees, frosty and mostly clear. Mostly clear and sunny at noon, not very warm. At 340pm it was 35 degrees, partly cloudy (high wispies) and light cold breeze, frost on the ground in the shade. At 550pm it was 27 degrees, calmer and appeared to be somewhat hazy. Lots of stars out at 11pm.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time November 22, 2019 at 10:00AM
Mostly clear, frosty and slight breeze
Max temperature 41 degrees F
Min temperature 16 degrees F
At observation 19 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

Nov 22 Weather:

At 10am it was 19 degrees, mostly clear (a few small clouds), frosty and slight chilly breeze. Sunny and clear at 1pm. At 345pm it was 36 degrees and clear, slight chilly breeze. At 530pm it was 29 degrees, clear except for a little thin rosy haze to the west. Lots of stars out at 11pm.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time November 23, 2019 at 10:00AM
Overcast, frosty
Max temperature 45 degrees F
Min temperature 16 degrees F
At observation 24 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

Nov 23 Weather:

At 10am it was 24 degrees, overcast and frosty. Clearing off mid-day and sunny. At 345pm it was 36 degrees and mostly clear, just a hint of a breeze. At 540pm it looked mostly clear. At 650pm it was 30 degrees. At 11pm thin haze and a few stars.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time November 24, 2019 at 10:00AM
Overcast, light breeze
Max temperature 47 degrees F
Min temperature 24 degrees F <- yesterday morning
At observation 32 degrees F
Precipitation Trace
Snowfall Trace
Snow depth Trace
————————–

Road Reports Nov 20, 2019

Note: The Valley County road levy failed to pass on Nov 5th. Snowplowing and road maintenance will likely be slashed in half. There was a meeting Nov 18, in Cascade to get an update from the road department. Will post more info when we get it.

Watch for a bad icy spot about halfway down the South Fork road, there has been 2 wrecks and several near misses. Please share road reports. Conditions change very quickly this time of year. High elevation roads may have several inches of snow. Be prepared for snow/ice, rocks and trees in the road and remember there is no cell phone service.

Yellow Pine: We have had some rain in Yellow Pine and snow in higher elevations in the last 3 days, local streets are clear and damp. Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN.
link: Local Forecast.
Yellow Pine Webcam: (check date on image)

Warm Lake Highway: Wednesday (Nov 20) mail truck driver reports a couple inches of snow at Big Creek summit, a little icy in the shade early morning.
Tuesday (Nov 19) a couple inches snow packed on Big Creek Summit.

Highway 55 Webcams Link:

South Fork Road: Tuesday (Nov 19) lots of small rocks on the road this morning – East Fork and South Fork – all can be negotiated so far.
We have had reports of two slide-offs in less than a week and several near misses due to the ice flow.
Tuesday (Nov 12) “South Fork is bare except for BAD ICE FLOW with deep rut about milepost 14. There will be black ice from Warm Lake road to milepost 7 at night and early morning.” – LI
Another report Monday (Nov 11) that a low clearance car might have trouble with that deep icy rut, about halfway out the South Fork road.
Last Sunday (Nov 10) a truck slid off the road into the river, slow down and watch for ice.

link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Sunday (Nov 10) Last report that the road is still in good shape. A recent report of small rocks coming down into the road.

Johnson Creek Road: Still open but travel at your own risk.
Wednesday (Nov 20) mail truck driver said there is snow from Landmark to Rusty Can, then wet road the rest of the way to Yellow Pine.
Reports that the road has pot holes between YP and the dump.
link: Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam
link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
Note: The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Open? No current report. Probably some snow up high. Travel at your own risk.
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Travel at your own risk. Probably ruts beat thru at the top.
Last report Saturday (Oct 26) going in with high clearance 4×4 required chains over the top, “was not easy”.
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcam: (check date on image)

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open.
Report from Stibnite Oct 29th: Following the end of the year grading, we’ve had a little rain & snow creating some muddy conditions. The temperatures are getting low enough to create a predominantly hard frozen running surface with patches of snow/ice in the shadows. Overall, the road is in pretty good conditions with the odd pothole here and there but should be traveled with caution.
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Probably closed by now at the summit? No current report on road conditions. Travel at your own risk.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Probably snowed closed by now. No current report. Travel at your own risk.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: Open? No current report. Probably some snow up high. Travel at your own risk.
Note: The approx elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
——————————-

Nov 17, 2019 The Yellow Pine Times

Nov 17, 2019 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Note: The deadline to order calendars has been moved up to Nov 25th. If you have not ordered your 2020 Yellow Pine Calendar, send (rrSue) an email with “calendar” in the subject line and your mailing info.

The boil order and water restrictions are still in effect.

Community Calendar:

April 2 – Boil water order issued
May 15 – Nov 30 Firewood Season
Nov 23 – Xmas tree permits
Nov 25 – Deadline to order 2020 YP Calendar
Nov 28 – Thanksgiving potluck 2pm at the Tavern
Dec 25 – Christmas dinner at the Community Hall 2pm
(details below)
———-

Local Events:

Xmas Tree Permits Nov 23

The Boise and Payette National Forest (NF) vendors will begin selling Christmas tree permits Saturday, Nov. 23. No local vendor this year.
— — — —

Nov 28 – Yellow Pine Thanksgiving

Thursday, November 28, 2019 at 2pm Potluck at the Yellow Pine Tavern – Turkey and bread stuffing provided by the Tavern. Also prime rib, pumpkin pie, and deviled eggs promised
— — — —

Dec 25 – Christmas dinner at the Community Hall 2pm

Potluck with turkey provided. We may have a Bingo game afterward.
———-

Village News:

Road Levy Failure will affect Yellow Pine Snowplowing

The Valley County Commissioners and Road Department are still working out the plan for Yellow Pine, they will have a report from the road department at the commissioner meeting on Monday, Nov 18th at 2pm, along with a public workshop.

Valley County Commissioner Elt Hasbrouck wrote on Wednesday Nov 13th, “The South Fork [road] will still be plowed but it may end up being a day or 2 later before we can get to it.” Elt also said, “I’m working on having Lakeshore place 2 bear proof containers on the southwest corner of the Johnson Creek intersection so that we won’t have to plow Johnson Creek.”

We will have info after the meeting to share next week.
— — — —

South Fork Slide Off

Sunday Nov 10 – report of a vehicle slide-off on the South Fork road. A pickup went off the road and crashed into the river around mile post 15. Nobody was hurt and our local SAR team was not dispatched.

The first tow truck called to the scene also slid off trying to pull the pickup out of the river. A second tow truck came and the rescue efforts blocked the road for some time and traffic was delayed. Some travelers came back to Yellow Pine as they didn’t want to take a chance on either the Johnson Creek or Lick Creek routes and waited here for word on the opening of the road late in the day.

