Idaho History Feb 16, 2020

The Prospector and Thunder Mountain News April 29, 1905

courtesy Sandy McRae and Jim Collord

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The Prospector and Thunder Mountain News

Roosevelt, Idaho April 29, 1905 Volume 1 Number 20

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Hunting and Fishing Grounds of Thunder Mountain.

Many inquiries have been received concerning the Thunder Mountain country as an outing ground and in answer to these many questions we publish a brief description of the country from a sportsman’s standpoint. Is safe to say that no other section in the United States presents a more pleasing prospect for the hunter and the angler than does this section of Central Idaho within a radius of twenty-fire or thirty miles from Roosevelt, the metropolis of the district.

In the very heart of the world-famed Bitter Root Range nestles the unique town of Roosevelt with the canyon walls fairly overhanging its streets.

This little city, a mining camp in the midst of one of the world’s richest mineral deposits, is also a center of one of the finest hunting and fishing grounds to be found in any land.

Marble creek, a brook six miles east of town, empties its waters into streams that flow to the sea. The creek is literally full of brook trout from six to ten inches in length.

Salmon trout are also very plentiful; this is a beautiful fish, and one of the best ever eaten, and varies in size from 5 to 22 pounds. Then there is the Red-side trout, weighing a pound to a pound and a half — from eleven to fourteen inches in length. All of these are fresh water fish and in winter go down the creek through the Middle Fork to the Salmon, perhaps even to the Snake river.

The last of July the Steelhead Salmon appears, having completed its long journey from the sea. This is a most remarkable salt-water fish. After maturing in the Pacific Ocean till three years of age, it starts on its inland passage to spawn.

Leaving the salt water and entering the Columbia it seems to have but one instinct: to go up stream to the very limit of depth. It passes through the Columbia to the Snake river, on through the Salmon to the Middle Fork and up Marble creek even to Belleco where the waters are so shallow that the fish’s back often protrudes from the water in its struggles to overcome the inborn instinct, sometime pitiful of reaching the source of the crystal mountain stream which seems to give life and vigor for the close of its thousand mile journey. When this fish reaches the mountain streams it is in fine condition — the meat is hard and delicious. But here the spawning is begun and the fish begin to fight. The males have continued and protracted fights, and shortly after their arrival begin to be wounded in these contests which may be seen from the bank of the stream — the water is thrown into foam in these struggles and the individual fish are rendered unfit to eat; for these reasons the Steelhead is good only upon his arrival.

Few of the Steelheads ever get back to the sea. The spawn is deposited and the little myriads of their young go down the tortuous channel to the sea and after maturing the same process of nature is repeated.

All tributaries of the Middle Fork receive this school as it comes from the lower rivers — the Salmon and Snake. The Monumental creek is now debarred on account of the waters being roiled by the operations of the Dewey mill. Some fish do come up this creek but the majority turn back and go … (page torn) … streams which remain … clear.

Big creek and other streams flowing into the Middle Fork get the full benefit and in return send back their myriads of young Salmon to the sea.

We have mentioned the fish, but for the hunter there is still greater attraction. Moose, Elk, deer, mountain sheep, mountain goats and small game abound.

No moose can be killed — they are protected by law and no true sportsman will kill this “Monarch of the Glen” while its species is being propagated. The legislature this winter placed a time limit of five years in order that the moose be given time to multiply.

Some of the largest elk heards [sic] in the world are within five miles of Roosevelt. This beautiful animal, which is the most perfect of all the horned species, is to be found within a days journey of town.

Deer are very plentiful. This graceful little denizen of the forest is found on every hand. When packers go out in the morning to get the stock, it is not an uncommon occurrence to see the deer among the horses. Thousands of deer are in these mountain resorts, and roam at will over vast ranges of the finest natural deer park in the world.

Mountain sheep are getting scarce. In summer they are found on the highest and roughest crags in this rugged country. Occasionally they are brought in and heads, with horns 13 to 16 inches in diameter, are gathered every year.

Wild goats, too, are hard to get; they live in the very highest altitudes of any animal in the Northwest. For a time in spring they come down to get fresh green grass after they have been living on the (?) of the peaks, but as the grass springs up on the mountain side they climb higher and can be found only on the very tops of high ranges.

The snowshoe rabbit, so called, is the best small game in the county. The thickets are full of them and they are delicious eating.

The above mentioned constitutes all the game animals. Grouse innumerable (?) found in all the woods as there are no sheep herds here to ruin their nests. Coyotes, which generally follow sheep ranges, are scarce in this country though not unknown — stray bands are sometimes heard by the prospector in the hills.

Foxes are not uncommon but most difficult to get. The rugged nature of the country gives them ample hiding, and the hunter seldom gathers one.

Black bears and brown bears are very plentiful. They are found sometimes within a few … (page torn) … to get. J. P. Bradner, of St. Paul, shot two last summer with a six shooter. R. C. Schofield killed a very fine grizzley [sic], a year ago about thirty miles from here. The bear weighed not less than 800 pounds.

