Monthly Archives: April 2020

Road Reports Apr 29, 2020

Please share road reports. Rock Migration Season in progress. Conditions change very quickly this time of year. High elevation roads still have several feet of snow. Be prepared for snow/ice, rocks and trees in the road and remember there is no cell phone service.

Yellow Pine: Local streets are bare. Elk are wandering around at dusk. Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN.
link: Local Forecast
Yellow Pine Webcam: (check date on image)

Warm Lake Highway: Wednesday (Apr 29) mail truck driver says the highway is good.
link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

Highway 55 Webcams Link:

South Fork Road: Report on Wednesday (Apr 29) road is in good shape.
Weight restrictions went into effect March 23rd.
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Snow free. Report Wednesday (Apr 29) the county grader is working today, the road is graded from Yellow Pine halfway to the South Fork turn off.

Lower Johnson Creek Road: Last report Wednesday (Apr 22) that lower Johnson Creek road is bare between YP and Wapiti Meadow Ranch.
Landmark and upper Johnson Creek closed to wheeled vehicles.
link: Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam
link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
Note: The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Closed to wheeled vehicles (no current report.)
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Last report April 10: [summit] “between 6-7 ft. Continuous snow floor from the Big Creek turnoff. About 3 ft remaining at the Big Creek turnoff.” – SA
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcam: (check date on image)

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open with restrictions
April 9 – Temporary Spring Restrictions on upper Stibnite Rd in effect.
Update from Midas March 30: As Spring nears, snow and ice on the Stibnite road is beginning to melt, leaving some sections of the road bare and others still covered in snow. The road is soft in places so Midas Gold crews are minimizing traffic and utilizing UTV’s when possible to prevent erosion. Warmer temperatures in the afternoons bring rocks down daily so caution for all travelers is advised. Midas Gold crews are vigilant and exercising extra caution to watch out for falling rocks and remove fallen rocks in order to maintain access to Stibnite.
We also received notice from the County that due to spring melt conditions there will be temporary travel restrictions on Stibnite Road. These restrictions are both to keep the road from further damage, reduce erosion and to keep the public safe.
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Closed to wheeled vehicles (no current report.)
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: Closed to wheeled vehicles (no current report.)
Note: The approx elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′
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Apr 26 2020 The Yellow Pine Times

Apr 26 2020 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Community Calendar:

Yellow Pine Tavern Closed until further notice.
April 17 – Boil water order issued
April 15-30 – Statewide Stay Home order extended
April 9 – Temp. Spring Restrictions on upper Stibnite Rd
March 23 – South Fork road weight restrictions
March 28-June 30 – Lower South Fork Salmon River closed to rafting
Spring Rx Burns postponed
(details below)
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Valley County Covid-19 Response Page
link:
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Valley County Emergency Operations Center
link:
— —

Rebound – Idaho Governor’s phasing program
link:
— —

COVID 19: Recommendations and Resources for Safe Business Practices
link: (lots of info for businesses)
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Local Events:

Nothing scheduled yet.
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Village News:

Aftershocks felt this week:

April 20 Aftershock at 1158pm M 4.1 on Cape Horn Mountain link:

April 24 Aftershock at 1250am M 3.4 south of Stanley Lake.
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Critters

Wolves (no recent reports) – wolves attacked and wounded a cow elk right in the village around 1030pm Sunday night (April 12th) in the area between main street and Alpine village. (Update the elk apparently survived, at least for a week.) Watch your pets!

Tick Season in full swing.

Bears are out of hibernation, protect your trash and pet food.

Foxes may still be around, watch your small pets.
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Yellow Pine Tavern closed due to COVID-19 fears

Tavern is still closed until further notice. Will have gas available as well as take out beer, pop, candy, chips, pizza. Call 208 739-7086 or go to 355 Yellow Pine Ave. House across street from the Tavern next to the Silver Dollar.
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Voting Idaho Primary Election May 19, 2020

For folks registered in the Valley County Precinct: Update, the Valley County Clerk’s office corrected an earlier report, Yellow Pine ballots will be mailed out next Monday *April 27th*. If you do not get your ballot by Friday’s mail, you should call and request one. (208) 382-7103. You may also download an absentee ballot (link) request and mail to the County Clerk (must be received by May 19th at 5pm).
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2020 Census

The 2020 Census Impacts All Valley County Residents

A report April 22nd that Valley County has had only had a 10% participation in the 2020 Census. Some folks with PO boxes have not received the paper census. You do not need and ID#, just your street address. It is recommended that we all fill out the census online.

If you spend 50% of your time in Valley County, you can consider it your home per the Census. Where you register with the Census is confidential and never linked to other governmental requirements such as property taxes or mailing address. The deadline for the 2020 Census has been extended until August. They will probably not be sending census takers up to Yellow Pine.

Link: to online census

You do not need an ID number. Go to the link. Click on “start questionnaire”. Then on the next page scroll down to “If you do not have a Census ID, click here” – when you click on that line it will start the census. (see below)

2020Census-a
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Boil Water Order issued April 17, 2020

As April 17th 2020, Yellow Pine is under another “Boil Order”.

Boil Water Advisory Notice

Boil Your Water Before Using

Bring tap water to a rolling boil, boil for one minute, and cool before using or use bottled water. Boiled or bottled water should be used for drinking, making ice, washing dishes, brushing teeth, and preparing food until further notice.

This Boil Water Advisory Notice applies to The Yellow Pine Water System

What Happened?

Starting on 3-22-2020 the water system had the following problem: Due to high water demand, treatment requirements were not met after the completion of maintenance procedures. .

This problem indicates that harmful microbes may be present in your drinking water. Harmful microbes in drinking water can cause diarrhea, cramps, nausea, headaches, or other symptoms and may pose a special health risk for infants, some elderly, and people with severely compromised immune systems. But these symptoms are not just caused by microbes in drinking water.

If you experience any of these symptoms and they persist, you should seek medical advice.

What is being done?

The system is being monitored and checked daily for compliance. .

It is likely that you will need to boil water for the next 3 to 5 days until the problem is fixed.

You will be informed when you no longer need to boil your water.

For more information, please contact:
Warren Drake
of the Yellow Pine Water System
at 208-573-6261
or wdrake@drakediversified.com

Please share this information with other people who drink this water, especially anyone who may not get this notice directly (for example, people in apartments, nursing homes, schools, and businesses).

You can do this by posting this notice in a public place or distributing copies by hand or mail.

State Water System ID#: 4430059 Date distributed: 3-22-2020
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Forest Info:

The Payette and Boise NF campgrounds in our area do not normally open until Memorial Day Weekend. Currently restrooms are locked. The Old Eastfork (Devil’s Bathtubs) campground is closed. The Forest Service will send info to share when they know more. There are plans to do work on the South Fork road this summer, they said they would wait until Johnson Creek road is open, but there is no firm date set yet for the work.
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Road News:

It’s Rock Migration Season. Watch for rocks on the EFSF road in the bowling alley area and some areas of the South Fork. While the earthquake didn’t shake anything big loose, the freeze thaw cycle along with wet weather is bringing down rocks large and small.

Report that the county will start grading the EFSF road Monday, April 27th.

April 9th the temporary road restrictions on the upper Stibnite Road went into effect.

The load restrictions on the South Fork Salmon River Road started on Monday 3/23. They will stay in effect until the subgrade has dried out and the roadway can support standard loading.

The FS has plans to work on the South Fork Road again this summer, they will send info if and when the project is scheduled.
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Rx Burns

All new prescribed burn ignitions have been paused across the Region in line with regional direction. The Forest will continue to prioritize keeping employees and the public safe during this time. The decision to temporarily postpone ignitions will prevent any effects from smoke that might further worsen conditions for those who are at risk in our communities while reducing exposure for Forest Service employees who might not otherwise need to travel.

We expect the pause on prescribed burn ignitions to be re-evaluated by the Regional Forester sometime in April.
– PNF
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Yellow Pine US Mail

The 3-day a week mail delivery started Nov 1st. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 55 cents. Support our local post office and purchase your holiday stamps here.
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Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Lakeshore last emptied the bins Feb 13th.

Dump Report April 22: The bins are getting pretty full, please stack bags to the side of the dumpsters if full. The road to the dump is bare now.

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

Yellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is located approximately 3 miles south on Johnson Creek Road.

The TRANSFER STATION is for household trash and yard waste:
* Household trash must be put inside (and fit) the dumpster;
* Yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, et.) goes in the burn pile on the south end of the turn-around;
* Cardboard boxes should be flattened before putting the in the dumpster,

The DUMPSTERS are NOT for:
* Furniture (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station).

The BURN PILE is NOT for:
* Cardboard boxes (flatten and put in dumpster);
* Furniture and appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Drywall and building material (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wire or fencing (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Foam Rubber (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wood with metal (like nails) attached (take to Donnelly Transfer Station.)

When closing the DOORS on the front of the dumpsters:
* Make sure the “U” brackets at the top and bottom of the door are engaged;
* The retaining bar at the middle of the door is slid into the pipe;
* And the “L” bars at the bottom of the doors dropped into place.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: 208/634-7176
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Local Groups:

YPWUA News:

New Boil Water Order issued April 17, 2020

Second half of the water bill is due June 15, 2020.

The last Yellow Pine Water Users Shareholders meeting was Sunday July 7, 2019.
link: 20190707YPWUAminutes
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VYPA News:

Proposed VYPA Bylaws Changes

Attached is the compiled proposed changes to the bylaws the Council has received.

The proposed changes and the proposed addendum B, are being published to give folks plenty of time to read and process the information before the first reading.

link: 2020 Proposed changes to Yellow Pine Bylaws Adopted 9-12-2015.pdf

link: 2020 Addendum B-letter of interest.pdf

link: 2018 Midas Gold Community Partnership Agreement with the Village of Yellow Pine

Deb Filler – Chairperson
Village of Yellow Pine Association

The community hall committee’s goal is to have adequate heating installed in the main hall before the June VYPA meeting.

If folks have items for the community yard sale, please place them by the north wall in the community hall. If you see items you would like to purchase, you can pay Deb, Ronda, or Lynn. All funds support the community hall.

VYPA meetings for 2020 – June 13, 2pm; July 11, 2pm; August 8, 2pm; September 12, 2pm.

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting Minutes for September 21, 2019
link: 20190921 Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting
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YPFD News:

YP Fire Commissioners:
Sue Holloway – District 1
Dan Stiff – District 2
Merrill Saleen – District 3
Fire Chief – Jeff Forster

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice

The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.”

Click the link: to view 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation
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Biz Listings:

The Corner (208) 633-3325

Closed for the winter.
Plan to open for Memorial Weekend with live music provided by Willie and the Singlewides.
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Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233

Closed until further notice.
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Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377

Closed for Winter.
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Knotty Kat Crochet Works – 208-502-0940
FB page link
open Tue – Sat, 9-5
Yellow Pine eggs $3/doz
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Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Tom & Sarah Lanham
156 Yellow Pine Ave, Yellow Pine Id 83677
website:
Facebook:
Starting June 2020 We will be doing trail rides out of Yellow Pine along with summer pack / camping trips to high mountain lakes in the area!

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
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Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430
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Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

The Star-News

subscribe:
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine

Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, will service Yellow Pine

B&T Safety Solutions LLC
208-271-1600 Based out of Donnelly
Snow removal, cleaning chimneys and stoves, we do cabin staining/chinking as well
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Letter to Share:

Dear Yellow Pine residents:

Cascade Medical Center is here for you. When I (Tom Reinhardt) attended your community meeting in September, I mentioned that we were preparing to provide tele-video medical visits. We now have that up and running. If you want to schedule an appointment, call our clinic at 208-382-4285. Vicki or one of the MAs will ask you some questions to make sure that a tele-video visit is the right choice given your symptoms or need. If so, we will work with you to make sure you are set up on the Cascade Medical Center patient portal (with our EMR). We will also make sure that you are set up to be able to do a tele-video visit (laptop with camera, desktop with camera, or smart phone). We use the Zoom telemedicine system, which is confidential and secure (it works like Skype or Face-time). Before the appointment, we will email you a link for the tele-video visit. When it is time for your appointment, you will click on the link in the email and you will be connected with our provider and can begin your visit.

Regarding insurance coverage, the COVID legislation passed in March assures coverage of telemedicine visits for patients with Medicare, Medicaid, VA. Private insurers have also decided to provide coverage just as for regular in person visits, at least until the COVID epidemic crisis is declared over.

My advice is that if someone usually goes to the VA for care, they should call the VA and see if they can do a video visit with them. Or if they usually go to McCall St. Lukes, they should call their doctor there.

Tom Reinhardt, CEO
Cascade Medical Center
April 4, 2020

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Local Observations:

Monday (Apr 20) overnight low of 26 degrees, clear sky and light breezes this morning, most of the snow is gone except in the shade. Lots of swallows calling and swooping, several jays squawking, female hairy woodpecker and nuthatches visiting. A few small clouds and breezy after lunch time. Partly cloudy, warm and light breezes mid-afternoon, high of 67 degrees. Clear sky at dusk and calmer, swallows and robins calling. Lots of stars out before midnight. Earthquake at 1158pm!

Tuesday (Apr 21) overnight low of 27 degrees, clear sky and light breezes this morning, smaller piles of snow in the shade. Lots of swallows, a few jays, juncos and cassin’s finches, a robin and a few nuthatches along with a pine squirrel and 2 hairy woodpeckers visiting. Gusty breezes after lunch time. Northern flicker, a few finches, nuthatches, jays, juncos, and a chipmunk visiting. Report of the first hummingbird sighting. Increasing clouds and gusty breezes early afternoon. Colombian ground squirrels are coming out of hibernation. Warm late afternoon, mostly cloudy and breezy, high of 65 degrees. Gray overcast at dusk and calmer, elk munching through the neighborhood and robins hopping and chirping. Cloudy before midnight, later some stars came out.

Wednesday (Apr 22) overnight low of 28 degrees, mostly high thin hazy clouds this morning, almost all of the snow has melted except in the shade. Lots of swallows, some jays, juncos, robins, several cassin’s finches and a few nuthatches visiting. Mostly cloudy and light breezes at noon. Mail truck made it in a little early. Ground squirrels and chipmunks are out of hibernation, pine squirrel visiting as well as a hairy woodpecker. Two large birds of prey circling high over the village. Overcast, warm and breezy mid-afternoon, high of 63 degrees. Dark overcast and short drizzles early evening. Dark overcast and chilly gusty breezes after sundown. Robins calling in the fading light. Cloudy with rain showers before midnight. Rained during the night.

Thursday (Apr 23) overnight low of 38 degrees, received 1/4″ rain during the night, mostly cloudy sky this morning with wisps of fog mid-mountain, small patches of old snow remain in the shade. No swallows this morning, robins calling all over the neighborhood, several juncos and cassin’s finches, a few noisy jays, a couple of nuthatches, a hairy woodpecker and the silly pine squirrel visiting. Sprinkles on and off after lunch time, getting a little breezy early afternoon. Mostly cloudy with gusty breezes late afternoon and early evening, high of 55 degrees. It was mostly cloudy and calmer at dusk. Robins calling and elk grazing along neighborhood streets. Cloudy before midnight. M 3.4 aftershock at 1250am located south of Stanley Lake.

Friday (Apr 24) overnight low of 32 degrees, gray overcast this morning, just a few patches of snow remaining in the shade. A few swallows this morning, jays, juncos, cassin’s finches and nuthatches visiting along with a cheeky chipmunk. Cloudy at lunch time. A little breezy early afternoon. Warm with gray cloud cover and breezy late afternoon, high of 55 degrees. Calmer at dusk and cloudy. Elk in the neighborhood and robins calling. Some stars out before midnight.

Saturday (Apr 25) overnight low of 28 degrees, overcast and breezy this morning, smaller patches of old snow in the shade. Swallows and robins calling, woodpecker banging, nuthatches, juncos and cassin’s finches visiting. Overcast and breezy at lunch time. Male evening grosbeak joined the finches and juncos at the feeders early afternoon, overcast and breezy. Breaks in the clouds and gusty breezes during the afternoon, high of 64 degrees. Gunshot at 601pm to the north west. Dark overcast, gusty breezes and sprinkles of rain at dusk. Robins chirping and hopping around. Rain lasted until some time after midnight.

Sunday (Apr 26) overnight low of 40 degrees, partly cloudy sky and light breezes this morning. The only snow is where it slid off roofs into piles, the “natural” snow on the flat has melted. Lots of swallows and robins calling, cassin’s finches, nuthatches, jays and a hairy woodpecker visiting. Increased traffic. Partly cloudy and light breezes at lunch time. Dark-eyed juncos, clark’s nutcracker and northern flicker were early afternoon visitors, along with a chipmunk and ground squirrels. Mostly high thin haze, warm and light breezes mid-afternoon, high of 66 degrees. Calmer at dusk, robins calling and elk in the neighborhood. Internet out at 930pm.
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Birth:

Rowen Connor Burdine

Born April 14, 2020, at St. Luke’s McCall to DJ and Tarra Burdine of Cascade.

A boy, 8 pounds even and 20.5 inches long.

Immediate Family: Brother, Lane (8). Sisters, Lilly (12) and Aspen (2).

Grandparents: Maternal, Buck and Connie Cox of Council. Paternal, David and Elaine Burdine of Wilder.

source: The Star-News April 23, 2020
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Idaho News:

Rebound Idaho

(Valley County April 23, 2020 via FB)

Governor Brad Little announced “Rebound Idaho” at today’s press conference. This plan, with the help of the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare and guidance issued by the White House and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, has established a data-driven approach to opening up Idaho’s economy. The approach reduces the risk of COVID-19 to Idaho’s most vulnerable population and preserves capacity in our healthcare system, while opening up businesses safely.

Link: to learn more

Please note: The State Stay-Home order is still in effect through Thursday, April 30th, Valley County’s emergency order expires May 15th.
— — —

‘Most of the state will be open by the end of June’: Here’s when Idaho bars, churches and more could reopen under Gov. Little’s plan

The governor says his four-stage plan will provide a “concrete roadmap” about what comes next.

Katie Terhune April 23, 2020 KTVB

Boise, Idaho — Idaho Gov. Brad Little laid out his four-step plan Thursday for how the state can reopen as the threat of coronavirus recedes.

The governor warned that the model hinges on people continuing to maintain social distance and abiding by the current stay-at-home order to avoid a second spike of illness that could push those openings back further into the summer.

continued:
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ISP trooper on NM manhunt had COVID-19

Dozens of officers were assigned to search

By Tom Grote for The Star-News April 23, 2020

Dozens of police officers, including nearly the entire forces of the Valley County Sheriff’s Office and the McCall Police Department, were potentially exposed to the COVID-19 virus during a manhunt near New Meadows in late March and early April.

An Idaho State Police trooper who was present during the search for fugitive William James became ill after his arrival and was relieved of duties three days into the search, Adams County Sheriff Ryan Zollman said. The trooper later tested positive for COVID-19, Zollman said.

The trooper was on scene for three days between March 29-31 and left on April 1, the sheriff said.