20191110SoForkWreck-a
photo courtesy Nancy Bellman

Folks need to be aware of dangerous road conditions in that area of the South Fork. Reports that water has been running down the middle of the road, eroding the pavement and freezing into a thick layer of ice right up to the edge along the river side. Last report that low clearance cars may have trouble with the deep rut.

[h/t to locals that sent reports]
— — — —

Boil Water Order Still in Effect

Bring all water to a boil, let it boil for one minute, and let it cool before using, or use bottled water. Boiled or bottled water should be used for drinking, making ice, brushing teeth, washing dishes, and food preparation until further notice. Boiling kills bacteria and other organisms in the water.
— — — —

Yellow Pine US Mail

The 3-day a week mail delivery started Nov 1st. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 55 cents Support our local post office and purchase your holiday stamps here.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

Yellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is located approximately 3 miles south on Johnson Creek Road.

The TRANSFER STATION is for household trash and yard waste:
* Household trash must be put inside (and fit) the dumpster;
* Yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, et.) goes in the burn pile on the south end of the turn-around;
* Cardboard boxes should be flattened before putting the in the dumpster,

The DUMPSTERS are NOT for:
* Furniture (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station).

The BURN PILE is NOT for:
* Cardboard boxes (flatten and put in dumpster);
* Furniture and appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Drywall and building material (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wire or fencing (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Foam Rubber (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wood with metal (like nails) attached (take to Donnelly Transfer Station.)

When closing the DOORS on the front of the dumpsters:
* Make sure the “U” brackets at the top and bottom of the door are engaged;
* The retaining bar at the middle of the door is slid into the pipe;
* And the “L” bars at the bottom of the doors dropped into place.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: 208/634-7176
———-

Local Groups:

YPWUA News:

The 2019 Yellow Pine Water Users Shareholders meeting was Sunday July 7th in the community hall.
Link to: 20190707YPWUAminutes.rtf

2019 YPWUA Yearly Meeting Sunday July 7th 10am Community Center

1. Financial Report – Willie
A. Current Account $27,510.17
B. Total revenue if everyone pays – $33,850.00
B. Budget Expenses – $32,010.00
C. Future rate increases – fall meeting a decision made on future rates
D. New Procedure Actions for Non-Payment – one water user stated that she was not going to pay her bill until her valve was repaired.
E. There are 55 shares held by 50 individuals, 112 services in Yellow Pine
F. It is requested that property owners that do not own a share, please buy one. $100 per share allows the property owner to vote on issues.

2. Operations Report – Steve
A. Current Operations We have obtained a grant to fix and get operational our new chlorine contact tank. We are currently using up to 50,000 gallons of water per day. We have spent many hours looking for leaks but have not found any major leak.
B. Chlorine levels through the boil order we will continue to keep the chlorine levels in an acceptable level.
C. Grant and work necessary
D. Boil Order Notification – Warren will be the one that orders and removes boil orders
E. Future Grants – we continue to investigate options for additional grants but nothing the works more than the grant to repair the chlorine contact tank.
F. Summer lawn watering – because of our boil order, we are requesting “no lawn watering the summer”.
G. Idaho rural water gave us a report that was given to the Water department several years ago.
H. Warren gave a very good explanation on our water system and what needs to happen to improve our system.

3. Election of Board Members
A. Dawn Brown and Stu Edwards, both are automatically nominated and without any other nominations, they will serve another 3 years on the board
B. Only shareholders can run for office and vote

Water Update Nov 11: The major leak has been repaired and has reduced our water usage to a level that our sand filters can keep up. We are still on a boil order until the sand filters can be cleaned and the turbidity levels settle. Warren will let us know when he feels comfortable with lifting the order.
– Steve H

Water Update Oct 23: October 22nd – The crew from Rocky Mountain Mechanical repaired the main water line leak up near the orchard.

Water Update Oct 15th: A major leak was found and a temporary fix was made until parts can be obtained. Once parts and people are available, that will be fixed. Fixing that leak doesn’t mean we will be off the boil order. The boil order was issued by the DEQ. They will not lift that order until the chlorine contact time meets the standard.
– Steve Holloway

Water Update Sept 21 (excerpted from VYPA 9/21 meeting notes):

Tests were conducted by Idaho Rural Water [July 19th] in an effort to locate the source of the major leak in the system. They will return October 3rd to continue the search for leaks. The line between Alpine Village and the Saleen property, which includes the bridge across the East Fork river is the line most suspected to be leaking. Cecil Dallman will stand by with a backhoe to dig in locations found. More digging work is needed at the tanks and pipes near the water facility. A second engineer is being consulted. Getting contractors to come to YP and replace seals is difficult. The previous grant money is tied to a timeline so some specified work must be done this fall.

The possibility for a large amount of grant money is very slim because we would have to take out a loan and use the borrowed money for the required matching money, and then there would be the loan payments. Money on hand must be used on required repairs to the contact tank. Because some water users do not have voting rights YPWUA does not qualify for some grants.

There are 56 shares available for purchase at $100/share. Each piece of land is entitled to own one share. Share holders are entitled to vote; water users that do not own a share may not vote, but do have access to water. The owners of the 56 lots are encouraged to purchase shares. Ownership of a share is shown on your annual water bill.

Anyone wanting to arrange a payment plan should contact Willie Sullivan.

– Steve Holloway/Willie Sullivan

May 1st: Leak in alley repaired

link to: #4430059 Yellow Pine Water Users Boil Water Notification 4-2-19
— — — —

VYPA News:

Cemetery – Tim Rogers: Marge Fields is researching the history of the log cabin now located at the cemetery, but formerly was in the center of the Yellow Pine village. A plaque will be placed at the cabin. The previous information sign showing names and locations of deceased buried in the cemetery will be repaired this winter and placed next year.

Road & Ditch Committee has been created. Clayton Egbert, Chairman. Tim Rogers and Tom Lanham have volunteered. This group and will need more volunteers.

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting Minutes for September 21, 2019
link to: 20190921 Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting
— — — —

YPFD News:

YP Fire Commissioners:
Sue Holloway District 1
Dan Stiff, District 2
Merrill Saleen, District 3
Fire Chief: Jeff Forster

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice

The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.”

link to: 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation

Stop the Bleed Class: We will do another class this spring/summer [2020] depending on interest.

Training update 10/24: “FD training is done for the year except for anyone wanting a one-on-one orientation session with the fire station and fire engine operations/pumping. Those that are interested can call me and I’ll make it happen.” – Fire Chief Jeff

YP Helispot update 10/24: “The Helispot is on it’s final stages of completion. The sidewalk to the pad needs to be concreted but everything else is complete. The gate and signs are up and Valley County Dispatch has the GPS coordinates. (44.95968 -115.49531) It’s listed as Yellow Pine Helispot. The gate is unlocked and will remain that way. There is a snow shovel there if needed. I’m asking that NO VEHICLES go beyond the gate. We already had a muddy ATV’er ride all over the pad and over the new paint with muddy tires marking up the pad. We’re planning on a dedication ceremony on the Wednesday or Thursday prior to the 2020 Harmonica Festival. More on that next year.”