The mountain lion, the worst curse of all game destroying animals, is very plentiful. A contemptible, sneaking beast, it destroys vast numbers of deer and rabbits. The State legislature last winter established a bounty of $15.00 on each lion killed and this will lead to their destruction. For mounting or for rugs the mountain lion or cougar is a splendid specimen. They are often 12 or 14 feet from tip to tip and the skin makes a fine souvenir of the hunter’s skill. They very seldom attack man but will kill almost any wild animal of the forest.

In the issue of THE NEWS of April 15 we published a digest of the new game law of Idaho. All true sportsmen are welcome here and they will find royal sport. And by “sportsman” we mean the men who will fish and hunt according to law. That includes every man who is visiting the county; it includes every prospector in the hills. But it absolutely excludes the man who will ruthlessly slaughter the beautiful wild game of our forests. Nothing more like that will be tolerated. Public sentiment can always en-bone law and every man in Roosevelt and every miner and prospector in the hills will stand together in this matter and THE NEWS will give its assistance in bringing to justice any such vandal of the forest.
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John U. Cassel Returns From the Middle Fork.

John U. Cassell arrived the 24th from the Middle Fork where he has been spending a most enjoyable vacation. Every body soon knew Jack was in town for he is no drone, and his genial, hustling go-ahead-and-do-some-thing-way has made him one of the best known and best liked mining men in the whole Thunder Mountain country. He returns in a few days to the Greyhound Mountain district where he owns considerable property.

He speaks in most glowing terms of the Middle Fork as an outing ground; he visited at the McGiveney brothers ranch which he says is a delightful spot with its hot strings and beautiful views.

Concerning the mining outlook of the Wilson creek, the Loon creek, and the Greyhound Mountain sections, Mr. Cassell says the … (page torn) … Loon creek district where the Lost Packer mine is showing marvelous results. In the deepest workings the rock is giving returns of from $80 to $150 gold, 100 oz. silver and 30 per cent. copper.

The company has been to great expense completing the wagon road in preparation for the arrival of the smelter which is being constructed by the Colorado Fuel & Iron Company and according to the contract, will be “blown in” on or before August 15.

This is a Pyritic smelter constructed to reduce the ore to a “matte” — five tons into one.

In the sixties some $10,000,000 of placer gold was taken from Loon creek and from a strip hardly four miles in length and it still has the reputation of having produced the coarsest gold of any placer in the world.

Near the head of the creek is a large bar — containing six or seven hundred acres with the bed rock very deep — fully thirty feet — and on this ground is to be built an extensive hydraulic plant. Great results may be expected from this work.

A large amount of Denver and Salt Lake capital is invested in the Loon creek section and the future of the camp is very bright.

In the Greyhound Mountain country, a thirty or forty ton smelter will be put in this year by the Greyhound Mining & Milling Company, of which ex-governor McConnell is at the head. This same company owns the famous Greyhound and Rufus properties on which enormous ore bodies have been opened up. This is a silver-lead district and has all the “earmarks” of becoming a second Coeur d’Alenes. The development of this section has been retarded on account of the very poor transportation facilities but the O. R. & N. people have bonded the Bull Dog property and this seems to be an additional precursor of a railroad.

Mr. Cassell says there is great activity in the Wilson creak district also. It is a well known fact that this section carries very high values. The rock is all free milling. On the Wyatt & Walker claims considerable work has been done which has developed an ore chute 250 feet in length with an average width of 18 inches yielding values in an arastra of $40 per ton. Geo. W. Bruce and Angus Cameron also have a fine showing on their property.

This section of the Thunder Mounder [sic] country will receive a large amount of attention this … (page torn) … count of the fine surface showing and the remarkably high grade character of the ore.
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19050429Pg1-txt1headline1The Beaver Dam.

It is not generally known that one of the finest and most architectural beaver dams in the whole Thunder Mountain country is within a mile and a half of town. Lava creek flows into the Monumental at a right angle and the industrious beaver has built his dam across the mouth of Lava, swinging it to the right and continuing his masterpiece of nature’s civil engineering across Monumental. Days and weeks and months have been consumed in this untiring process of building, and the fine “mill pond” or reservoir would seem to justify this incessant labor prompted by the instincts of nature.
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19050429Pg1-txt1headline2At the Monte Christo.

The Monte Christo people are in high spirits. In their main tunnel, now driven 375 feet, they have struck a fine body of ore; this is the third ledge they have cut in driving this tunnel and the work is now being pushed for the main lode which should be reached within the next few days.

Pat McEwen arrived Wednesday from the mine and says that the quartz in each of the three lodes now located is fine looking rock. From the last ore found a raise is to be made to the surface.
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We mentioned last week that Dr. Jones had bought out his former partner Hunter E. Crane. See Doe’s ad in this issue.
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19050429Pg2-txt1headline1The Lewis & Clark Exposition.

