Monthly Archives: January 2020

Road Reports Jan 29, 2020

Please share road reports. Conditions change very quickly this time of year. High elevation roads may have several inches of snow. Be prepared for snow/ice, rocks and trees in the road and remember there is no cell phone service.

Yellow Pine: Wednesday (Jan 29) we received 1/2 snow/sleet overnight, 17″ total snow on the ground. Local streets have a snow floor, some have been plowed, others packed by light traffic. Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN.
link: Local Forecast
Yellow Pine Webcam: (check date on image)

Warm Lake Highway: Wednesday (Jan 29) mail truck driver (Robert) says the highway was in excellent shape, county graders working today.
link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

Highway 55 Webcams Link:

South Fork Road: Wednesday (Jan 29) mail truck driver (Robert) says the upper 6 or so miles of the South Fork was really rough. Local plow is headed that way. From Reed Ranch on down there are patches of bare pavement in the sunny places.
Report Sunday (4pm Jan 26): “South Fork and East Fork roads are now, “some of everything”. There is a path through the avalanche, slush, ice, bare pavement, broken snow floor. On a 1 – 10 scale it’s about 5. That was about 3:00 & 4:00 1/26, but steady, wet snow is coming down after that.” – TR
Report Friday (Jan 24) that 2 avalanches closed the South Fork road around MM 6 Friday afternoon (mail truck had to shovel to get out.) Local plow went out Saturday and opened a path thru the slides.
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Wednesday (Jan 29) mail truck driver said the new snow had improved traction where it had been icy close to YP.

Lower Johnson Creek Road: Report Saturday (Jan 25) that the lower road was plowed this week.
Landmark and upper Johnson Creek closed to wheeled vehicles.
link: Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam
link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
Note: The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Closed to wheeled vehicles (no current report.)
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Last report Jan 8, 2020 (C&L): “Profile/Big Creek Road – Not suitable for wheeled traffic. There has been enough over snow traffic that the route is easy going for snowmobiles so long as you stay in compacted portion of the road.”
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcam: (check date on image)

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open.
Dec 31 last report from Midas Gold: Stibnite road is and will be plowed between YP and Stibnite. Please be aware of equipment on the road and take it slow.
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Closed to wheeled vehicles (no current report.)
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Report Jan 8, 2020 (C&L): “There is no evidence of travel up Smith Creek & up to Elk Summit. We would recommend only the most adventurous take on those routes until after the snow sets up.”
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: Closed to wheeled vehicles (no current report.)
Note: The approx elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′
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Winter Weather Advisory January 27, 11pm to Jan 28, 5pm

Winter Weather Advisory January 27, 11pm to Jan 28, 5pm

Link: Yellow Pine Forecast

This Afternoon A 20 percent chance of snow. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 37. West southwest wind around 6 mph.

Tonight A 40 percent chance of snow. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 26. South southwest wind around 6 mph. New snow accumulation of less than one inch possible.

Tuesday Snow before 11am, then rain and snow. High near 39. South southwest wind 5 to 7 mph. Chance of precipitation is 100%. New snow accumulation of 1 to 2 inches possible.

Tuesday Night Snow likely, mainly before 11pm. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 22. Southwest wind around 5 mph becoming calm in the evening. Chance of precipitation is 70%. New snow accumulation of less than a half inch possible.

Wednesday Partly sunny, with a high near 37. Calm wind.

Winter Weather Advisory

URGENT - WINTER WEATHER MESSAGE
National Weather Service Boise ID
951 AM MST Mon Jan 27 2020

...WINTER WEATHER ADVISORY FOR SNOW FOR THE WEST CENTRAL IDAHO
MOUNTAINS FROM 11 PM TONIGHT UNTIL 5 PM TUESDAY...

.A winter storm will move in rapidly tonight and bring mountain
snow and valley rain tomorrow. Snowfall totals are expected to be
sufficient to warrant an advisory for the West Central Idaho
Mountain zone, with 4-6 inches expected in McCall and 6-9 inches
at higher elevations.

West Central Mountains-
951 AM MST Mon Jan 27 2020

...WINTER WEATHER ADVISORY IN EFFECT FROM 11 PM THIS EVENING TO
5 PM MST TUESDAY...

* WHAT...Snow expected. Total snow accumulations of up to 6
  inches, except up to 9 inches over the higher mountains.

* WHERE...West Central Mountains zone.

* WHEN...From 11 PM this evening to 5 PM MST Tuesday. The heaviest
  snowfall will be from 5 am to 11 am Tuesday.

* IMPACTS...Plan on slippery road conditions.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...

Slow down and use caution while traveling.

The latest road conditions can be obtained by calling 5 1 1.

Jan 26, 2020 The Yellow Pine Times

Jan 26, 2020 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Community Calendar:

Jan 28 – comments due on power line relocation
Dec 7 thru Feb 21 Yellow Pine Tavern Holiday Closure
Feb 22 – Pie Contest 2pm at the Yellow Pine Tavern
(details below)
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Local Events:

Feb 22 – Pie Contest

2pm at the Yellow Pine Tavern, $1 per plate to taste the pies, money goes to the winners.
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Village News:

Ski Race Jan 18

Two intrepid skiers (Deb and Ronda) entered the cross country ski race, but after half a lap around the airstrip, the race was called due to the snow conditions (2 feet deep!) A great time was had by all.
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Chili Contest Results from Jan 18

20200118ChiliContest-a

The chili contest was fun and about thirteen gathered and sat around to talk.

Winners
Sarah 1st
Kat 2nd
Cecil 3rd
20200118-ChiliContestWinners-a
(photos courtesy Ray L)
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IPC Warm lake Feeder Line Relocation [Yellow Pine]

“Please submit your scoping comments by January 28, 2020”

(received Jan 13, 2020) Boise National Forest

Project Description

Idaho Power Company (IPC) has identified a need relocate a segment of line that is currently west of Johnson Creek. This segment of line is only accessible by a deteriorated light-duty bridge that cannot handle the weight of the large equipment required to maintain the line, thus creating a safety issue. Also, the segment of line where it crosses back over to the east side of Johnson Creek and continues into the community of Yellow Pine is at risk to rock slides and there has been repeated rock slide related outages and emergency repairs over the last several years. The proposed underground alignment would improve access, reduce customer outages, improve service and reliability, and ensure the electrical energy source to Yellow Pine residences is maintained.

Proposed Action:

IPC proposes to reroute approximately 2.49 miles of a portion of the existing overhead Warm Lake (WMLK 011) 7.2-kilovolt (kV) distribution line with approximately 2.74 miles of single-phase underground line.

The proposed underground line would be along the easterly ROW (66 feet) of Johnson Creek Road and the associated vaults and sectors would be located outside of the existing road prism and would not interfere with the free flow of traffic, disrupt communication services, or impair the full use and safety of the road.

The proposed project would involve plowing/trenching conduit, installing conductor, excavating and installing vaults/sectors, installing two new single poles (where the line transitions from overhead to underground), and backfilling the trench.

Once the underground distribution line is installed, the overhead line would be removed and the ROW for the portion of the overhead line would be relinquished. All project related disturbance would be repaired as soon as weather, ground, and scheduling conditions permit.

Approximately 0.27 miles of the existing overhead line (including four single-pole wood pole) would remain to continue to provide service to a private mining claim on the west side of Johnson Creek.

Project Location:

The proposed project is in Township 18 North, Range 08 East, Section 04, and Township 19 North, Range 08 East, Sections 28, 29, 32, & 33, Boise Meridian, Valley County, Idaho.

How to Comment

The Forest Service is contacting interested persons, groups, and agencies to make them aware of the project and to gather pertinent feedback. Your comments will help us identify and address issues. Comments may be submitted in the following ways:

* Through the project webpage (link). Select “Comment on Project” under “Get Connected” on the right panel. If uploading a file with comments, comments must be in the form of plain text (.txt), Word (.doc, .docx) or PDF (.pdf).
* Mail to Cascade Ranger District, PO Box 696, Cascade, ID 83611.
* Hand deliver to Boise National Forest, Cascade District, 540 North Main Street, Cascade, ID 83611. Office hours for submitting hand-delivered comments are 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, excluding holidays.
* By fax at 208-382-7480. If submitting comments by mail or fax, be sure to include “WMLK-11” in the subject line.

Comments received will be included in the project record and may be released in their entirety, if requested, pursuant to the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA).

When to Comment

To be most helpful, please submit your scoping comments by January 28, 2020. For further information on the project, please contact Terre Pearson-Ramirez, Team Leader, at 208-382-7400.
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January Snow

As of Sunday morning (Jan 26) Yellow Pine has 15 1/2″ of snow on the ground. We received 34″ of snowfall so far in January, average depth 15″. Average high 35 degrees, average low 18 degrees. Total water (rain + melted snow) = 2.57″. The warmer weather and rain this week has been absorbed by the snow pack, which is saturated and quite heavy. A report of a couple of avalanches on the upper South Fork closed the road for a while Friday night until the local plow driver could get out and clear a path on Saturday. Travel takes concentration this time of year.
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Biz Closures

The Corner is closed for the winter, opening again next spring. I can be reached at matt @ ypcorner.com or at 970-379-5155. Thanks, have a great winter!
– Matt

The Tavern will be closed from Saturday December 7th to Friday February 21st. UPS packages will be dropped off at Deb’s porch and she will also have gasoline for emergency situations. I will be available at my cell number for any questions or situations 208 739-7086
Thanks, Lorinne N. Munn

The Yellow Pine Lodge is closed for the winter.
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Yellow Pine US Mail

The 3-day a week mail delivery started Nov 1st. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 55 cents. Support our local post office and purchase your holiday stamps here.
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Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Report Saturday (Jan 25) the transfer station was plowed this week and the bins are about half full.

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

Yellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is located approximately 3 miles south on Johnson Creek Road.

The TRANSFER STATION is for household trash and yard waste:
* Household trash must be put inside (and fit) the dumpster;
* Yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, et.) goes in the burn pile on the south end of the turn-around;
* Cardboard boxes should be flattened before putting the in the dumpster,

The DUMPSTERS are NOT for:
* Furniture (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station).

The BURN PILE is NOT for:
* Cardboard boxes (flatten and put in dumpster);
* Furniture and appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Drywall and building material (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wire or fencing (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Foam Rubber (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wood with metal (like nails) attached (take to Donnelly Transfer Station.)

When closing the DOORS on the front of the dumpsters:
* Make sure the “U” brackets at the top and bottom of the door are engaged;
* The retaining bar at the middle of the door is slid into the pipe;
* And the “L” bars at the bottom of the doors dropped into place.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: 208/634-7176
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Local Groups:

YPWUA News:

Water rates have been increased, the 2019 fee is $400. Payment is due by Feb 15, 2020, or you can pay half and the other half is due June 15, 2020.

Boil Water Advisory Lifted November 22, 2019

The 2019 Yellow Pine Water Users Shareholders meeting was Sunday July 7th in the Community Hall.
link: 20190707YPWUAminutes
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VYPA News:

The community hall committee’s goal is to have adequate heating installed in the main hall before the June VYPA meeting.

If folks have items for the community yard sale, please place them by the north wall in the community hall. If you see items you would like to purchase, you can pay Deb, Ronda, or Lynn. All funds support the community hall.

VYPA meetings for 2020 – June 13, 2pm; July 11, 2pm; August 8, 2pm; September 12, 2pm.

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting Minutes for September 21, 2019
link: 20190921 Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting
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YPFD News:

YP Fire Commissioners:
Sue Holloway – District 1
Dan Stiff – District 2
Merrill Saleen – District 3
Fire Chief – Jeff Forster

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice

The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.” Click the link: to view 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation

We will do another class this spring/summer [2020] depending on interest. Training will resume in the spring. -Fire Chief Jeff
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Biz Listings:

The Corner (208) 633-3325

Closed for the winter.
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Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233

Closed Dec 7 thru Feb 21.
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Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377

Closed for Winter.
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Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Tom & Sarah Lanham
156 Yellow Pine Ave, Yellow Pine Id 83677
website:
Facebook:
Starting June 2020 We will be doing trail rides out of Yellow Pine along with summer pack / camping trips to high mountain lakes in the area!

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
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Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430
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Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

The Star-News

subscribe:
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine

Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, will service Yellow Pine

B&T Safety Solutions LLC
208-271-1600 Based out of Donnelly
Snow removal, cleaning chimneys and stoves, we do cabin staining/chinking as well
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (Jan 20) overnight low of 16 degrees, overcast sky, no new precipitation and measured 17″ of snow on the ground. A few nuthatches visited, a jay calling across the street. Overcast at lunch time and light breezes, high of 40 degrees. Chickadees stopped by. Overcast at sundown and fairly calm. No rain yet and overcast just before dark. Cloudy before midnight. Looks like it rained a little during the night, roofs starting to dry by morning.

Tuesday (Jan 21) 24 hour low of 23 degrees from Monday morning, at 10am it was 32 degrees and dark overcast, measured 17″ snow on the ground. Steeper roofs have slid and moderate pitches have long snow curls oozing off roofs. Red-breasted nuthatches, hairy woodpecker and mountain chickadees visiting. At lunch time a thinner place in the clouds and filtered sun for a short while, high of 39 degrees. Gusty breezes and a few drops of rain mid-afternoon. Breezy and light sprinkles with low foggy clouds at dusk. Still sprinkling early evening, temperature right at freezing and slick paths. Mid-evening it was snowing hard and stacking up, then back to rain again by late evening. Breaks in the clouds and stars out around 1030pm. Cloudy after midnight.

Wednesday (Jan 22) overnight low of 18 degrees, measured 1/4″ of frozen slush and 16 1/2″ total snow on the ground. Crusty slush improved traction on paths. Hairy woodpecker, red-breasted nuthatches, mountain chickadees, jays and a clark’s nutcracker visiting. Mail truck made it in a little early today. At lunch time it was still below freezing and overcast. A few breaks in the clouds early afternoon, then back to overcast sky before sundown, high of 36 degrees. Broken cloud cover, light breeze and just above freezing at dark. Cloudy night. Light snow falling before sunrise.

Thursday (Jan 23) 24 hour low of 23 degrees from Wed morning, overcast and fine light snow falling this morning, 1/4″ new snow and 16″ total snow on the ground. Clark’s nutcracker, jays, hairy woodpecker, mountain chickadees, a while-breasted and the usual bunch of red-breasted nuthatches visiting. Overcast and snow melting, dripping at lunch time, high of 37 degrees. Misted a little rain mid-afternoon. Above freezing and overcast just before sundown. Top of VanMeter hill fogged in since morning, cloudy at dark. Cloudy before midnight. Rain early morning, probably after 6am. Do not think it got below freezing during the night.

Friday (Jan 24) 24 hour low of 30 degrees from Thurs morning, overcast and raining lightly before sunrise, measured 15 1/2″ total snow on the ground, steep roofs are bare and flatter roofs are sliding. Raven calling and flying over the village, red-breasted nuthatches and chickadees visiting. Cloudy and drippy at lunch time, high of 41 degrees. Above freezing and melting snow early afternoon. Still above freezing at sundown. Patches of clear sky and above freezing at dark. Cloudy before midnight. Snowing before sunrise.

Saturday (Jan 25) overnight low of 27 degrees, low clouds – ridges fogged in, steady light snow falling (about 1/8″ by 10am) measured 15″ total snow on the ground. Woodpecker drumming, jays, chickadees and nuthatches visiting. Short light snow flurry after lunch, high of 38 degrees. Cloudy afternoon and above freezing. More bare roofs in the neighborhood, less steep ones are shedding some of their snow loads too. Overcast, humid and above freezing at dark. Some stars out before midnight. Snowing before 7am.

Sunday (Jan 26) overnight low of 25 degrees, measured 1/2″ new snow and 15 1/2″ total snow on the ground, low overcast (top of Van Meter in the clouds) and still snowing (good snowball snow.) Nuthatches and chickadees visiting. Stopped snowing just before lunch, above freezing and roofs dripping, low foggy overcast, high of 37 degrees. Rain/snow mix then all snow mid-afternoon, low foggy clouds to the valley floor. Slushfest. Still snowing at dark (3/4″ measured) and right at freezing. Slushy wet heavy snow.
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Idaho News:

Valley delays decision on new snowmobile rules

Problems found with Anderson Creek, car ban date

By Max Silverson for The Star-News Jan 23, 2020

Valley County commissioners on Tuesday said questions remain about proposed new rules for use of snowmobile trails and parking lots in the county.

No date was set for the commissions to take up the topic again.

Chief among the questions was a proposal to ban wheeled vehicles during the winter on Anderson Creek Road on the west side of Lake Cascade.

The owner of land along the road told commissioners that he is developing a subdivision along Anderson Creek Road and the ban would hinder access.

Commissioners told the owner, Ed Priddy of Eagle, that they wanted to find a solution and made plans to hold a meeting between Priddy and representatives from snowmobile groups. The Valley County Snowmobile Advisory Committee also was told to begin drafting rules for parking in the Francis Wallace Parking Lot on Warren Wagon Road north of McCall.

At the public hearing, three people spoke in favor of the ordinance and six people spoke against the rules as drafted.

continued:
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Valley Search & Rescue nominated for Idaho’s Brightest Star

The Star-News Jan 23, 2020

Valley County Search and Rescue was among 17 nominees in the Non-Profit/Civic Organization category in the 2020 Idaho’s Brightest Star Awards program.