YP Helispot update 10/26: “The concrete walkway to the Helispot was completed today 10/26/2019. Thanks to all who worked in the cold, rain and snow to accomplish this needed project. The stretcher can be rolled smoothly to the helicopter making it safer for the the patient and medical personnel making it more comfortable for the patient and safer for everyone. Job well done.” JF – AF
——–

Biz Listings:

Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377

Closed for Winter.
— — — —

The Corner (208) 633-3325

The Corner is closed for the winter, opening again next spring. I can be reached at matt @ ypcorner.com or at 970-379-5155. Thanks, have a great winter!
— — — —

Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233

Fall hours open 8am to close
Full breakfast served starting at 8am with special arrangement for earlier breakfast as needed. 92 Octane non ethanol gas available, cubed ice, beer, pop and water sold by the 6 and 12 pack, snacks, ice cream and many supplies available. Burgers and Pizza, Beer and Wine on the evening menu. Football and other sports available on our TV. Wi Fi, Verizon phone service and information available.
— — — —

Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Tom & Sarah Lanham
156 Yellow Pine Ave, Yellow Pine Id 83677
website:
Facebook:
It’s official starting June 2020 We will be doing trail rides out of Yellow Pine along with summer pack / camping trips to high mountain lakes in the area!

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
— — — —

Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430
— — — —

Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

The Star-News

subscribe:
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine

Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, will service Yellow Pine

B&T Safety Solutions LLC
208-271-1600 Based out of Donnelly
Snow removal, cleaning chimneys and stoves, we do cabin staining/chinking as well
— — — —

Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
———————–

Local Observations:

Monday (Nov 11) overnight low of 20 degrees, almost clear sky this morning and frosty. A few summer birds showed up, pine siskin, goldfinch and evening grosbeaks; resident jays, nuthatches, hairy woodpecker plus the clark’s nutcracker. High thin haze by lunch time. Overcast by mid-afternoon, cooler and very light breezes, high of 51 degrees. It appeared to be mostly clear at dusk, temps dropping, river sounds up. A little haze before midnight giving the moon a small halo.

Tuesday (Nov 12) overnight low of 20 degrees, overcast sky and breezy this morning. Jays, nutcracker and red-breasted nuthatches visiting. Thicker clouds at lunch time. A couple of starlings in the neighborhood. Darker thicker clouds and calmer by mid-afternoon, high of 46 degrees. Overcast at dusk, river sounds up. Cloudy before midnight.

Wednesday (Nov 13) overnight low of 27 degrees, partly clear sky (high thin clouds) and almost calm this morning. Jays, red-breasted nuthatches and a couple of clark’s nutcrackers visiting. Partly cloudy and nice at lunch time. Mail truck made it in on time. Partly cloudy mid-afternoon and nearly calm, high of 56 degrees. It appeared to be partly cloudy to mostly clear at dusk. Mostly clear before midnight and very bright moon.

Thursday (Nov 14) overnight low of 21 degrees, mostly clear sky this morning. The sun came over the ridge just after 10am. Jays, nuthatches and nutcrackers visiting. Partly cloudy at lunch time and calm. Pine squirrel and chipmunk visiting early afternoon and partly cloudy. Mostly cloudy by mid-afternoon and more clouds moving in, high of 56 degrees. Pretty much overcast at dark. Pale moonlight behind high clouds before midnight.

Friday (Nov 15) probably did not get below freezing last night, no frost and mostly cloudy sky this morning. Jays and red-breasted nuthatches visiting. Gray overcast and light breeze at lunch time. Mountain chickadee stopped by, first sighting in a very long time. Quiet day. Overcast and cool light breezes mid-afternoon, high of 53 degrees. Overcast and calm at dusk. Cloudy at midnight.

Saturday (Nov 16) overnight low of 29 degrees, dewy but no frost and partly clear sky this morning. A mountain chickadee and pine siskin joined the regulars at the feeders. Partly cloudy and light breezes at lunch time. Female hairy woodpecker and a female cassins finch visiting. Mild and mostly clear mid-afternoon, high of 52 degrees. Dark-eyed junco visited late afternoon. The sun is down behind the hill before 430pm now. Mostly cloudy at dusk and calmer. Moon rise behind clouds.

Sunday (Nov 17) overnight low of 31 degrees, overcast sky and a few sprinkles this morning (first precipitation so far in the month of November.) Jays, nuthatches, nutcracker and hairy woodpecker visiting. Light sprinkle of rain at lunch time and dark clouds. Damp, overcast and cool mid-afternoon, high of 44 degrees. Pine squirrel visited. Sprinkling and overcast at dark.
———————

Idaho News:

Snowplow cuts on the table

Valley County seeks to save money after levy failure

By Max Silverson for The Star-News Nov 14, 2019

Valley County commissioners will hold a workshop on Monday to determine which county roads might no longer be plowed due to a lack of funding and the failure of the road levy vote on Nov. 5.

The workshop is scheduled for 2 p.m. Monday during the commissioners’ regular meeting at the Valley County Courthouse in Cascade.

The session is not a public hearing, but the workshop will be open to the public.

During its meeting on Tuesday, commissioners instructed road superintendent Jeff McFadden to compile a list of roads that could be cut from the snowplowing routes as well as figures on how much the county would save by cutting those routes.

“It is important to have community involvement in setting priorities on which roads will be affected by the lack of funds for snowplowing and maintenance,” said Commissioner Sherry Maupin.

County roads are broken into the categories of major roads, minor roads, local collectors and private roads, McFadden said.

McFadden gave the example of Coho Lane, about one mile north of Donnelly, as one collector that could be plowed, but the subdivision it serves might not be plowed.

The county would consider plowing Coho Lane to where it meets the subdivision at Kokanee Lane and then turn around, he said.

The election on Nov. 5 saw voters reject a property tax that would have funded the county’s road department at about $4 million per year.

Without that revenue, commissioners have said the department would likely have to cut back on snowplowing and cease all road projects aside from basic maintenance.

The county may be forced to discontinue about half of its snowplowing routes depending on how severe the snowfall is over the winter, commissioners said.

Valley County Clerk Douglas Miller estimated that the county road department would be running a deficit by 2023 if no additional funding source can be found.

“It’s not a scare tactic, it’s just being honest with people that we can’t keep doing it this way,” Commission Chair Elt Hasbrouck said.

“We’re going to burn out our road department; those guys are going to quit because we’re working them too damn hard,” Hasbrouck said.