Some steps should be taken toward getting a good mineral exhibit from Thunder Mountain for the Lewis & Clark Fair to be held at Portland this summer. This section is now well known all over the country and a good collection from here would be of much interest to visitors to the fair, moreover the absence of any representative ore would be a source of adverse comment and much disappointment.
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As mentioned on another page, we have frequent inquiries from people on the outside concerning the hunting and fishing grounds here. The postmaster also receives many letters of this nature, and so for the benefit of all, we have endeavored to give authentic information concerning the fish and game of this locality. Roosevelt and the surrounding country is easily accessible from outside points. The trip can be made from Boise in four days over the newly completed wagon road and … (page torn) … through and the drive is a most enjoyable one. Good roadhouse accommodations may be found each evening and there will be no shortage of feed for animals. We have endeavored to give a good list of roadhouses which may be found in the advertising columns with distances shown, and tourists will find no privation or difficulty attached to a journey into this sylvan and virgin wild, where game and fish abound and where the bluest skies and clearest mountain streams give welcome to the dusty traveler. A growing sentiment exists to preserve the game. The State law is such that any true sportsman may gather his fish and game legally and yet see the county grow richer each year in the natural increase of the finest wild game to be found in the world.
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In as much as the 4th of July, the day of all days for the good American citizen is coming, now is the time to start the ball a rolling in order that the people of the the Thunder Mountain Mining District may observe this great occasion in a fitting and substantial manner. Those who were present at our last celebration went away with that glad feeling that while there were only a few of us here, that this great day was justly commemorated and all were unanimous in the verdict that the celebration, was a grand success. Another year has almost passed around and during that time the future great gold camp has gained in population so in order to keep pace with all up-to-date camps we should by all means give a larger and, if possible, better celebration this year. By a little hustling a subscription list of $500 could be easily procured and hung up for prizes to be contested for by the people of the district and again, as in most all other mining camps, we should extend the celebration for two days. Well, here is to the 4th of July, 1905, and let us all join in and make it a celebration that will have but few equals and no superior.
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For much of the information contained in the front page article — the “Hunting and Fishing Grounds of Thunder Mountain,” we are indebted to Chas. L. Myers, one of the pioneers of this district and a very successful hunter and fisherman.
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19050429Pg2-txt1headline2What God Couldn’t Do.

In a country school district in the State of Maine, the teacher had a notoriously large mouth. At the fireside one evening where this man boarded, sat an old man and his little grandson. After gazing thoughtfully into the fire for sometime, the boy looked into the old man’s face and said “Grandpa, is there anything God can’t do?” “No, Johnnie,” was the answer. Another period of silence followed. “Grandpa,” said the boy again, “I know something God can’t do.” “Why Johnnie!” exclaimed the grand father, “what is there God can’t do?” “Well,” answered Johnnie, “He couldn’t make teacher’s mouth any bigger unless he set back his ears.”
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Subscribe for THE THUNDER MOUNTAIN NEWS.
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19050429Pg3-txt1headline1Astralia’s [sic] Largest Dam.

The dam recently finished at Barossa, near Gawler, in southern Australia, is entirely of concrete and the largest of the kind that exists in Australia, says the Scientific American.

The site of the dam was selected at a point at which one of the banks presented a nearly perpendicular cliff 98 feet high, and at which the opposite bank, of an easy slope formed a sort of spur that projected into the bed of the river.

The dam is constructed entirely of concrete without any facing of dressed stone or rubber. Nevertheless, blocks of undressed gneiss were placed in the concrete, with intervals between them of at least six inches.

At about 15 feet from the top of the dam, such blocks ceased to be employed because of the slight thickness of the dam at this part, and rows of curved rails, connected by fish plates were imbedded [sic] in the concrete. A total weight of 40 tons of rails was worked into the dam in this manner. The dam is of the curved type, presenting its convex face to the water. The upstream facing is vertical and the downstream inclined. The height is 95 feet above the old level of the river.

The thickness is but 36 feet at the base of the foundation in the thickest part and 4.5 at the top. It was possible to make the dam of such slight thickness owing to the curved form that was given it in the plan and which gives to the structure all the resisting qualities of the arch.

During the time of frosts the masonry was covered with straw matting and fire was kindled that produced much smoke at the top of the masonry, doubtless to prevent the loss of heat by radiation, in this way the newly-laid concrete was very efficiently protected against the cold.

The concrete employed in the work was always mixed with the greatest care and in small quantities at a time. The mixture was made by weight and automatically. Before the composition of the concrete for one part or another of the. dam was decided upon, experiments were always made in order to make sure of the impermeability of the material to the pressure that it had to support.
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19050429Pg3-txt1headline2Not a Fall.

