Monthly Archives: May 2020

May 31, 2020 The Yellow Pine Times

May 31, 2020 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Community Calendar:

The Corner is Open w/reservations
Yellow Pine Tavern Closed until further notice.
April 17 – Boil water order issued
May 15 – Firewood Season starts
May 15 – Lower South Fork river open for float boating
May 18 – Work starts on South Fork road
June 1 – road work YP to Stibnite begins
Mid-June – YP Vet Clinic Canceled
June 13 – VYPA Meeting 2pm at the Community Hall
June 27 – Fest Meeting 2pm at the Community Hall
(details below)
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From Valley County

We need Your Help to protect the place and the people we all Love.
link:
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Valley County Covid-19 Response Page
link:
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Valley County Emergency Operations Center
link:
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Rebound – Idaho Governor’s phasing program
link:
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COVID 19: Recommendations and Resources for Safe Business Practices
link: (lots of info for businesses)
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Local Events:

Note: No local events have been confirmed by press time.
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June Yellow Pine Vet Clinic Canceled

In consultation with the Cascade Veterinary Clinic, we will not be hosting the June vaccination clinic in Yellow Pine this year. If you need your pet seen, please call Cascade Vet at (208) 382-4590 to arrange an appointment. Currently the protocol is to call the clinic from the parking lot when you arrive and someone will come out to your vehicle and take your pet inside. Due to space limitations they are not allowing people to accompany pets inside.
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Village News:

Diamond Fuel & Feed

We planning our Spring delivery up there soon, please call (208) 382-4430. We are open 830am – 5pm Monday-Friday. Closed weekends.
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Local Biz:

The Corner is open with reservations, call (208) 633-3325.

The Yellow Pine Tavern is closed, will do “to-go” orders and gas, call (208) 633-2233.
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Voting Idaho Primary Election

Don’t forget to return your mail in Ballot before June 2nd.
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2020 Census

The 2020 Census Impacts All Valley County Residents

Inching closer. Each of our communities and Valley County as a whole have increased our response rate by a few percentage points over the last few weeks – but we still have a lot of room to grow! We are still ranked #42 of 44 counties in Idaho for our Census response rate. Let’s get that number up! Responding to the Census takes less than 10 minutes and mean $1,483 per person in federal funding for Valley County.

It is recommended that we all fill out the census online.

If you spend 50% of your time in Valley County, you can consider it your home per the Census. Where you register with the Census is confidential and never linked to other governmental requirements such as property taxes or mailing address. The deadline for the 2020 Census has been extended until October 31st. They will probably not be sending census takers up to Yellow Pine.

Link: to online census

You do not need an ID number. Go to the link. Click on “start questionnaire”. Then on the next page scroll down to “If you do not have a Census ID, click here” – when you click on that line it will start the census. (see below)

2020Census-a
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Boil Water Order issued

Update May 15: As usual in previous years, the water plant is experiencing high water in boulder Creek which brings more debris into the sand filter.

The high demand caused by leaks in the system plugs the sand filters prematurely. We will be on a boil order at least through spring thaw.

As of April 17th 2020, Yellow Pine is under another “Boil Order”

Boil Water Advisory Notice

Boil Your Water Before Using

Bring tap water to a rolling boil, boil for one minute, and cool before using or use bottled water. Boiled or bottled water should be used for drinking, making ice, washing dishes, brushing teeth, and preparing food until further notice.

This Boil Water Advisory Notice applies to The Yellow Pine Water System

The system is being monitored and checked daily for compliance. .

You will be informed when you no longer need to boil your water.

For more information, please contact:
Warren Drake of the Yellow Pine Water System
at 208-573-6261 or wdrake@drakediversified.com

Please share this information with other people who drink this water, especially anyone who may not get this notice directly (for example, people in apartments, nursing homes, schools, and businesses).

You can do this by posting this notice in a public place or distributing copies by hand or mail.

State Water System ID#: 4430059 Date distributed: 3-22-2020
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Critters

Tick’s are plentiful this spring.

Bears are out of hibernation, protect your trash and pet food.

It is getting close to calving season, watch out for aggressive mother does and cows, they will stomp your dogs.
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Road News:

Reports of people making it out via Johnson Creek road, but watch for trees down and rocks once you get out to the highway. Travel at your own risk!

There is about 5 feet of snow at Profile Gap (May 27th)

photo courtesy Chris and Lois

Midas Gold will be working with local contractors to grade the road from Yellow Pine to Stibnite on June 1 and dust abatement of the road on June 15.

Work on the South Fork Salmon River road will begin on May 18th. This year’s work will be focused primarily on the Payette portions of the roadway. This initial work will not include road closures, but may cause some very short delays in traveling the road. The contractor will to begin implement the same closures as last year as soon as Lick Creek opens, which is expected to be right after the Memorial Day weekend. These closures will be from 0700 until 1600 every week day, just like last year. The Forest Service will provide weekly updates on Mile Post closures as we did last year.

The load restrictions on the South Fork Salmon River Road were lifted May 18th
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Forest Info

A report last week (May 23) of trees cut and stacked at the Yellow Pine Campground. Possibly hazard tree removal by the Boise NF.

The Krassel RD campgrounds are effectively open for use but currently with limited services – we advise all users to bring toilet paper, drinking water and strive to be as fully self-contained as possible as the District is not operating the campgrounds as open with full services. We have cleaned the restrooms in the South Fork paved road corridor, but water systems will take a little longer to bring on-line due to the need to sanitize and to receive water testing results.

All campgrounds and restroom facilities in the South Fork Corridor, Lick Creek/Secesh Corridor and along the East Fork South Fork Salmon River to Yellow Pine will begin seeing our regular restroom cleaning beginning this Friday, May 15th. Water systems will come online in the near future.

Rx Burns

All new prescribed burn ignitions have been paused across the Region in line with regional direction. The Forest will continue to prioritize keeping employees and the public safe during this time. The decision to temporarily postpone ignitions will prevent any effects from smoke that might further worsen conditions for those who are at risk in our communities while reducing exposure for Forest Service employees who might not otherwise need to travel.

We expect the pause on prescribed burn ignitions to be re-evaluated by the Regional Forester sometime in April.
– PNF
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Yellow Pine US Mail

The 6-day a week mail delivery will start soon. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 55 cents. Support our local post office and purchase your holiday stamps here.
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Yellow Pine Transfer Station

May 20th – report that the trash strewn about by the bears has been cleaned up at the Transfer Station.

Lakeshore last emptied the bins on or before May 1st. Please keep the burn pile neat.

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

Yellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is located approximately 3 miles south on Johnson Creek Road.

The TRANSFER STATION is for household trash and yard waste:
* Household trash must be put inside (and fit) the dumpster;
* Yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, etc.) goes in the burn pile on the south end of the turn-around;
* Cardboard boxes should be flattened before putting the in the dumpster,

The DUMPSTERS are NOT for:
* Furniture (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station).

The BURN PILE is NOT for:
* Cardboard boxes (flatten and put in dumpster);
* Furniture and appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Drywall and building material (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wire or fencing (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Foam Rubber (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wood with metal (like nails) attached (take to Donnelly Transfer Station.)

When closing the DOORS on the front of the dumpsters:
* Make sure the “U” brackets at the top and bottom of the door are engaged;
* The retaining bar at the middle of the door is slid into the pipe;
* And the “L” bars at the bottom of the doors dropped into place.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: 208/634-7176
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Local Groups:

YPWUA News:

New Boil Water Order issued April 17, 2020. This could last until runoff is over.

Second half of the water bill is due June 15, 2020.

The last Yellow Pine Water Users Shareholders meeting was Sunday July 7, 2019.
link: 20190707YPWUAminutes
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VYPA News:

Next Village Meeting June 13
link: June 2020 VYPA Agenda-1.docx

2020 Festival Meeting May 16, 2020 Notes
Note: at each meeting we simply add to info on the topic. That way, info from all meetings is included in a single document.
link: 2020 Festival Planning Notes.pdf

Next festival planning Meeting June 27th at 2pm at the Community Hall

Heat was installed in the community hall on April 30th.

Proposed VYPA Bylaws Changes

Attached is the compiled proposed changes to the bylaws the Council has received.

The proposed changes and the proposed addendum B, are being published to give folks plenty of time to read and process the information before the first reading.

link: 2020 Proposed changes to Yellow Pine Bylaws Adopted 9-12-2015.pdf

link: 2020 Addendum B-letter of interest.pdf

link: 2018 Midas Gold Community Partnership Agreement with the Village of Yellow Pine

Deb Filler – Chairperson
Village of Yellow Pine Association

The community hall committee’s goal is to have adequate heating installed in the main hall before the June VYPA meeting.

If folks have items for the community yard sale, please place them by the north wall in the community hall. If you see items you would like to purchase, you can pay Deb, Ronda, or Lynn. All funds support the community hall.

VYPA meetings for 2020 – June 13, 2pm; July 11, 2pm; August 8, 2pm; September 12, 2pm.

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting Minutes for September 21, 2019
link: 20190921 Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting
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YPFD News:

YPFD COVID19 Policy

link: YPFD Covid 19 SOP.docx

The link below is for the EMS folks!
link: Covid-19 EMS.pdf (May 23)

May 10th Burn Permits – contact the YPFD

Pile burning: Dress appropriately, have enough help on hand (people, water and tools) and make a firebreak before you start. Call your local fire protection district chief to let them know you’ll be conducting a debris burn. This saves them from sending emergency responders to your property if they are not needed. Do NOT burn on breezy afternoons.

Better yet, “Bring It, Don’t Burn It”, you can take your yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, etc.) to the burn pile at the Transfer Station on the south end of the turn-around. Remember, keep the pile neat. Woody debris only, no nails, no cardboard and no furniture! The Boise NF will burn the pile in the fall when it is safe and doesn’t pollute our fine YP air.

YP Fire Commissioners:
Sue Holloway – District 1
Dan Stiff – District 2
Merrill Saleen – District 3
Jeff Forster – Fire Chief

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice

The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.”

Click the link: to view 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation
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Biz Listings:

The Corner (208) 633-3325

Open 11am-8pm Closed Tuesdays
The best way to ensure we meet our social distancing guidelines is to call 208-633-3325 before dropping in but we will accommodate everyone, it just may take a bit more time. We will do breakfast on request and always have good coffee going.
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Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233

Tavern is still closed until further notice. Will have gas available as well as take out beer, pop, candy, chips, pizza. Call 208 739-7086 or go to 355 Yellow Pine Ave. House across street from the Tavern next to the Silver Dollar.
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Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377

Closed for Winter.
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Knotty Kat Crochet Works – 208-502-0940
FB page link
open Tue – Sat, 9-5
Yellow Pine eggs $3/doz
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Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Tom & Sarah Lanham
156 Yellow Pine Ave, Yellow Pine Id 83677
website:
Facebook:
Starting June 2020 We will be doing trail rides out of Yellow Pine along with summer pack / camping trips to high mountain lakes in the area!

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
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Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430 open 830am-5pm Monday-Friday, closed weekends.
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Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

The Star-News

subscribe:
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine

Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, will service Yellow Pine

B&T Safety Solutions LLC
208-271-1600 Based out of Donnelly
Snow removal, cleaning chimneys and stoves, we do cabin staining/chinking as well
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Letter to Share:

Dear Yellow Pine residents:

Cascade Medical Center is here for you. When I (Tom Reinhardt) attended your community meeting in September, I mentioned that we were preparing to provide tele-video medical visits. We now have that up and running. If you want to schedule an appointment, call our clinic at 208-382-4285. Vicki or one of the MAs will ask you some questions to make sure that a tele-video visit is the right choice given your symptoms or need. If so, we will work with you to make sure you are set up on the Cascade Medical Center patient portal (with our EMR). We will also make sure that you are set up to be able to do a tele-video visit (laptop with camera, desktop with camera, or smart phone). We use the Zoom telemedicine system, which is confidential and secure (it works like Skype or Face-time). Before the appointment, we will email you a link for the tele-video visit. When it is time for your appointment, you will click on the link in the email and you will be connected with our provider and can begin your visit.

Regarding insurance coverage, the COVID legislation passed in March assures coverage of telemedicine visits for patients with Medicare, Medicaid, VA. Private insurers have also decided to provide coverage just as for regular in person visits, at least until the COVID epidemic crisis is declared over.

My advice is that if someone usually goes to the VA for care, they should call the VA and see if they can do a video visit with them. Or if they usually go to McCall St. Lukes, they should call their doctor there.

Tom Reinhardt, CEO
Cascade Medical Center
April 4, 2020

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Local Observations:

Monday (May 25) overnight low of 32 degrees, mostly clear sky this morning. Lots of tree swallow and finches calling and flying around. Morning air traffic. A few grosbeaks (evening and black-headed) and a pine squirrel dodging finches at the feeders. Partly cloudy and breezy after lunch time. Seeing a few more hummingbirds. Warm, mostly cloudy and light breezes mid-afternoon, high of 74 degrees. Overcast, breezy and raining lightly mid-evening, steady rain until late evening. Overcast and breezy at dusk, hairy woodpecker calling. Cloudy before midnight.

Tuesday (May 26) overnight low of 49 degrees, low overcast and foggy ridges this morning. Finches, black-headed grosbeaks, juvenile nutcrackers and jays visiting, no tree swallows around. Air traffic at lunch time. Broken gray overcast and breezy mid-afternoon, high of 69 degrees. A little pine siskin stopped by. Mostly cloudy (dark gray) and calmer early evening. Mostly cloudy (high thin) at dusk and calm. Swallows came back and a large bird (eagle?) soaring over the village. High thin wispy clouds at dusk and robins calling. Stars out before midnight.