During that time, 13 of the 17 deputies on the Valley County force as well as Chief Deputy Dave Stambaugh were part of the search.

All 14 Valley County officers were ordered into self-quarantine for three days until test results showed none were infected, Stambaugh told The Star-News.

Seven of the nine officers on the McCall police force were at the search scene, but city officials declined to reveal whether any of the officers were taken off patrol or tested.

continued:
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Stibnite Foundation gives $2,000 grants to towns to battle COVID-19

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News April 23, 2020

The Stibnite Foundation has issued seven $2,000 community grants to help local communities assist residents in the fight against the COVID-19 virus.

“We felt it was important to help each community immediately and give them resources to meet growing needs,” said Bob Crump of Riggins, who chairs the foundation’s 10-member board.

Communities that received a $2,000 grant were the cities of Cascade, Donnelly, McCall, New Meadows, Council and Riggins and the Village of Yellow Pine.

Each board member worked within their respective communities to identify who the grants should be awarded to and how they should be divided, Crump said.

The $14,000 in emergency grant funding comes on top of the $50,000 in grants the foundation plans to award later this year, he said.

continued:
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Cascade sewer system clogged by garbage

Other systems say they are OK, so far

By Max Silverson for The Star-News April 23, 2020

The City of Cascade has seen a 50% increase in the amount of garbage showing up in the sewage lagoons since the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic began.

Napkins, wet-wipes and paper towels that apparently have been used as a substitute for toilet paper are showing up in addition to the usual tampons, condoms and even mop heads found in the city’s sewage lagoons, Cascade Mayor Judith Nissula said.

Sheltering in place and a shortage of toilet paper bought on by panic-buying hoarders has meant more garbage for city employees to fish out of the system.

“A lot of it I think has to do with people staying home, and being out of toilet paper,” Nissula said.

continued:
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M-D schools to stay closed for rest of academic year

Plans move forward for graduation celebration

By Max Silverson for The Star-News April 23, 2020

The McCall-Donnelly School District will keep its buildings closed through the end of the school year despite guidelines for reopening issued by the state.

M-D trustees decided to extend the “soft closure” of the district, but is developing a plan for an alternative ceremony for graduation, which is now scheduled for May 30.

continued:
— —

Cascade school to stay closed through end of school year

By Max Silverson for The Star-News April 23, 2020

The Cascade school building will stay closed through the end of the school year, but a graduation ceremony for seniors is still being developed, Superintendent Jeff Blaser said.

The Cascade School District Board of Trustees last week voted to extend the current school closure in response to Gov. Brad Little’s amended statewide stay-home order.

continued:
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MV keeps school building closed, plans graduation for May 23

By Max Silverson for The Star-News April 23, 2020

The Meadows Valley School District Board of Trustees voted on Monday to keep the school building closed until the end of the school year.

However, trustees still plan to hold a graduation ceremony for Meadows Valley High School seniors as planned on May 23.

“We will continue to deliver and stay connected with students through on-line methods,” MV superintendent Mike Howard said.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Earthquake damage to Cascade City Hall not serious

By Max Silverson for The Star-News April 23, 2020

The March 31 earthquake shook the foundations of Cascade City Hall, but did not make the building unsafe, the city was told last week.

The Cascade City Council was told in February that city hall was in need of a new roof and extensive repairs to the cinderblock building from water damage, Cascade Mayor Judith Nissula said.

The 6.5 magnitude earthquake opened up new cracks in the walls of the building, buckled the floor and caused two walls to move inches apart from each other, Nissula said.

An engineer examined the building last week and found the building was still structurally sound even though the damage looks troubling, she said. That eased fears the city would need to find a new home for its offices and meeting space.

continued:
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Valley County, schools divide $1.5 million in federal funds

By Max Silverson for The Star-News April 23, 2020

Local governments recently received about $1.5 million in federal funding for road work, schools, search and rescue and firewise projects from the Secure Rural Schools and Community Self-Determination Act of 2000.

Of that money, about $972,000 went to the Valley County Road Department, about $356,000 went to the McCall-Donnelly School District and about $60,000 went to the Cascade School District.

Also, about $114,000 went to a fund used for search and rescue and programs to thin and prune trees near homes to prevent wildfires, Valley County Clerk Douglas Miller said.

The federal funds are already included in this year’s $4 million road department budget and slated for general maintenance and matching grant funding, Valley County Road Superintendent Jeff McFadden said.

continued:
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Valley County Board of County Commissioners Invites You to Participate in a Public Hearing

Public Hearing
May 26, 2020 1:00 p.m.

Hearing will be held using teleconference and web-based tools unless emergency declarations are lifted.

The Valley County Commissioners enacted an Emergency Declaration in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, closing most Valley County facilities to the public, including the Valley County Courthouse. Therefore, our hearing procedures have temporarily changed.

Comments must be received by mail, fax, or email no later than May 20, 2020. To listen to and/or comment during the hearing, please go to (link) and click on link labeled “Watch Commissioner and Planning & Zoning Meetings Live” Instructions will be provided.

If you do not submit a comment, we will assume you have no objections to the proposals.

Direct questions & written comments to:
Douglas Miller
Valley County Clerk
PO Box 1350
Cascade, ID 83611
208-382-7100 (phone)
208-382-7107 (fax)
dmiller@co.valley.id.us

Valley County Waterways Ordinance

This proposal would create an ordinance covering all public waterways Including Deadwood Reservoir, Granite Lake, Horsethief Reservoir, Lake Cascade, Little Payette Lake, Payette Lake, Upper Payette Lake, Warm Lake, and specific reaches of the North Fork of Payette River.

It would establish regulations for use of said waterways in in order to promote and protect the health, safety and general welfare of citizens of the county.

This ordinance would also repeal the following ordinances: Ordinance 78-1 (3-13-1978), Ordinance 02-3 (8-12-2002), Ordinance 03-3 (5-27-2003) and Ordinance 08-1 (2-11-2008).

In addition, all waterways in Valley County are subject to the provisions of the Idaho state boating laws as found in the Idaho Safe Boating Act, Idaho Code Title 67, Chapter 70, other applicable Idaho State Statutes and the Idaho Administrative Code, IDAPA 26.01.3

link: to Draft Waterways Ordinances
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72nd annual Riggins Rodeo cancelled for the first time

The rodeo is usually held the first weekend in May, but not this year due to concerns about the spread of the coronavirus.

Brian Holmes April 22, 2020 KTVB

Riggins, Idaho — In Idaho, the first weekend in May means one thing — the Riggins Rodeo.

It’s the one weekend when Idaho’s whitewater capital turns it attention from boats to bucking chutes.

Usually.

After 71 straight years, Riggins will not be hosting a rodeo this spring.

Because of the clamping down across the state to help stop the spread of COVID-19, directors felt they wouldn’t be able to pull it off.

continued:
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Pandemic leads to Idaho potato market woes

4/25/20 AP

Idaho Falls, Idaho — The coronavirus pandemic has caused a once strong potato market to make an abrupt about-face, leading some Idaho growers to dump surplus spuds from storage cellars or to feed them to cattle.

Just a few weeks ago, Idaho potato farmers were enjoying some of their best fresh prices in recent memory and anticipated supplies would run short in the coming summer. The combination of lower spud yields and widespread frost damage during the 2019 harvest had contributed to a smaller statewide crop than normal, the Post Register reported Saturday.

The critical restaurant and food service market, however, has taken a dive due to stay-at-home orders amid the COVID-19 crisis. In response, potato processors have cut back on contracted acres with farmers, and fresh potato prices have plummeted, even as demand at grocery stores has been strengthened.

continued:
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ITD extends deadline for removal of studded snow tires.

We have gotten a couple of questions about the removal of snow tires, since the deadline is coming up. Normally, snow tires are legal in Idaho from Oct. 1 to April 30th, but due to the stay-home-order in place until April 30, ITD is aware that this may make it difficult for some. The deadline for removal of snow tires is June 30, 2020.

ITD is encouraging drivers to have their studded tires removed before the deadline if possible, as tires may cause undue wear on bare roadways. For more information you can visit them at 511.idaho.gov

(from Valley County Sheriff’s Office April 22, 2020 FB page)
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Scam Alert:

FBI: Fraudsters at work in Idaho with Covid-19 scams

by Scott Logan Tuesday, April 21st 2020

Boise, Idaho (CBS2) — The FBI says the increasing number of new Covid-19 scams all have one thing in common. They prey on the fear and uncertainty in our society and try to rip people off by selling bogus medical supplies as well as unproven tests and cures for Covid-19.

True, many people are always looking to steal somebody’s money.

But the FBI says it’s different now in the coronavirus pandemic.

continued:
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Public Lands:

Road conditions prompts temporary road closures for public safety

Boise, Idaho, April 22, 2020 — The Boise National Forest is temporarily closing National Forest System (NFS) road 327 (Granite-Rabbit Creek road) and NFS road 376 (Barber Flats-Alexander Flats cutoff) for public safety until May 4, 2020. Both roads are temporarily closed to all highway legal motorized vehicles (passenger cars, vans, SUVs, pickups and trucks) to provide for public health and safety due to vehicles becoming stuck and stranded in snow-covered segments of the roads.

“Motorists often do not realized the unsafe conditions until they have traveled a considerable distance. The roads may appear firmly packed in the morning, but as temperatures warm throughout the day the snow, ice and road base thaws,” said John Wallace, Acting Idaho City District Ranger. “Visitor safety is our primary concern and we want to warn motorists from getting into dangerous situations.”

Visitors should be cautious and be prepared for the unexpected. Know before you go and check the Boise National Forest’s webpage for current closure orders and maps. For specific details on this closure visit: (link)

Visit the interactive Forest Closure map to see where closures are located: (link)
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Headed outside to recreate? Here are some guidelines to follow to prevent the spread

By Natasha Williams Apr 22, 2020 KIVI

As the weather warms up, you might be itching to get outside, but if you do make sure you’re recreating responsibly to prevent the spread of the coronavirus.

Whether you’re headed out to play in the water, or hike your favorite trail, it’s important to remember to stay at lease 6 feet apart from each other, and avoid groups of people who aren’t immediate family members or housemates.

Keep travel to a minimum, and if you’re heading outside to recreate, stay as close to home as you can.

Make sure to bring all the food, drinks, and other supplies you need–and pack it out when you’re done.

continued: w/links to what is open/closed
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Letter to Share:

News From the Gamebird Foundation

Hi All:

Here’s a little news on what’s happening with the The Gamebird Foundation (TGBF).

We want to take a moment to thank you all as members and friends for helping to make our pheasant population grow. We also sincerely appreciate any and all donations of help or money for our very low budget 501(c)(3) non-profit corporation. Remember, all donations of funds and/or labor are tax deductible.

We are right in the middle of getting ready for the pheasant raising season – which means lots of baby chicks! For those that do not know, this time of the year that our members and friends get the brooders set up, making sure that heat and water is read for the pheasant chicks to start arriving. Idaho Fish and Game supplies the Gamebird Foundation with day-old chicks that are hatched by Little Canyon Shooting Preserve in Peck, ID. The members supply the food and great habitat for the birds that we release into the wild habitat when they are about 9-10 weeks old.

By putting the pheasants out in a good habit area, we are creating a reservoir for the birds to reproduce. We are now seeing mama hens that we turned out the year before showing up with a new brood of chicks the following year. If you are interested in visiting one of the places, just give me a call and we can arrange for a visit. We are tentatively planning a field day in May at Joel Warner’s place in Troy. If it becomes a possibility, we will announce the date at a later news release. We intend to have brooders loaded and with chicks and ready for a visit. Joel just told me that a couple of evenings ago, he had a big beautiful rooster pheasant with about 15 or 16 hens in the field out behind the house. The hens will nest in the draw that runs up the hill for about a mile, and show up with babies in June and July.

Dale Rose is heading up a crew of TGBF members and their families building brooders for new members that are going to raise pheasant chicks this year. So far I think they have built 25 new brooders this year. At this time, we have a few brooders left if anyone is interested in raising chicks. The brooders have a cost of about $250.00 to complete them. We would like (if you can afford it) to deposit $50.00 for the brooder, which we will return to you when you return the brooder or you can keep it to raise more baby pheasants. If you would like to build your own, we would be happy to send you the plans on how to build it.

We will have some great news on our youth hunting Access area and other Access areas around the Clearwater and the Panhandle regions in the near future. We may also have some good news to share on a couple of 30-40 acre habitat areas for pheasants and wildlife.

You can become a part of this great group of folks by becoming a member for just $20.00 for a year of membership – and this is for the whole family! Our normal meeting time (after this pandemic is over) is on the 1st Tuesday of every month at the Latah County Fairgrounds in the classroom of the main building. Meetings are open to the public, so please join us when you can. At this time, the May meeting has been cancelled by the fairgrounds. Hopefully we will be able to meet in June.

Jim Hagedorn
Executive Director
209-883-3423
Jhag1008@gmail.com
The Gamebird Foundation
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Critter News:

Pet Talk – Rat poison can kill dogs and cats

by Dr. Karsten Fostvedt April 24, 2020

There are a large number of anticoagulant rat poisons. These poisons inhibit the body’s ability to produce vitamin K. Without vitamin K, clotting proteins are not produced and bleeding internally occurs.

A rat poison is also called a rodenticide. Pets may directly ingest rodent bait, food contaminated with the poison or even rodents that have died from poison. Most of these poisons are bright blue-green pellets, and dogs and cats often confuse them for tasty kibble.

Signs can take several days to develop, because vitamin K stores must first be depleted. Signs are related to anemia or bleeding tendencies. Dogs and cats can bleed from any body orifice. Sometimes bleeding only occurs internally. In those cases, weakness and depression may be the only signs noted. Pale gums, bruising, nosebleeds, difficulty breathing, or blood in the urine, feces and eyes may occur. Bleeding may be sudden and life-threatening.

continued:
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Idaho’s black bears will soon emerge from winter dens

Apr 21, 2020 KIVI

Idaho — The Idaho Department of Fish and Game is reminding everyone that the state’s black bear population will soon emerge from winter hibernation.

Officials say the bears will immediately begin foraging for food to replenish their fat reserves. That diet is mostly spring grasses but can include pretty much anything that provides easy calories. IDFG says male black bears usually lose 15-30% of their body weight while female black bears can lose up to 40% during hibernation. Black bears are normally on a quest to eat between 15,000-20,000 calories a day.

IDFG has some reminders as hibernation ends. First, bears can smell food for miles. It isn’t too early for those in the Wood River Valley to ensure bears, as well as other wildlife, aren’t able to find food around homes and neighborhoods.

continued: w/tips

[Note: bears in the YP area are usually out by April 1st.]
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Grizzly bear tracks spotted 7 miles south of Grangeville

by CBS2 News Staff Wednesday, April 22nd 2020

An Idaho Fish and Game officer spotted fresh grizzly bear tracks about 7 miles south of Grangeville recently.

The fresh tracks were confirmed to be a grizzly bear and. They were found on April 18 in the Fish Creek Meadows winter recreation area, which is about 7 miles south of Grangeville.

IDFG is warning hunters and recreationists to be bear aware, because they don’t know if the grizzly is still in the area.

continued:
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Idaho angler catches record bull trout


Credit: Sawyer Livesey

A north Idaho angler has a really big fish story to tell.

The Idaho Department of Fish and Game is congratulating Sawyer Livesey of Post Falls for setting a new catch/release record for bull trout.

Sawyer reeled in the monster while fishing the Kootenai River near Bonner’s Ferry on April 8.

The bull trout measured 30.5 inches long, a new state record.

continued:
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Fish & Game News:

Hunters and hikers urged to be ‘Bear Aware’ as they head into the field this spring

By James Brower, Regional Communications Manager
Wednesday, April 22, 2020

Being ‘Bear Aware’ can help you avoid an unwanted bear encounter or attack

As the days get longer and the snow begins to subside, both hunters and bears are becoming more active across Idaho. Hunters and hikers need to take a few extra precautions when recreating in bear country. “We are definitely seeing both grizzlies and black bears coming out of their dens and becoming active across the state,” says Wildlife Biologist Jeremy Nicholson. “This is a good time of year to brush up on your ‘Bear Aware’ skills and remember to carry your bear spray with you and have it readily accessible when you venture into the woods.”

A recent video produced by Nicholson provides some helpful tips for recreating safely in bear country including what to do in different types of bear encounters or attacks.

continued:
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Mountain lion euthanized to protect public safety near Kimberly in southern Idaho

By Terry Thompson, Regional Communications Manager
Friday, April 24, 2020

A male mountain lion was euthanized east of Kimberly on the morning of April 24 to protect public safety. It is thought to be the same lion seen over the last two days in the same area, and was showing no fear of humans.

Fish and Game Conservation Officers received a report early Friday morning, April 24, of a mountain lion on a homeowner’s porch east of Kimberly. This was the second report of a mountain lion in the Kimberly area in two days. Before the officers’ arrival, the homeowner made repeated unsuccessful attempts to haze the mountain lion away from the house. The homeowner reported that the lion showed no fear despite him yelling repeatedly at the lion, and at one point the lion hissed and took an aggressive posture towards the homeowner.

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F&G commission will take emailed public comments prior to May meeting

By Brian Pearson, Conservation Public Information Specialist
Friday, April 24, 2020

Meeting agenda, instructions for submitting comments will be posted to F&G’s website on April 29

To allow continued public involvement during the COVID-19 pandemic, and in lieu of a public hearing, the Idaho Fish and Game Commission will take public comments via email for a seven-day period from April 29 through May 6 prior their teleconference meeting May 13-14.

Among items on the agenda, the Commission is scheduled to consider whether to proceed with rulemaking on two items that were brought forward by public petition: allowing lighted nocks for archery hunting and requiring signs posted near traps.

continued:
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More F&G News Releases

link:
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Crazy Critter Stuff:

Dog befriends baby giraffe after abandoned in South Africa

by The Associated Press Friday, November 22nd 2019


(AP Photo/Jerome Delay)

Mokopane, South Africa (AP) — A dog in South Africa has befriended a baby giraffe that was abandoned at birth, rescued and taken to a local orphanage.

Jazz the giraffe arrived at The Rhino Orphanage just days after birth. A farmer found him in the wild, weak and dehydrated, and called the center for help.

continued: w/video
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Seasonal Humor:

coronavirusconeofshame-a
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Idaho History Apr 26, 2020

Idaho 1918-1920 Influenza Pandemic

Part 2

Wallace, Idaho in 1918

1918WallacePickett-a

courtesy: Patty Pickett
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Wallace, Idaho

Wallace is a city in the western United States, the county seat of Shoshone County, Idaho, in the Silver Valley mining district of the Idaho Panhandle. Founded 136 years ago in 1884, Wallace sits alongside the South Fork of the Coeur d’Alene River (and Interstate 90), approximately 2,730 feet (830 m) above sea level. The town’s population was 784 at the 2010 census.

Wikipedia:
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Nine Mile Cemetery

Wallace, Shoshone County, Idaho

NineMileCemetery1-a

Originally this was at least three separate cemeteries, the United Cemetery, Miners Union Cemetery and Catholic Cemetery. Each one of the original cemeteries is now a section of the larger cemetery.