“Sorry to see you get such a fall,” said the pedestrian to a man who had just had a tumble from the rear platform of a street car.

“Oh, I didn’t get no fall,” was the cheerful reply.

“But you — you tumbled off.”

“Not at all. I got into an argument with the conductor and he threw me off.”

“I see. And you take it good-naturedly.”

“Got to, old fellow. That’s the sixth car I’ve been thrown off today because I wouldn’t pay fare, and you see I’m getting used to it.”

— Chicago News.
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W. H. Courtney sold his house on Main St. Wednesday and will buy or build for his restaurant.
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19050429Pg4headlineBillions of Shoe Lace Eyes Are Used.

“Some of the apparently most trivial things in the world are the most necessary things and fortunes are made in manufacturing them.” said Ralph L. Jenkins.

Take the lace eyes of shoes, for instance. The average person never gives them a thought, but they are indispensable to our foot-wear, and there are factories that devote themselves exclusively to making them. Did you ever stop to think how many of those little things are used every year?

On the basis of the population of the United States being 80,000,000, this country uses more than 3,000,000,000 of lace eyes and hooks a year. Every man, woman and child will wear out on an average two pairs of shoes in twelve months. The majority of people have two feet and there are twenty eyes and hooks in each shoe. Use your arithmetic and see what the total is. It foots up to 2,000,000 more than 3,000,000,000.

— Milwaukee Sentinel.
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A. D. Almond this week lost a valuable Masonic pin. As he had worn it over twenty years, he regarded it as a souvenir. Mr. Almond would be much pleased if any one finding it would return it to him or leave it at the NEWS office.
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LOCALS

See the ad of the Roosevelt Laundry.

Orin Goodrich and O. W. Laing went to Copper Camp Friday morning.

O. T. Lingo, the local freighter, is delivering timbers and lagging at the Dewey.

D. S. McInerney has been quite sick. He is much better as we go to press.

Sherman S. Whitaker has left his position at the Standard for a while in order to be able to attend to his own mining interests.

Travelers arriving are made at home at Geo. D. Smith’s hotel. The table is first-class and every courtesy is extended to patrons.

J. H. Hanson has gone to the Big creek district for another drove of cattle. He will arrive about the first of the month.

The boy or girl that is mindful of others and refuses to take advantage or speak evil of anyone has name written on flowers that bloom in human hearts. — Ex.

McAndrews & Reuter, this week, received a shipment of hats and other gent’s furnishing goods. They also received for their grocery department some fine butter.

Phil Guidicy left town Thursday at 3 a. m. for the outside. He will take his train from the range and load a general freight from Boise for this town. He will arrive as soon as horses can be brought over the summits.

E. E. Myers received a letter from B. F. Francis this week stating that he should leave Boise about the first of May if the roads permitted. Mr. Francis expects to carry a larger stock of general merchandise than has ever been brought into this town in any previous year.

A letter was received from Nash Wayland on the outside addressed to his father, L. A. Wayland, saying he should start for Roosevelt on the 1st of May with his train. He will thus arrive here with some forty horses and mules loaded with general merchandise stock about the 20th of May.

The name of the town in which we live is often mispronounced even by those living here. The town was named for the present executive head of the nation and on the authority of one of the president’s kinsmen the name, which means “rose land” or “rose field,” is pronounced Rose-velt. Let’s pronounce it right.
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19050429Pg5-txt1headline2Season Approaching.

One of those little men who always like to talk tapped the big man on the shoulder.

“It’s a shame,” he began “how little a man’s life is worth in Russia.”

“Tain’t worth so much over here if you are in my business,” said the big man.

“You don’t mean it?”

“Yes, sir. I’m liable to be chased by a gang far more blood-thirsty than the Cossacks of the Nevsky prospect.”

“W-who are you?”

“Oh. I’m a baseball umpire.”

—Chicago News.
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19050429Pg5-txt1headline3Notice For Publication
Survey No. 1994 A-B

U. S. LAND OFFICE,
Hailey, Idaho, April 13, 1905.

Notice is hereby given. that in pursuance of the Act of Congress approved May 10, 1872, the Thunder Mountain Gold and Silver Mining and Milling Company, whose postoffice is Nampa, Idaho, has made application for a patent for 1475 linear feet of the Massenet lode, bearing gold and silver. The same being 143 ft. south-westerly and 1332 ft. northeasterly from discovery shaft. Together with surface ground 567.67 feet in width. Also for 809.45 linear feet of the Dewey Mill site, with surface ground 275 feet in width situate in Thunder Mountain Mining District, Idaho County. State of Idaho. and described by the official plat and by the field notes on file in the office of the Register of Hailey District. Idaho, as follows, viz: Var 21 degrees 30 minutes E.

