Monthly Archives: February 2020

Road Reports Feb 26, 2020

Please share road reports. Conditions change very quickly this time of year. High elevation roads may have several inches of snow. Be prepared for snow/ice, rocks and trees in the road and remember there is no cell phone service.

Yellow Pine: Since Sunday Yellow Pine has received 1/2″ new snow, we now have a total of 29″ of snow on the flat. Local streets have a snow floor, some have been plowed, others packed by light traffic. Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN.
link: Local Forecast
Yellow Pine Webcam: (check date on image – appears to be stuck)

Warm Lake Highway: Wednesday (Feb 26) mail truck driver (Robert) the highway has a snow floor and good traveling this morning.
link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

Highway 55 Webcams Link:

South Fork Road: Wednesday (Feb 26) mail truck (Robert) says the upper road is snowpacked, the lower road has more open areas of pavement, watch for ice on the shady corners, very slick.
Last plowed Monday (Feb 17)
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Wednesday (Feb 26) mail truck driver (Robert) reports the road is mostly snow covered, a few bare spots starting to open. The last few mile near Yellow Pine are getting icy. No rocks to move.
Last plowed Monday (Feb 17)

Lower Johnson Creek Road: Last plowed Monday (Feb 17) to Wapiti Meadow including the dump.
Landmark and upper Johnson Creek closed to wheeled vehicles.
link: Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam
link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
Note: The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Closed to wheeled vehicles (no current report.)
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Snowmobile Report for Big Creek/Yellow Pine area
by C&L as of 2/20/2020
The route from Warm Lake to YP via Landmark is in excellent shape except for the section from Warm Lake to Landmark which is rough & continuous moguls. Experienced riders may want to avoid this by taking the Beaver Creek – Trout Creek (Power Line) route. The plow left sufficient loose surface snow on the road from Wapiti to YP for snowmobiles.
The trail from YP to Big Creek is in excellent shape, although the section from YP to Profile Creek is plowed & watch for full sized vehicles on this section especially on the blind corners.
The trail from BC to Elk Summit is a challenge. There is no evidence anyone has made that trip yet this year. We did travel the Government Creek Road to almost the Goldman Cut, and that is now good for snowmobiles. We also traveled the Smith Creek Trail from BC to the intersection with the Government Creek Road. This trail is good for experienced riders, but the creek crossings are a little troublesome; however we had a rookie rider with us & he did great although he sure slept good that night. There is no evidence anyone has passed through Goldman Cut yet this year & it is drifted in badly. Opening the Goldman Cut will require some “frisky folks”. For experienced snowmobilers the Smith Creek Loop is doable by going up the Government Creek Road to the Goldman Cut & then dropping down the steep slope (ski brakes make this easier) via the talus slides to the Smith Creek Road & then back to Big Creek. This would be a tough ride in reverse because of the steep slope. Riders taking this loop should pack a chain saw. The Smith Creek summer ford (1/2 mile west of Pueblo intersection) is impassible (4-5′ vertical banks at waters edge), but the long used natural snow bridge a few hundred feet upstream the ford is in good shape, but it does require some wiggling through the trees to get to the snow bridge.

Profile Creek Road: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcam: (check date on image)

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open.
Report from Midas Gold (McKinsey Lyon) on Feb 7: “Stibnite received 24 inches in the last 24 hours.” FB report of slides on the road between YP and the mine. Photo below courtesy Midas.

link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Closed to wheeled vehicles (no current report.)
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
(see snowmobile report above)
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: Closed to wheeled vehicles (no current report.)
Note: The approx elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′
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Feb 23, 2020 The Yellow Pine Times

Feb 23, 2020 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Community Calendar:

March (TBA)
May 2 – Firewise Meeting 2pm at the Fire Hall
(details below)
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Local Events:

Feb 21 The Yellow Pine Tavern Open

Winter Tavern Hours Open M, W, F, Sat 9am-2pm then 4pm-8pm, Sun 9am-2pm. Closed Tues, Thurs. Or Call 208 739-7086 or 208 633-2233 any time, will open as needed. Or check at house across the street next to Silver Dollar 365 Yellow Pine Ave.
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Feb 22 – Pie Contest

Another successful pie contest, about 15 years now. 14 pies! Rhonda placed first with her Chicken Pot Pie, Teri second with Lemon Meringue, Billie third with Apple, a hard job for our judges with so many great cooks in our small community. 30 folks out and about on a beautiful day to enjoy pie, good company and sun shine.

20200222PieContestWinners

linkto FB photo album
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May 2 Firewise Meeting

YPFD is participating in the “Wildfire Safety/National Community Preparedness Day”.

There will be an open house on May 2nd at 2pm at YPFD.

There will be presentations/pamphlets regarding what YPFD and the fire district has to offer on fire safety and mitigation for our community.
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Village News:

February Snow

This last week we had only 5 1/4″ snow fall giving us a total of 43 1/4″ so far in February. The snow depth was 34 1/2″ on Monday, settling and melting down to 29″ by Sunday morning (Feb 23.) Since the first of January we have had 81 3/4″ of snow fall.
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Biz News:

The Yellow Pine Tavern is open.

The Corner is closed for the winter, opening again next spring. I can be reached at matt @ ypcorner.com or at 970-379-5155. Thanks, have a great winter!
– Matt

The Yellow Pine Lodge is closed for the winter.
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Yellow Pine US Mail

The 3-day a week mail delivery started Nov 1st. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 55 cents. Support our local post office and purchase your holiday stamps here.
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Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Report the transfer station was last plowed Monday (Feb 17) and Lakeshore came in and emptied the bins on Thursday (Feb 13.)

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

Yellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is located approximately 3 miles south on Johnson Creek Road.

The TRANSFER STATION is for household trash and yard waste:
* Household trash must be put inside (and fit) the dumpster;
* Yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, et.) goes in the burn pile on the south end of the turn-around;
* Cardboard boxes should be flattened before putting the in the dumpster,

The DUMPSTERS are NOT for:
* Furniture (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station).

The BURN PILE is NOT for:
* Cardboard boxes (flatten and put in dumpster);
* Furniture and appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Drywall and building material (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wire or fencing (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Foam Rubber (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wood with metal (like nails) attached (take to Donnelly Transfer Station.)

When closing the DOORS on the front of the dumpsters:
* Make sure the “U” brackets at the top and bottom of the door are engaged;
* The retaining bar at the middle of the door is slid into the pipe;
* And the “L” bars at the bottom of the doors dropped into place.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: 208/634-7176
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Local Groups:

YPWUA News:

Water rates have been increased (see letter with water bill), the 2019 fee is $400. Payment is due by Feb 15, 2020, or you can pay half and the other half is due June 15, 2020.

Boil Water Advisory Lifted November 22, 2019

The 2019 Yellow Pine Water Users Shareholders meeting was Sunday July 7th in the Community Hall.
link: 20190707YPWUAminutes
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VYPA News:

The community hall committee’s goal is to have adequate heating installed in the main hall before the June VYPA meeting.

If folks have items for the community yard sale, please place them by the north wall in the community hall. If you see items you would like to purchase, you can pay Deb, Ronda, or Lynn. All funds support the community hall.

VYPA meetings for 2020 – June 13, 2pm; July 11, 2pm; August 8, 2pm; September 12, 2pm.

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting Minutes for September 21, 2019
link: 20190921 Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting
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YPFD News:

YP Fire Commissioners:
Sue Holloway – District 1
Dan Stiff – District 2
Merrill Saleen – District 3
Fire Chief – Jeff Forster

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice

The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.” Click the link: to view 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation

We will do another class this spring/summer [2020] depending on interest. Training will resume in the spring. -Fire Chief Jeff
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Biz Listings:

The Corner (208) 633-3325

Closed for the winter.
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Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233

Winter Tavern Hours
Open M,W,F,Sat 9-2 4-8 Sun 9-2
Closed Tues,Thurs
Or Call 208 739-7086 or 208 633-2233 anytime will open as needed
Or check at house across the street next to Silver Dollar 365 Yellow Pine Ave
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Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377

Closed for Winter.
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Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Tom & Sarah Lanham
156 Yellow Pine Ave, Yellow Pine Id 83677
website:
Facebook:
Starting June 2020 We will be doing trail rides out of Yellow Pine along with summer pack / camping trips to high mountain lakes in the area!

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
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Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430
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Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

The Star-News

subscribe:
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine

Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, will service Yellow Pine

B&T Safety Solutions LLC
208-271-1600 Based out of Donnelly
Snow removal, cleaning chimneys and stoves, we do cabin staining/chinking as well
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (Feb 17) overnight low of 13 degrees, started snowing at 6am and by 10am we had 5 1/4″ of snow (counting what fell last evening) and 34 1/2″ total snow on the ground, low overcast and snowing until 1130am this morning. Nutcrackers, nuthatches and jays visiting. Breaks in the clouds and bits of sunshine alternating with snow flurries and breezy mid-day, high of 35 degrees. Cloudy and light snowfall mid-afternoon then partly clear. Party clear and breezy at dusk. Lots of stars out before midnight.

Tuesday (Feb 18) overnight low of -8 degrees, almost clear sky this morning, average snow depth 32″. Fresh fox tracks in the neighborhood, female hairy woodpecker, jays and nuthatches visiting. Sunny and chilly at lunch time. Quiet day, very little traffic. Mostly clear and light cold breeze mid-afternoon, high of 34 degrees. Temperatures dropping into the teens after sunset and mostly clear. Mostly clear and cold before midnight.

Wednesday (Feb 19) overnight low of -10 degrees, clear sky this morning, an average of 31″ of snow on the ground. Not much activity at the bird feeders early, a few jays calling. Clear and breezy at lunch time. A trio of jays, both male and female hairy woodpeckers, nuthatches and chickadees visiting. Mail truck was a little late today, but no problems. Above freezing mid-afternoon, almost clear (thin haze) and chilly light breezes, high of 34 degrees. Sun going down behind the ridge after 530pm now. Snowmobile traffic. High thin clouds and a few bright stars out before midnight.

Thursday (Feb 20) overnight low of -8 degrees, mostly high thin clouds this morning and a light cold breeze, an average of 31″ of snow on the ground. Jays, chickadees, nuthatches and a nutcracker visiting, hairy woodpecker drumming on the power pole. Thicker clouds at lunch time. Overcast early afternoon, high of 41 degrees. Partly clear and calm late afternoon, still above freezing. Looked almost clear at dusk, just a tiny thin bit of haze to the west and below freezing. Snowmobile traffic. Partly hazy before midnight, patches of stars.

Friday (Feb 21) overnight low of 1 degree, 30″ snow on the ground, clear sky and slight breeze this morning. Jays, nuthatches, 2 clark’s nutcrackers and chickadees visiting, elk walking down the main road. Sunny and clear at lunch time. Warm and sunny mid-afternoon, high of 45 degrees. Clear at dusk, bright Venus shining high to the south west. Lots of stars out before midnight.

Saturday (Feb 22) 24 hour low of 4 degrees (from Friday morning) almost clear sky (1 tiny cloud) and measured 30″ of snow on the ground. Fresh fox tracks this morning, 3 jays, 2 nutcrackers, several nuthatches and a few chickadees visiting. Sunny and mild at lunch time. Quiet day. Mostly clear, warm and breezy mid-afternoon, high of 52 degrees. Clear, calm and down to freezing at dusk. Some clouds after midnight.

Sunday (Feb 23) 24 hour low of 10 degrees (from Saturday morning) and the sky was overcast, measured 29″ of snow on the ground. Fresh fox tracks again this morning. A few birds visiting, mostly red-breasted nuthatches. Breaks in the clouds around lunch time and scattered sunshine. Male and female hairy woodpeckers, jays, nuthatches and several chickadees visiting. Getting rather breezy by early afternoon, high of 48 degrees. Quite blustery mid-afternoon, snow melting and overcast. Breezy late afternoon, rain followed by snow, more than 1/4″ by dark.
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Idaho News:

Courthouse checkpoint blocks knives, guns

Most visitors have understood extra security

By Max Silverson for The Star-News Feb 20, 2020

… In November, Valley County limited access to the courthouse to the building’s south entrance and added a metal detector and full-time guard to improve security.

“It’s common knowledge that across the state of Idaho, you can’t bring weapons into a courthouse,” Valley County Clerk Douglas Miller said.

“Valley County has made a conscious decision to protect their employees as well as the general public when they are conducting business at the courthouse,” Miller said.

Ruskovich has found that the security checkpoint is part law enforcement, part public relations. She provide directions to visitors and hands out candy and small sheriff’s badge stickers to visiting children.

Records so far have counted 11 handguns, several hundred knives and one Taser that have been stopped at the checkpoint.

The courthouse usually sees between 200 and 500 visitors per week, according to their records.

The guns were mostly carried by people with concealed weapons permits who did not realize weapons were not allowed in the courthouse.

full story:
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Valley County postpones new regulations for short-term vacation rentals

KTVB February 19, 2020

McCall, Idaho — An update to a story we brought you last month regarding regulations at short-term rental properties in Valley County.

A public hearing was held Tuesday where the public was given a chance to let county commissioners know how they felt about new regulations.

The meeting came after more than 20 people were treated for carbon monoxide poisoning while staying in a short-term rental.

Following that meeting, Valley County Commissioner Sherry Maupin told us they have tabled further conversations on these regulations because more research is needed.

source:
— —

Proposed rules on Valley short-term rentals draws support

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News Feb 20, 2020

An ordinance aimed at regulating short-term rentals in the county received wide endorsement during a public hearing on Tuesday before Valley County commissioners.

The proposal would require every short-term rental outside of city limits to apply for a permit and set standards on occupancy, sewage disposal, garbage, setbacks, rules of operation, lighting, campfires, quiet hours, and notification to adjacent property owners.

Existing short-term rentals, which are defined as 30 days or less at a time, would be required to comply with the new ordinance.

continued:
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Valley approves new rules on secondary living spaces

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News Feb 20, 2020

Valley County commissioners on Tuesday endorsed an update to an ordinance regulating accessory dwelling units in the county.

However, commissioners did not have the updated ordinance finalized, so it will officially be passed at a future meeting.

The proposed changes primarily tweak language in the existing ordinance and create new rules for using accessory dwelling units as short-term rentals.

Accessory dwelling units are secondary living spaces, like a garage, on single family lots that contain their own bathroom, kitchen and sleeping quarters. They can be attached or detached from the primary living space.

continued:
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Proposed Valley rules on RVs draws fire, causes confusion

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News Feb 20, 2020

An ordinance that would allow multiple recreational vehicles on a single property as a “recreational vehicle campground” drew fire during testimony on Tuesday before Valley County commissioners.

Commissioners took no action on the proposal and set it aside for future review.

The ordinance would allow friends and family of property owners to regularly occupy up to three RVs on the site. Space in the campgrounds could not be rented out.

Use of more than three RVs on a property would trigger the need for a permit from the county.

continued:
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Washington man injured in snowmobile wreck near McCall

By Tom Grote for The Star-News Feb 20, 2020

A Washington man was flown out of a remote snowmobile play area near McCall last week when he was injured in a riding accident, McCall Fire & EMS said.

The 39-year-old man was rescued by an air ambulance that was able to set down near Pearl Lake about 35 miles northeast of McCall, Capt. Freddie Van Middendorp said.

The man, whose name and home town were not available, was riding with a group of six other experienced riders from Washington, Wisconsin and Canada down a series of small cliffs about noon on Feb. 12, Van Middendorp said.

The rider landed hard coming off a drop and the impact broke his hip, he said.

The other riders were able to contact first responders through a satellite location device that provides GPS coordinates. There was also cellphone service in the area.

continued:
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Idaho History:

Riggins, Idaho was once known as ‘Gouge Eye.’ Why the Postal Service forced a name change

A bar brawl in the mid-1800s influenced the town’s first name, but the U.S. Postal Service wasn’t having it.

Dani Allsop February 19, 2020 KTVB

Riggins, Idaho — Adjacent to the deepest gorge in North America, along the banks of the Salmon River, sits Idaho’s whitewater capital.

The small town straddles U.S. Highway 95 and is the hometown of NFL star Leighton Vander Esch.

We know it as the friendly town of Riggins, but it wasn’t always so friendly.

Morgan tweeted @the208ktvb, asking “I heard Riggins used to be named ‘Gouge Eye.’ Obviously there’s a story behind it, what is it?”

So we went straight to the source, the City of Riggins’ unofficial historian, Rocke Wilson.

In the 1850s, a vicious fight broke out between two men – Homer Levaander and Big Markham – at a local saloon, or as Wilson says, a room inside someone’s home with alcohol.

What were they fighting over?

continued:

Note: Homer S. Levander was the first grocer in Yellow Pine in 1926 or 1927. (per Harry Whithers in Nancy Sumner’s local history book, “Yellow Pine, Idaho”.)
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Mining News:

Midas Gold CEO’s job: Keep things moving

Sayer says efforts have shaved years off Stibnite mine approval

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News Feb 20, 2020

When Midas Gold Idaho President Laurel Sayer met with two high-ranking Forest Service officials in Washington D.C. in 2018 to discuss the Stibnite Gold Project, critics called it corruption.

Sayer called it doing her job.

“If I didn’t do that, the project would get lost and it would take years and years to complete with the resources available at a local level,” Sayer said.

“It isn’t new for any business to bring awareness of their projects to the federal level,” she said.

Sayer’s Beltway connections and understanding of environmental policy from her two-plus decades of experience are exactly why she was tabbed to lead Midas Gold through the permitting process.

Midas Gold’s lobbying is similar to that of any other industry in the country and is designed to keep the project from getting bogged down in bureaucracy, not to cut corners, she said.

“If we had as much influence as some of our naysayers think we do, I’d have had this permitted in two years,” Sayer said. “But we have to follow the regulatory process and that’s good.”

To date, Midas Gold has spent about $53 million shepherding the permitting process, a number that rises $2 million each month.

Sayer’s job is to prevent that number from climbing more by using her intimate understanding of interagency dealings and experience with the federal National Environmental Policy Act under which Stibnite must be permitted.

Two to three times each year, Sayer, 66, visits Washington D.C. to update former colleagues on Stibnite and offer insights into how to speed up what she says by nature is cumbersome, exhaustive process to analyze projects.

Those insights carry more weight considering the trust she forged with agency officials and politicians over the course of her 23-year career in natural resources policy.

“Throughout her career, Laurel has served as a trusted advisor and resource to many,” said Sen. Mike Crapo, who Sayer worked under for five years between 1993 and 1998.

On a July 2018 trip to Washington D.C., Sayer told officials that Midas Gold should be at the table to help draft a biological assessment, an analysis of how the project would impact endangered fish in the area.

The Payette National Forest initially balked at the idea amid worries that the company’s participation could harm the process.

But shortly after Sayer’s Washington D.C. visit, the Payette reversed course after high-ranking Forest Service officials clarified the process and Midas Gold’s role with Payette officials.

“Having that come from the top down, they’ll do it,” Sayer said. “They’re not going to change their position just because I tell them to do it.”

In May 2018, Sayer met with U.S. Forest Service Chief Vicki Christiansen to update her on the project following another slip in the permitting timeline.

Months later, the Payette was authorized to fill its deputy supervisor position full-time, allowing then-Supervisor Keith Lannom to focus more of his efforts on the Stibnite Gold Project.

“Bringing in that new capacity to the forest was a big help for us in moving forward and helped the forest have the resources needed to address other priorities in the Payette,” she said.

Lannom has since moved on, but the deputy supervisor position continues to be devoted to the Midas Gold project, Payette Public Affairs Officer Brian Harris said.

Sayer believes her work has saved Midas Gold years in a permitting process that already has consumed four years. The draft environmental study on the Stibnite Gold Project is not expected before April.