It is under the umbrella of the Nine Mile Cemetery Association, Inc, which was organized in 1965, and operates under a board of directors.

NineMileCemetery2-a

source: Find a Grave
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1918’s Influenza Epidemic

Part 1, The View from Nine Mile Cemetery, Wallace, Idaho

By Ron Roizen and Dennis O’Brien
Posted on November 20, 2018

The authors thank Jennifer Backman, M.D., for her help deciphering a number of the death certificates used in this analysis.

chart-1-a

November, 1918 was the worst month, according to Nine Mile Cemetery’s mute but somber testimony.

The first eight months of the year, from January to August, saw an average of five new graves per month at Nine Mile. Then, September saw eight deaths. One, notably, was that of a soldier killed in action over in France; another was caused by lobar pneumonia, one of the typical diagnoses assigned to deaths occasioned by influenza. The latter was possibly the first of the influenza epidemic’s victims at Nine Mile.

October saw a rush of new graves, thus also offering the first tangible evidence that the epidemic had now reached our area — there were 19 total deaths, 13 from influenza. Ten of these 13 influenza deaths fell in that month’s final 11 days. And then came November, with its 40 total deaths – eight times the graveyard’s typical monthly average – 37 from influenza. As in October, November’s deaths were concentrated in one portion of the month – 33 of its 37 influenza deaths occurred between the 1st and the 14th. Hence, the 25 days from October 20th to November 14th yielded the influenza epidemic’s greatest concentration of deaths, according to Nine Mile Cemetery’s record.

Total deaths in December, which included four from influenza, fell back to nine. Then January, 1919’s toll bounced back upward, with 14 total deaths, 10 from influenza. February became the first month since August, 1918, with no influenza deaths at all among its eight new graves. March saw seven total deaths, two from influenza. And then, finally, influenza all but disappeared in the remaining months of 1919, with perhaps a single additional death in May, 1919. In April and the remaining months of 1919, total deaths returned to the pre-epidemic average of five per month.

As registered in Nine Mile Cemetery’s experience, influenza had taken some 68 lives over the epidemic’s full run. The disease’s demographics were unusual — and are still largely unexplained. Instead of the usual pattern for flu – that is, disproportionately striking the very young and the very old (in what epidemiologist sometimes refer to as a “U-shaped” distribution) — the 1918-1919’s epidemic struck young adults the hardest.

The average age of Nine Mile’s 68 deaths was 35. As in the rest of the nation, the middle years provided the epidemic’s main targets. Twenty-six of Nine Mile’s victims, or 38 percent of the total, were in their thirties; 52, or 76 percent, fell in the broader age range from 20 to 49 years old. (Epidemiologist sometimes characterize the 1918-1919 influenza’s age distribution as “W-shaped.”) Among other sad implications, so great a concentration of victims in their 20s, 30s, and 40s would deprive many young families of a cherished and much needed parent.

The ratio of male to female deaths was also unusual. Here, but not necessarily also in the nation, male deaths greatly outnumbered female deaths. Fifty-three males (78 percent) and only 15 females (22 percent) perished from influenza at Nine Mile. The average age of female deaths, it may be noted, was a little younger than male deaths – 29-years-old for females; 37, for males. Nationally, the epidemic’s mortality may have moderately favored male deaths over female, but only moderately. “Whether males or females were more seriously affected by the epidemic,” said a contemporary epidemiological analyst, “is still an open question.”

Why were there so many more male influenza deaths at Nine Mile? One explanation is simply that, owing to our area’s mining industry, the population of vulnerable males between 20 and 49 was considerably larger than that of females. U.S. Census estimates for July 1, 1917, however, show that the male-to-female ratio in Shoshone County’s population was nearly 1:1.

Another inviting hypothesis is that mining tended to congregate males together in ways that females were not subject to – in, for instance, mine hoists, bunk houses or dormitories, and mess halls. According to Idaho historian Leonard J. Arrington, Idaho’s State Board of Health, following a recommendation from the U.S. Surgeon General, “… issued a statewide order, effective October 10, 1918, prohibiting all public assemblies ‘as a precaution.’” Churches, schools, dance halls, and other places of public assembly were closed. (The contemporary Wallace Press Times newspaper reported that citizens particularly missed going to Wallace’s several movie theaters while the ban remained in effect.) Men working in mining may have in effect partially sidestepped the public health benefits of these measures. But other factors, including the possibility of differential burial at Nine Mile Cemetery, may also have played roles in Nine Mile’s strongly skewed sex ratio.

Arguably the most intriguing epidemiological aspect of Nine Mile Cemetery’s record of the epidemic concerns its course over time. The distinguished American epidemiologist, Wade Hampton Frost, published an article on the then-recently concluded epidemic in August of 1919.* His article included a graph showing the patterning of mortality from all causes from July, 1918 to April, 1919 in three large American cities — Boston, Washington, D.C., and San Francisco. As is clear from context, Frost saw the trendlines in his chart as chiefly reflecting the impact of influenza-related deaths in each city.

frost-chart-4-1919-a

Frost’s graph (above, which he labeled “Chart 4”) illustrated three quite similar patterns in the epidemic’s course over time in these three locations. In all three, it had begun with a relatively sudden sharp upward spike, followed next by an almost equally great fall and dip, followed in turn by a somewhat lesser increase (which Frost termed the “recrudescence”) and fall.

The initial sharp spikes in these three cities were lagged across the three cities – with Boston’s coming first, D.C.’s second, and San Francisco’s, third. Frost analysis also suggested that the epidemic’s temporal patterning in U.S. cities could vary considerably (illustrated in his article’s next chart). Yet, the broad similarities evidenced in the three trendlines offered in Frost’s Chart 4 remain evocatively suggestive of a common temporal process.

In the following graph (below), we have taken the liberty of gently erasing Frost’s trendlines for Boston and D.C., and adding, mutatis mutandis, a trendline for the month-to-month mortality figures for influenza deaths at Nine Mile Cemetery (solid red line). Once again, the two trendlines evidence a notable similarity. But what might it mean that a big, cosmopolitan city like San Francisco and a small and isolated locale like the catchment area for Nine Mile Cemetery reported such similar temporal trends?

frost-chart-4-1919-sf-and-nmc-a

Frost read the various sorts of data his article offered as suggesting that “…the infection was already widely disseminated in this country some time before a serious epidemic was recognized.”

At a minimum, our chart also suggests that something essential about the disease’s epidemiological character was driving similar temporal patterning. In the end, Nine Mile Cemetery’s graves seem to be telling us, in effect, that even our community’s small numbers and isolated geography afforded no real protection against the 1918 influenza epidemic’s forceful dynamic process.

* W.H. Frost, “The Epidemiology of Influenza,” Public Health Reports (1896-1970), Vol. 34, No. 33 (Aug. 15, 1919), pp. 1823-1836.

source: (used with permission)
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1918’s Influenza Epidemic

Part 2, The Forgotten Scourge

By Ron Roizen
Posted on December 28, 2018

SoldiersCampFunstonKS-InfluenzaHospital-a
Soldiers afflicted with influenza being cared for at Camp Funston, Kansas, 1918.

Historical studies of the U.S.’s great influenza epidemic of 1918-1919 often note its relative historical unrememberedness. Even as it was occurring Americans arguably downplayed the epidemic’s harrowing cost in human suffering and deaths. More than a few reasons have been suggested. For one, the influenza epidemic’s worst weeks, in October and November, 1918, coincided with the triumphal advances and ultimate victory of the Allied forces in World War I. In the Wallace Press-Times, for example, war coverage dominated October’s and November’s news pages, reducing space available to influenza coverage. The American war effort may even have harbored an implicit warrant that only upbeat, supportive, and positive news should emanate from the American homefront, thus also subtly muting the record of the epidemic’s devastating course. The war’s progress, moreover, was indisputably a public drama playing out on a wide European stage whereas the epidemic’s stateside story was more often one of private tragedy shielded from public view behind the closed doors of afflicted and grieving households.
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Camp-Lewis-article-110518-aWallace Press-Times, Nov. 5, 1918

QUARANTINE TO BE LESS SEVERE

Camp Lewis Influenza Situation Greatly Improved and Soldiers Get Relief

Camp Lewis, Tacoma. Wash.. Nov. 4, [1918]. — The quarantine of soldiers to the military reservation and the closing of all indoor assemblages in camp, ordered three weeks ago to prevent the spread of influenza, will become less stringent this week, according to officers at headquarters. It was said today that while soldiers still would be forced to remain in camp and in adjacent territory until the epidemic lessens in nearby cities, camp theaters, Y. M. C. A., Knights of Columbus, Red Cross and Jewish Welfare board buildings probably would be opened before the weekend.

Twenty-eight cases of Influenza were reported in the 24-hour period ending at 1 o’clock p. m. today. Since Sunday only (??) cases of influenza were reported on on both reports. There were but two deaths and a total of only twenty cases of pneumonia.
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In Wallace, newspaper coverage through October, 1918, conveyed that the epidemic was a problem chiefly elsewhere but not here. A handful of cases were being treated in Wallace, said the paper, but these had come into town from elsewhere. Otherwise, military training camps — with their burgeoning numbers of trainees rushing to fill the war’s massive manpower needs — were a special focus of local news reports. The Wallace Press-Times regularly offered brief accounts on the disease’s ebb and flow at camps across the nation, often painting an ambiguous picture of alternating good and bad influenza news. The paper also kept tabs on the epidemic’s apparent migration across the nation’s big cities, beginning at Boston, then to other major eastern cities, to the Midwest, and finally farther westward. Until relatively late in the game, Wallace and Shoshone County appear to have been regarded as more or less safe havens.

An earlier outbreak of influenza, in the Spring of 1918, had manifested itself in a milder form of the disease, which also caused some confusion during the later outbreak in autumn, when influenza took a more dangerous form. Was the autumn outbreak the same milder malady seen earlier in the year or had a newer and more fearful strain of the disease appeared? Some autumnal accounts opted for the less scary option. “Spanish influenza is known throughout the United States now,” suggested a mid-October Wallace Press-Times article, “as the ‘three-day fever,’ and in its less virulent form the patient recovers after the third day.” And although the same article also cautioned that some communities had suffered more serious outbreaks, where deaths had been “numerous,” its overriding tone remained reassuring.

On Thursday, Oct. 10th, Wallace and other Shoshone County communities complied with an order from state health authorities to close all public facilities and gathering places, including schools, movie theaters, and churches. Even the courthouse halted its courtroom proceedings on behalf of influenza prevention. Public health advisories also cautioned against both kissing and spitting. In the absence of a demonstrable presence of influenza locally, newspaper coverage turned its attention to the new closures and their notable effects. “With no church services, no Sunday schools and no theaters,” said a Tuesday, Oct. 15th article in the Times, “Wallace residents who had no automobiles were hard pressed to know what to do with themselves.” A hint of wonder graced the paper’s report of the previous Sunday’s sudden quietude:

Probably never before in all its history was Wallace so quiet on a Sunday night. During the fore part of the evening a few strolled down to see if any new war bulletins had arrived, and after satisfying themselves on that score they wandered about for a while and then betook themselves homeward. There was no attraction of any kind to hold them down town, and by 9 o’clock the coming and going of the auto stages, aside from the passing of other autos, was the only sign of life presented, except for the occasional pedestrian who marvelled that he had the streets almost to himself.

An air of urgency didn’t find its way into local newspaper’s epidemic coverage until early November, 1918. On Monday, Nov. 4th, the paper published news of the imposition of a new and more dramatic preventive measure. As the following day, Nov. 5th, all Shoshone County’s residents over the age of five were required to wear masks in all outside-the-home encounters with others. This measure, said the announcement, was necessary because the epidemic had “… reached a serious stage and threatens the health and welfare of the community and drastic measures appear necessary to check the disease …”

It was the first time the newspaper shifted its stance on the epidemic, now sounding a clear alarm. “The full police power of the county,” said the announcement, would be used to enforce the new order’s provisions. Arrangements were being made moreover to provide effective masks to all citizens. Masks could also be crafted by women in their homes, said Mrs. Harry Allen, chairman of the local Red Cross chapter. Detailed instructions on mask making were offered. Masks, added the newspaper’s article, “… should be boiled every night or oftener to sterilize them.” Persons who could not obtain the six layers of the recommended gauze for home mask construction, said the article, could instead use “… four thicknesses of butter cloth or two thicknesses of medium muslin…” Before long, Boy Scouts were detailed to Wallace’s train station to hand out masks to arrivees lacking one.

Pullman-bank-employees-1918-a
Bank employees in Pullman, Washington wearing masks, 1918.

Two days later, on Wednesday, Nov. 6th, came an article titled “REASONS FOR MASK MADE PLAIN NOW.” County Health Officer F.W. Rolfs had reported 411 new cases and 34 deaths from influenza in the week ending Sunday, Nov. 3rd. Rolfs’ numbers may have stunned some readers. The masks, in short, were no longer a mere precautionary measure. Yet neither the mask’s effectiveness nor the epidemic’s local course were readily apparent. On Saturday, Nov. 9th, the newspaper editorialized that health officials needed to do more to keep the public informed of the epidemic’s local course. The county’s citizenry, said the editorial, had embraced the mask-wearing directive without objection. “How well they have complied,” said the editorial, “is best demonstrated by the fact that one cannot walk along the streets of Wallace and see a man, woman or child, or even small baby in a perambulator without a mask.” Now, in turn, suggested the editorial, it fell to local health officials to keep the regularly informed, each night, with news of whether the masks were having their desired preventive effect or not. “The community is entitled to know how the fight against this malady is progressing and it would appreciate the publication of this data by the health officials,” closed the editorial.

Just behind the local paper’s coverage lurked an essential tension between public health expertise, on the one hand, and popular uncertainty, on the other. As the influenza epidemic historian Nancy K. Bristow pointed out in her excellent book, American Pandemic (Oxford University Press, 2012), public health expertise was riding high in the second decade of the twentieth century. As she argued, by 1918 both the supremacy of germ theory (as the chief causal agent for infectious disease) and the contemporaneous rise of the Progressive Movement elevated the status of public health professionals and widened their cultural authority. Although medical science offered no cure for 1918’s influenza, a mood of bold and confident optimism attended the promulgation of public health advice and other measures aimed at thwarting the spread of influenza. The same confident optimism gave rise to a kind of public health hubris, which held that influenza’s actual spread and epidemic proportions must have resulted from the public’s failure to adhere firmly to the good advice public health officials had provided.

Repeated calls for public calm also reflected an aspect of this hubris. Calmness could, to be sure, have good effects for the community. The alternatives, hysteria and panic, might for example lead families to abandon sickened members or even flee into the hinterland. Widespread panic might even dismantle the public institutions — the clinics, doctors, nurses, and volunteers — serving bravely to help the sick. Yet public health calls for calm also harbored the implication that medico-scientific expertise and authority were sound, trustworthy, and effective — that is, if such advice were scrupulously obeyed. It was an implication that likely grew less and less credible as the epidemic progressed through November.

Float-2-July-4th-parade-1918-Wallace-a
Red Cross float, July 4th, 1918 parade, Wallace (image has been cropped).

The Wallace Press-Times was in some sense caught in the middle between public health’s authoritative claims and emergent public uncertainty and anxiety. Although the paper repeatedly published the advice and assurances coming from public health authorities, its reports also conveyed that public adherence to these prescribed preventive measures was widespread and strong. For example, the Nov. 9th Times’ editorial I’ve already referenced above reported the following about compliance with the mandatory mask order: “Despite the inconvenience the order has been accepted in the best of faith and no company of soldiers ever more faithfully observed the ‘alert’ to don gas masks than have the citizens of this community in adjusting themselves to the new order of things.” Widespread and rigorous public compliance harbored a sobering implication for the expertise claims of public health authorities. A rigorously compliant citizenry that nevertheless fell victim to the influenza epidemic’s deadly embrace implied of course that public health’s scientific expertise claims had been substantially oversold.
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WPT-seeing-citizens-again-112218b-aWallace Press-Times article, Nov. 29, 1918.

Wallace Gets Chance To See Citizens Again

Wallace citizens were again able to look each other in the face yesterday after 15 days of muzzling, and many were the expressions of relief heard. In fact, many citizens had become so used to wearing a face covering that they felt only half clothed while following their usual pursuits about town, and people were noted walking about with a perplexed expression as though they had forgotten something and were trying hard to remember what it might be.

One family of father, mother and two small sons were noted out in front of their home making a permanent record of the historic epidemic. They were lined up in full mask equipment while a neighbor kindly pressed the button and the Kodak did the rest.

Mayor Brown stated lasts night that not a new case of influenza was reported yesterday by physicians.
— —

The epidemic took a fearful toll in Shoshone County. Dr. Rolfs’ report of 34 deaths for the week ending Sunday, Nov. 3rd makes it possible to suggest a provisional estimate of the epidemic’s overall loss of life countywide. Nine Mile Cemetery, as it happens, holds 12 graves of influenza victims who died that same week. These graves represent 35 percent of the countywide total Rolf reported. If roughly the same ratio obtained over the entire course of the epidemic, then Nine Mile’s total of 68 influenza deaths would translate into an estimated 194 influenza deaths for the county as a whole. According to the decennial census, Shoshone County’s total resident population in 1920 was 14,250. Influenza’s total death toll in the county therefore would have equated to a death rate of 136 per 100,000 population, or about two-and-a-half times the national influenza mortality rate. Of course, the ratio of Nine Mile and countywide deaths may have varied over the epidemic’s full course, thus altering my countywide calculation upward or downward. Still, a heavy price in human life had been paid — made worse by the fact that most of influenza’s victims were felled in the prime of life (see Part 1).

Bert-Lytell-in-Unexpected-Places-Seattle-Star-100518-aContemporary advertisement for the film, “Unexpected Places,” Seattle Star, Oct. 5, 1918.