The Idaho’s Brightest Star Awards program celebrates outstanding dedication and accomplishments of Idaho’s volunteers. Honorees are nominated by fellow Idahoans for their civic contributions and volunteer spirit.

The 2020 awards ceremony was held last week at Boise State University’s Student Union Building.

continued:
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Event Guide: McCall Winter Carnival 2020

Thousands of people will converge on the small Idaho mountain community for the annual event. Here’s a guide to all the activities happening at this year’s carnival.

KTVB January 22, 2020

McCall, Idaho — The popular McCall Winter Carnival returns for its 55th year. Festivities will bring plenty of fun and excitement for all the kids and family. This year’s carnival runs from Friday, Jan. 24 to Sunday, Feb. 2.

The carnival attracts thousands of people across the globe to enjoy live events, fireworks over Payette Lake and the famous snow and ice sculptures.

This year’s theme is “It’s a kids world!”

Visitors will be able to enjoy snow sculpture viewings, live music and events each day.

continued:
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Historical group seeks images of McCall from 1940 to 1980

The Star-News Jan 23, 2020

The McCall Historic Preservation Commission is seeking photos, home movies and other historical accounts of McCall and the surrounding areas taken from the 1940s through the 1980s.

The commission will use the media to create a video documenting McCall’s transition from a town centered on industry to one centered on recreation and tourism.

The organization is also seeking candidates to provide oral histories in interviews that will be featured in the video.

The new production will be a follow-up to the 2018 History of McCall video, which describes the early years of McCall. To view the 2018 production, visit (link)

Historic videos and images can be uploaded online at (link)

For more information or to email the media, contact the Historic Preservation Commission at McCallTransitions@gmail.com

source:
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The History of McCall Idaho

(34 minute video) City of McCall A journey through the history of McCall Idaho. Sponsored by the Historical Preservation Commission. Copyright 2017

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Warm, rainy weather causes rockfalls along Highway 95, seriously damaging one car

If you’re driving on Highway 95 near Riggins, make sure to use extra caution and look out for rockfalls.

January 24, 2020 KTVB

Boise, Idaho — Thanks to warm and rainy weather throughout Idaho, the Idaho Transportation Department is urging drivers to use extra caution and look out for rockfalls when driving on Highway 95 near Riggins.

On Friday, a rock fell onto Highway 95 south of Riggins and a car crashed into it, folding up the car’s front-end like paper. Officials at the Idaho Transportation Department said no one seriously injured in the crash.

continued:
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Firewise Grant Program accepts applications through Feb. 28

The Star-News Jan 23, 2020

The Idaho Firewise Grant Program is accepting applications from fire departments and other community organizations seeking to increase wildland fire awareness through education.

The program has awarded more than $96,941 to fund projects throughout Idaho over the past six years.

For more information on the program, contact Stephanie Nelson at 208-630-4201 or (link).

For more information on Idaho Firewise grant requirements or to submit a grant proposal, visit (link) The deadline for submitting proposals is Friday, Feb. 28.

source:
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Mining News:

Stibnite Gold Project opponents form nonprofit corporation

The Star-News Jan 23, 2020

A citizens group that is opposed to the Stibnite Gold Project proposed by Midas Gold Corp. has incorporated as a nonprofit conservation organization.

Save the South Fork Salmon is dedicated to protecting the natural, cultural, and economic values of the South Fork of the Salmon River watershed and the people and economies that depend on it,” said Fred Coriell of McCall, the group’s president and a member of its board of directors.

“We decided that incorporating as a non-profit conservation organization would be the best way to maximize our effectiveness,” Coriell said. “As a corporation, we will have far better access to technical and legal expertise.”

Prior to incorporation, members and supporters worked as a loosely organized community of volunteers.

Its most visible recent project was a protest rally in October in downtown McCall that drew about 300 people.

… For more information, go to (link).

full story:
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Bemetals Further Extends Down Plunge DMEA Zone Mineralization at the High-Grade, Polymetallic, South Mountain Project in Idaho, U.S.A.

Jan 20, 2020

Vancouver, Canada – BeMetals Corp. (“BeMetals” or the “Company”) (TSXV: BMET and OTCQB: BMTLF) is pleased to announce the remaining analytical results from its Phase 1 underground drilling campaign, including holes SM19-016, SM19-017 and SM19-018 from the Company’s high-grade South Mountain Base and Precious Metal Project (“South Mountain” or the “Project”) in southwestern Idaho, U.S.A. Most importantly, drill hole SM19-016 has further increased the down plunge extent of the DMEA zone by approximately 75 metres and the zone remains open at depth (See Figures 1 & 2). The Company has also recently agreed upon revised terms with Copper Cross Zambia Limited at the Pangeni Copper Exploration Project in Zambia, to extend the due date for money-in-the-ground exploration investment until the end of 2020. This allows for a full field season of exploration activities this year. (See Pangeni section of this news release for more details).

From this batch of recent analytical results, hole SM19-016 has identified multiple zones of dominant gold and silver mineralization in the projected extension of the polymetallic DMEA zone (See Figure 1 & Table 2). The geological logging and interpretation of SM19-016 suggests this drill hole intersected the margins of the DMEA zone based on an increase in the observed ratio of skarn to massive sulphide styles of mineralization. Future drilling will test areas in close proximity to SM19-016 where more massive sulphide mineralization is likely to be discovered.

continued:
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Public Lands:

Last Chance Road Closed for Good Neighbor Authority Project

New Meadows, ID, January 24, 2020 – Last Chance Road (FS Road 453) on the New Meadows Ranger District is closed to motorized public access for the implementation of the Duck Duck Goose Hazardous Tree Removal Project at Last Chance Campground.

While the road is typically left open for over-snow traffic, it is not usually plowed in the winter. This year, the road has been plowed open for logging equipment access to the site, and motorized public use of the roadway is not allowed due to concerns for public and contractor safety.

The Duck Duck Goose Hazardous Tree Removal Project is a Good Neighbor Authority project in partnership with the Idaho Department of Lands, and a part of the larger Little Red Goose Forest Resilience Project in the Goose Creek and Sixmile drainages. These drainages have been hit hard in recent years by insect and disease infestation, and the Little Red Goose Project is focused on the removal of insect and disease killed trees to promote forest health and resiliency in the project area.

The road closure is expected to last through early April 2020, or the end of tree removal operations. Road closure signs have been posted to inform members of the public of this closure.

Brian Harris
Public Affairs Officer
Payette National Forest
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Critter News:

Search and rescue teams rely on canines

By Heatherann Wagner January 23, 2020 Local News 8

Teton County, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK)- It’s the time of year when we hear more and more about avalanche safety. The Teton County Search and Rescue team helps respond to our local mountains when needed. Dogs are often used with teams to quickly locate people.

Jason O’Neill- Director of the group says, “For the search work in general, whether it’s avalanche or area search the K-9s really effective for time. Especially in avalanche they can be really fast compared to and keep team members at safe distances while the K-9’s go in and work. So you can instead of having a 10 person pro blind walking across the avalanche site, you can have a single dog work that site. And they’re fast, they can find people in a couple of minutes.” The dogs go through years of training that continues through the dogs lives.

For volunteers, they meet and train at a facility in Driggs that houses their equipment. The group O’Neill is in charge of is around 30 people from all walks of life. The biggest requirement is having ability and skill in the mountains.

continued:
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Lawmaker proposes wolf-free zones in southern Idaho

by Keith Ridler Associated Press Thursday, January 23rd 2020

Boise, Idaho (AP) – Some areas in Idaho would be declared wolf-free zones, and other areas where the animals have killed livestock would have increased wolf-killing opportunities under legislation proposed Wednesday.

The Senate Resources and Environment Committee voted to clear the way for a hearing on the measure put forward by Republican Sen. Bert Brackett, a rancher in the area designated for wolf-free zones.

“Wolf numbers have continued to increase, livestock depredation remains unacceptably high,” he said. “More needs to be done. Ranchers’ livelihood is being threatened by wolves.”

Federal officials say there were 175 wolf attacks on livestock in Idaho in fiscal year 2019, which ended on June 30.

continued:
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Idaho wolf population is estimated at 1,000 animals

by Keith Ridler Associated Press Thursday, January 23rd 2020


In this Feb. 2, 2010, file photo, a wolf track, imprinted in the snow, was left near the carcass of an elk in Avery, Idaho. (Kathy Plonka/The Spokesman-Review via AP, File)

Boise, Idaho (AP) – The director of the Idaho Department of Fish and Game on Thursday said there are an estimated 1,000 wolves in Idaho.

Ed Schriever told the House Resources and Conservation Committee that the estimate made public for the first time is the first wolf population estimate in Idaho since 2015.

“We will be making that estimate every year, and we will know from this point forward if the population is going up, as some people speculate, if it’s been level, or if it’s decreasing,” Shriever told lawmakers.

Shriever said the wolf population peaked early in the summer of 2019 at about 1,500 following the birth of pups. He said subtracting hunting and trapping kills along with other deaths puts the population now closer to 1,000.

continued:
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Nampa man fined, banned for guiding illegal Alaska hunts

by Associated Press Thursday, January 23rd 2020

Anchorage, Alaska (AP) – An Idaho man who illegally guided bear and moose hunts in Alaska was fined $20,000 and ordered never to hunt in the state again.

U.S. District Court Judge Sharon Gleason on Wednesday also ordered Paul Silvis, 52, of Nampa, to serve six months of home confinement, to be followed by five years of supervised release, federal prosecutors announced Wednesday.

Silvis in October pleaded guilty to two felony violations of the Lacey Act, the law that bans illegal wildlife trafficking, U.S. Attorney Bryan Schroder said in the announcement.

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Fighting rams stop traffic on Idaho highway

The two male bighorn sheep were caught butting heads on a road near Riggins over the weekend.

KTVB January 20, 2020

Lisa and Fred Taylor were on a winding road near Riggins over the weekend when they came upon two bighorn sheep.

The rams were engaged in a battle, putting on quite a display of headbutting alongside the roadway.

Shortly, after bashing heads, one of the rams turns toward the vehicle and gives a look of disgust at the people watching, then returns to the fight.

source:

video:


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Fish and Game works to reduce Magic Valley elk population

Jan 22, 2020 By Steve Liebenthal KIVI

Twin Falls, Idaho — These elk, grazing just north of Mountain Home are part of a population that Fish and Game managers say has grown too large.

“We’re talking almost three thousand elk above our top-end objective,” said State Wildlife Manager Jon Rachel.

So why is that a problem? Depredation. The growing population has created problems, mostly for farmers.

And when deer, pronghorn antelope or elk damage crops, hunters and anglers pay the price. In 1990, the Idaho Legislature mandated that Fish and Game compensate farmers for damage, and two summers ago, that compensation went through the roof.

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Ice fishing tourney Feb. 1 to raise funds for firefighters group

The Star-News Jan 23, 2020

The second annual “Deep Freeze for Firefighters” ice fishing fundraiser tournament with prizes, raffles and an auction will be Saturday, Feb. 1, beginning at 7:30 a.m. at Lake Cascade.

Prizes will be awarded for largest trout as well as first, second and third place winners for total weight of three best perches.

Check-in and registration will be from 7:30 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. at Cascade Reservoir’s Poison Creek Campground boat ramp. Parking is $5 for those who do not have the Idaho Parks Pass.

Weigh-in will be at 3 p.m. at Perch 55, 256 N. Main St. in downtown Donnelly. The raffles and benefit auction will follow the weigh-in.

The entry fee is $25. Proceeds will benefit the Wildland Firefighter Foundation, whose mission is to help families of wildland firefighters who were killed or injured in the line of duty.

source:
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Fish & Game News:

Camera surveys provide new statewide wolf population estimate

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Supervisor
Friday, January 24, 2020


Idaho Fish and Game

Game cameras took 11 million photos to help researchers count wolves

Idaho Fish and Game has a new estimate of the statewide wolf population through its new survey method using game cameras and mathematical modeling, which will be repeated annually and fine-tuned during the next few years.

At the Fish and Game Commission meeting on Jan. 23 in Boise, staff reported there were an estimated 1,541 wolves in the state during summer 2019. The estimate represents the peak population shortly after pups were born.

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F&G collaring mule deer bucks to get a better look at long-term survival

By Brian Pearson, Conservation Public Information Specialist
Tuesday, January 21, 2020


Roger Phillips/Idaho Fish and Game

Wildlife managers want to know how bucks are faring during hunting season

Fish and Game researchers want to learn more about mule deer buck survival during hunting seasons, including how the season structure, and hunter access and habitat types affect buck survival. Biologists are using specially designed GPS collars and ear tags to help answer those questions, and collars are being placed on mule deer during winter that will remain on bucks through the upcoming hunting season.

Researchers hope that understanding buck survival will help biologists better manage deer hunting and avoid over-harvesting bucks, as well as meeting hunters’ desires for the age class of bucks and types of hunting seasons.

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More F&G News Releases

link:
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Crazy Critter Stuff:

Man v. Moose as Alaska resident gets trapped in shed

NY Daily News Jan 18, 2020

Things came to a head right in front of the shed.

Anchorage resident Curtis Phelps tried to take out the trash, but a moose tried to take him out. Phelps ducked into the shed for cover.

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video:

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Seasonal Humor:

WinterDogPoop-a
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Idaho History Jan 26, 2020

The Prospector and Thunder Mountain News April 8, 1905

courtesy Sandy McRae and Jim Collord

[Note: to view the old ads, turn off your ad blocker. There are no commercial ads on this page. Click an ad to start a slide show.]


(link to larger size image of banner)

The Prospector and Thunder Mountain News

Roosevelt, Idaho April 8, 1905 Volume 1 Number 17

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Locals

James Hash was up from the Middle Fork for a few days this week.

Robt. Pugh, E. Jenson and Robt. Kirk arrived from Grangeville Monday.

Carl Sandell arrived from Boise this week and went to work at the Sunnyside mine Friday.

Geo. Batters and Al. Adell have gone to Middle Fork of Salmon for a pleasure and prospecting trip.

Willis W. Loy arrived from the outside and is in the employ of the Thunder Mountain Pearl Mining Co.

Floyd H. Barnett is putting a canvas roof on his office to use until he can get roofing material from the outside.

McAndrews & Reuter have bought the general merchandise stock of Gus. Holtgren and moved it to their store on Main St.

Dr. C. T. Jones commenced Wednesday the remodeling of his building on the west side of Main street. [He will make it into a] first-class lodging house.

H. J. Hanson drove two beeves to town this week. The animals were in fine condition and the beef is good. This is the first fresh meat to arrive this spring.

G. P. Pugh and son Robert have gone to work at the 20th Century temporarily – until the snow in the mountains will admit of their doing the assessment work on their various claims.

Tom Neighbors received a letter from S. P. Burr recently that he left Boise for his home in Moscow on the 18th ult. Mr. Burr expects to return to Roosevelt by the 15th inst. via Grangeville and Warren.

Dr. Elmer H. Capen, president or Tufts College, died March 22nd. E. W. Whitcom, Esq., of this town is a graduate of Tufts, class of ’87 and entertained a deep feeling of friendship for Dr. Capen.

Mrs. R. Ross Arnold has been engaged to teach the school in this town. The school books have arrived and school will begin April 24th. Mrs. Arnold will arrive a few days prior to that time.

Patrick O’Donnell, who has been quite sick for several weeks, left for Boise with Wm. Kreps Monday. He was somewhat better and we hope he will fully regain his former health. Joe Surprise went with him.

The water in Monumental creek was muddy as it flowed through town Thursday. We find it was caused by the creek having been turned through the 20th Century flume two miles and a half above town. The pentstock and flume are in fine condition and the mill was started Thursday morning.

Bert Either recently received a letter from Chas. A. Knodle, of Butte, Mont., stating that a railroad will start from Lewiston coming this way and that work will doubtless begin this summer. The exact location or destination of the road is not stated.

E. B. Dodson, a stockholder of the Adams Mining Co., made up principally of Atlantic City and Philadelphia capitalists, arrived last Friday. Extensive development work will be done on their property, situated on Divide creek, between Divide and Cooney creek. H. C. Willis, the vice-president and manager, is expected to arrive within three weeks with necessary equipment.
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News From the Middle Fork.

T J. Lynch returned Thursday from the Middle Fork of the Salmon river where he has been for nearly a month. He was delighted with his trip and speaks in glowing terms of the springs and says that in all his experience in the mountains he never saw two prospectors situated so comfortably as are Voller and McNerney.

They have a fine ranch of about forty acres cleared on which they raise all their vegetables and hay for stock; they have a fine range and are well supplied with fresh eggs, milk and butter. The hot springs are situated near their cabin which is but a short distance from the ore lode they are developing. They are not pushing the work on their mining property very fast – perhaps because they are so pleasantly situated. They have had some good assays. They are now building a two-story house 14×24 feet in the clear.

Mr. Lynch says Mr. Cunningham is very feeble and was unfortunate in loosing [sic] nearly all of his potatoes last winter by frost. J. Herron is assisting him on the ranch.

Jack Murray has taken up a ranch five miles below Mahoney’s. Mr. Mahoney has leased his ranch to his two sons and he himself this summer is going to build “that ditch.”

Mr. Lynch says that deer are very plentiful on the Middle Fork and that the fish are just beginning to come up the stream.
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John Shaffer Drowned

Well Known Pioneer Meets Death in the South Fork.