Without someone like Sayer greasing the skids, Midas Gold would risk getting lost in the shuffle of thousands of other projects federal agencies are tasked with reviewing each year, including roads, bridges, power lines and other standard infrastructure, she said.

Many of those projects also have lobbyists staying in the ear of federal officials, just as do environmental groups or any other interest group, Sayer said.

“Having someone speak to the importance of your project is just good business,” she said.

Sayer concedes that Midas Gold’s dual approach to clean up past pollution at Stibnite while building a new mine complicates the permitting process.

But Sayer will not let that stand in the way of a project she believes could ultimately sway public perception of mining.

“I’m not going to let them (regulators) say ‘we’ve never done this before’ and walk away,” she said. “Let’s stay here and figure out how we can.”

source: © Copyright 2009-present Central Idaho Publishing Inc.
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Public Lands:

Insect-damaged trees cut down at popular New Meadows-area campground

KTVB February 18, 2020


Credit: Idaho Department of Lands – The Last Chance Campground near New Meadows.

Forest officials and contractors are working together to remove trees that have been infected and damaged by insects at a campground in the Payette National Forest.

The logging operation at the Last Chance Campground near New Meadows comes after infestations of Douglas fir tussock moths and spruce budworms. The insects damage and even kill trees, leaving them unstable.

Stephanie Merrill, Sales Prep Forester with the Payette National Forest, said officials wanted to be proactive about getting rid of the trees before warmer weather brings campers to the area. Dead or unstable trees can topple over without warning.

continued:
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US agency to pay for 11,000 miles of fuel breaks in 6 states

2/15/20 AP

The Bureau of Land Management has announced plans to fund 11,000 miles (17,703 kilometers) of strategic fuel breaks in Idaho, Oregon, Washington, California, Nevada and Utah in an effort to help control wildfires.

The fuel breaks are intended to prop up fire mitigation efforts and help protect firefighters, communities and natural resources, The Oregonian reported Saturday.

According to the BLM, wildfires are becoming bigger and more frequent across the Great Basin states. Between 2009 and 2018, more than 13.5 million acres of BLM land burned in the project area.

continued:
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Critter News:

Pet Talk – Idiopathic epilepsy in dogs

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt Feb 21, 2020 IME

Idiopathic epilepsy is a disorder of recurring seizures of unknown cause. In some breeds, there is a genetic or inherited influence. For most dogs we do not know the cause of these epileptic seizures. All diagnostic tests used to search for the causes of seizures are normal in animals with idiopathic epilepsy. Idiopathic epilepsy is very uncommon and cats. It typically affects dogs from 1-5 years of age, but may develop at any age. Sometimes we can see small scar tissue in the brain, but often we see no inciting cause.

Animals with idiopathic epilepsy have recurring seizures. Most seizures last 1-3 minutes, and they can occur at any time of the day. Time between seizures can be as short as minutes, or as long as months. The Latin term “ictus” refers to a seizure. The time between seizures is called the interictal. Affected animals are normal between seizures, and do not have any neurological abnormalities on physical exam.

continued:
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Idaho Fish and Game Commission extends wolf hunting and trapping seasons

Feb 21, 2020 By Steve Liebenthal KIVI

Boise, Idaho — The Idaho Fish and Game Commission has approved extensions of hunting and trapping seasons for wolves in Idaho. Under the new regulations many hunting units will be open year round, and new trapping seasons were added.

In addition, snares will now be an option for trappers in unit forty-five northeast of Mountain Home.

Fish and Game recently asked for public comment.

continued:
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32 more pronghorn killed by train in eastern Idaho

by CBS2 News Staff Monday, February 17th 2020

The Idaho Department of Fish and Game is reporting an additional 32 pronghorn have been killed in a second train accident north of Hamer, Idaho.

A train collided with 64 pronghorn Feb. 3 killing 45 on impact and severely injuring another 19 in the same area of eastern Idaho.

IDFG gave a second update Friday that an additional 32 were struck by a train in a second incident. IDFG staff were in the area on a continued search for pronghorn that were hung up in a fence the evening before officials made the discovery.

continued:
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Helicopter sharpshooters to kill Grand Teton nonnative goats

By Mead Gruver – 2/21/20 AP

A disputed effort to help native bighorn sheep in Grand Teton National Park was scheduled to start Friday with a helicopter buzzing over rugged peaks with sharpshooters aboard tasked with killing nonnative mountain goats.

Park officials closed off a large portion of the Teton Range to the public for the eradication effort and planned to begin the flights in the afternoon, park spokeswoman Denise Germann said.

The operation was scheduled despite opposition from Wyoming officials including state Game and Fish Department Director Brian Nesvik, who protested Friday in a call with acting Grand Teton Superintendent Gopaul Noojibail.

continued:
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BLM issues decision for wild horse gather at Four Mile Herd Management Area

Feb. 21, 2020
Contact: Mike Williamson mwilliamson@blm.gov 208-384-3393

Boise, Idaho – The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Four Rivers Field Office signed a Decision Record for an upcoming wild horse helicopter and bait/water trap gather in the Four Mile Herd Management Area (HMA).

This decision authorizes the removal of excess wild horses from the HMA to reach the Appropriate Management Level (AML), the number of wild horses and burros that the HMA can support in balance with other uses and resources on public land. The decision also authorizes the application of fertility control to mares to help reduce the population increase in the HMA. The objective of these actions is to protect the range and wild horses by slowing the herd’s population growth.

The Four Mile HMA is in Gem County, approximately 15 miles north of Emmett. The HMA consists of approximately 18,800 acres of federal, state and private land, with a current population of approximately 184 wild horses. The BLM estimates the herd population will reach 221 wild horses by the end of the 2020 foaling season. The AML has been established at 37-60 wild horses.

The BLM sets the AML through land use planning efforts that involve public participation, vegetation inventories, and allocation of forage in terms of animal unit months. Planning efforts include an inventory and the monitoring of all uses of the public rangelands.

The impacts of the gather are described and analyzed in the Four Mile HMA Wild Horse Gather Environmental Assessment (EA). The EA and Decision Record are posted on the BLM website at: (link).

Horses removed from the range will be prepared for the BLM adoption and sale program. For more information on how to adopt or purchase a wild horse or burro, visit the BLM National Wild Horse and Burro website at (link) or call (866) 468-7826.

For additional gather-specific information, please contact Boise District Wild Horse Specialist Raul Trevino at 208-896-5603. Persons who use a telecommunications device for the deaf may call the Federal Relay Service (FRS) at 1-800-877-8339. The FRS is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Replies are provided during normal business hours.
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Golden eagle shot and killed in Cassia County

KTVB February 20, 2020

Oakley, Idaho — The Idaho Department of Fish and Game is asking for the public’s help after a golden eagle was shot in Cassia County.

The dead eagle, an adult, was discovered west of Oakley on Feb 10.

Killing an eagle is a violation of both state and federal law. The birds are protected under the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act.

Anyone with information about the eagle’s death is asked to call the Citizens Against Poaching hotline at 1-800-632-5999 or the Idaho Fish and Game at 208-324-4359. Tipsters can remain anonymous, and may be eligible for a reward.

source:
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Fish & Game News:

Idaho Fish and Game Commission extends wolf hunting and trapping seasons

By Brian Pearson, Conservation Public Information Specialist
Thursday, February 20, 2020

Changes take effect immediately, Feb. 20

During a conference call on Feb. 20, the Idaho Fish and Game Commission adopted nine proposed modifications to wolf hunting and trapping for the 2019-20 and 2020-21 seasons, extending wolf hunting opportunity, opening more areas to wolf trapping and extending trapping seasons, which all take effect immediately.

continued:
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Draw results available for spring bear controlled hunts

By Brian Pearson, Conservation Public Information Specialist
Friday, February 21, 2020

Most controlled hunts begin April 1

Spring bear controlled hunt draw results are available now.

The results have been posted through Fish and Game’s licensing system.

continued:
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Bobcat check-in in Grangeville: Feb. 23 from 2-4pm

By Jennifer Bruns, Regional Communications Manager
Tuesday, February 18, 2020

Attention Trappers! A bobcat check-in will be held at Rae Bros Sporting Goods, 247 E. Main St. in Grangeville on Sunday, February 23rd from 2-4pm. Each trapper will be charged a $1.75 administration fee and $2 per pelt.

Contact the regional office (208) 799-5010 for more information.

source:
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Two new sturgeon fishing access sites cleared in the Niagara Springs Wildlife Management Area

By Terry Thompson, Regional Communications Manager
Tuesday, February 18, 2020

With the help of local sturgeon anglers, Fish and Game created two new sturgeon fishing access sites within the Niagara Springs Wildlife Management Area.

The Snake River supports a healthy population of white sturgeon in southern Idaho, providing anglers the opportunity to pursue the largest fish in Idaho. A prized fish for anglers to catch, anglers often are challenged to find public access sites. Recent efforts by Fish and Game will help to provide additional public access sites when fishing for sturgeon on the Snake River.

continued:
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More F&G News Releases

link:
https://idfg.idaho.gov/press
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Crazy Critter Stuff:

‘Oh deer!”: North Carolina man struck in unusual hit and run

by The Associated Press Monday, February 10th 2020

Locust, N.C. (AP) — A suspect escaped from a hit and run in a North Carolina McDonald’s parking lot last month. But police aren’t looking for who’s responsible.

Ken Worthy was leaving the restaurant in Locust with his wife and a Diet Coke in hand, when he saw something approaching him, the victim told news outlets.

“I mean, just see the flash of him rolling over me and in a straight line, and he was gone,” Worthy told WSOC-TV.

What he saw coming wasn’t a car, but a frenzied deer that had run startled, likely from woods nearby, and stopping for nothing in its way. Security video taken from the store showed the animal barreling toward Worthy before plowing him over him and continuing on.

Worthy and his wife were surprised, but not hurt during the incident, he told the station. In fact, he didn’t even spill his Diet Coke.

source:

video:

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Seasonal Humor:

WinterHotFlash2-a
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page updated Feb 28, 2020

Bird of the week: Gray Jay

Gray Jay
(year around higher elevations)
GrayJay-a
(photo © Alix d’Entremont)
more photos: Macaulay Library

Canada Jay, Whiskey Jack
Perisoreus canadensis
Canada Jays are dark gray above and light gray below, with black on the back of the head forming a partial hood. Juveniles are grayish black overall, and usually show a pale gape at the base of the bill.
The deceptively cute Canada Jay is one of the most intrepid birds in North America, living in northern forests year-round and rearing chicks in the dark of winter. Highly curious and always on the lookout for food, Canada Jays eat just about anything, from berries to small animals. They may even land on your hand to grab a raisin or peanut. During summer they hoard food in trees to sustain themselves through bleak winters.

Learn more about this bird: The Cornell Lab of Ornithology

Link to Birds Page
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Idaho History Feb 23, 2020

The Prospector and Thunder Mountain News May 6, 1905

courtesy Sandy McRae and Jim Collord

[Note: to view the old ads, turn off your ad blocker. There are no commercial ads on this page. Click an ad to start a slide show.]


(link to larger size image of banner)

The Prospector and Thunder Mountain News

Roosevelt, Idaho May 6, 1905 Volume 1 Number 21

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The Great Sunnyside Dropped Her Stamps Wednesday
Tremendous Difficulties Overcome and the Mill Running Smoothly

19050506Pg1photo1Caption: Scene on the Sunnyside where Great Tunnels are being Driven into the Dome of Thunder Mountain.

The Sunnyside mill started Wednesday under most auspicious circumstances. A brief description of the mine and mill will be interesting to our readers for the mine is one of the best known in the State of Idaho and is about to take its place as a great producer of wealth. It cannot possibly fail, for a vast blanket of orc has been thoroughly blocked out by a splendid system of cross-cuts, winzes, and raises showing a solid block 440 feet long by 120 in width with an average depth or thickness of 22 feet. $10 per ton is a very conservative estimate of the value of this great mass of ore — it will probably average more than that figure.

The raise now being made in the Bar Oak tunnel will strike the ore body 204 feet north of the present development in the Sunnyside. This tunnel … over 1800 … (page torn) … cost of more than $18,000 was made in order that the immense tonnage might be worked from beneath. Thus avoiding hoisting and from the raise, the mine can be worked systematically and economically.

The Sunnyside mine is not yet three years old and we feel justified in saying that for its age it is one of the best developed and opened up mines in the State. The several thousand feet of tunnels are good and finely ventilated.

The tramway which is a mile and a half in length from the upper terminal at the mine to the mill is a perfect success. At one point there is a span of 1000 feet running over a canyon and the buckets pass fully 150 feet from the ground. The highest of the cable towers is 84 feet.

The tram running at the rate of 350 feet per minute with 34 buckets carrying 500 pounds each, develops with its fall of 1600 feet, sufficient power which is twenty horsepower, to run a number 3 Gates crusher of a capacity of twenty tons per hour. The new automatic grips are working most satisfactorily.

Herman Veilman has been in charge of the remodeling of the tramway and grips and Supt. Abbott says to Mr. Veilman is due much credit. THE NEWS representative was present at the dropping of the stamps and courteously given every opportunity to observe the workings of the mill and tramway.

19050506Pg1photo2Caption: Sunnyside Wagons Leaving Randall’s for Roosevelt.
(link to larger raw size)

The machinery at the mill which was set in motion at 3:30, ran like clock work. The boilers carrying just 80 pounds of steam and not the least crowded during the 30 minutes trial run, the fires not having been replenished during the time, furnished the power with perfect ease for the whole plant: the thirty stamps dropped 95 times at a 6 inch drop per minute, the electric lights were turned on and with both injectors running the boilers frequently blew off steam.

The present foreman of the mill, W. H. Paddock, a widely known and experienced mill man all over the West has been of the greatest service in the readjustment of the mill and in bringing it into perfect working condition.

Chas. Annett, the electrician, has put the 1000-light electric plant into splendid working order. This is one of the best plants in the State. It has a beautiful marble switch board and the lights burn brightly and steadily. All the buildings, as well as the mine have the electric lights, a matter of great convenience and economy.

The sawmill will soon be put into operation and the works will probably carry 75. men on the payroll this summer.

The ditch bringing water to the mill is a mile and a quarter in length and flumed the whole distance with two retaining tanks near the mill. The water is taken from Marble creek where a dam thirty feet high is built across the canyon which at this point is only 30 feet wide and the dam is anchored to the solid rock walls on each side.

The buildings at Belleco, for which the site of the mill has been named, are very convenient. The bunkhouse is roomy and well lighted as is also the kitchen and dining room building. The stamp mill is well arranged and well lighted.

19050506Pg1photo3Caption: Mrs. Purdum and Mrs. Euler by the Sunnyside Cabin.
(linkto larger raw size)

With the exception of R. W. Purdum, no other one man has been so closely identified with the life of the Sunnyside mine as E. L. Abbott. He is and has been from the very beginning the general superintendent, and so complete has been Mr. Purdum’s confidence in Mr. Abbott that he has virtually been given complete control of the development work of the mine. The results tell their own story, and the consummation Wednesday may well have been a proud and happy day for E. L. Abbott, and his many friends all over the mining West congratulate him on the success he so richly deserves.
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See what W. H. Courtney has to say in his new ad.
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Another Branch From the Thunder Mountain Road.

From the wagon road that leads to the Sunnyside mine, C. M. DeCamp will build to the Erie group this summer branching off near Dan Cotter’s house. At the Erie a large body of low grade ore has been opened up this winter.

Last year when Mr. DeCamp cut out a trail, he very wisely made it wide enough for a wagon road thus leaving little work and expense for its completion.

Mr. DeCamp’s company also has a group of promising claims known as the Cheapman Group north of the main wagon road at the same point where the road leaves for the Erie group; here a road will be built north through Dan Cotter’s ground to the group. … (page torn) … simply cutting logs out of the road and a small amount of grading; this it is seen how easy it is for all other companies to build to their properties.

Since the Dewey and Sunnyside companies have built the main road which leads over the top of Thunder Mountain all other roads leading from it will have but little grade.

New companies have the advantage of the experience of the pioneer companies who have broken the ice in ascertaining the proper treatment of the ores and the development of the ore bodies.
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T. J. Thompson, formerly manager of the Robb Mercantile Co.’s store here, has resigned his position and will go into business for himself. He will build at the junction of the Standard and H. Y. roads and carry a first-class line of liquors, cigars, pipes, tobaccoes and lunch goods.

O. T. Lingo and “Shorty” returned from Big creek Wednesday with thirty-five head of mules and horses.
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E. W. Whitcomb Arrives From the Outside.

E. W. Whitcomb, Esq., arrived in town Thursday after an absence of two months. Mr. Whitcomb went out for the purpose of being admitted to the Idaho bar, he having previously practiced at the Maine, Washington and Alaskan bars.

He was admitted at Grangeville March 7 to the Second Judicial District of the State of Idaho and will open a law office here at once.

Mr. Whitcomb, whose father is one of the leading attorneys in the State of Maine, had a most thorough training in Common law which gives him a vantage ground in handling the code law of our State. His whole practice at the bar has been a very successful one. In speaking of his trip, Mr. Whitcomb says the trail over Snow Slide is still too dangerous to undertake. He and his companions after attempting it returned to Big Creek and went around by Monumental to town.

He says that Grangeville is alive to the question of an electric road from [Lewiston?.] At a … (page torn) … sum of money was subscribed to carry the project into effect. Lewiston also took the same step, and all indications point to the certainty of the road being built in the immediate future.

At Resort (Burgdorf’s Hot Springs) Mr. Whitcomb learned that Gov. Frank Gooding and Ex Governor Hunt were daily expected there on a trip to determine the advisability of building a wagon road to Big Creek and possibly through to Roosevelt to be connected with some outside point to be determined later.

In Seattle Mr. Whitcomb met many of his old Alaskan friends who, after having spent the winter in the States were again on their way to the North.

From reliable men holding interests in the Tanana country he learned that the camp there is very promising and has not been overestimated through the press: that it will ultimately prove to be the richest camp in the district in the production of placer gold.

Mr. Whitcomb says that in the mining world outside Thunder Mountain stands well.
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Fine Mail Service.

Thomas Naighbors came in Friday evening from Knox, where he had been in telephonic communication with outside parties concerning the properties now in his charge.

We learn from him that U. S. mail sacks are on the route to Roosevelt — hanging on trees by the wayside — they will doubtless arrive in a few years. Many people in Thunder Mountain are saying Blank Blank such mail service as has been given this district during the past winter. It is absolutely abominable — there is little effort on the part of the contractors, or sub contractors or sub-sub contractors to get the U. S. mail to the postoffice here.

Mr. Naighbors went to Knox for a business and pleasure trip and he surely accomplished the latter for he, in company with B. B. Scott, caught the very first Salmon to come up from the sea to that district. The fish, which weighed over 16 pounds, was taken at the outlet of Hot Lake — and while speaking of fish — just to change the subject a little — four deer crossed the road on Southwest Fork summit on their way to Indian Creek. The tracks were fresh as Mr. Naighbors came along the road. The deer arriving so early pressages [sic] the coming of summer.

At Knox, C. C. Randall is doing a rushing business. Travel is heavy and he can hardly accommodate the transient trade — beds are made on the floor and the full capacity of his hotel is taxed.

Thornton & Gilman have bought out Mr. Cole at Johnson Creek, the telephone station, and they will continue there a good road house. Mr. Cole has contracted to construct the sawmill for Mr. Snow on the Thunderbolt mining property.