The mask-wearing requirement was lifted on Thursday, Nov. 21st. “Wallace citizens were once again able to look each other in the face yesterday after 15 days of muzzling,” reported the next day’s News-Press, “and many were the expressions of relief heard.” Many citizens, the report added, had become so used to wearing the mask that they felt “only half clothed” without it. The general bans on churches, schools, theaters, and other venues were lifted on Sunday, Nov. 23rd, although children were not allowed to return to movie houses until Friday, the 29th. The Liberty Theater, reported the Wallace Press-Times on the 29th, was showing a film titled “Unexpected Places,” starring Bert Lytell, “the mile-a-minute western star.” “This film has been featured in some of the biggest showhouses in the country,” the Times’ added, “and is famous for its many beautiful outdoor scenes.” A “screaming farce comedy” was also on the program. I wonder if the showing of Bert Lytell’s fast-paced film and a rollicking comedy so soon after the epidemic’s worst period had passed affords us, in retrospect, yet another indirect but telling measure of how readily the scourge could fade from public consciousness and memory.

source: (used with permission)
— — — — — — — — — —

1900’s Providence Hospital, Wallace Idaho

1900sProvidenceHospitalWallace-a

courtesy: Leiana Rogers Knight‎ from Old School North Idaho
———————

Back to Table of Contents
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 1)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 2)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 3)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 4)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 5)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 6)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 7)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 8)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 9)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 10)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 11)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 12)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 13)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 14)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 15)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 16)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 17)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 18)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 19)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 20)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 21)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 22)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 23)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 24)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 25)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 26)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 27)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 28)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 29)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 30)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 31)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 32)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 33)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 34)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 35)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 36)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 37)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 38)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 39)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 40)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 41)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 42)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 43)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 44)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 45)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 46)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 47)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 48)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 49)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 50)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 51)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 52)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 53)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 54)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 55)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 56)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 57)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 58)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 59)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 60)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 61)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 62)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 63)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 64)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 65)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 66)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 67)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 68)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 69)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 70)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 71)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 72)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 73)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 74)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 75)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 76)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 77)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 78)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 79)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 80)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 81)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 82)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 83)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 84)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 85)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 86)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 87)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 88)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 89)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 90)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 91)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 92)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 93)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 94)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 95)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 96)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 97)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 98)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 99)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 100)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 101)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 102)

Road Reports Apr 26, 2020

Please share road reports. Rock Migration Season has begun. Conditions change very quickly this time of year. High elevation roads may have several feet of snow. Be prepared for snow/ice, rocks and trees in the road and remember there is no cell phone service.

Yellow Pine: Most of the snow has melted, remaining piles from sliding off roofs are much smaller. Local streets are bare. Elk are wandering around at dusk. Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN.
link: Local Forecast
Yellow Pine Webcam: (check date on image)

Warm Lake Highway: Wednesday (Apr 2) mail truck driver says the highway is good.
link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

Highway 55 Webcams Link:

South Fork Road: Report on Thursday (Apr 23) that there were small rocks on the road and the FS road crew were cleaning ditches.
Weight restrictions went into effect March 23rd.
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Snow free. A report that Valley County crews will start grading the EFSF road on Monday (Apr 27th.)
Report Wed (April 22) mail truck driver reported no big rocks on the road this morning. Watch for new rocks, we are still having aftershocks on top of our usual freeze thaw.

Lower Johnson Creek Road: Report Wednesday (Apr 22) that lower Johnson Creek road is bare between YP and Wapiti Meadow Ranch.
Landmark and upper Johnson Creek closed to wheeled vehicles.
link: Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam
link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
Note: The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Closed to wheeled vehicles (no current report.)
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Last report April 10: [summit] “between 6-7 ft. Continuous snow floor from the Big Creek turnoff. About 3 ft remaining at the Big Creek turnoff.” – SA
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcam: (check date on image)

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open with restrictions
April 9 – Temporary Spring Restrictions on upper Stibnite Rd in effect.
Update from Midas March 30: As Spring nears, snow and ice on the Stibnite road is beginning to melt, leaving some sections of the road bare and others still covered in snow. The road is soft in places so Midas Gold crews are minimizing traffic and utilizing UTV’s when possible to prevent erosion. Warmer temperatures in the afternoons bring rocks down daily so caution for all travelers is advised. Midas Gold crews are vigilant and exercising extra caution to watch out for falling rocks and remove fallen rocks in order to maintain access to Stibnite.
We also received notice from the County that due to spring melt conditions there will be temporary travel restrictions on Stibnite Road. These restrictions are both to keep the road from further damage, reduce erosion and to keep the public safe.
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Closed to wheeled vehicles (no current report.)
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: Closed to wheeled vehicles (no current report.)
Note: The approx elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′
——————————-

Weather Reports Apr 19-25, 2020

Apr 19 Weather:

At 10am it was 41 degrees, mostly cloudy and light breeze. At 1pm it was mostly cloudy and a bit breezy. At 445pm it was 58 degrees, mostly cloudy and breezy. At 7pm it was partly cloudy. At 830pm it was 46 degrees, mostly clear and light breezes. Stars out at 1130pm – partly to mostly clear?

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time April 20, 2020 at 10:00AM
Clear, breezy
Max temperature 63 degrees F
Min temperature 26 degrees F
At observation 41 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth Trace
— — — — — — — — — —

Apr 20 Weather:

At 10am it was 41 degrees, clear and light breezes. A few clouds at 130pm. At 420pm it was 65 degrees, partly cloudy and light breezes. At 830pm it was 48 degrees, clear and calmer. Looked clear at 11pm, lots of stars.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time April 21, 2020 at 10:00AM
Clear, light breeze
Max temperature 67 degrees F
Min temperature 27 degrees F
At observation 43 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth Trace
— — — — — — — — — —

Apr 21 Weather:

At 10am it was 43 degrees, clear and light breeze. Gusty breezes and a few small clouds before 1pm. Mostly cloudy at 3pm and quite breezy. At 4pm it was 63 degrees, mostly cloudy and breezy. At 8pm it was 50 degrees, gray overcast and calmer. Cloudy at 1120pm. At 130am some stars out.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time April 22, 2020 at 10:00AM
Mostly high thin haze
Max temperature 65 degrees F
Min temperature 28 degrees F
At observation 43 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth Trace
— — — — — — — — — —

Apr 22 Weather:

At 10am it was 43 degrees, mostly high thin haze. At 1230pm it was 57 degrees, mostly cloudy and light breezes. At 4pm it was 60 degrees, overcast and breezy. Gusty winds at 5pm. Short little drizzle at 635pm. At 8pm it was 46 degrees, dark overcast and gusty chilly breezes. Rained before 11pm, roofs are wet. Rain showers during the night, probably ending around 5am.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time April 23, 2020 at 10:00AM
Mostly cloudy
Max temperature 63 degrees F
Min temperature 38 degrees F
At observation 42 degrees F
Precipitation 0.25 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth Trace
— — — — — — — — — —

Apr 23 Weather:

At 10am it was 42 degrees and mostly cloudy. Sprinkling at 1210pm, lasted less than an hour. Short sprinkle of rain at 255pm and breezy. At 445pm it was 53 degrees, mostly cloudy and gusty breezes. At 845pm it was 44 degrees, mostly cloudy and calmer. Cloudy at 1115pm.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time April 24, 2020 at 10:00AM
Overcast
Max temperature 55 degrees F
Min temperature 32 degrees F
At observation 40 degrees F
Precipitation 0.02 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth Trace
— — — — — — — — — —

Apr 24 Weather:

At 10am it was 40 degrees and overcast. Breaks in the clouds at 1pm. Cloudy and breezy at 5pm. At 6pm it was 51 degrees, gray overcast and variable breezes. At 830pm it was 47 degrees and calmer. Partly clear at 1115pm, some stars out.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time April 25, 2020 at 10:00AM
Overcast, breezy
Max temperature 55 degrees F
Min temperature 28 degrees F
At observation 43 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth Trace
— — — — — — — — — —

Apr 25 Weather:

At 10am it was 42 degrees, overcast and breezy. Overcast and breezy at 1pm. Gusty breezes mid-afternoon. At 445pm it was 62 degrees, mostly cloudy and gusty. At 830pm it was 53 degrees, just staring to sprinkle, overcast and gusty breezes. Raining pretty good at 945pm. Steady rain at 1115pm. Probably quit raining around 130am. Not raining at 245am.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time April 26, 2020 at 10:00AM
Partly cloudy, light breeze
Max temperature 64 degrees F
Min temperature 40 degrees F
At observation 46 degrees F
Precipitation 0.12 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
————————-

Road Reports Apr 22, 2020

Please share road reports. Rock Migration Season has begun. Conditions change very quickly this time of year. High elevation roads may have several feet of snow. Be prepared for snow/ice, rocks and trees in the road and remember there is no cell phone service.

Yellow Pine: Not much snow left in Yellow Pine. Local streets are pretty much bare now. We felt a strong aftershock Monday just before midnight. Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN.
link: Local Forecast
Yellow Pine Webcam: (check date on image)

Warm Lake Highway: Wednesday (Apr 2) mail truck driver says the highway is good.
link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

Highway 55 Webcams Link:

South Fork Road: Report Wed (April 22) mail truck driver reports the entire road is bare, no rocks this morning. Says the FS is cleaning ditches, watch for equipment.
Weight restrictions went into effect March 23rd.
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Report Wed (April 22) mail truck driver reported no big rocks on the road this morning. Watch for new rocks, we have been having aftershocks on top of our usual freeze thaw.

Lower Johnson Creek Road: No current report.
Landmark and upper Johnson Creek closed to wheeled vehicles.
link: Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam
link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
Note: The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Closed to wheeled vehicles (no current report.)
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Report April 10: [summit] “between 6-7 ft. Continuous snow floor from the Big Creek turnoff. About 3 ft remaining at the Big Creek turnoff.” – SA
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcam: (check date on image)

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open with restrictions
April 9 – Temporary Spring Restrictions on upper Stibnite Rd in effect.
Update from Midas March 30: As Spring nears, snow and ice on the Stibnite road is beginning to melt, leaving some sections of the road bare and others still covered in snow. The road is soft in places so Midas Gold crews are minimizing traffic and utilizing UTV’s when possible to prevent erosion. Warmer temperatures in the afternoons bring rocks down daily so caution for all travelers is advised. Midas Gold crews are vigilant and exercising extra caution to watch out for falling rocks and remove fallen rocks in order to maintain access to Stibnite.
We also received notice from the County that due to spring melt conditions there will be temporary travel restrictions on Stibnite Road. These restrictions are both to keep the road from further damage, reduce erosion and to keep the public safe.
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Closed to wheeled vehicles (no current report.)
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: Closed to wheeled vehicles (no current report.)
Note: The approx elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′
——————————-

Apr 19, 2020 The Yellow Pine Times

Apr 19, 2020 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Community Calendar:

Yellow Pine Tavern Closed until further notice.
April 17 – Boil water order issued
April 15-30 – Statewide Stay Home order extended
April 9 – Temp. Spring Restrictions on upper Stibnite Rd
March 23 – South Fork road weight restrictions
March 28-June 30 – Lower South Fork Salmon River closed to rafting
Spring Rx Burns postponed
(details below)
———-

Valley County Covid-19 Response Page
link:
— —

Valley County Emergency Operations Center
link:
— —

Idaho Gov’s Stay at Home Order
link:
——————-

Local Events:

Nothing scheduled yet.
———-

Village News:

Critters

Wolves – a report of wolves attacking and wounding a cow elk right in the village around 1030pm last Sunday night (April 12th) in the area between main street and Alpine village. Watch your pets!

Tick Season in full swing.

Bears are out of hibernation, protect your trash and pet food.

Foxes are around, watch your small pets.
— — — —

Boil Water Order issued April 17, 2020

As April 17th 2020, Yellow Pine is under another “Boil Order”.

Boil Water Advisory Notice

Boil Your Water Before Using

Bring tap water to a rolling boil, boil for one minute, and cool before using or use bottled water. Boiled or bottled water should be used for drinking, making ice, washing dishes, brushing teeth, and preparing food until further notice.

This Boil Water Advisory Notice applies to The Yellow Pine Water System

What Happened?

Starting on 3-22-2020 the water system had the following problem: Due to high water demand, treatment requirements were not met after the completion of maintenance procedures. .

This problem indicates that harmful microbes may be present in your drinking water. Harmful microbes in drinking water can cause diarrhea, cramps, nausea, headaches, or other symptoms and may pose a special health risk for infants, some elderly, and people with severely compromised immune systems. But these symptoms are not just caused by microbes in drinking water.

If you experience any of these symptoms and they persist, you should seek medical advice.

What is being done?

The system is being monitored and checked daily for compliance. .

It is likely that you will need to boil water for the next 3 to 5 days until the problem is fixed.

You will be informed when you no longer need to boil your water.

For more information, please contact:
Warren Drake
of the Yellow Pine Water System
at 208-573-6261
or wdrake@drakediversified.com

Please share this information with other people who drink this water, especially anyone who may not get this notice directly (for example, people in apartments, nursing homes, schools, and businesses).

You can do this by posting this notice in a public place or distributing copies by hand or mail.

State Water System ID#: 4430059 Date distributed: 3-22-2020
— — — —

2020 Census

Report that the Census forms have arrived in Yellow Pine. Check your post office box.

Or you can fill out the census online. [It takes about 5 minutes.]

Link:
— — — —

Yellow Pine Tavern closed due to COVID-19 fears

Tavern will be closed til further notice. Will have gas available as well as take out beer, pop, candy, chips, pizza. Call 208 739-7086 or go to 355 Yellow Pine Ave. House across street from the Tavern next to the Silver Dollar.
— — — —

Road News:

It’s Rock Migration Season. Watch for rocks on the EFSF road in the bowling alley area and some areas of the South Fork. While the earthquake didn’t shake anything big loose, the freeze thaw cycle along with wet weather is bringing down rocks large and small.

April 9th the temporary road restrictions on the upper Stibnite Road went into effect.

The load restrictions on the South Fork Salmon River Road started on Monday 3/23. They will stay in effect until the subgrade has dried out and the roadway can support standard loading.

The FS has plans to work on the South Fork Road again this summer, they will send info if and when the project is scheduled.
— — — —

Rx Burns

All new prescribed burn ignitions have been paused across the Region in line with regional direction. The Forest will continue to prioritize keeping employees and the public safe during this time. The decision to temporarily postpone ignitions will prevent any effects from smoke that might further worsen conditions for those who are at risk in our communities while reducing exposure for Forest Service employees who might not otherwise need to travel.

We expect the pause on prescribed burn ignitions to be re-evaluated by the Regional Forester sometime in April.
– PNF
— — — —

Yellow Pine US Mail

The 3-day a week mail delivery started Nov 1st. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 55 cents. Support our local post office and purchase your holiday stamps here.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Lakeshore last emptied the bins Feb 13th.

Dump Report April 7: The bins are about 3/4 full. The road to the dump is not bad for this time of year, 4-wheel drive is still needed in some places.

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

Yellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is located approximately 3 miles south on Johnson Creek Road.

The TRANSFER STATION is for household trash and yard waste:
* Household trash must be put inside (and fit) the dumpster;
* Yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, et.) goes in the burn pile on the south end of the turn-around;
* Cardboard boxes should be flattened before putting the in the dumpster,

The DUMPSTERS are NOT for:
* Furniture (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station).

The BURN PILE is NOT for:
* Cardboard boxes (flatten and put in dumpster);
* Furniture and appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Drywall and building material (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wire or fencing (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Foam Rubber (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wood with metal (like nails) attached (take to Donnelly Transfer Station.)

When closing the DOORS on the front of the dumpsters:
* Make sure the “U” brackets at the top and bottom of the door are engaged;
* The retaining bar at the middle of the door is slid into the pipe;
* And the “L” bars at the bottom of the doors dropped into place.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: 208/634-7176
———-

Local Groups:

YPWUA News:

New Boil Water Order issued April 16, 2020

Second half of the water bill is due June 15, 2020.

The last Yellow Pine Water Users Shareholders meeting was Sunday July 7, 2019.
link: 20190707YPWUAminutes
— — — —

VYPA News:

Proposed VYPA Bylaws Changes

Attached is the compiled proposed changes to the bylaws the Council has received.

The proposed changes and the proposed addendum B, are being published to give folks plenty of time to read and process the information before the first reading.

link: 2020 Proposed changes to Yellow Pine Bylaws Adopted 9-12-2015.pdf

link: 2020 Addendum B-letter of interest.pdf

link: 2018 Midas Gold Community Partnership Agreement with the Village of Yellow Pine

Deb Filler – Chairperson
Village of Yellow Pine Association

The community hall committee’s goal is to have adequate heating installed in the main hall before the June VYPA meeting.

If folks have items for the community yard sale, please place them by the north wall in the community hall. If you see items you would like to purchase, you can pay Deb, Ronda, or Lynn. All funds support the community hall.

VYPA meetings for 2020 – June 13, 2pm; July 11, 2pm; August 8, 2pm; September 12, 2pm.

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting Minutes for September 21, 2019
link: 20190921 Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting
— — — —

YPFD News:

YP Fire Commissioners:
Sue Holloway – District 1
Dan Stiff – District 2
Merrill Saleen – District 3
Fire Chief – Jeff Forster

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice

The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.”

Click the link: to view 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation
——–

Biz Listings:

The Corner (208) 633-3325

Closed for the winter. Plan to open for Memorial Weekend with live music provided by Willie and the Singlewides.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233

Closed until further notice.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377

Closed for Winter.
— — — —

Knotty Kat Crochet Works – 208-502-0940
FB page link
open Tue – Sat, 9-5
Yellow Pine eggs $3/doz
— — — —

Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Tom & Sarah Lanham
156 Yellow Pine Ave, Yellow Pine Id 83677
website:
Facebook:
Starting June 2020 We will be doing trail rides out of Yellow Pine along with summer pack / camping trips to high mountain lakes in the area!

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
— — — —

Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430
— — — —

Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

The Star-News

subscribe:
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine

Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, will service Yellow Pine

B&T Safety Solutions LLC
208-271-1600 Based out of Donnelly
Snow removal, cleaning chimneys and stoves, we do cabin staining/chinking as well
— — — —

Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
———————–

Letter to Share:

Dear Yellow Pine residents:

Cascade Medical Center is here for you. When I (Tom Reinhardt) attended your community meeting in September, I mentioned that we were preparing to provide tele-video medical visits. We now have that up and running. If you want to schedule an appointment, call our clinic at 208-382-4285. Vicki or one of the MAs will ask you some questions to make sure that a tele-video visit is the right choice given your symptoms or need. If so, we will work with you to make sure you are set up on the Cascade Medical Center patient portal (with our EMR). We will also make sure that you are set up to be able to do a tele-video visit (laptop with camera, desktop with camera, or smart phone). We use the Zoom telemedicine system, which is confidential and secure (it works like Skype or Face-time). Before the appointment, we will email you a link for the tele-video visit. When it is time for your appointment, you will click on the link in the email and you will be connected with our provider and can begin your visit.

Regarding insurance coverage, the COVID legislation passed in March assures coverage of telemedicine visits for patients with Medicare, Medicaid, VA. Private insurers have also decided to provide coverage just as for regular in person visits, at least until the COVID epidemic crisis is declared over.

My advice is that if someone usually goes to the VA for care, they should call the VA and see if they can do a video visit with them. Or if they usually go to McCall St. Lukes, they should call their doctor there.

Tom Reinhardt, CEO
Cascade Medical Center
April 4, 2020

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Local Observations:

Monday (Apr 13) overnight low of 14 degrees, partly cloudy sky and cold light breezes this morning, estimate 6″ old crusty snow remaining – lots of open ground but still over a foot in the shade. Did not hear any swallows this morning, a few jays and a flicker calling, a few juncos, nuthatches and the silly squirrel visiting. Partly cloudy and chilly breezy at lunch time. Jays and flickers still calling early afternoon, female hairy woodpecker and a white-breasted nuthatch stopped by as well as several dark-eyed juncos. Partly cloudy and chilly breezes mid-afternoon, high of 44 degrees. Clear sky, cold and breezy at dusk. Stars out before midnight.