John Shaffer was drowned in the South Fork of the Salmon River on March 29th.

Mr. Shaffer was one of the best known citizens in this part of the state and leaves many friends to regret his death. He was universally liked; always generous and genial he made friends on every hand and kept them.

He spent several years at Custer in its palmy days, and before the wagon road was built carried the mail there on snow shoes.

During the first excitement at the Coeur d’Alenes, he went to that camp. He was an expert miner as well as an all round frontiersman, and at one time was foreman of the famous Bunker Hill mine. In 1898 he came to the South Fork of the Salmon and bought what afterwards became widely known as Shaffer’s ranch. Hundreds of people stopped there during the rush to Thunder Mountain and all will remember his hearty, kindly ways. While he made much money he was generous to a fault, and did not accumulate a large property though he left a good ranch and considerable stock.

On the afternoon of his death he had been taking up the planking of his bridge across the South Fork, deeming it unsafe, and was crossing on one of the timbers, or stringers, of the bridge; he lost his balance and fell into the stream which at this point is a boiling torrent. The water is icy cold at this time of year and it is thought he either became cramped at once or was stunned by the fall; he apparently made no effort to save himself but was swept down the stream. The body was found the next evening at 5 o’clock some distance down the river.

Mr. Shaffer leaves a wife and two little boys who were at their home on the ranch at the time of his death, also a sister, Mrs. Julius Cross, who is postmistress at Custer, in this state.

The funeral took place the next day after the body was found. Near the house on the ranch is a rounded knoll on which stands a beautiful, wide spreading pine tree. Mr. Shaffer had spoken of this spot as an ideal burial place, and here he was laid to rest.
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Caption (page torn): A [glimpse] of Redfish Lake … Sawtooth range … of Thunder Mountain
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MINING NEWS

(page torn)… and Lester H. Busby have gone to Reardon [sic] creek to inspect their mining property there.

The Sunnyside mine took on five more men Friday morning. Supt. Abbott expects the stamps to drop not later than the 25th of the month.

Clate Vance and James LeRoy went down Monumental creek Wednesday to their property opposite the Roosevelt Monument to do some assessment work.

Prospectors returning from the hills say the south sides of the mountains are almost entirely bare and water in the draws at this time of year makes panning easy.

M. W. Mouat, of Denver, is in town experting the property of the Thunder Mountain Pearl Mining Co. He says Mr. DeCamp will arrive in about a month.

Peeler Foster, H P. Brown and Lou Englebright sold their group of three claims on the canyon side just in front of THE NEW’S office to T. M. Nichols of Chicago. The group is known as the Alliance No. 1, 2 and 3.

T. G. Thomas and son left Wednesday for Ramey Ridge to commence work on their Mildred and War Eagle properties. Their partner, August Herzog of Spokane, is expected soon. They believe the development work will warrant coutinuous [sic] operations.

At the H. Y. -Climax work is being pushed on the Polo Duro tunnel. Supt. Whitlock was in town Thursday and says he is just starting a shaft near the old cook house, and they have already found some remarkably good float.
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Railroad Activity in Idaho.

The next two years promises to be an era of great activity in railroad building in this state.

The North and South Railway is a topic of intense interest to every patriotic citizen of Idaho and indications point to a speedy accomplishment of this much desired project.

It is confidently believed that the Northern Pacific will extend its line from Stites through the Lolo Pass of the Bitter Roots to Missoula, Mont. Should this be done Grangeville would doubtless get a branch from the N. P. even if the main line should not pass through that city. This cut-off would pass through a very mountainous country and would. doubtless develop a large mineral belt, but of course the immediate object of this connection would be to accommodate the traffic between Eastern points, and Portland and San Francisco.

The Oregon Railroad and Navigation Company have already … (page torn) … to Grangeville.

The O. R. & N. survey follows the Clearwater river up to Big Canyon thence it starts up on to the prairie.

It is reported that the O. R. & N. people will at once start a survey from Meadows, to which point the Pacific and Idaho Northern will be extended this year from Council, and thus shut out the N. P. from the Salmon river valley.

The O. R. & N. lines now extend from Wallace over through the Coeur d’Alenes down to Moscow, and the road is being built to Lewiston. Should the line be continued through Grangeville and on down to connect with the P. and I. N. the North and South railroad would be complete and all points in the western part of the state would have fairly good connection.

The proposed new railroad tapping the N. P. in Montana, passing through Salmon City and Boise thence on to the coast will give Idaho a very good railroad system.

Several projects for building a railroad into the Thunder Mountain country are now being considered and the probability is that within eighteen months we shall hear the locomotive whistle in Roosevelt.
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W. T. Saunders arrived in town Monday from his ranch on Big creek. He says the snow is all gone down there. Mr. Saunders returned Wednesday. He says that the bear is still hibernating but he looks for him to appear in about two weeks, that the feed for stock is luxuriant and that the horses on the range “jump ten feet high and stay up in the air kicking for five minutes before they come down.”
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Western Courtesy.

Seth Bullock went to Washington in connection with the cowboy contingent that took part in the inaugural parade. He has made many sensible statements in various “interviews” with newspaper men. He is quoted as having said the following while on a visit in New York:

“A man from out our way can’t help seeing certain things. He can’t help seeing the way a lot of sheepfaces along these subways and street cars of yours crowd the women and stamp on their feet to get ahead of them. Great God Almighty! I came over from Washington yesterday on the Congressional limited, and things they call men pushed ther [sic] way by women who were there before ’em into the dining car, and when they were through with their dinners, these same critters sat there and smoked cigars and let the women wait.

Now, you don’t see doings like that out in our country. If that’s typical of the eastern gentleman, then the real American gentlemen are to be found out west.

Let me tell you, I don’t think it is typical. I think I recognize some of these critters. For many years the west has been shipping … (page torn) … east to Chicago and I can’t help thinking … those … romping around here in New York with two of their legs missing – having got past Chicago and the scalding vats.”

We are well acquainted with the customs of large eastern cities and feel justified in saying that a woman will receive more courtesy and politeness on any western frontier than in New York City or in any other large eastern city. We believe there isn’t a miner or a prospector in Thunder Mountain, and we know most of them pretty well, who would sit in a crowded car and let a woman stand clinging to a strap overhead. Some of them might forget the senseless fad of removing their hats while in an elevator car if a lady happened to be present, for the western man’s politeness “consists of kindness,” but when it comes to real genuine, downright politeness (we don’t mean certain steriotyped [sic] forms and foolish inconveniences called etiquette) it is found in the big West where men have room to move, good air to breathe, and space for the heart to grow big and brave, and we hope that when our mother or sister boards a crowded car there will be at least one western cowboy aboard, like Seth Bullock, who has a seat, for we know he will not sit and let a woman stand.
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In our columns we often speak of “The Thunder Mountain country.” In using this term we do not refer to the small section lying just about the town of Roosevelt but for want of any other significant designation, we use it to include this whole mining section extending more than twenty-five miles in every direction with Roosevelt at its center.
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Pipe Dream.

On March 27th the Statesman published an interview with Fred. C. Bradley, a member of the exposition commission. An extract follows:

“Today Mr. Bradley will visit Nampa to see Mr. Dewey and Mr. Purdum relative to an exhibit. from Thunder Mountain. It appears the people of Roosevelt have a novel project on foot. They propose to take a pack train loaded with ore straight from that camp to Portland, pitch a camp, and give an illustration of the life of the prospector. Commissioner McBride thinks he can secure ground for their camp if they determine to go ahead with the undertaking.”

This proposition is so preposterous that it hardly needs comment if it were to be read only by mining men and prospectors, or those accustomed to frontier life. It is ludicrous to a packer to read of loading a train with ore, driving it over mountain ranges for 150 miles and then for hundreds of miles over roads with barbwire fence on each side. Some one has surely had a “pipe dream.”
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Idaho has only one congressman, Burton L. French. He is said to be the youngest member of the national house of representatives. He has already made an enviable record for himself and one of which he and his state may well be proud. He is a tireless worker and though not given over to oratorical display accomplishes a vast amount of work with committees which has been of great value to his state as well as to the nation. lie is a man of great integrity as he has evidenced in his refusal to for the construction mileage grab, thus depriving himself … (page torn) … western …vote for the bill which was hardly less than a steal. Mr. French has already taken a commanding place in congress; we predict for him a great future. We are proud of his ability, and still more proud of his integrity.
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Why I Prospect.

‘Tis for the glamor of the life,
And the gleam of the virgin gold
That congour me visions,
Of a wealth untold.
And to perhaps see by my emprise
A city of free wild life arise,
And to feel at last
That when I am gone
My soul for the right
Will prospect on.

– Tamerack.
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Why Kentuckians Elope.

In the country districts of Kentucky a girl is an old maid at 25, at 30 she is passe and relegated to teacups, cats and knitting. Corkscrew curls are hers, and on her hands when she goes to church are half lace mitts, not kids. All this, writes a Shelbyville correspondent of the Henderson Journal, makes the race to conjugal happiness one of almost maddening haste – in Kentucky. Twenty-seven elopements in two days is the record of one backwoods county this season.

In common with all the other states of the Union, Kentucky has more poor families than rich ones, and a follows that the preponderance of marriages is among the former, whose purses are not always equal to heavy outlays for elaborate wedding ceremonies. Hence it is that the most economical scheme of elopement is highly popular, with the added advantage of the spirit of romance that surrounds the idea of running away and being pursued by alleged irate parents, who, it should be noted, never succeed in coming up with the elopers until the knot has been tied. The whole affair is a pleasing illusion, and may it always be so.

The old people, however, raise perennial objections – they always do. The old people are match-makers who follow all the traditions of the south, and the girl who is ambitious to dodge the implication of being called an old maid will take no risks. Down here in Kentucky there is no dearth of suitors, and the average Blue Grass belle does not have to wait long. She has sweethearts before she is out of short skirts, and it is no uncommon thing for her to be engaged while she still wears her hair in a long plait down her back and tops her curls with a junty tam-o’-shanter.

Here in Shelbyville eloping couples find a mecca. It is a quiet little place, with lots of churches and no end of obliging ministers. The town is a stop for all trains, but the elopers do not take the railroad route if they are in fear of being discovered – not in Kentucky. These young Lochinyars take the best high stepper from the stable and start down the pike in a good rig. They then feel assured that they will clear all pursuers and get the knot tied before the father can interrupt their plans by appearing on the scene with bootjack, gun or glad hand.

In some counties in Kentucky last fall the number of elopements is said to have been as great as that of ordinary unromantic, premeditated marriages. There are instances where three girls and three young men have formed a party and eloped together. The method of procedure sometimes is unique. The belle wants none of the traditions lacking – not in Kentucky. Her wardrobe may be slight, because she is in a hurry, but she is sure to take along Something old, something new, Something borrowed and something blue.

A Lawrenceburg farmer heard that his daughter was clearing out with the son of a neighbor. There was no very strenuous objection, and the father bought some wedding presents and with some of his friends started out in pursuit. They arrived in town about an hour after the ceremony and were told that the happy pair had gone to the hotel for dinner. The whole party, headed by the new bride’s father, rushed into the dining room and formally presented the gifts, afterward buying tickets for a honeymoon trip to Cincinnati.

Several marriages have been performed on railroad trains, and one couple sought refuge by taking their minister on board a boat which was plying on the Kentucky river below Frankford.

– Pittsburg Gazette.
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Following is a list of the officers of the Sunnyside company for the ensuing year: F. T. F. Lovejoy, president; J. C. Russell, vice-president; R. E. Russell, treasurer; C. J. Flemming, secretary; R. W. Purdum, general manager. Mr Purdum, in his report to the company, says the drifts and cuts at the mine have blocked out three and three-quarter acres of ore valued, according to the report of Prof. John Kruse, at $800,000 an acre. Mr. Purdum says that by means of the drilling machine now in use, the gold ore blanket has been located under 40 acres of ground and no indication of the limit has been found.
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Big Creek.

R. B. MacGregor and A. A. Lyden arrived from Ramey Ridge, and reported the development work done in the district during the winter was very satisfactory.

I. R. Frier, Supt. of the Pueblo Mining & Milling Co. sunk a shaft to the depth of 90 feet and run a crosscut at the bottom of the shaft, a distance of 70 feet, all in ore, and numerous pieces showing free gold. This company is figuring for the installation of a mill during the summer.

D. T. Davis, who is at present negotiating with a western company for his property on Beaver creek, has one of the best showings in the district. The lead is 60 ft. wide and crops for a distance of 800 feet, several places standing 20 feet above the surface. The values consist of gold and silver. Values from a trace to $40.

James Hand, who has been developing his property on Beaver creek during the winter, has extended his tunnel a distance of 50 feet – all in ore. The face of the drift having a vertical depth of 130 feet on the lead and free gold is very easily seen in the quartz with the naked eye.

Stewart and Lyden, whose property is on the Ramey Ridge side of Beaver creek, have a very good surface showing. They have two parallel leads a distance of 200 feet apart, one being 10 feet 8 inches wide and can be traced for a distance of 900 feet – values from $3.12 to $87.72. A crosscut tunnel has been run to a distance of 131 feet, but owing to not having supplies, were compelled to discontinue the work before reaching the lead. The other lead is 7 feet and can be traced 500 feet on surface – values as high as $70.

Stephenson and Lynch, who are located on Ramey Ridge, have shown up some excellent bodies of ore.

Butcher and Cassette, who were the discoverers of the district, have opened up with shaft and tunnels, a great body of ore. An average sample across the lead valued $11.40 in free gold.

Yates and MacGregor, who have been working on their properties on Ramey Ridge during the winter, report development work very satisfactory.

All told the prospects of the district are very promising.
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Had to Get His Breath.

One of the representatives from Texas says that while he was coming to Washington he was greatly amused by the antics of a young married couple on the sleeper.

“There was a continuous performance of kissing,” says the representative, “and the smacks could be heard like the cracking of a new saddle.” Finally there was a lull in the performance and the bride blurted out:

“Oh, Jim, dear, I fear you have ceased to love me.”

“‘No, no, darling,’ came the answer; ‘but I must have time to get my breath.’

“It was a half minute before the bridegroom ‘got his breath,’ and the smacking was resumed.”

– Washington Times.
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J. B. Pyle and John Sitting left last Sunday for a trip to Boise and will return in about six weeks.
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Do It Now.

When you’ve got a job to do,
Do it now!
If it’s one you wish was through,
Do it now!
If you’re sure the job’s your own,
Just tackle it alone;
Don’t hem and haw and groan —
Do it now!
Don’t put oil a bit of work,
Do it now!
It doesn’t pay to shirk,
Do it now!
If yon want to fill a place,
And be useful to the race,
Just get up and take a brace,
Do it now.

– Frank Harrington, in the New York Sun.
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The Statesman’s Ghost Story.

The Boise Statesman offered a prize of $5.00 for the best ghost story not exceeding 300 words.

Here is the prize winner:

THE GHOST OF HAYVILLE.

Beside the usual crowd at the Hayville store, was a stranger in a shaded corner, listening, silently, as the others talked.

The wind shrieked dismally, dashing the rain against the windows.

“Makes me think o’ the night o’ man Hawkins killed himself,” said Pete Longman, as he shook the rain from his slouched hat and squirted a quid of tobacco under the farthest leg of the stove.

“Yes, me too. ‘Twas jist sech a night. I’d give mybody twenty five dollars jist to sleep in that house one night,” responded John Sloan, the storekeeper.

“Ye’ll kape yer twinty-foive, I’m thinkin’,” put in Mike Sullivan.

The stranger moved uneasily, then arose, saying:

“Gentlemen, I’m broke, and if you’ll guarantee me twenty-five dollars, I’ll sleep in that house to night. I don’t believe in ghosts.”

“Do it, an’ the twenty five’s yourn,” answered Sloan.

“You bet!”

“We’ll see’t ye git it,” came from the others.

The stranger hastened to the haunted house, accompanied to the front gate by Pete.

He stretched himself on the floor, expecting to go asleep at once, but after several hours, he was still wide awake.

“Just us two!” sounded a hoarse, ghostly voice at his side.

Up he started, caring naught for twenty-five dollars, nor for twenty-five thousand, for that matter. Breathlessly he went down the walk, pausing just long enough to open the gate, which stubbornly refused to yield to his efforts.

“Wasn’t that a devil of a race?” from the same ghostly voice at his elbow.

Off again, through the rain, he plunged, landing this time in a deep mud hole.

“Tired?” breathed the terrible voice. Yes, he was, but on he sped, never halting, until he had left the village far behind.

The ghost was a parrot, owned by the man who committed suicide.

– Ida R. M’Sparran.
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Another Pioneer Passes Away.

George Dyer, living near the Shaffer Ranch, on the South Fork of the Salmon, died of old age March 30th.

Mr. Dyer came around Cape Horn many years ago in company with Mr. Kelley, of the Kelley & Patterson firm, of Warren. He had lived in that section for a long time.
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Insane Man Missing.

At the time of Mr. Shaffers death reported elsewhere, an insane man, whose name we are unable to learn, was being kept temporarily at the ranch house. During the excitement which followed the sad drowning accident, the man disappeared and at last accounts he had not been heard of. Grave fears for his safety are entertained.
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J. W. Wright, a well-known Thunder Mountain and Warren mining man, for the past two years a resident of this city, died last night from an attack of grip. Mr. Wright leaves a wife and four children. Mr. Wright was interested in some of the most promising mining properties in the Thunder Mountain and Warren sections.