At Tuesday’s meeting, commissioners acknowledged more information needs to be presented on how road levy taxes would be spent.

“We have to inform the public a little bit more on what they are spending their tax dollars on, because right now, they don’t get it,” Maupin said.

“We’re asking them for their money and we have to show them how we’re going to spend it,” she said.

Commissioners plan to hold town hall meetings to discuss the budget for the road department and possible funding solutions.

“I believe we will hold meetings in Cascade, Donnelly and McCall as work sessions to listen to public input on the priorities they see,” Maupin said.

source: © Copyright 2009-2018 Central Idaho Publishing Inc.
— — — — — — — — — —

Nevermind!

Valley County to continue to accept plastic for recycling

By Max Silverson for The Star-News Nov 14, 2019

Valley County Commissioners on Tuesday reversed course from last week and decided not to stop accepting plastics at the county’s three recycling depots.

Commissioners voted last week to remove plastic recycling containers starting Dec. 2 because bins were too contaminated and resulted in the plastics being hauled to landfills.

The county will now accept all types of plastics at the McCall, Donnelly and Cascade depots and send them to a facility owned by the multinational firm Geocycle in Devil’s Slide, Utah, to be used in commercial concrete production.

Geocycle will accept plastic as long as it is free of garbage, metal and large pieces of PVC pipe, Scott Carnes, site manager for Lake Shore Disposal, told commissioners.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Contamination stalls New Meadows water line completion

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News Nov 14, 2019

Bacteria contaminating newly installed water lines along U.S. 95 in downtown New Meadows will delay completion of the project until spring at the earliest, according to the Idaho Transportation Department.

Repeated failed water quality tests over the last two months have stymied Knife River Corporation of Boise, the general contractor for the project hired by the ITD, which is funding most of the $2.4 million project.

“It is not certain what will be required to achieve passing tests,” said Jennifer Gonzalez, a spokesperson for ITD.

“The contractor has been dousing the line with chlorine, has mechanically scrubbed it and has flushed it multiple times,” Gonzalez said.

The delays are costing the city more money than the $239,000 it expected to pay for the new water line, the only portion of the work funded by the city, New Meadows City Clerk Mac Qualls said.

City water customers will not have their service affected by the faulty water line. Instead, the old line that the new line was built to replace will continue to be used, Qualls said.

continued:
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‘I was really blessed to not be dead’: North Idaho man injured by stray bullet

On Oct. 30, the Boundary County resident was talking with a friend on his cellphone when a stray bullet ripped through a bay window in his home.

Taylor Viydo November 15, 2019 KTVB

Looking back at what happened at his home in late October, Carl Hunter realizes he was inches away from having his life be drastically different.

…A responding Boundary County Sheriff’s deputy later located a deformed rifle bullet near the bay window among shattered glass and blood.

Undersheriff Richard Stevens told KREM that the incident appears to be the aftermath of a hunting accident. The department said that based on the bullet’s deformities, the bullet likely struck a tree or the ground before crashing through Hunter’s window.

… Both Hunter and Stevens emphasized the importance of area shooters and hunters shooting responsibly and knowing what lies beyond their targets. Although Hunter’s home is located in a semi-rural area, both men noted the close proximity of other homes and a church in the area.

full story:
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New law requires Idaho drivers to provide proof of insurance to DMV or risk registration suspension

Nov 13, 2019 Local News 8

Vehicle owners will need to provide proof of insurance for two consecutive months or risk having their registration suspended beginning in 2020.

The law (Idaho Code Section 49-1234) was passed during the 2019 Idaho legislative session and goes into effect in January. It requires the Idaho Transportation Department’s Division of Motor Vehicles to determine monthly whether the owner of a vehicle has insurance. The law applies only to non-commercial vehicles and excludes trailers and off-highway vehicles.

A notification letter will be sent to affected vehicle owners to alert them of the law change.

Owners without insurance coverage for two consecutive months will receive a warning and be given 30 days to provide proof of insurance or obtain an exemption before their registration is suspended.

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Census Bureau in search of Idaho-based employees

Rachel Spacek, Idaho Press November 14, 2019

Boise, Idaho — Idaho is in need of roughly 9,000 employees to work for the U.S. Census Bureau as census takers.

Nationwide, the U.S. Census Bureau needs about 2.7 million workers, said Michael Hall, assistant regional census manager through the Los Angeles Regional Census Center. Hall met with the Idaho State Complete Count Committee Wednesday to discuss job recruitment and hard-to-count groups, according to the Idaho Press.

The Census Bureau will be recruiting employees through February. Hall said the Boise Census office hopes more than 13,000 people apply for census jobs but expects to hire only around 9,000.

“We try to hire local people who are familiar with their areas, to go in and work there,” Hall said.

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Mining News:

Chemical bubble bath would extract gold from Stibnite ore

Minerals from froth would move to next step of processing

(Note: This is the fourth part in a series detailing Midas Gold Idaho’s operating plan for its proposed gold and antimony mine near Yellow Pine. Next week: Oxidation)

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News Nov 14, 2019

Billowing metallic bubbles laced with gold, silver and antimony would spill out of water tanks the size of small swimming pools as Midas Gold begins the process of separating precious metals from rock.

After crushing and grinding, finely ground ore the size of sand granules would be continuously fed into the flotation circuit at a rate of about 22,000 tons per day, according to Midas Gold’s proposed operating plan for the Stibnite area near Yellow Pine.

Flotation consists of a series of chemical reactions in large water tanks to isolate pyrite and stibnite, which are the two minerals that contain gold, silver and antimony.

The circuit would include about eight water tanks that would vary in size from 13-foot cubes with a capacity of 15,000 gallons to 26-foot cubes with a capacity of 100,000 gallons.

Once in the tanks, Midas Gold would add specific chemicals to the water to help either pyrite or stibnite rise to the surface while other minerals remain at the bottom, according to the company’s plan.

Like jets on a hot tub, the tanks would have air pumped into them and circulated to agitate the water and generate bubbles for stibnite and pyrite minerals to latch onto.

Another chemical would be added to promote stronger, frothy bubbles capable of supporting the added weight of minerals attached to them.

Bubbles at the surface of the tank would then spill over into a collection trough, where the precious metal-laden bubbles would be directed to another two stages of flotation to further isolate pyrite and stibnite from other rock.

For antimony, the process would take about 20 minutes from the time the ore enters the tanks to when it exits in concentrate form.

For gold and silver, it would take about an hour and a half because more care would be taken to isolate all pyrite minerals, which also require more effort to float than stibnite minerals.

The leftover slurry of rock at the bottom of tanks would be designated as tailings and neutralized before being pumped to the company’s planned 100-million-ton lined tailings storage area.