Tuesday (Apr 14) overnight low of 19 degrees, clear sky this morning, measured an average of 4″ old crusty snow on the ground – more bare ground every day. The tree swallows are back, a few juncos and nuthatches visiting. Cloudy before lunch time. Elk wandering by early afternoon. Clark’s nutcracker, juncos and nuthatches visiting, jays and flickers calling. Overcast and breezy late afternoon, high of 52 degrees. Elk wandering thru the neighborhood this evening. Overcast and slight breeze at dusk. Cloudy before midnight. Snowed during the night.

Wednesday (Apr 15) overnight low of 29 degrees, mostly cloudy sky, 1/2″ new snow and an average of 4″ old snow on the ground this morning. Lots of birds calling, flickers, jays, juncos and nuthatches, no swallows tho. Started raining then rain/snow mix then big blobs of snow before lunch time. Mail truck made it in early, 2″ new snow on Big Creek summit. Lots of juncos twittering about. Rain showers on and off this afternoon. Shots fired at 312pm. Mostly cloudy and breezy late afternoon, high of 45 degrees. Overcast and gusty breezes at dusk, looks like it might be snowing up on VanMeter hill. Cloudy before midnight. Clearing during the night.

Thursday (Apr 16) overnight low of 22 degrees, clear sky and breezy this morning, measured an average of 2″ old snow (ranges from 0-12″ with lots of open ground.) Mountain chickadees, jays and juncos calling, hairy woodpecker, nuthatches and pine squirrel visiting. Clear and breezy at lunch time. A few small clouds late afternoon, warmer and calmer, high of 47 degrees. Robin visiting. Clear at dusk and above freezing. Stars out before midnight.

Friday (Apr 17) overnight low of 18 degrees, clear sky and light breeze this morning, calling it an average of 2″ old snow (half the yard is bare.) Swallows are back, swooping and singing, heard a robin calling, a couple of hairy woodpeckers, a jay, nuthatches and juncos visiting. Sunny and light breezes at lunch time. Increased traffic. Clark’s nutcracker visited. Sunny and warm late afternoon, milder breezes, high of 59 degrees. Leaf buds on lilacs starting to break open. Report of a mourning dove in the neighborhood and buttercups blooming. Above freezing at dusk, almost clear and calm. Clear night.

Saturday (Apr 18) overnight low of 23 degrees, mostly hazy sky and breezy this morning, about 1″ of old snow (quite a bit of snow in the shade remains.) Swallows, jays and red-winged blackbirds calling, juncos, blackbirds and nuthatches visiting. Cloudy, warm and breezy at lunch time. Increased traffic. Possible aftershock at 319pm. Northern flicker calling, swallows singing and jays imitating hawks. Thicker overcast, warm and breezy late afternoon, high of 62 degrees. Partly clear, calmer and above freezing at dusk, river sounds up. Partly clear before midnight.

Sunday (Apr 19) overnight low of 26 degrees, mostly cloudy sky and light breeze this morning, about 1″ of old snow on the ground. Swallows, robins, blackbirds, flickers and jays calling, nuthatches and juncos visiting. A report of a white-crowned sparrow in the neighborhood. Mostly cloudy and a little breezy at lunch time. First chipmunk sighting, also a male and female cassin’s finches, a clark’s nutcracker, 3 male red-wing blackbirds and a pine squirrel visited. Mostly cloudy, warm and breezy late afternoon, high of 63 degrees. Decreasing clouds this evening, mostly clear and light breezes at dusk. Robins and blackbirds calling.
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RIP:

Larry Fredrick (Chappy) Chapman
April 19, 1945 – March 23, 2020

Larry (Chappy) Chapman 74, left this earth and moved to heaven on March 23, 2020. He passed peacefully at home in Riggins.

Larry was born April 19, 1945, to parents Preston (Jack) Chapman and Alice Calderwood Chapman in Evergreen, Idaho. He joined his older sister Caroll. The family lived there for six months then moved to Council. Larry enjoyed many summers on Lost Lake, playing on the boat dock that his parents owned and operated. He attended school in Council and Riggins. Larry’s father passed away in 1959. His mother later married Jack Howard and the family moved up the Big Salmon River to the Howard Ranch. In 1965 Larry was drafted into the U.S. Army where he was stationed in Germany as a truck driver. It was there that he also started his logging career. He worked for several logging outfits over the years around Riggins. The crew was always good for plenty of laughs.

Larry married Nancee Mazewski on October 19, 1968, their marriage lasted 5 years. Together they had two daughters, Candi and Kendi. He taught them to fish, play cribbage and pool, shoot beer cans, and pan for gold. He also taught them how to drive the old 37 Ford pickup with no brakes!

Larry moved to Yellow Pine, Idaho in 1981 where he worked for Bowman’s at Alpine Village cutting their winter wood supply. He also held employment for the Stibnite mine for 6 years or so. For several years he wintered in Riggins and summered in Yellow Pine. He was given the title “Mayor Chappy of Yellow Pine” and later became Honorary Mayor for life.

He loved puttering around in his old cars and trucks searching for driftwood. He was quite the driftwood artist and inventor of the Automatic Fish Catcher and The Boot Saver. Larry was also an accomplished poet and wrote some real good ones about the logging crew and their shenanigans. He had an infectious smile. Everyone who met him immediately liked him. He had a knack for story-telling and could create quite an audience. When he was finished, you were crying and your belly hurt from the rolling laughter.

He was preceded in death by his parents; his ex wife, Nancee Riggs; his baby sister, Donna Jean Chapman; and his daughter, Candi Lysiak. Survivors include: daughter, Kendi (Mark) Camacho, of Weiser, ID; sister, Caroll Parsons, of Fruitland, ID; five grandchildren and many great grandchildren.

Chappy was an honest, hardworking man with a kind heart that always helped out anyone in need. He will be greatly missed as a father, grandfather, brother and friend. There will be a celebration in his honor at a later date.
— —

May 29, 2000 The Yellow Pine Times

Yellow Pine People

This week we interviewed Yellow Pine’s “Mayor” – Larry “Chappy” Chapman, who is back with us for the summer.

Chappy was born in Council, Idaho. He first came to Yellow Pine in 1981. When asked, “Why did you come to Yellow Pine?” Chappy replied, “To cut the winter wood supply for the Bowman’s at Alpine Village.” He also worked at the Stibnite mine for 6 or years.

When asked about his vehicles, Chappy said, “I have a 1937 Ford Flatbed, (my “town” car); a 1939 Studebaker Pickup; a 1941 robin-egg-blue Plymouth 4-door sedan; a 1946 Ford Ton and half truck, (which is for sale, the half fresh paint job is flat-black); a 1949 silver Plymouth 4-door sedan (that’s my road car); a 1954 black Chevy Pickup; a 1971 dark-blue 240-Z, (it’s also for sale); and a 1977 green Ford pickup with camper, (which will be for sale shortly).”

2012SeptSkiVisit1-a
1954 black Chevy Pickup, photo courtesy Joe K.
— —

The Yellow Pine Times April 17, 2000

The First Chicken Sh*T Contest in Yellow Pine

– by Larry “Chappy” Chapman, Mayor of Yellow Pine

… the whole story on the first Chicken Sh*t contest, well as I dimly remember, Evelyn Bowman, the woman I was working for at the Alpine Village went somewhere for a couple of weeks and left me in charge.

There were 22 chickens in the freezer after snowmobile season, so I figgered she’s be plumb proud of me if I put most of them to good use. I promptly invited the [whole] town to help me eat some, so we had a big feast. I cooked 16 of them. 42 people showed up, a lot of people for Yellow Pine in the winter [March 10, 1984].

Later on we decided to have a Chicken Sh*t contest. We didn’t have a board made up, so I got an old sheet (according to Evelyn it was her best one) and marked off squares with a felt pen and you wrote your name in the square.

When we got all the squares sold we sent somebody up to Richter’s to get a chicken (Seems to me like it was Montana.) When he got back he had a great BIG rooster.

So we throw the board out in the snow and started waitin’. So we waited and waited and finally the rooster sh*t. Well, it covered 5 squares, so we went to waitin’ again. Well, just before dark he sh*t again (only 3 squares this time.) Wound up we had to hold a flashlight in his eyes to keep him from going to roost.

Mrs. Bowman was madder than a wet hen about the chicken, but I didn’t want to eat all of them before they freezer burnt.


2012 Chicken Sh*t Contest

[Note: Folks wishing to send a card can email rrSue for families addresses.]
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Idaho News:

Idaho governor extends closures, stay-at-home order through end of April

“Idaho will be better positioned for strong economic comeback because we are making difficult changes in how we live and work in the short-term.”

Katie Terhune April 15, 2020 KTVB

Idaho’s statewide stay-at-home order and mandatory business closures implemented to slow down the spread of coronavirus will be extended until at least April 30, Gov. Brad Little says.

The governor made the announcement during a press conference Wednesday morning, the same day his previous 21-day stay-home order was set to expire.

Idaho residents are directed to continue social distancing, wearing masks out in public, and avoiding gathering in groups.

continued:
— —

The changes that were made from the original order include:

* Out-of-state travelers must self-isolate in Idaho for 14 days after arrival. This does not apply to those performing essential services or those who live in one state and work or gain essential services in another state.
* “Non-essential” facilities and services may open for curbside and delivery only. Any facility or service, including those formerly deemed “non-essential,” can begin to operate via curbside services, drive-in, drive-through pickup, mailing services or delivery services only.

In addition, “non-essential” businesses may prepare to reopen after April 30 if they do the following:

* Have operational plans in place to maintain social distancing for staff and patrons
* Provide adequate sanitation and protective coverings for employees and patrons
* Offer curbside and pickup delivery
* Limit the number of people in business at a time
* Direct flow of people in operation.

This, of course, may not occur if there is an upward trend of COVID-19 cases between now and April 30.

full story: Local News 8 April 17, 2020
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Community Cares program makes information available

The Star-News April 16, 2020

The Valley County Emergency Operations Center, Central District Health and local libraries are teaming up to create the Community Cares Information Center.

The program’s goal is to connect needs in the community due to COVID-19 with available resources and services.

“We have so many people in our community wanting to help,” McCall Public Library Director Meg Lojek said.

“This program gives us an opportunity to centralize all of the unique non-medical needs from residents in Valley County and do our best to connect those needs with available people, goods and services,” Lojek said.

To start, Community Cares will focus on school supplies for local children, transportation and delivery services, food needs and referred services for childcare needs, technology needs, mental health services and tutoring.

We will be adding other categories as needs and resources are brought to our attention,” Lojek said.

… For more information on the Community Cares Information Center, visit (link)

full story:
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St. Luke’s Clinics find new ways to connect with patients

By Laura Crawford for The Star-News April 16, 2020

Dr. Dave Hall’s typical day in the clinic at St. Luke’s McCall starts by reviewing his schedule and the charts of the patients he’s going to see.

But instead of greeting patients in an exam room, Hall logs into his computer or smartphone and greets his patient in a virtual exam room knows as a video visit.

With rapid changes happening within health care during this unprecedented time of the COVID-19 pandemic, providers are finding new ways to connect with their patients using telehealth services.

… In order to do video visits, patients need to have a myChart account with St. Luke’s and a smart phone with video capability.

… “After we get through this I can see making video visits a part of my regular practice, especially for those who live in remote areas like Yellow Pine and Warren,” Hall said.

full story:
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St. Luke’s Riggins clinic open, Meadows Valley clinic is closed

The Star-News April 16, 2020

St. Luke’s Clinic – Salmon River Family Medicine in Riggins remains open.

Hours are 9 am. to 4 p.m., Monday through Thursday. All services are by appointment only, no walk-ins will be accepted. Call 208-628-3666 to schedule.

All physical therapy services have been suspended and only essential lab draws will be done by appointment only.

St. Luke’s Clinic – Meadows Valley Family Medicine clinic is closed. Call Payette Lakes Medical for appointments at 208-634-2225.

Anyone with mild symptoms of respiratory illness, including fever, cough, shortness of breath, nausea, vomiting or diarrhea should call St. Luke’s Clinic in McCall at 208-634-1776.

Clinic staff will complete a risk assessment over the phone and provide guidance on next steps, which may or not include testing.

source: © Copyright 2009-present Central Idaho Publishing Inc.
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Valley County Board of County Commissioners Invites You to a Public Hearing

Public Hearing
May 18, 2020 1:00 p.m.

Hearing will be held using teleconference and web-based tools unless emergency declarations are lifted.

The Valley County Commissioners enacted an Emergency Declaration in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, closing most Valley County facilities to the public, including the Valley County Courthouse. Therefore, our hearing procedures have temporarily changed.

Comments must be received by mail, fax, or email no later than May 12, 2020.

To listen to and/or comment during the hearing, please go to (link) and click on link labeled “Watch Commissioner and Planning & Zoning Meetings Live” Instructions will be provided.

If you do not submit a comment, we will assume you have no objections to the proposals.

Direct questions & written comments to:
Cynda Herrick, AICP, CFM
Planning & Zoning Administrator
PO Box 1350
Cascade, ID 83611
208-382-7115 (phone)
208-382-7119 (fax)
cherrick@co.valley.id.us

Accessory Dwelling Unit (ADU)
Ordinance 2020-05 Amendment
This proposal would modify the definition of Accessory Dwelling Unit and remove the definition of the defunct Valley/Adams Regional Housing Authority within Valley County Code 9-3-1. Chapter 9-4-7 Accessory Dwelling Units would be modified. Requirements for long-term and short-term rental property would be specified as to whether they would be administratively approved or conditionally approved. Parking for accessory dwelling units will not be allowed in public right-of-ways.

Recreational Vehicle Campground
Ordinance 2020-06
This proposal would define Recreational Vehicle Campground and Recreational Vehicle Park in Valley County Code 9-3-1 and create Chapter 9-4-8 Recreational Vehicle Campground. Administrative permits would be required for two or three RV units. Other requirements include sewage disposal, garbage, setbacks, rentals, lighting, camp fires, quiet hours, lot coverage, and notification of adjacent property owners.

Short Term Rental
Ordinance 2020-07
This proposal would create Chapter 9-4-9 Short Term Rentals. Short Term Rentals would require an Administrative Permit with specific standards regulating maximum occupancy, sewage disposal, garbage, setbacks, rules of operation, lighting, camp fires, quiet hours, and notification to adjacent property owners.

Draft ordinances, meeting minutes, and agendas are posted on the Valley County website: (link)
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Earthquake damage adds to Valley courthouse problems

By Max Silverson for The Star-News April 16, 2020

Asbestos flooring and two new cracks from earthquake damage were found in the ramshackle north end of the Valley County Courthouse in Cascade last week, county commissioners were told on Monday.

The new problems are only the latest in the north end of the courthouse, which was built in 1920 and has seen several problems and subsequent renovations over the years.

The basement of the north end of the building, which housed the Department of Motor Vehicle and plat clerks’ offices, was closed off completely to the public and county staff when a pipe burst causing a widespread mold outbreak on Jan 21.

The DMV and plat clerks were moved to new offices within the building following the mold outbreak.

Asbestos floor tiles were found under the carpeting in the northeast corner of the basement offices.

It is not yet known how much asbestos will need to be removed, said Valley County Clerk Doug Miller, noting that the problem could exist throughout the basement of the north wing.

“When we began removing that carpet, the tile started coming up,” Miller said. “They stopped immediately and had the tile tested for asbestos.”

The county is seeking bids for a firm to remove the asbestos. Once the asbestos is removed, the plan is to finalize mold cleanup in the area and potentially use the offices in the future.

Whether the county will be able to use the office space and entire north end of the building is dependent on the extent of damage from the 6.5 magnitude earthquake that occurred on March 31. The epicenter of the earthquake was about 42 miles east of Cascade.

Repairs to the north wing of the building will be considered pending an inspection by an engineer, Miller said.

The north and northwest sides of the building have two new cracks in them, one of which is about two feet long and four inches deep, Miller said.

A capital improvement plan is slated to begin in May, commissioners have said.

About $6,000 has been spent on cleaning up the mold in the building, but an estimate for the costs of removing the asbestos flooring was not yet known, Miller said.

source: © Copyright 2009-present Central Idaho Publishing Inc.
— — — — — — — — — —

Aftershocks in central Idaho continue after historic 6.5 magnitude earthquake

by CBS2 News Staff Tuesday, April 14th 2020

It’s been more than two weeks since central Idaho had one of its strongest earthquakes on record.

And the aftershocks are still occurring.

According to the United States Geological Survey, in the last 24 hours, there have been 15 reported earthquakes that registered a magnitude 2.5 or higher near the epicenter near Stanley.

There was also a 3.2 quake about 43 miles northeast of Idaho City at about 10:30 a.m. [April 14]

source:

[Note: the center of the aftershocks in the above story is south of Cape Horn (Hwy 21) and east of Banner Summit.]
— — — — — — — — — —

Idaho Secretary of State partners with grocers to make sure voters don’t have to pay for ballot postage

The Primary Election date is May 19.

Jeremy Stiles April 16, 2020

Idaho Secretary of State Lawerence Denney is teaming up with grocers to address concerns about return postage on absentee ballots for the upcoming primary election, which includes congressional, legislative and county races.

Because of the COVID-19 coronavirus outbreak and associated social-distancing directives, the May 19 primary will be done entirely by absentee ballot.

Denney said some counties are already providing return postage so that voters do not need to pay for their own stamp to mail in a ballot. However, not all voters are receiving return postage. That’s where the grocery store partnership comes in.

“All a voter needs to do is bring their completed, sealed and signed return-ballot envelope to any of the store locations, bring it to the customer service counter, and the store will provide a stamp for the voter,” said Kathy Holland with Albertsons Companies Intermountain Division.

continued:

[Note: Yellow Pine is a vote-by-mail precinct in Valley County. Voters registered in the Yellow Pine precinct will receive a letter in the postal mail from the County Clerk where you can indicate which primary ballot to receive. Usually there is return postage on the voted ballot envelope.]
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Tips & Advice:

How to properly wear face masks to prevent coronavirus spread

The CDC has recommended people wear masks when social distancing measures are difficult to maintain, but a mask can be less effective if not worn properly.

Suzanne Nuyen (TEGNA) April 14, 2020

Masks have become a common sight recently since the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommended Americans wear them in public to mitigate the spread of the new coronavirus. However, many people are wearing the masks incorrectly, which can affect how well it protects you and others from viruses.

According to the CDC, face masks should fit snugly against the side of a person’s face. The World Health Organization says your entire mouth and nose should be covered, with no gaps between your face and the mask.

Health experts stress that people should not have a false sense of security because they are wearing a mask. The best way to prevent the spread of the new coronavirus, which causes COVID-19, is still to wash your hands frequently and limit time outside. The CDC also does not recommend people wear surgical or N95 masks, which should be reserved for health care and other frontline workers.

Here are some do’s and don’ts for wearing a mask.

continued:
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Scam Alert:

‘DO NOT click the link’; Police warn of scam COVID-19 text messages

by Elizabeth Tyree Thursday, April 16th 2020

Police are warning cell phone users of a new text message scam during the coronavirus pandemic.