– Weiser World.
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The NEWS has two 2nd hand stoves for sale – one heating stove and one cook stove.
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His Opinion of Thunder Mountain.

B. F. Francis, in an interview with a Statesman reporter, describes his trip out, and in speaking of the country, says:

“The most noticeable thing in the whole Thunder Mountain country is the general air of confidence which pervades the whole district for miles in all directions from Roosevelt, the metropolis. This is not limited to those alone who are interested in the great mines whose wealth of mineral deposits has already. been established beyond all doubt, as for instance the Sunnyside, the Dewey, the H. Y. and the Mysterious Slide mines, but on every hand signs of great activity prevail and there seems to be good reason for this.

“Great bodies of heavily mineralized ore are being uncovered on all sides; in fact, there seems to be good indications that the whole country for 25 miles in all directions from Roosevelt will be dotted with stamp mills, and that, too, within a short space of time.

“The Standard mine is the latest big development. The Great Teriett lode, a body of ore 56 feet wide and averaging $10 per ton, has been cut and a drift is now being run. It is impossible at this time to even estimate the extent of this ore body.

“The town of Roosevelt is the commercial and mining center. It is favorably situated right in the heart of what will surely be one of the great mining sections of the world, embracing the Ramey Ridge country, with its great quartz deposits where extensive operations are showing fine developments, Rainbow mountain, a vast depository of mineral wealth, the Big creek country, which is among the most promising of all, and the copper camp district, ten miles below town, which has a fine showing of ore carrying good deposits of copper and gold.

“On the whole the Thunder Mountain country never looked so promising as it does today. Its experimental stage is passed; at least six stamp mills will be running by the last of the coming summer, and more will soon follow.

“The camp has every indication now of soon becoming one of the greatest bullion producers of the northwest.”
— — — —

19050408Pg6-txt1headline2
International Happenings.

The free coinage of silver in Mexico ends the 16th of this month and a gold standard is established.

On March 22, Field Marshal Oyama gave to an associated press correspondent his first interview. When asked to discuss the probability of peace he answered, “I am only a soldier, not a politician.”

General Kuropatkin, after receiving two disastrous defeats from Field Marshal Oyama, was dismissed in disgrace from the supreme command of the Manchurian armies. He generously offered his services in any capacity at the front and was placed at the head of the very army which his successor Gen. Linevitch, had left, thus changing places with his former subordinate. This shows remarkable patriotism on the part of General Kuropatkin.

Emperor William is desirous of getting on closest terms of friendship with France and the French people says the Daily Chronicle of London. The time is opportune. The alliance of France and Russia is an unnatural one formed for sinister purposes and the results of the far East render the continuance of this alliance useless. It is much to be hoped that France and Germany will put aside their ancient enmity, so bitter since the Franco-German war, and be friends again.

Venezuela, or perhaps more properly, President Castro is making more trouble. Absolutely devoid of all consideration of the duties of a ruler toward the people, or one nation toward the other nations of the earth, he now proposes to capture New Orleans and teach the United States a lesson. He is not satisfying the just claims of any of his foreign creditors, and we may look for more trouble with this most turbulent little republic, whose whole history since it obtained its independence, has been one of disorder and revolution.
— — — —

19050408Pg6-txt1headline3
National.

In accordance with the president’s recommendation congress recently voted to return some confederate battle flags. A proclamation was issued by Gen. Stephen D. Lee, commander of the United Confederate Veterans, praising the president and congress for this action.

Colorado had three governors within 24 hours. Governor Adams was ousted, and Governor Peabody installed at 5 o’clock p. m. March 17th, and immediately after Peabody’s resignation was filed at 4:20 on the afternoon of the 18th, Lieutenant Governor McDonald was sworn in as governor.

For years, Addicks has held up the State of Delaware – for years at a time she has had but one U. S. senator and sometimes none at. all. On March 22nd the legislature adjourned after taking 49 ballots on the senatorship with no majority The state will have but one senator for two years more.
— — — —

19050408Pg6-txt1headline4
State Items.

Two baloonists [sic], O’Dell and Dare, were killed in a double baloon [sic] ascension at Wallace, March 20th. They were between 150 and 200 feet from the ground and were almost instantly killed.

Twin Falls City is having a genuine boom and will be a good sized town within a very few years. Moreover, it will be a city of stability as it is situated in one of the finest agricultural districts in the northwest now that the great irrigation project is completed. On March 22nd, 3200 acres of land situated within a few miles of the city were sold at auction at an average price of $21.50; the water costs $15 an acre making the total average cost $36.50.

The Idaho Wool Grower’s Association bought the Great Western salt plant, 12 miles from Ogden, on March 2. Prior to that time, stock salt was selling at $6.05 F. 0. B. The price was controlled by the trust which dropped the price to $3.50 as soon as the association bought the Great Western. The association met the cut with a $3.00 rate; the trust again dropped to $2.50 which the association met. A great stock salt war is on. The Idaho Wool Grower’s Association consumes 5000 tons per year and the output of the Great Western is 20,000 tons.
— — — —

— — — — — — — — — —

Images of full sized pages:

link: Page 1 top
link: Page 1 bottom

link: Page 2 top
link: Page 2 bottom

link: Page 3 top
link: Page 3 bottom

link: Page 4 top
link: Page 4 bottom

link: Page 5 top
link: Page 5 bottom

link: Page 6 top
link: Page 6 bottom
—————————

Further Reading

Link to Thunder Mountain and Roosevelt index page
Link: Public folder with images of the old newspapers
Link: November 5, 1904
Link: November 12, 1904
Link: February 4, 1905
Link: March 18, 1905
Link: March 25, 1905
Link: April 1, 1905
Link: April 8, 1905
Link: April 15, 1905
Link: April 22, 1905
Link: April 29, 1905
Link: May 6, 1905
Link: May 13, 1905
Link: May 20, 1905
Link: June 3, 1905
Link: June 24, 1905
Link: July 1, 1905
Link: July 15, 1905
Link: August 19, 1905
—————-

updated September 26, 2022

Bird of the week: Steller’s Jay

Steller’s Jay

(common, year around)

2011 May 11
20110511stellars-jay1-a
2020 January 25
20200125stellars-a

link: to larger photos
more: Photos by Local Color Photography

Steller’s Jay
Cyanocitta stelleri
Size and Shape: Steller’s Jays are large songbirds with large heads, chunky bodies, rounded wings, and a long, full tail. The bill is long, straight, and powerful, with a slight hook. Steller’s Jays have a prominent triangular crest that often stands nearly straight up from their head.
Both Sexes
Length: 11.8-13.4 in (30-34 cm)
Weight: 3.5-4.9 oz (100-140 g)
Wingspan: 17.3 in (44 cm)
Color Pattern: At a distance, Steller’s Jays are very dark jays, lacking the white underparts of most other species. The head is charcoal black and the body is all blue (lightest, almost sparkling, on the wings). White markings above the eye are fairly inconspicuous.
Like other jays, Steller’s Jays are bold, inquisitive, intelligent, and noisy. Steller’s Jays spend much of their time exploring the forest canopy, flying with patient wingbeats. They come to the forest floor to investigate visitors and look for food, moving with decisive hops of their long legs.
Learn more about this bird: The Cornell Lab of Ornithology
Link to Birds Page

——————————

Updated: Road Reports Jan 26, 2020

Please share road reports. Conditions change very quickly this time of year. High elevation roads may have several inches of snow. Be prepared for snow/ice, rocks and trees in the road and remember there is no cell phone service.

Yellow Pine: Snowing in Yellow Pine Sunday morning, so far 1/2″ new (on top of ice) and 15 1/2″ total snow on the ground. Local streets have a snow floor, some have been plowed, others packed by light traffic. Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN.
link: Local Forecast
Yellow Pine Webcam: (check date on image)

Warm Lake Highway: Wednesday (Jan 22) mail truck driver (Robert) says the highway was was good (for conditions.)
link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

Highway 55 Webcams Link:

South Fork Road: Report Sunday (4pm Jan 26): “South Fork and East Fork roads are now “some of everything”. There is a path through the avalanche, slush, ice, bare pavement, broken snow floor. On a 1 – 10 scale it’s about 5. That was about 3:00 & 4:00 1/26, but steady, wet snow is coming down after that.” – TR
Report Saturday (Jan 25) that 2 avalanches closed the South Fork road around MM 6 Friday night. Local plow went out Saturday and opened the road.
Report the county road grader was on the upper South Fork road Monday (Jan 20) peeling back the snow/ice and clearing turnouts.
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Wednesday (Jan 22) mail truck driver said to watch for icy conditions the first 3 miles out of Yellow Pine, otherwise good travel.

Lower Johnson Creek Road: Report Saturday (Jan 25) that the lower road was plowed this week.
Landmark and upper Johnson Creek closed to wheeled vehicles.
link: Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam
link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
Note: The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Closed to wheeled vehicles (no current report.)
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Last report Jan 8, 2020 (C&L): “Profile/Big Creek Road – Not suitable for wheeled traffic. There has been enough over snow traffic that the route is easy going for snowmobiles so long as you stay in compacted porting of the road.”
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcam: (check date on image)

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open.
Dec 31 last report from Midas Gold: Stibnite road is and will be plowed between YP and Stibnite. Please be aware of equipment on the road and take it slow.
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Closed to wheeled vehicles (no current report.)
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Report Jan 8, 2020 (C&L): “There is no evidence of travel up Smith Creek & up to Elk Summit. We would recommend only the most adventurous take on those routes until after the snow sets up.”
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: Closed to wheeled vehicles (no current report.)
Note: The approx elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′
——————————-

Weather Reports Jan 19-25, 2020

Jan 19 Weather:

At 10am it was 31 degrees, broken cloud cover and variable breezes. Mostly clear by 130pm. At 330pm it was 40 degrees and mostly clear. At 550pm it was 27 degrees, clear sky and cold breezes. At 1030pm lots of stars. At 130am it was cloudy.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time January 20, 2020 at 10:00AM
Overcast
Max temperature 45 degrees F
Min temperature 16 degrees F
At observation 23 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 17 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

Jan 20 Weather:

At 10am it was 23 degrees and overcast. Thinner clouds and filtered sun at noon, light breezes. At 345pm it was 35 degrees and overcast. At 550pm it was 33 degrees and overcast. Cloudy and calm at 1030pm. Cloudy at 130am. Rained a little during the night, probably didn’t get much below freezing.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time January 21, 2020 at 10:00AM
Dark overcast
Max temperature 40 degrees F
Min temperature 23 degrees F <- yesterday morning
At observation 32 degrees F
Precipitation Trace
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 17 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

Jan 21 Weather:

At 10am it was 32 degrees and dark overcast. Thin spot in the cloud cover and filtered sun for a short time around noon. A little after 2pm tops of the ridges foggy and breezy. At 3pm it was 37 degrees, overcast, occasional drops of rain and strong gusty breezes. At 530pm it was 35 degrees, low overcast, gusty breezes and sprinkling. At 730pm it was 32 degrees and still raining lightly. Snowing hard at 750pm, sticking and stacking up. At 815pm it was back to raining, then just before 830pm snowing lightly. Not raining or snowing at 850pm. Stars out at 1040pm. Cloudy at 130am.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time January 22, 2020 at 10:00AM
Overcast
Max temperature 39 degrees F
Min temperature 18 degrees F
At observation 23 degrees F
Precipitation 0.12 inch
Snowfall 1/4″ inch (frozen slush)
Snow depth 16 1/2 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

Jan 22 Weather:

At 10am it was 23 degrees and overcast. At 12pm it was 28 degrees and overcast. At 1pm breaks in the clouds. At 330pm it was 35 degrees and overcast. At 6pm it was 33 degree, broken cloud cover and light chilly breeze. No stars – cloudy at 11pm. Cloudy at 2am. Trace of snow fell some time before morning.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time January 23, 2020 at 10:00AM
Low overcast, light snow falling
Max temperature 36 degrees F
Min temperature 23 degrees F <- yesterday morning
At observation 30 degrees F
Precipitation 0.02 inch
Snowfall 1/4 inch
Snow depth 16 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

Jan 23 Weather:

At 10am it was 30 degrees, overcast – sitting down on VanMeter, fine light snow falling. Doesn’t appear to be snowing at 11am. At 12pm overcast and roofs dripping. At 1pm overcast and drippy. Around 2pm overcast, misting lightly for a short time. At 330pm it was 37 degrees and low overcast (top of VanMeter fogged in.) At 6pm it was 33 degrees and overcast (top of VanMeter still fogged in.) Cloudy at 1040pm. Cloudy at 130am. Rain before sunrise, raining at 920am, probably quit by 930am.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time January 24, 2020 at 10:00AM
Low overcast
Max temperature 37 degrees F
Min temperature 30 degrees F <- yesterday morning
At observation 33 degrees F
Precipitation 0.03 inch (rain)
Snowfall Trace
Snow depth 15 1/2 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

Jan 24 Weather:

At 10am it was 33 degrees, low overcast (top of VanMeter foggy) and not raining. A few sprinkles probably around noon or 1pm (freckled the roof.) At 4pm it was 38 degrees and breaks in the cloud cover. At 6pm it was 33 degrees and mostly cloudy (patches of clear sky.) Cloudy at 1030pm. Cloudy at 130am. Light snow falling before 930am.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time January 25, 2020 at 10:00AM
Low overcast, light steady snow
Max temperature 41 degrees F
Min temperature 27 degrees F
At observation 31 degrees F
Precipitation Trace
Snowfall Trace
Snow depth 15 inch
— — — — — — — — — — — —

Jan 25 Weather:

At 10am it was 31 degrees, low foggy clouds and steady light snow. Not snowing at 1220pm. Short light snowfall at 1240pm. At 4pm it was 36 degrees and overast. At 6pm it was 33 degrees and overcast. Some stars out around 1030pm. Cloudy at 2am. Snowing before 7am.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time January 26, 2020 at 10:00AM
Low overcast, light snowfall
Max temperature 38 degrees F
Min temperature 25 degrees F
At observation 32 degrees F
Precipitation 0.06 inch
Snowfall 1/2 inch
Snow depth 15 1/2 inch
———————-

Road Reports Jan 22, 2020

Please share road reports. Conditions change very quickly this time of year. High elevation roads may have several inches of snow. Be prepared for snow/ice, rocks and trees in the road and remember there is no cell phone service.

Yellow Pine: We have 16 1/2″ of snow on the ground in Yellow Pine Wednesday morning, freezing rain and snow Tuesday night have put a crust and glaze on everything. Local streets have a snow floor, some have been plowed, others packed by light traffic. Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN.
link: Local Forecast
Yellow Pine Webcam: (check date on image)

Warm Lake Highway: Wednesday (Jan 22) mail truck driver (Robert) says the highway was was good (for conditions.)
link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

Highway 55 Webcams Link:

South Fork Road: Report the county road grader was on the upper South Fork road Monday (Jan 20), peeling back the snow/ice and clearing turnouts. Wednesday (Jan 22) the mail truck driver (Robert) reports a good trip in.
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Wednesday (Jan 22) mail truck driver said to watch for icy conditions the first 3 miles out of Yellow Pine, otherwise good travel.

Lower Johnson Creek Road: Local plow went out as far as Wapiti Meadow Thursday (Jan 16.)
Landmark and upper Johnson Creek closed to wheeled vehicles.
link: Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam
link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
Note: The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Closed to wheeled vehicles (no current report.)
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Report Jan 8, 2020 (C&L): “Profile/Big Creek Road – Not suitable for wheeled traffic. There has been enough over snow traffic that the route is easy going for snowmobiles so long as you stay in compacted porting of the road.”
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcam: (check date on image)

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open.
Dec 31 report from Midas Gold: Stibnite road is and will be plowed between YP and Stibnite. Please be aware of equipment on the road and take it slow.
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Closed to wheeled vehicles (no current report.)
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Report Jan 8, 2020 (C&L): “There is no evidence of travel up Smith Creek & up to Elk Summit. We would recommend only the most adventurous take on those routes until after the snow sets up.”
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: Closed to wheeled vehicles (no current report.)
Note: The approx elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′
——————————-

Jan 19 2020 The Yellow Pine Times

Jan 19 2020 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Community Calendar:

Jan 28 – comments due on power line relocation
Dec 7 thru Feb 21 Yellow Pine Tavern Holiday Closure
(details below)
———-

Local Events:

There will probably be a pie contest President’s day weekend in February.
———-

Village News:

Chili Contest Jan 18

The chili contest was fun and about thirteen gathered and sat around to talk.
Sarah 1st
Kat 2nd
Cecil 3rd
— — — —

January Snow

So far in January Yellow Pine has received 33″ of snow. In the last 7 days we have received a little over 13 inches of snow. Total snow on the ground measured Sunday morning is 18 1/2″ (snow is settling, not melting.)

P1000574-20200115Snow
Jan 15, 2020 just before noon, 20″ snow on the ground.
— — — —

Biz Closures

The Corner is closed for the winter, opening again next spring. I can be reached at matt @ ypcorner.com or at 970-379-5155. Thanks, have a great winter!
– Matt

The Tavern will be closed from Saturday December 7th to Friday February 21st. UPS packages will be dropped off at Deb’s porch and she will also have gasoline for emergency situations. I will be available at my cell number for any questions or situations 208 739-7086
Thanks, Lorinne N. Munn

The Yellow Pine Lodge is closed for the winter.
— — — —

Yellow Pine US Mail

The 3-day a week mail delivery started Nov 1st. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 55 cents. Support our local post office and purchase your holiday stamps here.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Report Jan 12 that the transfer station was plowed and there was still room in the bins.

