Idaho History March 15, 2020

The Prospector and Thunder Mountain News June 3, 1905

courtesy Sandy McRae and Jim Collord

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The Prospector and Thunder Mountain News

Roosevelt, Idaho News June 3, 1905 Volume 1 Number 25

Note: missing page 4 – (blank page not printed.)

19050603Pg1-txt1headline1He Thought He Stopped the Paper.

An acquaintance met Horace Greeley, one day, and said: “Mr. Greeley, I’ve stopped your paper.” “Have you?” said the editor; “well, that’s too bad,” and he went his way.

The next morning Mr. Greeley met his subscriber again, and said: “I thought you had stopped the ‘Tribune.'”

“So I did.”

“Then there must be some mistake,” said Mr. Greeley, “for I just came from the office and the presses were running, the clerks as busy as ever, the compositors were hard at work, and the business was going on the same as yesterday and the day before.”

“Oh!” ejaculated the subscriber, “I didn’t mean that I had stopped the paper, I stopped only my copy of it, because I didn’t like your editorials.”

“Pshaw!” retorted Mr. Greeley, “It wasn’t worth taking up my time to tell me such a trifle as that. Mr. dear sir, if you expect to control the utterance of the ‘Tribune’ by the purchase of one copy a day, or if you think to find [any] newspaper or magazine [worth reading] that will never express … (page torn) … with your own, you are doomed to disappointment.”

— Success.
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19050603Pg1-txt1headline2B. F. Francis’ New Store.

B. F. Francis arrived in Roosevelt last Saturday and commenced to prepare a place for his mammoth stock of general merchandise which is expected to arrive most any time. Mr. Francis secured the Dr. C. T. Jones’ building on north Main street and has had it remodeled and shelving put in. This building is only about half large enough for his use. Ben has a large sign already in place so it will not be hard to find his store.
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M. J. Milmore and J. B. Martin returned Monday from a prospecting trip to Hoodo. They secured three claims in that section. One of these claims is located on Wilson creek and has a 17 foot ledge. The other two claims were located on Hoodo and Erasta creeks. The veins on these claims run from two and one-half to five feet in width and are between a quartsite and chist contact. They have received one assay from the float that went $61. They seem well satisfied with the country and are going back as soon as convenient.
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H. C. Willis, general manager of the Adams Mining Co., arrived in town the first of the week. Mr. Willis has been spending most of the time at the mine and expresses himself well pleased with the progress of the work under way. Mr. Willis will leave today in company with Mead Mayo for Boise.
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19050603Pg1-txt1headline3Our Northern Route.

The State Commission has decided to take up the northern route into Big creek from Warren. While this route might not meet with the approval of some of our citizens it will be so much toward opening up this great mining district. The road has been promised on the condition the citizens of that district pay half and the state one-half of the expense. This, they no doubt will do as it is to their interest.

The route of the proposed road leads southwesterly from Warren up Warren creek to its head, over the summit to Pony creek, down that stream to the south fork of the Salmon, up the south fork to Elk creek and up that stream to the Elk creek summit, then dropping down to the Werdenhoff mine on Big creek. Bids will be called for at once, the idea being to have construction work begun on June 25.

If this road is completed by fall to the Werdenhoff mine they will readily see that it will be necessary to extend it on to Roosevelt in order to get our trade. This northern route would not only prove a revenue to the people in … (page torn) … accommodation to a great many here who are compelled to travel this route.

If a person goes the southern route in the winter time they are compelled to go down through parts of Oregon and Washington before they reach the county seat. Think of how many days and how many hundreds of miles they travel to reach this point? The people in Grangeville have no interest in us any more than to collect their share of the taxes and make us humble servants for a lot of high salaried county officials. What have we received from the county in return for our support? The privilege of casting a vote to support these officials.
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19050603Pg1-txt1headline4School Election.
(COMMUNICATED.)