Mr. Naighbors says that the reports concerning the Monte Christo strike have not been exagerated and that at the Sunshine mine also, in charge of Chas. Werdenhoff, several rich stringers have been traversed during their tunnelling.
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Reclamation of the Sahara

There are many surprises in the geography of Africa, says the Review of Reviews. One of the greatest of these, perhaps, is the truth about the Desert of Sahara, which has for so long been supposed to consist exclusively of bleak, vast, uninhabitable wastes of sand. The truth seems to be that within the limits of the so-called desert there are vast stretches of land potentially fertile, a waiting only the touch of irrigation to make them blossom like the rose.

The increasing importance of French interests in the Sahara and Soudan has furnished the theme for a book, recently issued in Paris, under the title, “The Sahara, the Soudan, and the Trans-Sahara railroads.” In reviewing this book and analyzing its suggestions, M Robert Doucet, writing in the France de Demain, declares that, after 25 years, M. Paul Leroy-Beaulieu’s struggle to destroy the legend of the Sahara desert has succeeded.

We now know that there are vast agricultural and economic possibilities in the Sahara. A number of French “missions,” says M. Doucet, have proved that, not only is the Sahara inhabitable, as far as nature is concerned, but the bands of robbers and brigands are not anywhere near so frequent or terrible as has been imagined. In the south and central portions, the Sahara is comparatively free from sand dunes and the oases are frequent and fertile. Moreover, the climate, speaking generally, is healthful. “The heat is not excessive in these regions, and the nighly [sic] frosts compensate largely for the fatigues and heat of the day.” The temperature throughout the southern and eastern portion is moderate. M. Leroy-Beaulieu, says the writer, advocates a number of railroads across the desert strip to exploit the commercial possibilities of this vast region.

— Gazette.
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Passing of the Politician.

We hear a good deal said these days about “the passing of the politician,” says the Washington Post. By this is meant that the old-fashioned professional office-holder — the citizen who made a livelihood of public service — is gradually in process of being crowded off the road by the man whose political preferment is only an incident in a career absorbed by other interests who stand for some definite idea in the great workaday world, and who accepts his office as a call to duty, a reward of merit, or a stepping stone to a special object.

This is not a new phenomenon by any means. There was a long period after the civil war when the politician pure and simple held the center of the stage in public affairs. Then came, about the middle of the ’70s, a change similar to that which some observers see now in progress. As one and another of the old “war horses” were set aside and replaced by figures like Isaac Christiancy of Michigan. David Davis of Illinois and the others who were believed to be the pioneers of a new movement, we were told that the politician as a distinct type was going out and would be known thence-forward as a curio rather than as a living force in the republic.

But it was the change itself that was passing; not the politician. He simply retired into the background for a time. He stayed in the shadows till the wave or novelty had spent itself. Then he re-emerged and took his place as conspicuously as before, and the old story was repeated.

The political history of our country is an evolution. We occasionally have a period of variation, which brings new men and new ideas to the front, but their service is only to prepare the way for a fresh era in which the old familiar principle is to assert itself again under unaccustomed forms and guises. The American people are too busy to give a great deal of time and thought themselves to the solution of public problems; it is cheaper and easier for them to hire persons regularly drilled in the business to do their legislating and administering for them.

The politician will continue with us always. Whoever else takes up his work for a little, treating it as an excursion or a holiday, may be trusted to get tired and lay it aside ere long for something more profitable We witness the same process going on in other fields. The magazine literature of today is furnished chiefly by specialists, men who have “done things” and who dip into literature merely to tell their fellows how this and that was accomplished. The general describes his battles, the scientist has discoveries, the banker his business triumphs. We are apt to say that the old-fashioned man of letters, who made his living with his pen and treated all subjects with equal fluency, is dead. He is really only dormant. The bearers of special messages will soon write themselves out, and the old literary worker will come back and occupy his field once more.

So with the politician. He is “passing,” perhaps, but only into a state of suspended animation; when the railroad magnates, and the successful business men and the attorneys for individual interests have their fling at public life, the professional officeholders will slip once more into their places and politics become a calling again.

— Pittsburg Gazette.
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Few French Millionaires.

The vast wealth of France is divided into a large number of small savings, according to a recent computation in the French financial journal, Le Rentier. In France, it seems, there are not 20,000 persons who are millionaires — and it must be remembered that by millionaire is meant a possessor of 1,000,000 francs, or, in other words, $193,000. There are possibly ten persons in the country whose fortunes are 100,000,000 francs, or about $19,000,000 or over.

All the holders of great fortunes may easily be mentioned by name; only about 100 persons are worth between $2,000,000 and $10,000,000, and 14,000 have accumulated or inherited property valued at from $193,000 to $386,000. That is, France has very few rich citizens. This distribution of wealth in France is indicated by the facts that in 1902 there was left by persons dying property of the value of $921,000,000; but of the 363,612 inheritances distributed in that year more than 300,000 consisted of sums ranging from 20 cents to $1,930. About two-thirds of the property to be distributed was in sums of $200 to $400. The large inheritances, from about $50,000 to $1,000,000, represented only 0.04 per cent. of the total amount; and the property to be divided amounting to more than $100,000 represented lees than 0.01 per cent of the total value.

It is the vast army of small savers in France, the 9,000,000 persons whose names figure in the tax accounts and who own the millions of small parcels of personal real estate, that make the fortune of the country. In comparison with their aggregate accumulations the possessions of the wealthy are insignificant. Such facts as these illustrate in a striking manner the thrift of the masses of the French people.

— Gazette.
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Many a song remains unsung but could these be touched into life they should tell, not of those who killed their fellows, but of the humble and unpretentious men and women who devote their lives to doing good deeds unseen, without expecting or receiving reward. The Carnegie fund will not reach the kind-hearted farmer who feeds the birds in winter, who ever speaks gently at home and does acts of kindness to those less fortunate than himself. It will not reach the farmers’ wife who, through days of sadness and nights devoid of ease is not forgetful of those “small ministries of life” on which depends the large part of what goes to make the sum total of human happiness.
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19050506Pg5-txt1headline2
The Colorado Results.

It is of no great consequence to the people of Colorado who holds the office of governor for the rest of the present term. But it is of consequence to them to have broken down at last the system of fraud which has ruled for six or eight years past in Colorado elections. Democratic supremacy in the state has rested during that time on the fraudulent vote returned in Denver by the thugs who control the election machinery there.

— New York Tribune.

link: The Day Colorado Had 3 Governors
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19050506Pg5-Notice1
Notice For Publication

Survey No. 1994 A-B

U. S. LAND OFFICE,
Hailey, Idaho, April 13, 1905.

Notice is hereby given. that in pursuance of the Act of Congress approved May 10, 1872, the Thunder Mountain Gold and Silver Mining and Milling Company, whose postoffice is Nampa, Idaho, has made application for a patent for 1475 linear feet of the Massenet lode, bearing gold and silver. The same being 143 ft. south-westerly and 1332 ft. northeasterly from discovery shaft. Together with surface ground 567.67 feet in width. Also for 809.45 linear feet of the Dewey Mill site, with surface ground 275 feet in width situate in Thunder Mountain Mining District, Idaho County. State of Idaho. and described by the official plat and by the field notes on file in the office of the Register of Hailey District. Idaho, as follows, viz: Var 21 degrees 30 minutes E.

Massenet lode. Beginning at corner No, 1 whence U. S. L. M. No. 2 Thunder Mountain District, bears N. 45 degrees 20 minutes W. 154.94 feet. Thence N. 41 degrees 27 minutes E. 1478 feet to corner No 2. Thence N. 48 degrees 33 minutes W. 567.67 feet to corner No. 3, Thence S. 41 degrees 27 minutes W. 1475 feet to corner No. 4. Thence S. 48 degrees 33 minutes E. 567.67 feet to corner No. 1, the place of beginning, containing 19.222 acres, Dewey Mill Site. Beginning at corner No. 1 identical with corner No. 1 Massenet lode, whence U. S. L. M. No. 2 Thunder Mountain Mining District bears N. 45 degrees 20 minutes W. 154.91 feet. Thence N. 41 degrees 27 minutes E. 275 feet to corner No. 2. Thence S. 36 degrees 38 minutes E. 809.45 feet to corner No. 3. Thence S. 41 degrees 27 minutes W. 275 feet to corner No. 4. Thence N. 36 degrees 38 minutes W. 809.45 feet to corner No. 1. the place of beginning, containing 5 acres, making a total of 21.222 acres for the lode and mill site, and forming a portion of the unsurveyed lands of the United States, in the said Thunder Mountain Mining District, Idaho County, State of Idaho. Names of the adjoining claims. if any, are unknown. The notice of amended location of the Massenet lode is recorded in volume 9, page 285, and the location notice of the Dewey Mill Site in volume 9, page 261 in the office of the Deputy County Recorder, at Roosevelt. Idaho.

Any and all persons claiming adversely the mining ground, vein, lode, premises or any portion thereof so described, surveyed, platted and applied for, are hereby notified that unless their adverse claims are duly filed as according to law and the regulations thereunder, within the time prescribed by law, with the Register of the United States Land Office at Halley, Idaho, they will be barred by virtue of the provisions of the United States Statutes in such cases made and provided.

N J SHARP, Register.
First publication April 29, 1905.
Last publication July 29, 1905.
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Notice For Publication

Dewey Group of Mining Claims
Survey No. 1988.

UNITED STATES LAND OFFICE.
Hailey, Idaho, April 13, 1905.

Notice is hereby given, that in pursuance of the Act of Congress approved May 10, 1872, Thunder Mountain Gold and Silver Mining and Milling Company. whose postoffice is Nampa, Idaho. has made an application for a patent for 436.49 linear feet on the Coal Pit Fraction lode, bearing gold and silver, the same being 146.49 feet northwesterly and 290 feet southeasterly from discovery shaft.

669.22 linear feet on the Goldie lode, bearing gold and silver. the same being 237.22 feet northwesterly, and 432 feet southeasterly from discovery cut.

1468.38-linear feet on the Golden Reef lode, bearing gold and silver, the same being 638.78 feet northwesterly, and 790 feet southeasterly from discovery cut.

1494.83 linear feet on the Gravel Point lode, bearing gold and silver, the same being 729.83 feet northwesterly, and 765 feet southeasterly from discovery cut.

1281.72 linear feet on the Poormans Treasure lode, bearing gold and silver, the same being 656.72 feet northwesterly, and 625 feet southeasterly from discovery cut.

1500 linear feet on the Golden Treasure lode; bearing gold and silver, the same being 530 feet northwesterly and 970 feet southeasterly from discovery cut.

1500 linear feet on the Black Cat lode, bearing gold and silver, the same being 1175 feet northwesterly and 325 feet southeasterly from discovery cut.

608.06 linear feet on the Fraction lode, bearing gold and silver, the same being 365 feet northwesterly and 243.06 feet southeasterly from discovery shaft.

1127.63 linear feet on the Equinox lode, bearing gold and silver, the same being 350 feet northwesterly and 777.63 feet southeasterly front discovery cut.

1039.74 linear feet on the Gold Bug lode, bearing gold and silver, the same being 670 feet northwesterly and 369.74 feet southeasterly from discovery cut.

1493.60 linear feet on the Roosevelt lode, bearing gold and silver, the same being 100 feet northwesterly and 1393.60 feet southeasterly from discovery shaft.

428.75 linear feet on the Parker lode, bearing gold and silver, the same being 100 feet northeasterly and 328.75 feet southwesterly from discovery cut thereon.

With surface ground 564 feet in width on the Coal Pit Fraction, 559 feet in width on the Goldie, 591.92 feet in width on the Golden Reef, 572.20 feet in width on the Gravel Point, 551.92 feet in width on the Poormans Treasure, 600 feet in width on the Golden Treasure, 219.10 feet in width on the Black Cat, 580.39 feet in width on the Fraction, 473.18 feet in width on the Roosevelt, 586.37 feet in width on the Equinox, 491.63 feet in width on the Gold Bug and 600 feet in width on the Parker, situated in the Thunder Mountain Mining District, County of Idaho, State of Idaho and described by the official plat, and by the field notes on file in the U. S. Land office at Hailey, Idaho and more particularly described as follows, viz: Var. 21 degrees 30 minutes E.

Coal Pit Fraction lode. Beginning at corner No. 1 whence U. S. L. M. No. 2 Thunder Mountain Mining District, bears N. 65 degrees 11 minutes W. 6315.5 feet. Thence S. 31 degrees 31 minutes W. 574.72 feet to corner No. 2. Thence S. 47 degrees 24 minutes E. 436.49 feet to corner No. 3. Thence N. 31 degrees 31 minutes E. 574.72 feet to corner No. 4. Thence N. 47 degrees 21 minutes W. 436.49 feet to corner No. 1. the place of beginning Containing 5.632 acres.

Goldie lode. Beginning at corner No, 1 whence U. S L. M. No. 2 Thunder Mountain Mining District, bears N. 63 degrees 43 minutes 35 seconds W. 6653.80 ft. Cor. No. 4 Coal Pit Fraction lode bears S. 88 degrees 58 minutes E. 87.8 feet. Thence S. 42 degrees 48 minutes 38 seconds E. 679.48 feet to corner No, 2. Thence N. 36 degrees 46 minutes E. 574.59 feet to corner No. 3. Thence N. 57 degrees 36 minutes W. 670.20 feet to corner No. 4. Thence S. 36 degrees 46 minutes W. 400.63 feet to corner No. 1, the place of beginning. Containing 7.375 acres.

Golden Reef lode. Beginning at corner No. 1, whence U. S. L. M. No. 2 Thunder Mountain Mining District, bears N 64 degrees 02 minutes 56 seconds W. 9732.15 feet. Identical with corner. No 4 Coal Pit Fraction lode. Thence S. 31 degrees 31 minutes W. 574.72 feet to corner No. 2. Thence S. 35 degrees 25 minutes 38 seconds E. 628.78 feet to corner No 3. Thence S. 60 degrees 28 minutes E. 846.49 feet to corner No. 4. Thence N. 31 degrees 31 minutes E. 592.87 feet to corner No. 5. Thence N. 60, degrees 28 minutes W. 846.49 feet to corner No. 6. Thence N. 36 degrees 58 minutes W. 621.89 feet to corner No. 1, the place of beginning. Containing 18.821 acres.

Gravel Point lode. Beginning at earner No. 1. Identical with corner No. 2 Goldie lode and corner No 6 Golden Reef lode. Whence U. S. L. M. No. 2 Thunder Mountain Mining District, bears N. 61 degrees 49 minutes 25 seconds W. 7291.64 feet. Thence S. 58 degrees 28 minutes E. 1494.83 feet to corner No. 2. Thence N. 36 degrees 46 minutes E. 574.59 feet to corner No. 3. Thence N. 58 degrees 28 minutes W. 1491.83 feet to center No 4. Thence S. 36 degrees 46 minutes W. 574.59 feet to corner No. 1. the place of beginning. Containing 19.349 acres.

Poormans Treasure lode. Beginning at corner No 1 Identical with corner No. 5 Golden Reef lode, whence U. S. L. M. No. 2 Thunder Mountain Mining District, bears N. 61 degrees 40 minutes 56 seconds W. 8137.94 ft. Cor. No. 2 Gravel Point lode bears S. 55 degrees 51 minutes 41 seconds E 619.52 feet Thence S. 31 degrees 31 minutes W. 592.87 feet to corner No. 2. Thence S. 61 degrees 02 minutes E. 1281.72 feet to corner No. 3. Thence N. 31 degrees 31 minutes E. 592.87 feet to corner No. 4. Thence N. 64 degrees 02 minutes W. 1281.72 feet to corner No. 1, the place of beginning. Containing 16.443 acres.

Golden Treasure lode. Beginning at corner No 1 whence U. S. L. M. No. 2 Thunder Mountain Mining District bears N. 57 degrees 17 minutes 09 seconds W. 7566.71 feet. Thence S. 21 degrees 18 minutes W. 594.77 feet to corner N. 2. Thence S. 62 degrees 21 minutes 40 seconds E. 1500 feet to corner No. 3. Thence N. 21 degrees 18 minutes E. 603.70 feet to corner No. 4. Thence N. 64 degrees 02 minutes W. 939.17 feet to corner No. 5. Identical with corner No. 4 Golden Reef lode, and corner No. 2 Poormans Treasure lode. Thence N. 60 degrees 28 minutes W. 560.32 feet to corner No. 1. the place of beginning. Containing 20.132 acres.

Black Cat lode. Beginning at corner No. 1, whence U. S. L. M. No. 2 Thunder Mountain Mining District bears N. 51 degrees 11 minutes 06 seconds W, 7633.86 feet. Thence N. 55 degrees 03 minutes E. 246.82 feet to corner No. 2. Identical with corner No. 2 Golden Treasure lode. Thence S. 62 degrees 21 minutes 40 seconds E. 1500 feet to corner No. 3. Thence S. 55 degrees 03 minutes W. 246.82 feet to corner No. 4. Thence N. 62 degrees 21 minutes 40 seconds W. 1500 feet to corner No. 1, the place of beginning, Containing 7,545 acres.

Fraction lode. Beginning at corner No. 1. Identical with corner No. 3 Poormans Treasure lode, whence U. S. L. M. No. 2 Thunder Mountain Mining District bears N. 53 degrees 23 minutes 36 seconds W. 9400.95 feet. Thence S. 61 degrees 07 minutes E. 608.06 feet to corner No. 2. Thence N, 31 degrees 31 minutes N, 581 feet to corner No. 3. Identical with the S. W. corner of the Gem Fraction lode, unsurveyed. Corner No. 1 of survey No. 1967 Warren Fraction lode bears N. 39 degrees 28 minutes E. 1052.07 feet. Thence N. 61 degrees 07 minutes W. 608.06 feet to corner No. 4. Thence S. 31 degrees 31 minutes W. 581 feet to corner No. 1, the place of beginning. Containing 8.102 acres.

Equinox lode. Beginning at corner No. 1, whence U. S. L. M. No. 2 Thunder Mountain Mining District, bears N. 57 degrees 47 minutes 50 seconds W. 9071,60 feet. Thence S. 21 degrees 18 minutes W. 266.99 feet intersect corner No. 2 Roosevelt lode, 547 feet to corner No. 2. Thence S. 58 degrees 47 minutes 52 seconds E. 1134.44 feet to corner No. 3. Thence N. 21 degree 18 minutes E. 591.66 feet to corner No. 4. Thence N. 61 degrees 02 minutes W. 1127.63 feet to corner No. 1, the place of beginning. Containing 14.606 acres.

Gold Bug lode. Beginning at corner No. 1. Identical with corner No 3 Fraction lode. Whence U. S. L. M, No. 2, Thunder Mountain Mining District, bears N, 61 degrees 51 minutes 51 seconds W. 10025.99 feet. Thence S, 31 degrees 31 minutes W. 525 feet to corner No. 2. Thence S. 38 degrees 54 minutes E. 1039.74 feet to corner No. 3. Thence N. 31 degrees 31 minutes E. 525 feet to corner No, 4 Identical with the west side line angle post of the Gem Fraction mining claim. Thence N. 38 degrees 54 minutes W. 1039.74 feet to corner No. 1, the place of beginning. Containing 11.806 acres.

Roosevelt lode. Beginning at corner No. 1. Whence U. S. L. M. No. 2. Thunder Mountain Mining District, bears N. 59 degrees 09 minutes 17 seconds W. 9032.83 feet Cor.’s No’s. 3-1 Poormans Treasure and Fraction lodes, bears S. 40 degrees 21 minutes 24 seconds E. 387.91 feet. Thence S. 21 degrees 18 minutes W. 485 feet to corner No. 2. Thence S. 56 degrees 38 minutes E. 1493.00 ft. to corner No, 3. Thence N. 21 degrees 18 minutes E. 485 feet to corner No. 4. Thence N. 50 degree 38 minutes W. 1493.60 ft. to corner No. 1, the place of beginning. Containing 4.901 acres.