Not all gold and silver would be harvested from the tailings, so Midas Gold would monitor and occasionally reprocess the tailings slurry to extract lingering gold and silver.

Ore with two or more pounds of antimony per ton would go through the flotation process to remove antimony before going undergoing gold and silver flotation.

During antimony flotation, a chemical would be added to ensure pyrite minerals remain at the bottom of the tank while stibnite minerals are drawn to the surface.

At the end of the flotation circuit, metallic antimony-laden bubbles would be gathered in a liquid slurry form. Water would then be drained from the slurry to create a dry antimony powder.

The powder would only be about 60% antimony by weight. Traces of gold, silver, mercury and rock would make up the rest of the concentrate, which would be hauled away for further refining in one-ton to two-ton truckloads up to twice daily.

It would be uneconomic to extract antimony from ore containing two pounds or less per ton, so that ore would skip antimony flotation and go straight to gold and silver flotation tanks.

Concentrations of gold and silver collected from flotation bubbles would continue through the on-site ore processing facility, with the next step being oxidation, which would free gold and silver from the pyrite containing it.

Lime, which would be used to control acidity in the flotation tanks, would be the most used chemical in the flotation process at up to 187 tons per day.

Midas Gold plans to mine and process lime on site from a large limestone deposit in the existing West End pit.

Midas Gold would need to use about six to seven pounds of other chemicals in the flotation circuit per ton of ore processed, or about 70 tons per day at a cost of about $2.1 million per year.

source: © Copyright 2009-2018 Central Idaho Publishing Inc.
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Simplot proposing 5 open-pit phosphate mines in E. Idaho

by Keith Ridler Associated Press Monday, November 11th 2019

Boise, Idaho (AP) – Federal officials have released a final plan for five open-pit phosphate mines and reclamation work in eastern Idaho proposed by Idaho-based J.R. Simplot Company.

The U.S. Bureau of Land Management and U.S. Forest Service released the jointly-prepared final environmental impact statement Friday for the Dairy Syncline Mine Project about 14 miles (23 miles) east of Soda Springs.

The five mines, disposal areas, tailing ponds and other mine workings would cover about 4.3 square miles (11 square kilometers).

The two federal agencies are taking comments before making decisions.

continued:
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Public Lands:

Boise forest plans thinning of trees in Clear Creek drainage

By Max Silverson for The Star-News Nov 14, 2019

The Boise National Forest is seeking comments on the 11,000-acre Lost Horse project in the Cascade Ranger District. The project is located about 21 miles east of Cascade in the Clear Creek drainage.

The goal of the project is to change the concentration and species of trees in the project area to reduce fire danger and improve animal habitats, a news release said.

Trees in the area are mostly densely populated fir species. An overgrowth of these trees has kept larger species like ponderosa pine from growing and crowded out animal habitats.

The densely packed fir stands have also been affected by a tussock moth outbreak, with several large patches of trees dying off, the release said.

Trees would be thinned throughout the project area and prescribed burns carried out to clear brush and smaller trees. About 5,900 acres would receive prescribed burns.

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Payette and Boise National Forests Begin Christmas Tree Permit Sales Nov. 23

McCall, ID, November 14, 2019 – The Payette and Boise National Forest vendors will begin selling Christmas tree permits Saturday, Nov. 23. On Monday, Nov. 25, permits will be available at Forest Service offices. All tree permits are valid to Dec. 25.

Each permit allows one tree to be cut, with a limit of three permits per family. For both Forests, the cost of a permit for one tree is $10, and the maximum height of a permitted tree is 12 feet. Permits are valid on both the Payette and Boise National Forest – one permit works for both Forests.

All purchasers are provided with information about where a Christmas tree may be harvested, restrictions and helpful tips. A Christmas Tree Permit is for personal use only, and use of permits for commercial purposes is prohibited. Permits are non-refundable and the purchaser must be at least 18 years in age.

In coordination with the “Every Kid in a Park” program, fourth-graders who are participating in the Every Kid in a Park program can receive a free Christmas tree Permit. The U.S. Forest Service is among several federal agencies that support the Every Kid in a Park initiative which is a nationwide call to action to build the next generation of outdoor enthusiasts. The initiative provides a free pass to all fourth-grade students who first go to (link) and complete the application/voucher process, print it and bring it to a Forest Service office.

To receive a free Christmas tree permit, the fourth-grader and a parent must go to a Forest Service office in person with the “voucher” they received from the online website at: (link)

Commercial vendors will not be issuing a free Christmas tree permit to participants of the Every Kid in a Park program, and free Christmas tree permits cannot be sent through the mail or electronically. Participation in the Every Kid in a Park program also offers benefits at National Parks and on other public lands and facilities across the United States.

Harvesting a Christmas tree is a fun adventure and often a traditional family event. Please review the Christmas tree brochure and map for optimal areas and be fully prepared for winter travel.

If an unusually heavy snowfall occurs in southwest Idaho, and forest roads become a safety concern for the public, some areas may be closed early to Christmas tree gathering. Forest roads are not plowed. Call ahead and check websites for road conditions before heading out. Please do not block private or county roadways at any time.

To provide for family safety, officials advise a few simple guidelines:

* Use the brochure with instructions provided.
* Practice winter survival and driving techniques.
* Bring the right tools, such as a saw and a shovel, so the tree can be cut to within 6” of the ground’s surface.
* Take along emergency equipment, plenty of food and water, and try to use a 4-wheel drive vehicle if you are planning to travel in snow country.
* Always inform neighbors and family friends of the route you intend to take, include a map of your destination, and the time that you plan to be gone.
* Be prepared for the possibility of a long hike or snowmobile ride while searching for the perfect tree.
* According to Idaho state law, any vehicle carrying a load that extends more than 4 feet past the tailgate, must display a red or florescent orange flag tied on the end of the load to caution other drivers.

Where to get a Christmas Tree Permit

Payette National Forest Offices (link)

All Payette National Forest offices are open Monday through Friday, 8am to 4:30pm Vendors and offices closed on Thanksgiving.