There will be an election Monday, June 5, for three school trustees for this district. A meeting of the retiring trustees will be held from 1 to 2 o’clock for the purpose of making their report. A judge and clerk of election will be chosen for the election of the three trustees. Election will be held right after the meeting from 2 to 5 o’clock. Three of our well known resident citizens have signified their willingness to run for the trusteeship, viz: C. W. Hinkey, P. McKinney and J. M. Ellis.

All interested in the school should attend the meeting June 5th from 1 to 2 o’clock at the Fairview building, now used as school house.
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The Thunder Mountain country is receiving its share of moisture.
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19050603Pg1-txt1headline5Here and There.

When you want a good meal read Le Roy’s ad and give him a call.

We have been informed the Fairview claims have been rebonded to the same company.

Olof Hagberg and Peter Johnson have sold their lot opposite the Lisenby Hotel to Gus Holtgren.

Jack Ferguson and Jim Hash came up from Loom creek Thursday with a load of oats and “spuds.”

The Clark brothers, of Boise, who have been doing assessment work on the Bannock Burn claims south of Roosevelt, passed through town Tuesday on a prospecting trip. They only completed about one-half of this work and concluded to give the remainder up for the present time on account of the water. They had nine horses with them.

Jack Cassell and George Sheppard returned Thursday from a two weeks trip to Greyhound Mountain, in Custer county. They struck a big thing in finding one of the strongest veins in the country. They have seven feet of a … ore carrying silver … (page torn) … granite … wall with porphyry foot wall. George Batters and Al. Adell are interested with them.

Newton Hibbs, of Salmon, arrived in camp this week to take charge of the Rainbow Gold Mining Co.’s property. This company has a fairly well developed property on Sable creek, three miles from Roosevelt. One shift has been working on a cross-cut for Mr. Hibbs for the past month. A dike 30 fee wide has been cut at a depth of [100?] feet which carries good gold values. If the preliminary tests of this great ore body are confirmed by more careful sampling, this mine is ready for a 50 ton reduction plant. The company is prepared to install such a plant this fall, if tests now being made demonstrate the fact that the values can be saved by cyanide or other economic methods of extraction.

Wm. Kreps, sister and nephew and four men arrived in Roosevelt last Monday night from Boise. Mr. Kreps had 30 head of stock besides some milch cows and calves. Mr. Kreps loaded 12,000 pounds of stuff out of Boise for this pace and succeeded in getting it as far as Snows place. He was compelled to break the snow on Cabin creek summit before reaching Snows place where he left his wagons. He brought his stock in heavily packed. He has five good draft teams which he will work at the mines. He says this is the easiest trip he has ever made into Thunder Mountain at this time of the year. Mr. Kreps is now remodeling his stable so he will have a place to keep his feed and stock.
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19050603Pg2-header
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After the long and bitter contest among the towns of northern Idaho it has been decided to locate the asylum at Orofino. This is not a bad location for an institution of this kind.
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If reports are true concerning the railroad situation on Camas prairie they will soon have a road of some kind. It most likely would be well patronized by the traveling public in the winter.
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Mine superintendents who are hiring men and sending them in here will please bear in mind that we are American citizens and that this class of labor will be appreciated instead of Italians. A hint to the wise should be sufficient!
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There are a lot of enquiries [sic] coming to Roosevelt about a property that is being handled by an old timer in the Thunder Mountain country and if he does not let up we will advertise him and his “bunco property.” This annoyance and robbery has gone for enough.
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The Thunder Mountain country is still [without a road] district and the commissioners have adjourned until in July and then if they should see fit to take this matter up we would hardly get the road work started until the first of September. This will come in our busy season and will only serve to will this money and what will we get in return? We need the road repairing now and not next fall. Our roads need repairing as all other mountain roads do in the spring and from the present outlook the only work they will receive will be from donations.
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This issue of THE NEWS makes it six months old and four months under the present management, and now we are compelled to explain away one thing. On taking hold of this newspaper plant we supposed that as an application had been made to enter it as second class matter everything was perfectly satisfactory. After running some thirty days we found that a new entry had to be made and in a letter from the Third Assistant Postmaster General last week claims this has never been done, and after receiving $25 for postage at 8 cents per pound, we have at last been shut off from that and are compelled to use stamps in order to get our paper through the mail.
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Owing to the Thunder Mountain wagon road not being finished until late last fall and the amount of machinery that had to be freighted in it was thought, by some on the outside not familiar with the situation, that the camp was receiving a set back when the Sunnyside was compelled to close down waiting the arrival of the new crusher and grips. This closing down was the best thing that ever happened this district. If this mine had worked all winter we would of all been on scant rashings [sic] at the present time. When they made the first start this spring there was a number of men sent in from the outside to go to work and when these men were laid off the most of them started out. We are safe in saying that there was not a practical miner in the crowd and as they were not familiar with this mining life they had all kind of hard luck stories to tell. If these men had of been miners and of stayed until now they could of found plenty of work. There are comparatively no idle men to be had at this time. In a month from now a man can get a job wherever he asks for it and there will be no delay.
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19050603Pg3-header
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19050603Pg3-txt1headline1
Her Compensation.