Parker lode. Beginning at corner No. 1, whence U. S. L. M. No 2 Thunder Mountain Mining District, bears N. 57 degrees 47 minutes 49 seconds W. 10559.04 feet. Thence S. 32 degrees 43 minutes W. 428.75 feet to corner No. 2. Thence S. 38 degrees 54 minutes E. 631.08 feet to corner No. 3. Thence N. 32 degrees 43 minutes E. 428.75 to corner No. 4. Thence N. 38 degrees 54 minutes W. 175 feet intersect corner No. 3 Gold Bug lode. 631.08 feet to corner No. 1, the place of beginning. Containing 5.898 acres. Making a total of 140.430 acres for the lode claim, and forming a portion of the unsurveyed public lands in the said Thunder Mountain Mining District, County and State of Idaho.

The name of the adjoining and conflicting claim as shown by the plat of survey is Gem Fraction. Others if any unknown. The notices of location or amended location of the several claims of this group are recorded in the Deputy Recorder’s office of Thunder Mountain Mining District as follows:

Gold Pit Fraction, volume 9, page 277; Goldie, volume 9, page 279; Golden Reef, volume 9, page 281; Gravel Point, volume 9, page 275; Poormans Treasure, volume 9, page 269; Golden Treasure, volume 9, page 283; Black Cat, volume 9, page 265; Fraction, volume 9, page 267 ; Equinox, volume 9, page 273; Gold Bug, volume 9, page 271; Roosevelt, volume 9, page 262, and Parker, volume 9, page 264.

Any and all persons claiming adversely the mining ground, vein, lode, premises or any portion thereof so described, surveyed, platted and applied for are hereby notified that unless their adverse claims are duly filed as according to law and the regulations thereunder, within the time prescribed by law, with the Register of the United States Land Office at Hailey, Idaho, they will be barred by virtue of the provisions of the United States statutes in such cases made and provided.

N. J. SHARP, Register.
First publication April 29, 1905
Last publication July 29, 1905.
— — — —

— — — — — — — — — —

19050506Pg6-txt1headline1
LOCALS

Rhodes & Kettenger have commenced work on their new building.

Hank McGiveney was in town on a business trip the first of the week.

F. B. McCann was in from his claims on Sugar creek this week.

O. M. Snyder, E. W. Whitcomb and H. G. McMillan arrived from the outside Thursday evening.

S. S. Whitaker and Fred Roesch returned Friday from a five days prospecting trip in the Dynamite creek country. They found some good looking rock.

P. M. Reuter, of the firm of McAndrews & Reuter came in yesterday evening and will remain in town for a few days.

Queeney & McGiveney have opened up their livery stable and now have both hay and grain. See their ad in this issue.

D. S. Cotter found a double cinch saddle, numbered “44” on his properly. The owner can have the same by calling on Mr. Cotter.

Joe Byars was in town yesterday and says that the weather in his section of the country has been unusually moist for the past ten days.

Sam Jones has again taken charge of the lunch counter at the Lisenby Hotel, after some months vacation, and invites his friends to call and see him.

Robt. Skinner and A. D. Almond have the contract to raise … of a building 16×24 for … (page torn) … Courtney on his lot opposite the postoffice.

We learn though Mr. Whitcomb that R. C. Schofield has been very sick at Spokane, but is now much better and will probably arrive in Roosevelt the last of this month.

S. I. Choat, who has a contract on the Gold Bullion tunnel, was in town Wednesday and reports work moving along in the usual way. It will take him some weeks yet to complete the work.

W. T. Evans arrived May 1st from Nampa, and on the 2nd assumed the management of the Robb Mercantile Co.’s store, the position having been made vacant by the resignation of T. J. Thompson.

P. McMahon leaves the first of the week for Boise where he will visit his family and purchase his seasons stock of goods. Mr. McMahon says that when he returns he will commence the erection of a new building.

While H. O. Johnson was at Salmon this winter, the girls there commented on the size of his feet. On his return to Thunder Mountain he diminished the size of one of them this week by chopping off a slice with an ax, but neglected to trim down the other foot to match.

L. A. Wayland, of the firm of L. A. Wayland & Son, will leave the first of the week with the part of their train which has wintered in this section, and will meet Nash Wayland at Dixie where some forty horse loads of general merchandise will be at once started for Roosevelt.

Mr. and Mrs. Arnold left Grangeville April 27 for Roosevelt via Dixie. Mrs. Arnold is to be the school teacher here — Mrs. Myers supplying temporarily — and she should have arrived before this but has probably been delayed on account of the depth of snow on the summits.

Jas. Le Roy and M. M. Kinsinger have rented the Queeney building next to the Log Cabin Saloon and are fitting it up for a cigar stole and restaurant. Mr. Kinsinger is to have the cigar counter and club room and Mr. Le Roy will run the chop house and restaurant. They will open up this coming week and Le Roy’s big turkey is to grace the first table.

M. F. Campbell, accountant at the Sunnyside, arrived from Nampa last Sunday. He left Roosevelt for the outside on the 11th at 2 p. m. and arrived at Knox on the 12th at 5 p. m. — the record we believe for winter traveling. He ‘phoned from Knox for material to be used on the tramway and went on to High Valley to meet the rig from Emmett in order to hasten its transportation. Mr. Campbell says the snow is all gone from Thunder City to the outside and that the roads are in good shape for freighting to that point. He believes that freight will begin to arrive here by June 1. Speaking of Nampa he said that the town already seemed to feel the life of R. W. Purdum’s administration as mayor.
— — — —

19050506Pg6-txt1headline2
Henry Wax Dead.

All people of this section who are acquainted in Grangeville remember Henry Wax, one of the … (page torn) … best known merchants in that town. On his way to attend the Grand Lodge of Oddfellows to which he was a delegate, Mr. Wax met with an accident and was taken to the hospital in Portland where he died. The remains were brought back to Lewiston where the funeral took place April 19.
— — — —

19050506Pg6-txt1headline3
Roosevelt Laundry Price List.

Gent’s out side shirt, 25c; under shirt, 20c; drawers, 20c.; handkerchiefs each, 5c; large turkish bath towels, 15c; barber or bar towels 50c per dozen or 5c each; socks, per pair, 10c; collars, double 25c, single 12 1/2 cts. Extra charges made for mending.
— — — —

— — — — — — — — — —

Images of full sized pages:

link: Page 1 top
link: Page 1 bottom

link: Page 2 top
link: Page 2 bottom

link: Page 3 top
link: Page 3 bottom

link: Page 4 top
link: Page 4 bottom

link: Page 5 top
link: Page 5 bottom

link: Page 6 top
link: Page 6 bottom
—————————

Further Reading

Link to Thunder Mountain and Roosevelt index page
Link: Public folder with images of the old newspapers
Link: November 5, 1904
Link: November 12, 1904
Link: February 4, 1905
Link: March 18, 1905
Link: March 25, 1905
Link: April 1, 1905
Link: April 8, 1905
Link: April 15, 1905
Link: April 22, 1905
Link: April 29, 1905
Link: May 6, 1905
Link: May 13, 1905
Link: May 20, 1905
Link: June 3, 1905
Link: June 24, 1905
Link: July 1, 1905
Link: July 15, 1905
Link: August 19, 1905
——————-

Updated September 30, 2022

Road Reports Feb 23, 2020

Please share road reports. Conditions change very quickly this time of year. High elevation roads may have several inches of snow. Be prepared for snow/ice, rocks and trees in the road and remember there is no cell phone service.

Yellow Pine: Since Wednesday no snow has fallen in Yellow Pine, we now have a total of 29″ of snow on the flat. Local streets have a snow floor, some have been plowed, others packed by light traffic. Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN.
link: Local Forecast
Yellow Pine Webcam: (check date on image, appears to be stuck on Feb 18th)

Warm Lake Highway: Wednesday (Feb 19) mail truck driver (Robert) the highway has a snow floor and good traveling this morning.
link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

Highway 55 Webcams Link:

South Fork Road: Wednesday (Feb 19) mail truck (Robert) says the upper road is snowpacked, the lower road has open areas of pavement. Good trip in today.
Last plowed Monday (Feb 17)
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Wednesday (Feb 19) mail truck driver (Robert) reports the rocks had been cleared.
Last plowed Monday (Feb 17)

Lower Johnson Creek Road: Last plowed Monday (Feb 17) to Wapiti Meadow including the dump.
Landmark and upper Johnson Creek closed to wheeled vehicles.
link: Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam
link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
Note: The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Closed to wheeled vehicles (no current report.)
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Snowmobile Report for Big Creek/Yellow Pine area
by C&L as of 2/20/2020
The route from Warm Lake to YP via Landmark is in excellent shape except for the section from Warm Lake to Landmark which is rough & continuous moguls. Experienced riders may want to avoid this by taking the Beaver Creek – Trout Creek (Power Line) route. The plow left sufficient loose surface snow on the road from Wapiti to YP for snowmobiles.
The trail from YP to Big Creek is in excellent shape, although the section from YP to Profile Creek is plowed & watch for full sized vehicles on this section especially on the blind corners.
The trail from BC to Elk Summit is a challenge. There is no evidence anyone has made that trip yet this year. We did travel the Government Creek Road to almost the Goldman Cut, and that is now good for snowmobiles. We also traveled the Smith Creek Trail from BC to the intersection with the Government Creek Road. This trail is good for experienced riders, but the creek crossings are a little troublesome; however we had a rookie rider with us & he did great although he sure slept good that night. There is no evidence anyone has passed through Goldman Cut yet this year & it is drifted in badly. Opening the Goldman Cut will require some “frisky folks”. For experienced snowmobilers the Smith Creek Loop is doable by going up the Government Creek Road to the Goldman Cut & then dropping down the steep slope (ski brakes make this easier) via the talus slides to the Smith Creek Road & then back to Big Creek. This would be a tough ride in reverse because of the steep slope. Riders taking this loop should pack a chain saw. The Smith Creek summer ford (1/2 mile west of Pueblo intersection) is impassible (4-5′ vertical banks at waters edge), but the long used natural snow bridge a few hundred feet upstream the ford is in good shape, but it does require some wiggling through the trees to get to the snow bridge.

Profile Creek Road: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcam: (check date on image)

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open.
Report from Midas Gold (McKinsey Lyon) on Feb 7: “Stibnite received 24 inches in the last 24 hours.” FB report of slides on the road between YP and the mine. Photo below courtesy Midas.

link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Closed to wheeled vehicles (no current report.)
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Report Jan 8, 2020 (C&L): “There is no evidence of travel up Smith Creek & up to Elk Summit. We would recommend only the most adventurous take on those routes until after the snow sets up.”
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: Closed to wheeled vehicles (no current report.)
Note: The approx elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′
——————————-

Weather Reports Feb 16-22, 2020

Feb 16 Weather:

At 10am it was 30 degrees, overcast and steady snow falling. Quit snowing by 1130am and sucker hole letting in some sun. At 1230pm patches of blue sky. At 350pm it was 36 degrees, mostly cloudy and flag flapping breezes. A few flakes falling at 420pm and breezy. Snowing hard at 445pm and windy. Moderate snowfall at 520pm, socked in and lighter breezes. Flaking at 540pm. Stopped snowing by 610pm, about an inch new snow. At 630pm it was 21 degrees, slight breeze and mostly clear. Snowing lightly at 11pm, overcast and light breeze. Not snowing at midnight and 17 degrees. Bright stars out at 130am. Started snowing at 6am. Socked in and still snowing at 930am.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time February 17, 2020 at 10:00AM
Socked in low, steady snow
Max temperature 41 degrees F
Min temperature 13 degrees F
At observation 20 degrees F
Precipitation 0.26 inch
Snowfall 5 1/4 inch
Snow depth 34 1/2 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Feb 17 Weather:

At 10am it was 20 degrees, socked in and steady snow. At 1045am it was 22 degrees, thin clouds bits of sun and had stopped snowing. At 1120am it was 26 degrees and snowing, VanMeter stocked in. Not snowing and sucker holes at 1210pm. At 1pm breaks in the clouds, breezy and little icicles dripping. Light snow 105pm for 2 minutes, then bits of sun again. At 225pm low clouds, breezy and light snow falling. Sucker hole 230pm, and stopped snowing. Snowing again at 240pm, low clouds and breezy, lasted about 15-20 minutes, then breaks in the clouds. At 345pm it was 30 degrees and partly clear, lighter breezes. At 630pm it was 22 degrees, breezy and partly clear. Stars out at 11pm.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time February 18, 2020 at 10:00AM
Almost clear
Max temperature 35 degrees F
Min temperature -8 degrees F
At observation -5 degrees F
Precipitation Trace
Snowfall Trace
Snow depth 32 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Feb 18 Weather:

At 10am it was -5 degrees and almost clear. Sunny and cold at 12pm. At 330pm it was 33 degrees, light cold breeze and mostly clear. At 630pm it was 15 degrees and mostly clear. At 1130pm stars out, some haze.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time February 19, 2020 at 10:00AM
Clear and cold
Max temperature 34 degrees F
Min temperature -10 degrees F
At observation -7 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 31 inch (average)
— — — — — — — — — —

Feb 19 Weather:

At 10am it was -7 degrees and clear. Breezy at noon. At 1245pm it was 25 degrees, clear and chilly breeze. At 330pm it was 34 degrees, almost clear (very thin haze) and cold light breezes. At 630pm it was 16 degrees and mostly clear (thin haze) and light breeze. At 1130pm just the bright stars, a little hazy and breezy.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time February 20, 2020 at 10:00AM
Mostly high thin clouds, light breeze
Max temperature 34 degrees F
Min temperature -8 degrees F
At observation 1 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 31 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Feb 20 Weather:

At 10am it was 1 degrees, mostly high thin cloud and cold light breeze. Mostly cloudy at 1pm. Overcast at 215pm. At 420pm it was 37 degrees, calm and partly clear (thin wispy clouds.) At 630pm it was 22 degrees and appeared to be almost clear. At 11pm appeared partly cloudy (hazy), some stars.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time February 21, 2020 at 10:00AM
Clear, slight breeze
Max temperature 41 degrees F
Min temperature 1 degrees F
At observation 4 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 30 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Feb 21 Weather:

At 10am it was 4 degrees, clear sky and slight breeze. Clear and sunny at noon. At 350pm it was 44 degrees and clear. At 640pm it was 25 degrees and clear (slight thin haze to the west.) Mostly clear at 1030pm.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time February 22, 2020 at 10:00AM
Almost clear
Max temperature 45 degrees F
Min temperature 4 degrees F
At observation 10 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 30 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Feb 22 Weather:

At 10am it was 10 degrees and almost clear. Sunny and mild at noon. At 330pm it was 50 degrees, mostly clear and a little breezy. At 630pm it was 32 degrees and almost clear (a bit of thin haze.) Stars out at 1130pm. Fewer stars at 130am, partly or mostly cloudy.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time February 23, 2020 at 10:00AM
Overcast
Max temperature 52 degrees F
Min temperature 10 degrees F <- yesterday morning
At observation 24 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 29 inch
————————

Road Reports Feb 19, 2020

Please share road reports. Conditions change very quickly this time of year. High elevation roads may have several inches of snow. Be prepared for snow/ice, rocks and trees in the road and remember there is no cell phone service.

Yellow Pine: Since Sunday Yellow Pine has received 5 1/4″ new snow, and an average of 31″ of snow on the flat. Local streets have a snow floor, some have been plowed, others packed by light traffic. Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN.
link: Local Forecast
Yellow Pine Webcam: (check date on image)

Warm Lake Highway: Wednesday (Feb 19) mail truck driver (Robert) the highway has a snow floor and good traveling this morning.
link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

Highway 55 Webcams Link:

South Fork Road: Wednesday (Feb 19) mail truck (Robert) says the upper road is snowpacked, the lower road has open areas of pavement. Good trip in today.
Last plowed Monday (Feb 17)
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Wednesday (Feb 19) mail truck driver (Robert) reports the rocks had been cleared.
Last plowed Monday (Feb 17)

Lower Johnson Creek Road: Last plowed Monday (Feb 17) to Wapiti Meadow including the dump.
Landmark and upper Johnson Creek closed to wheeled vehicles.
link: Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam
link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
Note: The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Closed to wheeled vehicles (no current report.)
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Last report Jan 8, 2020 (C&L): “Profile/Big Creek Road – Not suitable for wheeled traffic. There has been enough over snow traffic that the route is easy going for snowmobiles so long as you stay in compacted porting of the road.”
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcam: (check date on image)

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open.
Report from Midas Gold (McKinsey Lyon) on Feb 7: “Stibnite received 24 inches in the last 24 hours.” FB report of slides on the road between YP and the mine. Photo below courtesy Midas.

link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Closed to wheeled vehicles (no current report.)
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Report Jan 8, 2020 (C&L): “There is no evidence of travel up Smith Creek & up to Elk Summit. We would recommend only the most adventurous take on those routes until after the snow sets up.”
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: Closed to wheeled vehicles (no current report.)
Note: The approx elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′
——————————-

Feb 16, 2020 The Yellow Pine Times

Feb 16, 2020 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Community Calendar:

Dec 7 thru Feb 21 Yellow Pine Tavern Holiday Closure
Feb 22 – Pie Contest 2pm at the Yellow Pine Tavern
May 2 – Firewise Meeting 2pm at the Fire Hall
(details below)
———-

Local Events:

Feb 22 – Pie Contest

2pm at the Yellow Pine Tavern, $1 per plate to taste the pies, money goes to the winners.
— — — —

May 2 Firewise Meeting

YPFD is participating in the “Wildfire Safety/National Community Preparedness Day”.

There will be an open house on May 2nd at 2pm at YPFD.

There will be presentations/pamphlets regarding what YPFD and the fire district has to offer on fire safety and mitigation for our community.
———-

Village News:

February Snow

February has brought a LOT of snow to Yellow Pine so far. From Feb 1st to Feb 16th: a total of 37.9″ of snow has fallen and since January 1st 76.5″ of snow has fallen, which is more than average for an entire winter.
P1000593-20200216SnowDepth
10am Feb 16, 2020
— — — —

Winter Closures

The Corner is closed for the winter, opening again next spring. I can be reached at matt @ ypcorner.com or at 970-379-5155. Thanks, have a great winter!
– Matt

The Tavern will be closed from Saturday December 7th to Friday February 21st. UPS packages will be dropped off at Deb’s porch and she will also have gasoline for emergency situations. I will be available at my cell number for any questions or situations 208 739-7086
Thanks, Lorinne N. Munn

The Yellow Pine Lodge is closed for the winter.
— — — —

Yellow Pine US Mail

The 3-day a week mail delivery started Nov 1st. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 55 cents. Support our local post office and purchase your stamps here.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Report the transfer station was plowed Wednesday (Feb 12) and Lakeshore came in and emptied the bins on Thursday (Feb 13.)

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

Yellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is located approximately 3 miles south on Johnson Creek Road.

The TRANSFER STATION is for household trash and yard waste:
* Household trash must be put inside (and fit) the dumpster;
* Yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, et.) goes in the burn pile on the south end of the turn-around;
* Cardboard boxes should be flattened before putting the in the dumpster,

The DUMPSTERS are NOT for:
* Furniture (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station).

The BURN PILE is NOT for:
* Cardboard boxes (flatten and put in dumpster);
* Furniture and appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Drywall and building material (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wire or fencing (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Foam Rubber (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wood with metal (like nails) attached (take to Donnelly Transfer Station.)

When closing the DOORS on the front of the dumpsters:
* Make sure the “U” brackets at the top and bottom of the door are engaged;
* The retaining bar at the middle of the door is slid into the pipe;
* And the “L” bars at the bottom of the doors dropped into place.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: 208/634-7176
———-

Local Groups:

YPWUA News:

Water rates have been increased (see letter with water bill), the 2019 fee is $400. Payment is due by Feb 15, 2020, or you can pay half and the other half is due June 15, 2020.