The Thomaston Police Department in Maine posted on Facebook a photo of the alert being sent to people in a text message.

… The BBB said scammers have also been targeting seniors with text messages posing as the U.S. Department of Health, and telling them they need to take a mandatory online COVID-19 test in order to receive the recently approved government stimulus payment.

full story:
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Mining News:

Stibnite Foundation to give out $50,000 in grants for 2020

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News April 16, 2020

A charitable foundation designed to pour future profits from Midas Gold’s Stibnite Gold Project back into local projects has opened its first grant cycle.

The Stibnite Foundation will grant $50,000 this year in McCall, Donnelly, Cascade Riggins, Council, New Meadows and Yellow Pine, said Bob Crump of Riggins, president of the foundation’s board.

“We know there are so many amazing people and organizations across our region working to create positive change in these communities,” Crump said.

“It is going to be an honor to support some of these efforts, but we recognize it will also be a big challenge to determine what projects we fund during our 2020 grant cycle,” he said.

Only non-profit organizations are eligible for the grants, which will be awarded based on community need, project feasibility, sustainability, projected local and regional impact and organizational stability, Crump said.

A maximum grant amount is not specified, but the foundation plans to award five to 20 grants, he said.

Applications can be found at (link).  The deadline is 5 p.m. and grants will be announced Sept. 1.

Judging will be conducted over the summer by the foundation’s 10-member board, which consists of two Midas Gold representatives and representatives from eight communities.

Communities and their representatives are Glenna Young for Cascade, Pat DeHaas for Council, Gene Tyler for Donnelly, Julie Good for New Meadows, Crump, Ronda Rogers for Yellow Pine, Clete Edmunson for Adams County and Denis Duman for Idaho County.

Laurel Sayer represents Midas Gold Idaho on the foundation board and Anne Labelle represents Midas Gold Corp., the Vancouver, B.C., parent company of Midas Gold Idaho.

The board meets on the second Thursday of each month, but meetings are not open to the public.

The City of McCall is not represented on the board because last year it declined to sign Midas Gold’s community agreement.

Also not represented is Valley County, which had its offer to sign the agreement withdrawn by Midas Gold amid worries over possible conflicts of interest with future permit requests.

However, nonprofits in McCall and Valley County are eligible to apply for a grant.

Midas Gold used $1 million in stocks and cash to launch the foundation last April before adding another $100,000 in cash this year.

Future funding is tied to the company’s growth and the success of the Stibnite Gold Project, a proposed gold and antimony mine near Yellow Pine.

Another $100,000 would be given to the foundation if the Forest Service grants approval of the project, an action currently projected for late 2021.

An additional $100,000 and 1.5 million shares of stock would be given to the foundation once Midas Gold receives all of the 50-plus permits needed to allow construction to begin.

Once construction begins on the project, the company would give the foundation $250,000 each year during the projected three-year construction phase.

That would be a total of $1.15 million in cash and 3 million shares of stock before Midas would extract an ounce of gold from the ground.

Once Stibnite begins producing gold, Midas Gold would give 1%, or at least $500,000, of its annual net profits to the foundation over the expected 12 to 15-year life of the project.

The company would give the foundation a final payment of $1 million when mining has been completed and reclamation efforts begin.

The intent of the foundation is to develop a lasting endowment and enable the foundation to continue to exist after the mine is closed, according to Midas Gold.

source: © Copyright 2009-present Central Idaho Publishing Inc.
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Public Lands:

USDA Forest Service Big Creek Hazardous Fuel Reduction Update

Dear Interested Party,

The Big Creek Hazardous Fuels Reduction Environmental Assessment and draft Decision Notice has been completed and is being sent to those who have previously requested to be included on the project mailing list or have submitted specific written comments related to the project. The Big Creek Hazardous Fuels Reduction is being considered under the Hazardous Fuels Reduction Act on the Krassel District and Payette National Forest. The proposed fuels treatments are in direct proximity to the Edwardsburg-Big Creek communities, private lands, USFS Administrative sites and along Forest Roads (FR) 50340 (Warren-Profile Gap), FS Road 50343 (Logan Creek), Government Creek FS Road 50344 and FS Road 50371 (Big Creek-Smith Creek) and associated spur roads. These treatments are designed to reduce the risk of effects to private homes, structures, other private property, and National Forest resources, from wildland fires and would increase the effectiveness of fire suppression efforts, as well as improve ingress/egress of public and emergency responders. The Responsible Official who will issue a decision on this project is the Krassel District Ranger.

The revised environmental assessment and draft decision notice as well as other project information is found on the project’s webpage: (link) Hardcopy documents may be made available to interested parties upon request by calling 208-634-0700.

This project is subject to the objection process pursuant to 36 CFR 218 Subpart C.

Eligibility to File Objections

Objections will be accepted only from those who have previously submitted specific written comments regarding the proposed project either during scoping or other designated opportunity for public comment in accordance with § 218.5(a). Issues raised in objections must be based on previously submitted timely, specific, written comments regarding the proposed project unless based on new information arising after designated opportunities.

Individual members of organizations must have submitted their own comments to meet the requirements of eligibility as an individual; objections received on behalf of an organization are considered as those of the organization only. If an objection is submitted on behalf of a number of individuals or organizations, each individual or organization listed must meet the eligibility requirement of having previously submitted comments on the project (§ 218.7). Names and addresses of objectors will become part of the public record.

Contents of an Objection

Incorporation of documents by reference in the objection is permitted only as provided for at § 218.8(b). Minimum content requirements of an objection are identified in § 218.8(d) include:

* Objector’s name and address with a telephone number if available; with signature or other verification of authorship supplied upon request; Identification of the lead objector when multiple names are listed, along with verification upon request; Name of project, name and title of the responsible official, national forest/ranger district of project, and
* Sufficient narrative description of those aspects of the proposed project objected to, specific issues related to the project, how environmental law, regulation, or policy would be violated, and suggested remedies which would resolve the objection.
* Statement demonstrating the connection between prior specific written comments on this project and the content of the objection, unless the objection issue arose after the designated opportunity/opportunities for comment. Written objections, including any attachments, must be filed within 30 days following the publication date of this legal notice in the newspaper of record. It is the responsibility of Objectors to ensure their objection is received in a timely manner (§ 218.9). The publication date in the McCall Star-News, newspaper of record, is the exclusive means for calculating the time to file an objection of this project. Those wishing to object to this proposed project should not rely upon dates or timeframe information provided by any other source. We appreciate your interest in the Payette National Forest and this project.

Filing an Objection

Written objections, including any attachments, must be filed within 30 days following the publication date of this legal notice in the newspaper of record. It is the responsibility of Objectors to ensure their objection is received in a timely manner (§ 218.9). The publication date in the McCall Star-News, newspaper of record, is the exclusive means for calculating the time to file an objection of this project. Those wishing to object to this proposed project should not rely upon dates or timeframe information provided by any other source.

The Reviewing Officer is the Intermountain Regional Forester. You can file objections on the project website as listed above or send objections to Objection Reviewing Officer, Intermountain Region USFS, 324 25th Street, Ogden, Utah 84401; or fax to 801-625-5277; or by email to: objections-intermtn-regional-office@usda.gov

We appreciate your interest in the Payette National Forest and this project. If you have any questions regarding this project or comment period, please contact Patrick Schon at 208-634-0623.

Sincerely,
Anthony B. Botello
Krassel District Ranger
Payette National Forest
— — — — — — — — — —

New campaign provides guidelines for outdoor recreation

By Katie Kloppenburg Apr 16, 2020 KIVI

Boise, Idaho — Governor Brad Little and natural resource managers are urging Idahoans to protect the health of themselves and everyone around the while doing outdoor activities. Recreate Responsible Idaho is a new campaign offering guidelines for those who want to recreate outdoors.

The Governor’s office says all of us must work together to keep areas open for recreation during the COVID-19 pandemic. By following guidelines set in Recreate Responsible Idaho, closures can be minimized if people do not overcrowd areas and practice social distancing.

State and federal lands and many other recreational areas are largely open for day use, even under the Governor’s statewide stay-home order. People must recreate responsibly by observing social distancing, limiting how far they travel and reducing their impacts on any place they visit.

continued:

[Note: Higher elevation campgrounds are still closed due to snow, most do not normally open until Memorial Weekend.]
— — — — — — — — — —

Boise County deputies helping several drivers stuck on Rabbit Creek Road

by CBS2 News Staff Saturday, April 18th 2020

Boise County, Idaho (CBS2) — Boise County Sheriff’s deputies are helping get stranded cars off of Rabbit Creek Road.

In a Facebook post on Saturday, the sheriff’s office says deputies were out Thursday, Friday and Saturday to help stranded drivers.

The sheriff’s office gave information for those planning to use snowy roads.

continued:
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see also:

Urgent Warning from Boise County Sheriff’s Office

“If there is snow – don’t go.”

link: to FB post
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Letter to Share:

Check Out What the Gamebird Foundation is Doing

Just a quick note to let everyone know what The Gamebird Foundation (tgf) have been up to. Dale Rose and his hard working crew have been very busy building brooders for the soon to arrive, starting May 5th, baby pheasant chicks. So far that first wave of chicks will amount to about 4500 in May and counting. By the end of July, we should have raised and released into great habitat around 10,000 wild pheasants. Dale’s crew has built 25 brooders; we have nine left that are not spoken for. Thank God, some folks are building their own. WE ARE ASKING THAT THOSE OF YOU WANTING YOUR BROODER TO CALL Dale Rose, 208-875-1385 and make arrangements to pick up your brooder. We would like a $50.00 deposit on the brooder and equipment if you can afford it. It cost us about $250.00 to get you set up to raise the chicks, feed and all. If you want to return the equipment when you are done or tired of raising pheasants we will give you back your deposit. This is not a money making project as we are all in this together.

If you want to raise pheasant chicks or would like to help someone else, we are a 501c3 non-profit Corp. All donations are a tax deductible write of if you wish. We could use any donations. You can send donations to the Gamebird Foundation, PO Box 100, Viola, Idaho 83872. Thank all the members and Volunteers that have help put this project together. If you would like to become a member to help us bring the wild pheasants back. You can join the family for $20.00 per year. Every member, every dollar helps.

“The Pheasant Guy”
Jim Hagedorn
Executive Director
The Gamebird Foundation
208-883-3423
Jhag1008@gmail.com
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Critter News:

Pet talk – Rhinitis and sinusitis in dogs

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt April 17, 2020 IME

Rhinitis is inflammation of the nasal cavity, and sinusitis is inflammation of the sinuses. The inflammation can affect just one area or both, and can be either acute or chronic.

Bacterial infection of the nose or sinuses seldom occurs as a primary disease. It is usually associated with viral, fungal, parasitic or foreign-body disease. Foreign objects and fungal disease are the most common. Allergic conditions can predispose dogs to chronic inflammation of the nasal cavity or sinuses. Tooth root abscesses may extend into the nasal cavity. Tumors involving the nasal cavity or sinuses can commonly occur in older dogs. Sometimes a source of the inflammation is never identified.

Sneezing and nasal discharge are common clinical signs. Acute onset of episodes of violent sneezing is often associated with inhalation of a foreign object.

continued:
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Treasure Valley sees increase in urban hen keeping

By Katie Kloppenburg Apr 16, 2020 KIVI

Treasure Valley residents are getting closer to their food source during the COVID-19 pandemic. Local farm and garden stores have seen more demand for baby chicks, chicken supplies and general gardening supplies.

Gretchen Anderson, a backyard chicken advocate, Master Gardener and native Idahoan applauds the trend, but wants new chicken owners to educate themselves.

“There are a lot of great books on raising backyard chickens and online resources,” said Anderson. “However, I would caution would-be or brand new chicken keepers to seek poultry information from a trusted source.”

continued:
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Fish & Game News:

Winter survival for radio-collared mule deer fawns and elk calves tracking above average

By Brian Pearson, Conservation Public Information Specialist
Friday, April 17, 2020

73 percent of collared fawns and 84 percent of collared calves made it through March

Statewide winter survival of radio-collared mule deer fawns and elk calves was above average through the end of March, and Fish and Game officials are optimistic that those numbers will continue on their current trajectory through the end of the monitoring period on June 1.

“In terms of winter survival, it looks like this year is going to come in above average, which would mean more young animals are recruited into the herds, and that would be great news for our deer and elk populations and our hunters,” said Daryl Meints, Deer and Elk Program Coordinator for Fish and Game. “We still have another month and a half to go before those ‘young of the year’ are recruited into the population and we will continue monitoring through June 1, but I’m hopeful the final numbers will remain above average.”

continued:
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New F&G process for hunters to exchange or buy returned elk tags starts April 23

By Staff Writer
Thursday, April 16, 2020

Each year, hunters return a limited number of tags that can be redistributed

Every year, a few hunters return and exchange their general season elk tag. Often the returned tags are highly sought-after tags, so Fish and Game has identified a more consistent and transparent way of handling them:

continued:
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You can still go fishing during COVID-19 restrictions, so get out and enjoy spring

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Supervisor
Thursday, April 16, 2020

Fishing is a low-risk activity if you maintain social distancing, and there are fishing spots nearby

Taking the dangers of COVID-19 seriously and going fishing are not mutually exclusive, and in Idaho, most people can fish close to home. COVID-19 has created many challenges for Idahoans, but fortunately, we don’t have to stop fishing during beautiful spring weather.

Here are some tips to keep your fishing fun and interesting while minimizing risk to yourself and others.

continued:
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Spring Edition of Windows to Wildlife

In the spring edition of Windows to Wildlife

* Beaver Dam Analogs and Stream Restoration
* A Golden Eagle’s Journey – Alaska to Idaho
* Alpine Surveys – On the Search for the Elusive Black Rosy-finch
* Supporting Idaho’s Wildlife Diversity

link:
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More F&G News Releases

link:
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Crazy Critter Stuff:

Bald eagles, eaglets found nesting in arms of Arizona cactus

For the first time in decades, bald eagles have been found nesting in an Arizona saguaro cactus

By The Associated Press April 16, 2020,


This undated photo provided by the Arizona Department of Game and Fish shows a bald eagle nesting in a saguaro cactus in central Arizona. It’s the first time in decades bald eagles have been found nesting in an Arizona saguaro cactus. (AP Photo/Arizona Department of Game and Fish)

Phoenix — For the first time in decades, bald eagles have been found nesting in an Arizona saguaro cactus.

The Arizona Game and Fish Department revealed Wednesday that biologists discovered a pair of eagles and their eaglets in the arms of a large saguaro during a recent eagle survey.

continued:
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Seasonal Humor:

WolfLame-a

DogCovidExcited-a
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Bird of the week: Rufous Sided Spotted Towhee

Rufous Sided Spotted Towhee

(early spring visitor)

20120314towhee-a
20120314rufous-sided-spotted-towhee-a
link: to larger photos
more: Photos by Local Color Photography

Spotted Towhee
Pipilo maculatus
Size and Shape: A large sparrow with a thick, pointed bill, short neck, chunky body, and long, rounded tail.
About a third again bigger than a Song Sparrow and twice as heavy. Smaller than a robin.
Both Sexes
Length: 6.7-8.3 in
Weight: 1.2-1.7 oz
Wingspan: 11.0 in
Color Pattern: Male Spotted Towhees have jet-black upperparts and throat; their wings and back are spotted bright white. The flanks are warm rufous and the belly is white. Females have the same pattern but are grayish brown where males are black. In flight, look for white corners to the black tail.
Learn more about this bird: The Cornell Lab of Ornithology
Link to Birds Page
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Idaho History Apr 19, 2020

Idaho 1918-1920 Influenza Pandemic

(Part 1)

1918-20SpanishFlu-a
source: Spokesman.com
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1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic in Idaho

Pandemic influenza arrived in Idaho sometime before the end of September, 1918. The Public Health Service did not require states to report influenza before September 27, 1918. On September 30th, officials reported several cases of influenza in Canyon County. Less than two weeks later, the number of cases had grown to such an extent that the state was unable to track the disease accurately. By late October, influenza cases were reported from Boise, Coeur d’Alene, Idaho Falls, Lewiston, Moscow, Pocatello, Twin Falls, Wallace, and many other towns.

In 1918-1919 most of the population of Idaho lived in rural areas (1920 census = 431,866 with no cities or towns having a population of more than 70,000). Rural Idaho suffered terribly from the pandemic. Russell Clark, a resident of Paris, Idaho remembered the impact of the pandemic this way: “There was a feeling of depression and sadness because neighbors, you see, were passing away.” The mortality rate was nearly 50 percent in Paris, Idaho.

State officials and newspapers urged calm. In Rexburg, the local paper insisted that there was “no occasion for panic” but then went on to discuss the need to enforce the town’s quarantine. The Northern Idaho News of Sandpoint also urged calm, but then noted that, as a precautionary measure, schools would be closed indefinitely, and churches, picture shows and all public gatherings of every kind would be prohibited. The newspaper also issued a warning to parents to keep their children away from the railway depots as a precaution against infection. To their dismay, many officials found that quarantines had no real impact on the spread of the disease.

Watkin L. Roe from The Franklin County Citizen Newspaper wrote to Surgeon General Rupert Blue on the behalf of “many prominent citizens” in January 1919. He wrote “this county has been closed tight, that is so far as schools, academy, theaters, and picture shows are concerned.” But, he noted, “In looking up similar conditions in other towns, we find that the said towns have been opened in spite of the prevalence of the epidemic. And reviewing these cases, we find that the conditions in those places have been much worse that what we have had in this section.” Roe wrote that 1,300 of the county’s 7,500-8,000 residents had been sickened by the flu and 31 had died. Mr. Roe asked the Surgeon General if there was “any virtue in the vaccines and serums which the doctors are using.” What was a community to do? How could officials know when the disease had truly run its course? The Surgeon General did not send an answer.

Though social distancing measures likely helped, many Idahoans were still afflicted. In Idaho, as elsewhere, the disease simply ran its course, unchecked by actions taken by state, local or federal officials. While influenza rates lessened during the late fall, it was not until the summer of 1919 that the disease began to disappear from the state.

At the Idaho State Pandemic Influenza Summit held in Boise on March 27, 2006 the Secretary of Health and Human Services, Mike Leavitt warned Idahoans:

“The final toll that the pandemic took in Idaho will never be known. But the echoes of suffering and loss remain. When it comes to pandemics, there is no rational basis to believe that the early years of the 21st century will be different than the past. If a pandemic strikes, it will come to Idaho.”

Influenza Among the American Indians 1918-1919

Native Americans suffered disproportionately from the 1918 influenza pandemic. The Bureau of Indian Affairs was overwhelmed as influenza swept through rural reservations, killing thousands. During the period from October 1st 1918 to March 31st 1919, there were 73,651 reported cases of influenza and 6,270 deaths out of a total Indian population of 304,854. This case mortality rate of 8.5% was substantially higher than that of the general population (2.5%). The reporting of the attacks is probably incomplete, suggesting even higher mortality in the American Indian population. The mortality varied in different localities especially being high among the Indians of the Mountain States (Arizona, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah and Wyoming). Out of a total Indian population in these Mountain States of 91,475, the attacks numbered 32,285 and of these 3,553 or 11 per cent, died. The highest mortality occurred among the Indians in Utah, Colorado, Idaho, Arizona, and New Mexico. Out of a reported population of 4,208 Indians in Idaho, there were 650 influenza cases and 75 deaths (case mortality of 11.5%). These figures are taken from a statement furnished to the U.S. Public Health Service by the Office of Indian Affairs, Department of the Interior.*
(* U.S. Public Health Reports, 9th May 1919.)