Ye patient old maid
When all has been said,
There’s a pile of good to your credit.

Now that you are gone
We have a new song;
‘Tis the “bachelor girl” we must edit.

Before your slow death
One just held his breath,
Were the term spake in your hearing,

‘Twas cats and weak tea
And passementerie
With a temper not very endearing

With all this slander,
O! goose minus gander,
You filled a niche well in the home,

A handy right bower
In sunshine or shower,
In the whirl, too, as Maud’s chaperone.

But now ’tis decreed
That you shall precede
Both spinsters and dames in the race —

A man without pants,
A goose in a trance,
One smiles a droll smile at your pace.

Oh! bachelor girl,
This flag now unfurl,
And wave it where single men see it —

“I’m tired of this strife
Please take me to wife,”
And I’m sure in a year you’ll be it.

SAM SOUTH.

* Passementerie wiki link:
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19050603Pg3-txt1headline2Doomed Tribe of Red Men.

“The full blood Indian is finally passing, just as the deer or the wild turkey will finally die if penned up,” said Col. John N. Florer, of Gray Horse, O. T., who has lived with the Osage Indians for thirty-three years. and is one of the valued counselors of the tribe, at the Coates House, recently. “My prediction is that in twenty-five years more there will not be a full-blood Osage left.”

“When I first went among the Osages,” said Col. Florer to a Kansas City Journal reporter, “the tribe comprised between 6,000 and 8,000 persons. Now there are but 1,700 or 1,800 of them, including, of course, all those of mixed blood. The Osages have been holding their own pretty well in point of numbers in the last four or five years, but they are doomed to go the way of their fellows.

“The dying out of the race is due in large measure to the change in their habits of life. They used to be out in the open air all the time, and when they traveled it was always on horseback. Even when they moved their camps each Indian would round up his string of ponies and make pack animals of six or eight of them, to carry his belongings. Now they ride about in buggies and carriages, the best to be had. They are rich enough to afford all the luxuries of that sort, and, with no incentive to exertion, their lives are about as far removed from their former habits of activity as could be.

“I was present at the council near Independence, Kans., when the treaty was signed by which the tribe surrendered to the government the Osage ceded lands in southern Kansas, and purchased in their stead the million and a half acres from the Cherokees, which they have since occupied. That trade was a good thing for the Osages. They got $1.25 per acre for the land, and the deferred payments were to draw five per cent interest. That mounted up rapidly, and is the source of the annuities which the Osages enjoy today.