Boil Water Advisory Lifted November 22, 2019

The 2019 Yellow Pine Water Users Shareholders meeting was Sunday July 7th in the Community Hall.
link: 20190707YPWUAminutes
— — — —

VYPA News:

The community hall committee’s goal is to have adequate heating installed in the main hall before the June VYPA meeting.

If folks have items for the community yard sale, please place them by the north wall in the community hall. If you see items you would like to purchase, you can pay Deb, Ronda, or Lynn. All funds support the community hall.

VYPA meetings for 2020 – June 13, 2pm; July 11, 2pm; August 8, 2pm; September 12, 2pm.

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting Minutes for September 21, 2019
link: 20190921 Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting
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YPFD News:

YP Fire Commissioners:
Sue Holloway – District 1
Dan Stiff – District 2
Merrill Saleen – District 3
Fire Chief – Jeff Forster

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice

The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.” Click the link: to view 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation

We will do another class this spring/summer [2020] depending on interest. Training will resume in the spring. -Fire Chief Jeff
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Biz Listings:

The Corner (208) 633-3325

Closed for the winter.
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Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233

Will open Friday Feb 21.
Winter Hours Open every day 9am-2pm 4pm-8pm
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Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377

Closed for Winter.
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Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Tom & Sarah Lanham
156 Yellow Pine Ave, Yellow Pine Id 83677
website:
Facebook:
Starting June 2020 We will be doing trail rides out of Yellow Pine along with summer pack / camping trips to high mountain lakes in the area!

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
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Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430
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Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

The Star-News

subscribe:
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine

Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, will service Yellow Pine

B&T Safety Solutions LLC
208-271-1600 Based out of Donnelly
Snow removal, cleaning chimneys and stoves, we do cabin staining/chinking as well
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (Feb 10) light snow early morning, trace by 10am and still snowing, snow depth varies from 30-32″ deep. Done snowing before 1030am and large patches of blue sky. Jays and hairy woodpecker calling, chickadees and nuthatches visiting. Cloudy, breezy and icicles dripping after lunch time, high of 35 degrees. Patches of blue sky and gusty breezes mid-afternoon, dropping below freezing before sunset. Sun headed behind the ridge at 440pm. Report of hungry elk from the upper side of the village across the river. Mostly clear at dusk, lighter breezes. Bright moon and stars before midnight.

Tuesday (Feb 11) overnight low of 2 degrees, mostly clear sky this morning, measured an average of 31″ of snow on the ground. Jays, chickadees and nuthatches visiting. Sunny and very blue sky at lunch time, high of 43 degrees. Sunny, chilly breezes and warm sunshine mid-afternoon. Mostly clear at dusk and calmer, a few clouds painted in golden colors. Clouds moved in and light snowfall late evening into the night, finishing with a trace of graupel.

Wednesday (Feb 12) 24 hour low of 7 degrees (from Tues morning) it probably hovered around 25 during the night, trace of snow/graupel on the board this morning, an average of 30″ total snow on the ground (several crusty layers), mostly cloudy and light breeze. Jays, nuthatches and chickadees visiting. Mostly cloudy and light breezes at lunch time, high of 39 degrees. Mail truck made it in a little early. Report of hungry elk in the lower SE part of the village. Partly cloudy and breezy mid-afternoon. Gun shots around 4pm. Partly hazy at dusk and calmer. High thin hazy clouds before midnight, stars shining. Bright waning moon after midnight and cold.

Thursday (Feb 13) overnight low of 3 degrees, almost clear sky this morning, measured an average of 30″ old crusty snow on the ground. Several jays, a clark’s nutcracker, a female hairy woodpecker, red-breasted nuthatches and a few mountain chickadees visiting. Bright sunshine and icicles dripping at lunch time, high of 48 degrees. Snowmobile traffic. Clear, warm and light chilly breezes late afternoon. Clear sky at dusk and calm. Breezy and cloudy before midnight. Breezy and light snow falling some time after midnight.

Friday (Feb 14) 24 hour low of 5 degrees (from Thurs morning) the low was probably around 25F, it was 27F at 10am, mostly cloudy and breezy, trace of new snow and an average of 30″ total snow on the ground. Several jays calling from the trees, a trio visiting along with a nutcracker and several red-breasted nuthatches. Mostly cloudy and a bit breezy at lunch time, followed by a short little snow flurry, high of 39 degrees. Later both a female and a male hairy woodpecker, a white breasted nuthatch and mountain chickadees visited. Another short snow flurry and breezy early afternoon. Partly cloudy and quite breezy by mid-afternoon. Cloudy and calmer after dark. Cloudy at midnight. Dusting of snow fell before 6am.

Saturday (Feb 15) overnight low of 21 degrees, 1/10″ new snow and measured 29″ total snow on the ground, overcast and fairly calm. Hairy woodpecker drumming on the power pole, lots of jays being vocal in the neighborhood, clark’s nutcracker, red-breasted nuthatches and a chickadee visiting. Cloudy at lunch time, high of 36 degrees. Snowmobile traffic. Cloudy and light breezes mid-afternoon. Stronger breezes and thicker clouds late afternoon. Snowing after dark and stacking up. Not snowing at midnight. More snow after 7am.

Sunday (Feb 16) 24 hour low of 26 degrees (30F at 10am) 2 1/2″ new snow and 31″ total snow on the ground, overcast and steady snowfall until 11am (trace then melted.) Clark’s nutcracker, male and female hairy woodpeckers, jays and red-breasted nuthatches visiting. Breaks in the clouds at lunch time and icicles dripping, high of 41 degrees. Mostly cloudy mid-afternoon and flag flapping breezy. Next round of snow started off with flakes, then snowing pretty hard by 445pm and windy, tapering off and done by 610pm (about 1″ new), then mostly clear and lighter breezes. Snowmobile traffic.
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Idaho News:

Wilkses offer to open roads

County would take over access roads in Kennally Creek, Gold Fork areas

By Max Silverson The Star-News Feb 13, 2020

20200213RoadsWilks
Graphic courtesy Wilks Ranch Brokers. Red lines shows roads on land owned by DF Development that are under discussion to be transferred to Valley County.

Representatives of DF Development on Monday offered to Valley County commissioners ownership of roads now owned by the company near Donnelly and Cascade.

The proposal would see the county take ownership of roads in the Kennally Creek and Gold Fork areas that provide access to state and federal land.

“The subject property, which we refer to as Gold Fork North, is over 11,000 acres and would provide the general public with some beautiful scenery and allow access to State and National Forest land,” Wilks Ranch Brokers Manager of Sales and leasing Jerry Conring wrote in an email to the county.

The new roads would have direct access off of Barker Lane and Gold Fork Road, Conring said.

Commissioners were receptive to the proposal, but also asked that the company consider making more DF Development owned roads into public roads.

Those requests include sections of Flat Creek Road, Lost Basin Road, West Fork Creek Road, Packer John Road, Sage Hen Road, Lost Basin Road, Corral Creek Road and Horsethief Road.

“I think it’s great they turned around and decided to deal with us instead of locking everybody out,” Commission Chair Elt Hasbrouck said.

Commissioners speculated that the transfer of roads may be in advance of DF Development selling parcels of land in the area at some time in the future.

Wilks Ranch Brokers has a property listed for sale on its website that roughly consists of the northern half of the roads proposed. The 5,722-acre property called Kennally Creek Ranch is listed for about $11.4 million.

The county would also be responsible for road maintenance if ownership were transferred.

The roads could be classified as high clearance or ATV trails, costing little in maintenance costs, but would still be accessible by the public, Hasbrouck said.

Commissioners and DF Development representatives did not make a decision on Monday, but made plans to look at the condition of each road once the snow melts.

DF Development is controlled by Farris and Dan Wilks of Cisco, Texas, who purchased 172,000 acres of private land in west-central Idaho in 2016.

The land was previously owned by Boise Cascade Corp and later Potlatch Corp., which managed the lands for timber harvest. The companies allowed the public to use the land for hunting, hiking, mountain biking, ATV use and other activities.

The new owners erected gates and “No Trespassing” signs across access roads into their land due to what the brothers said was instances of abuse.

The DF Development lands are concentrated around Smith Ferry, along the east side of Long Valley between Cascade and Lake Fork, and surrounding Meadows Valley.

source: © Copyright 2009-present Central Idaho Publishing Inc.
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Valley County to hear proposed rules on short-term rentals

By Max Silverson The Star-News Feb 13, 2020

Valley County commissioners will air a proposed ordinance governing short term rental in the county at a public hearing on Tuesday.

A public hearing will be one of three beginning at 1 p.m. Tuesday at the Valley County Courthouse in Cascade.

Two other hearings will be on proposed regulations on accessory dwelling units and recreational vehicle campgrounds.

The rules would require every short-term rental to apply for an annual administrative permit and set standards on maximum occupancy, sewage disposal, garbage, setbacks, rules of operation, lighting, camp fires, quiet hours, and notification to adjacent property owners.

The purpose of the ordinance is to safeguard the public health, safety and general welfare in order to protect the integrity of residential neighborhoods, according to the draft ordinance.

Short term rental refers to any residence that is rented for 30 days or less. Current short-term rentals would not be exempted from obtaining a permit.

The proposal would require that the number of occupants could not exceed the limits of the septic system as approved by Central District Health. Portable toilets could not be used to increase the maximum occupancy.

continued:
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Valley DMV office to get new home in Cascade courthouse

By Max Silverson The Star-News Feb 13, 2020

The Division of Motor Vehicles office at the Valley County Courthouse in Cascade is set to move to a new permanent location in the building’s ground floor after a water leak and mold outbreak forced a temporary move.

The DMV, which was forced to close between Jan. 21-24, will relocate to a large meeting room, kicking off an office shuffle among county departments.

The shuffle plans followed a discussion between Valley County Assessor June Fullmer and Valley County commissioners during commissioners’ weekly meeting on Monday.

Staff in the plat clerk’s office was also forced to relocate due to the mold and needed a permanent working space while the north wing of the building is renovated.

The DMV is set to begin moving into the new space as soon as possible, Fullmer said.

continued:
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Cascade hopes to get a total makeover for HGTV’s new ‘Hometown Takeover’ show

As for what parts of the city that need a makeover, Mayor Nissula says the library, city hall, sidewalks, and streetscaping could all use a little improvement.

KTVB February 11, 2020

Boise, Idaho — The City of Cascade is making the case that the small town deserves a large-scale makeover for a new HGTV show,

Mayor Judy Nissula told KTVB that the city submitted the video to the network on Friday.

The new show is called “Hometown Takeover” and is a spin-off one of HGTV’s current shows, “Hometown.” The hosts are choosing a second community of 40,000 or fewer and help them completely revamp their town.

continued:

video:

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Friend of avalanche center to host fundraiser Feb. 21

The Star-News Feb 13, 2020

The Friends of the Payette Avalanche Center will host a fundraiser party with live music on Friday, Feb. 21, from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. at Banyan’s on the Green.

The event will also include a silent auction and raffle prizes. Live music will be performed by Jughandle Parade.

Cost is $10 at the door. All proceeds will benefit the Friends of the Payette Avalanche Center, which is a partner to the Payette Avalanche Center.

The Friends of the Payette Avalanche Center is a nonprofit organization whose mission is to provide a community-based forum to share avalanche information, to operate and maintain local beacon basic training facilities and to provide basic avalanche education to winter recreationists.

For more information on the Payette Avalanche Center or its Friends, visit (link). Banyans on the Green is located at 925 Fairway Dr.

source:
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US National Weather Service: Idaho, Northwest snow pack above average

by CBS 2 News Staff Sunday, February 16th 2020

Boise, Idaho (CBS2) — Snow pack in much of Idaho, and in much of the northwest as well, is above average for the season, according to the US National Weather Service.

A map shows much of the Gem State with snow pack averages over 100 percent.

continued w/map:
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Letter to Share:

Response to Questions-Warm Lake Feeder Line Relocation

2/11/2020

Thank you for your comments on the upcoming Idaho Power Warm Lake Feeder Line Relocation Project. Here are some follow-up to several questions asked.

Disruption of service: Yes, there will be a short outage in service (approximately 4 hours) to transition power from the existing overhead line to the new underground line. IPC will coordinate this outage with the town of Yellow Pine so that the outage will not adversely affect residents and businesses.

Expense to Homeowners: There will be no increase in cost of services to local residents specific from this project.

Length of project and coordination with the Harmonica Festival: The duration of the total construction period is anticipated to be two months. IPC will coordinate with the community of Yellow Pine and schedule project activities so that they do not occur during Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, or interfere with community events/festivals since businesses rely on the revenue generated by these holidays/festivities.

Traffic control along Johnson Creek Road: Project activities will require set up and operation of equipment within and along Johnson Creek Road. As such, IPC will implement appropriate traffic control and/or road restrictions to ensure public safety during construction.. Traffic control may include flaggers and restriction of traffic to one lane, as well as limited road closures. IPC will coordinate project activities with the Valley County Road Department. Prior notice would be given for any extended delay or road blockage. The closures would only be for the time needed to perform the construction tasks requiring the road restrictions. The road restrictions would be managed according to the Manual of Uniform Traffic Control Devices.

Terre Pearson-Ramirez
NZ NEPA Planner
Boise National Forest
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Public Lands:

Burntlog Route Geophysical Investigation – Scoping

2/10/2020

The Forest Service is seeking public input (scoping comments) for the Burntlog Route Geophysical Investigation Project on lands managed by the Cascade Ranger District of the Boise National Forest as part of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) review.

Project Description

The purpose of the Burntlog Route Geophysical Investigation is to collect crucial data at proposed rock quarries, bridge abutments, cut slopes, and soil nail/ mechanically stabilized earth wall locations. This project is needed to inform feasibility of developing a transportation route from the Stibnite mine site to Highway 55. The current proposal is to use the existing Burntlog road and develop a new alignment between Trapper Creek and Stibnite.

Analysis indicates that this action falls within the category of 36 CFR 220.6(e)(8) – Short-term (1 year or less) mineral, energy, or geophysical investigations and their incidental support activities that may require cross-country travel by vehicles and equipment, construction of less than 1 mile of low standard road, or use and minor repair of existing roads.

The Decision on this analysis will only authorize the geophysical investigation. The decision on the actual construction of the road is tied to the larger Stibnite analysis.

For a more detailed description of the proposed project, please review the proposed action report (PAR) on the Project webpage: (link)

How to Comment

The Forest Service is contacting interested persons, groups, and agencies to make them aware of the project and to gather pertinent feedback for the environmental assessment. Your comments will help us identify and address issues. Comments may be submitted in the following ways:

* Through the Project webpage (link above). Select “Comment on Project” under “Get Connected” on the right panel. If uploading a file with comments, comments must be in the form of plain text (.txt), Word (.doc, .docx) or PDF (.pdf).
* Mail to the Cascade Ranger District, PO Box 696, Cascade, ID 83611.
* Hand deliver to the Cascade Ranger District 540 North Main Street, Cascade, ID 83611. Office hours for submitting hand-delivered comments are 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, excluding holidays.
* By fax at 208-259-3366.

If submitting comments by mail or fax, be sure to include “Burntlog Route Geophysical Investigation” in the subject line.

Comments received will be included in the project record and may be released in their entirety, if requested, pursuant to the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA).

When to Comment

To be most helpful, please submit your scoping comments by March 2, 2020. For further information on the project, please contact Terre Pearson-Ramirez, Team Leader, at 208-382-7400.
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Two-Bit Road Decommissioning-Scoping

2/11/2020

The Forest Service is seeking public input (scoping comments) for the Two-Bit Road Decommissioning Project on lands managed by the Cascade Ranger District of the Boise National Forest as part of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) review.

Project Description

The Two-Bit Road Decommissioning project proposes to decommission approximately 18 miles of non-system routes in the Six-bit Creek and Curtis Creek subwatersheds. The purpose is to reduce sediment delivery to the South Fork Salmon River and several tributaries to improve spawning and rearing habitat for the threatened Chinook salmon, steelhead, and bull trout.

Analysis indicates that this action falls within the category 36 CFR 220.6(e)(20) – Activities that restore, rehabilitate, or stabilize lands occupied by roads and trails, to a more natural condition that may include removing, replacing, or modifying drainage structures and ditches, reestablishing vegetation, reshaping natural contours and slopes, reestablishing drainage-ways, or other activities that would restore site productivity and reduce environmental impacts

For a more detailed description of the proposed project, please review the proposed action report (PAR) on the Project webpage: (link).

How to Comment

The Forest Service is contacting interested persons, groups, and agencies to make them aware of the project and to gather pertinent feedback for the environmental assessment. Your comments will help us identify and address issues. Comments may be submitted in the following ways:

* Through the Project webpage (link above). Select “Comment on Project” under “Get Connected” on the right panel. If uploading a file with comments, comments must be in the form of plain text (.txt), Word (.doc, .docx) or PDF (.pdf).
* Mail to the Cascade Ranger District, PO Box 696, Cascade, ID 83611.
* Hand deliver to the Cascade Ranger District, 540 North Main Street, Cascade, ID 83611. Office hours for submitting hand-delivered comments are 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, excluding holidays.
* By fax at 208-259-3366.

If submitting comments by mail or fax, be sure to include “Two-Bit Road Decommissioning” in the subject line.

Comments received will be included in the project record and may be released in their entirety, if requested, pursuant to the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA).

When to Comment

To be most helpful, please submit your scoping comments by March 2, 2020. For further information on the project, please contact Terre Pearson-Ramirez, Team Leader, at 208-382-7400.
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Tawnya Brummett selected as Forest Supervisor For Boise National Forest

2/12/2020

Boise Idaho, February 12, 2020 — Regional Forester Nora Rasure has selected Tawnya Brummett as the Forest Supervisor for the Boise National Forest. Tawnya has served for the last three years as the Boise National Forest’s Deputy Forest Supervisor. She replaces Cecilia Romero Seesholtz who retired December 2019.

“We are excited that Tawnya has accepted the position to lead Idaho’s Capital City Forest,” said Rasure. “Her diverse experience in range, wildlife, wildland fire and leadership will help the Boise National Forest continue to implement an ambitious forest management program.”

Brummett has 19 years in federal service most recently as acting Forest Supervisor for the Payette National Forest. Before serving as the Boise National Forest’s Deputy Forest Supervisor, she was the Deputy Forest Supervisor on the Tongass National Forest in southeast Alaska; District Ranger on the Lolo National Forest in Montana; Wildlife Biologist and Range Specialist on the Gila National Forest in NM; Wildlife Biologist on the Angelina-Sabine National Forest in East Texas; hotshot fire crewmember on the Gila National Forest.

“I am honored to step into this leadership role on the Boise National Forest,” said Brummett. “I look forward to strengthening existing partnerships as well as inviting new ideas and collaborative opportunities. I want our stakeholders to know that I remain committed to working with them to address concerns and implement strategies that improve the health of the forest while supporting our communities.”

Tawnya comes from a farming and ranching family in New Mexico, she, and her family are avid outdoor enthusiasts. During their off-time they enjoy multiple outdoor experiences on National Forest System lands including, boating, camping, hunting and hiking.

Brummett is a recognized leader in wildland fire, chairing a national complex fire leadership program for the last two years. She holds a bachelor’s degree in Wildlife Biology from Stephan F. Austin State University.
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Idaho Department of Transportation Maintenance Facility at Banks Special Use Permit Renewal -Scoping

2/11/2020

The Forest Service is seeking public input (scoping comments) for the Idaho Department of Transportation Maintenance Facility at Banks Special Use Permit Renewal Project as part of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) review.