Wednesday (May 27) overnight low of 39 degrees, clear sky and light breeze this morning. Lots of swallows and finches, a couple of hummingbirds visiting. Air traffic buzzing the village after lunch time. Hazy wispy clouds and light breezes mid-afternoon, high of 77 degrees. Finches twittering, black-headed grosbeaks and jays visiting, all kinds of squirrels scampering about. Very thin high haze in the sky by evening and breezy. Partly hazy at dusk and robins calling. Clear before midnight, lots of stars.

Thursday (May 28) overnight low of 38 degrees, partly hazy sky and breezy this morning. Lots of swallows flying, finches and robins calling. Mostly clear and light breezes after lunch time. Quite warm, mostly clear and light breezes mid-afternoon, high of 86 degrees. Partly cloudy and slight breeze mid-evening. Raven calling from the east, swallows, finches and robins singing. Lilac blooms about to pop. At dusk it was almost clear (1 little cloud) and breezes picking up, and robins chirping. Mostly cloudy and breezy after midnight. Thunderstorm with rain after 2am.

Friday (May 29) overnight low of 50 degrees, mixed overcast sky (thin haze and thicker dark clouds) and muggy, rain total = 0.04″. Early airplane traffic. First lilac blooms, tree swallows hunting feathers for nests and robins calling. Rivers are up. Partly cloudy, warm and muggy after lunch time. Pretty warm and muggy with light breezes and partly cloudy mid-afternoon, high of 88 degrees. Female hairy woodpecker stopped by a couple of times. Partly cloudy mid-evening, folks out golfing. Mostly cloudy and breezy before midnight.

Saturday (May 30) overnight low of 47 degrees, thunder and short hard rain around 830am (0.03″) overcast sky and humid this morning. Rivers are up and lilacs blooming. Swallows hunting feathers for nests, finches and robins calling, a couple of chipmunks and 2 pine squirrels scampering about. Clouds thinning before noon, loud rumble but probably not thunder. Skinny male hairy woodpecker and a hummingbird visited. Hot and gusty breezes mid-afternoon, high of 91 degrees. Increased traffic. Dark storm clouds to the south and west, breezy, warm and humid mid-evening. Dark overcast and calmer at dusk. Cloudy, calm and humid before midnight. Rain early morning.

Sunday (May 31) overnight low of 50 degrees, early morning rain showers (0.02″) mostly cloudy and breezy this morning. Wind gusts and power blip at 902am. No swallows around this morning, a few finches and a black-headed grosbeak, a female hairy woodpecker and 1 hummingbird visited. Lilacs in full bloom and bleeding hearts putting out flowers. Mostly cloudy and breezy after lunch time. A rufous and a calliope hummingbird, a mourning dove and a clark’s nutcracker visited. Mostly cloudy and lighter breezes mid-afternoon, high of 71 degrees. Several jays visiting and robins hopping about. Partly cloudy and a bit breezy mid-evening.
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Letter to Share:

from Valley County Sheriff’s Office

PSA Saturday –

We would like to take this opportunity to educate some folks on the usage of your UTV, ATV or Dirt Bikes on County roads in Valley County.

We get several questions and complaints during the spring, summer and fall on the use of these vehicles in neighborhoods and on County maintained roads, public and private. Remember, just because a road is marked private (blue signs), it’s still accessible to the public and you must still follow the rules of the road.

Use on City & County Roads (does not include private property)

The following requirements must be met on city, county, and highway district roads.

• Valid restricted vehicle license plate. [IC 49-402(4)]
• Valid IDPR OHV registration sticker affixed to restricted vehicle license plate. (IC 67-7122)
• Valid driver’s license. (IC 49-301) – Parents can be cited for allowing an unlicensed minor to operate an ATV or UTV. Please keep this in mind.
• Liability insurance or alternative insurance. (IC 49-1223 or IC 49-1232)
• A helmet under age 18. (IC 49-666) Please make sure it’s a DOT inspected helmet.
• Muffler and U.S. Forest Service approved spark arrestor. Your muffler has to pass 96 dB at the half-meter test, SAE J1287. The OHV cannot exceed 96dB. (IC 67-7125)
• If you are riding on a highway within city limits, you may NOT go beyond the 45 mph signs in Valley County. This may not be the case in other cities, please be sure to check city codes prior to operating an off road vehicle on state highways within other city jurisdictions, they vary.

For safe operation on roads the following equipment is recommended.

• Brake light.
• Headlight and taillight after dark/poor visibility.
• Horn audible at 200 feet.
• Mirror showing roadway 200 feet behind the OHV

License & Registration

Any OHVs being operated or transported on public lands, roads or trails of the state of Idaho must display a current IDPR OHV Registration Sticker. Idaho Code 67-7124. Registration has been extended until June 30th, due to COVID-19, however they are asking that you attempt to get this completed as soon as you can.

Non-resident Requirements

Non-residents are required to have either a valid OHV registration from their home state of residence or a valid IDPR OHV registration sticker. Nonresidents must purchase an Idaho restricted vehicle license plate with a valid IDPR OHV registration sticker if they don’t have a plate and wish to operate on Idaho’s local jurisdiction roads (i.e.county roads).

Please be courteous, pay attention to speed limits and remember when you are driving through neighborhoods there are lots of things going on, kids playing, family pets and people walking or biking their neighborhoods.

We are asking that if you would like to report traffic complaints in your neighborhood, to call at the time it’s occurring, get a good description of the vehicle, a plate would be great and a description of the occupants, if possible.

Some of the questions the dispatcher might ask you are; Which direction did they go? Do you know where they live? When did this occur?

All of this information helps us in assisting you in better serving your needs. A lot of these vehicles look the same and disappear quickly!

As always, Stay Safe, be healthy and practice social distancing.

(via FB May 23, 2020)
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Photo to Share:

Highway 55 May 30th


Idaho Weather Watcher Calvin Bohrer took this photo while on Highway 55, just south of Banks, and shared it with KTVB’s Idaho Weather Watchers Facebook group.

source:

According to a post on the Horseshoe Bend community FB group, traffic was stopped and not allowed to go North past HS Bend until the highway the tree was removed.
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Idaho News:

Idaho to enter Stage 3 of reopening plan, movie theaters can open on Saturday

by Bryan Levin & CBS2 News Staff Thursday, May 28th 2020

Idaho is ready for the next step of re-opening up its economy.

On Thursday, Gov. Brad Little said the Gem State will transition into Stage 3 of the state’s Idaho Rebounds plan beginning on Saturday.

Some of the most significant changes includes bars, which will now be allowed to open up their doors. Also on Thursday, the governor said he’s allowing movie theaters will also be able to open this weekend. Those were previously designated in Stage 4.

“Due to the sacrifices Idahoans have made in the past two months and the care they have shown for their neighbors, I’m hopeful that we’ve past the worst of COVID-19 in our state,” Little said.

continued:
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Valley County Transfer Site notes Clean Up Days next week

The Star-News May 28, 2020

Valley County residents can haul household and yard debris to the Transfer Site for free or reduced cost during Clean Up Days Wednesday through Saturday, June 3-6, from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Most residential materials will be free to dump, but hazardous household materials will not be accepted.

Dump fees for items such as auto batteries, large tires, refrigerators, small boats, snowmobiles and watercraft will be half price. Fees for some large items, such as motorhomes and large boats, will be regular price.

Items must be separated into lumber, concrete, large metal items and woody debris and yard waste, as all will go into separate piles.

Loads of lumber, metal or woody debris must be brought to the site by 4:30 p.m. to be weighed.

The Transfer Site will accept residential yard debris for free through Tuesday, Oct. 20. This debris includes unprocessed wood products such as trees, branches, bushes, leaves, pine needles and pine cones.

Fall Clean Up Days will be Thursday through Saturday, Sept. 24-26.

The Valley County Transfer Site is located at 240 Spink Lane, off Farm to Market Road in Donnelly. For more information, visit http://co.valley.id.us and scroll down to the Transfer Site icon.

source:
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St. Luke’s McCall resumes non-urgent services

By Tom Grote for The Star-News May 28, 2020

St. Luke’s McCall will restart non-urgent services such as imaging, procedures, elective surgeries and clinic visits.

“The reopening approach is to ensure we can meet the care needs of our community while still providing safe care in a safe environment and be prepared to respond should there be a surge in COVID-19 cases,” a statement from the hospital said.

St. Luke’s is prepared to immediately reduce non-urgent services in the event of a surge in COVID-19 patients, the statement said.

continued:
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Face-Off Over Face Masks

Mandate by businesses OK with most, but not all, customers

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News May 28, 2020

The decision to require all customers and employees in May Hardware in McCall was an easy one for Scott Fereday.

“It doesn’t take but one person to come in here and be infected for basically my whole staff to go down, or at least have an exposure to the point where we could have to close the store,” said Fereday, co-owner of the store at 809 N 3rd St. downtown.

Starting May 15, the store mandated that anyone entering must wear a mask, with large banners and signs out front warning of the new policy designed to combat the COVID-19 virus.

Employees had been wearing masks since early April, but Fereday felt more precautions were needed as the state advances through Idaho Gov. Brad Little’s four-stage plan to re-open the state and tourists return to McCall.

“It was just a no-brainer for us since we had already as a staff been wearing masks at that point for four weeks,” he said.

The store sees up to 1,200 transactions on busy summer day, and Memorial Day weekend this year proved to be one of the store’s busiest ever, Fereday said.

Few have complained about the new policy and many have even thanked staffers for the extra step to boost safety, he said.

“You’ll get a few that grumble a little bit, and then you’ll get some people that see the sign at the door and start swearing and walk away,” he said. “And that’s fine. That’s their opinion.”

Some malcontent customers have threatened to never shop at the store again and instead shop in Boise, while others have berated the policy in profanity-laced tirades.

continued:
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Guidance now available for safe gatherings

May 27, 2020 Local News 8

State and local public health experts created a new guidance document to assist with decisions about gatherings during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The document addresses how to plan for safe gatherings in the various stages of the Idaho Rebounds plan and after.

“Mass gatherings highly influence virus activity. It is recommended that all future plans for gatherings beyond the stages of the Rebound Idaho plan should be planned with cancellation or postponement contingencies. Idaho public health experts, DHW and all local Public Health Districts, will support any decision to postpone or cancel gatherings and public events in order to protect Idahoans and those who visit Idaho.”

The Interim Guidance for Safe Gatherings and Public Events in Idaho document is available HERE.

continued:
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Cascade to go ahead with Fourth of July fireworks show

The decision comes one day after McCall opted to cancel their city fireworks show over Payette Lake over concerns about the spread of coronavirus.

May 28, 2020 KTVB

The annual fireworks display over Lake Cascade will proceed as normal this Fourth of July, the Cascade Chamber of Commerce announced Thursday.

“We have safety precautions put in place, and strongly encourage people to follow social distancing guidelines,” the Chamber tweeted.

… Cascade’s fireworks show is slated to begin at dusk on July 4.

full story:
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The 4th of July Fireworks ARE happening at Lake Cascade this year!

From Lake Cascade Recreation Area & Cascade Chamber of Commerce

We have safety precautions put in place, and strongly encourage people to follow social distancing guidelines according to the Idaho Rebounds Plan. Please view the fireworks at your own risk! No food vendors – Same place as last year on the Golf Course. No music vendors are scheduled to be playing before the fireworks at this time. SPACE WILL BE VERY LIMITED we ask that you police yourself and respect others space for social distancing. If you are worried please find a safe place in your cars to enjoy the fireworks (highly encouraged). If you are sick stay home please. Plan on very long wait times after the fireworks are over patience will be important – Boat Ramps, and all roads in and out of Cascade.
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McCall will skip its 4th of July fireworks show this year due to crowd health concerns

by CBS2 News Staff Wednesday, May 27th 2020

The widely popular 4th of July fireworks show in McCall has been canceled this year.

On Wednesday, the McCall Area Chamber of Commerce and the town cited concerns with crowd health and safety concerns due to COVID-19.

“It is really disappointing to not host the fireworks show on Payette Lake this year,” said Lisa Johnson, McCall Area Chamber event committee chair. “But the health and safety of our community and guests is our primary focus.”

Local officials issued a survey to gauge opinion on whether to host the show. Of the more than 830 people who took the survey, just over 47 percent said they were not in favor or unsure on hosting the fireworks.

continued:
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McCall council splits 3-2 to ban alcohol in parks July 3-5

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News May 28, 2020

Alcoholic beverages will be banned in lakefront parks in the City of McCall on the Independence Day holiday for the fifth year in a row, the McCall City Council voted last week.

Council members split 3-2 over whether to continue the ban on booze at Legacy Park, Brown Park, Davis Beach Park, Art Roberts Park and Rotary Park, which this year will last all weekend from July 3-5.

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Tamarack Resort opens summer operations

by CBS2 News Staff Wednesday, May 27th 2020

Summer Operations are up and running at Tamarack.

Here’s a list of things to do at the resort:

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McCall Farmers’ Market will not operate physical market

The Star-News May 28, 2020

For the first time in 29 years, the McCall Farmers’ Market will not have a physical presence this summer, market manager Susie Marshall said.

The decision not to hold the market was due to social distancing guidelines that remain in place due to the COVID-19 pandemic, Marshall said.

“This was a very difficult and overwhelming decision to make,” she said.

