Idaho History Feb 23, 2020

The Prospector and Thunder Mountain News May 6, 1905

courtesy Sandy McRae and Jim Collord

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The Prospector and Thunder Mountain News

Roosevelt, Idaho May 6, 1905 Volume 1 Number 21

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The Great Sunnyside Dropped Her Stamps Wednesday
Tremendous Difficulties Overcome and the Mill Running Smoothly

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Caption: Scene on the Sunnyside where Great Tunnels are being Driven into the Dome of Thunder Mountain.

The Sunnyside mill started Wednesday under most auspicious circumstances. A brief description of the mine and mill will be interesting to our readers for the mine is one of the best known in the State of Idaho and is about to take its place as a great producer of wealth. It cannot possibly fail, for a vast blanket of orc has been thoroughly blocked out by a splendid system of cross-cuts, winzes, and raises showing a solid block 440 feet long by 120 in width with an average depth or thickness of 22 feet. $10 per ton is a very conservative estimate of the value of this great mass of ore — it will probably average more than that figure.

The raise now being made in the Bar Oak tunnel will strike the ore body 204 feet north of the present development in the Sunnyside. This tunnel … over 1800 … (page torn) … cost of more than $18,000 was made in order that the immense tonnage might be worked from beneath. Thus avoiding hoisting and from the raise, the mine can be worked systematically and economically.

The Sunnyside mine is not yet three years old and we feel justified in saying that for its age it is one of the best developed and opened up mines in the State. The several thousand feet of tunnels are good and finely ventilated.

The tramway which is a mile and a half in length from the upper terminal at the mine to the mill is a perfect success. At one point there is a span of 1000 feet running over a canyon and the buckets pass fully 150 feet from the ground. The highest of the cable towers is 84 feet.

The tram running at the rate of 350 feet per minute with 34 buckets carrying 500 pounds each, develops with its fall of 1600 feet, sufficient power which is twenty horsepower, to run a number 3 Gates crusher of a capacity of twenty tons per hour. The new automatic grips are working most satisfactorily.

Herman Veilman has been in charge of the remodeling of the tramway and grips and Supt. Abbott says to Mr. Veilman is due much credit. THE NEWS representative was present at the dropping of the stamps and courteously given every opportunity to observe the workings of the mill and tramway.

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Caption: Sunnyside Wagons Leaving Randall’s for Roosevelt.
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The machinery at the mill which was set in motion at 3:30, ran like clock work. The boilers carrying just 80 pounds of steam and not the least crowded during the 30 minutes trial run, the fires not having been replenished during the time, furnished the power with perfect ease for the whole plant: the thirty stamps dropped 95 times at a 6 inch drop per minute, the electric lights were turned on and with both injectors running the boilers frequently blew off steam.

The present foreman of the mill, W. H. Paddock, a widely known and experienced mill man all over the West has been of the greatest service in the readjustment of the mill and in bringing it into perfect working condition.

Chas. Annett, the electrician, has put the 1000-light electric plant into splendid working order. This is one of the best plants in the State. It has a beautiful marble switch board and the lights burn brightly and steadily. All the buildings, as well as the mine have the electric lights, a matter of great convenience and economy.

The sawmill will soon be put into operation and the works will probably carry 75. men on the payroll this summer.

The ditch bringing water to the mill is a mile and a quarter in length and flumed the whole distance with two retaining tanks near the mill. The water is taken from Marble creek where a dam thirty feet high is built across the canyon which at this point is only 30 feet wide and the dam is anchored to the solid rock walls on each side.

The buildings at Belleco, for which the site of the mill has been named, are very convenient. The bunkhouse is roomy and well lighted as is also the kitchen and dining room building. The stamp mill is well arranged and well lighted.

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Caption: Mrs. Purdum and Mrs. Euler by the Sunnyside Cabin.
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With the exception of R. W. Purdum, no other one man has been so closely identified with the life of the Sunnyside mine as E. L. Abbott. He is and has been from the very beginning the general superintendent, and so complete has been Mr. Purdum’s confidence in Mr. Abbott that he has virtually been given complete control of the development work of the mine. The results tell their own story, and the consummation Wednesday may well have been a proud and happy day for E. L. Abbott, and his many friends all over the mining West congratulate him on the success he so richly deserves.
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See what W. H. Courtney has to say in his new ad.
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19050506Pg1headlineAnother Branch From the Thunder Mountain Road.