Project Description

The Emmett Ranger District, in coordination with the Idaho Department of Transportation, is seeking to issue a new special use authorization for a new term to replace expired authorization EMT100131 which authorized the operation and maintenance of a building and storage area for the State of Idaho Department of Transportation—known as Banks Maintenance Shed No. 3114.

Analysis indicates that this action falls within the category 36 CFR 220.6(e)(15) issuance of a new special use authorization for a new term to replace an expired special use authorization. There are not changes to the authorized facilities or increases in the scope or intensity of the authorized activities and the holder is in full compliance with the terms and conditions of their expired authorization

For a more detailed description of the proposed project, please review the proposed action report (PAR) on the Project webpage: (link)

How to Comment

The Forest Service is contacting interested persons, groups, and agencies to make them aware of the project and to gather pertinent feedback for the environmental assessment. Your comments will help us identify and address issues. Comments may be submitted in the following ways:

* Through the Project webpage (link above). Select “Comment on Project” under “Get Connected” on the right panel. If uploading a file with comments, comments must be in the form of plain text (.txt), Word (.doc, .docx) or PDF (.pdf).
* Mail or hand deliver to the Emmett Ranger District, 1857 Highway 16, Emmett, ID 83617. Office hours for submitting hand-delivered comments are 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, excluding holidays.
* Fax 208-365-7637.

If submitting comments by mail or fax, be sure to include “IDT Maintenance Facility SUP” in the subject line.

Comments received will be included in the project record and may be released in their entirety, if requested, pursuant to the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA).

When to Comment

To be most helpful, please submit your scoping comments by March 2, 2020. For further information on the project, please contact Terre Pearson-Ramirez, Team Leader, at 208-382-7400.
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Cambridge Telephone Company Special Use Permit Renewal-Scoping

2/10/2020

The Forest Service is seeking public input (scoping comments) for the Cambridge Telephone Company Special Use Permit Renewal Project as part of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) review.

Project Description

The Lowman Ranger District in coordination with Cambridge Telephone Company is seeking to issue a new special use authorization for a new term to replace expired authorization LMN419306 which authorized the lease of land for the operation and maintenance of a microwave common carrier (MCC 803) on Jackson Peak.

Analysis indicates that this action falls within the category 36 CFR 220.6(e)(15) issuance of a new special use authorization for a new term to replace an expired special use authorization. There are not changes to the authorized facilities or increases in the scope or intensity of the authorized activities and the holder is in full compliance with the terms and conditions of their expired authorization

For a more detailed description of the proposed project, please review the proposed action report (PAR) on the Project webpage: (link)

How to Comment

The Forest Service is contacting interested persons, groups, and agencies to make them aware of the project and to gather pertinent feedback for the environmental assessment. Your comments will help us identify and address issues. Comments may be submitted in the following ways:

* Through the Project webpage (link above). Select “Comment on Project” under “Get Connected” on the right panel. If uploading a file with comments, comments must be in the form of plain text (.txt), Word (.doc, .docx) or PDF (.pdf).
* Mail or hand deliver to the Lowman Ranger District, 7359 Highway 21, Lowman, ID 83637. Office hours for submitting hand-delivered comments are 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, excluding holidays.
* By fax at 208-259-3366.

If submitting comments by mail or fax, be sure to include “Cambridge SUP” in the subject line.

Comments received will be included in the project record and may be released in their entirety, if requested, pursuant to the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA).

When to Comment

To be most helpful, please submit your scoping comments by March 2, 2020. For further information on the project, please contact Terre Pearson-Ramirez, Team Leader, at 208-382-7400.
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Lowman Fire Station Special Use Renewal Project -Scoping

2/10/2020

The Forest Service is seeking public input (scoping comments) for the Lowman Fire Station Special Use Renewal Project as part of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) review.

Project Description

The Lowman Ranger District in coordination with the Lowman Fire Department is seeking to issue a new special use authorization for a new term to replace expired authorization LMN433701 which authorized the Fire Station off mile marker 80 on Idaho State Highway-21.

Analysis indicates that this action falls within the category 36 CFR 220.6(e)(15) issuance of a new special use authorization for a new term to replace an expired special use authorization. There are not changes to the authorized facilities or increases in the scope or intensity of the authorized activities and the holder is in full compliance with the terms and conditions of their expired authorization

For a more detailed description of the proposed project, please review the proposed action report (PAR) on the Project webpage: (link)

How to Comment

The Forest Service is contacting interested persons, groups, and agencies to make them aware of the project and to gather pertinent feedback for the environmental assessment. Your comments will help us identify and address issues. Comments may be submitted in the following ways:

* Through the Project webpage (link above). Select “Comment on Project” under “Get Connected” on the right panel. If uploading a file with comments, comments must be in the form of plain text (.txt), Word (.doc, .docx) or PDF (.pdf).
* Mail or hand deliver to the Lowman Ranger District, 7359 Highway 21, Lowman, ID 83637. Office hours for submitting hand-delivered comments are 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, excluding holidays.
* By fax at 208-259-3366.

If submitting comments by mail or fax, be sure to include “Lowman Fire Station SUP” in the subject line.

Comments received will be included in the project record and may be released in their entirety, if requested, pursuant to the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA).

When to Comment

To be most helpful, please submit your scoping comments by March 2, 2020. For further information on the project, please contact Terre Pearson-Ramirez, Team Leader, at 208-382-7400.
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Lowman Wildland Urban Interface (WUI) Project

2/11/2020

The Forest Service is seeking public input (comments) for the Lowman Wildland Urban Interface Project on lands managed by the Lowman Ranger District of the Boise National Forest as part of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) review.

Project Description

The Lowman WUI project would utilize prescribed fire, non-commercial thinning, and commercial thinning to reduce the risk of uncharacteristic wildfire to the wildland urban interface around the community of Lowman. The proposed project is an activity implementing a land management plan and is subject to the pre-decisional objection process at 36 CFR 218 Subparts A and B.

For a more detailed description of the proposed project, please review the proposed action report (PAR) on the Project webpage: (link)

How to Comment

The Forest Service is contacting interested persons, groups, and agencies to make them aware of the project and to gather pertinent feedback for the environmental assessment. Your comments will help us identify and address issues. Comments may be submitted in the following ways

* Through the Lowman WUI Project webpage (link above). Select “Comment on Project” under “Get Connected” on the right panel. If uploading a file with comments, comments must be in the form of plain text (.txt), Word (.doc, .docx) or PDF (.pdf)
* Mail or hand deliver to the Lowman Ranger District, 7359 Highway 21, Lowman, ID 8363. Office hours for submitting hand-delivered comments are 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, excluding holidays
* By fax at 208-259-3366.

If submitting comments by mail or fax, be sure to include “Lowman WUI” in the subject line.

Comments received will be included in the project record and may be released in their entirety, if requested, pursuant to the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA).

Comment Period & Pre-decisional Objection Process

The opportunity to comment ends 30 days following the date of publication of the legal notice in the Idaho World. Only those who submit timely and specific written comments (36 CFR §218.2) regarding the proposed project or activity during a public comment period established by the responsible official are eligible to file an objection (36 CFR §218.24(b)(6)). For issues to be raised in objections, they must be based on previously submitted specific written comments regarding the proposed project or activity and attributed to the objector. For objection eligibility, each individual or representative from each entity submitting timely and specific written comments must either sign the comment or verify identity upon request. The publication date of the legal notice in the newspaper of record is the exclusive means for calculating the time to submit written comments on a proposed project or activity. The time period for the opportunity to comment on a proposed project or activity to be documented with an environmental assessment shall not be extended. It is the responsibility of all individuals and organizations to ensure that their comments are received in a timely manner.

For further information on the project, please contact Ryan Shannahan, Team Leader, at 208-259-3361.
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Public informational meeting about Sage Hen Recreation Area

Boise National Forest 2/11/2020
Contact: Venetia Gempler (208) 373-4105

Emmett, Idaho, February 11, 2020 — The Emmett Ranger District of the Boise National Forest is hosting an informational meeting Feb. 20, 2020, to share proposed restoration activities in the Sage Hen Recreation Area.

“We are hosting this meeting before we begin the formal scoping process to provide an overview of the proposed project and restoration needs, “said Katie Wood, Emmett District Ranger. “The Sage Hen area is a favorite destination for many forest visitors and we want people to know they can participate and inform the development of the proposed action.”

For more information about the Sage Hen Integrated Restoration Project visit: (link). There the public can request more information and sign up to receive email updates.

The meeting details include:

* Date: Feb. 20, 2020
* Time: 6:00 – 7:30 p.m.
* Location: Emmett Ranger District Office, 1857 Highway 16, Suite A, Emmett ID
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Tips & Advice:

Cold Weather Safety Tips

Exposure to winter’s dry, cold air and chilly rain, sleet and snow can cause chapped paws and itchy, flaking skin, but these aren’t the only discomforts pets can suffer. Winter walks can become downright dangerous if chemicals from ice-melting agents are licked off of bare paws. To help prevent cold weather dangers from affecting your pet’s health, please heed the following advice from our experts:

* Repeatedly coming out of the cold into the dry heat of your home can cause itchy, flaking skin. Keep your home humidified and towel dry your pet as soon as he comes inside, paying special attention to his feet and in-between the toes. Remove any snow balls from between his foot pads.

* Never shave your dog down to the skin in winter, as a longer coat will provide more warmth. If your dog is long-haired, simply trim him to minimize the clinging ice balls, salt crystals and de-icing chemicals that can dry his skin, and don’t neglect the hair between his toes. If your dog is short-haired, consider getting him a coat or sweater with a high collar or turtleneck with coverage from the base of the tail to the belly. For many dogs, this is regulation winter wear.

* Bring a towel on long walks to clean off stinging, irritated paws. After each walk, wash and dry your pet’s feet and stomach to remove ice, salt and chemicals—and check for cracks in paw pads or redness between the toes.

* Bathe your pets as little as possible during cold spells. Washing too often can remove essential oils and increase the chance of developing dry, flaky skin. If your pooch must be bathed, ask your vet to recommend a moisturizing shampoo and/or rinse.

* Massaging petroleum jelly or other paw protectants into paw pads before going outside can help protect from salt and chemical agents. Booties provide even more coverage and can also prevent sand and salt from getting lodged between bare toes and causing irritation. Use pet-friendly ice melts whenever possible.

* Like coolant, antifreeze is a lethal poison for dogs and cats. Be sure to thoroughly clean up any spills from your vehicle, and consider using products that contain propylene glycol rather than ethylene glycol.

* Pets burn extra energy by trying to stay warm in wintertime. Feeding your pet a little bit more during the cold weather months can provide much-needed calories, and making sure she has plenty of water to drink will help keep her well-hydrated and her skin less dry.

* Make sure your companion animal has a warm place to sleep, off the floor and away from all drafts. A cozy dog or cat bed with a warm blanket or pillow is perfect.

* Remember, if it’s too cold for you, it’s probably too cold for your pet, so keep your animals inside. If left outdoors, pets can freeze, become disoriented, lost, stolen, injured or killed. In addition, don’t leave pets alone in a car during cold weather, as cars can act as refrigerators that hold in the cold and cause animals to freeze to death.

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Critter News:

February Is Dental Procedure Month!

Save 15% on All Dental Procedures Through February 29.

We just want to show that we appreciate our clients very much.

Cascade Veterinary Clinic
Dr. Keith Ruble, DVM
935 S. Hwy 55 Cascade 382-4590
Large & Small Animal Medicine & Surgery

source: The Star-News
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MCPAWS to hold free cat microchipping clinic Feb. 20

The Star-News Feb 13, 2020

MCPAWS will host a free cat microchip clinic on Thursday, Feb. 20, from 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. at the MCPAWS Regional Animal Shelter.

In 2019, MCPAWS saw an increase of the number of stray cats successfully returned to their humans due in part to the increased effort to microchip owned cats.

“Most stray cats are never reunited with their owners,” development director Kattie Kingsley said in a recent press release. “MCPAWS is working to address this issue by offering free cat microchips. All you have to do is bring your cat in a carrier to MCPAWS.”

Microchipped cats are reunited with their owners 38.5% of the time, compared to just 1.8% for those without chips.

A microchip is a small, electronic chip about the size of a grain of rice that is injected under the skin of an animal. No surgery or anesthesia is required.

The microchip contains a number that is linked to the owner’s information and can be read when a scanner is passed over the area.

Call 208-634-3647 for more information or to schedule a time outside the clinic hours to have a cat microchipped free of charge.

MCPAWS, which is located at 831 S. Third St., received a Maddie’s Fund grant to fund the microchip clinic.

source: The Star-News
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Pet Talk – Dogs are always swallowing foreign objects!

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt Feb 14, 2020

A gastric foreign body is any item that is present in the stomach and not passing the small intestine or is vomited. Some gastric foreign bodies can cause severe vomiting or intestinal obstruction, and others, such as coins or metal toys, can poison the animal. Gastric foreign bodies occur when something is swallowed but cannot leave the stomach. They may include large pieces of bone, an item that the animal was playing with, rocks, socks, gloves and underwear. Some animals eat unusual items if they have nausea, and some eat unusual items as part of a behavioral problem. This consumption of unusual items is called PICA.

The most common clinical sign of a gastric foreign body is vomiting. Most animals also lose their appetite. If the foreign body is made of zinc, the animal may develop anemia. If it is made of a heavy metal such as lead, then poisoning may occur.

If the gastric foreign body is suspected, abdominal X-rays are commonly recommended.

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Council, Boise mushers dominate in 100-mile Idaho Sled Dog Challenge

by CBS2 News Staff Tuesday, February 11th 2020


Courtesy Photographer Melissa Shelby and the Idaho Sled Dog Challenge

Boise, Idaho (CBS2) — Idaho mushers took first and third place in the 100-mile Idaho Sled Dog Challenge.

Winner Laurie Warren from Council finished the race Jan. 31 after 20 hours and 55 minutes on the trail.

Seppa Francis, a 15-year-old from Kuna, finished the junior race, a 37-mile event in which she was the only contender, with help from Kevin Daugherty, a musher from McCall vying in the 100-mile race.

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Community leaders discuss wildlife education

F&G initiative is in early planning phase

Emily Jone Feb 14, 2020 IME


Express photo by Roland Lane, The Wood River Valley has long had a problem with bears eating from residents’ trash cans, such as this female black bear and her cubs near Board Ranch, west of Ketchum, about five years ago.

A diverse group of Wood River Valley nonprofit leaders, city representatives and Forest Service and BLM employees met on Feb. 6 to discuss a grassroots effort to mitigate human-wildlife conflict.

The purpose of the well-attended “wildlife-friendly community” meeting, spearheaded by the Idaho Department of Fish and Game, was to brainstorm how each jurisdiction could renew its commitment to wildlife preservation and education.

“With all the incidents that have occurred recently, from the killing of pets to the mountain lion killed [on Jan. 30], we can take real steps to reduce our conflicts with wildlife—animals never win in those situations,” said Hailey City Council President Kaz Thea, who attended the meeting, during a council meeting Monday. “We can increase our educational efforts.”

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Winter Wildlife Photos

photo gallery by Roland Lane IME

gallery link:
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Idaho, other western states to study big game range land

The grant was announced by the U.S. Department of the Interior on Friday.

Associated Press February 14, 2020

Boise, Idaho — Idaho has been awarded a grant to study how elk herds move through a northern Idaho migration corridor also used by grizzly bears and wolverines.

The grant was announced by the U.S. Department of the Interior on Friday.

It’s part of $3.2 million in funding for big game range land studies in 11 western states.

Idaho’s work will involve tagging 40 elk in the McArthur Lake area and using 119 trail cameras to map their movements.

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Idaho visitors could see big hike in hunting, fishing fees

Most notably, the costs for elk and deer hunting are going up dramatically, which are the two most profitable areas for Idaho Fish and Game.

Keith Ridler (AP) February 11, 2020

Boise, Idaho — Legislation significantly increasing what it will cost nonresidents to hunt deer and elk in Idaho headed to the full Senate on Monday.

The Senate Resources and Environment Committee approved the measure that the Idaho Department of Fish and Game says resident hunters asked for so there will be less overcrowding in the field.

“Hunt satisfaction reported by many resident hunters has declined to the point where the (Idaho Fish and Game) Commission has made finding relief for this problem one of their highest priorities,” Paul Kline, a deputy director at the Department of Fish and Game, told lawmakers.

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Group of elk hit by train in southeastern Idaho

Idaho Fish and Game say the elk were hit in rural Bear Lake County early Sunday morning.

Associated Press February 11, 2020

Dingle, Idaho — Idaho Fish and Game officials say a small group of elk were hit by a train in rural Bear Lake County over the weekend.

Conservation officers said 11 elk were killed in the collision near Dingle early Sunday morning. Two others were injured and had to be dispatched by wildlife managers. The salvageable meat was donated to members of the community, Fish and Wildlife officials said.

Such incidents are uncommon in southeastern Idaho, though this is the second incident in the area in a little over a year. In January 2019, about 30 elk were killed by a train traveling between Montpelier and Soda Springs.

Earlier this month, about 45 pronghorn were killed and another 19 were injured and had to be put down by wildlife managers in a train collision north of Hamer in eastern Idaho.

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Nampa deploys decoys to scare off crows

Feb 12, 2020 KIVI

Nampa, Idaho — For several years now, the City of Nampa has been having problems with an influx of crows. Businesses and residents have complained about the mess left behind from the birds.

For the past two months, the city has been using plastic crow decoys, placing them in trees, to scare the crows away. According to city officials, it’s been working so far.

“The area downtown has not seen the impact that it had a couple of years ago,” said Amy Bowman, communications manager for the City of Nampa. “And so really, it’s been a great success.”

In the past, the city has tried scaring the crows away with shiny objects and even used infrared lasers. So far, the decoys seem to be working the best. There is no word on how long they will stay in place.

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Fish & Game News:

Idaho Department of Fish and Game hosting public meetings on Chinook salmon seasons

Feb 12, 2020 KIVI


Copyright 2018 Scripps Media, Inc.

Boise, Idaho — This month, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game is asking for the public’s input on the upcoming Chinook salmon seasons.

During these meetings, pizza and refreshments will be provided, and biologists will discuss what we learned from last year’s Chinook Salmon season, what this year’s salmon return is projected to look like, and strategies we could use to manage this year’s Chinook run. As always, input from anglers is important to help ensure the Chinook Salmon run is managed in a manner that is most satisfying to all who participate in this amazing fishery.

In addition to this, biologists will also give presentations on topics we think anglers may be interested in, such as: “What have we been doing to control sea-lions?”, and “Where are all our fish dying?”, and “What is our ocean looking like?”. At the meetings in Nampa and Cascade, there will also be a special presentation on ‘Perch Management at Lake Cascade’.

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Remember Idaho’s nongame wildlife when completing your taxes

By Mike Demick, Staff Biologist
Friday, February 14, 2020

Anyone working on this year’s tax forms might consider checking the box to donate to Idaho’s wildlife.

Taxpayers may check the square on their Idaho tax forms to donate any amount of their refund to the Nongame Wildlife Conservation Fund administered by Idaho Fish and Game.

This fund is used to pay for important work on species that are not hunted, fished or trapped – the “nongame” species of wildlife and plants that make up the vast majority of Idaho’s biological diversity. Other Fish and Game programs aimed at game animals and fish are funded through the sale of licenses and tags to hunters and anglers.

No general taxes go to either game or nongame programs.

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More F&G News Releases

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Crazy Critter Stuff:

Zoo animals enjoy treats on Valentine’s Day

ABC News

Gorillas enjoyed hearts made of biscuit and gelatin, while tortoises ate heart-shaped watermelon, as an Illinois zoo treated their animals to snacks to celebrate Valentine’s Day.

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2 bobcats try to flirt, end up yelling at each other instead

Colorado bobcats in love?