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Donnelly Farmers Market will return to city park on June 17

The Star-News May 28, 2020

The Donnelly Farmers Market will kick off its third summer season with fresh produce and other wares on Wednesday, June 17, from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. at Donnelly City Park.

Shoppers will also find meats, goat cheese, eggs, baked goods and crafts from more than 25 local and regional vendors at the market, open every Wednesday from June 17 through Sept. 23.

The farmers market will follow the recommendations of Central District Health and the Idaho Farmers Market Association, including social distancing of vendors and customers as well as hand sanitizing stations.

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Central Idaho Historical Museum will not open this summer

The Star-News May 28, 2020

The Central Idaho Historical Museum in McCall will not open this summer due to restrictions caused by the COVID-19 pandemic.

The museum is located on four acres along State Street between West Lake Street (Idaho 55) and Park Street across from St. Luke’s McCall.

“We felt we could not conduct tours of the Warden’s House or have visitors in the museum and still keep a safe distance for people,” board member Kathy Deinhardt Hill said.

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Up the Creek Gravel Grinder race canceled by COVID-19 worries

By Max Silverson for The Star-News May 28, 2020

The 60-mile Up the Creek Gravel Grinder bike race that was set for July 25 east of Cascade has been canceled due to precautions to prevent the spread of the COVID-19 disease.

The organizing committee decided canceling was the safest course of action, race organizer Mary Tracey of Cascade said.

The race was meant to take the place of the 4 Summit Challenge while that event’s usual route on Warm Lake Road to the Reed Ranch on the South Fork Road underwent major road work.

“When we were told that South Fork Road was unavailable to us again this summer due to road construction, Mike Cooley of George’s Cycles proposed doing a gravel grinder race as an alternative,” Tracey said.

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St. John’s Day picnic cancelled by COVID-19 precautions

The Star-News May 28, 2020

The annual Juhannus, or St. John’s Day potluck picnic, that had been scheduled for June 28 has been canceled due to efforts to limit the spread of the COVID-19 illness.

The Finnish Ladies Aid stages the picnic, which started with Finnish immigrants who came to Valley County in the early 1900’s.

Juhannus is celebrated at the point of the year with the most daylight. It is the biggest summer celebration in Finland and signals the start of the “real summer.”

source:
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Middleton takes ‘conservative approach’ cancels 4th of July Parade, keeps fireworks

by Trevor Fay Tuesday, May 26th 2020

Independence Day is just six weeks away and Treasure Valley communities are already planning how to celebrate without compromising people’s health.

As communities continue to recover from the first wave of the coronavirus, leaders are deciding how best to celebrate upcoming holidays.

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2020 National Oldtime Fiddlers’ Contest and Festival Cancelled

March 26, 2020

This morning, The National Oldtime Fiddlers’ Contest and Festival Board held an emergency meeting. We have come to the decision that the 2020 Contest and Festival will be canceled. We look forward to celebrating the 68th year of the Contest and Festival in June, 2021.

Our decision was not made lightly. We had to consider the current situation we are in and examine the outlook for the coming months. Additionally, we had to consider the reality of participants’ ability to travel in June – both financial and physical. This is the necessary and right decision for the safety of our community and all participants.

The official 2021 dates are June 20th – 26th.

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Several major Treasure Valley events scheduled for summer 2020 canceled because of coronavirus

At least eight major events, including the Snake River Stampede and National Oldtime Fiddlers’ Fest have already canceled and more events are still undecided.

Misty Inglet May 29, 2020 KTVB

Large events continue to fall victim to the COVID-19 pandemic. All across Idaho, events such as 4th of July celebrations, rodeos, and festivals are being canceled due to concerns over the virus.

… The Snake River Stampede isn’t riding solo in being canceled. Many other major events across the Treasure Valley have also canceled their 2020 events:

Twin Falls Western Days – May 29 to 31
Emmett Cherry Festival – June 17 to 20
Magic Valley Dairy Days – June 11 to 13
Meridian Dairy Days – June 24 to 27
Boise Music Fest – June 27
God and Country Festival – July 1

full story:
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Bannock County 4th of July activities canceled

May 26, 2020 Local News 8

Pocatello, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – Bannock County Commissioners have decided to cancel county-sponsored 4th of July events this year.

Commissioners said there were several reasons for the decision. They said the financial cost of the events would have been beyond available budgets.

The event is usually paid for by sponsors so there is not money in the budget set aside for the festivities.

The commissioners said they didn’t want to pull from the tax payers’ dollars to “shoot $60,000 off into the sky” after asking county departments to prepare for budget cuts.

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Victor cancels 4th of July activities

May 28, 2020 Local News 8

Victor, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK)-The city of Victor has formally canceled this year’s 4th of July events due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Given the event size, density of the crowd, and having no effective way to reduce attendance, the Victor City Council determined it could not safely allow the events.

Mayor Will Frohlich called it a difficult decision.

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Dozens of workers at another Idaho meatpacking plant have tested positive for COVID-19

May 27, 2020 Idaho Statesman

Dozens of employees at yet another Idaho meatpacking facility have tested positive for COVID-19. It’s the latest in a string of meat and food processing facilities to experience large coronavirus outbreaks — mostly in the rural parts of the state.

At least 44 workers at Ida-Beef, a large slaughterhouse and meatpacking facility in Burley, have tested positive for coronavirus as of Tuesday, according to the South Central Public Health District. None of those employees have been hospitalized, and there have been no fatalities linked to the outbreak at the facility.

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NM man, 74, charged in fatal shooting of son, 50

Fight started over discipline of children

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News May 28, 2020

A New Meadows man has been charged with fatally shooting his son last Friday night in the home they lived together in New Meadows, according to the Adams County Sheriff’s Office.

Steven Walker, 74, was charged with manslaughter after Troy Walker, 50, died from a single gunshot wound through the sternum, the sheriff’s office said.

Walker surrendered without incident and was booked into the Adams County Jail in Council, where he remained Wednesday.

The elder Walker told investigators that he shot his son, but said he did so in self-defense, according to court documents.

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Suspect in New Meadows shootout pleads not guilty

William “Bill” Pearle James, 24, is accused of trying to kill two Adams County deputies in March.

Katie Terhune May 27, 2020 KTVB

New Meadows, Idaho — A Cambridge man who was the subject of a week-long manhunt has pleaded not guilty to trying to kill two Adams County deputies in a shootout in March.

William “Bill” Pearle James, 24, pleaded not guilty to all charges May 15. He faces two counts each of attempted murder, assault on an officer, and assault with intent to commit a serious felony.

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Ensuring ballot security during Idaho’s all absentee primary

by Haley Kramer Tuesday, May 26th 2020

You have until Tuesday, May 26 at 8 p.m. to request a ballot for the Idaho primary. You have until June 2 at 8 p.m. to actually turn in that ballot.

… Idaho’s Chief Deputy Secretary of State Chad Houck says it’s important to distinguish between mail-in voting being done in other states and what the state of Idaho has always done.

“Idaho never operated under a mail ballot system. We’ve always had some aspects of being able to move ballots by mail through what we call absentee voting,” Houck said. “Absentee voting has been in statutes, it was there before COVID and it was some really good established processes.”

… Houck says there have only been a handful of cases of voter fraud in Idaho over the last 30 years. That being said there is an extensive process to make sure your vote is secure.

full story:
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Just over 62% of Idaho responded to 2020 Census

by Ryan L Morrison Friday, May 29th 2020 CBS2

Just over 62% of Idaho responded to the 2020 Census, according to the U.S. Census Bureau.

Responses to the 2020 Census in Idaho have reached 62.6% with 53.5% responding online.

Current self-response rates nationwide have went over the 60% response rate milestone. And as of May 25, online responses are 9.2 percentage points above Census Bureau projections,

continued:

[Note: You do NOT need an ID number to fill out the online census (more info under village news.)]
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Three aftershocks reported near Stanley, USGS reports

USGS has reported three aftershocks in Stanley, Idaho, all under 4.0 magnitude.

Celina Van Hyning May 31, 2020 KTVB

USGS is reporting three aftershock earthquakes between Saturday and Sunday morning. All of the earthquakes were under a 4.0 magnitude.

All aftershocks were within 10 kilometers of the city of Stanley, according to USGS.

The first aftershock occurred around 1 p.m. on Saturday afternoon and was reported as a 2.7 magnitude. The second occurred around 2:30 a.m. on Sunday morning and was reported as a 2.8 magnitude, followed by a 3.9 magnitude aftershock around 10 a.m.

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Public Lands:

Idaho State Parks will open up campgrounds this weekend

By Steve Dent May 28, 2020 KIVI

Idaho State Parks provides people with opportunities to enjoy the outdoors, in total, 30 different parks are scattered throughout the gem state, and each has its own unique characteristics.

During the COVID-19 pandemic, the state parks remained open, however, they closed down their campgrounds to limit the spread of the coronavirus, but this spring, the parks saw a record number of people at their parks.

“On one hand, it has strained our resources, but on the other hand, it has shown that people have developed a renewed appreciation for getting outdoors,” said Craig Quintana of the Idaho State Parks.

On Saturday, the Idaho State Parks will open their campgrounds for the first time in 2020.

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Idaho RV registration enforcement postponed again

May 29, 2020 Local News 8

Idaho has again extended its grace period to register recreational vehicles.

The Idaho Parks and Recreation Department asked law enforcement agencies to suspend enforcement of 2020 registrations until July 1. A current grace period expires May 31.

The extension will give the department more time to transition to a new registration system. Among its advantages, a system that will give customers an ability to easily buy or renew registrations online, at retail vendors, or at county motor vehicle offices.

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Campground use increases in pandemic, sparking bad behavior

by Jackson Wilde Herald Journal Saturday, May 30th 2020

With outdoor recreation being one of the few activities available during the COVID-19 pandemic, campsites are undergoing a large uptick in positive and negative use. Local forest rangers are encouraging folks to treat campgrounds respectfully, extinguish campfires and plan ahead for trips.

Cache National Forest Logan District Ranger Jennefer Parker said irresponsible gun shooting, garbage and trespassing are all on the rise this season. However, an increase in unattended fires is prompting the most concern. Parker said multiple citations were recently issued for people who “completely walked away” from their campfires.

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Poison Hemlock now present in Idaho


Photo by: Idaho Weed Awareness Campaign

May 28, 2020 KIVI

Idaho noxious weed officials are warning people to be on the lookout for Poison Hemlock, a dangerous noxious weed proven to be fatal to humans and livestock. Poison Hemlock is now in full growth around the state.

Poison Hemlock typically grows in riparian areas, stream banks, canals and ditch banks, ponds and pastures. The plant grows for two years, in the second year it flowers and then dies. The Idaho Weed Awareness Campaign has information about Poison Hemlock and what to do to control and eradicate it on their website.

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Letter to Share:

Don’t Be A Fawn Napper!

Every year, fawns are reported by the caring public as being orphaned or abandoned. Sometimes it is a case of death of the doe, leaving the fawn obviously orphaned. Sometimes it is a case of an injured fawn, causing the doe to abandon her baby. But, unfortunately, it is often a case of not being orphaned at all, but rather the mother just being out of sight.

If you come across a lone fawn, DO NOT TOUCH! Keep a distance and call Mystic Farm Wildlife Rescue or your local Idaho Department of Fish and Game officer. An assessment of the situation will be made and proper measures taken if warranted. In the event the fawn truly is orphaned and is deemed a viable candidate for rehabilitation, Mystic Farm Wildlife Rescue is available. By providing shelter, food and medical care, trained Mystic Farm staff can help orphaned and/or injured wildlife until they can be ‘soft released’ back into their natural habitat.

Some facts to know:

* Mother deer will leave their fawn for many hours while they go off to feed nearby. The mother does this so predators will not see a vulnerable fawn when they see her. She can be gone many hours, leaving the camouflaged and scent free fawn motionless, avoiding detection by predators.

* Is it injured? If a fawn is seen lying upright, eyes wide open, but flattened to the ground, do not touch it! This is a fawn’s camouflage position to blend in with its surroundings. When the fawn is picked up, it will allow its body to become limp and dangle in your hands. The legs are not broken! Put the baby down, walk away, and leave the area.

* If a fawn is obviously ill or injured – lying on its side, kicking and crying, bleeding, etc. – gently pick it up and place in a safe, quiet place. A light cloth placed over the eyes will often calm it. Keep the fawn away from pets and other human activity. Touch, odors, and the sound of the human voice will only add to the stress of the situation and may cause additional harm. Keep the fawn free from cold drafts or keep it cool if the weather is warm. Please do not feed the fawn. Call Mystic Farm immediately.

* The fawn is on the road! Mystic Farm receives many calls regarding fawns in the middle of the road. Why are they there? Because the mom is nearby! If the fawn is in danger of being hit by cars, gently pick it up and place it about twenty feet off the side of the road and leave the area.

* Is it too late to return to the mother if the fawn has been handled by humans? Will she then reject it? NO! That is an “Old Wives Tale.” Though we strongly encourage you to not touch the fawn, the mother will not abandon it if you do – she just wants her baby back. She is around human scent all the time. Her maternal instinct is much stronger than her ability to rationalize human scent on her baby.

* What happens to the fawn if a rescue is warranted? After arrival at Mystic Farm, the fawn is evaluated and checked for any injuries, dehydration, etc. Wounds are treated either on the premises or through the services of local veterinarians. The fawn is put on an appropriate diet and feeding schedule. Once the fawns gain strength and can nurse from a bottle on their own, the ‘blind feeding method’ is utilized using “hands off” bottle racks. Human contact is kept to a minimum. The fawns are kept in an isolated area – free from predators and forming their own little “herd.” They are free to browse and live in a large, safe, enclosure. Over the course of the season, the fawns are slowly introduced back into the wild.