A second wave of influenza developed among the Indian population in April 1919.

source: Idaho Health and Welfare
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Nurse1918-a

caption: A nurse wearing a mask as protection against influenza. September 13, 1918. (Photo/National Archives)
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A little slice of history: When the Spanish Flu came to Idaho

by Rick Just Mar 8, 2020 for the Idaho Press

I know, you’re getting tired of hearing about the current pandemic. Maybe reading about one more than a hundred years ago will be of interest.

In September of 1918, Treasure Valley residents were focused on the war raging in Europe. They were involved with drives to raise money for that effort and young men were leaving regularly for the fight. But there were lesser headlines in the papers that were starting to capture the attention of readers. There was a plague moving into the United States from Europe. It was sometimes called the Army Plague, because it was infecting army camps and shipyards where returning soldiers were billeted. It would soon be known widely as the Spanish Influenza.

The Idaho Statesman’s medical columnist, Dr. William Brady wasn’t much concerned about it. He was certain it would be no worse than any other flu that had come and gone in the preceding decades. He recommended that his readers prepare for it by taking long walks out of doors. Getting fresh air and plenty of exercise would not prevent the flu, but it would give one the strength and vigor needed to combat it.

The first reports that really hit home were of area soldiers who were quarantined at their bases, either in training or on their way home. Sickness followed for many, and death for a few. Reports of traveling citizens in eastern cities coming down with the disease soon followed.

On October 2, 1918, the Spanish Flu had hit the valley. Six families, consisting of 15 persons in and near Caldwell came down with the disease. The carrier was identified as a woman from Missouri who had visited the families. Quarantines were put in place.

Most of the stories about the flu in local papers were from back east where cases were growing rapidly. A health commissioner in New York was recommending gauze or chiffon masks. Another helpful suggestion he had was to avoid kissing unless you did it through a handkerchief.

As concern about the Spanish Influenza mounted, advertisements started popping up offering preventions, cures, or symptomatic relief. Tanlac Laxative Tablets were said to contain the very elements needed by the system to give it fighting strength. Lister’s Anteseptic Solution was billed as “First Aid to Prevent Spanish Influenza.” This on the same page as an ad for Danderine, claiming that dandruff makes hair fall out. These were alongside ads such as that from the California Fig Syrup Company lauding their product as a cure when your child was cross, irritable, feverish, or had bad breath. Another ad went after the flu fear market, claiming Kondon’s Catarrhal Jelly applied inside the nose would give antiseptic relief.

By October 6, a boy in Star had come down with the flu. On October 9, Dr. E.T. Biwer, secretary of the state board of health, ordered a ban on all public gatherings, including theaters, dance halls, churches, the Natatorium, Liberty Loan rallies (raising money for the war), and political rallies. Only public and private schools were exempted.

This ruffled a lot of feathers. Lodge representatives, members of men’s and women’s clubs, ministers, and pool hall owners made the phone ring constantly at the state board of health, a usually quiet office. Dr. Biwer stood firm, saying that only open-air meetings and private and public schools were exempt.

The Boise Ministerial Association took another tact, saying that if there was danger enough to close churches, then schools should also be closed.

Meanwhile, the Boise City Council questioned the state official’s authority to ban meetings and asked for a legal opinion. An opinion came quickly, but in the form of a Statesmen editorial on October 12. The editors opined that such stringent measures should not be put into effect until “there were 400 or 500 cases, or at least more than our physicians could control.”

Meanwhile, the state began citing pool hall owners for defying the order.

On October 13, the Statesman reported 90 cases of influenza in the state. On October 15, the secretary of the board of health ruled that a state land board meeting should be closed after seeing that 25 people had showed up for the event. That was the same day the paper reported Boise’s first influenza cases.

Mrs. Ray Shawver, 1317 North Twenty-second Street was named as the first person in Boise to catch the disease. Her house was quarantined, and a yellow flag was put out front to visually mark it. When the Statesman next reported state statistics, the number of influenza cases had risen to 161. New cases were reported in Star and Nampa.

It was about this time that the motion picture industry suspended delivery of films to theaters to assure that patrons would not be gathering in infectious groups.

On October 16 the Statesman reported a statewide total of 209 cases. On the 17th, the number was up to 471. On the 18th, the story broke that there were 300 cases of Spanish Influenza in the town of Nez Perce, population 600.

Ada County Civil Defense began gathering the names of nurses, calling for “graduate nurses, pupil nurses, undergraduate nurses, trained attendants, practical nurses and midwives.”

On October 19, the state statistics came in again. Ada county had only 15 cases, but there were 1008 infected statewide. Seven had died.

On October 20, the state health board gave a general closing order for schools statewide. Courts began rescheduling cases.

A rumor spread quickly that Boise was under quarantine, as some smaller towns such as Challis, were. The secretary of the state board of health moved quickly to quash that one.

On the 23rd the statewide toll of confirmed cases reached 1711.

Boise dragged its feet on closing schools. Even so it was costing $20,000 a day statewide to pay teachers who were not working.

By October 28 the Statesman reported 11 new cases in the city, and six deaths in a single day. St. Anthony and Rexburg were under quarantine. Halloween was cancelled in Boise.

The Spanish Influenza would ebb and flow over the coming months until The Statesman was able to declare in a headline on January 19, 1919, “Schools Free of Disease.”

Because of haphazard reporting it is difficult to determine an exact number for those who succumbed to the disease. In Boise, it was probably about 75. Other areas of the state were hit much harder. Paris, Idaho, according to the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare, had a mortality rate of nearly 50 percent. Native Americans were hit especially hard in Idaho, with 75 deaths out of a population of just over 4,000. Worldwide estimates are between 20 and 50 million who succumbed to the disease.

source: Speaking of Idaho
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FluMask1918-a

caption: A woman in a flu mask during the 1918 flu pandemic. Getty Images
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Warning … the 1918 pandemic

By Diana Baird Emmett Messenger Index Dec 24, 2012

The 1918 influenza pandemic killed more than 600,000 Americans and 50 million people worldwide, according to Center for Disease Control historians. Scientific technology improvements made it possible to identify pandemics in later years compared to the 1918 tragedy.

The influenza epidemic in 1918 was the story of the worst epidemic ever known in the U.S.

The nation was at war and in the middle of draft call-ups, troop shipments and bond drives when the epidemic hit.

American soldiers from Fort Riley, Kansas carried the disease to the trenches of Europe where it mutated into a killer virus. When they returned home, they brought the flu home with them. One soldier complained of fever, sore throat and a headache and by noon they had over 100 cases. A week later there were 500 and that spring brought the death of 48 soldiers. Across the country thousands of soldiers fell ill quickly and dead bodies were “stacked like cord wood.”

The disease spread to the civilian population and people could be healthy in the morning and dead by nightfall. Some died more slowly and doctors were baffled and hopeless to stop the influenza. Many officials found that quarantines had no real impact on the spread of the disease.

National public health officials distributed masks and forbade spitting in the streets. In Emmett, health officials threatened punishment of fines or imprisonment if the law was not followed. But, the disease spread across the nation. More than 195,000 died in America in October 1918.

The nation had a shortage of caskets on the east coast and the dead were left in gutters and stacked in caskets on front porches. People hid and were afraid to interact with friends and neighbors.

Idaho officials and newspapers urged the community to remain calm. In some Idaho counties, public gatherings were prohibited.

As suddenly as the disease came … it vanished. It ran out of fuel and people who were susceptible to it, according to the CDC. In Idaho, the disease ran its course and influenza rates decreased by the late fall.

Idaho pandemic timeline

The US Department of Health and Human Services

On Sept. 30, 1918, officials in Idaho reported that there were several cases of influenza in Canyon County. In less than two weeks, the state admitted that the number of cases had grown to such an extent that they were unable to track the disease accurately. By late October, cases of influenza were reported in Boise, Coeur d’Alene, Idaho Falls, Lewiston, Moscow, Pocatello, Twin Falls, Wallace and a range of other towns.

source: Idaho Press © Copyright 2020
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Boise’s Forgotten Pandemic

Spanish-Flu-1918-a

by Todd Shallat, Ph.D., with Mistie Rose and Molly Humphreys October 4, 2016
This essay is excerpted, in part, from The Other Idahoans: Forgotten Stories of the Boise Valley, Investigate Boise Community Research Series, Vol. 7 (Boise State University School of Public Service, 2016).

The Great Pandemic of 1918 spread through a fatal cough. Vomiting and delirium followed. Victims spat blood, then suffocated. Most died within 24 hours.

Known as the Spanish flu — elsewhere as the Spanish Lady, the Blue Death, the Fever of War, and the Great Influenza — the terror hit Boise at the vulnerable, fatal moment of America’s triumph at the close of the First World War. Boise, by then a city of 19,000, had streetcars, opera houses, a Gothic cathedral, and a Moorish spa, but no reliable system of medical reporting. Mysteries continue to cloud the way deaths were recorded. Quarantines, mostly voluntary, were loosely enforced. Only graves and a few brittle public records hint at the murderous toll.

Origins of the Pandemic

The killer may have originated in China as a lethal strain of H1N1 influenza. Or it may have begun as bird or swine flu in Kansas, where the pandemic was first diagnosed. Shifting and drifting with genetic mutation, the influenza devastated the killing fields of Europe at the close of the First World War. By October 1918 it had swept the globe from France to New Zealand. By February 1919, when suddenly the phantom vanished, the wartime epidemic had killed more soldiers than died under enemy fire.

Epidemiologists have estimated that a third of the Earth’s population may have been exposed to the airborne infection. Perhaps 1 in every 200 people died after exposure.

Wartime suspicion clouded every aspect of the great pandemic. How did it kill? Where was it born? Cures were also elusive. Doctors worldwide were slow to acknowledge the devastation. The Red Cross could do little more than provide surgical masks to swaddle faces in cotton gauze.

Doctors in Idaho were as dumbfounded as any. “I myself came down with the disease in January 1919,” said Leonard J. Arrington, a historian raised in Twin Falls. “Every hamlet was stricken,” he continued. “Every neighborhood lost children, parents and grandparents. Almost everyone old enough to have memories of it recalls with the grief the passing of a relative, a friend a respected official.”

Sadly, few records exist for Ada County. In 1919, when the U.S. Surgeon General conducted an influenza census, Boise was outside its scope. In 1920, Ada was one of 22 Idaho counties that frustrated health officials by failing to tally and carefully label causes of death by infectious disease.

Perhaps the worst of the fever bypassed Boise. Or perhaps in the Boise Valley, where nostalgia clouded misfortune, the trauma was subconsciously blocked for a city’s self-preservation. Perhaps it called into question the fables of frontier progress with memories too horrific not to repress.

Bodies Stacked Like Cordwood

Was it meningitis? Bacterial pneumonia? A plot hatched by Germany’s Bayer aspirin? A virus launched from a U-boat?

Europeans first scapegoated Spain because Spanish newspapers had been quick to report the story. But it was an epidemic like no other. Tamer strains of viral influenza had long been common in Europe, hitting mostly the poor, the very old and the very young. But the 1918 pandemic was more democratic. It crippled men as powerful as FDR and President Woodrow Wilson, and the virus hit young adults especially hard.

Scientists still debate why the flu became so deadly. Not until 2004 were microbiologists able to isolate the murderous H1N1 strain. Some say the virus, born in China, had been transmitted through the wartime migrants who labored behind British lines. Some say the fatal strain had mutated in the filth of field hospitals and troop ships. Others say the influenza was American born.

The killer, whatever its source, savaged the United States in three murderous waves: the first, in the early spring of 1918, the second, in the fall of 1918, and the third, in the winter of 1918-1919. “Patient zero” was said to have been Albert Gitchell, an army cook from Kansas, the first to be diagnosed. On the morning of March 11, 1918, at Camp Funston in Ft. Riley, Kansas, Gitchell had staggered into the infirmary with a fever of 103°F. By midday the camp was flooded with 107 cases. By month’s end, the number of cases had surged to 1,127. Forty-eight victims died.

Doctors at first shrugged it off as germs spread by dust storms. In September 1918, however, when the virus jumped to New England, the pandemic could not be ignored. U.S. Surgeon General Victor Vaughan reported the trauma from Camp Devens outside of Boston on the day 63 soldiers died. “The faces soon wear a bluish cast,” said Vaughan, reporting the horror. “A distressing cough brings up the blood stained sputum. In the morning the dead bodies are stacked about the morgue like cordwood.” Doctors were entirely helpless. Vaughan feared that the killer might murder every human on Earth.

Death toll estimates vary. The U.S. Department of Health has estimated that 165,000 Americans died of the influenza. Ghana in West Africa may have lost 100,000 people; Brazil, 300,000; Japan, 390,000. Worldwide estimates range from 20 to 100 million. The influenza killed more people in 24 months than HIV-AIDS has killed in 35 years.

Idaho and the Boise Valley

“When your head is blazing, burning / And your brain within is turning / Into buttermilk from churning / It’s the Flu,” wrote a poet in Idaho Falls. “When your stomach grows uneasy / quaking, querulous, and queasy / All dyspeptic and diseasy / It’s the Flu.”

But Boise doctors remained unconcerned through the summer of 1918. Dr. William Brady, the Statesman’s medical columnist, predicted the virus would be no worse than others that regularly crossed the Atlantic. “Avoid worry,” said another physician. Westerners were said to be hardy enough to stand tall against influenza. And people who lived in cities, it was said, had resistance to diseases spread in a crowd. Fresh air and exercise were recommended. A Boise Rexall prescribed a flu regimen of iron pills, hydrogen peroxide, antiseptic gargle and cod liver oil.

Tunnel vision on the war in Europe kept the disease from Boise’s headlines. “FRENCH TROOPS HOLD OFF HUNS” was the Statesman headline on October 2, 1918, when the killer struck Caldwell and Star. Fifteen people from six families had visited with an infected friend from Missouri. All were quarantined after reporting dangerous symptoms. Olive Michel Shawver of N. 22nd Street had the sad misfortune of being the City of Boise’s first reported victim. On October 15, she was confined to her North End home.

By mid-October the mayor of Boise had joined the Red Cross and the U.S. Public Health Service to ban meetings in public places, closing churches, theaters, pool halls, dance halls, courtrooms, cigar shops and funeral homes. Boise schools mostly stayed open. In Kimberly, Idaho, nevertheless, city officials refused to let Boise-bound travelers step off the train. Deputies in Custer County guarded the mountain passes, arresting travelers or turning them back at gunpoint.

19181015BoiseFlu-a
Boise Public Library. The Boise School Board downplayed the threat as troops returned to Boise and the virus continued to spread. Pictured: Statesman headlines, October 15, 1918.

Idaho’s Native Americans grieved some of the pandemic’s worst devastation. In 1918, of the 4,200 natives in Idaho, there were 650 documented cases of flu. Seventy-five died from flu-related heart failure and suffocation. In Nez Perce, a town of about 600 on the tribe’s reservation, health officials estimated 300 cases.

Mormon communities received aid from Utah when the third wave materialized. The city of Paris in Bear Lake County may have lost as many as 500 people — a mortality rate of 50 percent.

Boise, meanwhile, was ill-equipped as any Western city. Boise’s Red Cross offered $75 (per month, presumably) and all travel expenses to lure experienced nurses. Gloves on their hands, gauze on their faces, the nurses delivered hot meals from sanitary community kitchens. Trolley conductors with police power had orders to prevent passengers from spitting or placing their feet on the seats.

Tunnel vision on the war in Europe continued to dominate Boise headlines through October of 1918 as Germany capitulated. On November 11, 1918, Armistice Day, Boiseans flooded the Idaho Statehouse to hear Governor Moses Alexander proclaim the United States’ moment of triumph. A parade — fever-be-dammed — erupted on Boise’s Main Street. “Ten thousand yelling, shooting, screeching, tooting, routing, laughing, talking citizens of Boise parade the streets,” the Statesman reported. A band played “Hot Time in the Old Town Tonight.” A small boy milked laughs with a sign: “The Kaiser has got the flu. He has flown.” The flu, aside from that sign, seemed to be largely forgotten. No health department official dared to stop the celebration. The Statesman reported that only one Boisean at the victory party had worn a surgical mask.

No one remembers whether or not the parade spread the infection. Medical records are sketchy. Brigham Young University has since compiled a “death index” of Idaho fatalities. From October through February, 1918-1919, the index reports 279 deaths in Boise. Influenza or flu is listed as the cause of death in 75 of those cases, more than half of them young adults. Flu-like pneumonia is listed as a cause of death in 60 additional cases.

But if Boise followed the pattern of other American cities, the pandemic of 1918 was dangerously underreported. Hospitals often refused to admit what seemed to be mild cases. And because the virus came in waves with ever-more deadly mutations, there was no standard diagnostic test.

Local resentment of state officials may have also blurred the reporting. On October 20, 1918, for example, state health officials denounced “unpatriotic” physicians who refused to keep careful statistics. One of the accused was Dr. George Collister, the founder of a subdivision. Officials alleged that Collister had failed to quarantine 32 Basques in their Grove Street rooming house. In 1920, the state’s Department of Public Welfare reported in frustration that half of Idaho’s counties had refused to fill out reports.

And then, inexplicably, the virus subsided. In January 1919, even as influenza rebounded elsewhere, state legislators returned to Boise to ratify the 18th Amendment, prohibiting the sale and consumption of demonic alcohol. Theaters had already reopened and, on January 19, the Statesman headlined “SCHOOLS FREE OF DISEASE.” Boise flu cases had fallen below 600. By February the phantom was gone.

Grave Misfortunes

No memorial recalls Boise’s pandemic — none but the granite in the cemeteries, marking the victims in rows. Boise’s cemetery at Morris Hill inters at least 110 bodies from the wartime virus. Laborers, housekeepers, nurses, cooks, janitors and railroad workers — they were local victims of global misfortune, more than half of them young adults.

Agnes Stites was one. Age 22 when she died in 1918, Stites had suffocated while spitting blood at St. Alphonsus Hospital. Her flu-stricken baby daughter, age 22 months, died the following day.

Ystora Yoshihara of Japan, another victim of influenza, was a naturalized citizen who worked as a cook at the OK Restaurant on Boise’s Main Street. Influenza took him at age 41.

Albert P. Smith of Boise, age 50, died from influenza and heartbreak just four days after the death of his teenage daughter, Thelma Louise. He had been a boiler inspector in the Eastman Building. She had worked as a stenographer.

Edward Jeff Brummett, a farmer, had relocated from New Mexico with his wife and children about six months before his death by influenza at St. Luke’s Hospital. His wife also died of the influenza. He was 28. She was 20. Their daughter and son took sick but survived.