McCall Forest Supervisor’s Office
500 North Mission Street, McCall, ID
208-634-0700

Council Ranger District Office
2092 Highway 95, Council, ID
208-253-0100

New Meadows Ranger District Office
3674 Highway 95, New Meadows, ID
208-347-0300

Weiser Ranger District Office
851 E Ninth St., Weiser, ID
208-549-4200

McCall Ranger District Office
102 West Lake St., McCall, ID
208-634-0400

Payette National Forest Vendors

Weiser: Ridley’s Food and Drug (208) 549-1332
652 E First St., Weiser, ID
Open: Everyday 7am – 11pm

Cambridge: Jay’s Sinclair (208) 257-5000
Corner of Hwy 95 and Hwy 71, Cambridge, ID
Open: Everyday 7am – 8pm

Council: Farmer’s Supply Cooperative (208) 253-4266
2030 N. Highway 95, Council, ID
Open: Everyday 6am – 10pm

McCall: Albertsons (208) 634-8166
132 E. Lake Street, McCall, ID
Open: Everyday 6:30am -11pm

New Meadows: C & M Lumber (208) 347-3648
3625 Walker Ln, New Meadows, ID
Open: Mon – Sat 8am – 6pm
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Critter News:

Pet Talk – Allergic bronchitis and cats

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt Nov 15, 2019 IME

Feline allergic bronchitis is inflammation of the lower airways, especially the bronchi. The inflammation is often complicated by narrowing of the airways, which is called bronco constriction. This can greatly reduce the intake of oxygen. Allergic bronchitis has two forms. The acute form is associated with reversible inflammatory changes and is also referred to as feline asthma. The chronic form is associated with irreversible airway damage. It can eventually lead to emphysema, a debilitating disease that results from enlargement and dysfunction of the smallest airways and the lungs.

The acute form is usually triggered by a hyperactive immune response to environmental irritants. In most cases, the specific inciting cause is never identified. Most cats are young to middle-age when they’re first affected. The cat usually appears healthy and has no systemic signs of illness. Wheezing and coughing are common signs. If signs are mild and intermittent, the cat may be normal between episodes. Occasionally, episodes of breathing difficulty may progress to become severe and life-threatening. The cat may sit hunched over with the neck extended, trying to take in air.

A tentative diagnosis may be made from the history and physical examination findings. X-rays may or may not reveal changes compatible with allergic bronchitis, but help to rule out other causes of coughing.

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Off-leash dog fines could triple in Meridian if new ordinance passes

Nov 14, 2019 By Natasha Williams KIVI TV

Meridian, Idaho — Walking the dog without a leash in Meridian could soon be a very expensive proposition.

The Meridian City Council is thinking about more than tripling the fines for dog owners who let their pets off leash. Right now, the fines for having a dog loose is $25 for the first offense, $50 for the second, and $100 for the third.

If the council approves the plan, fees could jump to $100 for the first offense, $200 for the second, and $300 for the third.

Councilwoman Genesis Milam introduce the ordinance, saying in was in response to the enormous number of complaints she’s getting regarding people being chased or bitten by dogs. Meridian City Attorney, Bill Nary, says owners need to be more aware.

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Fish and Game warn of more wildlife on the roads

By Heatherann Wagner Nov 13, 2019 Local News 8

Idaho Fish and Game is reminding drivers to be aware in the roads. It’s the time of year when big game animals start to migrate. The most active times tend to be dawn and dusk. They ask that drivers slow down, buckle up, and scan the roads.

source:
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Bobcat spotted near Parkcenter Boulevard

by CBS 2 News Staff Friday, November 15th 2019


Bobcat near Parkcenter. (Courtesy photo)

Boise, Idaho (CBS 2) — A rather large kitty has been making the rounds in the Parkcenter Boulevard area.

A CBS2 viewer shared with us a photo taken last week of a bobcat hanging out, perhaps looking for its next meal.

Bobcats are not uncommon to Idaho and even the Treasure Valley, but it does appear they like the Boise River area. In 2016, another bobcat was spotted near the Greenbelt.

source:
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Northwest Montana grizzly deaths spur pushback

Nov 13, 2019 AP

The mortality rate of grizzly bears in northwestern Montana has prompted a group of bear researchers to challenge whether the grizzly should be removed from federal protection.

This month a grizzly bear was shot by a hunter east of Eureka and state wildlife managers killed another bear near Libby after it broke into a garage to eat a harvested elk.

The Missoulian reports the number of known grizzly deaths in the Northern Continental Divide Ecosystem recovery zone this year has reached 48.

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Texas A&M is now home for Elliott the Elk

Elliott is planting his hooves at A&M’s Wildlife Center to be raised in captivity for veterinary students to study his species.

Gabriela Garcia November 15, 2019 KTVB

College Station, Texas — From football players to various alumni, Texas A&M has been home to a few big names.

Lately, there’s a pretty big star that’s living on campus, Elliott the Elk.

He has planted his hooves at A&M’s Winnie Carter Wildlife Center, coming from Idaho.

continued:
https://www.ktvb.com/article/life/animals/elliotttheelktamuvetschoolwildlifecenter/277-18a1e193-9d44-4954-af24-bceba7bb2dd9

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Nearly 300 wild horses captured in central Idaho

Associated Press November 12, 2019

Challis, Idaho — Nearly 300 wild horses have been captured in central Idaho as part of a plan by federal land managers to reduce the number of wild horses roaming the area to about 185.

The U.S. Bureau of Land Management says that 295 wild horses were rounded up over seven days ending Monday in the Challis Herd Management Area near the town of Challis.

Aerial census flights are planned this week to determine the number of wild horses remaining in the area.

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Northwest Wyoming deer test positive for chronic wasting

Nov 11, 2019 AP

Cheyenne, Wyo. (AP) – Wildlife biologists have confirmed a disease deadly to deer, elk and moose in several deer in a new area of northwest Wyoming, near the Montana line.

The Wyoming Game and Fish Department says the deer came from the Clark area. Tests for chronic wasting disease came back positive for mule deer and white-tailed deer killed by hunters and for mule deer killed by vehicles.

The deer were killed in early November.

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Craft Fair Aids Trio of Nonprofits

November 12, 2019 By Mary Malone Bonner County Daily Bee


Mystic Farm Wildlife Rescue

Sandpoint, [Idaho] — The third annual Ponderay Arts and Crafts Festival is coming up just in time for the holiday season.

With 42 vendors made up of local artists, crafters and others, there will be plenty of gift ideas for everyone at the festival.

“There is a lot of excellent stuff,” said Dory McIsaac from Mystic Farm Wildlife Rescue, the featured nonprofit for the event.

… McIsaac will be selling her handmade Mystic Farm candles, which come in a variety of scents. She has also been busy making antler art to sell this year, she said, such as wind chimes, candle holders, keychains and other items. There will be T-shirts and hats for sale to support the wildlife rescue as well.

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Largemouth bass earns angler new Idaho catch and release record at 25 inches, 9.7 lbs

by CBS 2 News Staff Thursday, November 14th 2019


25-inch, 9.7-pound bass earns angler new Idaho catch and release record. (Idaho Department of Fish)

Boise, Idaho (CBS 2) — A 25-inch, 9.7-pound bass just earned an angler the new Idaho catch and release record for largemouth bass.

J.J. Schillinger, of Post Falls, hooked this monster during the Panhandle Bass Anglers Fall Open tournament in October. He caught the bass in Cave Lake, one of a dozen chain lakes along the Coeur d’Alene River.