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

Yellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is located approximately 3 miles south on Johnson Creek Road.

The TRANSFER STATION is for household trash and yard waste:
* Household trash must be put inside (and fit) the dumpster;
* Yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, et.) goes in the burn pile on the south end of the turn-around;
* Cardboard boxes should be flattened before putting the in the dumpster,

The DUMPSTERS are NOT for:
* Furniture (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station).

The BURN PILE is NOT for:
* Cardboard boxes (flatten and put in dumpster);
* Furniture and appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Drywall and building material (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wire or fencing (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Foam Rubber (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wood with metal (like nails) attached (take to Donnelly Transfer Station.)

When closing the DOORS on the front of the dumpsters:
* Make sure the “U” brackets at the top and bottom of the door are engaged;
* The retaining bar at the middle of the door is slid into the pipe;
* And the “L” bars at the bottom of the doors dropped into place.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: 208/634-7176
———-

Local Groups:

YPWUA News:

Boil Water Advisory Lifted November 22, 2019

The 2019 Yellow Pine Water Users Shareholders meeting was Sunday July 7th in the Community Hall.
link: 20190707YPWUAminutes
— — — —

VYPA News:

The community hall committee’s goal is to have adequate heating installed in the main hall before the June VYPA meeting.

If folks have items for the community yard sale, please place them by the north wall in the community hall. If you see items you would like to purchase, you can pay Deb, Ronda, or Lynn. All funds support the community hall.

VYPA meetings for 2020 – June 13, 2pm; July 11, 2pm; August 8, 2pm; September 12, 2pm.

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting Minutes for September 21, 2019
link: 20190921 Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting
— — — —

YPFD News:

YP Fire Commissioners:
Sue Holloway – District 1
Dan Stiff – District 2
Merrill Saleen – District 3
Fire Chief – Jeff Forster

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice

The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.” Cliick link: to view 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation

Stop the Bleed Class: We will do another class this spring/summer [2020] depending on interest. Training will resume in the spring. -Fire Chief Jeff
——–

Biz Listings:

The Corner (208) 633-3325

Closed for the winter.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233

Closed Dec 7 thru Feb 21.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377

Closed for Winter.
— — — —

Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Tom & Sarah Lanham
156 Yellow Pine Ave, Yellow Pine Id 83677
website:
Facebook:
Starting June 2020 We will be doing trail rides out of Yellow Pine along with summer pack / camping trips to high mountain lakes in the area!

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
— — — —

Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430
— — — —

Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

The Star-News

subscribe:
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine

Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, will service Yellow Pine

B&T Safety Solutions LLC
208-271-1600 Based out of Donnelly
Snow removal, cleaning chimneys and stoves, we do cabin staining/chinking as well
— — — —

Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
———————–

Local Observations:

Monday (Jan 13) overnight low of 14 degrees, measured 4 3/4″ new snow and 19″ total snow on the ground, overcast, light breeze and flaking snow (started around 8am.) A white-breasted and several red-breasted nuthatches, a jay and a hairy woodpecker visiting. Light snowfall all day (scant trace), light afternoon breezes, high of 26 degrees. Steady light snowfall at sundown, light dusting by dark and calmer. Still snowing after midnight, probably snowed most of the night. .

Tuesday (Jan 14) overnight low of 13 degrees, overcast, 2 1/4″ new snow and 20″ snow on the ground. Started snowing again shortly after 10am. Nuthatches visiting. Internet outage from around 1130am to 1215pm. Steady light snow at lunch time, high of 26 degrees. Several mountain chickadees and a hairy woodpecker joined the nuthatches at the feeders. About an inch of snow by the time the sun went behind the ridge at 345pm, breaks in the clouds, light chilly breeze and a few flakes falling. Wind gusts causing tree blizzards after 4pm. Gusty and fine light snow at dark. Low clouds, gusty winds and moderate snow late evening. Snowed until after midnight, then some clearing and bright moon. Cold night.

Wednesday (Jan 15) overnight low of -4 degrees, mostly clear sky and light cold breeze, 2 1/2″ new snow and 20″ snow on the ground (settled not melted.) Jays, chickadees and nuthatches visiting. The sunrise lit up the top of VanMeter and turned the fresh snow golden pink. Mail truck made it in on time. Mostly clear and breezy after lunch time, high of 31 degrees. Partly clear mid-afternoon and sharp cold breezes. Looked mostly clear at dark, cold breezes and temperature dropping quickly. Snowing and blowing at 10pm, temperature rising. Breezy and snowing lightly after midnight. Probably snowed until around 6am.

Thursday (Jan 16) overnight low was around 18 degrees (gizmo had -3F from yesterday morning) it was 26F at measurement time, overcast sky, 7/8″ new snow and 19″ snow on the ground (settled not melted.) Flicker, hairy woodpecker, jays, chickadees and nuthatches visiting. Overcast at lunch time, high of 33 degrees. Quiet day. Overcast and a bit breezy at sundown. Overcast and calmer at dark. Snow started before 920pm and snowed all night.

Friday (Jan 17) overnight low of 14 degrees, mostly clear sky, 2 3/4″ new snow and 20″ snow on the ground. Hairy woodpecker, a trio of jays, mountain chickadees, a white-breasted and several red-breasted nuthatches visiting. Some gusty breezes after lunch time blowing snow out of the trees and clouds coming in, high of 33 degrees. Sun down behind the ridge at 350pm and mostly cloudy. Mostly cloudy at dark and quiet.

Saturday (Jan 18) 24 hour low of 13 degrees, overcast sky, no new snow and 19 1/2″ old snow on the ground. Nuthatches and chickadees visiting. Overcast and gusty breezes at lunch time, high of 32 degrees. Flaking snow on and off in the afternoon, no accumulation. Quiet day. Overcast at dark and calm. Very dark and cloudy before midnight, calm and quiet. Cloudy night.

Sunday (Jan 19) 24 hour low of 25 degrees (Saturday morning) and 31 degrees before sunrise, broken cloud cover and breezy, measured 18 1/2″ snow on the ground (settled not melting.) Not many birds around this morning. Mostly clear and icicles dripping after lunch time. Mostly clear and warm afternoon, steep roofs sliding and trees unloading snow, high of 45 degrees. Sun still above the ridge at 330pm but close to going down. Clear sky and breezy just before dark.
————————

Idaho News:

Valley officials: We are out of options

McCall meeting reviews funding for county roads

By Max Silverson for The Star-News Jan 16, 2020

Valley County commissioners told a town meeting in McCall on Tuesday that the county is out of options to fund maintenance and improvements of county roads.

“We are one of four counties in the state of Idaho that does not levy property taxes for roads,” commissioner Sherry Maupin said told about 30 people at the McCall American Legion Post.

Commissioners presented road department budgets, current funding sources and the specifics of the department’s funding and fielded questions.

More town hall meetings are planned, likely in Donnelly and Cascade, but dates and times have not yet been set.

A vote last November to levy property taxes to fund the department with about $3.8 million in additional revenue received 50.7% of the vote but fell short of the required 66.6%.

The county’s current of about $4.1 million allows the department to complete regular maintenance, but no major repairs of improvement projects, the audience was told.

In December, Congress passed an extension of a federal subsidy to rural counties with large amounts of federal land.

The subsidy is expected to bring the county about $1 million over the net two years.

Those attending Tuesday’s meeting asked about options to a road levy, the need to raise taxes and urging the county to ask the Forest Service to contribute more money to maintaining backcountry roads.

Some in attendance bemoaned what they felt was the ever-increasing burden of taxes from not only the county, but also the other taxing districts.

The county has several easements on Forest Service roads that provide access to backcountry locations such as Yellow Pine, Big Creek and Deadwood Reservoir.

The county receives $2,000 per mile for maintaining those roads, which provide access to recreational destinations, county officials said.

Another comment from the audience made the point that residents in McCall, Donnelly and Cascade already pay for the roads in their cities through taxes, which makes a new tax for county roads an unfair burden.

Commissioners said most city residents likely drive on county roads and that state law does not allow for the county to exempt residents living within city limits from paying county property taxes.

Commissioners floated the idea of taxing at a lower rate than previously proposed and circulated a survey where people could select a levy rate they found most appropriate.

Rates on the survey ranged from the full $83 per $100,000 in value that the failed levy proposed to less than half that amount.

Commissioners said they would consider the results of the surveys from each meeting when planning future levy votes.

source: © Copyright 2009-present Central Idaho Publishing Inc.
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Valley County to hear proposed rules for snowmobile trails

Parking, limits on wheeled vehicle among changes

By Max Silverson for The Star-News Jan 16, 2020

Overnight parking, regulations for wheeled vehicles on snowmobile trails and rules for other tracked vehicles are among the proposed changes to a Valley County ordinance governing snowmobile trail use.

A public hearing on the proposed changes is scheduled for 1 p.m. Tuesday at the Valley County Courthouse in Cascade.

County code already regulates snowmobile operation, speed and use on public roads and trails.

The additional proposal on Tuesday would add restrictions to snowmobile parking lots.

Vehicles parked in lots that impede snow removal equipment or the flow of traffic could be towed under the proposed ordinance.

Overnight parking would be allowed only in designated areas, with the exception of approved special events.

The rules would require snowmobile rental companies to provide transportation to trailheads and parking lots.

Tracked vehicles weighing over 2,000 pounds may be permitted for homeowners beyond groomed trailheads.

Wheeled vehicles would not be allowed to travel on Warren Wagon Road, No Business Road, Anderson Creek Road, High Valley Road, Clear Creek Road., East Side Drive/Brush Creek, and the “Green Gate” road from the first snowfall of the year until deemed safe by the county or April 30, whichever comes first.

The draft ordinance also proposed what should be done if a wheeled vehicle becomes stuck on a groomed snowmobile trail or closed road.

The operator of the vehicle would be responsible for the removal of the vehicle and the county parks and recreation director would be responsible for determining if a tow company or snow groomer can be used to remove the vehicle.

The cost of removing a vehicle and repairing the groomed trail would be set at $200 per hour with an additional $200 “mobilization fee” incurred.

source: © Copyright 2009-present Central Idaho Publishing Inc.
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‘Huge undertaking’: Highway 21 reopens after ITD clears snow from road north of Idaho City

by Deni Hawkins Friday, January 17th 2020


ITD crews work to clear snow from a section of Highway 21 between Idaho City and Lowman. (Courtesy: Boise County Emergency Management)

Idaho City, Idaho (CBS2) — Highway 21 is back open as of Friday morning, after being closed in two spots for several days because of heavy snow and avalanche concerns.

According to 511, there are currently no closures active on the highway. Crews from the Idaho Transportation Department had been working to clear snow from a section of Highway 21 between Idaho City and Lowman since earlier this week.

Several feet of snow fell in the area quickly last weekend, and plows simply weren’t able to keep up.

continued:
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Lawmakers eye plans to boost money for Idaho roads

by Associated Press Wednesday, January 15th 2020

Boise, Idaho (AP) – Two methods to bring in millions of dollars to pay for maintaining Idaho’s roads gained traction with lawmakers on Tuesday.

The House Transportation and Defense Committee voted to send to the full House a bill that would use money generated from investing about $275 million sitting in the state’s rainy-day account.

Republican Rep. Joe Palmer said the investment account would still serve as an emergency reserve should an economic slowdown occur.

continued:
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2020 McCall Winter Carnival celebrating 55 years

Jan 14, 2020 By: Steve Bertel KIVI


courtesy Tony Harrison

McCall, Idaho — McCall is gearing up to celebrate 55 years of the McCall Winter Carnival. Every year, the small town of 3,000 in central Idaho welcomes a surge of more than 60,000 people during the ten-day winter festival.

This year’s event runs Friday, Jan. 24 to Sunday, Feb. 2 — and celebrates the theme “It’s A Kids World.”

“It’s really asking the community and visitors to see through a child’s eyes and look at the world with that innocence and joy,” said McCall Winter Carnival Director Allison Wright. “Sometimes, it’s good to let go a little bit and just have some fun.”

continued:
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Ice rolling on Lake Lowell and a pickup buried in snow near McCall:

Hundreds of Idaho residents shared photos after an extra wintry week of weather.

KTVB Jan 17, 2020

After a frigid and snowy week, the KTVB Idaho Weather Watchers Facebook group has been overflowing with incredible photos of snow and wintry conditions across the state of Idaho.


Credit: Helen Brown
Helen Brown shared a photo in the Idaho Weather Watchers Facebook group and captioned it “brother found his pickup.” The photo was taken near McCall.

continued:
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Snowmobiler killed in avalanche west of Ketchum

The avalanche happened Wednesday afternoon in the Sawtooth National Forest.

KTVB January 15, 2020

A snowmobiler died Wednesday afternoon after getting caught in avalanche in the Sawtooth National Forest, officials said.

According to the Sawtooth Avalanche Center, two snowmobilers were riding in the Baker Creek drainage west of Ketchum when they were caught in an avalanche.

One of the riders escaped the slide, found his buried partner, and removed snow to clear the buried person’s face, the avalanche center said in a Facebook post.

continued:
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Initial snowpack, heavy winter storms and high wind increasing avalanche risk in C. Idaho

by Sarah Jacobsen Thursday, January 16th 2020

Boise, ID (CBS2) — Winter is finally here, and with a combination of heavy snow hammering Central Idaho, and now high winds coupled with a initial light snow pack, means dangerous avalanche conditions at all elevations for Central Idaho.

“You need 4 things to have an avalanche, the first is a weak layer and we have multiple weak layers in the snow pack that are weak sugary grains of depth toward the bottom, large celery surface crystals and some crust near the top,” explains Director of the Sawtooth Avalanche Center, Scott Savage. “So you can picture the weak layer as thin layer of potato chips and they are pretty happy when there is no weight on top of them, but what happens when you stack a bunch of books on those potato chips? they crack or crumble.”

Savage says the series of winter storms over the past week, are causing the uptick.

continued:
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‘Live to ski another day’: Experts talk avalanche safety in Idaho

With several fatal avalanches in the region over the last week, experts talk safety on the slopes.

Misty Inglet January 16, 2020 KTVB

Five people have been killed in three avalanches in Idaho and Eastern Oregon within the last week.

In at least one case, the avalanche was proven to be human-triggered.

Scott Savage, director of the Sawtooth Avalanche Center, said there is no average time frame that is considered “avalanche season” so having multiple avalanches in January is not unusual.

continued:
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Idaho Firewise Grant Program accepts applications through Feb. 28

The Star-News Jan 16, 2020

The Idaho Firewise Grant Program is accepting applications from fire departments and other community organizations seeking to increase wildland fire awareness through education.

The program has awarded more than $96,941 to fund projects throughout Idaho over the past six years.

For more information on the program, contact Stephanie Nelson at 208-630-4201 or (FB link).

For more information on Idaho Firewise grant requirements or to submit a grant proposal, visit (link). The deadline for submitting proposals is Friday, Feb. 28.

source:
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Tips & Advice:

Winter storm driving hacks: Why kitty litter and old socks could be game changers

January 14, 2020 Local News 8

If you hate driving in the winter, you are not alone.

Here are some useful and unique tips provided by Allstate to help you conquer winter-related driving dilemmas.

* Get your vehicle out of the snow with [old fashioned] kitty litter. Spreading kitty litter directly in front of the tires that are stuck (this will depend on whether your car is front or rear wheel drive) may help your tires grip and get you out of the snow.

* Prevent windshield wipers from freezing with old socks. If you’re out running errands, putting socks over each windshield wiper blade can help keep them from freezing over and sticking to your windshield while you’re away from your car.

* Cover side mirrors with plastic bags to prevent frost buildup. Keeping plastic grocery store or food storage bags in your glove compartment may help you keep your side mirrors from freezing.

* De-ice your locks using hand sanitizer. The alcohol in the sanitizer is an ingredient known to help melt ice.

continued:
Note: Do Not use the new clumping litter, it get slick when wet.
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Mining News:

Midas Gold to offer hot chocolates, cookies during Winter Carnival

The Star-News Jan 16, 2020

McCall Winter Carnival goers can warm up with hot chocolate and cookies at the Midas Gold booth at Art Roberts Park, 327 E. Lake St.

The booth will be open on Fridays, Jan. 24 and 31, from noon to 5 p.m. and Saturdays, Jan. 25 and Feb. 1, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

source:
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McCall council splits over Midas Gold letter

Panel votes 3-2 to request extension of comment period

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News Jan 16, 2020

The McCall City Council last week split over whether to request the public be given more time to comment on the proposed Midas Gold mine near Yellow Pine.

The council split 3-2 in favor of making the request to the Payette National Forest to double the public comment period from the 45-day minimum to 90 days.

Mayor Bob Giles, council member Colby Nielsen and new council member Mike Maciaszek all supported the request, while council members Melanie Holmes and Thom Sowers voted against it.

The council voted on a request made to the council last month by the group Save The South Fork to ask for the extension of comment to the draft study of the mine by the Payette National Forest.

Public comment will be considered by the Payette in formulating the final version of the operating plan to be used by Midas Gold to extract gold and antimony from the historic Stibnite Mining District.