“Those were the good old days which the Indians always speak of as ‘the buffalo days.’ I went out on the plains with them in their hunts for years. On out west from the Osage nation there used to be times when one could see buffalo for miles and miles. At a distance it had the appearance of a dark, surging sea. In a year there I bought 28,000 buffalo hides — more than there are in the whole country today. Of course there are lots of younger members of the tribe to whom that is all tradition and they will sit around for hours and listen to the elders talk of the old times.”
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James McCalla, Wm. Mitchell and Mr. Commer own seven claims on Big creek opposite the town of Golden and the Lick creek. They expect to go to work on this property soon. The ores are an odd kind in this country carrying five per cent. nickle, twelve per cent. cobalt and $3 gold. The vein is well defined and in granite.
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Page 4 (blank)
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19050603Pg5-txt1headline1The Fake Town of “Hallis”

We can now explain away the matter concerning the fake town of Hallis. There is no such a town but we have been able to locate the companies and their properties. Finding this property does not help the companies very much, for a legitimate mining company would not be guilty of handling such ground. These people are not wanting to handle the ground but are out to sell stock.

This property lies on the West Fork of Monumental creek below Roosevelt but hardly shows up as the Mining Record has it. Part of the companies cannot be found of record. But possibly when they took these claims out to advertise them they have changed the name to suit their taste thanking they could do a better business. These companies own one claim each and we are not able to say whether the assessment work was done for last year or not.

The Liberty Bell Gold Mining Co. own one claim and is called the Sandpoint.

Victoria Mining Co. own one claim called the Rambler.

The owner of these two claim, is the inter-Trust Security Co., 7911 Water street, Boston, Mass.

The Consolidated Mining & Development Co. own one claim called the Ram Rod.

The Idaho Exploration & Development Co. awn one claim called the Frontier.

F. L. Miner, 501 Mutual Reserve building, New York City, seems to be secretary or manager for the last two companies.

The above information is found of record in the recorder’s office at this place and if they can clear away this matter it would be much more satisfactory to the people in the mining profession. This way of selling mining stock and not expending the money on the ground should be passed up as a fraud and not tolerated in the camp.
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19050603Pg5-txt1headline2The New Butcher Firm.

People in Roosevelt will be interested to know that Peter McKinney and H. J. Hanson have entered into a co-partnership under the firm name of McKinney & Hanson, for the purpose of opening a first-class meat and produce market in the Pioneer Meat Market building, being the same formerly occupied by Mr. Hanson. Mr. McKinney will have charge of the shop and Mr. Hanson will superintend the killing of the cattle and other outside work. By this arrangement it is believed by both the gentlemen that they will be able to give better service to their patrons and to furnish beef at more reasonable prices. The firm has already purchased a large number of fat steers and promise their customers a superior quality of meat during the coming season. Both Mr. McKinney and Mr. Hanson are well known in Roosevelt as experienced butchers and market men and both have a large number of friends who wish them success in their joint enterprise.
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Jones & Frost have formed a co-partnership in the livery business and have commenced to erect a barn on south Main street.
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Mrs. Euler and son left Monday for Boise.
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Notices For Publication

19050603Pg5Notice1

19050603Pg5Notice2

link: Notice For Publication.rtf
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19050603Pg6-txt1headline1
LOCALS

Hunter E. Crane left Monday for outside points for a three weeks trip.

S. S. Whitaker left Tuesday for Elk City where he Will visit relatives for awhile.

Wm. Dutton is spending a few days with the McGiveney brothers at the hot springs.

Robt. Skinner has disposed of his lot next to the Log Cabin Club to Geo. W. Bruce.

The school directors of Roosevelt wish to extend their thanks to J. R. Noss, of the Twentieth Century mine, for the lumber donated for the school desks.

Ollie Lingo has commenced the erection of a home in Roosevelt. The building is to be 20×36. When this is finished his mother and father will come to Roosevelt and make this camp their future residence.

The Standard Mining company will commence a raise and also to sink on the main ledge the first of the week. They are working as large a force of men as they have accommodations for at the present time.

The Government Townsite Association held a meeting at Smith’s Hotel last Friday evening to transact some important business. The hearing of this case will come up at the Hailey Land Office on the 20th of July. A committee was appointed to gather evidence in this case.
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19050603Pg6-txt1headline24th of July Celebration.