Allison Sylte February 14, 2020 KTVB

Boulder County, Colo. — This Valentine’s Day, humans across the world will attempt to flirt during a Hallmark holiday that honors the beauty of love.

Of course, there are some humans that aren’t so good at flirting, because honestly, it’s hard.

With that being said, be thankful that your flirting (likely) doesn’t sound anything like these two bobcats.

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Seasonal Humor:

V-DayMiner-a
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Bird of the week: Eastern Blue Jay

Eastern Blue Jay

(uncommon, rare visitor)

20191015eastern-blue-jay1
link: to more photos
more: Photos by Local Color Photography

Blue Jay
Cyanocitta cristata
Size and Shape: Large crested songbird with broad, rounded tail. Blue Jays are smaller than crows, larger than robins. About the same size as a Western Scrub-Jay
Both Sexes
Length: 9.8-11.8 in (25-30 cm)
Weight: 2.5-3.5 oz (70-100 g)
Wingspan: 13.4-16.9 in (34-43 cm)
Color Pattern: White or light gray underneath, various shades of blue, black, and white above.
Blue Jays make a large variety of calls that carry long distances. Most calls produced while the jay is perched within a tree. Usually flies across open areas silently, especially during migration. Stuffs food items in throat pouch to cache elsewhere; when eating, holds a seed or nut in feet and pecks it open.
Learn more about this bird: The Cornell Lab of Ornithology
Link to Birds Page
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Idaho History Feb 16, 2020

The Prospector and Thunder Mountain News April 29, 1905

courtesy Sandy McRae and Jim Collord

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(link to larger size image of banner)

The Prospector and Thunder Mountain News

Roosevelt, Idaho April 29, 1905 Volume 1 Number 20

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Hunting and Fishing Grounds of Thunder Mountain.

Many inquiries have been received concerning the Thunder Mountain country as an outing ground and in answer to these many questions we publish a brief description of the country from a sportsman’s standpoint. Is safe to say that no other section in the United States presents a more pleasing prospect for the hunter and the angler than does this section of Central Idaho within a radius of twenty-fire or thirty miles from Roosevelt, the metropolis of the district.

In the very heart of the world-famed Bitter Root Range nestles the unique town of Roosevelt with the canyon walls fairly overhanging its streets.

This little city, a mining camp in the midst of one of the world’s richest mineral deposits, is also a center of one of the finest hunting and fishing grounds to be found in any land.

Marble creek, a brook six miles east of town, empties its waters into streams that flow to the sea. The creek is literally full of brook trout from six to ten inches in length.

Salmon trout are also very plentiful; this is a beautiful fish, and one of the best ever eaten, and varies in size from 5 to 22 pounds. Then there is the Red-side trout, weighing a pound to a pound and a half — from eleven to fourteen inches in length. All of these are fresh water fish and in winter go down the creek through the Middle Fork to the Salmon, perhaps even to the Snake river.

The last of July the Steelhead Salmon appears, having completed its long journey from the sea. This is a most remarkable salt-water fish. After maturing in the Pacific Ocean till three years of age, it starts on its inland passage to spawn.

Leaving the salt water and entering the Columbia it seems to have but one instinct: to go up stream to the very limit of depth. It passes through the Columbia to the Snake river, on through the Salmon to the Middle Fork and up Marble creek even to Belleco where the waters are so shallow that the fish’s back often protrudes from the water in its struggles to overcome the inborn instinct, sometime pitiful of reaching the source of the crystal mountain stream which seems to give life and vigor for the close of its thousand mile journey. When this fish reaches the mountain streams it is in fine condition — the meat is hard and delicious. But here the spawning is begun and the fish begin to fight. The males have continued and protracted fights, and shortly after their arrival begin to be wounded in these contests which may be seen from the bank of the stream — the water is thrown into foam in these struggles and the individual fish are rendered unfit to eat; for these reasons the Steelhead is good only upon his arrival.

Few of the Steelheads ever get back to the sea. The spawn is deposited and the little myriads of their young go down the tortuous channel to the sea and after maturing the same process of nature is repeated.

All tributaries of the Middle Fork receive this school as it comes from the lower rivers — the Salmon and Snake. The Monumental creek is now debarred on account of the waters being roiled by the operations of the Dewey mill. Some fish do come up this creek but the majority turn back and go … (page torn) … streams which remain … clear.

Big creek and other streams flowing into the Middle Fork get the full benefit and in return send back their myriads of young Salmon to the sea.

We have mentioned the fish, but for the hunter there is still greater attraction. Moose, Elk, deer, mountain sheep, mountain goats and small game abound.

No moose can be killed — they are protected by law and no true sportsman will kill this “Monarch of the Glen” while its species is being propagated. The legislature this winter placed a time limit of five years in order that the moose be given time to multiply.

Some of the largest elk heards [sic] in the world are within five miles of Roosevelt. This beautiful animal, which is the most perfect of all the horned species, is to be found within a days journey of town.

Deer are very plentiful. This graceful little denizen of the forest is found on every hand. When packers go out in the morning to get the stock, it is not an uncommon occurrence to see the deer among the horses. Thousands of deer are in these mountain resorts, and roam at will over vast ranges of the finest natural deer park in the world.

Mountain sheep are getting scarce. In summer they are found on the highest and roughest crags in this rugged country. Occasionally they are brought in and heads, with horns 13 to 16 inches in diameter, are gathered every year.

Wild goats, too, are hard to get; they live in the very highest altitudes of any animal in the Northwest. For a time in spring they come down to get fresh green grass after they have been living on the (?) of the peaks, but as the grass springs up on the mountain side they climb higher and can be found only on the very tops of high ranges.

The snowshoe rabbit, so called, is the best small game in the county. The thickets are full of them and they are delicious eating.

The above mentioned constitutes all the game animals. Grouse innumerable (?) found in all the woods as there are no sheep herds here to ruin their nests. Coyotes, which generally follow sheep ranges, are scarce in this country though not unknown — stray bands are sometimes heard by the prospector in the hills.

Foxes are not uncommon but most difficult to get. The rugged nature of the country gives them ample hiding, and the hunter seldom gathers one.

Black bears and brown bears are very plentiful. They are found sometimes within a few … (page torn) … to get. J. P. Bradner, of St. Paul, shot two last summer with a six shooter. R. C. Schofield killed a very fine grizzley [sic], a year ago about thirty miles from here. The bear weighed not less than 800 pounds.

The mountain lion, the worst curse of all game destroying animals, is very plentiful. A contemptible, sneaking beast, it destroys vast numbers of deer and rabbits. The State legislature last winter established a bounty of $15.00 on each lion killed and this will lead to their destruction. For mounting or for rugs the mountain lion or cougar is a splendid specimen. They are often 12 or 14 feet from tip to tip and the skin makes a fine souvenir of the hunter’s skill. They very seldom attack man but will kill almost any wild animal of the forest.

In the issue of THE NEWS of April 15 we published a digest of the new game law of Idaho. All true sportsmen are welcome here and they will find royal sport. And by “sportsman” we mean the men who will fish and hunt according to law. That includes every man who is visiting the county; it includes every prospector in the hills. But it absolutely excludes the man who will ruthlessly slaughter the beautiful wild game of our forests. Nothing more like that will be tolerated. Public sentiment can always en-bone law and every man in Roosevelt and every miner and prospector in the hills will stand together in this matter and THE NEWS will give its assistance in bringing to justice any such vandal of the forest.
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John U. Cassel Returns From the Middle Fork.

John U. Cassell arrived the 24th from the Middle Fork where he has been spending a most enjoyable vacation. Every body soon knew Jack was in town for he is no drone, and his genial, hustling go-ahead-and-do-some-thing-way has made him one of the best known and best liked mining men in the whole Thunder Mountain country. He returns in a few days to the Greyhound Mountain district where he owns considerable property.

He speaks in most glowing terms of the Middle Fork as an outing ground; he visited at the McGiveney brothers ranch which he says is a delightful spot with its hot strings and beautiful views.

Concerning the mining outlook of the Wilson creek, the Loon creek, and the Greyhound Mountain sections, Mr. Cassell says the … (page torn) … Loon creek district where the Lost Packer mine is showing marvelous results. In the deepest workings the rock is giving returns of from $80 to $150 gold, 100 oz. silver and 30 per cent. copper.

The company has been to great expense completing the wagon road in preparation for the arrival of the smelter which is being constructed by the Colorado Fuel & Iron Company and according to the contract, will be “blown in” on or before August 15.

This is a Pyritic smelter constructed to reduce the ore to a “matte” — five tons into one.

In the sixties some $10,000,000 of placer gold was taken from Loon creek and from a strip hardly four miles in length and it still has the reputation of having produced the coarsest gold of any placer in the world.

Near the head of the creek is a large bar — containing six or seven hundred acres with the bed rock very deep — fully thirty feet — and on this ground is to be built an extensive hydraulic plant. Great results may be expected from this work.

A large amount of Denver and Salt Lake capital is invested in the Loon creek section and the future of the camp is very bright.

In the Greyhound Mountain country, a thirty or forty ton smelter will be put in this year by the Greyhound Mining & Milling Company, of which ex-governor McConnell is at the head. This same company owns the famous Greyhound and Rufus properties on which enormous ore bodies have been opened up. This is a silver-lead district and has all the “earmarks” of becoming a second Coeur d’Alenes. The development of this section has been retarded on account of the very poor transportation facilities but the O. R. & N. people have bonded the Bull Dog property and this seems to be an additional precursor of a railroad.

Mr. Cassell says there is great activity in the Wilson creak district also. It is a well known fact that this section carries very high values. The rock is all free milling. On the Wyatt & Walker claims considerable work has been done which has developed an ore chute 250 feet in length with an average width of 18 inches yielding values in an arastra of $40 per ton. Geo. W. Bruce and Angus Cameron also have a fine showing on their property.

This section of the Thunder Mounder [sic] country will receive a large amount of attention this … (page torn) … count of the fine surface showing and the remarkably high grade character of the ore.
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The Beaver Dam.

It is not generally known that one of the finest and most architectural beaver dams in the whole Thunder Mountain country is within a mile and a half of town. Lava creek flows into the Monumental at a right angle and the industrious beaver has built his dam across the mouth of Lava, swinging it to the right and continuing his masterpiece of nature’s civil engineering across Monumental. Days and weeks and months have been consumed in this untiring process of building, and the fine “mill pond” or reservoir would seem to justify this incessant labor prompted by the instincts of nature.
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At the Monte Christo.

The Monte Christo people are in high spirits. In their main tunnel, now driven 375 feet, they have struck a fine body of ore; this is the third ledge they have cut in driving this tunnel and the work is now being pushed for the main lode which should be reached within the next few days.

Pat McEwen arrived Wednesday from the mine and says that the quartz in each of the three lodes now located is fine looking rock. From the last ore found a raise is to be made to the surface.
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We mentioned last week that Dr. Jones had bought out his former partner Hunter E. Crane. See Doe’s ad in this issue.
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The Lewis & Clark Exposition.

Some steps should be taken toward getting a good mineral exhibit from Thunder Mountain for the Lewis & Clark Fair to be held at Portland this summer. This section is now well known all over the country and a good collection from here would be of much interest to visitors to the fair, moreover the absence of any representative ore would be a source of adverse comment and much disappointment.
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As mentioned on another page, we have frequent inquiries from people on the outside concerning the hunting and fishing grounds here. The postmaster also receives many letters of this nature, and so for the benefit of all, we have endeavored to give authentic information concerning the fish and game of this locality. Roosevelt and the surrounding country is easily accessible from outside points. The trip can be made from Boise in four days over the newly completed wagon road and … (page torn) … through and the drive is a most enjoyable one. Good roadhouse accommodations may be found each evening and there will be no shortage of feed for animals. We have endeavored to give a good list of roadhouses which may be found in the advertising columns with distances shown, and tourists will find no privation or difficulty attached to a journey into this sylvan and virgin wild, where game and fish abound and where the bluest skies and clearest mountain streams give welcome to the dusty traveler. A growing sentiment exists to preserve the game. The State law is such that any true sportsman may gather his fish and game legally and yet see the county grow richer each year in the natural increase of the finest wild game to be found in the world.
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In as much as the 4th of July, the day of all days for the good American citizen is coming, now is the time to start the ball a rolling in order that the people of the the Thunder Mountain Mining District may observe this great occasion in a fitting and substantial manner. Those who were present at our last celebration went away with that glad feeling that while there were only a few of us here, that this great day was justly commemorated and all were unanimous in the verdict that the celebration, was a grand success. Another year has almost passed around and during that time the future great gold camp has gained in population so in order to keep pace with all up-to-date camps we should by all means give a larger and, if possible, better celebration this year. By a little hustling a subscription list of $500 could be easily procured and hung up for prizes to be contested for by the people of the district and again, as in most all other mining camps, we should extend the celebration for two days. Well, here is to the 4th of July, 1905, and let us all join in and make it a celebration that will have but few equals and no superior.
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For much of the information contained in the front page article — the “Hunting and Fishing Grounds of Thunder Mountain,” we are indebted to Chas. L. Myers, one of the pioneers of this district and a very successful hunter and fisherman.
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What God Couldn’t Do.

In a country school district in the State of Maine, the teacher had a notoriously large mouth. At the fireside one evening where this man boarded, sat an old man and his little grandson. After gazing thoughtfully into the fire for sometime, the boy looked into the old man’s face and said “Grandpa, is there anything God can’t do?” “No, Johnnie,” was the answer. Another period of silence followed. “Grandpa,” said the boy again, “I know something God can’t do.” “Why Johnnie!” exclaimed the grand father, “what is there God can’t do?” “Well,” answered Johnnie, “He couldn’t make teacher’s mouth any bigger unless he set back his ears.”
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Subscribe for THE THUNDER MOUNTAIN NEWS.
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Astralia’s [sic] Largest Dam.

The dam recently finished at Barossa, near Gawler, in southern Australia, is entirely of concrete and the largest of the kind that exists in Australia, says the Scientific American.

The site of the dam was selected at a point at which one of the banks presented a nearly perpendicular cliff 98 feet high, and at which the opposite bank, of an easy slope formed a sort of spur that projected into the bed of the river.

The dam is constructed entirely of concrete without any facing of dressed stone or rubber. Nevertheless, blocks of undressed gneiss were placed in the concrete, with intervals between them of at least six inches.

At about 15 feet from the top of the dam, such blocks ceased to be employed because of the slight thickness of the dam at this part, and rows of curved rails, connected by fish plates were imbedded [sic] in the concrete. A total weight of 40 tons of rails was worked into the dam in this manner. The dam is of the curved type, presenting its convex face to the water. The upstream facing is vertical and the downstream inclined. The height is 95 feet above the old level of the river.

The thickness is but 36 feet at the base of the foundation in the thickest part and 4.5 at the top. It was possible to make the dam of such slight thickness owing to the curved form that was given it in the plan and which gives to the structure all the resisting qualities of the arch.

During the time of frosts the masonry was covered with straw matting and fire was kindled that produced much smoke at the top of the masonry, doubtless to prevent the loss of heat by radiation, in this way the newly-laid concrete was very efficiently protected against the cold.

The concrete employed in the work was always mixed with the greatest care and in small quantities at a time. The mixture was made by weight and automatically. Before the composition of the concrete for one part or another of the. dam was decided upon, experiments were always made in order to make sure of the impermeability of the material to the pressure that it had to support.
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Not a Fall.

“Sorry to see you get such a fall,” said the pedestrian to a man who had just had a tumble from the rear platform of a street car.

“Oh, I didn’t get no fall,” was the cheerful reply.

“But you — you tumbled off.”

“Not at all. I got into an argument with the conductor and he threw me off.”

“I see. And you take it good-naturedly.”

“Got to, old fellow. That’s the sixth car I’ve been thrown off today because I wouldn’t pay fare, and you see I’m getting used to it.”

— Chicago News.
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W. H. Courtney sold his house on Main St. Wednesday and will buy or build for his restaurant.
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Billions of Shoe Lace Eyes Are Used.

“Some of the apparently most trivial things in the world are the most necessary things and fortunes are made in manufacturing them.” said Ralph L. Jenkins.

Take the lace eyes of shoes, for instance. The average person never gives them a thought, but they are indispensable to our foot-wear, and there are factories that devote themselves exclusively to making them. Did you ever stop to think how many of those little things are used every year?

On the basis of the population of the United States being 80,000,000, this country uses more than 3,000,000,000 of lace eyes and hooks a year. Every man, woman and child will wear out on an average two pairs of shoes in twelve months. The majority of people have two feet and there are twenty eyes and hooks in each shoe. Use your arithmetic and see what the total is. It foots up to 2,000,000 more than 3,000,000,000.

— Milwaukee Sentinel.
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A. D. Almond this week lost a valuable Masonic pin. As he had worn it over twenty years, he regarded it as a souvenir. Mr. Almond would be much pleased if any one finding it would return it to him or leave it at the NEWS office.
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LOCALS

See the ad of the Roosevelt Laundry.

Orin Goodrich and O. W. Laing went to Copper Camp Friday morning.

O. T. Lingo, the local freighter, is delivering timbers and lagging at the Dewey.

D. S. McInerney has been quite sick. He is much better as we go to press.

Sherman S. Whitaker has left his position at the Standard for a while in order to be able to attend to his own mining interests.

Travelers arriving are made at home at Geo. D. Smith’s hotel. The table is first-class and every courtesy is extended to patrons.

J. H. Hanson has gone to the Big creek district for another drove of cattle. He will arrive about the first of the month.

The boy or girl that is mindful of others and refuses to take advantage or speak evil of anyone has name written on flowers that bloom in human hearts. — Ex.

McAndrews & Reuter, this week, received a shipment of hats and other gent’s furnishing goods. They also received for their grocery department some fine butter.

Phil Guidicy left town Thursday at 3 a. m. for the outside. He will take his train from the range and load a general freight from Boise for this town. He will arrive as soon as horses can be brought over the summits.

E. E. Myers received a letter from B. F. Francis this week stating that he should leave Boise about the first of May if the roads permitted. Mr. Francis expects to carry a larger stock of general merchandise than has ever been brought into this town in any previous year.

A letter was received from Nash Wayland on the outside addressed to his father, L. A. Wayland, saying he should start for Roosevelt on the 1st of May with his train. He will thus arrive here with some forty horses and mules loaded with general merchandise stock about the 20th of May.

The name of the town in which we live is often mispronounced even by those living here. The town was named for the present executive head of the nation and on the authority of one of the president’s kinsmen the name, which means “rose land” or “rose field,” is pronounced Rose-velt. Let’s pronounce it right.
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Season Approaching.

One of those little men who always like to talk tapped the big man on the shoulder.

“It’s a shame,” he began “how little a man’s life is worth in Russia.”

“Tain’t worth so much over here if you are in my business,” said the big man.

“You don’t mean it?”

“Yes, sir. I’m liable to be chased by a gang far more blood-thirsty than the Cossacks of the Nevsky prospect.”

“W-who are you?”

“Oh. I’m a baseball umpire.”

—Chicago News.
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Notice For Publication

Survey No. 1994 A-B

U. S. LAND OFFICE,
Hailey, Idaho, April 13, 1905.

Notice is hereby given. that in pursuance of the Act of Congress approved May 10, 1872, the Thunder Mountain Gold and Silver Mining and Milling Company, whose postoffice is Nampa, Idaho, has made application for a patent for 1475 linear feet of the Massenet lode, bearing gold and silver. The same being 143 ft. south-westerly and 1332 ft. northeasterly from discovery shaft. Together with surface ground 567.67 feet in width. Also for 809.45 linear feet of the Dewey Mill site, with surface ground 275 feet in width situate in Thunder Mountain Mining District, Idaho County. State of Idaho. and described by the official plat and by the field notes on file in the office of the Register of Hailey District. Idaho, as follows, viz: Var 21 degrees 30 minutes E.