Mystic Farm Wildlife Rescue, Inc. is a non-profit 501 (c) 3 organization. We are a licensed facility available to provide rehabilitation and release back into the wild of orphaned and/or injured fawns. None of the caring staff or volunteers at Mystic Farm receive a salary or payment for service. Operating out of love and caring for our precious wildlife, we ask our community to do the same. “Don’t Be A Fawn Napper.” Help us to help the wildlife remain wild!

Mystic Farm Wildlife Rescue, Inc.
710 Sanctuary Hills
Sagle, ID 83860
208 241-7081

*Mystic Farm Wildlife Rescue, Inc. is not open for tours. The animals in our care are kept to a minimum of human contact. Thank you for your understanding and support.
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Critter News:

Prepare your dog: Rattlesnake, porcupine and skunk avoidance courses happening June 6

By Katie Kloppenburg May 28, 2020 KIVI

Summer is coming and people are heading out in the foothills more. It’s time for hikers and trail runners to be on the lookout for rattlesnakes–and the same goes for their dogs!

A rattlesnake avoidance training course is happening on June 6 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Separate training sessions will also teach dogs how to steer clear of skunks and porcupines.

The Idaho Chukar Foundation is hosting the events at Julia Davis Park. You can only register your dog for one avoidance session because experts say multiple training sessions in the same day is too much stimulation for a dog.

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Pet Talk – Fracture repair: casts and splints

Dr. Karsten Fostvedt May 29, 2020 IME

Casts are external devices used to treat bone fractures or temporarily immobilize a joint. Casts are used for only certain types of fractures, typically those that are simple, closed [no exposure of the bone through the skin surface] and located below the elbow or stifle [knee]. Casts are commonly made of fiberglass resin.

Splints are most often used as temporary devices to immobilize a broken bone or joint before surgery. If support for the leg after a surgical procedure is required, a padded splint may be applied. Splints are usually a combination of soft bandage materials and a strip of rigid metal or fiberglass.

Support bandages can also help reduce the pain and swelling associated with bone fractures or surgery. A type of support bandage called a Robert Jones bandage does not have a rigid splint but relies on a large amount of cotton padding to stabilize the leg. The Robert Jones bandage is commonly used if the injured area is below the elbow or knee. If the area is above those joints, a splint called a spica splint is usually applied.

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Bear attacks hiker near Henrys Lake Outlet

May 29, 2020 Local News 8

Fremont County, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – An adult male was attacked by a bear while hiking along the Outlet Overlook Trail at Henrys Lake State Park late Friday afternoon.

Idaho Department of Fish and Game reports the victim sustained injuries but was able to walk out on his own.

At around 5:30 p.m. he was transported by helicopter to Eastern Idaho Regional Medical Center

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Fish and Game to begin grizzly trapping in the Caribou-Targhee National Forest

Biologists will radio-collar the bears and monitor them to learn more about their reproduction, food habits, and survival rates.

May 27, 2020 KTVB


Credit: Jeremy Nicholson/Idaho Fish and Game A bear outside an IDFG trap

The Idaho Department of Fish and Game will begin its yearly trapping of grizzly bears for research purposes on Sunday.

Biologists will focus first on trapping bears in the Upper Snake Region, in areas where hunting is prohibited in order to avoid conflicts with hunters. Trapping will then expand in the Caribou-Targhee National Forest on July 1 to within the caldera in Island Park, west of Highway 20 along the Centennial Mountain Range, and in the Cave Falls and Teton areas near the Wyoming border.

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Grizzly bear warning issued in Boundary County

by CBS2 News Staff Tuesday, May 26th 2020

The Boundary County Sheriff’s Office issued a grizzly bear warning Tuesday to its residents.

A young grizzly bear caused extensive damage to a protected beehive near Porthill, according to BCSO. Porthill is a small town on the edge of the Canada, Idaho border.

“Ensure all food attractants are secured,” BCSO said. “Be bear aware!”

source:
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Idaho sockeye begin perilous journey

The state’s most endangered species begins migration

By Steve Liebenthal May 27, 2020 KIVI

Stanley, Idaho — It’s one of the most scenic places in Idaho – a lake that was named for an amazing fish.

“That’s how it got it’s name,” said Stanley Resident Tom Stuart. “Redfish Lake is named for the red fish, the sockeye salmon that return here. In the 1890s biologists reported as many and 150 thousand sockeye salmon returning to the Stanley Basin.”

But in 1909 the Sunbeam Consolidated Mining Company dumped 300 tons of concrete in the river, building the Sunbeam Dam to generate power for its mining operation on the Yankee Fork, and suddenly, the sockeye’s migration to and from the Pacific Ocean was totally blocked. A year later, the mine shut down, but the barrier remained in the river.

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Fish & Game News:

2020 Campground Openers/Closures at Horsethief Reservoir

By Martin Koenig, Natural Resource Program Coordinator
Tuesday, May 26, 2020

Camping at Horsethief Reservoir opens May 30

The opening of campgrounds at Horsethief Reservoir has been delayed due to the current COVID-19 situation. The opening date for overnight camping at Horsethief Reservoir Campground has been set for Saturday, May 30th. Basic sanitary measures to address COVID-19 issues for campground users are being implemented.

Horsethief Reservoir is managed cooperatively by the Idaho Department of Fish and Game and the YMCA. Fish and Game manages the popular trout fishery, while the YMCA manages the campgrounds. Several campgrounds are being renovated to improve camping facilities. Osprey Bay and Easter’s Cove campgrounds will remain closed for much of the 2020 season because of construction.

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F&G capture and euthanize injured mountain lion near Rexburg

By James Brower, Regional Communications Manager
Sunday, May 24, 2020

On the evening of May 23, a young male mountain lion was tranquilized by Fish and Game staff on the outskirts of Rexburg. The young lion had an injury on his right flank and was held overnight for observation. It was later determined that the injury was severe and the lion was euthanized.

Over the past few weeks Fish and Game received reports of a mountain lion being spotted by Rexburg residents as the cat crossed fields and yards. More recently the young lion was photographed by a backyard trail camera on the west side of town.

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More F&G News Releases

link:
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Crazy Critter Stuff:

Holy gust front! Radar shows Texas bats getting blown away by distant storm

by Scott Sistek KOMONews.com Meteorologist Thursday, May 21st 2020


A gust front begins to blow away a swarm of millions of bats in south central Texas. (Photo: Chris Suchan via RadarScope Pro)

San Antonio, Texas — A swarm of bats heading out into their nightly adventures in south central Texas Wednesday night got quite the surprise from Mother Nature.

The National Weather Service’s Doppler radar picked up signals of a colony of millions of Mexican free-tailed bats leaving the Frio Bat Cave in Uvalde County as a massive thunderstorm raged well to their west, according to meteorologist Chris Suchan with our sister station WOAI-TV in San Antonio.

The intense downdrafts from the thunderstorm’s torrential rains created what’s known as a gust front — the boundary where those downdrafts race outward from the thunderstorm.

You can see it all unfold on the radar animation — the thunderstorm in the far west; the thin line of the gust front and the expanding ring of bats leaving the cave.

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Seasonal Humor:

CovidQuarantine-a
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Gatorland’s Social Distancing Skunk Ape

Ladies and Gentlemen and children of all ages, we here at Gatorland take safety very seriously and we’d like to introduce you to our very own Social Distancing Skunk Ape!

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Idaho History May 31, 2020

Idaho 1918-1920 Influenza Pandemic

Part 7

Idaho Newspaper clippings Oct 15 – 21, 2020

1918Atlantic6-streetsweeper
A mask is worn by a street sweeper in New York in 1918. The admonition of the New York Health Board to wear masks to check the spread of influenza epidemic was: “Better ridiculous than dead.” Library of Congress via AP, National Archives

source: Alan Taylor April 10, 2018 “30 Photos of the 1918 Flu Pandemic” The Atlantic
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The Idaho Republican. October 15, 1918, page 1

19181015IR1-headline
Health Official Adds More Rules
Hotels, Restaurants, Town Authorities and Railroads Given Instructions.

Orders issued by the state board of health to prevent and control Spanish influenza were supplemented and extended Thursday by J. K. White state sanitary inspector, in special instructions to mayors and chairmen of village boards, to hotels, restaurants and confectioneries, and to common carriers.

Health inspectors and county health officers were authorized “to peremptorily close any and all places failing to observe” the order applying to them.

“Dry Sweeping” Banned

Mayors and village chairmen were instructed to have streets swept only between 9 a. m. and 6 p. m. and then only after the streets and sidewalks have been well sprinkled with water.

Hotels, restaurants, eating houses, dining rooms, soda fountains, confectioneries, ice cream parlors and others were directed “to cause a thoro [sic] sterilization by washing and rinsing in warm water and then complete immersion in boiling water of all equipment, including dishes, knives, forks, spoons, glasses and so forth, used in the serving to the public foods and drinks, immediately after each individual use.

Also Common Drinking Cups

“The use of public, or common drinking cups and towels, in any place whatsoever,” the instructions continue, “and the use of broken or chipped drinking cups or glasses, is positively prohibited.

“Inspectors of this department and, all local health officers will enforce this order, and are directed to peremptorily close any and all places falling to observe this order, or refusing to comply with these provisions, making report of their action to this office.

“On the spirit in which this order is accepted and observed, depends whether or not it will be modified or strengthened, in order to get the desired results.”

Conductors of trains are charged by the state sanitary inspector with the responsibility, and “are requested to use their police power when and where necessary,” to enforce the following requirements to be observed by common carriers within the state in the operation of passenger coaches:

“Provide free and adequate ventilation at all times, maintain normal temperature.

“Prohibit dry sweeping at any and all times when coaches are occupied.

“At least an inch. of water to be kept in all cuspidors, and under no circumstances must they be permitted to become dry.

“The promiscuous spitting In the aisle or in any other other place than that provided will be strictly prohibited.

“The placing of feet on seats whether cushioned or not will be prohibited.”

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 15 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Republican. October 15, 1918, page 7

Fighting Influenza.

Washington. – In its fight to stop the spread of Spanish influenza, the public health service is investigating the causes of the disease, the conditions which promote its spread and the part played by carriers in epidemics of the malady.
— —

Idaho Budget

Owning to the prevalence of Spanish influenza the Child Welfare campaign at Caldwell has been indefinitely postponed.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 15 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Bonners Ferry Herald. October 15, 1918, page 1

19181015BFH1headline
No public Meetings Now
County Physician Fry is Sent Order by the State Board of Health
Local Schools Are Closed
Would Prevent Severe Epidemic In Boundary County

On account of the spreading of Spanish influenza in the west after a several weeks visit in the east and an appearance of the disease in some parts of Idaho, the state health board on Wednesday, issued orders to all county physicians to enforce on and after Thursday stringent restrictions against the congregating of crowds in places of public amusement or assemblage. The following wire was received by Dr. E. E. Fry. county physician, Wednesday afternoon from Biwer, secretary of the state board of health:

“State board of health directs you to in form mayors of cities and chairman board of village trustees in your county that because of Spanish influenza all public assemblages and places of amusement excepting private and public schools be prohibited from operation on and after Thursday, October 10, until further notice. Letter of verification follows. You are directed to secure compliance with this order.”

Dr. Fry immediately notified S. E. Henry, chairman of the board of village trustees and Mr. Henry issued an order in compliance with the instructions of the state health board. Consequently the Amazon theater is now closed, there were no church services Sunday and the pool rooms are closed except for the sale of tobaccos, candies, etc. No loitering in these places of business are permitted. The school trustees of Independent School District No. 4 on Wednesday night decided that the schools of the district should be closed until the danger of an epidemic is passed. Dr. Fry reported that there were possibly 50 cases of influenza, in a mild form, in the county and advised against closing the schools, stating that the students could be better watched in the school rooms and be given medical treatment at the first sign of disease. The schools of District No. 14 were also closed on Friday.

The government public health service has sent out a pamphlet on the disease which has already been given, the nickname of “the flu.” The report states that the disease is highly contagious and is passed from the nose and mouth mucous and is particularly serious in crowded and ill-ventilated quarters. Fresh air, exercise and a careful diet are its best preventatives. In most cases a person taken sick with influenza feels ill rather suddenly. He feels weak. has pains in the eyes, ears, head or back and may be sore all over. Many patients feel dizzy, some vomit. Most patients complain of feeling chilly and with this comes a fever in which the temperature rises to 100 or 104. In most cases the pulse remains relatively slow. …

source: Bonners Ferry Herald. (Bonners Ferry, Idaho), 15 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Bonners Ferry Herald. October 15, 1918, page 2

Idaho News Paragraphs

Recent Happenings in This State Given in Brief Items for Busy Readers.

There is no Spanish influenza in Potlatch.

Two cases of influenza have developed at the state normal school and City Health Officer Susan Bruce has ordered the school closed.

source: Bonners Ferry Herald. (Bonners Ferry, Idaho), 15 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Bonners Ferry Herald. October 15, 1918, page 4

Local Pick-ups

Gust Anderson and his baby child are both seriously ill with Spanish influenza.