From the wagon road that leads to the Sunnyside mine, C. M. DeCamp will build to the Erie group this summer branching off near Dan Cotter’s house. At the Erie a large body of low grade ore has been opened up this winter.

Last year when Mr. DeCamp cut out a trail, he very wisely made it wide enough for a wagon road thus leaving little work and expense for its completion.

Mr. DeCamp’s company also has a group of promising claims known as the Cheapman Group north of the main wagon road at the same point where the road leaves for the Erie group; here a road will be built north through Dan Cotter’s ground to the group. … (page torn) … simply cutting logs out of the road and a small amount of grading; this it is seen how easy it is for all other companies to build to their properties.

Since the Dewey and Sunnyside companies have built the main road which leads over the top of Thunder Mountain all other roads leading from it will have but little grade.

New companies have the advantage of the experience of the pioneer companies who have broken the ice in ascertaining the proper treatment of the ores and the development of the ore bodies.
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T. J. Thompson, formerly manager of the Robb Mercantile Co.’s store here, has resigned his position and will go into business for himself. He will build at the junction of the Standard and H. Y. roads and carry a first-class line of liquors, cigars, pipes, tobaccoes and lunch goods.

O. T. Lingo and “Shorty” returned from Big creek Wednesday with thirty-five head of mules and horses.
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19050506Pg2-txt1headline1E. W. Whitcomb Arrives From the Outside.

E. W. Whitcomb, Esq., arrived in town Thursday after an absence of two months. Mr. Whitcomb went out for the purpose of being admitted to the Idaho bar, he having previously practiced at the Maine, Washington and Alaskan bars.

He was admitted at Grangeville March 7 to the Second Judicial District of the State of Idaho and will open a law office here at once.

Mr. Whitcomb, whose father is one of the leading attorneys in the State of Maine, had a most thorough training in Common law which gives him a vantage ground in handling the code law of our State. His whole practice at the bar has been a very successful one. In speaking of his trip, Mr. Whitcomb says the trail over Snow Slide is still too dangerous to undertake. He and his companions after attempting it returned to Big Creek and went around by Monumental to town.

He says that Grangeville is alive to the question of an electric road from [Lewiston?.] At a … (page torn) … sum of money was subscribed to carry the project into effect. Lewiston also took the same step, and all indications point to the certainty of the road being built in the immediate future.

At Resort (Burgdorf’s Hot Springs) Mr. Whitcomb learned that Gov. Frank Gooding and Ex Governor Hunt were daily expected there on a trip to determine the advisability of building a wagon road to Big Creek and possibly through to Roosevelt to be connected with some outside point to be determined later.

In Seattle Mr. Whitcomb met many of his old Alaskan friends who, after having spent the winter in the States were again on their way to the North.

From reliable men holding interests in the Tanana country he learned that the camp there is very promising and has not been overestimated through the press: that it will ultimately prove to be the richest camp in the district in the production of placer gold.

Mr. Whitcomb says that in the mining world outside Thunder Mountain stands well.
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19050506Pg2-txt1headline2Fine Mail Service.

Thomas Naighbors came in Friday evening from Knox, where he had been in telephonic communication with outside parties concerning the properties now in his charge.

We learn from him that U. S. mail sacks are on the route to Roosevelt — hanging on trees by the wayside — they will doubtless arrive in a few years. Many people in Thunder Mountain are saying Blank Blank such mail service as has been given this district during the past winter. It is absolutely abominable — there is little effort on the part of the contractors, or sub contractors or sub-sub contractors to get the U. S. mail to the postoffice here.

Mr. Naighbors went to Knox for a business and pleasure trip and he surely accomplished the latter for he, in company with B. B. Scott, caught the very first Salmon to come up from the sea to that district. The fish, which weighed over 16 pounds, was taken at the outlet of Hot Lake — and while speaking of fish — just to change the subject a little — four deer crossed the road on Southwest Fork summit on their way to Indian Creek. The tracks were fresh as Mr. Naighbors came along the road. The deer arriving so early pressages [sic] the coming of summer.

At Knox, C. C. Randall is doing a rushing business. Travel is heavy and he can hardly accommodate the transient trade — beds are made on the floor and the full capacity of his hotel is taxed.

Thornton & Gilman have bought out Mr. Cole at Johnson Creek, the telephone station, and they will continue there a good road house. Mr. Cole has contracted to construct the sawmill for Mr. Snow on the Thunderbolt mining property.