We have been requested to state that there will be a citizen’s mass-meeting held this evening (Saturday) at B. F. Francis’ store for the purpose of perfecting arrangements for a 4th of July celebration.
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Milt Merritt and Clate Vance left last Monday for Ramey Ridge and after spending a few days there they will then go to Stites after a load of supplies for their own use. Robt. Skinner and R. D. Almond accompanied them as far as Ramey Ridge where they will do some assessment work.

E. A. Clark, who has been employed at the Dewey mine the past winter left for Boise Thursday for a much needed vacation, before doing the annual work on his property, which is located on Cooper Mountain. Mr. Clarks holdings consist of a group of six full clams and two fractions on which property the Hood & Cooper ledges traverse with outcroppers. These claims are also an extension of the Snowstorm.

According to the Statesman of May 21, a mill has arrived in Boise for the Curran-Caswell Gold Mining Company, owners of the Mysterious Slide group on Mule creek, and will be shipped as soon as the roads get into condition for heavy freighting, which we hope will not be long. The plant consists of a 5-foot Monadnock mill, with boiler and engine, and a small sawmill. It is expected the mill will handle 100 tons of ore daily. The character of the ore is such that it is anticipated the plant will develop the maximum capacity. When this plant is completed we can safely say. that it will run steady for the work is being handled by experienced men.
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The McGiveney brothers were up the first of the week with a full cargo of hay. While here they disposed of their interest in the livery stable to Wm. Queeney.

Fred Todd, superintendent of the Standard mine, left Tuesday for St. Paul where he will attend the directors and stockholders meeting, of the company, to be held in that city on the 10th inst.

The Weiser Signal of the 20th ult. says the owners of the Buffalo group will install a 50-stamp mill on their property the coming summer. If this goes in it will no doubt prove another producer. We will expect more reliable information when Thomas Neighbors returns from Boise as he will have charge of the work.

James Mahoney and Pete Rude came up from the Middle Fork the latter part of last week with a packtrain load of vegetables which they disposed of readily. They left the first of the week for the transfer for a load of freight for this place. Mr. Mahoney informs us that he has his ditch completed but cannot use it on account of not having enough cable. This wire cable is used to convey the water across the river and the shortage was not discovered until they commenced to use it. The mistake was made in the shipment and hence he will lose the use of part of the ground this season.
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FORFEITURE NOTICE.

To E. M. Clements, his heirs or assigns:

You are hereby notified that I have expended during the year 1904 the sum of two (200) hundred dollars in labor and improvements upon the Edmon, Bullion and Amalgan Bar mining claims in the Pittsburg group of quartz mining claims, situate in Thunder Mountain mining district, Idaho Co., State of Idaho, the location certificates of which are found of record in the office of the recorder of said county, in order to hold said claims for the period ending December 31, 1904, you proportion of said expenditures being one (100) hundred dollars for said year, for the one-third interest belonging to you. And if, within ninety days after the service of this notice by publication, you fail or refuse to contribute your proportion of such expenditures as co-owner, together with the cost of this notice, your interest in said claims will become the property of the undersigned your co-owner, under the terms of section 2324, Revised Statutes of the United States.

Dated at Roosevelt, Idaho, May 17, 1905,
D. T. SILLIVAN.
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FORFEITURE NOTICE.

To J. Fry, his heirs or assigns:

You are hereby notified that I have expended during the year 1904 the sum of one (100) hundred dollars in labor and improvements upon the Monk mining claim in the Pittsburg group of quartz claims, situated in the Thunder Mountain mining district, Idaho county, State of Idaho, the location certificate of which is found of record in the office of the recorder of said county, in order to hold said claim for the period ending December 31, 1904, your proportion of said expenditures being fifty (50) dollars for said year, for the one-half interest belonging to you. And if, within ninety days after the service of this notice by publication, you fail or refuse to contribute your proportion of such expenditures as co-owner, together with the cost of this notice, your interest in said claims will become the property of the undersigned your co-owner, under the terms of section 2324, Revised Statutes of the United States.

Dated at Roosevelt, Idaho, May 17, 1905.
D. T. SILLIVAN.
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FORFEITURE NOTICE.