… J.J.’s new record bass beat the previous record of 23.75 inches set by Dale Stratton at Sawyers Pond near Emmett in May of 2017.

full story:
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Fish & Game News:

Oh deer! Peak season for hitting wildlife on the road is here

By Mike Demick, Staff Biologist
Wednesday, November 13, 2019

Motorists are urged to slow down and be extra careful.

With big game animals on the move for mating and migration, wildlife-vehicle collisions tend to peak this time of year. Motorists are urged to slow down and be extra careful.

The deer mating season occurs in November, and they tend to be active all day and become inattentive at times. And with increased snow in the higher elevations, Idaho’s big game herds are migrating to lower elevation winter ranges, crossing many highways and roads.

“While you can’t predict when wildlife will cross the road, being extra alert, slowing down, and avoiding driving under low light conditions if possible is your best defense,” said Greg Painter, Idaho Fish and Game wildlife manager based in Salmon.

continued:
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Two moose illegally killed near Isabella Road east of Elk River on Nov. 2

By Jennifer Bruns, Regional Communications Manager
Tuesday, November 12, 2019

Idaho Fish and Game officers are investigating an incident that occurred on Saturday, November 2 near Isabella Road east of Elk River, Idaho. Officers are asking for help locating a red Chevy pickup truck that was seen leaving the area where two moose were killed. The pickup was described as a 2007-2014 model red Chevrolet pickup with newer bedside wood racks approximately cab height. Witnesses reported seeing a black lab in the bed of the truck and said that the vehicle left the area traveling at a high rate of speed. Both moose were taken from the scene.

If anyone has information regarding this incident, call Sr. Conservation Officer, Brian Perkes at 208-969-1605 or contact the Citizens Against Poaching hotline at 1-800-632-5999. Callers can remain anonymous.

source:
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Three whitetailed deer found shot and left to waste near Keuterville/Ferdinand on Nov. 2

By Jennifer Bruns, Regional Communications Manager
Tuesday, November 12, 2019

On Saturday, November 2, 2019 two deer were found shot and left to waste in agricultural fields in the Keuterville/Ferdinand area.

The first deer, a white tail doe, was found off Agnew Rd, near the intersection of Keuterville Rd. She had been gut shot and left to waste in a stubble field. She appears to have been shot late night on Friday, November 1 or early morning Saturday, November 2. The meat was salvaged and donated to a local family.

The second deer, a 4×4 white tail buck, was found off Rolling Hills Rd, about 3 miles outside Ferdinand. He was also gut shot and left to waste in a stubble field. He appears to have been shot in the same time frame as the doe.

continued:
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More F&G News Releases

link:
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Fun Critter Stuff:

Deer breaks into home, refuses to leave bathtub

by WSMH/WEYI Staff Friday, September 27th 2019


Picture from Fenton Police

Fenton, Mich (WSMH/WEYI) – Fenton Police responded to a bizarre breaking and entering on Wednesday, September 25th.

Police believe a deer may have been hit by a car and then crashed through the window of a home.

Once inside the home, police say the deer went into the bathtub and would not leave.

continued:
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Seasonal Humor:

FallFirewoodCutting-a

FallLongWinter-a
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Idaho History Nov 17, 2019

“Sheepherder” Bill Borden

Thunder Mountain, Edwardsburg, McCall, South Fork Salmon River, Idaho

1897 Bill Borden

WarrenSkiMailThunderMtn-aMail Warren to Thunder Mtn Skis and Skiing, Warrens, Idaho

William Borden “Sheepherder Bill” carried mail from Warrens to Thunder Mountain. Bill Patterson storekeeper & postmaster at right, 1897.

Publisher Idaho State Historical Society
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Sheepherder Bill’s Explosive Story

​When “Sheepherder Bill” Borden made the paper, it was rarely good news. In 1902, the June 27 issue of the Idaho Statesman ran the following blurb, which was typical of the mentions about the man: “Bill Borden, better known as Sheepherder Bill, was in police court yesterday on the usual charge of being drunk. He was fined and costed to the amount of $5 and not having the coin, he will languish in the Bastille.”

Borden was a well-known miner in the Thunder Mountain region. He was also well known as a packer, carrying the heaviest backpacks of mail between Warrens and Thunder Mountain. And he was well known as a moonshiner. In his youth he was an ordained minister. Did you notice anything about sheep in all those well-knowns? Why he was called “Sheepherder Bill” is a minor mystery.

It was bad news, again, in July of 1905. It seems that Borden and a man named Barnum were curious about whether or not a piece of fuse was still good. One of them lit it and, yes, it was good. The burning fuse was tossed unartfully away, landing on a box of dynamite. The resulting explosion killed Barnum, and badly injured Borden. The first reports of the incident listed, “Sheepherder Bill, rock blown into side; probably fatal.”

The second report, a couple of days later, credited Mrs. Carl Brown with saving his life.

The best news I found about Borden in early papers was a story in the Statesman in 1907 when he was said to have found a “rich gold find mysteriously near Meadows.”

The bad news held off for a number of years, but the final report was of Sheepherder Bill’s death by a second explosion. His homemade still had blown up inside his cabin in 1932. He had perished in the resulting fire.

source: Speaking of Idaho history posts are copyright 2018 by Rick Just
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Sheepherder Bill

as remembered by Ida Brown

Edwardsburg c. 1908

EdwardsburgBrown-aEdwardsburg, now Big Creek, where the Browns spent one winter.
(pg 41)

On one of their few holidays they had left Betty and gone on a fishing party. While everybody was sitting around a campfire, somebody tinkered with a fuse that was too short for safety. The dynamite exploded. One man was killed and Sheepherder Bill Borden had a hole blown in his chest. Many were peppered with gravel, Ida’s hair was shaken out of its knot and her knees badly bruised. A dog that was along was deafened.

Bill Borden cried to Ida: “Miz Brown, Miz Brown, I’m a dyin!”

“No you’re not!” Ida told him firmly, taking from her shirt pocket the large clean handkerchief she always carried and pressing it into the hole. This checked the bleeding, but nevertheless a man was dispatched to Thunder Mountain, miles away, for a doctor. The doctor couldn’t come, but Ida got her patient to the Edwardses’ and nursed him to recovery. Carl wasn’t hurt by the blast though for months Ida would be prying gravel from his back with a darning needle dipped in peroxide.
(pgs 22-23)

Shiefer ranch, South Fork Salmon River c. 1909
ShieferRanchBrown-aIda and Betty at the Shiefer ranch* in South Fork Canyon
(pg 41)

Before the Browns were really settled, friends from the South Fork started visiting them. There was Sheepherder Bill Borden, somehow related to that well known family, who’d apparently never had anything to do with sheep. Well recovered from the hole in his chest, he could pack more on his back than anybody. More than limber Carl Brown. Once he carried a cookstove over the summits to Big Creek for Mrs. Edwards. On another trip, going in afoot with the Edwardses, he found himself packing young Napier more than seemed necessary. Finally rebelling he unloaded the child and said to Mrs. Edwards: “Ma’am, I think it would be better if we just killed this little boy and you went on home and made yourself another.”