Mr. Naighbors says that the reports concerning the Monte Christo strike have not been exagerated and that at the Sunshine mine also, in charge of Chas. Werdenhoff, several rich stringers have been traversed during their tunnelling.
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19050506Pg3-txt1headlineReclamation of the Sahara

There are many surprises in the geography of Africa, says the Review of Reviews. One of the greatest of these, perhaps, is the truth about the Desert of Sahara, which has for so long been supposed to consist exclusively of bleak, vast, uninhabitable wastes of sand. The truth seems to be that within the limits of the so-called desert there are vast stretches of land potentially fertile, a waiting only the touch of irrigation to make them blossom like the rose.

The increasing importance of French interests in the Sahara and Soudan has furnished the theme for a book, recently issued in Paris, under the title, “The Sahara, the Soudan, and the Trans-Sahara railroads.” In reviewing this book and analyzing its suggestions, M Robert Doucet, writing in the France de Demain, declares that, after 25 years, M. Paul Leroy-Beaulieu’s struggle to destroy the legend of the Sahara desert has succeeded.

We now know that there are vast agricultural and economic possibilities in the Sahara. A number of French “missions,” says M. Doucet, have proved that, not only is the Sahara inhabitable, as far as nature is concerned, but the bands of robbers and brigands are not anywhere near so frequent or terrible as has been imagined. In the south and central portions, the Sahara is comparatively free from sand dunes and the oases are frequent and fertile. Moreover, the climate, speaking generally, is healthful. “The heat is not excessive in these regions, and the nighly [sic] frosts compensate largely for the fatigues and heat of the day.” The temperature throughout the southern and eastern portion is moderate. M. Leroy-Beaulieu, says the writer, advocates a number of railroads across the desert strip to exploit the commercial possibilities of this vast region.

— Gazette.
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19050506Pg4-txt1headlinePassing of the Politician.

We hear a good deal said these days about “the passing of the politician,” says the Washington Post. By this is meant that the old-fashioned professional office-holder — the citizen who made a livelihood of public service — is gradually in process of being crowded off the road by the man whose political preferment is only an incident in a career absorbed by other interests who stand for some definite idea in the great workaday world, and who accepts his office as a call to duty, a reward of merit, or a stepping stone to a special object.

This is not a new phenomenon by any means. There was a long period after the civil war when the politician pure and simple held the center of the stage in public affairs. Then came, about the middle of the ’70s, a change similar to that which some observers see now in progress. As one and another of the old “war horses” were set aside and replaced by figures like Isaac Christiancy of Michigan. David Davis of Illinois and the others who were believed to be the pioneers of a new movement, we were told that the politician as a distinct type was going out and would be known thence-forward as a curio rather than as a living force in the republic.

But it was the change itself that was passing; not the politician. He simply retired into the background for a time. He stayed in the shadows till the wave or novelty had spent itself. Then he re-emerged and took his place as conspicuously as before, and the old story was repeated.

The political history of our country is an evolution. We occasionally have a period of variation, which brings new men and new ideas to the front, but their service is only to prepare the way for a fresh era in which the old familiar principle is to assert itself again under unaccustomed forms and guises. The American people are too busy to give a great deal of time and thought themselves to the solution of public problems; it is cheaper and easier for them to hire persons regularly drilled in the business to do their legislating and administering for them.

The politician will continue with us always. Whoever else takes up his work for a little, treating it as an excursion or a holiday, may be trusted to get tired and lay it aside ere long for something more profitable We witness the same process going on in other fields. The magazine literature of today is furnished chiefly by specialists, men who have “done things” and who dip into literature merely to tell their fellows how this and that was accomplished. The general describes his battles, the scientist has discoveries, the banker his business triumphs. We are apt to say that the old-fashioned man of letters, who made his living with his pen and treated all subjects with equal fluency, is dead. He is really only dormant. The bearers of special messages will soon write themselves out, and the old literary worker will come back and occupy his field once more.

So with the politician. He is “passing,” perhaps, but only into a state of suspended animation; when the railroad magnates, and the successful business men and the attorneys for individual interests have their fling at public life, the professional officeholders will slip once more into their places and politics become a calling again.

— Pittsburg Gazette.
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19050506Pg5-txt1headline1Few French Millionaires.

The vast wealth of France is divided into a large number of small savings, according to a recent computation in the French financial journal, Le Rentier. In France, it seems, there are not 20,000 persons who are millionaires — and it must be remembered that by millionaire is meant a possessor of 1,000,000 francs, or, in other words, $193,000. There are possibly ten persons in the country whose fortunes are 100,000,000 francs, or about $19,000,000 or over.