Paul Peter, one of the Boundary county draft men assigned to duty in the spruce production department of the government and stationed in a camp near Aberdeen, Wash., came here last week to spend a 15 day furlough visiting with friends and relatives. His camp is new in quarantine on account of Spanish influenza.

source: Bonners Ferry Herald. (Bonners Ferry, Idaho), 15 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Bonners Ferry Herald. October 15, 1918, page 12

Local News

H. I. Monks has been confined to his home several days the past week with an attack of Spanish influenza.

The meeting of the Union Ladies’ Aid society has been postponed until further notice on account of Spanish influenza.

source: Bonners Ferry Herald. (Bonners Ferry, Idaho), 15 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., October 15, 1918, page 1

Adolf Hendrickson Died at Jefferson, MO.

A telegram was received today by Mrs. Adolph Hendrickson announcing the death of her husband at Jefferson, Mo., of Spanish influenza. Mr. Hendrickson left here October 3 with the solders, although he was drafted from Clearwater county. Mr. Hendrickson’s parents live at Try and about Christmas he was married to Mrs. Schumacker, who has three children. Mr. Hendrickson was twenty-four years of age.
— —

Prof. Soulen returned yesterday from a week’s session of the Lemhi county teachers’ association at Salmon City. A fine spirit and good attendance characterized the sessions until Thursday, when the meetings were terminated by a message closing all public gatherings on account of the prevailing epidemic. No influenza cases were reported over the divide in Lemhi county.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 15 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., October 15, 1918, page 6

Deary and Vicinity Have Influenza Mildly

Mr. and Mrs. Archie Liddle, accompanied by Mr. and Mrs. Walter Weed, motored to Troy, Idaho, where Mrs. Weed took the train for Lewiston, to visit her daughter June, who is under quarantine in the school.

The play that was to have been given at the Pleasant Home and Bear Creek school house has been called off, owing to Spanish influenza making its appearance in the neighborhood.
— —

Planning to Save Tubercular Men
Idaho Anti-Tuberculosis Association asks Latah County to Help it.

Catharine R. Athey, executive secretary for the Idaho Anti-Tuberculosis association is in Moscow today and is interviewing those who should help the association. The calling of men for military service in Idaho has developed the fact that there are many who are suffering with tuberculosis. Miss Athey says that Latah county alone has 18 who were rejected because of this dread disease…

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 15 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Challis Messenger., October 16, 1918, page 3

Four hundred and eighty-seven men called to entrain from the state beginning October 7 for Camp Lewis were released from the call until further notice by Provost Marshal General Crowder last week in a telegram to the adjutant general, advising that this was necessary because of the epidemic of Spanish influenza.

source: The Challis Messenger. (Challis, Idaho), 16 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., October 16, 1918, page 1

[Moscow]

Great care is being exercised to prevent any cases of influenza reaching the university. Last night the kitchen at the harvester plant was not prepared to cook the entire supper for the men so food was cooked at the mess halls at the university and brought to the harvester plant. There is not a single case of influenza among the 600 men at the university and the authorities were taking no chances of them being exposed by permitting the new arrivals, who may have been exposed to the disease enroute to Moscow, to eat at the university. The men who have arrived all have a “clean bill of health” but as they come from many points and some of them have traveled long distances it was feared they might have come in contact with the disease and the greatest care is being taken to keep them from the men at the university who are in quarantine. The men are given a physical examination upon arrival here.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 16 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Grangeville Globe. October 17, 1918, page 1

Nezperce Appeals For Aid.
Entire Population Afflicted and None Able to Help Others.

The influenza situation at our neighboring town of Nezperce is indescribable, says Dr. E. L. White, of the White hospital at Lewiston, who visited that place Wednesday in an interview in tonight’s Tribune. There have been four deaths reports.

“There is not a family in Nezperce,” said Dr. White, “where there is not one to two cases and in some instances entire families are stricken. This is the genuine Spanish influenza. The situation is indescribable. I would not venture an estimate of the number of cases in Nezperce and environs. The serious situation is not confined to the town. There are cases in the country where whole families are ill and no one to attend to them. In some cases there was no person to notify neighbors of the illness in the house. No word could be sent to town and there is nobody in the town to go to their relief.”

In answer to the call relief was secured today, when through the escort of prominent Lewiston people it is reported here that 50 nurses and doctors arrived on tonight’s train to aid the stricken people.
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19181017GG1

source: The Grangeville Globe. (Grangeville, Idaho), 17 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Grangeville Globe. October 17, 1918, page 8

Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Chase and children left Tuesday morning for Lewiston and if the influenza wave lets up they will go on to Moscow and Spokane. The family will remain at one of the latter places for a short time and Mr. Chase will return to attend to some unfinished business.
— —

O. E. Collins

Most everybody in town remembers Orville Collins. He grew to manhood in Grangeville and went to school here. In writing to his sister, Mrs. Broyles, Orville gives some interesting information regarding the gas mask and other matters. He is stationed at Camp Lewis and is a member of Battery E, 37th Regiment, Field Artillery:

“Dear Sister: – I received the box of cigarettes today and was glad to get them. They were just the right kind; you are sure some good guesser.

“We are still in quarantine. Bill Criddlebaugh went to the hospital yesterday. There are two or three leaving our battery every day for hospital.

“We have been taking gas test, of which we have three lays. The gas mask is certainly some rig. The face piece is made of thin rubber with glass lenses so you can see. Inside the face piece is a rubber mouth-piece which you put in your mouth and surely makes a mouthful. There is a wire nose-clamp which you put on your nose and you have to breath through your mouth-piece. From the mouth-piece is a rubber tube going to a tin can which you pack in a sack. In the bottom of the can is a little valve through which the air comes. Inside the can are some things that purify the air and you can go through a gas attack without injury. Monday we are going in the gas house and try it. We are only allowed six seconds to take the mask out of the sack and put it on, mouth-piece in mouth and nose clamp on nose. Believe me you have to travel some to do it in that length of time.

“Seattle is quarantined, all schools, theatres and public places closed. Soldiers are not allowed to go to Seattle. I was in Tacoma last Saturday and Sunday and had a good time. There are a few cases of Spanish influenza in camp, but not many. Lots of measles and mumps. We have inspection twice a day now for measles.

“We have another new captain, he just returned from France. He gave us a talk today telling us about conditions over there and it was real interesting to hear him. He seems to be a fine fellow. All our officers are good. It has rained good and hard all day and still coming. Water is standing everywhere.”

source: The Grangeville Globe. (Grangeville, Idaho), 17 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Lincoln County Times., October 17, 1918, page 4

Orchard Valley

Miss Myrtle Journey, our country superintendent, visited our school last Thursday.

The school board closed the school Monday on account of influenza.

source: Lincoln County Times. (Jerome, Idaho), 17 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Payette Enterprise., October 17, 1918, page 1

Call for Nurses

Owning to the present influenza epidemic, the Red Cross Department of Nursing desires to get in touch with every graduate nurse, every woman who has had any training, every practical nurse, and every woman who has taken the training to be a Nurses’ aid. The Red Cross offers to graduates $70.00 and expenses, and to undergraduates and Aids from $30.00 to $50.00 according to qualifications, with expenses. Division office will direct assignments. If interested apply to Dr. J. C. Woodward, Chairman, Payette County chapter American Red Cross.
— —

Do not burn the leaves from your lawn. Put them on the grade and plow them under. It is claimed by the board of health in some clinics that smoke from burning leaves have a tendency to irritate the throat making one more susceptible to the epidemic that is reported to be prevalent in some parts of this country, as well as other throat trouble.
— —

Miss Madeline Manning of Walla Walla, Wash., is visiting at the home of E. C. S. Brainard during the period the Walla Walla schools are closed on account of the prevalent influenza.

source: Payette Enterprise. (Payette, Canyon Co., Idaho), 17 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Payette Enterprise., October 17, 1918, page 2

Spanish influenza is a dangerous, serious malady, to be avoided if at all possible, but think how much worse it would be if they had named it “German influenza.”

source: Payette Enterprise. (Payette, Canyon Co., Idaho), 17 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Idaho County Free Press. October 17, 1918, page 1

19181017ICFP1-headline
Influenza Spreads over Central Idaho
300 Cases and Three Deaths at Nezperce – Cottonwood Schools are Closed
2 Cases Near Grangeville
James B White, Auditor of Lewis County and Former Grangeville Resident, Is Dead.

NOTICE TO PARENTS

The Grangeville school board has made an order closing the city schools on account of Spanish influenza until further notice. The board requests all parents and guardians to keep children at home as such as possible and by all means to keep them off the public streets and places where people usually congregate.

The epidemic of Spanish influenza is rapidly spreading over central Idaho. With more than 300 eases, and three deaths, on Wednesday, the town of Nezperce has sent an urgent call to Spokane for physicians and nurses to care for the ever increasing cases. There are not enough well persons in Nezperce to care for those who are ill. The epidemic has reached Grangeville and Cottonwood. Two cases were reported from Cottonwood Wednesday night. The public schools there have been closed.

Near Grangeville one or two cases are reported, with others under suspicion. The public schools here are to be closed Friday night, October 18. All other public gatherings, including churches, are forbidden. Pool halls and the picture show are closed.

James B. White, county auditor for Lewis county, was one of the victims of the malady. He died Wednesday evening after an illness of only a few days. Mr. White was born and reared in Grangeville. The body will be bought here for burial. Funeral services were set for Friday afternoon at 1 o’clock at the grave in Prairie View cemetery. Mr. White was 35 years old. Mrs. White is a daughter of Mrs. C. Overman of Grangeville. Mr. White was at one time a deputy in the county auditor’s office here.

source: Idaho County Free Press. (Grangeville, Idaho), 17 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Idaho County Free Press. October 17, 1918, page 4

G.H.S. School Notes

On account of Spanish influenza, teachers institute was not held at Lewiston this week, so the pupils found themselves without a vacation.

source: Idaho County Free Press. (Grangeville, Idaho), 17 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Idaho County Free Press. October 17, 1918, page 6

19181017ICFG2-headline
Courts to Decide Closing Order Legality
Suits Are Brought Against Pool Hall Men In The Capital City
Attorney General Rules
Mayor of Boise Bucks State Board of Health in Edict to Check Spanish Influenza

While S. H .Hays, mayor of Boise, was questioning the legality of the state board of health’s dosing order, to prevent spread of Spanish influenza, and suspended the order in Boise, until the attorney general ruled whether or not the board could issue such drastic edict, T. E. Edmundson, mayor of Grangeville, promulgated a closing order, at the request of the state board of health, which closed even the mayor’s own motion picture theatre.

Grangeville has shown a disposition to respect the order, without questioning its legality but Boise, has not. Because Boise has raised an objection, the courts must decide whether the state board of health acted within its powers in issuing the order, for at least ten complaints, according to word from Boise, have been filed charging the defendants, pool hall operators, with failure to observe the edict. The complaints were flied by the attorney general’s office.

Walters Rules for Board.

“Other municipalities in the state are warned to observe the order, because it will be enforced,” said Attorney General Walters. “The state board has power to issue such an order under the statutes, and municipalities cannot suspend orders made pursuant to statute.”

In support of his view, the attorney general quoted the following language from a legal authority:

“General provisions for the preservation of the life and health of the people of the state are no more suspended in the territory comprised within a municipality than are the criminal laws of the state. It would be obviously unwise for a state to delegate to any municipality full and complete control of matters pertaining to the public health. The municipality might in the preservation of sanitary conditions in its own territory work incalculable mischief to the health and comfort of people living in adjacent territory. To prevent this being done, it is primarily necessary that there shall be one central authority clothed with the power of affording equal protection to all.”

Fines Up to $300.

“Failure to observe an order issued by the state board of health pursuant to statute is punishable as a misdemeanor, and persons convicted are subject to fines of not less than $50 or more than $300, or imprisonment of not less than 30 or more than 90 days in the county jail, or both fine and imprisonment.

“The board ‘s authority,” said the attorney general, “to issue orders to prevent disease is set out in section 1086 of the state statutes.” This section is, in part as follows:

“Whenever the state hoard of health shall have cause to believe that there is any danger of cholera, smallpox or other contagious or infectious disease invading this state or country, it shall be the duty of said board to take such action, and adopt and enforce such roles and regulations as may be necessary to prevent the introduction of such infectious of contagious disease within the state, and any persons or persons or corporations refusing or neglecting to obey such rules and regulations shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor.”

source: Idaho County Free Press. (Grangeville, Idaho), 17 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Idaho County Free Press. October 17, 1918, page 8

Because of the epidemic of Spanish influenza, the September term of the district court has been adjourned sine die. This was deemed advisable by Judge Seales.

Because of Spanish influenza, all other cases must go over until next term.
— —

W. C. Michie and Family Will Remove to Lone Star State.

… While in the south, Mr. Michie suffered an attack of Spanish influenza, which is prevalent throughout Texas. He was in bed two days with the epidemic, which left him in a weakened condition. When in Dallas, Mr. Michie said he was advised the platform of the railroad station was lined with coffins, containing bodies of persons who had died of influenza. The bodies were mostly of soldiers, and were being sent to their homes for burial.
— —

Red Cross Rooms Are Open
Influenza Closing Order Does Not Apply to War Work

The recent state-wide closing order, as a precaution against spread of Spanish influenza, does not apply to war work, according to word just received here from Boise. Consequently, the Red Cross rooms will be open as usual.

source: Idaho County Free Press. (Grangeville, Idaho), 17 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., October 17, 1918, page 4

Former Moscow Man is Recovering From Influenza

Mrs. Clara Boemeke received word from her grandson that her son, John Crow, well known in Moscow, is recovering from a severe attack of influenza at Bremerton, where he has been employed in the shipyards. His wife is now quite sick with the disease. Mrs. Boemeke has two nephews in the service, both of who have had the disease but are recovering.
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Juliaetta Notes

All public gatherings except the public schools have been closed, but so far no cases of the influenza have been reported in Juliaetta.