What these unfortunates had in common was bad timing, mostly. Bad timing had made them too young for immunities from past pandemics, too old to benefit from coming advances in medical science that brought virus vaccines. Bad timing moreover had brought these victims to Boise at the fluke tragic moment when 12,000 Idaho troops had returned from Europe in shock and jubilation, spewing disease.

A century later it remains our own sad modern misfortune to write about common people in an era of celebrity wealth. “Sad stories are a hard sell in Boise,” says Bruce DeLaney, the owner of a downtown bookshop. Only the headstones are left to recall forgotten pandemics, marking memories collectively lost.

source: BSU Blue Review © 2020 All Rights Reserved. Boise State University
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Celebration of Armistice, Moscow, Idaho Nov. 11, 1918

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source: Mike Fritz Collection History of Idaho
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November 11, 1918

by Justin Smith

On November 11, 1918 Boise celebrated the end of the Great War, but it was a dangerous celebration to attend. For four years the globe had been at war. It was a long, bloody, muddy mess in the trenches of Europe and Boise wanted to celebrate despite the danger.

America had entered late into the fight on April 6, 1917, but the United States still recorded 116,516 deaths and approximately 320,000 sick and wounded out of the 4.7 million men served. The USA lost more personnel to disease (63,114) than to combat (53,402), largely due to the influenza epidemic.

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That’s right, more American soldiers died from the flu than from fighting. The epidemic, known as “the Spanish flu”, began in late 1917 in the troop staging and hospital camp in Étaples, France. Before it was over an estimated 500,000,000 were infected around the world and 50,000,000-100,000,000 died (3-5% of the world population). For some reason this version of the flu was not only highly virulent, it was also lethal to many who contracted it, even if they were otherwise healthy.

At the time of these photos Idaho was in the midst of the epidemic and such a large gathering was a threat to public health. This may explain why so few people are at the celebration. Still, those who were there were putting their lives and the lives of their families at risk.

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The Idaho Health and Welfare Department explains how bad it was in Idaho: “Pandemic Spanish Influenza arrived in Idaho sometime before the end of late September 1918. On September 30th, officials reported several cases of Spanish Flu in Canyon County. Less than two weeks later, the number of cases [rose] to such an extent that the state was unable to track the disease accurately. By late October, Spanish Flu cases were reported in Boise, Coeur d’Alene, Idaho Falls, Lewiston, Moscow, Pocatello, Twin Falls, Wallace, and many other towns.

“Rural Idaho suffered terribly from the pandemic. The mortality rate was nearly 50% in Paris, Idaho. Quarantines had no real impact on the spread of the disease. While influenza rates lessened during the late fall, it was not until the summer of 1919 that the disease began to disappear from the state.”

“Because service workers, who frequently came into contact with the public, were at a greater risk of contracting influenza, they often wore masks in attempt to ward off the disease. The masks, however, were ineffective in preventing the spread of influenza.”

1918PostalCarrier-a

The epidemic was so frightening that some towns, like Challis, posted armed guards to keep people from entering. Governor Alexander (almost certainly somewhere in these photos) was forced to step in and tell Challis to remove their self-imposed quarantine because Challis was the only route some communities could take to reach other places. Still, the fear and paranoia continued.

Nurses became ill and the hospitals, which were small and lightly staffed in 1918, scrambled to find anyone who could act as a nurse. Patients were stuck in bed for weeks. In villages, smaller towns, and on farms no medical care was available without travel and the sick were unable to do so. The Boise Visiting Nurses Association was founded and offered to send a nurse to care for homebound patients for $1.00 per day. A plea went out to any woman who had nursing experience to contact the Ada County Council of Defense or the Idaho State Graduate Nurse’s Association if they were able and willing to work. It was not enough.

There was no cure for the Spanish flu and, just like everywhere else, Idaho simply had to wait it out. How many died we will never know. Health records and death certificates were not the priority. In the spring of 1919 the number of cases began to decline and soon the epidemic was over. On November 11, 1919 Boise had its real celebration for the end of the Great War. This time the whole city seemed to attend.

1919 Clipping

1918NovBoiseNews1-aA remarkable display of community spirit, surcharged with 100 percent Amercanism, was shown by citizens of Boise today in the celebration of “Armistice” day, the first anniversary of the signing of the armistice, which stopped the guns in the great war one year ago today.

That genuine sentiment has come back into patriotic meetings to take the place of the rather ritualistic flavor to which patriotic meetings had begun to descend just before the world war awakened the national spirit, was wonderfully shown at the huge mass meeting at the Pinney this afternoon. Every speech, every song, every incident in the program was a demonstration of the great patriotic fervor that has seized the nation.

EVERYBODY GOES.

Almost to a man, Boise merchants and professional men closed their places of business and turned out with their employees to swell the attendance at the mass meeting, and the high school students attended the meeting in a body, accompanied by the teaching staff.

Henri Scott, the celebrated Metropolitan opera baritone, who appears in concert at the Pinney this evening, very graciously sang a patriotic descriptive number, “The Americans Come,” a declamatory account of the joy experienced by a blind French soldier over the arrival of hie brothers to aid in the conquering of the Hun.

The G. A. R. Fife and Drum corps and the Boise Municipal band kept up a concert of patriotic airs before the meeting, and played several program numbers. Lead by Eugene Farner the audience rang with mighty volume, the favorite national hymns. “America,” and “The Star-Spangled Banner.”

source: History of Boise November 24, 2019 (FB) used with permission
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Pocatello and the 1918 ‘Spanish’ flu

By Tara A. Rowe Apr 10, 2020 Idaho State Journal

In the fall of 1918, a heated Senate campaign was underway in Idaho between Democrat John F. Nugent and Republican Frank Gooding. It came to a screeching halt when the Spanish flu reached Idaho. Not unlike our current environment with COVID-19, political rallies were no longer allowed. As the two camps traded barbs in the Pocatello Tribune, those stories appeared side by side with reports of influenza deaths. On Election Day, for their health and safety, voters had to enter their polling place one at a time. Nugent edged out Gooding with the votes of fewer people (970) than had died of influenza in Bannock County (1,000 plus).

As communities throughout Idaho now grapple with the spread of the coronavirus, similarities to Pocatello’s struggle with the 1918 influenza epidemic are striking. While many of the same measures as those in the early 20th century have been instituted to fight 21st century coronavirus, there are lessons to be learned from what Pocatello did during that earlier epidemic.

What continues to be referred to as ‘Spanish’ flu was a particularly deadly H1N1 influenza strain that circled the globe. This strain caused the immune system to overreact. It attacked healthy young adults at unprecedented rates. No longer were children and the elderly the most vulnerable.

This flu began its spread in military camps on American soil. It was transported around the world by soldiers fighting the Great War. Attribution to the Spanish is due to lack of censorship in Spain during World War I. Americans, both civilians and soldiers, were learning of the fast rise of cases in Spain, but not other countries. This changed in the fall of 1918 when, unlike cases that spring in military camps, the disease had mutated before being brought back home by American GIs.

The fall of 1918 brought isolated cases dotting Idaho’s landscape. Counties were mandated to report both flu and pneumonia cases as 10 to 15 percent of flu cases resulted in bronchial pneumonia. Newspapers reported “brevities” daily, sometimes matching reported numbers, sometimes not. Reporting could not keep up with deaths. By Oct. 8, there were 30 known cases of influenza in Idaho. Without a confirmed case in Bannock County and with reassurance from the city physician that the health condition of Pocatello was very good, the Pocatello Tribune called for the radical measure of closing public halls to prevent spread of the disease. Fear of an Idaho city experiencing the kind of outbreak big cities on the East Coast were experiencing forced the Idaho State Board of Health to comply with recommendations from the U.S. Surgeon General that included closing public halls, theaters, churches and other indoor gatherings. Like today, ill persons were advised to stay home, but no enforcement mechanism existed. Schools were not closed immediately. Many Pocatellans wanted quick action on public gatherings, but lacked concern for schools.

Responses to the board of health’s order varied. Some feared it didn’t go far enough, and others feared it encroached on the liberties of Idahoans. Disinformation abounded. Despite what other cities were learning, voices in Idaho contended that young, healthy individuals were safe and experienced only mild symptoms. The Tribune of Oct. 4 stated that, “in the strong and well-nourished (sic), the attack is mild as a rule, subsiding in three or foar (sic) days.” As preventative measures were discussed, many believed the “malady not dangerous unless neglected.” Opinion columns questioned whether it was the flu at all and some debated the origin of the disease. Tribune readers were presented the argument that the origin was not Spanish, but German. Like Towney and Chuck in Katherine Anne Porter’s novella “Pale Horse, Pale Rider,” some believed the disease reached American shores by German submarine.

Objectors to quarantine were concerned with scheduled Liberty Bond meetings. Money was needed for the war effort. Additionally, objectors argued that while no epidemic existed in Idaho, the order had “jeopardized the livelihoods” of workers. The Tribune printed one such objection: “There is every disposition to comply but there does not appear to be necessity for the order, according to those in position to speak with authority on the subject.” Like today, medical authorities were unanimous in their support of quarantine. Residents of the city did not rush to follow this recommendation.

Between the initial order of Oct. 9 and an expanded order on Oct. 10 that closed schools, a protest of the order was held in Pocatello. Some continued to fight the order, but most could see the epidemic coming and complied. On Oct. 11, Bannock County had zero known cases. On Oct. 12, there were 25 suspected cases. Despite cases in the county, Pocatello announced that outdoor gatherings like a Liberty Bond event called the “Parade of the Italians” (to be held on Columbus Day) would go forward.

A parade in the midst of an epidemic is a catastrophe-in-the-making. Today we hear the governor of Louisiana state he did not know that it was not a good idea to go ahead with Mardi Gras. His state is now being ravaged by coronavirus. In 1918, the city of Philadelphia experienced an outbreak on a horrific scale. Despite high numbers of cases, the city went forward with a Liberty Bond parade on Sept. 28 — 200,000 Philadelphians gathered. City officials said that there was no cause for concern, the contagion was “well in hand.” Within 72 hours of the parade, the beds of the city’s 31 hospitals were filled. Within a week of the parade, 45,000 people were sick. Within six weeks, 12,000 were dead. The mortality rate was unmatched.

The day after Pocatello’s parade, reported cases increased — 100 new cases were reported. Following Columbus Day festivities in cities around the state, the Idaho Board of Health issued an order banning all indoor and outdoor gatherings. It is not possible to attribute exponential growth of flu cases and deaths to a single event due to unreliable reporting of the period.

The first personal threat Pocatellans felt was on Oct. 12 when it was reported that Miss Effie Gittins, a city water employee, and Judge Frank Dietrich of the U.S. District Court for Idaho had become ill. Both were well known. Previously some knew of soldiers who had become ill or died while stationed elsewhere, but now a common connection existed. This is not unlike when Tom Hanks announced he had tested positive for coronavirus — opinion changed. Additional restrictions were issued to stop dry sweeping; to require hotels, restaurants, eating houses, dining rooms and soda fountains to sterilize their establishments; to ban cups and towels for common use; and new railway rules.

New railway rules impacted railroad towns like Pocatello disproportionately. Train cars had to have open and adequate ventilation and had to maintain a consistent temperature. Like city streets, dry sweeping was prohibited (i.e. everything had to be sprayed down first, an obstacle for any railroad that didn’t have easy access to water). No public spitting was allowed; the communal spittoon was removed. Riders were not allowed to place their feet on seats.

As the epidemic took hold in East Idaho, many communities did not allow passengers to disembark if they were non-residents or had traveled to hot spots. Stations from Driggs to Idaho Falls were closed. Neighboring Jackson Hole, Wyoming, closed itself to those from “infected territories.” This included Idaho. In Gooding, passengers were had their movements monitored much akin to the way China is tracking its citizens. Boise required travelers be quarantined. In Challis, armed guards blocked entry into town. The esteemed historian Leonard J. Arrington called this the “Quarantine War.” The situation in Challis ended with the Idaho attorney general determining the statewide quarantine order legally justified by the extraordinary epidemic. History repeats itself.

The location of the Oregon Short Line impacted the city in ways far more dangerous than a transient or traveler bringing the disease into town. Many railroad workers lived in packed, close-quarter company housing. To the east of the rail yard sat what is referred to as the Triangle, a neighborhood consisting of minority groups living in close proximity. The railroad employed most men of the Triangle. This diverse group often lived in multi-generational homes and in 1918 couldn’t institute necessary hygiene and sanitation to slow the spread of disease. As the map of influenza deaths shows, the Triangle was hit hard. The mortality rate among minority groups, similar to coronavirus today, was higher than in other populations. Idaho had a mortality rate of 11.5 percent among Native Americans. For a population of 4,208, there were 650 cases and 75 deaths. Names like DeFilippis, Bertasso, Valbaena, Yoshida, Orepe and Kotigos are among the names of Pocatellans who succumbed to the flu. Much of the Triangle no longer remains, but the contribution of its citizens can be seen all over town. Their story is one of great loss.

The first death in Pocatello was a 10-month-old boy named Eldon Beebe Myler. His death was reported on Sept. 16, 1918. Exactly one month later his grandfather, Charles C. Myler, died. The Mylers were only one of many families to lose multiple members. Mr. and Mrs. Luigi DeFilippis died a week apart. They had five small children, one of whom, an infant, also died. The Orgill family of McCammon had their family tragedy play out one entry in the Tribune at a time. Brothers Thomas and Samuel Orgill each lost children to the illness. Their two families combined lost five children. Mrs. Kokan Yoshida died, leaving behind a husband and three children, all of whom were ill. Mr. and Mrs. Christopher Riley died with their infant twin daughters. There was no shortage of tragedy in Pocatello. Unfortunately, this was a familiar pattern. No age, nationality, ethnicity or class was spared.

On Oct. 12, the Tribune reported 211,000 cases and 7,432 casualties nationally. Unfortunately, they believed it would soon peak. The epidemic was hardly confined to 1918. The U.S. saw its last outbreak in late spring 1920. Pocatello’s last cluster of deaths came in summer 1919. Despite attempts at vaccination, several vaccines failed, herd immunity from one-third of the world’s population being infected likely ended the spread of the disease.

What can we learn from Pocatello’s experience with the Spanish flu? First, self-distancing measures largely work. Once quarantine measures are strictly adhered to, cases slow. Pocatello benefited more from isolation than the gauze masks of the time. Where quarantine backfired was in highly dense areas like the Triangle. As shocking numbers of African-Americans die from coronavirus, we can look to 1918’s largely poor minorities with less access to health care to see they died at higher rates. The creation of home health care was Idaho’s response to rural residents and minorities needing nurses. Recruitment by the Red Cross of retired and graduate nurses was essential to maintain care for the afflicted. Idaho is doing this type of recruitment successfully today.

The two great lessons to be learned from 1918 come from two histories of the epidemic. The first, from historian John M. Barry says, when describing a Philadelphia military camp being disinfected and quarantined after an outbreak, that no matter the mitigation efforts “the virus has already escaped.” In Idaho, our stay-at-home order came two weeks after the first confirmed coronavirus case. We must believe that the virus was already spreading among us.

When this work began in 2011, myself and the late Karen Kearns, director of special collections at Idaho State University, hoped to determine the exact numbers of infected and dead. Our research in the Tribune and Idaho death certificates found no such numbers. This reflects what the oral history of the American Catholic Historical Society said in 1919: “Facts unrecorded are quickly lost in the new interests of changing time. … We have little left now, beyond material statistics, and vague impressions drawn from ‘paper accounts’ of the epidemic.” Let us hope that for posterity our current pandemic records will better reflect what it cost our communities.

source: © Copyright 2020 Idaho State Journal
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Back to Table of Contents
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 1)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 2)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 3)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 4)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 5)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 6)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 7)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 8)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 9)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 10)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 11)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 12)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 13)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 14)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 15)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 16)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 17)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 18)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 19)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 20)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 21)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 22)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 23)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 24)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 25)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 26)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 27)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 28)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 29)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 30)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 31)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 32)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 33)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 34)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 35)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 36)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 37)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 38)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 39)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 40)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 41)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 42)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 43)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 44)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 45)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 46)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 47)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 48)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 49)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 50)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 51)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 52)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 53)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 54)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 55)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 56)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 57)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 58)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 59)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 60)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 61)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 62)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 63)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 64)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 65)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 66)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 67)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 68)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 69)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 70)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 71)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 72)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 73)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 74)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 75)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 76)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 77)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 78)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 79)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 80)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 81)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 82)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 83)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 84)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 85)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 86)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 87)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 88)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 89)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 90)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 91)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 92)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 93)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 94)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 95)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 96)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 97)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 98)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 99)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 100)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 101)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 102)

Road Reports Apr 19, 2020

Please share road reports. Rock Migration Season has begun. Conditions change very quickly this time of year. High elevation roads may have several feet of snow. Be prepared for snow/ice, rocks and trees in the road and remember there is no cell phone service.

Yellow Pine: The snow in Yellow Pine is going away quickly this week, lots of bare ground but there is still several inches in the shady places. Most local streets are bare or nearly bare. Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN.
link: Local Forecast
Yellow Pine Webcam: (check date on image)

Warm Lake Highway: Wednesday (Apr 15) mail truck driver reports 2″ new snow on Big Creek summit this morning. (Probably melted by now.) No current report.
link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

Highway 55 Webcams Link:

South Fork Road: Report Wed (April 15) mail truck driver reports the entire road is bare, no rocks this morning. No current report.
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Report Wed (April 15) mail truck driver reported no rocks on the road, looks like it had been cleared of rocks on Tuesday. Road is bare until the last few miles before Yellow Pine. Watch for new rocks, we have been having aftershocks on top of our usual freeze thaw.

Lower Johnson Creek Road: No current report (old report that 4×4 is needed in some spots between YP and the dump.)
Landmark and upper Johnson Creek closed to wheeled vehicles.
link: Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam
link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
Note: The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Closed to wheeled vehicles (no current report.)
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Report April 10: [summit] “between 6-7 ft. Continuous snow floor from the Big Creek turnoff. About 3 ft remaining at the Big Creek turnoff.” – SA
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcam: (check date on image)

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open with restrictions
April 9 – Temporary Spring Restrictions on upper Stibnite Rd in effect.
Update from Midas March 30: As Spring nears, snow and ice on the Stibnite road is beginning to melt, leaving some sections of the road bare and others still covered in snow. The road is soft in places so Midas Gold crews are minimizing traffic and utilizing UTV’s when possible to prevent erosion. Warmer temperatures in the afternoons bring rocks down daily so caution for all travelers is advised. Midas Gold crews are vigilant and exercising extra caution to watch out for falling rocks and remove fallen rocks in order to maintain access to Stibnite.
We also received notice from the County that due to spring melt conditions there will be temporary travel restrictions on Stibnite Road. These restrictions are both to keep the road from further damage, reduce erosion and to keep the public safe.
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Closed to wheeled vehicles (no current report.)
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: Closed to wheeled vehicles (no current report.)
Note: The approx elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′
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