All the holders of great fortunes may easily be mentioned by name; only about 100 persons are worth between $2,000,000 and $10,000,000, and 14,000 have accumulated or inherited property valued at from $193,000 to $386,000. That is, France has very few rich citizens. This distribution of wealth in France is indicated by the facts that in 1902 there was left by persons dying property of the value of $921,000,000; but of the 363,612 inheritances distributed in that year more than 300,000 consisted of sums ranging from 20 cents to $1,930. About two-thirds of the property to be distributed was in sums of $200 to $400. The large inheritances, from about $50,000 to $1,000,000, represented only 0.04 per cent. of the total amount; and the property to be divided amounting to more than $100,000 represented lees than 0.01 per cent of the total value.

It is the vast army of small savers in France, the 9,000,000 persons whose names figure in the tax accounts and who own the millions of small parcels of personal real estate, that make the fortune of the country. In comparison with their aggregate accumulations the possessions of the wealthy are insignificant. Such facts as these illustrate in a striking manner the thrift of the masses of the French people.

— Gazette.
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Many a song remains unsung but could these be touched into life they should tell, not of those who killed their fellows, but of the humble and unpretentious men and women who devote their lives to doing good deeds unseen, without expecting or receiving reward. The Carnegie fund will not reach the kind-hearted farmer who feeds the birds in winter, who ever speaks gently at home and does acts of kindness to those less fortunate than himself. It will not reach the farmers’ wife who, through days of sadness and nights devoid of ease is not forgetful of those “small ministries of life” on which depends the large part of what goes to make the sum total of human happiness.
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19050506Pg5-txt1headline2The Colorado Results.

It is of no great consequence to the people of Colorado who holds the office of governor for the rest of the present term. But it is of consequence to them to have broken down at last the system of fraud which has ruled for six or eight years past in Colorado elections. Democratic supremacy in the state has rested during that time on the fraudulent vote returned in Denver by the thugs who control the election machinery there.

— New York Tribune.

link: The Day Colorado Had 3 Governors
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19050506Pg5-Notice1Notice For Publication
Survey No. 1994 A-B

U. S. LAND OFFICE,
Hailey, Idaho, April 13, 1905.

Notice is hereby given. that in pursuance of the Act of Congress approved May 10, 1872, the Thunder Mountain Gold and Silver Mining and Milling Company, whose postoffice is Nampa, Idaho, has made application for a patent for 1475 linear feet of the Massenet lode, bearing gold and silver. The same being 143 ft. south-westerly and 1332 ft. northeasterly from discovery shaft. Together with surface ground 567.67 feet in width. Also for 809.45 linear feet of the Dewey Mill site, with surface ground 275 feet in width situate in Thunder Mountain Mining District, Idaho County. State of Idaho. and described by the official plat and by the field notes on file in the office of the Register of Hailey District. Idaho, as follows, viz: Var 21 degrees 30 minutes E.

Massenet lode. Beginning at corner No, 1 whence U. S. L. M. No. 2 Thunder Mountain District, bears N. 45 degrees 20 minutes W. 154.94 feet. Thence N. 41 degrees 27 minutes E. 1478 feet to corner No 2. Thence N. 48 degrees 33 minutes W. 567.67 feet to corner No. 3, Thence S. 41 degrees 27 minutes W. 1475 feet to corner No. 4. Thence S. 48 degrees 33 minutes E. 567.67 feet to corner No. 1, the place of beginning, containing 19.222 acres, Dewey Mill Site. Beginning at corner No. 1 identical with corner No. 1 Massenet lode, whence U. S. L. M. No. 2 Thunder Mountain Mining District bears N. 45 degrees 20 minutes W. 154.91 feet. Thence N. 41 degrees 27 minutes E. 275 feet to corner No. 2. Thence S. 36 degrees 38 minutes E. 809.45 feet to corner No. 3. Thence S. 41 degrees 27 minutes W. 275 feet to corner No. 4. Thence N. 36 degrees 38 minutes W. 809.45 feet to corner No. 1. the place of beginning, containing 5 acres, making a total of 21.222 acres for the lode and mill site, and forming a portion of the unsurveyed lands of the United States, in the said Thunder Mountain Mining District, Idaho County, State of Idaho. Names of the adjoining claims. if any, are unknown. The notice of amended location of the Massenet lode is recorded in volume 9, page 285, and the location notice of the Dewey Mill Site in volume 9, page 261 in the office of the Deputy County Recorder, at Roosevelt. Idaho.