The cannery is still running full time and will continue to do so as long as the nice warm weather ripens the tomatoes.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 17 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Rathdrum Tribune., October 18, 1918, page 1

Post Falls

The school was closed by an order of the board Oct. 9 and will remain closed until the county physician deems it safe to reopen. The action was taken owing to the threatened epidemic of influenza.
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Coeur D’ Alene

The Hayden Lake fair, scheduled for October 18, and the farmers’ union convention have been postponed indefinitely because of the influenza quarantine.
— —

19181018TRT1-headline
Ask Parents’ Help
Official Action In Interest Of Public Health.

The Rathdrum public schools were closed by order of the school board and have not been in session this week. The action was taken in the interest of the public health, as it is believed if the children were kept at home and not allowed to congregate, there would be less likelihood of the influenza becoming epidemic in the community.

It was observed, however, that instead of remaining at home, many children, including those of the high school had a tendency to gather in groups in public places down town and to form parties to visit neighboring communities where influenza prevails to some extent. To combat this tendency on the part of the young people, the board of village trustees held a special meeting Tuesday, night and, in cooperation with the school board and health officer, issued a public health notice as follows:

At the request of the school board, it is hereby ordered by the board of trustees of the Village of Rathdrum, in cooperation with the health officer, that all children of school age in the village be required to remain at their homes and to refrain from congregating together or visiting with one another, and to keep off the streets except when running errands, until notice shall be given that the danger of an epidemic of influenza is over. It is urged upon the parents, in the interest of the public health and safety, that they give all possible assistance in enforcing this order upon the children of our community.”

source: The Rathdrum Tribune. (Rathdrum, Idaho), 18 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Rathdrum Tribune., October 18, 1918, page 2

The influenza epidemic in the military camps is abating, but continues to spread through the civilian population. About 500 cases are now reported in Idaho.

source: The Rathdrum Tribune. (Rathdrum, Idaho), 18 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Rathdrum Tribune., October 18, 1918, page 3

Personal Mention

F. L. Coon and family, ill with the influenza last week, are reported recovering.
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Local Paragraphs

An extra gang on the N. P. railroad, brought here last week, was quarantined in the car near the depot Saturday by local officials when it was discovered some of the men had influenza.

source: The Rathdrum Tribune. (Rathdrum, Idaho), 18 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Oakley Herald. October 18, 1918, page 1

J. C. De La Mare left today for Salt Lake City to attend the funeral of his daughter-in-law, Mrs. Robert De La Mare, who died of Spanish influenza. The sympathy of the city goes out to the family in their bereavement.
— —

Influenza.

As we go to press, one hundred and twenty cases of Spanish influenza are reported in Cassia County. A hundred of these are in Burley. It is rumored that a man died of the disease at Clearcreer [sic] last night.

source: The Oakley Herald. (Oakley, Idaho), 18 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Oakley Herald. October 18, 1918, page 11

To Battle with Influenza.

Washington. – The following telegram, which is self-explanatory, relates to the emergency medical and nursing relief work furnished through the United States public health service to communities unable to cope with the present situation even with state aid:

“Public health service will mobilize with aid volunteer medical service all outside medical aid required in combating present influenza epidemic. Red Cross upon specific request from this service will mobilize nursing personnel and furnish necessary emergency hospital supplies which cannot be obtained otherwise. Inform all city and county health officers your state that all appeals for aid must be made to state health department, which will make request of surgeon general, public health service, whenever local needs require. Whenever necessary public health service will establish district officer to co-operate with state officials and distribute medical and nursing personnel.

(signed) Blue, Surgeon General, U.S. Public Health Service.”

source: The Oakley Herald. (Oakley, Idaho), 18 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Clearwater Republican. October 18, 1918, page 1

Open Air Meeting

Unless there is an outbreak of influenza before Sunday, permission is granted for an open air meeting. It will be held at the band stand on the school grounds at 11 a.m., Sunday, October 20. Preaching, singing and an interesting service. You are invited.

F. L. Moore, Pastor
— —

The Orofino schools were closed this week as a precaution against the spread of Spanish Influenza, and parents are urged to keep their children off the streets.

source: Clearwater Republican. (Orofino, Idaho), 18 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Clearwater Republican. October 18, 1918, page 4

Village Health Order.

Supplementing orders Nos. 42. 43 and 44 have been issued by the Idaho State Board of Health, in co-operation with the United States Health Service, in the control of Spanish. Influenza. In substance they are as follows.

Thorough sterilization by washing and rinsing in warm water and then complete immersion In boiling water of all equipment, including dishes, knives, forks, spoons, glasses. etc., used in the serving to the public of foods and drinks, immediately after each individual use.

The use of public or common drinking cups and towels in any place whatsoever, and the use of broken or chipped drinking cups or glasses Is positively prohibited.

Inspectors of this department and all local health officers will enforce this order, and are directed to peremptorily close any and all places failing to observe this order, or refusing to comply with these provisions, making report of their action to this office.

On the spirit in which this order is accepted and observed depends whether or not It will he modified or strengthened. In order to get the required results.

J. B. Loomis, Village Clerk.

source: Clearwater Republican. (Orofino, Idaho), 18 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Kendrick Gazette. October 18, 1918, page 1

School Notes

Some of the pupils are leaving school because of the influenza, but school will be closed before any danger arises from the disease.

Miss Dupertuis received word Tuesday of the death of her brother’s wife at Portland. The brother is with General Pershing in France. The death of his wife, which was due to influenza, leaves two little children homeless. One has influenza. They will be taken care of by a sister of Miss Dupertuis, who lives in Portland.
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Influenza at Nez Perce

Reports from Nez Perce are to the effect that there are over 250 cases of influenza in that town and adjoining community. About ten cases have developed into pneumonia and a number of cases are reported critically ill. Only three physicians have been available and one of these is now ill and unable to render services.

source: The Kendrick Gazette. (Kendrick, Idaho), 18 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Kendrick Gazette. October 18, 1918, page 6

Gleanings

Last week there was an influenza scare in this community, the report being circulated that there was a case in town. So far there has been nothing to indicate that there are any grounds for the report. There have been no cases reported to Dr. Rothwell, local health officer.

source: The Kendrick Gazette. (Kendrick, Idaho), 18 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Recorder. October 18, 1918, page 5

“Flu” in Starr Family

Mr. and Mrs. Clyde Starr and a young lady of the same household are the only sufferers in Lemhi county from Spanish influenza, according to reports made to the county health officer, Dr. Wright. The Starrs reside on the Barrack ranch. The health officer reports the malady in light form and under control.
— —

Two Salmon Boys Victims of Spanish Influenza

The wires have brought the sad news to Salmon that two of our boys Harry Bullock and Jack Kirkham, the former in Camp Fremont and the latter in Camp Lewis, have been taken as victims of the Spanish influenza.

Young Bullock died October 12 and his body is expected to arrive in Salmon today. The death of young Kirkham was announced by telegram received by Mrs. Roy Buchanan, his sister, yesterday afternoon. The funeral arrangements have not been announced. The home of the Kirkhams is near Tendoy. Mrs. Margaret Kirkham is the mother of this stricken home and the father was the late Robert Kirkham. The mother and elder daughter, Miss Olive, went to Camp Lewis upon being appraised of the dangerous condition of the soldier. They will return with the body. There are two other sisters and a younger brother surviving.

source: The Idaho Recorder. (Salmon City, Idaho), 18 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Recorder. October 18, 1918, page 6

19181018IR1-headline
Influenza Epidemic Has Not Yet Reached Its Peak
Nearly a Quarter of a Million Cases Have Been Reported From Army Camps

Washington, Oct. 12. — The epidemic of Spanish influenza which has reached practically every section of the country, continues to spread with no signs of abatement. Detailed reports as to its spread among the civilian populations are not available at the public health service bureau, but officials say nothing has been received to indicate that the malady has reached its peak.

New cases of influenza in army camps showed a slight decline in the 24 hours ending at noon yesterday, but pneumonia cases increased over the day previous. Influenza cases reported to the surgeon general of the army numbered 12,024; pneumonia cases 2,824, and deaths 892. Thursday’s reports showed 12,321 new cases of influenza; 2,797 new cases of pneumonia, and 889 deaths.

The total number of influenza cases at camps since the beginning of the epidemic has reached 223,000; pneumonia cases 27,907, and deaths 8,335.

source: The Idaho Recorder. (Salmon City, Idaho), 18 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Recorder. October 18, 1918, page 7

Northwest Notes

With Spanish influenza already raging at Libby, in Northwestern Montana, at Chateau, in central Montana, at Billings and Scobey, in eastern Montana, an at Whitehall and Twin Bridges in southern Montana, health official are of the opinion that only good luck, coupled with hard work can prevent a widespread epidemic of this disease in Montana.
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News Review of The Great War

On Monday the master numbers in the new draft were drawn. President Wilson taking the first from the bowl. The classification of the men is progressing well, but the sending of those selected to the training camps may be delayed by the serious spread of the epidemic of influenza. Rigorous measures are being adopted to check the disease, with prospects of success. Considering its nature the number of deaths is not extraordinary.

source: The Idaho Recorder. (Salmon City, Idaho), 18 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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1918Atlantic6-streetcar
A conductor checks to see if potential passengers are wearing required masks in Seattle, in 1918. Library of Congress via AP, National Archives

source: Alan Taylor April 10, 2018 “30 Photos of the 1918 Flu Pandemic” The Atlantic
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Montpelier Examiner. October 18, 1918, page 1

19181018ME1-headline
Influenza Still Raging Thruout United States
Despite the Drastic Measures Which are Being Used the Disease Numbers Its Victims by Hundreds — Local Condition Still Good.

The Spanish influenza still has a strong grip on this country, despite the hard fight that is being made against it However, in some sections of the country, where the disease first appeared, the conditions are much improved, but it is continuing to spread throughout the land and there are but few places in the United States where it has not made its appearance.

In Utah the disease has spread rapidly the past week, but the percentage of deaths has been light. The Utah State board and the Salt Lake city board of health are working in conjunction to keep the situation as well in hand as possible. However, Dr. Beatly stated Tuesday that, according to all indications, the disease had just started in Utah and a long and bitter fight could be expected.

Wednesday the Idaho state board of health said that there were between 400 and 1100 cases of influenza in the state, Bannock county, with 140 cases, having the largest number of any county that had reported to the state board. The state board has directed the county and city boards of health to use every means possible to stamp out and prevent the spread of the disease.

At this writing, Thursday afternoon, the situation in Montpelier is good, which is due largely to the stringent orders that have been put into effect by the city board of health. The great trouble in keeping the disease out, is the handling of people who come into the city from infected districts. So far this phase of matters has been well handled.

A quarantine has been placed against the people of Star Valley, in which there were two deaths up to Wednesday and a large number of cases. In fact, a telephone message was received here from Afton Wednesday evening, asking if nurses or help of some kind could be sent there, as there were 14 cases in the town with no nurses and very limited medical assistance.

If the people will co-operate with the local board of health in carrying out the latter’s orders, it is barely possible that anything like an epidemic of the disease can be averted in Montpelier.

Dr. Woods Hutchinson, the noted, American authority on health and sanitation, was in Salt Lake Tuesday, having come from Boston where he went through the epidemic of influenza in that city. He gave out some statements relative to the disease and its action, which are of interest. Probably the most startling announcement made by Dr. Hutchinson was to the effect that medical treatment won’t prevent or cure the malady. He stated that no medicine has been found that would prevent a person who was susceptible from taking the disease if he were exposed and medicine would not cure him after he got it.

“It is true that a vaccine has been developed which has been found to give fairly good results in prevention And has quite effective in reducing fatalities, but this is so limited in quantity, and the possibilities of its manufacture are so limited that it cannot be gotten in quantities sufficient to be of material use in this epidemic,” said Dr Hutchinson.

“Hence the only thing to do is to take every possible precaution to protect yourself from infection. Using medicines for this purpose is useless. Nothing has been found that is effective. The only thing that is at all effective is the gauge mask and people who want to protect themselves should wear them, even in street cars, on the streets and other places where they are likely to come into contact with the disease.

“If you get the disease you don’t need a hospital, a physician and a trained nurse They cannot do anything more for you than any other person who will wait upon you and see that you have what you want. No medicine has been found which has any effect upon the disease, so you don’t need medicine. If you get the disease in the pneumonia stage, what you need is not a hospital with doctors and nurses, but a tent out in the fresh air with someone, protected by a mask, to see that you have water to drink and nourishing food. If the resistance powers of your constitution are sufficient to throw off the poison you will get well. If they are not you will he dead in about three days. But you stand far better chances for recovery out in the fresh air than in a most modern hospital. Fresh air is the only medicine and the only treatment that seems to have any effect at all. But experience has demonstrated that fresh air is effective, therefore it should be used to the fullest extent.”

“If a susceptible person gets a dose of the germs in his nose,” said the doctor, “he is going to get the disease in spite of everything. Whether he will throw it off or will die from it depends entirely upon whether his constitutional resistance is sufficient to overcome the poison,”

In short, for Hutchinmon says that if you wish to guard against infection wear a gauze mask, and if you get the disease, go to bed in the fresh air and stay there.