To Wm. Burg, his heirs or assigns:

You are hereby notified that I have expended during the year 1904 the sum of one hundred [100] dollars in labor and improvements upon the Golden Chest Fraction lode, situated in Thunder Mountain Mining district, Idaho county, State of Idaho, the location certificate of which is found of record in the deputy recorder’s office at Roosevelt, Idaho, also county seat, Grangeville, Idaho, in order to hold said claim for the period ending Dec, 31, 1904, your proportion of said expenditures being the sum of fifty [50] dollars for said year, for the one-half interest belonging to you. And if, within ninety days after the service of this notice by publication, you fail or refuse to contribute your proportion of such expenditure as co-owner, together with the cost of this notice, your interest in said claim will become the property of the undersigned your co-owner, under the terms of section 2324, Revised Statutes of the United States.

Dated at Roosevelt, Idaho, May 20, 1905
THOMAS NEIGHBORS.
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The owners of the Lion Group of claims have commenced their annual assessment work this week. This property is situated on Mule creek near town.
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Subscribe for the NEWS.
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Link to Thunder Mountain and Roosevelt index page

Link: Public folder with images of the old newspapers
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Other Papers

Elk City Mining News. May 27, 1905, page 1

ECMN19050527-1headlineTo Thunder Mountain.

The Stonebreaker brothers and Frank Roberts of Stites passed through town Tuesday with their pack train on their way to Roosevelt. Nash Wayland and Harry Markham arrived in Elk Sunday with the former’s pack train, also loaded for Roosevelt. They unloaded here and doubled back for another load before proceeding farther.
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ECMN19050527-2headlineWarren-Big Creek Road.

The state wagon road commission made its first appropriation last Tuesday. It set aside $10,000 to build the road from Warren to Big Creek, a distance of 30 miles. The mining companies in Big Creek and the citizens of Weiser and upper country have agreed to contribute an equal amount for the purpose.

source: Chronicling America
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Elk City Mining News. May 27, 1905, page 8

C. D. Patterson of Spokane, the millwright who will erect the Thunder Mountain company’s mill, arrived on Wednesday’s stage and proceeded to the mine the same day.

source: Chronicling America
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Elmore Bulletin. June 01, 1905, page 4

William J Bryan has notified the regents of the state university that $400 of the philanthropic fund left by the late Philo M. Bennett, had been apportioned to the Idaho university. The money is to constitute a fund, the income for life of which is to be used for an annual prize for the best paper on political economy, statesmanship or any other related subject. It is hoped that the fund will be increased by local subscriptions to $1,000 that three prizes may be given. Mr. Bennett lost his life in a runaway accident on the road to Thunder Mountain.

source: Chronicling America
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Lewiston Inter-State News. June 02, 1905, Page 3

LISN19050602-1headlineRailway Program.
(Boise Statesman.)

Some very peculiar railway stories emanate from New York. They are peculiar because of their manner of dealing with the geography and topography of this northwestern country. The Statesman had occasion a few days ago to call attention to one such story. It now finds another bearing on the same subject in the form of a special to the Portland Oregonian. This special says:

“The Union Pacific and Northern Pacific executive committees met separately on Thursday and passed motions to prepare for building a joint line, from Huntington or such other point on the Oregon Short Line as may be chosen near Huntington to either Culdesac or Clearwater on the Northern Pacific. The entire new line will be about 550 miles long and will be built of 75 pound rails and equipped according to the Union Pacific’s specification, the total cost not to exceed $15,000,000, and work on the surveys to begin immediately. The surveys made by both railroads in 1900 will be abandoned in favor of a line to follow the Snake river closely.”

The Oregonian construes that as an announcement that a line is to be built from Huntington to Lewiston, following the water grade down the Snake river. A line from the south to Culdesac would have to leave the Snake at some point. Yet the special states it is proposed to keep as close as possible to that river. The contradictions are so confusing that it is difficult to understand what may really be implied.