Massenet lode. Beginning at corner No, 1 whence U. S. L. M. No. 2 Thunder Mountain District, bears N. 45 degrees 20 minutes W. 154.94 feet. Thence N. 41 degrees 27 minutes E. 1478 feet to corner No 2. Thence N. 48 degrees 33 minutes W. 567.67 feet to corner No. 3, Thence S. 41 degrees 27 minutes W. 1475 feet to corner No. 4. Thence S. 48 degrees 33 minutes E. 567.67 feet to corner No. 1, the place of beginning, containing 19.222 acres, Dewey Mill Site. Beginning at corner No. 1 identical with corner No. 1 Massenet lode, whence U. S. L. M. No. 2 Thunder Mountain Mining District bears N. 45 degrees 20 minutes W. 154.91 feet. Thence N. 41 degrees 27 minutes E. 275 feet to corner No. 2. Thence S. 36 degrees 38 minutes E. 809.45 feet to corner No. 3. Thence S. 41 degrees 27 minutes W. 275 feet to corner No. 4. Thence N. 36 degrees 38 minutes W. 809.45 feet to corner No. 1. the place of beginning, containing 5 acres, making a total of 21.222 acres for the lode and mill site, and forming a portion of the unsurveyed lands of the United States, in the said Thunder Mountain Mining District, Idaho County, State of Idaho. Names of the adjoining claims. if any, are unknown. The notice of amended location of the Massenet lode is recorded in volume 9, page 285, and the location notice of the Dewey Mill Site in volume 9, page 261 in the office of the Deputy County Recorder, at Roosevelt. Idaho.

Any and all persons claiming adversely the mining ground, vein, lode, premises or any portion thereof so described, surveyed, platted and applied for, are hereby notified that unless their adverse claims are duly filed as according to law and the regulations thereunder, within the time prescribed by law, with the Register of the United States Land Office at Halley, Idaho, they will be barred by virtue of the provisions of the United States Statutes in such cases made and provided.

N J SHARP, Register.
First publication April 29, 1905.
Last publication July 29, 1905.
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19050429Pg5-txt1headline4Notice For Publication
Dewey Group of Mining Claims
Survey No. 1988.

UNITED STATES LAND OFFICE.
Hailey, Idaho, April 13, 1905.

Notice is hereby given, that in pursuance of the Act of Congress approved May 10, 1872, Thunder Mountain Gold and Silver Mining and Milling Company. whose postoffice is Nampa, Idaho. has made an application for a patent for 436.49 linear feet on the Coal Pit Fraction lode, bearing gold and silver, the same being 146.49 feet northwesterly and 290 feet southeasterly from discovery shaft.

669.22 linear feet on the Goldie lode, bearing gold and silver. the same being 237.22 feet northwesterly, and 432 feet southeasterly from discovery cut.

1468.38-linear feet on the Golden Reef lode, bearing gold and silver, the same being 638.78 feet northwesterly, and 790 feet southeasterly from discovery cut.

1494.83 linear feet on the Gravel Point lode, bearing gold and silver, the same being 729.83 feet northwesterly, and 765 feet southeasterly from discovery cut.

1281.72 linear feet on the Poormans Treasure lode, bearing gold and silver, the same being 656.72 feet northwesterly, and 625 feet southeasterly from discovery cut.

1500 linear feet on the Golden Treasure lode; bearing gold and silver, the same being 530 feet northwesterly and 970 feet southeasterly from discovery cut.

1500 linear feet on the Black Cat lode, bearing gold and silver, the same being 1175 feet northwesterly and 325 feet southeasterly from discovery cut.

608.06 linear feet on the Fraction lode, bearing gold and silver, the same being 365 feet northwesterly and 243.06 feet southeasterly from discovery shaft.

1127.63 linear feet on the Equinox lode, bearing gold and silver, the same being 350 feet northwesterly and 777.63 feet southeasterly front discovery cut.

1039.74 linear feet on the Gold Bug lode, bearing gold and silver, the same being 670 feet northwesterly and 369.74 feet southeasterly from discovery cut.

1493.60 linear feet on the Roosevelt lode, bearing gold and silver, the same being 100 feet northwesterly and 1393.60 feet southeasterly from discovery shaft.

428.75 linear feet on the Parker lode, bearing gold and silver, the same being 100 feet northeasterly and 328.75 feet southwesterly from discovery cut thereon.

With surface ground 564 feet in width on the Coal Pit Fraction, 559 feet in width on the Goldie, 591.92 feet in width on the Golden Reef, 572.20 feet in width on the Gravel Point, 551.92 feet in width on the Poormans Treasure, 600 feet in width on the Golden Treasure, 219.10 feet in width on the Black Cat, 580.39 feet in width on the Fraction, 473.18 feet in width on the Roosevelt, 586.37 feet in width on the Equinox, 491.63 feet in width on the Gold Bug and 600 feet in width on the Parker, situated in the Thunder Mountain Mining District, County of Idaho, State of Idaho and described by the official plat, and by the field notes on file in the U. S. Land office at Hailey, Idaho and more particularly described as follows, viz: Var. 21 degrees 30 minutes E.