Any and all persons claiming adversely the mining ground, vein, lode, premises or any portion thereof so described, surveyed, platted and applied for, are hereby notified that unless their adverse claims are duly filed as according to law and the regulations thereunder, within the time prescribed by law, with the Register of the United States Land Office at Halley, Idaho, they will be barred by virtue of the provisions of the United States Statutes in such cases made and provided.

N J SHARP, Register.
First publication April 29, 1905.
Last publication July 29, 1905.
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19050506Pg5-Notice2Notice For Publication
Dewey Group of Mining Claims
Survey No. 1988.

UNITED STATES LAND OFFICE.
Hailey, Idaho, April 13, 1905.

Notice is hereby given, that in pursuance of the Act of Congress approved May 10, 1872, Thunder Mountain Gold and Silver Mining and Milling Company. whose postoffice is Nampa, Idaho. has made an application for a patent for 436.49 linear feet on the Coal Pit Fraction lode, bearing gold and silver, the same being 146.49 feet northwesterly and 290 feet southeasterly from discovery shaft.

669.22 linear feet on the Goldie lode, bearing gold and silver. the same being 237.22 feet northwesterly, and 432 feet southeasterly from discovery cut.

1468.38-linear feet on the Golden Reef lode, bearing gold and silver, the same being 638.78 feet northwesterly, and 790 feet southeasterly from discovery cut.

1494.83 linear feet on the Gravel Point lode, bearing gold and silver, the same being 729.83 feet northwesterly, and 765 feet southeasterly from discovery cut.

1281.72 linear feet on the Poormans Treasure lode, bearing gold and silver, the same being 656.72 feet northwesterly, and 625 feet southeasterly from discovery cut.

1500 linear feet on the Golden Treasure lode; bearing gold and silver, the same being 530 feet northwesterly and 970 feet southeasterly from discovery cut.

1500 linear feet on the Black Cat lode, bearing gold and silver, the same being 1175 feet northwesterly and 325 feet southeasterly from discovery cut.

608.06 linear feet on the Fraction lode, bearing gold and silver, the same being 365 feet northwesterly and 243.06 feet southeasterly from discovery shaft.

1127.63 linear feet on the Equinox lode, bearing gold and silver, the same being 350 feet northwesterly and 777.63 feet southeasterly front discovery cut.

1039.74 linear feet on the Gold Bug lode, bearing gold and silver, the same being 670 feet northwesterly and 369.74 feet southeasterly from discovery cut.

1493.60 linear feet on the Roosevelt lode, bearing gold and silver, the same being 100 feet northwesterly and 1393.60 feet southeasterly from discovery shaft.

428.75 linear feet on the Parker lode, bearing gold and silver, the same being 100 feet northeasterly and 328.75 feet southwesterly from discovery cut thereon.

With surface ground 564 feet in width on the Coal Pit Fraction, 559 feet in width on the Goldie, 591.92 feet in width on the Golden Reef, 572.20 feet in width on the Gravel Point, 551.92 feet in width on the Poormans Treasure, 600 feet in width on the Golden Treasure, 219.10 feet in width on the Black Cat, 580.39 feet in width on the Fraction, 473.18 feet in width on the Roosevelt, 586.37 feet in width on the Equinox, 491.63 feet in width on the Gold Bug and 600 feet in width on the Parker, situated in the Thunder Mountain Mining District, County of Idaho, State of Idaho and described by the official plat, and by the field notes on file in the U. S. Land office at Hailey, Idaho and more particularly described as follows, viz: Var. 21 degrees 30 minutes E.

Coal Pit Fraction lode. Beginning at corner No. 1 whence U. S. L. M. No. 2 Thunder Mountain Mining District, bears N. 65 degrees 11 minutes W. 6315.5 feet. Thence S. 31 degrees 31 minutes W. 574.72 feet to corner No. 2. Thence S. 47 degrees 24 minutes E. 436.49 feet to corner No. 3. Thence N. 31 degrees 31 minutes E. 574.72 feet to corner No. 4. Thence N. 47 degrees 21 minutes W. 436.49 feet to corner No. 1. the place of beginning Containing 5.632 acres.

Goldie lode. Beginning at corner No, 1 whence U. S L. M. No. 2 Thunder Mountain Mining District, bears N. 63 degrees 43 minutes 35 seconds W. 6653.80 ft. Cor. No. 4 Coal Pit Fraction lode bears S. 88 degrees 58 minutes E. 87.8 feet. Thence S. 42 degrees 48 minutes 38 seconds E. 679.48 feet to corner No, 2. Thence N. 36 degrees 46 minutes E. 574.59 feet to corner No. 3. Thence N. 57 degrees 36 minutes W. 670.20 feet to corner No. 4. Thence S. 36 degrees 46 minutes W. 400.63 feet to corner No. 1, the place of beginning. Containing 7.375 acres.