It has long been the belief of most observers that the Union Pacific would eventually secure a line down the Snake over which it would have a water grade all the way to Portland. It is altogether probable that it has been determined to construct such a line as part of the present program of extension.

That would make the continued references to a line from Culdesac meaningless unless it be assumed it is the intention to make a north and south connection over another route — one by which the great interior region could be developed. A line following the canyon of the river would not contribute much toward the development f the country, as it would be too inaccessible along the greater part of the way.

On the other hand, a line through the higher country would tap many rich regions and afford others transportation facilities with comparatively short wagon hauls. With the P. & I. N. at Pollock, to which it is to be constructed according to the information recently published in The Statesman, and with the Northern Pacific at Grangeville, or with a line out through the heart of the Nez Perce prairie from Culdesac, there would be but a short link to be built to connect the two sections.

Such a line as this, with branches like that to Thunder Mountain proposed by Mr. Van Riper and his associates, would open up a vast region. The traffic from it could flow in either direction — northward to the Northern Pacific or southward to the Short Line.

In addition to all the indications of such a purpose. it may be added that The Statesman has received several intimations, from persons qualified to speak advisedly. that the program does involve such a connection between the P. & I. N. and a road from the north. That road will be purely for the development of the country and accommodation of the settlers and business interests of the interior, since it would not be suitable for heavy through traffic.

source: Chronicling America
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Elk City Mining News. June 03, 1905, page 1

The Twentieth Century Mining & Power Co., Ltd., is hauling in a ten-stamp mill for their property at Thunder Mountain.

source: Chronicling America
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Elk City Mining News. June 03, 1905, page 4

ECMN19050603-Ad1

source: Chronicling America
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Elk City Mining News. June 10, 1905, page 1

ECMN19050610-1headlineTHUNDER MOUNTAIN
Mill for the Curren-Caswell Property — General Notes of Interest.

A special from Boise states that a mill has arrived there for the Curren-Caswell Gold Mining Co., owner of the Mysterious Slide group at Thunder Mountain. It will be shipped to the camp as soon as the roads get into condition for heavy freighting, which, it is hoped, will be about the first of next month.

This plant consists of a 5-foot Monadnock mill, with boiler and engine, and a small sawmill. It will be put up by a man sent from the machinery house from which it was secured, going in under a guarantee that it will do all that is claimed for it. The company pays, only the expenses of the man sent to put it into operation. It is expected the mill will handle 100 tons of ore daily. The character of the ore is such that it is anticipated the plant will develop the maximum capacity. The values will be saved by simple amalgamation. It is known that a large proportion of the gold will amalgamate, but if it be found too much is being lost, a cyanide plant will be installed with which to treat the tailings.

In the Mysterious Slide a very large body of ore has been developed, carrying values about like those of other properties of the camp. It can be mined very cheaply and can be made to pay very handsomely. Martin Curren and Ben Caswell have been developing the mine for a long time, determining the proportions and the value of the ore body. They have demonstrated they have sufficient ore to keep a large plant running for years, and that its grade is sufficient to assure large profits. It is the intention to double the capacity of the plant next year.

According to reports the bond on the Eureka property has been taken up before the time was up and the $50,000 is to be paid over at once.

The 10-stamp mill on the Dewey is running steadily on low grade ore, but at that about $7 per ton was being realized. The company run out of timber, which prevented them from stoping their best body of ore, and it became necessary to work ore which was not so rich in value.

The Sunnyside is running 30 stamps of its 40 stamp mill. The company shut down for a short time to install an engine, which will furnish additional power to operate the crusher.

The Adams Mining company is building a wagon road from the main road on Monumental creek to its property and getting out timber for the mill, which will be taken in from Boise as soon as the roads are passable.

The Pearl Mining company is moving the machinery from the Erie to the Cheapman group with the intention of developing that property.

source: Chronicling America
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Elk City Mining News. June 10, 1905, page 8

ECMN19050610-headline1
Local Mentions

Wayland’s pack train left for Roosevelt Tuesday via Dixie.