Coal Pit Fraction lode. Beginning at corner No. 1 whence U. S. L. M. No. 2 Thunder Mountain Mining District, bears N. 65 degrees 11 minutes W. 6315.5 feet. Thence S. 31 degrees 31 minutes W. 574.72 feet to corner No. 2. Thence S. 47 degrees 24 minutes E. 436.49 feet to corner No. 3. Thence N. 31 degrees 31 minutes E. 574.72 feet to corner No. 4. Thence N. 47 degrees 21 minutes W. 436.49 feet to corner No. 1. the place of beginning Containing 5.632 acres.

Goldie lode. Beginning at corner No, 1 whence U. S L. M. No. 2 Thunder Mountain Mining District, bears N. 63 degrees 43 minutes 35 seconds W. 6653.80 ft. Cor. No. 4 Coal Pit Fraction lode bears S. 88 degrees 58 minutes E. 87.8 feet. Thence S. 42 degrees 48 minutes 38 seconds E. 679.48 feet to corner No, 2. Thence N. 36 degrees 46 minutes E. 574.59 feet to corner No. 3. Thence N. 57 degrees 36 minutes W. 670.20 feet to corner No. 4. Thence S. 36 degrees 46 minutes W. 400.63 feet to corner No. 1, the place of beginning. Containing 7.375 acres.

Golden Reef lode. Beginning at corner No. 1, whence U. S. L. M. No. 2 Thunder Mountain Mining District, bears N 64 degrees 02 minutes 56 seconds W. 9732.15 feet. Identical with corner. No 4 Coal Pit Fraction lode. Thence S. 31 degrees 31 minutes W. 574.72 feet to corner No. 2. Thence S. 35 degrees 25 minutes 38 seconds E. 628.78 feet to corner No 3. Thence S. 60 degrees 28 minutes E. 846.49 feet to corner No. 4. Thence N. 31 degrees 31 minutes E. 592.87 feet to corner No. 5. Thence N. 60, degrees 28 minutes W. 846.49 feet to corner No. 6. Thence N. 36 degrees 58 minutes W. 621.89 feet to corner No. 1, the place of beginning. Containing 18.821 acres.

Gravel Point lode. Beginning at earner No. 1. Identical with corner No. 2 Goldie lode and corner No 6 Golden Reef lode. Whence U. S. L. M. No. 2 Thunder Mountain Mining District, bears N. 61 degrees 49 minutes 25 seconds W. 7291.64 feet. Thence S. 58 degrees 28 minutes E. 1494.83 feet to corner No. 2. Thence N. 36 degrees 46 minutes E. 574.59 feet to corner No. 3. Thence N. 58 degrees 28 minutes W. 1491.83 feet to center No 4. Thence S. 36 degrees 46 minutes W. 574.59 feet to corner No. 1. the place of beginning. Containing 19.349 acres.

Poormans Treasure lode. Beginning at corner No 1 Identical with corner No. 5 Golden Reef lode, whence U. S. L. M. No. 2 Thunder Mountain Mining District, bears N. 61 degrees 40 minutes 56 seconds W. 8137.94 ft. Cor. No. 2 Gravel Point lode bears S. 55 degrees 51 minutes 41 seconds E 619.52 feet Thence S. 31 degrees 31 minutes W. 592.87 feet to corner No. 2. Thence S. 61 degrees 02 minutes E. 1281.72 feet to corner No. 3. Thence N. 31 degrees 31 minutes E. 592.87 feet to corner No. 4. Thence N. 64 degrees 02 minutes W. 1281.72 feet to corner No. 1, the place of beginning. Containing 16.443 acres.

Golden Treasure lode. Beginning at corner No 1 whence U. S. L. M. No. 2 Thunder Mountain Mining District bears N. 57 degrees 17 minutes 09 seconds W. 7566.71 feet. Thence S. 21 degrees 18 minutes W. 594.77 feet to corner N. 2. Thence S. 62 degrees 21 minutes 40 seconds E. 1500 feet to corner No. 3. Thence N. 21 degrees 18 minutes E. 603.70 feet to corner No. 4. Thence N. 64 degrees 02 minutes W. 939.17 feet to corner No. 5. Identical with corner No. 4 Golden Reef lode, and corner No. 2 Poormans Treasure lode. Thence N. 60 degrees 28 minutes W. 560.32 feet to corner No. 1. the place of beginning. Containing 20.132 acres.

Black Cat lode. Beginning at corner No. 1, whence U. S. L. M. No. 2 Thunder Mountain Mining District bears N. 51 degrees 11 minutes 06 seconds W, 7633.86 feet. Thence N. 55 degrees 03 minutes E. 246.82 feet to corner No. 2. Identical with corner No. 2 Golden Treasure lode. Thence S. 62 degrees 21 minutes 40 seconds E. 1500 feet to corner No. 3. Thence S. 55 degrees 03 minutes W. 246.82 feet to corner No. 4. Thence N. 62 degrees 21 minutes 40 seconds W. 1500 feet to corner No. 1, the place of beginning, Containing 7,545 acres.