McCall Payette Lake c. 1910
PayetteLakeBrown-aU.S. Forest Service supervisor Julian Rothery at McCall in 1910, Ida Brown and Baby Betty, Herbert Williams a later supervisor.
(pg 41)

A stout drinker, Bill usually ran out of money before he could get himself out of McCall. One Sunday morning Ida, dressing for Sunday school, said to Betty: “If Sheepherder Bill comes here while I’m gone, don’t let your father give him any money.”

Returning, she checked with Betty.

But Betty cried, “What shall I do! Daddy told me not to tell you anything!”

“If he told you not to tell, then don’t,” Ida said, knowing the answer anyhow.

Sheepherder Bill prudently delayed his next trip to town, but by that time he had decided to go to Philadelphia for a visit. He was full of this plan, and explained it in great detail to the Browns. They thought it was indeed a fine idea, and when he left the house they assumed it might be a long time before they saw their friend again. Perhaps he would decide to stay among his relatives in the East.

But Bill got only as near Philadelphia as the out-skirts of McCall. He was found there blissfully drunk. When sober he reconsidered his plan, and felt that having been delayed he might as well not make the trip. A few years later he was burned up when his mountain still exploded.
(pgs 47-48)

Setting a dinner plate for whoever comes also makes one feel part of the country, and Ida was always doing this. People, mostly men of course, from the mountains and the canyons were always dropping in, usually at meal time. On a summer afternoon Boston Brown and Sheepherder Bill came to town. They intended to drop in first at a saloon, briefly. More drinks later than they realized, they set out for Ida’s. However, they didn’t quite make it – they collapsed in the weeds at the edge of her yard and fell asleep. Their sleep was not too sound, for they reared up at intervals and yelled “Yippee”, or they advised listeners to “Let ’er Go Double.”

Some of Ida’s more staid neighbors were shocked and were determined to do something. But Ida earnestly explained that the two men were old friends, they were doing nobody any harm and shouldn’t be bothered.
(pg 57)

source: “The King’s Pines of Idaho; a story of the Browns of McCall” by Grace Edgington Jordan 1961 (21 megs)
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Note * the Shiefer ranch lies across the river from the old Brewer Homestead Site on the South Fork Salmon River (near the Elk Summit to Warrens bridge) and is now a FS campground.

source: Back Country History Project Metsker Atlas South Fork
[h/t SMc]
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Borden, Sheepherder Bill

by Roxanna Allen

William “Sheepherder Bill” Borden claimed he was a descendant of the famous Borden milk products family. He lived in a cabin at the mouth of Porphyry Creek, where he always raised a fine garden. A well-educated man that had a weakness for drink, “Sheepherder” Bill made several stakes and would proceed to drink up all of his profits.

Whiskey would prove to be the ruin of, “Sheepherder” Bill. He was burned in his cabin when his whiskey still blew up, or so it was supposed when the burned cabin was discovered.

excerpted from: The Star-News 8/17/78
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S.F. Salmon River; Porphyry Creek

PorphyryCreek-a

source: Topo Map of Streams in Valley County, Idaho
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Borden, Bill

Referred to as “Sheepherder Bill”, he had a moonshine still that blew up and he was burned to death in his cabin date about 1932
(p.29 Sheepeater Campaign; Carrey)
Burial Location: S.F. Salmon River; Porphyry Creek

source: Idaho County GenWeb
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Note: On the west side of the Porphyry Bridge across the South Fork of the Salmon river from the mouth of Porphyry Creek, down stream to the north is a small cleared area of about half an acre. At the base of the cliff rocks were stacked probably from clearing the land, and old lilac bushes are growing wild. In a little “cave” in the cliff a pipe runs fresh spring water. No signs of cabin remnants or grave site were present in 2001.
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Link to History Back Country Post Offices
Link to Curley Brewer
Link: Thunder Mountain / Roosevelt History index page
Link: Big Creek / Edwardsburg History index page
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page updated October 14, 2020

Road Reports Nov 17, 2019

Note: The Valley County road levy failed to pass on Nov 5th. Snowplowing and road maintenance will likely be slashed in half. There will be a meeting tomorrow, Nov 18, at 2pm in Cascade to get an update from the road department.

Watch for a bad icy spot about halfway down the South Fork road. Please share road reports. Conditions change very quickly this time of year. High elevation roads may have several inches of snow. Be prepared for snow/ice, rocks and trees in the road and remember there is no cell phone service.

Yellow Pine: We have had dry weather so far in November, local streets are clear. Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN.
link: Local Forecast.
Yellow Pine Webcam: (check date on image)

Warm Lake Highway: Last report Wednesday (Nov 13) Mail truck driver reports there are slick spots in the shady places to watch for in the early morning going over Big Creek summit, especially on the Cascade side.

Highway 55 Webcams Link:

South Fork Road: Tuesday (Nov 12) “South Fork is bare except for BAD ICE FLOW with deep rut about milepost 14. There will be black ice from Warm Lake road to milepost 7 at night and early morning. That section was occasionally wet today so it will freeze at night.” – LI
Another report Monday (Nov 11) that a low clearance car might have trouble with that deep icy rut, about halfway out the South Fork road.
Last Sunday (Nov 10) a truck slid off the road into the river, slow down and watch for ice.
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Sunday (Nov 10) Last report that the road is still in good shape.

Johnson Creek Road: Still open but travel at your own risk.
Wednesday (Nov 13) mail truck driver said there are frozen ruts up at Landmark, upper Johnson Creek road has ruts beat down to dirt, then clear and dry all the way to Yellow Pine – except in the shade. Another report that the road between YP and the Dump is getting ‘pot-holy’.
link: Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam
link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
Note: The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Open? No current report. Probably some snow up high. Travel at your own risk.
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Travel at your own risk. Probably ruts beat thru at the top.
Last report Saturday (Oct 26) going in with high clearance 4×4 required chains over the top, “was not easy”.
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcam: (check date on image)

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open.
Report from Midas Gold Oct 29th: Following the end of the year grading, we’ve had a little rain & snow creating some muddy conditions. The temperatures are getting low enough to create a predominantly hard frozen running surface with patches of snow/ice in the shadows. Overall, the road is in pretty good conditions with the odd pothole here and there but should be traveled with caution.
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Probably closed by now at the summit? No current report on road conditions. Travel at your own risk.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Probably snowed closed by now. No current report. Travel at your own risk.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: Open? No current report. Probably some snow up high. Travel at your own risk.
Note: The approx elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
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