Golden Reef lode. Beginning at corner No. 1, whence U. S. L. M. No. 2 Thunder Mountain Mining District, bears N 64 degrees 02 minutes 56 seconds W. 9732.15 feet. Identical with corner. No 4 Coal Pit Fraction lode. Thence S. 31 degrees 31 minutes W. 574.72 feet to corner No. 2. Thence S. 35 degrees 25 minutes 38 seconds E. 628.78 feet to corner No 3. Thence S. 60 degrees 28 minutes E. 846.49 feet to corner No. 4. Thence N. 31 degrees 31 minutes E. 592.87 feet to corner No. 5. Thence N. 60, degrees 28 minutes W. 846.49 feet to corner No. 6. Thence N. 36 degrees 58 minutes W. 621.89 feet to corner No. 1, the place of beginning. Containing 18.821 acres.

Gravel Point lode. Beginning at earner No. 1. Identical with corner No. 2 Goldie lode and corner No 6 Golden Reef lode. Whence U. S. L. M. No. 2 Thunder Mountain Mining District, bears N. 61 degrees 49 minutes 25 seconds W. 7291.64 feet. Thence S. 58 degrees 28 minutes E. 1494.83 feet to corner No. 2. Thence N. 36 degrees 46 minutes E. 574.59 feet to corner No. 3. Thence N. 58 degrees 28 minutes W. 1491.83 feet to center No 4. Thence S. 36 degrees 46 minutes W. 574.59 feet to corner No. 1. the place of beginning. Containing 19.349 acres.

Poormans Treasure lode. Beginning at corner No 1 Identical with corner No. 5 Golden Reef lode, whence U. S. L. M. No. 2 Thunder Mountain Mining District, bears N. 61 degrees 40 minutes 56 seconds W. 8137.94 ft. Cor. No. 2 Gravel Point lode bears S. 55 degrees 51 minutes 41 seconds E 619.52 feet Thence S. 31 degrees 31 minutes W. 592.87 feet to corner No. 2. Thence S. 61 degrees 02 minutes E. 1281.72 feet to corner No. 3. Thence N. 31 degrees 31 minutes E. 592.87 feet to corner No. 4. Thence N. 64 degrees 02 minutes W. 1281.72 feet to corner No. 1, the place of beginning. Containing 16.443 acres.

Golden Treasure lode. Beginning at corner No 1 whence U. S. L. M. No. 2 Thunder Mountain Mining District bears N. 57 degrees 17 minutes 09 seconds W. 7566.71 feet. Thence S. 21 degrees 18 minutes W. 594.77 feet to corner N. 2. Thence S. 62 degrees 21 minutes 40 seconds E. 1500 feet to corner No. 3. Thence N. 21 degrees 18 minutes E. 603.70 feet to corner No. 4. Thence N. 64 degrees 02 minutes W. 939.17 feet to corner No. 5. Identical with corner No. 4 Golden Reef lode, and corner No. 2 Poormans Treasure lode. Thence N. 60 degrees 28 minutes W. 560.32 feet to corner No. 1. the place of beginning. Containing 20.132 acres.

Black Cat lode. Beginning at corner No. 1, whence U. S. L. M. No. 2 Thunder Mountain Mining District bears N. 51 degrees 11 minutes 06 seconds W, 7633.86 feet. Thence N. 55 degrees 03 minutes E. 246.82 feet to corner No. 2. Identical with corner No. 2 Golden Treasure lode. Thence S. 62 degrees 21 minutes 40 seconds E. 1500 feet to corner No. 3. Thence S. 55 degrees 03 minutes W. 246.82 feet to corner No. 4. Thence N. 62 degrees 21 minutes 40 seconds W. 1500 feet to corner No. 1, the place of beginning, Containing 7,545 acres.