The Payette plans to release the draft study later this month so a 45-day extension would push the deadline for public comments from mid-March to early May.

An extension of the public comment period would not delay a final decision on the project, currently slated for March 2021, Payette Public Affairs Officer Brian Harris told The Star-News.

Giles, Nielsen and Maciaszek said the extension was “practical” and necessary for the council to thoroughly review the draft study.

“It is an important enough issue for enough people in this community that we owe it to our community to do our due diligence in making sure the right thing happens should it be approved or denied,” Nielsen said.

Holmes said she did not want to see the process drawn out. “If we need some additional planning time, we should do a special meeting and just get it done,” she said.

Sowers called the extension request a “filibuster tactic” and said the extra time to review the draft study would probably not sway anyone’s opinion on the project.

Giles pointed to a well-attended 2018 lecture series on the Midas Gold proposal as evidence of the importance of the project within the community.

The council decided last year not to sign Midas Gold’s proposed Community Agreement after hearing testimony from 68 citizens, 58 of who were in opposition.

The agreement would have allowed the city to appoint a representative to the Stibnite Advisory Council, which meets monthly to hear updates on the project from Midas Gold officials, and to the Stibnite Foundation.

Council members feared conflicts of interest if the city was directly involved with the Stibnite Foundation, a charitable foundation set up and funded by Midas Gold to make grants for community projects.

The Stibnite Foundation is governed by a board of appointed representatives from each of the eight communities that signed the Community Agreement.

Adams County, Idaho County, the Village of Yellow Pine and the cities of Cascade, Donnelly, New Meadows, Riggins and Council all signed the community agreement.

Valley County was originally asked to sign the agreement but Midas Gold later withdrew the invitation.

Midas Gold cited a possible conflict since it will need permits from the county to operate the mine.

The foundation currently has about $950,000 in cash and shares from Midas Gold and expects to begin its first grant cycle later this year.

source: © Copyright 2009-present Central Idaho Publishing Inc.
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Public Lands:

IPC Warm lake Feeder Line Relocation [Yellow Pine]

“Please submit your scoping comments by January 28, 2020”

received Jan 13, 2020 Boise National Forest

Project Description

Idaho Power Company (IPC) has identified a need relocate a segment of line that is currently west of Johnson Creek. This segment of line is only accessible by a deteriorated light-duty bridge that cannot handle the weight of the large equipment required to maintain the line, thus creating a safety issue. Also, the segment of line where it crosses back over to the east side of Johnson Creek and continues into the community of Yellow Pine is at risk to rock slides and there has been repeated rock slide related outages and emergency repairs over the last several years. The proposed underground alignment would improve access, reduce customer outages, improve service and reliability, and ensure the electrical energy source to Yellow Pine residences is maintained.

Proposed Action:

IPC proposes to reroute approximately 2.49 miles of a portion of the existing overhead Warm Lake (WMLK 011) 7.2-kilovolt (kV) distribution line with approximately 2.74 miles of single-phase underground line.

The proposed underground line would be along the easterly ROW (66 feet) of Johnson Creek Road and the associated vaults and sectors would be located outside of the existing road prism and would not interfere with the free flow of traffic, disrupt communication services, or impair the full use and safety of the road.

The proposed project would involve plowing/trenching conduit, installing conductor, excavating and installing vaults/sectors, installing two new single poles (where the line transitions from overhead to underground), and backfilling the trench.

Once the underground distribution line is installed, the overhead line would be removed and the ROW for the portion of the overhead line would be relinquished. All project related disturbance would be repaired as soon as weather, ground, and scheduling conditions permit.

Approximately 0.27 miles of the existing overhead line (including four single-pole wood pole) would remain to continue to provide service to a private mining claim on the west side of Johnson Creek.

Project Location:

The proposed project is in Township 18 North, Range 08 East, Section 04, and Township 19 North, Range 08 East, Sections 28, 29, 32, & 33, Boise Meridian, Valley County, Idaho.

How to Comment

The Forest Service is contacting interested persons, groups, and agencies to make them aware of the project and to gather pertinent feedback. Your comments will help us identify and address issues. Comments may be submitted in the following ways:

* Through the project webpage (link). Select “Comment on Project” under “Get Connected” on the right panel. If uploading a file with comments, comments must be in the form of plain text (.txt), Word (.doc, .docx) or PDF (.pdf).
* Mail to Cascade Ranger District, PO Box 696, Cascade, ID 83611.
* Hand deliver to Boise National Forest, Cascade District, 540 North Main Street, Cascade, ID 83611. Office hours for submitting hand-delivered comments are 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, excluding holidays.
* By fax at 208-382-7480. If submitting comments by mail or fax, be sure to include “WMLK-11” in the subject line.

Comments received will be included in the project record and may be released in their entirety, if requested, pursuant to the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA).

When to Comment

To be most helpful, please submit your scoping comments by January 28, 2020. For further information on the project, please contact Terre Pearson-Ramirez, Team Leader, at 208-382-7400.
— — — — — — — — — —

Officials want more bear safety signs in the Boise National Forest

by CBS2 News Staff Tuesday, January 14th 2020


An example of bear-safety signage.

Boise, Idaho (CBS2) — The Boise National Forest would like to add more bear safety signs to its campgrounds.

BNF announced Tuesday it’s applying for grant funding from the Idaho Department of Parks and Recreation to improve bear safety signage at a number of campgrounds and picnic areas across the forest.

The forest is asking for money from the Department’s Recreational Vehicle Fund.

“Improved bear awareness at developed recreation sites will inform forest visitors how to safely enjoy the outdoors while sharing the landscape with bears,” BNF said. “Signage will focus on food storage and waste management guidance. Developed recreation sites with past nuisance bear problems are prioritized for the signage.”

source:
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Boise National Forest to submit grant proposal to Idaho Department of Parks and Recreation

Boise, Idaho, January 14, 2020 — The Boise National Forest is applying for grant funding from the Idaho Department of Parks and Recreation to improve bear safety signage at a number of campgrounds and picnic areas across the Boise National Forest.

The application will request funding through the Department’s Recreational Vehicle Fund. Improved bear awareness at developed recreation sites will inform forest visitors how to safely enjoy the outdoors while sharing the landscape with bears. Signage will focus on food storage and waste management guidance. Developed recreation sites with past nuisance bear problems are prioritized for the signage.

All grant proposals will improve the visitor experience and mitigate public health and safety hazards. If received, implementation of the grant would begin in summer of 2020.

Comments or requests for more information should be submitted to:

Boise National Forest Supervisor’s Office
Attn: Lisa Nutt
1249 S. Vinnell Way, Suite 200
Boise, ID 83709

Or by calling the Boise National Forest at 208-373-4100.
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New Start – JaBob Minerals Project EA and FONSI: Opportunity for Public Comment

Dear Interested Party:

The Idaho City Ranger District of the Boise National Forest has prepared an Environmental Assessment/Finding of No Significant Impact (EA/FONSI) for the New Start – JaBob (NSJB) Mining Project Plan of Operations. It is the Boise National Forest’s responsibility under Forest Service mineral regulations at 36 CFR 228(A) to respond to plans of operation for mineral exploration and ensure that the Plan’s Proposed Action minimizes adverse environmental impacts as defined at 36 CFR 228.8. The Plan was submitted pursuant to the 36 CFR 228(A) – Locatable Minerals. The Forest Service is mandated to act timely in processing Plans submitted under the mining laws, including completion of an environmental review, which is the purpose of this EA. This EA/FONSI is subject to the pre-decisional objection process at 36 CFR 218, Subparts A and B.

The NSJB project area is located approximately one mile southwest of Pioneerville, Idaho, in Boise County. The legal description is Township 07N Range 05E, Section 10, Boise Meridian.

The EA/FONSI is available at (link) Click on the “Analysis” tab under “Project Documents.”

Opportunity to Comment

We welcome your comments on the content of the EA/FONSI. Instructions for commenting are found in the Legal Notice published in the Idaho Statesman on Friday, January 17, 2020. A copy can also be found on the project website (above). Comments specific to the proposed action that identify a cause-effect relationship are most helpful. Comments received in response to this solicitation, including names and addresses of those who comment, will be considered part of the public record for this project and will be available for public inspection. The following options are available for submitting comments.

Electronic comments may be submitted through a web form on the NSJB Project webpage (link). To submit a comment using the web form, select “Comment/Object on Project” under “Get Connected” on the right panel of the project’s webpage.

Written comments can be submitted via fax at 208-373-4111 or mailed to Travis Whitman, Idaho City Ranger District, 3833 Hwy 21, Idaho City, ID 83631, or hand-delivered to the same address during normal business hours (8:00 AM to 4:30 PM, Monday-Friday, excluding federal holidays). If submitting comments by mail or fax, be sure to include “New Start – JaBob Mining Project” in the subject line.

If you have any questions, please direct them to Travis Whitman, Team Leader, at 208-392-3719.
— — — — — — — — — —

The Saint Minerals Project (Revised) – Opportunity for Public Comment

January 17, 2020 – The Forest Service is seeking scoping comments for The Saint Minerals Project located on the Idaho City Ranger District. Information regarding this project is provided in the “Proposal Information” document (link below).

The Forest Service is contacting interested persons, groups, and agencies to make them aware of the project and to gather pertinent feedback. This project was originally proposed and scoped in August 2016 but was placed on hold due to changes in the proposal.

Please submit your scoping comments by Friday, February 14, 2020, and make your comments as specific as possible. Your comments will help us refine the proposal and identify preliminary issues. Comments received in response to this request will be available for public inspection and will be released in their entirety if requested pursuant to the Freedom of Information Act.

How to Comment

Written, facsimile, hand-delivered, verbal, and electronic comments concerning this project will be accepted.

Written comments can be submitted via fax at 208-373-4111 or mailed to Travis Whitman, Idaho City Ranger District, PO Box 129, Idaho City, ID 83631, or hand-delivered to the same address during normal business hours (8:00 AM to 4:30 PM, Monday-Friday, excluding federal holidays). If submitting comments by mail or fax, be sure to include “The Saint Mining Project” in the subject line.

Electronic comments may also be submitted to The Saint Minerals Project webpage at (link) To submit comments using the web form select “Comment/Object on Project” under “Get Connected” on the right panel of the project’s webpage.

Stay Connected to this Project via the Web

The Forest Service has transitioned to a web-based electronic comment system that allows all interested parties to receive project material (scoping documents, updates, draft and final NEPA documents, and decisions) by e-mail. This system gives you direct control over which mailing lists you are subscribed to and immediate electronic access to project documents as they are posted online.

To subscribe, go online to The Saint Minerals Project webpage at (link) On the project webpage, you will see a box titled “Get Connected” on the right hand side of the page, click on “Subscribe to Email Updates”. When you click on that item, you will be prompted to provide your e-mail address and select a password. Once you are subscribed, you will receive all project information via e-mail.

If you have no comments on the proposal but want to remain on the mailing list and don’t want to use the automated process described above, please contact Travis Whitman.

For further information on The Saint Minerals Project, please contact Travis Whitman, Minerals Administrator, at 208-392-6681.
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Lowman Ranger District of the Boise National Forest Intend to Submit Grant Proposal to Idaho Department of Parks and Recreation

Lowman, Idaho, January 13, 2020 — The Lowman Ranger District of the Boise National Forest is applying for grant funding from the Idaho Department of Parks and Recreation to install an additional vault toilet at Mountain View Campground.

The application will request funding through the Department’s Recreational Vehicle Fund. Installation of the vault toilet is to accommodate for projected high use numbers and improve accessibility after the campground’s reconstruction in summer 2020.

All grant proposals will improve the visitor experience and mitigate public health and safety hazards. This will also help sustain the capital investment of Mountain View Campground. If received, implementation of the grant would begin in late summer of 2020.

Comments or requests for more information should be submitted to:

Lowman Ranger District
Attn: Lauren Bonney
7539 Highway 21
Lowman, ID 83631

Or by calling the Lowman Ranger District at 208-259-3361
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Critter News:

Pooches will provide the power at Monster Dog Pull on Jan. 26

The Star-News Jan 16, 2020

The dog-gone most fun event of the Winter Carnival is the Monster Dog Pull on Sunday, Jan. 26, at Alpine Village in downtown McCall starting at 11 a.m.

Dogs of every shape and size will pull small weighted sleds along a short course one at a time, competing for the fastest time in one of six weight classes.

Prizes will be awarded to the top three finishers in each class. No special training, skills or equipment required.

Registration is $15 for each dog racing, with sign-ups held from 10:45 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. There is no admission for spectators.

All proceeds will benefit MCPAWS, which provides safe shelter for abandoned, surrendered and lost cats and dogs.

MCPAWS also finds loving homes for all adoptable animals, promotes responsible pet ownership and reduces overpopulation through spay and neuter services.

For more information visit (link) or call 634-DOGS

source:
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Third annual Idaho Sled Dog Challenge returns to McCall this month

Jan 14, 2020 By KIVI Staff

McCall, Idaho — The Idaho Sled Dog Challenge is returning to McCall starting January 28 during the 2020 McCall Winter Carnival.

Celebrating its third consecutive year, the race features world-class mushers . It is the only 300-mile Yukon Quest qualifier in the lower 48 and one of only three such events in the contiguous continental U.S. states for the Iditarod. The Iditarod and the Yukon Quest are considered the longest and the toughest sled dog races in the world.

The Idaho Sled Dog Challenge is part of the Rocky Mountain Triple Crown, which also includes the Eagle Cap Extreme January 22-25 near Joseph, Oregon, and the Race to the Sky February 7-11 near Helena, Montana.

continued:
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Pet Talk – Nasal tumors in dogs

Dr. Karsten Fostvedt Jan 17, 2020 IME

Tumors of the nasal cavity and nearby sinuses account for about 1 to 2 percent of tumors in dogs. Most nasal tumors occur in large-breed dogs older than 8. Most nasal tumors are malignant or cancerous. The cause of these tumors is unknown. There are multiple tumor types, including primary tumors arising from the tissues within the nasal cavity, and secondary tumors that invade the nose, especially from the tissues around the nose.

Most signs are very subtle initially, and the tumor can be present in the nasal cavity or sinuses for months before any abnormalities are seen. The first abnormality that occurs is a bloody discharge from one nostril only. If your dog has a bloody discharge from one nostril, then take it to your veterinarian for an immediate exam. Open-mouth, noisy breathing is common if the nasal cavity is obstructed.

Tumors may be suspected in animals with chronic nasal discharge unresponsive to symptomatic therapy. X-rays of the head may demonstrate changes in the nasal cavity or sinuses that are compatible with the tumor.

continued:
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Idaho Fish and Game forces mountain lion to leave Ketchum backyard

Jan 14, 2020 By Katie Kloppenburg KIVI

Ketchum, Idaho — Idaho Fish and Game used non-lethal methods to remove a mountain lion that frequented a Ketchum backyard. Fish and Game officers were notified on Friday, January 10, that the mountain lion which had been hazed the day before had returned.

The large male lion was bedded in the same location as found on January 9. After assessing the situation, officers fired several shotgun rounds, using rubber slugs and buckshot, to force the lion to leave the backyard. After the hazing, the lion ran from the area.

Once the area was clear, officers inspected the day bed and found a partially eaten elk calf, which the lion had been feeding on over the last few days. The elk was removed, reducing the chances of the lion returning.

continued:
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‘We have a very healthy elk population’: Idaho Fish & Game responds to concerns about elk slaughter in Magic Valley

Misty Inglet January 13, 2020 KTVB

Jerome, Idaho — A Facebook post claiming Idaho Fish and Game slaughtered 172 elk in the Magic Valley region is generating a heated debate on the social media platform.

With hundreds of comments and more than a thousand shares, the post has sparked some outrage with many questioning why Fish and Game would kill the elk. Others wondered if the post was true.

Terry Thompson, communications manager for Fish and Game Magic Valley region, tells KTVB that elk were killed but the number was actually 206 not 172.

According to Thompson, the elk were killed as part of a research project with a graduate student from the University of Idaho.

continued:
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Fish & Game News:

More Camping Improvements Coming to Horsethief Reservoir

By Evin Oneale, Regional Communications Manager
Thursday, January 9, 2020


Jordan Messner, IDFG

Horsethief Reservoir continues to be a camping and fishing destination for outdoor enthusiasts across Idaho. As visitation continues to increase, the need has arisen to provide more structured camping to protect the very environment that visitors travel to Horsethief to enjoy.

That effort began in 2018, when three of Horsethief’s east side camping loops — Beaver Tail, Trout Landing and Horsethief Creek — were upgraded with compacted gravel loop roads, parking pads, new picnic tables and fire rings.

That project was just the beginning. In 2019, Horsethief Reservoir underwent additional renovation, this time targeting the King’s Point camping loop and the adjacent boat ramp area. The loop road was widened and paved, as were all 28 King’s Point campsites, with each site outfitted with large sand living pads, picnic tables and fire rings. The boat ramp parking area was enlarged and paved to better serve Horsethief boaters. Both will be ready for campers and boaters when the snow melts this spring.

continued:
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Windows to Wildlife Newsletter

In this Winter 2019 issue:

* For Wildlife, Climate Change is all About Timing
* Bees to Bears
* Idaho Birding Trail
* Bird Populations in North America are on the Decline
* Seven Simple Actions to Help Birds
* Winter Wildlife Events

link:
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Winter weather so far has not prompted the need for emergency big game feeding

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Supervisor
Tuesday, January 14, 2020

Big game herds are well adapted to survive a typical Idaho winter

When big snowstorms roll through Idaho, people often wonder if Idaho Fish and Game will start feeding deer, elk, pronghorn and other animals. The short answer is that this is a normal winter so far, and the department usually only feeds big game during extreme winter conditions, or when other factors prompt it.