Fraction lode. Beginning at corner No. 1. Identical with corner No. 3 Poormans Treasure lode, whence U. S. L. M. No. 2 Thunder Mountain Mining District bears N. 53 degrees 23 minutes 36 seconds W. 9400.95 feet. Thence S. 61 degrees 07 minutes E. 608.06 feet to corner No. 2. Thence N, 31 degrees 31 minutes N, 581 feet to corner No. 3. Identical with the S. W. corner of the Gem Fraction lode, unsurveyed. Corner No. 1 of survey No. 1967 Warren Fraction lode bears N. 39 degrees 28 minutes E. 1052.07 feet. Thence N. 61 degrees 07 minutes W. 608.06 feet to corner No. 4. Thence S. 31 degrees 31 minutes W. 581 feet to corner No. 1, the place of beginning. Containing 8.102 acres.

Equinox lode. Beginning at corner No. 1, whence U. S. L. M. No. 2 Thunder Mountain Mining District, bears N. 57 degrees 47 minutes 50 seconds W. 9071,60 feet. Thence S. 21 degrees 18 minutes W. 266.99 feet intersect corner No. 2 Roosevelt lode, 547 feet to corner No. 2. Thence S. 58 degrees 47 minutes 52 seconds E. 1134.44 feet to corner No. 3. Thence N. 21 degree 18 minutes E. 591.66 feet to corner No. 4. Thence N. 61 degrees 02 minutes W. 1127.63 feet to corner No. 1, the place of beginning. Containing 14.606 acres.

Gold Bug lode. Beginning at corner No. 1. Identical with corner No 3 Fraction lode. Whence U. S. L. M, No. 2, Thunder Mountain Mining District, bears N, 61 degrees 51 minutes 51 seconds W. 10025.99 feet. Thence S, 31 degrees 31 minutes W. 525 feet to corner No. 2. Thence S. 38 degrees 54 minutes E. 1039.74 feet to corner No. 3. Thence N. 31 degrees 31 minutes E. 525 feet to corner No, 4 Identical with the west side line angle post of the Gem Fraction mining claim. Thence N. 38 degrees 54 minutes W. 1039.74 feet to corner No. 1, the place of beginning. Containing 11.806 acres.

Roosevelt lode. Beginning at corner No. 1. Whence U. S. L. M. No. 2. Thunder Mountain Mining District, bears N. 59 degrees 09 minutes 17 seconds W. 9032.83 feet Cor.’s No’s. 3-1 Poormans Treasure and Fraction lodes, bears S. 40 degrees 21 minutes 24 seconds E. 387.91 feet. Thence S. 21 degrees 18 minutes W. 485 feet to corner No. 2. Thence S. 56 degrees 38 minutes E. 1493.00 ft. to corner No, 3. Thence N. 21 degrees 18 minutes E. 485 feet to corner No. 4. Thence N. 50 degree 38 minutes W. 1493.60 ft. to corner No. 1, the place of beginning. Containing 4.901 acres.

Parker lode. Beginning at corner No. 1, whence U. S. L. M. No 2 Thunder Mountain Mining District, bears N. 57 degrees 47 minutes 49 seconds W. 10559.04 feet. Thence S. 32 degrees 43 minutes W. 428.75 feet to corner No. 2. Thence S. 38 degrees 54 minutes E. 631.08 feet to corner No. 3. Thence N. 32 degrees 43 minutes E. 428.75 to corner No. 4. Thence N. 38 degrees 54 minutes W. 175 feet intersect corner No. 3 Gold Bug lode. 631.08 feet to corner No. 1, the place of beginning. Containing 5.898 acres. Making a total of 140.430 acres for the lode claim, and forming a portion of the unsurveyed public lands in the said Thunder Mountain Mining District, County and State of Idaho.

The name of the adjoining and conflicting claim as shown by the plat of survey is Gem Fraction. Others if any unknown. The notices of location or amended location of the several claims of this group are recorded in the Deputy Recorder’s office of Thunder Mountain Mining District as follows:

Gold Pit Fraction, volume 9, page 277; Goldie, volume 9, page 279; Golden Reef, volume 9, page 281; Gravel Point, volume 9, page 275; Poormans Treasure, volume 9, page 269; Golden Treasure, volume 9, page 283; Black Cat, volume 9, page 265; Fraction, volume 9, page 267 ; Equinox, volume 9, page 273; Gold Bug, volume 9, page 271; Roosevelt, volume 9, page 262, and Parker, volume 9, page 264.