“It is a peculiarity of the disease that it attacks the physically strong and robust just as quickly and as fatally as it does a weak person. In fact, it seems to hit the strong more fatally than the weak. But it is also peculiar that the malady does not seem to attack children and old people to any extent. It is persons from 26 to 35 or 40 among whom it seems to spread most.”

The doctor explains that the bacilli of the disease have the queer habit of disappearing from the nose and mouth of the infected person in light cases within two or three days and the patient thinks he is well. Then he suddenly develops a lung infection that is highly fatal. The bacili merely move from the mouth and nose to the lunge, he explained, and there gather force for the infection which is so quick and so fatal.

Pathological tests that have been made, the doctor stated, have shown that the lung infection in fatal cases was neither pneumoccus nor strepoccocus pneumonia, but pure influenza. He says that the influenza bacilli are found in pure culture and without mixed infection.

source: Montpelier Examiner. (Montpelier, Idaho), 18 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

The Meridian Times., October 18, 1918, page 1

Many of the people who rush to the drug stores to buy influenza remedies, are the same ones who shut out of their rooms the best remedy of all, and one that cost nothing, fresh air.
— —

1918PharmacyAdMeridian

source: The Meridian Times. (Meridian, Idaho), 18 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Meridian Times., October 18, 1918, page 2

In Its fight to stop the spread of Spanish influenza the public health service is investigating the causes of the disease, the conditions which promote its spread and the part played by carriers in epidemics of the malady.

source: The Meridian Times. (Meridian, Idaho), 18 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Meridian Times., October 18, 1918, page 7

In the Gem State

Drastic closing regulations have been passed by the state board of health, owing to the Spanish influenza epidemic. Theatres, churches and all public meetings are put under the ban, but the public and private schools have not been closed.

Earl Oakley, a teacher in Caldwell high school, has contracted smallpox, and two other teachers near town are reported afflicted with the disease. It is thought that the disease can be traced to the teachers’ institute, held in Boise some time ago.

source: The Meridian Times. (Meridian, Idaho), 18 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Meridian Times., October 18, 1918, page 8

The doctors in Meridian report not less than seven suspected cases of Spanish influenza in this vicinity. The majority of these cases are in the Kuna district south of town.

source: The Meridian Times. (Meridian, Idaho), 18 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

The Idaho Republican. October 18, 1918, page 1

Stop Burning of Leaves

As soon as a strong autumn wind sweeps down the valley Boise’s streets, sidewalks and yards will be ankle deep with fallen leaves, and then, it the plan of the past years is followed, these leaves will be raked into piles and burned. The result will be that the city will be full of an acrid smoke which will irritate the membrane of the nose and throat, aggravate all “colds” and create an inflammation that will make hundreds of persons more susceptible to the germs of Spanish Influenza.

In Salt Lake the health authorities have forbidden the burning of leaves this year because the smoke will probably aggravate the influenza danger. Boise physicians have long been opposed to the burning practice and this year, of all times, the local authorities, here and elsewhere in the state, should listen to and follow the advise which physicians give.

Fallen leaves make nearly the best mulch that is known. The cash value of the leaves burned in Boise every autumn is probably several thousand dollars, when their worth as mulch and fertilizer is taken into account. This year besides being wasteful, the burning of leaves will also prove an unusual menace to the health of the community. Other plans should be made at once for their disposition before the annual drop begins.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 18 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Idaho Republican. October 18, 1918, page 2

Moreland

Mrs. Jennie Williams who has one to Camp Fremont to spend the winter, wrote to her home folks and said that the camp was quarantined for influenza.
— —

McDonaldville

School has been closed here for two weeks on account of sickness and the parents needing their children to help harvest crops.

The Baily family who are suffering with Spanish influenza are in a very serious condition. Mr. Baily’s sister from Salt Lake arrived here the first of the week to take care of the sick folks.

The Fred Cooper family are reported ill with the Spanish influenza.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 18 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Idaho Republican. October 18, 1918, page 4

“Nod” Mulville Heard From

Mrs. Emma Ashton received a letter from her son, “Nod,” the first of the week stating that he was recovering from an attack of Spanish Influenza. He also stated there were 1300 cases at Camp Pike at the present time.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 18 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Idaho Republican. October 18, 1918, page 5

Local News

The Kirk families of Centerville, who have been ill with the Spanish Influenza, are now somewhat improved.

To quit burning leaves and thash [sic] may seem a remote preventative of influenza, but that is recommended for towns and villages because the smoke and ashes irritates the tender membranes.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 18 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Idaho Republican. October 18, 1918, page 8

Shelley

Mr. Waller has been seriously ill with the influenza for about ten days, but the last reports are that he is improving

Clifford Dean and William Fly both recently came home from Salt Lake City, where they have been in the S. A. T. C. at the University of Utah. There being no school or drilling at the university until the danger from influenza is overcome.

The pools halls will remain closed until further notice from the government. People may go into the pool halls for a drink or ice cream, but should absolutely not loaf around such places as long as there is any danger of the Spanish influenza spreading. The picture show will not open until notified by the government that they can do so.

It is reported that there are several cases of influenza in Jameston. Everything should be done that is possible to keep the disease from spreading.
— —

Taber

Mrs. Siesser received a telegram Wednesday reporting the death of her sister Mrs. H. C. Watson of Spanish Influenza at Springfield, Mo.

Mrs. Fred Lee and two children are working in the potatoes at Moreand this week. The hogs that were infected with cholera are all O. K. now.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 18 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

Shoshone Journal. October 18, 1918, page 7

Idaho State News

Many of the wood-working plants in Idaho have been forced to suspend operations, and the workingmen, feeling that they could serve their country in a more direct way, have gone into the shipyards and other active war industries.

The courts will decide whether or not the state board of health acted within its powers in issuing the closing order as a preventive against possible spread of Spanish influenza in the state, as all violators are to be arrested.

J. Darling was fined $17 and costs for being drunk on the streets of Boise, and upon his inability to pay the fine was committed to serve his time in the city jail or work in Julia Davis park. Darling claims he was drinking hard cider.

As far as known there has been no case of Spanish influenza in Idaho Falls or Bonneville county. Every precaution is being taken to prevent its appearance. All public indoor gatherings are prohibited. Theaters are closed and no church services are being held.

source: Shoshone Journal. (Shoshone, Idaho), 18 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., October 18, 1918, page 1

Camp Lewis is Quarantined.

Camp Lewis, Wash. — This camp will be placed under strict quarantine tomorrow as a preventative measure against influenza which is now epidemic in the northwest.
— —

19181018DSM1-headline
Eldon G. Phelps Died Early Today
Moscow Young Man Expired In Naval Hospital At Puget Sound Yard

Eldon Phelps, of Moscow, died this morning at the naval hospital at the Puget Sound navy yard, of influenza. Mrs. Pearl Phelps, his wife, received a telegram yesterday from Dr. C. C. Grieve, commanding officer, stating that her husband was seriously sick. Today she received another telegram announcing that he had died at 4:42 this morning.

Mr. Phelps enlisted in the naval reserve on June 28 and was called on October 2 and left here on that date. He was well and favorably known here. He is a son of C. H. Phelps, of Moscow and leaves a widow and young child. He had been employed as driver of the truck for Williamson’s department store.

Eldon left Moscow October 2 with the contingent of boys to join the navy. He was born in Illinois, but had lived in Idaho since he was nine years of age, and at the time of his death was 24 years of age. He was married in September, 1917, to Miss Pearl Buchanan, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James Buchanan, of this city. Besides his wife, he leaves a young son, nine weeks of age. The body will be brought to Moscow Saturday and the funeral will probably occur Sunday.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 18 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., October 18, 1918, page 5

19181018DSM2-headline
Nezperce Stricken With Influenza
Lewiston Asked To Help Town Where Disease Has Been Fatal To Four

Lewiston. — Dr. E. L. White of the White hospital, Lewiston, who has been assisting in handling the influenza epidemic in Nez Perce, made an urgent appeal today that 25 or more Lewiston people go to Nez Perce today to act as nurses there and that as many physicians as possible also go. Dr. White states “there is not a family in Nez Perce where there is not one to two cases, and in some instances entire families are stricken. The situation is not confined to the town. There are cases in the country where whole families are ill and no one to attend them”

It was stated that Dr. Gist, Dr. Taylor and Dr. Dunlap have been trying to meet the situation, but that Dr. Gist is ill and the remaining two physicians are worked to the point of exhaustion. Dr. White urged quick action on the part of Lewiston people today, asking that those who can make the trip by automobile reach Nez Perce at the earliest possible moment.

Mayor Osmers and P. R. Bevis, president of the Lewiston Commercial club, in cooperation with Dr. Susan Bruce, city health officer, and Dr. Alley, county physician, are making arrangements for relief work. The Lewiston Red Cross chapter urges that all women who have taken home nursing courses report.

Four Deaths Reported.

County Auditor J. B. White died yesterday evening about 6 o’clock.

Clarence Brown, son of the Nezperce butcher, died about 8 p. m. yesterday.

Henry Berry, aged about 17, died at 4 o’clock this morning.

Fred Hillenbrand, the Nezperce drayman, died at 5 o’clock this morning.
— —

Telephone Raise To Be Protested
Moscow Citizens Will Object to Local Company Increasing Its Rates

The hearing on the application of the Moscow Telephone company for the privilege of increasing its rates, which was to have been held here on October 22, has been indefinitely postponed because of the influenza order which forbids the holding of any public meetings. George G. Pickett, city attorney, received notice from the public utilities commission of Idaho, by telegraph today, that the hearing has been “indefinitely postponed.” …

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 18 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., October 19, 1918, page 1

Influenza Causes U. To Close Temporarily

The Classes in the University of Idaho were dismissed today owning to a mild attack of influenza developed in cases of two of the S. A. T. C. men. There is some doubt as to whether the men really have influenza but it was thought best to close the school for today and call off all meetings for Sunday. The three cases under suspicion are in quarantine and will be closely watched. The other men will be kept in the open air as much as possible and it is believed there will be no danger of the disease.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 19 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

1919Atlantic10-a
Physics class, University of Montana, Missoula, 1919. During the influenza epidemic, classes were held outdoors. National Archives

source: Alan Taylor April 10, 2018 “30 Photos of the 1918 Flu Pandemic” The Atlantic
— — — — — — — — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., October 21, 1918, page 1

19181021DSM2-headline
Influenza Closes The University
State Board Of Health Closed All Schools In State Of Idaho Today

The University of Idaho was closed today for indoor classes, but a number of classes were held out doors and the S. A. T. C. and vocational training men worked as usual. The closing of indoor classes was ordered in compliance with the instructions from the state board of health and not because of any local conditions that would warrant it.

There are few cases that are suspicious among students, but every one has been put in close quarantine for observation. Every case of a severe cold is being watched and the person suffering with it is not permitted on the campus. Students who live at home are not permitted to attend the open air classes, but an opportunity has been given them to take their bed and bedding to the barracks and remain under the same rules as the S. A. T. C. men, but they will be required to pay for their meals.

There is one case of pneumonia in the vocational training squad. but it is slight. The patient reached Moscow the last of last week from a distant point.

The Red Cross is doing all that it can for the men under quarantine and will take charge of the nursing, should any be required. With more than 1250 students and soldiers here it is regarded as remarkable that there are so few cases.

Dr. Lindley, president of the university, is giving his personal attention to the work of caring for all who are under suspicion and has been rushing from one barracks to another to see that every one is comfortable and the health board’s rules are strictly obeyed.

The situation at the university is not regarded as at all serious and it is hoped to receive permission before long to reopen the school for its regular work.

A sensational story was published in today’s Spokesman-Review to the effect that Spokane women are working over time on influenza masks for Moscow, where 1000 had been ordered for the S. A. T. C. and the vocational training men. Dr. Lindley knows nothing of this and no one here knows who gave such an order. The story says these masks are being made for Gonzaga University, Spokane, and for W. S. C. at Pullman. They may have been ordered by the war department. It is certain they were not ordered from Moscow.

Does Not Effect S. A. T. C.

The University of Idaho today received the following telegram which is self-explanatory:

“President, University of Idaho,
“Moscow, Idaho.
“You are advised that State Board of Health has today closed all public and private schools in the state. State institutions are by this order quarantined from date — this quarantine to include administrative forces, instructors and student body, and will apply to those living on premises of university. Students living in Moscow to be excluded from school. Nothing in this order applies to the operation of the S. A. T. C.
“Biwer, Secy.”
— —

Two Funerals and One Death Today
Two Soldiers Buried With Military Honors – aged Woman Passed Away

The funeral of Adolph Hendrickson, who died at Jefferson Barracks, Mo., a few days ago, was held at the Moscow cemetery today at 10:30. Rev. J. Quincy Biggs conducted the services. There was a military escort for the body. Corporal James E. Shoptaw, of the 18th company at Jefferson Barracks accompanied the body to Moscow.

At 2:30 this afternoon the funeral of Eldon Phelps, of Moscow, who died at Bremerton, Ore., Friday, was held at the Moscow cemetery. Rev. Mr. Biggs delivered the sermon and conducted the services, which were attended by many friends. A military escort accompanied the body to the grave.