Fish and Game has winter feeding advisory committees in each region of the state except the Panhandle (which has never had a winter feeding program). The regional advisory committees keep a watchful eye on several weather conditions and factors, such as snow depths, whether there’s crust on snow that hinders an animal’s ability to forage and extended periods of sub-zero temperatures. They also monitor if animals are causing damage to private agriculture lands, or creating hazards to public safety, such as congregating near freeways and highways.

continued:
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More F&G News Releases

link:
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Crazy Critter Stuff:

Caught On Video: Highland Park House Cat Fights Off 3 Coyotes

Jan 14, 2010

Los Angeles, CA (KCAL/KCBS) — A black-and-white cat named Max proved the claws can come out in an instant when he faced off with three coyotes at his Highland Park home.

The epic battle last Wednesday night was caught on Maya Gurrin’s home security video.

“My husband and I were watching a movie right here and all of a sudden we see this kind of shadow of a tail,” she said. “We walk outside and all of a sudden we see just three coyotes completely surrounding him.”

continued:

video:


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Seasonal Humor:

SnowSickHand-a
“If you have had enough cold and snow, Please… raise your hands.”
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Idaho History Jan 19, 2020

The Prospector and Thunder Mountain News April 1, 1905

courtesy Sandy McRae and Jim Collord

[Note: to view the old ads, turn off your ad blocker. There are no commercial ads on this page. Click an ad to start a slide show.]


(link to larger size image of banner)

The Prospector and Thunder Mountain News

Roosevelt, Idaho April 1, 1905 Volume 1 Number 16

19050401Pg1A-banner

19050401Pg1headline
Sunnyside Crusher Arrives With 62 Horses And 21 Men

William Kreps, the Dauntless Freighter, Crosses Four Mountain Ranges With 20,000 Pounds of Mining Machinery.

19050401Pg1DeweyHotel
The Dewey Palace Hotel (Home of Thunder Mountain Millionaires) Nampa, Idaho
By courtesy of Mrs. Mansfield of Idaho Leaders

William Kreps is just arriving with the Sunnyside Mine machinery weighing fully 20,000 lbs. The great rock crusher, which weighs 7000 pounds, drawn by twelve horses is the last of the teams to arrive and will pass through town as we go to press. This ponderous piece of machinery loaded on the sled stands fully eight feet above the road bed.

A representative of THE NEWS met the teams at Southwest Fork summit in order to see for himself the consumation [sic] of this gigantic undertaking. He was shown every courtesy by Mr. Kreps and thus enabled to give a systematic account of this stupendous journey.

Mr. Kreps took the crusher at Pearl Summit, 25 miles this side of Nampa on the 11th of March, where it was left by previous freighters. Coming up Squaw creek hill, the mud reached the wagon box. 20 horses were used in pulling the load up this hill. Mr. Kreps took the Sunnyside company at its word. He was told to get the machinery to the mine and he has done what few men would have thought possible. He hired horses and men whenever he needed them and kept his eye on the goal. He owns one team of six horses which is perhaps not surpassed in the whole state. The horses average 1500 pounds each and seem to take work as a passtime [sic]. With 4000 pounds of machinery on their sled Mr. Kreps sent this team ahead to break the road and up some of the mountains there was fully three feet of snow.

At High Valley it became necessary to transfer the crusher from wheels to a sled. The last mile and a half was made through mud which seemed to have no bottom. After the [crusher passed], not even a saddle horse could make his way and the fence was taken down on one side and a temporary road made through a field.

Mr. Kreps had a novel way of transferring his load. He drove along side a large tree, placed a tackle of wire cable above the load, lifted it by means of horses, and drawing the wagon out and a sled underneath, lowered the ponderous weight to the sled.

He experienced no further trouble and made good time to Smith’s Ferry on the Payette. Here he found the ice although two feet thick in places too rotten to bear his tremendous load, or even his stock. He spent three days in dynamiting a canal, so to speak, through the river which at this point is several hundred feet wide. The canal he made about 25 feet in width and loading the crusher on to the ferryboat, attached a line to it and with twelve horses which he had engaged on the opposite side of the stream he pulled the boat through the slush ice made in dynamiting, to the other shore. A little later the ice cleared and loading his horses on the boat they were poled across.

This side of Smith’s Ferry, Mr. Kreps began to pick up other machinery belonging to the crusher, hired men and horses as they were needed and swept the road clean of machinery needed at the Sunnyside mine.

Several miles this side of Thunder City he was again obliged to transfer his loads to wheels for a few miles and then back to sleds again. He accomplished this in the same manner as before – simply … (page torn).

At Big Creek Summit, 12 miles south of Knox, Mr. Kreps showed his resourceful genious [sic] in a remarkable way. The road along this summit was sidling and frozen hard. He hired Joseph Rollins with his team and an ordinary breaking plough and ploughed a single furrow through the snow and ice on the upper side of the road for a distance of two miles. This made a trench for the upper runners of his sleds and held them in place, thus preventing them from sliding down the mountain side with his tremendous loads.

Fortune seemed to smile sometimes, however, on the heroic efforts being made; at Johnson creek when the teams arrived, there was no snow on the grade; Mr. Kreps made preparations to again transfer his loads to wheels. At dark snow began to fall and at daylight next morning the road was covered with six inches of snow. The morning was warm and time could not be lost. Hastily harnessing his teams be rushed the great loads up the mountain side to the height where the old snow had not melted. He returned to Johnson Creek for dinner with men and horses, went back up the hilt and made Reardon Creek that night.

The road which Mr. Kreps had broken on a previous trip was of much value as it formed a firm foundation below tie new snow – across Bald Hill which is over 8000 feet high, for fully eight miles the new snow was over three feet deep.

Hearing of the approach of the teams, Supt. Abbott sent seven men in charge of D. S. Cotter to assist in getting … (page torn) … down Southwest Fork summit. This work was of great service.

Mr. Kreps himself, with two sixes arrived Thursday afternoon, leaving the crusher to follow from Bald Hill. Charles Haynes, a veteran driver, has been with that load during the whole trip.

Leaving his own superb six, driven by Al. Woods, to break the road to the Sunnyside mine, Mr. Kreps went back to see the last load in.

To feed this large number of horses 15 bales of hay and 11 sacks of oats were used daily. It is pleasant to be able to say that no care or expense was spared to keep the horses in good condition and make them comfortable. Mr. Kreps himself is a master driver and not only knows how to care for horses but insists that it shall be done.

This marvelous undertaking passes into the wonderful history of Thunder Mountain. In the dead of winter William Kreps has drawn 20,000 pounds of machinery over four mountain ranges and will set it down in perfect condition at its destination.
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Locals

Charles E. Curtis has opened a saloon at Belleco.

Wm. Queeney has gone to Middle Fork of the Salmon.

Mrs. Sam Hancock is spending a few days with Mrs. Pannkake at the Y. H.

Bert Merridth and Claude Taylor went to work at the Dewey Wednesday.

E. M. Thornton returned Thursday … (page torn).

Mrs. Morris went to Belleco this morning where she will take charge of the Sunnyside boarding house.

A. A. Lyden, R. B. MacGregor and Ed. Lewis arrived from the Ramey Ridge country the 27th ult.

Mrs. Charles E. Curtis and family, Mis. C. M. Taylor and Mrs. Hasbrook took the stage this morning for Boise.

H. C. Ailport, the sub-contractor for this end of the mail route, arrived Thursday afternoon with a sleigh load of mail. Mr. Ailport made great efforts to get the mail in.

E. L. Reid is quite sick. Stage-driver Ailport went to the Southwest Fork of Monumental Friday morning and brought him to town. We hope he will soon be about again.

McCrum & Deary, of Boise, always carry a first class stock of drugs and medicines. They make a specialty of mail order business, and solicit Thunder Mountain trade. See their advertisement.

A petition was circulated last week praying the county commissioners to declare the Thunder Mountain Road a county road and appoint a road supervisor. R. D. Almond was named as supervisor, and the petition was universally signed.

Ed. Collins, while working in the Blue Point tunnel at the 20th Century, narrowly escaped death last Saturday. While timbering the tunnel a huge boulder weighing nearly a ton fell from the roof grazing his head and shoulder. He is not seriously injured though disabled for a few days.
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The Oriental situation as we go to press seems almost axiomatic. After the battle of Liao Yang Japan intimated that she would gladly welcome peace. The Czar said, “I will risk another battle.” He risked it – the cost is some hundred and fifty thousand human lives – this doesn’t amount to much to the Czar – he considers his private soldiers in the same light as a freighter does his stock – “the collar will fit another horse” – the Czar has millions of men, his “subjects,” left. The autocracy of Russia must be sustained. The bankers of Paris, however, think that the down-trodden peasantry of Russia may at last reach the limit of endurance; they think that weeping Poland and strangled Finland may yet assert, and they refuse the Russian loan. Japan has not millions of serfs to throw to the front, but after she has buried her 50,000 dead as the result of the awful battle of Mukden she has left millions of men whose very life blood thrills with the noblest … (page torn)

… captain of modern warfare. The Japanese have never known defeat – they are fighting for principles as lofty as the blue dome and we confidently predict for Japan the victory.
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Every few months some obscure word is brought forth from the deep recess of the English language and inflicted upon the reading public until the word becomes so trite that newspaper men are ashamed longer to use it. The latest nuisance is the word “effete” applied to the eastern states – “Effete East” People who are acquainted with the East or who do business there find it is not very much “effete.”
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The reason we have such an irregular mail service is simply the fact of underbidding for the contract to carry the mail. Any branch of federal service carries with it prestage [sic] and responsibilities – many federal officials remember the prestage [sic] and forget the responsibility.
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The Standard Oil Company has had everything its own way for many years. It is now facing an investigation, national in extent, which is backed by the executive head of the nation. It is safe to say that its methods will be well aired.
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It is said that there is but one daily mining newspaper in the world – The Daily Mining Record of Denver.
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Locals Continued.

The Summit House was the scene of much activity Wednesday evening when 21 men with the Sunnyside machinery spent the night there. Fully 50 horses were tied about the grounds.

Fred Roesch is putting up a dwelling house 16×24 feet in the clear on his lot south of the pioneer meet [sic] market. He will set it back from the street so that the front of the lot may be used as a business location.

S. L. Gillam has a very fine mountain sheep’s head, a present from Ed. Myers, which he will have mounted and hang as an ornament in his saloon. He has quite extensive decorations in mind which we shall report later.

Says the Mining Recorder: “An important mining deal was recently made in Kansas City whereby George Brant transferred his interest in the Brant Mining & Milling Company for an interest in the Golden Islet, situated in Jones gulch. New officers were elected for the Golden Islet Mining & Milling Company, as follows: J. G. McKnight, president; S. E. Bowerman, vice-president; J. F. Mensing, secretary and treasurer.” Geo. Brant is well known in this section as the local manager of the Brant Mining & Milling Company.

I have been requested to state my prices for professional services; they are as follows: A common extraction, without anaesthetics [sic], $1.00; absolutely painless extraction, $2.50; seemless [sic] gold crown, 22k.-30 gague [sic], $10 to $15; for bridge work, $10 to $12.50; plates from, $25 to $100; silver fillings $1.50 to $2.00; platinum fillings, $2.50 to $3.00; gold fillings, $3.50 up. A word in regard to the painless extraction: I am inventor of an anaesthetic [sic] which has taken me years to complete, and the experiments incidental thereto have cost much time, trouble and money. Ask those who have used my anaesthetic [sic] if I missrepresent [sic] its effect. In no dental parlors outside, can you get first-class work done cheaper than I do it and the after effects commonly known to painless extraction, are not known to my patients since my anaesthetic [sic] is local in its effect. I do all kinds of dental work known to the profession. I avoid giving needless pain in all dental operations. Ask your friends about this. I take personal interest in my patients and so assume to refer you to any of them. C. T. JONES, D. D. S.
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Idaho’s Game Law.

During the session of the last legislature, considerable attention was given to the fish and game law. The law as it now stands is a good one and all good citizens of the state will unite in upholding it. We are too apt to disregard the value of the wild animals of our forests. There is perhaps the finest hunting ground in the world right here in Idaho. Elk, deer, bears of several varieties, mountain sheep, beaver, martin, grouse and all small game abound in our great mountain fastnesses. Nothing but wanton disregard of all decent and sportsmanlike hunting will ever despoil our forests. The only game which really needs protection at the present time is Elk, deer and mountain sheep.

Three great evils menace the increase, and even the continuance of these fine species of game in this section of the country, namely:

Destruction by cougars,
Wanton slaughter,
And sale of wild game.

The first named is perhaps the worst evil of till. Few people realize the terrible destruction of deer caused by the cougar, or American lion. Many mountaineers estimate that every full grown cougar kills not less than thirty deer each year, and so the wisdom of the late legislature is shown, in offering a bounty of $15 for every cougar killed – the cougar is of absolutely no use – a sneaking, cowardly beast which stealthily crawls upon his prey and springing from his lair sets his jaws in death grip on the throat of his victim.

The second evil, wanton slaughter, is fast disappearing from this section, though we have suffered from it in the past. It seems hardly credible that any man would stand and deliberately shoot a wild deer of the forest for the pleasure of seeing it fall in death throes. Unfortunately such has been the case and right here in Thunder Mountain.

There are men, God grant they are few, so deeply depraved that a living mark is preferable to a target for rifle practice, even though it be the finest specimen of wild game for which they have not the slightest use except the morbid satisfaction of seeing it give up its life.

Last year three fine elk were killed in the Chamberlain Basin – they weighed from 300 to 500 pounds each. Two teeth were taken from each elk and the carcasses were left to rot. The State Game Warden, Van Irons, used every means to bring the dastard who killed them to justice; he failed because the two witnesses who could testify for the prosecution were too cowardly to do so, and left the state.

But perhaps the least excusable and most disgraceful of all the agencies of destruction of wild game animals is claudestine [sic] sale of the meat. We believe there is not a state in the union where deer or elk may be legally sold – there is certainly not one where any attention is given to the preservation of game. No good citizen will sell a deer or elk. It is legally as well as morally wrong; and no man who has respect for himself and interest in his community and those who are to come after him, will, for a few paltry dollars, so degrade himself.

No restaurant or hotel keeper who is honorable and does a legitimate business will serve a piece of deer meat at his table unless it is furnished by his guest.

The state of Maine has the finest hunting and fishing of any or the older states. Why? Because it has the most stringent laws, and because every citizen upholds them.

Maine’s revenue from her game and fish probably amounts to $1,000,000 a year. That amount is brought into the state. A man may leave Boston in the morning and be in the very heart of a great game country at night.

On the shores of Rangely Lake, is situated a hotel property worth not less than $100,000 – the “Rangely Lake House,” which is supported by the fish and game resources. There, a man may be given six months in jail for killing a deer out of season and at the Parsons Hotel on Dead River where the deer may be seen any sunny morning at the edge of the wood, you can not get venison served unless you legally kill it yourself.

The preservation of the game makes revenue to every man in the country, farmer, guide, boatman, liveryman and hotel keeper.

The time is not too distant when the same conditions may exist here if every citizen will do his own honest part in strengthening the arm of the law. We owe it to ourselves; we owe it to those who come after us.
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The Great American Hen.

The great American hen, thrice hail! Here in very sooth is a subject for an epic. In his annual report Secretary Wilson says the farmers’ hens produce one and two-third billions of dozens of eggs every year. Think of that! Under a beneficent republican administration the hens of the American farmyards produce annually 1,666,666,666 dozens of eggs. What is the wealth of a Monte Cristo compared with the wealth produced by these cheerful, clucking, industrious denizens of the barnyard? It invites the mind to rhapsodical flights of fancy.

– Rochester Post-Express.
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International Happenings

During the week preceeding [sic] March 9th, deaths from plague numbered 34,000. Statistics show that the deaths from bubonic plague in India within a few years have reached 3,000,000. In 1903 the deaths from this source was 860,000.

On March 9th, Lord Rosebery in a speech before the City of London Liberal Club, said: “There is one thing to which no wise statesman ever will expose the country, namely, the curse of a dual government. We have sufficient warnings in the example of Norway and Sweden, and Austria and Hungary to avoid the peril of having the vulture gnawing at our very vitals.”

It is reported that President Castro of Venezuela has sold his government and himself for $2,600,000. Castro’s financial agent at Antwerp has been instructed to sign an agreement with German and British bond holders turning over 50 per cent. of the customs receipts of five Venezuelan ports until the full amount of the indebtedness is paid. This will take about fifty years and will give to Germany and Great Britain a preponderance of influence in the republic. He receives the amount referred to above as a gift.
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NATIONAL.

Wm. R. Hearst announces that his papers will not support Mayor McClellan for re-election as mayor of New York.

It is now reported that Mrs. Huntington and her millions are behind the Western Pacific railroad move, instead of the Goulds.

Harry S. New has been appointed vice-chairman of the Republican National Committee and will be acting chairman upon the resignation of Secretary Cortelyou.