Any and all persons claiming adversely the mining ground, vein, lode, premises or any portion thereof so described, surveyed, platted and applied for are hereby notified that unless their adverse claims are duly filed as according to law and the regulations thereunder, within the time prescribed by law, with the Register of the United States Land Office at Hailey, Idaho, they will be barred by virtue of the provisions of the United States statutes in such cases made and provided.

N. J. SHARP, Register.
First publication April 29, 1905
Last publication July 29, 1905.
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19050429Pg6-txt1headline1Thunder Mountain Brown Returns.

D. J. Brown — “Thunder Mountain Brown” — arrived this week from the Yellow Pine Basin. After speaking of the townsite which nature has provided in this beautiful yellow pine valley, Mr. Brown said he was astonished at the growth of Roosevelt, where on every hand the activity and life of the camp is in evidence.

It re called to him the early days, when the Caswell boys were washing out their first placer which led to the investment of Col. W. H. Dewey — the pioneer venture, which has made Thunder Mountain.

Mr. Brown says that the Yellow Pine country is looking well. He has just finished cutting a four foot ledge of well defined quartz on East Fork of the Salmon, six miles above the Yellow Pine Basin proper. This lode pans some free gold but is mostly base in values.

Thomas Ryan has just struck a big ledge of gold ore on the divide between Tamarac [sic] and Divide creeks. This is about five miles above the property which Mr. Brown has, and is base ore which averages $20 per ton by assays.

Mr. Brown’s theory of the placer outlook at Yellow Pine Basin is somewhat interesting. He believes that were a bed rock flume or drain run from the main Johnson creek one mile below the Basin proper, thus enabling the exposure of the real bedrock in the Basin, that a valuable placer deposit would be found.
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19050429Pg6-txt1headline2Wm. Queeney Arrives From Salmon City.

Wm. Queeney arrived on the 25th from a trip to the Salmon country where he went to secure cattle for next fall’s killing for his company — Queeney & McGiveney. He secured a large number of first-class stock which will be driven in during the last of the summer. Mr. McGiveney himself will arrive in town about the first of the month with a train load of hay and grain for their livery and feed barn.

Mr. Queeney says that I. N. Hibbs, superintendent of the Rainbow Mining & Milling Co., will soon arrive and that the property of the company on Botha creek will probably he extensively worked this summer. Mr. Queeney himself was over the ground Friday, and he says there is a good surface showing. Two men commence work this morning.

Two men will arrive within the next week who have in mind a sawmill plant and if they are able to secure a good timber site within a few miles of town we may look for a good sawmill within the next few months — one that will turn out first-class boards and dimension lumber.

Mr. Queeney, in common with all our citizens who stray away from home, is glad to get back to Roosevelt which he says is the most wide awake town he has seen on his trip.
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Mr. Spears, of the Spears American Exchange, Geo Holleren the general manager, and Geo. Bruce are expected the first of next week.
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Chas. J. Perkins, well known here, is reported to have arrived at Boise on his way to Thunder Mountain.
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19050429Pg6-txt1headline3More Arrivals.

Henry Kinsinger and Dave Sillivan arrived from Boise this noon having made a quick trip. Mr. Kinsinger says the mail is scattered along the road and that little effort is being made to get it in. The mail service here this winter has been abominable — it might be nearer the truth to prefix that adjective with a big damn.

Mr. Kinsinger says that Bert Ailport’s contract is completed and that a new contract is let to Al. Austin of Boise, who has a livery barn there with plenty of stock so that the prospect of a better service seems bright — each change we have had this winter has been hailed with joy only to be turned into disappointment as the mail service has continued to be absolutely wretched.

If the department at Washington would make the fines for nondelivery so high as to make it absolutely imperative to get the mail here, then the cheap bidding would cease and a price would be paid that would insure the arrival of the mail on time and its consequent departure on time. Such service as we have had is exasperating and the government contractors have apparently had no thought or desire to give a decent mail service.
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19050429Pg6-txt1headline4Great Strike at Monte Christo.

The following letter received today from Bert Ethier, E. M., seems to confirm the reports of the strike just made at the Monte Christo:

EDITOR NEWS: –

A strike that will play a great part in the future mining operations in this country was made at the Monte Christo on the 26th of this month, the crosscut tunnel having intersected the main vein at a distance of 375 feet and at a depth of 125 feet from the surface. The vein pitch is 70 degrees making the depth on the vein 170 feet. At the present time the full width of the vein is not known but five feet has been crosscut and that amount of work shows a well defined body of ore that evidently carries as good if not hatter values than are exposed on the surface works.

The ore is a silver carbonate containing gold values. This strike places the Monte Christo mine on the side of the bread winners.

– BERT ETHIER.
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19050429Pg6-txt1headline5Notice.

All parties knowing themselves to be indebted to me at the Lisenby Lunch Counter are kindly requested to call and settle with Mr. Lisenby, who will have charge of the accounts and oblige.

– W. W. MATHENY.
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page updated Feb 19, 2020