Fraction lode. Beginning at corner No. 1. Identical with corner No. 3 Poormans Treasure lode, whence U. S. L. M. No. 2 Thunder Mountain Mining District bears N. 53 degrees 23 minutes 36 seconds W. 9400.95 feet. Thence S. 61 degrees 07 minutes E. 608.06 feet to corner No. 2. Thence N, 31 degrees 31 minutes N, 581 feet to corner No. 3. Identical with the S. W. corner of the Gem Fraction lode, unsurveyed. Corner No. 1 of survey No. 1967 Warren Fraction lode bears N. 39 degrees 28 minutes E. 1052.07 feet. Thence N. 61 degrees 07 minutes W. 608.06 feet to corner No. 4. Thence S. 31 degrees 31 minutes W. 581 feet to corner No. 1, the place of beginning. Containing 8.102 acres.

Equinox lode. Beginning at corner No. 1, whence U. S. L. M. No. 2 Thunder Mountain Mining District, bears N. 57 degrees 47 minutes 50 seconds W. 9071,60 feet. Thence S. 21 degrees 18 minutes W. 266.99 feet intersect corner No. 2 Roosevelt lode, 547 feet to corner No. 2. Thence S. 58 degrees 47 minutes 52 seconds E. 1134.44 feet to corner No. 3. Thence N. 21 degree 18 minutes E. 591.66 feet to corner No. 4. Thence N. 61 degrees 02 minutes W. 1127.63 feet to corner No. 1, the place of beginning. Containing 14.606 acres.

Gold Bug lode. Beginning at corner No. 1. Identical with corner No 3 Fraction lode. Whence U. S. L. M, No. 2, Thunder Mountain Mining District, bears N, 61 degrees 51 minutes 51 seconds W. 10025.99 feet. Thence S, 31 degrees 31 minutes W. 525 feet to corner No. 2. Thence S. 38 degrees 54 minutes E. 1039.74 feet to corner No. 3. Thence N. 31 degrees 31 minutes E. 525 feet to corner No, 4 Identical with the west side line angle post of the Gem Fraction mining claim. Thence N. 38 degrees 54 minutes W. 1039.74 feet to corner No. 1, the place of beginning. Containing 11.806 acres.

Roosevelt lode. Beginning at corner No. 1. Whence U. S. L. M. No. 2. Thunder Mountain Mining District, bears N. 59 degrees 09 minutes 17 seconds W. 9032.83 feet Cor.’s No’s. 3-1 Poormans Treasure and Fraction lodes, bears S. 40 degrees 21 minutes 24 seconds E. 387.91 feet. Thence S. 21 degrees 18 minutes W. 485 feet to corner No. 2. Thence S. 56 degrees 38 minutes E. 1493.00 ft. to corner No, 3. Thence N. 21 degrees 18 minutes E. 485 feet to corner No. 4. Thence N. 50 degree 38 minutes W. 1493.60 ft. to corner No. 1, the place of beginning. Containing 4.901 acres.

Parker lode. Beginning at corner No. 1, whence U. S. L. M. No 2 Thunder Mountain Mining District, bears N. 57 degrees 47 minutes 49 seconds W. 10559.04 feet. Thence S. 32 degrees 43 minutes W. 428.75 feet to corner No. 2. Thence S. 38 degrees 54 minutes E. 631.08 feet to corner No. 3. Thence N. 32 degrees 43 minutes E. 428.75 to corner No. 4. Thence N. 38 degrees 54 minutes W. 175 feet intersect corner No. 3 Gold Bug lode. 631.08 feet to corner No. 1, the place of beginning. Containing 5.898 acres. Making a total of 140.430 acres for the lode claim, and forming a portion of the unsurveyed public lands in the said Thunder Mountain Mining District, County and State of Idaho.

The name of the adjoining and conflicting claim as shown by the plat of survey is Gem Fraction. Others if any unknown. The notices of location or amended location of the several claims of this group are recorded in the Deputy Recorder’s office of Thunder Mountain Mining District as follows:

Gold Pit Fraction, volume 9, page 277; Goldie, volume 9, page 279; Golden Reef, volume 9, page 281; Gravel Point, volume 9, page 275; Poormans Treasure, volume 9, page 269; Golden Treasure, volume 9, page 283; Black Cat, volume 9, page 265; Fraction, volume 9, page 267 ; Equinox, volume 9, page 273; Gold Bug, volume 9, page 271; Roosevelt, volume 9, page 262, and Parker, volume 9, page 264.

Any and all persons claiming adversely the mining ground, vein, lode, premises or any portion thereof so described, surveyed, platted and applied for are hereby notified that unless their adverse claims are duly filed as according to law and the regulations thereunder, within the time prescribed by law, with the Register of the United States Land Office at Hailey, Idaho, they will be barred by virtue of the provisions of the United States statutes in such cases made and provided.