President Roosevelt is not satisfied with the progression made by the Panama Canal Commission – we may look for important changes. Roosevelt has to be shown.

A terrible boiler explosion followed by destructive fire occurred in a Brockton shoe factory the 21st of March. The last accounts we have on going to press state that 53 bodies had been taken from the ruins.

A newspaper advertisement in New York offering a day’s work to fifty snow shovelers brought more than 300 men to the spot before daylight the next morning. When the man appeared with the fifty work checks a rush ensued which necessitated calling the police. When they arrived more than 20 individual couples were engaged in a fist fight for the privilege of shoveling all day for $2.

The President’s cabinet is composed as follows: Secretary of State, John Hay of Ohio. Secretary of the Treasury, Leslie M. Shaw of Iowa. Secretary of War, William H. Taft of Ohio. Secretary of the Interior, Ethan A. Hitchcock of Missouri. Secretary of tin Navy, Paul Morton of Illinois. Secretary of Agriculture, James Wilson of Iowa. Postmaster General, Robert J. Wynne. Attorney General, William H. Moody of Massachusetts. Secretary of Commence [sic] and Labor, Victor H. Metcalf of California.
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State Items.

There are but two mining camps in the West and Alaska that produce more mineral wealth than the Coeur d’Alenes, a section 10×20 miles in extent. These are Butte and Cripple Creek. In 1904 the smelter returns for ore shipped from the Cour d’Alenes [sic] was $12,317,375.

At the annual debate between the University of Idaho and the University of Utah held at Moscow, March 9th, the victory was awarded to Idaho. The question was: “Resolved, that it would be unwise to make provision in our laws for compulsory voting.” Idaho had the negative, thus favoring the enactment of such a law.

A terrible accident occurred March 12th to Mrs. P. E. Ellis, wife of postmaster Ellis of Stites. She was riding a spirited horse over a dangerous road when the cinch broke and Mrs Ellis was thrown against a sharp rock at the side of the road. Her skull was crushed, so that parts had to be removed leaving an aperture, 2×3 inches into which was inserted a silver plate. It would hardly seem possible that she could recover but at last accounts she was improving.

On the Middle Fork of the Clearwater River, B. F. Cressler recently had a most marvelous escape from death says the Stites Journal. He was hunting and had chosen a sunny spot on which to eat his lunch. He took a cup of coffee and walked to the edge of a cliff a few feet away where stood a lone fire tree fully 325 feet above the rocks below. Hearing a slight noise he turned and saw a huge black bear eating the bacon he had just left. His rifle stood leaning against a tree very near Mr. Bear who after finishing the bacon, came defiantly toward him. Nothing could be done but climb the tree; this Mr. Cressler did, and did it quickly. The bear came also but with exasperating deliberation. The man had climbed as high as e dared to go. The rocks under the cliff were fully 400 feet below him. He felt pitch on the limb he clasped and with perfect self possession he cut a small limb, split the end and fastened in a piece of the pitch The bear was now within five feet of him; with his only match he lighted the pitch and allowed the scalding drops to fall on the bears face. One burning drop fell into the nostril and the bear, crazed with the pain, raised both front paws to scratch away the fiery torture, lost his hold and fell with a dull thud to the rocks below. Mr. Cressler made haste to desend [sic] and in recounting the adventure modestly said “that was a close call.”
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Further Reading

Clippings from Idaho for April 1 – 8, 1905

Elk City Mining News April 01, 1905

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19050401ElkCityMiningNews1A Five Stamp Mill.

W. Stoever, manager of the Thunder Mountain Gold Mining company, left on Sunday’s stage for Spokane to complete the details preliminary to the shipment of their five stamp mill which the company recently purchased and which will be installed as soon as possible. The first consignment will reach Stites April 20th.

source: Elk City Mining News., April 01, 1905, Page 1, from Chronicling America
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19050401ElkCityMiningNews1headlineARE WAKING UP.

Yesterday the Journal threw a word of warning in respect to the possible effect of the operations of the State Wagon Road commission on the diversion of Thunder Mountain business to the southern part of the state. It is common knowledge that the constantly growing business into Thunder now goes through northern Idaho via Moscow, Lewiston and Stites, geographical conditions being favorable, and the wagon road facilities much better than are available by a southern route.

If the northern wagon road receives a fair share of the appropriation to the disposal of the commission this supremacy, will be retained at the north, but if the road from Stites is neglected and the Boise-Thunder road built on an extensive scale the south will aggrandize itself at the expense of the north, because other things being equal this business would naturally flow through northern channels.

Business men throughout southern Idaho are keenly alive to the possibilities of extending their sphere of trade, and will not lose an opportunity of impressing upon the commission the desirability of improving the wagon road facilities from Boise to Thunder. This course is perfectly proper. At the same time the northern interests should insist if possible that the Stites road receive reasonable consideration. It’s a pure matter of dollars and cents.

– Moscow Journal.

source: Elk City Mining News., April 01, 1905, Page 4, from Chronicling America
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The Weiser Semi-Weekly Signal April 05, 1905

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The State Will Pay Dollar For Dollar

Decision Reached by Road Commission Now In Session — The Warren – Big Creek Road.

Any section of the state desiring a [wagon] road built under the authority the act of the last legislature establishing a state wagon road commission must pay dollar for dollar [to] the state. That is the decision [arrived] at by the commission, which [is] now session in this city, says [the] Boise Statesman. The commission has but $50,000 at its disposal. Several times that amount is asked in [?] presented during the legislative session which went over by unanimous consent to be considered by the commission. In order that any [applicable] benefits should accrue to [?] parts of the state it was [?] necessary to adopt the dollar [to] dollar rule.

The Commission’s first day was a [?] one. Three delegations were [?] representing the Atlanta, Warren-Big creek and Sheep Mountain [road] projects. The commission also [set] up the work of charting the [roads] asked by the bills presented to [the] legislature.

The commission devoted some time looking over the wagon road bills [that] were printed, and in searching through the records for evidences of [?] that were not printed. As [?] as possible the routes are being charted. All these projects will [be] scheduled under the following [findings]: Length, estimated cost, [State’s] proportion of expense, kind [of] mineral opened up. The commission will send an engineer over [the] various proposed roads and will [?] inspect them. The inspections will be made as fast as weather conditions in the mountains [will] permit. Probably the first examination will be made of the Atlanta project owing to the likelihood [of] the trail being opened early.

In the Weiser delegation, which [?] on behalf of the Warren-Big creek road were E. M. Barton, Dr. G. [?] Waterhouse, Dr. J. R. Numbers and C. W. Luck, the engineer. Others who were present when the project was being discussed were J. B. Eldridge, James Green, ex-Governor Hunt, M. B. Gwinn, J. E. Clinton, Jr., Max Mayfield and Leonard Logan.

Engineer Luck presented a report based on surveys of three routs he had made into the Big creek section for mining companies. His surveys converged at the Werdenhoff mine, which is located in about the center of the district One, 40 miles in length, went from tho Werdenhoff mine over Profile pass, through Yellow Pine basin and, via Johnson creek, to a connecting point with the present Thunder Mountain road. This he called the southern route because the nearest railroad point was Council and because it would be of little use to peoplo in the north. The other survey was from the Werdenhoff mine to Dixie and thence to Stites — the northern route, which would accommodate none from the south.

The third route, and the one which the commission was urged to accept and aid in building road over, was from Warren via Elk creek to the Werdenhoff mine, a distance of 35 1/2 miles, with three miles of the road already built. This route would be available for people in the north, south and west and presented no great difficulties in wagon road construction. There would have to be built three and a half miles of road above the Payette lakes so as to straighten out the state road and place it in the west side of the river. That, with some repairing on the state road, would leave a splendid route from the lakes to Warren. The total cost, including a substantial bridge across the south fork of the Salmon at Shafer’s ranch, would not exceed $30,000.

E. M. Barton said the mining companies and others would pay half this sum.

source: The Weiser Semi-Weekly Signal., April 05, 1905, Page 1, from Chronicling America
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Long Valley Advocate April 06, 1905

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SMITH’S FERRY.

Smith’s Ferry, March 29,1905.

The crusher for the Belle of Thunder Mountain mining company, which passed here about two weeks ago, was at Riordan creek 18 miles this side of Roosevelt when last heard of. The crusher weighs about 7000 pounds all in one piece and is a difficult load to haul on account of condition of roads.

The new saw mill for G. Al. Snow of Knox passed the ferry a few days ago. Air. Snow is also going to put up a quartz mill this summer, a great deal of the machinery is now in Emmett.

F. A. Noland of Van Wyck passed the ferry Tuesday night enroute to Sweet, having got word that his father at that place was very ill.

Winter is again with us, weather has been stormy for past 14 days and in the last 36 hours snow has fallen to a depth of 10 inches.

Roads are very bad for heavy loads, so soft and muddy that wheels must he used and ground will not bear up heavy loads.
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ALPHA

Alpha, April 1, 1906.

The ranchers of this end of the valley are waking up to the fact that it is profitable to raise oats, and a very large acreage is going to be sown this spring.

The Snow freight outfit passed through here last Wednesday with two ten-horse loads of the saw mill machinery that they are putting in on Johnson creek.

B. F. Cushing, an old miner and prospector of Pearl, passed through here Thursday enroute to Thunder Mountain.

Lafe Cantrell and Oscar Pinkston of It attended the Odd Fellows lodge here Saturday night.

John Atkins was visiting friends in Round valley last Saturday and Sunday.

We are enjoying beautiful spring weather again after the recent snow storm.

Mrs. Laurence Herrick was visiting friends in Round valley last week.
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BEAVER MEADOWS

Van Wyck, April 2, 1905.

John McMurren has returned from the Thunder Mountain district, where he has been freighting for the Sunnyside mine. He reports three feet of new snow, also a narrow escape of B. L. Ward’s freight outfit from sliding down the side of Riordan mountain, however they are not going to give up hauling the machinery to its destination.

L. S. Kimball of Van Wyck is the man behind the district telephone project. He generally makes things go.

August Stunz and two daughters, the Misses Bertha and Gretchen, went to Van Wyck Saturday.

Frank McMurren is working at Fred Rutledge’s livery barn at Yan Wyck.

School begins here April 3rd.

Source: Long Valley Advocate., April 06, 1905, Page 1, from Chronicling America
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19050406LVAdvocate4headlineNORTH & SOUTH ROAD

Col. Spofford Believes Long Valley Route Will be Selected.

Col. Judson Spofford, president of the Lewiston and Southeastern Electric railway, has returned from an extended visit at Boise, where he states a deep interest has been aroused in the north and south road project, says the Lewiston Tribune. In speaking of the conditions and the outlook for the construction of the north and south road, Col. Spofford said:

“The matters of the Lewiston and Southeastern Electric railway are progressing nicely. Everybody in the southern part of the state seems anxious to see it become the north and south road, between Lewiston and Boise.

“Of course there will be efforts made to have this north and south line terminate at some point other than Boise, but that is a matter the people of that section will have to settle for themselves. In my opinion no route for a north and south road would completely fill the bill unless it went through the Long valley country and would make it practicable to run a branch from some point in the Long valley country into Thunder Mountain. I am firmly of the opinion that if Thunder Mountain had railroad facilities, it would soon become one of the greatest gold mining camps in the United States. And with a north and south road between Lewiston and Boise there would be a fine summer resort at the Payette lakes.

“The joint resolution passed by the legislature, one submitting to the vote of the people a constitutional amendment allowing counties and municipalities to issue bonds in aid of great public utilities, and the one also submitting to a vote of the people an amendment to the constitution allowing the legislature to exempt from taxation for a period of ten years such railroads as would be of great benefit to the state, have already had a splendid effect upon eastern capital and the correspondence I have had with eastern people regarding these matters indicates that We will have no trouble in financing the proposition.”

source: Long Valley advocate., April 06, 1905, Page 5, from Chronicling America
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The Nezperce Herald April 06, 1905

19050406NezperceHerald2headline
For Idaho Wagon Roads.

The state wagon road commission met in Boise April 3rd and organized with Governor Gooding as chairman and State Senator M. E. Lewis as secretary. The other member is J. W. Wheeler, of Shoshone. It was decided by the commission that no project should be taken up for which private interests did not subscribe as much as would be appropriated by the commission. Delegations ware heard during the day and evening on behalf of the various projects. First came the presentation of the Sheep mountain project. Then the Atlanta road, to give Atlanta and other sections an outlet down the Boise river was heard. In the evening a large delegation from Boise and Weiser was heard on behalf of the road from Warren into the Big Creek district. It was announced the interested people would give half the cost of the road. It was also suggested that the survey already made be adopted as that would save much time, since it will be two months before the engineers can enter the field to make a new survey. The commission did not take action on any project. There is $50,000 appropriated by the state for roads, and it is the intention through the rule adopted to make $100,000 available. The singular fact developed that the law does not carry an emergency clause though it directed the commission to hold its first meeting April 3rd. Consequently the commission will not be able to enter into a contract before May 6. Work until that time will be rather informal.
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Frank and Wallace Hedrick started for Boise last Tuesday with fifty-fire head of horses. These horses will be sold for pack animals to be used in the Thunder Mountain district. Jack Jackson of Kamiah, and Sam Bell, of Nezperce, accompanied the boys on their trip.

source: The Nezperce herald., April 06, 1905, Page 8, from Chronicling America
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Shoshone Journal April 07, 1905

19050407ShoshoneJournal1Shoshone Journal

A Weekly Republican Paper,
W. D. Crocker, Publisher.

Issued Every Friday At
SHOSHONE, a city of 1,000; the county west of Lincoln county, and the best town in Southern Idaho, on the main line of the Oregon Short Line Railway and a junction of the same line of road to Ketchum, a distance of (?) miles and the nearest route to Thunder Mountain.

Subscription, Per Year, $2.00
Payable in Advance.

Entered at the post office at Shoshone, Idaho, as second-class mail matter for  transmission through the United States mails.

source: Shoshone Journal., April 07, 1905, Page 4, from Chronicling America
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The Caldwell Tribune April 08, 1905

19050408CaldwellTribuneBanner

D. M. Traynor and family left for Thunder Mountain Thursday.

source: The Caldwell tribune., April 08, 1905, Page 5, from Chronicling America
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Elk City Mining News April 08, 1905

19050408ElkCityMiningNewsBanner

Rudolph & Medaris have put their ferry in shape to handle all trade with safety and dispatch. They are looking for a heavy travel toward Thunder Mountain this summer.
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19050408ElkCityMiningNews2headline
Mixed in His Geography.

The Evening Journal of Portland publishes the following interview given out by the editor of the Grangeville News, who is visiting in that city, and who, if quoted correctly, is guilty of the provincial’s blunder of mixing more than his geography.

“Central Idaho is a land of virgin mineral resources, operating mines and witchery for the prospector,” says H. L. Herzinger, editor of the Grangeville News, who is in this city. “Many districts are being brought out, and most of these are equipped for milling and heavy placer work. Aside from being a much used highway to Thunder Mountain, this region,” Mr Herzinger says, “is thronged with mining men.

“In Clearwater district, near Grangeville, the Dewey and Evergreen are developing constantly. Arrangements are being made by the management of the Dewey for a 10-stamp milling plant to be erected this summer.

“Newsome district, next above Clearwater, is most conspicuous at present from remarkable developments of the great porphyry dyke property of Schissler Bros. Other men are doing heavy development in this district.

“Buffalo Hump, which is next in order, has several mills. The Big Buffalo’s 24 stamps are said to be dropping steadily on high grade milling ore. At the Jumbo ten stamps are dropping, and the Atlas and Wise Boy mines are equipped with 10-stamp mills. The Concord owner is arranging to put a mill in at an early date. The good ore recently encountered in the Mother Lode has encouraged the management to erect a mill, work on which is expected to commence early this spring. In general, the Hump is more active this spring than ever before in its history.

“At Four Mile there is one property destined to command national attention. This is the big Hogan mine, on which the great, milling plant of the old Republic mine, at Republic, Wa., is being installed. Over 100 tons of machinery for the Hogan went through Grangeville this winter and spring, and more is to follow. April 1 was the date set by the management to commence milling with the enlarged plant. The Hogan has been using a 20-stamp mill for some time, making in this work a record for low mining and milling never exceeded in the northwest, unless at the Barns-King, Kendall or Big Indian mines of Montana. With the new equipment the management expects to make even a better record.

“Elk City is another promising interior district of central Idaho, where several placers are said to be making good records. Moose Creek, where a big placer deal was recently consummated, is near Elk City.

“Warren has several quartz properties and three or four prominent placers. Senator W. A. Clark’s eldest son was in there several days ago, and is currently reported to have an option on the McKinley mine, which has a good showing of ore.”

source: Elk City mining news., April 08, 1905, Page 1, from Chronicling America
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Link to Thunder Mountain and Roosevelt index page
Link: Public folder with images of the old newspapers
Link: November 5, 1904
Link: November 12, 1904
Link: February 4, 1905
Link: March 18, 1905
Link: March 25, 1905
Link: April 1, 1905
Link: April 8, 1905
Link: April 15, 1905
Link: April 22, 1905
Link: April 29, 1905
Link: May 6, 1905
Link: May 13, 1905
Link: May 20, 1905
Link: June 3, 1905
Link: June 24, 1905
Link: July 1, 1905
Link: July 15, 1905
Link: August 19, 1905
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page updated September 24, 2022