Massenet lode. Beginning at corner No, 1 whence U. S. L. M. No. 2 Thunder Mountain District, bears N. 45 degrees 20 minutes W. 154.94 feet. Thence N. 41 degrees 27 minutes E. 1478 feet to corner No 2. Thence N. 48 degrees 33 minutes W. 567.67 feet to corner No. 3, Thence S. 41 degrees 27 minutes W. 1475 feet to corner No. 4. Thence S. 48 degrees 33 minutes E. 567.67 feet to corner No. 1, the place of beginning, containing 19.222 acres, Dewey Mill Site. Beginning at corner No. 1 identical with corner No. 1 Massenet lode, whence U. S. L. M. No. 2 Thunder Mountain Mining District bears N. 45 degrees 20 minutes W. 154.91 feet. Thence N. 41 degrees 27 minutes E. 275 feet to corner No. 2. Thence S. 36 degrees 38 minutes E. 809.45 feet to corner No. 3. Thence S. 41 degrees 27 minutes W. 275 feet to corner No. 4. Thence N. 36 degrees 38 minutes W. 809.45 feet to corner No. 1. the place of beginning, containing 5 acres, making a total of 21.222 acres for the lode and mill site, and forming a portion of the unsurveyed lands of the United States, in the said Thunder Mountain Mining District, Idaho County, State of Idaho. Names of the adjoining claims. if any, are unknown. The notice of amended location of the Massenet lode is recorded in volume 9, page 285, and the location notice of the Dewey Mill Site in volume 9, page 261 in the office of the Deputy County Recorder, at Roosevelt. Idaho.

Any and all persons claiming adversely the mining ground, vein, lode, premises or any portion thereof so described, surveyed, platted and applied for, are hereby notified that unless their adverse claims are duly filed as according to law and the regulations thereunder, within the time prescribed by law, with the Register of the United States Land Office at Halley, Idaho, they will be barred by virtue of the provisions of the United States Statutes in such cases made and provided.

N J SHARP, Register.
First publication April 29, 1905.
Last publication July 29, 1905.
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Notice For Publication

Dewey Group of Mining Claims
Survey No. 1988.

UNITED STATES LAND OFFICE.
Hailey, Idaho, April 13, 1905.

Notice is hereby given, that in pursuance of the Act of Congress approved May 10, 1872, Thunder Mountain Gold and Silver Mining and Milling Company. whose postoffice is Nampa, Idaho. has made an application for a patent for 436.49 linear feet on the Coal Pit Fraction lode, bearing gold and silver, the same being 146.49 feet northwesterly and 290 feet southeasterly from discovery shaft.

669.22 linear feet on the Goldie lode, bearing gold and silver. the same being 237.22 feet northwesterly, and 432 feet southeasterly from discovery cut.

1468.38-linear feet on the Golden Reef lode, bearing gold and silver, the same being 638.78 feet northwesterly, and 790 feet southeasterly from discovery cut.

1494.83 linear feet on the Gravel Point lode, bearing gold and silver, the same being 729.83 feet northwesterly, and 765 feet southeasterly from discovery cut.

1281.72 linear feet on the Poormans Treasure lode, bearing gold and silver, the same being 656.72 feet northwesterly, and 625 feet southeasterly from discovery cut.

1500 linear feet on the Golden Treasure lode; bearing gold and silver, the same being 530 feet northwesterly and 970 feet southeasterly from discovery cut.

1500 linear feet on the Black Cat lode, bearing gold and silver, the same being 1175 feet northwesterly and 325 feet southeasterly from discovery cut.

608.06 linear feet on the Fraction lode, bearing gold and silver, the same being 365 feet northwesterly and 243.06 feet southeasterly from discovery shaft.

1127.63 linear feet on the Equinox lode, bearing gold and silver, the same being 350 feet northwesterly and 777.63 feet southeasterly front discovery cut.

1039.74 linear feet on the Gold Bug lode, bearing gold and silver, the same being 670 feet northwesterly and 369.74 feet southeasterly from discovery cut.

1493.60 linear feet on the Roosevelt lode, bearing gold and silver, the same being 100 feet northwesterly and 1393.60 feet southeasterly from discovery shaft.

428.75 linear feet on the Parker lode, bearing gold and silver, the same being 100 feet northeasterly and 328.75 feet southwesterly from discovery cut thereon.

With surface ground 564 feet in width on the Coal Pit Fraction, 559 feet in width on the Goldie, 591.92 feet in width on the Golden Reef, 572.20 feet in width on the Gravel Point, 551.92 feet in width on the Poormans Treasure, 600 feet in width on the Golden Treasure, 219.10 feet in width on the Black Cat, 580.39 feet in width on the Fraction, 473.18 feet in width on the Roosevelt, 586.37 feet in width on the Equinox, 491.63 feet in width on the Gold Bug and 600 feet in width on the Parker, situated in the Thunder Mountain Mining District, County of Idaho, State of Idaho and described by the official plat, and by the field notes on file in the U. S. Land office at Hailey, Idaho and more particularly described as follows, viz: Var. 21 degrees 30 minutes E.

Coal Pit Fraction lode. Beginning at corner No. 1 whence U. S. L. M. No. 2 Thunder Mountain Mining District, bears N. 65 degrees 11 minutes W. 6315.5 feet. Thence S. 31 degrees 31 minutes W. 574.72 feet to corner No. 2. Thence S. 47 degrees 24 minutes E. 436.49 feet to corner No. 3. Thence N. 31 degrees 31 minutes E. 574.72 feet to corner No. 4. Thence N. 47 degrees 21 minutes W. 436.49 feet to corner No. 1. the place of beginning Containing 5.632 acres.

Goldie lode. Beginning at corner No, 1 whence U. S L. M. No. 2 Thunder Mountain Mining District, bears N. 63 degrees 43 minutes 35 seconds W. 6653.80 ft. Cor. No. 4 Coal Pit Fraction lode bears S. 88 degrees 58 minutes E. 87.8 feet. Thence S. 42 degrees 48 minutes 38 seconds E. 679.48 feet to corner No, 2. Thence N. 36 degrees 46 minutes E. 574.59 feet to corner No. 3. Thence N. 57 degrees 36 minutes W. 670.20 feet to corner No. 4. Thence S. 36 degrees 46 minutes W. 400.63 feet to corner No. 1, the place of beginning. Containing 7.375 acres.

Golden Reef lode. Beginning at corner No. 1, whence U. S. L. M. No. 2 Thunder Mountain Mining District, bears N 64 degrees 02 minutes 56 seconds W. 9732.15 feet. Identical with corner. No 4 Coal Pit Fraction lode. Thence S. 31 degrees 31 minutes W. 574.72 feet to corner No. 2. Thence S. 35 degrees 25 minutes 38 seconds E. 628.78 feet to corner No 3. Thence S. 60 degrees 28 minutes E. 846.49 feet to corner No. 4. Thence N. 31 degrees 31 minutes E. 592.87 feet to corner No. 5. Thence N. 60, degrees 28 minutes W. 846.49 feet to corner No. 6. Thence N. 36 degrees 58 minutes W. 621.89 feet to corner No. 1, the place of beginning. Containing 18.821 acres.

Gravel Point lode. Beginning at earner No. 1. Identical with corner No. 2 Goldie lode and corner No 6 Golden Reef lode. Whence U. S. L. M. No. 2 Thunder Mountain Mining District, bears N. 61 degrees 49 minutes 25 seconds W. 7291.64 feet. Thence S. 58 degrees 28 minutes E. 1494.83 feet to corner No. 2. Thence N. 36 degrees 46 minutes E. 574.59 feet to corner No. 3. Thence N. 58 degrees 28 minutes W. 1491.83 feet to center No 4. Thence S. 36 degrees 46 minutes W. 574.59 feet to corner No. 1. the place of beginning. Containing 19.349 acres.

Poormans Treasure lode. Beginning at corner No 1 Identical with corner No. 5 Golden Reef lode, whence U. S. L. M. No. 2 Thunder Mountain Mining District, bears N. 61 degrees 40 minutes 56 seconds W. 8137.94 ft. Cor. No. 2 Gravel Point lode bears S. 55 degrees 51 minutes 41 seconds E 619.52 feet Thence S. 31 degrees 31 minutes W. 592.87 feet to corner No. 2. Thence S. 61 degrees 02 minutes E. 1281.72 feet to corner No. 3. Thence N. 31 degrees 31 minutes E. 592.87 feet to corner No. 4. Thence N. 64 degrees 02 minutes W. 1281.72 feet to corner No. 1, the place of beginning. Containing 16.443 acres.

Golden Treasure lode. Beginning at corner No 1 whence U. S. L. M. No. 2 Thunder Mountain Mining District bears N. 57 degrees 17 minutes 09 seconds W. 7566.71 feet. Thence S. 21 degrees 18 minutes W. 594.77 feet to corner N. 2. Thence S. 62 degrees 21 minutes 40 seconds E. 1500 feet to corner No. 3. Thence N. 21 degrees 18 minutes E. 603.70 feet to corner No. 4. Thence N. 64 degrees 02 minutes W. 939.17 feet to corner No. 5. Identical with corner No. 4 Golden Reef lode, and corner No. 2 Poormans Treasure lode. Thence N. 60 degrees 28 minutes W. 560.32 feet to corner No. 1. the place of beginning. Containing 20.132 acres.

Black Cat lode. Beginning at corner No. 1, whence U. S. L. M. No. 2 Thunder Mountain Mining District bears N. 51 degrees 11 minutes 06 seconds W, 7633.86 feet. Thence N. 55 degrees 03 minutes E. 246.82 feet to corner No. 2. Identical with corner No. 2 Golden Treasure lode. Thence S. 62 degrees 21 minutes 40 seconds E. 1500 feet to corner No. 3. Thence S. 55 degrees 03 minutes W. 246.82 feet to corner No. 4. Thence N. 62 degrees 21 minutes 40 seconds W. 1500 feet to corner No. 1, the place of beginning, Containing 7,545 acres.

Fraction lode. Beginning at corner No. 1. Identical with corner No. 3 Poormans Treasure lode, whence U. S. L. M. No. 2 Thunder Mountain Mining District bears N. 53 degrees 23 minutes 36 seconds W. 9400.95 feet. Thence S. 61 degrees 07 minutes E. 608.06 feet to corner No. 2. Thence N, 31 degrees 31 minutes N, 581 feet to corner No. 3. Identical with the S. W. corner of the Gem Fraction lode, unsurveyed. Corner No. 1 of survey No. 1967 Warren Fraction lode bears N. 39 degrees 28 minutes E. 1052.07 feet. Thence N. 61 degrees 07 minutes W. 608.06 feet to corner No. 4. Thence S. 31 degrees 31 minutes W. 581 feet to corner No. 1, the place of beginning. Containing 8.102 acres.

Equinox lode. Beginning at corner No. 1, whence U. S. L. M. No. 2 Thunder Mountain Mining District, bears N. 57 degrees 47 minutes 50 seconds W. 9071,60 feet. Thence S. 21 degrees 18 minutes W. 266.99 feet intersect corner No. 2 Roosevelt lode, 547 feet to corner No. 2. Thence S. 58 degrees 47 minutes 52 seconds E. 1134.44 feet to corner No. 3. Thence N. 21 degree 18 minutes E. 591.66 feet to corner No. 4. Thence N. 61 degrees 02 minutes W. 1127.63 feet to corner No. 1, the place of beginning. Containing 14.606 acres.

Gold Bug lode. Beginning at corner No. 1. Identical with corner No 3 Fraction lode. Whence U. S. L. M, No. 2, Thunder Mountain Mining District, bears N, 61 degrees 51 minutes 51 seconds W. 10025.99 feet. Thence S, 31 degrees 31 minutes W. 525 feet to corner No. 2. Thence S. 38 degrees 54 minutes E. 1039.74 feet to corner No. 3. Thence N. 31 degrees 31 minutes E. 525 feet to corner No, 4 Identical with the west side line angle post of the Gem Fraction mining claim. Thence N. 38 degrees 54 minutes W. 1039.74 feet to corner No. 1, the place of beginning. Containing 11.806 acres.

Roosevelt lode. Beginning at corner No. 1. Whence U. S. L. M. No. 2. Thunder Mountain Mining District, bears N. 59 degrees 09 minutes 17 seconds W. 9032.83 feet Cor.’s No’s. 3-1 Poormans Treasure and Fraction lodes, bears S. 40 degrees 21 minutes 24 seconds E. 387.91 feet. Thence S. 21 degrees 18 minutes W. 485 feet to corner No. 2. Thence S. 56 degrees 38 minutes E. 1493.00 ft. to corner No, 3. Thence N. 21 degrees 18 minutes E. 485 feet to corner No. 4. Thence N. 50 degree 38 minutes W. 1493.60 ft. to corner No. 1, the place of beginning. Containing 4.901 acres.

Parker lode. Beginning at corner No. 1, whence U. S. L. M. No 2 Thunder Mountain Mining District, bears N. 57 degrees 47 minutes 49 seconds W. 10559.04 feet. Thence S. 32 degrees 43 minutes W. 428.75 feet to corner No. 2. Thence S. 38 degrees 54 minutes E. 631.08 feet to corner No. 3. Thence N. 32 degrees 43 minutes E. 428.75 to corner No. 4. Thence N. 38 degrees 54 minutes W. 175 feet intersect corner No. 3 Gold Bug lode. 631.08 feet to corner No. 1, the place of beginning. Containing 5.898 acres. Making a total of 140.430 acres for the lode claim, and forming a portion of the unsurveyed public lands in the said Thunder Mountain Mining District, County and State of Idaho.

The name of the adjoining and conflicting claim as shown by the plat of survey is Gem Fraction. Others if any unknown. The notices of location or amended location of the several claims of this group are recorded in the Deputy Recorder’s office of Thunder Mountain Mining District as follows:

Gold Pit Fraction, volume 9, page 277; Goldie, volume 9, page 279; Golden Reef, volume 9, page 281; Gravel Point, volume 9, page 275; Poormans Treasure, volume 9, page 269; Golden Treasure, volume 9, page 283; Black Cat, volume 9, page 265; Fraction, volume 9, page 267 ; Equinox, volume 9, page 273; Gold Bug, volume 9, page 271; Roosevelt, volume 9, page 262, and Parker, volume 9, page 264.

Any and all persons claiming adversely the mining ground, vein, lode, premises or any portion thereof so described, surveyed, platted and applied for are hereby notified that unless their adverse claims are duly filed as according to law and the regulations thereunder, within the time prescribed by law, with the Register of the United States Land Office at Hailey, Idaho, they will be barred by virtue of the provisions of the United States statutes in such cases made and provided.

N. J. SHARP, Register.
First publication April 29, 1905
Last publication July 29, 1905.
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Thunder Mountain Brown Returns.

D. J. Brown — “Thunder Mountain Brown” — arrived this week from the Yellow Pine Basin. After speaking of the townsite which nature has provided in this beautiful yellow pine valley, Mr. Brown said he was astonished at the growth of Roosevelt, where on every hand the activity and life of the camp is in evidence.

It re called to him the early days, when the Caswell boys were washing out their first placer which led to the investment of Col. W. H. Dewey — the pioneer venture, which has made Thunder Mountain.

Mr. Brown says that the Yellow Pine country is looking well. He has just finished cutting a four foot ledge of well defined quartz on East Fork of the Salmon, six miles above the Yellow Pine Basin proper. This lode pans some free gold but is mostly base in values.

Thomas Ryan has just struck a big ledge of gold ore on the divide between Tamarac [sic] and Divide creeks. This is about five miles above the property which Mr. Brown has, and is base ore which averages $20 per ton by assays.

Mr. Brown’s theory of the placer outlook at Yellow Pine Basin is somewhat interesting. He believes that were a bed rock flume or drain run from the main Johnson creek one mile below the Basin proper, thus enabling the exposure of the real bedrock in the Basin, that a valuable placer deposit would be found.
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Wm. Queeney Arrives From Salmon City.

Wm. Queeney arrived on the 25th from a trip to the Salmon country where he went to secure cattle for next fall’s killing for his company — Queeney & McGiveney. He secured a large number of first-class stock which will be driven in during the last of the summer. Mr. McGiveney himself will arrive in town about the first of the month with a train load of hay and grain for their livery and feed barn.

Mr. Queeney says that I. N. Hibbs, superintendent of the Rainbow Mining & Milling Co., will soon arrive and that the property of the company on Botha creek will probably he extensively worked this summer. Mr. Queeney himself was over the ground Friday, and he says there is a good surface showing. Two men commence work this morning.

Two men will arrive within the next week who have in mind a sawmill plant and if they are able to secure a good timber site within a few miles of town we may look for a good sawmill within the next few months — one that will turn out first-class boards and dimension lumber.

Mr. Queeney, in common with all our citizens who stray away from home, is glad to get back to Roosevelt which he says is the most wide awake town he has seen on his trip.
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Mr. Spears, of the Spears American Exchange, Geo Holleren the general manager, and Geo. Bruce are expected the first of next week.
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Chas. J. Perkins, well known here, is reported to have arrived at Boise on his way to Thunder Mountain.
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More Arrivals.

Henry Kinsinger and Dave Sillivan arrived from Boise this noon having made a quick trip. Mr. Kinsinger says the mail is scattered along the road and that little effort is being made to get it in. The mail service here this winter has been abominable — it might be nearer the truth to prefix that adjective with a big damn.

Mr. Kinsinger says that Bert Ailport’s contract is completed and that a new contract is let to Al. Austin of Boise, who has a livery barn there with plenty of stock so that the prospect of a better service seems bright — each change we have had this winter has been hailed with joy only to be turned into disappointment as the mail service has continued to be absolutely wretched.

If the department at Washington would make the fines for nondelivery so high as to make it absolutely imperative to get the mail here, then the cheap bidding would cease and a price would be paid that would insure the arrival of the mail on time and its consequent departure on time. Such service as we have had is exasperating and the government contractors have apparently had no thought or desire to give a decent mail service.
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Great Strike at Monte Christo.

The following letter received today from Bert Ethier, E. M., seems to confirm the reports of the strike just made at the Monte Christo:

EDITOR NEWS: –

A strike that will play a great part in the future mining operations in this country was made at the Monte Christo on the 26th of this month, the crosscut tunnel having intersected the main vein at a distance of 375 feet and at a depth of 125 feet from the surface. The vein pitch is 70 degrees making the depth on the vein 170 feet. At the present time the full width of the vein is not known but five feet has been crosscut and that amount of work shows a well defined body of ore that evidently carries as good if not hatter values than are exposed on the surface works.

The ore is a silver carbonate containing gold values. This strike places the Monte Christo mine on the side of the bread winners.

– BERT ETHIER.
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Notice.

All parties knowing themselves to be indebted to me at the Lisenby Lunch Counter are kindly requested to call and settle with Mr. Lisenby, who will have charge of the accounts and oblige.

– W. W. MATHENY.
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Images of full sized pages:

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Further Reading

Link to Thunder Mountain and Roosevelt index page
Link: Public folder with images of the old newspapers
Link: November 5, 1904
Link: November 12, 1904
Link: February 4, 1905
Link: March 18, 1905
Link: March 25, 1905
Link: April 1, 1905
Link: April 8, 1905
Link: April 15, 1905
Link: April 22, 1905
Link: April 29, 1905
Link: May 6, 1905
Link: May 13, 1905
Link: May 20, 1905
Link: June 3, 1905
Link: June 24, 1905
Link: July 1, 1905
Link: July 15, 1905
Link: August 19, 1905
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page updated September 29, 2022