Several loads of machinery arrived for the Thunder Mountain company this week.

source: Chronicling America
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SM19050613-1headlineSITUATION AT THUNDER.

Well, here we are in the famous Thunder Mountain country (that is Ben and I) and find that the stories that are floating around the Salmon River country about the scarcity of laborers to be an exaggeration, as there are at least between seventy-five and one hundred idle men in Roosevelt at the present time ready to go to work the first chance they have to do so.

This I believe will be the banner year of Thunder Mountain but it is too early in the season to make any predictions. The roads and trails are impassable owing to deep snows in the mountains and high water, and nearly all of the mining companies and stores are short of supplies.

The “Sunnyside” Company which employs more men than any other one company had to suspend operation about 2 weeks ago owing to a defect in the workings of their tramway, but they expect to have this remedied and resume operations by June 1st. The success of this company means much to Thunder Mountain. They have spent thousands of dollars in the erection of a forty-stamp mill, tramway, boarding and bunk houses and on the road which was built from Boise last year. Judging from reports the “Sunnyside” has immense bodies of free-mill-ore and is undoubtedly one of the largest mines in the State. The mine is at present under the management of Supt. Abbott.

The H. Y. and Climax Co., have only three men in their employ at present, but will put on a larger force as soon as the snow disappears. The mine is now under the management of Peter Wagner, who was foreman of the “Sunnyside” mine last year.

The “Standard” has a fine showing of high grade ore, and at the present time have a force of fourteen men at work under the management of Supt. Schnider. This is a new company which started up late in the winter.

The Dewey Company have been working a force of thirty men all winter in their mine and mill. This property is under the management of Supt. Hang and William Pryor — the latter is well known to all old Custerites and at one time was foreman of the “Skylark” mine at Bayhorse.

The 20th Century Company have about thirty men at work but they expect to double their force as soon as they can get the machinery in for their ten stamp mill which they will erect during the coming summer.

The De Camp property on Divide Creek have a small force at work and they have let a contract for the hewing of square timbers for a ten stamp mill which is to be erected this year.

There are a great many people in this section who have claimed Custer county as their home at one time or another, viz: Mel Hicks, Myron Shonover, Pat Lynch, Mrs. Morris and daughter, Nick Dorsa, Frank Tully, Chas. Frost, Toni Horton, Joe Davis, Jas. West, Geo. Shepherd, Al Green, Dr. Jones, Jas. Kerr and Mike Foley.

Those coming here in search of work, do not come before the 1st of July, as there will be little doing before that time. Prices on all commodities are high and one to live a life of idleness in here must have an income of [a] Wall Street magnate. Flour is from $13 to $15 per 100; sugar from 20 to 25c per pound; rice 20c; bacon 25 to 40c; dried fruits 20 to 27c., and everything else in proportion.

CLYDE WILKINSON.
Roosevelt, Ida., May 29, 1905.

source: Chronicling America
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The Weiser Semi-Weekly Signal. June 14, 1905, page 1

WSWS19050614-1headlineNo Road District in Thunder.

The Thunder Mountain country is still without a road district and the commissioners have adjourned until in July and then if they should see fit to take this matter up we would hardly get the road work started until the first of September, says the Thunder Mt. News. This will come in our busy season and will only serve to collect this money and what will we get in return? We need the road repairing now and not next fall. Our roads need repairing as all other mountain roads do in the spring and from the present outlook the only work they will receive will be from donations.

source: Chronicling America
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The Weiser Semi-Weekly Signal. June 14, 1905, page 2

WSWS19050614-2headlineStill Taking Weiser-Warren Route.

The people of Boise are still taking the Weiser-Warren route to Thunder Mountain, despite the $50,000 state wagon road built for the special benefit of the capitol city, as witness this from Monday’s Statesman:

“Mrs. Brown Lower has left, via Weiser and Council, for Roosevelt, called there by news of the serious illness of her sister, Mrs. Ed Myers, formerly of Boise”

source: Chronicling America
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