N. J. SHARP, Register.
First publication April 29, 1905
Last publication July 29, 1905.
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19050506Pg6-txt1headline1
LOCALS

Rhodes & Kettenger have commenced work on their new building.

Hank McGiveney was in town on a business trip the first of the week.

F. B. McCann was in from his claims on Sugar creek this week.

O. M. Snyder, E. W. Whitcomb and H. G. McMillan arrived from the outside Thursday evening.

S. S. Whitaker and Fred Roesch returned Friday from a five days prospecting trip in the Dynamite creek country. They found some good looking rock.

P. M. Reuter, of the firm of McAndrews & Reuter came in yesterday evening and will remain in town for a few days.

Queeney & McGiveney have opened up their livery stable and now have both hay and grain. See their ad in this issue.

D. S. Cotter found a double cinch saddle, numbered “44” on his properly. The owner can have the same by calling on Mr. Cotter.

Joe Byars was in town yesterday and says that the weather in his section of the country has been unusually moist for the past ten days.

Sam Jones has again taken charge of the lunch counter at the Lisenby Hotel, after some months vacation, and invites his friends to call and see him.

Robt. Skinner and A. D. Almond have the contract to raise … of a building 16×24 for … (page torn) … Courtney on his lot opposite the postoffice.

We learn though Mr. Whitcomb that R. C. Schofield has been very sick at Spokane, but is now much better and will probably arrive in Roosevelt the last of this month.

S. I. Choat, who has a contract on the Gold Bullion tunnel, was in town Wednesday and reports work moving along in the usual way. It will take him some weeks yet to complete the work.

W. T. Evans arrived May 1st from Nampa, and on the 2nd assumed the management of the Robb Mercantile Co.’s store, the position having been made vacant by the resignation of T. J. Thompson.

P. McMahon leaves the first of the week for Boise where he will visit his family and purchase his seasons stock of goods. Mr. McMahon says that when he returns he will commence the erection of a new building.

While H. O. Johnson was at Salmon this winter, the girls there commented on the size of his feet. On his return to Thunder Mountain he diminished the size of one of them this week by chopping off a slice with an ax, but neglected to trim down the other foot to match.

L. A. Wayland, of the firm of L. A. Wayland & Son, will leave the first of the week with the part of their train which has wintered in this section, and will meet Nash Wayland at Dixie where some forty horse loads of general merchandise will be at once started for Roosevelt.

Mr. and Mrs. Arnold left Grangeville April 27 for Roosevelt via Dixie. Mrs. Arnold is to be the school teacher here — Mrs. Myers supplying temporarily — and she should have arrived before this but has probably been delayed on account of the depth of snow on the summits.

Jas. Le Roy and M. M. Kinsinger have rented the Queeney building next to the Log Cabin Saloon and are fitting it up for a cigar stole and restaurant. Mr. Kinsinger is to have the cigar counter and club room and Mr. Le Roy will run the chop house and restaurant. They will open up this coming week and Le Roy’s big turkey is to grace the first table.

M. F. Campbell, accountant at the Sunnyside, arrived from Nampa last Sunday. He left Roosevelt for the outside on the 11th at 2 p. m. and arrived at Knox on the 12th at 5 p. m. — the record we believe for winter traveling. He ‘phoned from Knox for material to be used on the tramway and went on to High Valley to meet the rig from Emmett in order to hasten its transportation. Mr. Campbell says the snow is all gone from Thunder City to the outside and that the roads are in good shape for freighting to that point. He believes that freight will begin to arrive here by June 1. Speaking of Nampa he said that the town already seemed to feel the life of R. W. Purdum’s administration as mayor.
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19050506Pg6-txt1headline2Henry Wax Dead.

All people of this section who are acquainted in Grangeville remember Henry Wax, one of the … (page torn) … best known merchants in that town. On his way to attend the Grand Lodge of Oddfellows to which he was a delegate, Mr. Wax met with an accident and was taken to the hospital in Portland where he died. The remains were brought back to Lewiston where the funeral took place April 19.
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19050506Pg6-txt1headline3Roosevelt Laundry Price List.

Gent’s out side shirt, 25c; under shirt, 20c; drawers, 20c.; handkerchiefs each, 5c; large turkish bath towels, 15c; barber or bar towels 50c per dozen or 5c each; socks, per pair, 10c; collars, double 25c, single 12 1/2 cts. Extra charges made for mending.
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Link to Thunder Mountain and Roosevelt index page

Link: Public folder with images of the old newspapers
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