Mrs. Margaret Eri died at the family home in the southeast part of town yesterday. She was 77 years old and leaves a husband and one daughter, Mrs. T. Grendahl. The funeral will be held at 10:30 tomorrow forenoon.
— —

Children Must Not Congregate in Moscow

Dr. Adair, city health officer, asks all families who have cases of influenza to remain at home until cured. If the people will obey the voluntary quarantine regulations and keep all who are afflicted with the disease at home until they fully recover, there will be no flag placed at that home. But if the people will not do this they will be officially quarantined, flags placed at the homes and they will not be permitted to leave until the quarantine is raised and the names of all persons having the disease will be published. Parents are requested to not permit children to congregate in their homes nor allow them to run to the homes of neighbors. Every child should be kept, as nearly as possible, on the premises of its parents. If these rules are obeyed the disease may be stamped out without an epidemic.
— —

B. Y. O. F. Club Gives Fruit to Soldiers

The Star-Mirror office is in receipt of a large box of fruit, jelly and other delicacies for the soldiers’ mess from the B. Y. O. F. club. Mrs. J. Shannon brought two large jars of fruit and preserves to the office today for the soldiers’ mess. A lady called and asked where she could deliver apples for the soldiers and was told to send them here and they will be sent to the men who are in training. This fruit is especially needed now when a number are in the hospital suffering with slight cases of influenza.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 21 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., October 21, 1918, page 4

19181021DSM1-headline
Say Spanish Influenza is Camouflaged Grip

The following circular was issued to physicians yesterday by Dr. John B. Anderson, city health officer of Spokane:

“The local profession has loyally assisted the health department in the past and no valid reason can be advanced why that staunch support will not be continued.

“As long as time exists men capable of independent thinking will be more or less individualistic in their ideas as to methods of effectually developing fundamental problems. However, the potential of action in unity has been handed down through the experience of ages, and has become an axiomatic principle of democratic government.

New in Name Only.

“As a result of the prevalence abroad of the so-called ‘Spanish influenza,’ the health officer is taking such precautions to safeguard the health of the city as are indicated by conditions and the apparent nature of the malady.

“Doctor, you may have laudable convistions [sic] as to methods of fighting a crisis like the present at variance with the routine established by those now in authority. However, our mutual aim is identical — suppress the ‘flu ;’ save life. To that end we request during the period of this present epidemic of influenza, that you treat every case of cold coming to your attention as influenza until the contrary is established, at least to the extent of insisting on the same exacting requirements, to-wit: Keep the patient isolated; deny visitors to his presence, and have him remain isolated from the public for at least three days after the temperature shall have been normal. Inform your patients that the only thing new about ‘Spanish influenza’ is the adjective that it is none other than the old fashioned familiar influenza, alias la grippe, dolled up in a new dress.

How to Avoid Infection.

“Much good will be accomplished if you will take the time to tell your patient that colds and grippe are communicated by droplet infection, explain what droplet infection is, and that the present restrictions are established with the idea of preventing people from massing, thereby minimizing the danger incident, to close proximity of infected persons.

“The state board of health has made influenza a reportable disease, as well as pneumonia, both broncho and lobar.

“In reporting pneumonia, please state whether or not the primary cause was thought to be influenza. With pneumonia report include name, address and age of patient.

“In reporting influenza, total daily number of new cases is the information desired. Instruct your office attendant to look after this detail.

Prompt Report Urged.

“The surgeon general’s office requests of the health office accumulated influenza data by wire daily. This is an additional reason for your making prompt daily reports.

“Enclosed is a leaflet issued by the surgeon general’s office. If you can make use of more copies of this leaflet, on your request we will see that you are supplied.

“Permit, me, doctor, to thank you for the execution of the within formulated requests. In so doing, I anticipate, as my experience justifies, a full compliance.”

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 21 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
———————————

Back to Table of Contents
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 1)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 2)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 3)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 4)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 5)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 6)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 7)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 8)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 9)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 10)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 11)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 12)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 13)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 14)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 15)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 16)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 17)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 18)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 19)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 20)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 21)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 22)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 23)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 24)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 25)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 26)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 27)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 28)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 29)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 30)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 31)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 32)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 33)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 34)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 35)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 36)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 37)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 38)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 39)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 40)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 41)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 42)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 43)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 44)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 45)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 46)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 47)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 48)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 49)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 50)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 51)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 52)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 53)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 54)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 55)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 56)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 57)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 58)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 59)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 60)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 61)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 62)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 63)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 64)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 65)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 66)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 67)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 68)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 69)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 70)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 71)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 72)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 73)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 74)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 75)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 76)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 77)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 78)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 79)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 80)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 81)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 82)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 83)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 84)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 85)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 86)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 87)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 88)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 89)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 90)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 91)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 92)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 93)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 94)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 95)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 96)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 97)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 98)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 99)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 100)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 101)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 102)

Road Reports May 31, 2020

Please share road reports. Conditions change very quickly this time of year. High elevation roads still have lots of snow. Be prepared for rocks and trees in the road and remember there is no cell phone service.

Yellow Pine: Local streets are bare and starting to dry out. Elk and deer are wandering around at dusk. Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN.
link: Local Forecast
Yellow Pine Webcam: (check date on image)

Warm Lake Highway: No problems reported. (See Johnson Creek report for upper road condition.)
link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

Highway 55 Webcams Link:

South Fork Road: Tuesday (May 26) mail truck driver reports the road is pretty rough right now. Multiple reports of extra traffic and full campgrounds.
Road work will begin May 18th. “This initial work will not include road closures, but may cause some very short delays in traveling the road.” – PNF
Weight restrictions were lifted May 18th.
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Monday (May 26) mail truck driver reports rocks have been cleared and road is in great shape.

Johnson Creek Road: Open but not recommended yet. Travel at your own risk.
Report Friday (May 29) people were able to go out Johnson Creek. “Johnson creek was actually quite nice to drive on. Very few spots that even have snow on it anymore. Warm lake Highway however has multiple trees taking up one lane, and several landslides with large rocks closing one of the lanes.” – RL
link: Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam
link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
Note: The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Closed to wheeled vehicles (no current report.)
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Report for May 27th, Big Creek to Yellow Pine: “On Wednesday (5/27/2020) we had an easy ride out from Big Creek. There is about 5 feet of snow at Profile Gap. There is a solid snow cover on the road about 2-3 miles down on both sides of Profile Gap. Trees have been cleared to accommodate standard 4x4s once the snow is gone. Quite a few small rocks on Profile Creek Road up to Missouri Ridge trail head, but standard 4×4 vehicles have been driving that far.” – C&L
20200527ProfileRoadReport-a
photo courtesy Chris and Lois
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcam: (check date on image)

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open
May 26 report from Midas: Midas Gold will be working with local contractors to grade the road from Yellow Pine to Stibnite on June 1 and dust abatement of the road on June 15.
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Closed to wheeled vehicles (no current report.)
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Warrens Wagon Road: Report May 22 that the county plowed the road open to Secesh Meadows.

Deadwood Summit: Closed to wheeled vehicles (no current report.)
Note: The approx elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′
——————————-

Weather Reports May 24-30, 2020

May 24 Weather:

At 930am it was 44 degrees and mostly high thin clouds. At 1pm it was partly cloudy and breezy. At 3pm it was 66 degrees, partly cloudy and breezy. At 7pm it was 61 degrees and mostly clear. At 930pm it was 49 degrees and mostly/partly cloudy. Looks clear at 1130pm, lots of stars.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time May 25, 2020 at 09:30AM
Mostly clear
Max temperature 67 degrees F
Min temperature 32 degrees F
At observation 49 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

May 25 Weather:

At 930am it was 49 degrees and mostly clear (a little thin haze.) Partly cloudy and breezy at 1pm. At 230pm it was 71 degrees, mostly cloudy and light breezes. At 7pm it was 62 degrees, overcast and had been raining lightly long enough to make things damp, breezy as well. Light steady rain for about an hour or more. Sprinkling a few drops at 830pm. At 840pm it was 53 degrees, not raining, overcast and breezy. Looked cloudy at 1130pm. Possible shower early morning?

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time May 26, 2020 at 09:30AM
Low overcast
Max temperature 74 degrees F
Min temperature 49 degrees F
At observation 52 degrees F
Precipitation 0.05 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

May 26 Weather:

At 930am it was 52 degrees, humid, low overcast and foggy ridges. Cloudy at 1pm. At 330pm it was 66 degrees, broken gray overcast and a bit breezy. At 630pm it was 66 degrees and mostly cloudy (dark.) At 830pm it was 62 degrees, mostly cloudy (high thin wispies) and calm. Stars out and breezy at 1115pm. Clouds at 130am.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time May 27, 2020 at 09:30AM
Clear, light breeze
Max temperature 69 degrees F
Min temperature 39 degrees F
At observation 54 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

May 27 Weather:

At 930am it was 54 degrees, clear and light breeze. At 1pm warm, clear sky and light breeze. At 345pm it was 76 degrees, mostly hazy wispy clouds and light breezes. At 830pm it was 64 degrees, partly hazy and breezy. Looked clear at 1130pm, lots of stars.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time May 28, 2020 at 09:30AM
Partly hazy, breezy
Max temperature 77 degrees F
Min temperature 38 degrees F
At observation 55 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

May 28 Weather:

At 930am it was 55 degrees, partly hazy and breezy. Mostly clear and light breezes at 1pm. At 330pm it was 84 degrees, mostly clear and light breezes. At 639pm it was 79 degrees, partly cloudy and slight breeze. At 850pm it was 65 degrees, almost clear (1 small cloud) and breezes picking up. At 130am it was mostly cloudy and breezy. Far off thunder at 205am. Rain started at 230am.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time May 29, 2020 at 09:30AM
Mixed overcast and muggy
Max temperature 86 degrees F
Min temperature 50 degrees F
At observation 63 degrees F
Precipitation 0.04 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

May 29 Weather:

At 930am it was 63 degrees, mixed overcast (thin haze and thicker dark clouds) and muggy. At 2pm it was 83 degrees, partly cloudy, light breezes and quite muggy. At 330pm it was 86 degrees, partly cloudy, humid and light breezes. At 715pm it was 82 degrees, partly cloudy and slight breeze. At 1115pm it was mostly cloudy (very few stars) and flag flapping breezy. Thunderstorm and short hard rain around 830am.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time May 30, 2020 at 09:30AM
Overcast
Max temperature 88 degrees F
Min temperature 47 degrees F
At observation 54 degrees F
Precipitation 0.03 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

May 30 Weather:

At 830am thunder followed by short hard rain. At 930am it was 54 degrees and overcast. Clouds thinning by 1130am. Cloudy at 1pm, thicker dark clouds, humid and slight breeze. Wind gusting up at 3pm. At 320pm it was 91 degrees, mostly cloudy and gusty. At 630pm it was 85 degrees, mostly cloudy (dark ones to the south west) humid and breezy. At 840pm it was 71 degrees, dark overcast but calmer. At 1130pm it was cloudy and still. Breezy at 130am. Rain during the night (probably between 4am and 7am.) Gusty at 9am, power blip 902am.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time May 31, 2020 at 09:30AM
Mostly cloudy, breezy
Max temperature 91 degrees F
Min temperature 50 degrees F
At observation 59 degrees F
Precipitation 0.02 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
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Road Reports May 27, 2020

Please share road reports. Conditions change very quickly this time of year. High elevation roads still have lots of snow. Be prepared for rocks and trees in the road and remember there is no cell phone service.

Yellow Pine: Local streets are bare and starting to dry out. Elk and deer are wandering around at dusk. Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN.
link: Local Forecast
Yellow Pine Webcam: (check date on image)

Warm Lake Highway: No problems reported.
link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

Highway 55 Webcams Link:

South Fork Road: Tuesday (May 26) mail truck driver reports the road is pretty rough right now.
Road work will begin May 18th. “This initial work will not include road closures, but may cause some very short delays in traveling the road.” – PNF
Weight restrictions were lifted May 18th.
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Monday (May 26) mail truck driver reports rocks have been cleared and road is in great shape.

Lower Johnson Creek Road: Last report Wednesday (May 13) The road is pretty good between YP and Wapiti Meadow Ranch. The county graded parts of the road recently.
Landmark and upper Johnson Creek still closed to wheeled vehicles.
link: Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam
link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
Note: The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Closed to wheeled vehicles (no current report.)
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Closed to wheeled vehicles. No current report.
Last report April 10: [summit] “between 6-7 ft. Continuous snow floor from the Big Creek turnoff. About 3 ft remaining at the Big Creek turnoff.” – SA
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcam: (check date on image)

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open
May 26 report from Midas: Midas Gold will be working with local contractors to grade the road from Yellow Pine to Stibnite on June 1 and dust abatement of the road on June 15.
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Closed to wheeled vehicles (no current report.)
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Warrens Wagon Road: Report May 22 that the county plowed the road open to Secesh Meadows.

Deadwood Summit: Closed to wheeled vehicles (no current report.)
Note: The approx elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′
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May 24, 2020 The Yellow Pine Times

May 24, 2020 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Community Calendar:

Yellow Pine Tavern Closed until further notice.
Spring Rx Burns postponed
April 9 – Temp. Spring Restrictions on upper Stibnite Rd
April 17 – Boil water order issued
May 15 – Firewood Season starts
May 15 – Lower South Fork river open for float boating
May 18 – Weight restrictions South Fork road lifted
May 18 – Work starts on South Fork road
Mid-June – YP Vet Clinic Canceled
June 13 – VYPA Meeting 2pm at the Community Hall
June 27 – Fest Meeting 2pm at the Community Hall
(details below)
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From Valley County

We need Your Help to protect the place and the people we all Love.
link:
— —

Valley County Covid-19 Response Page
link:
— —

Valley County Emergency Operations Center
link:
— —

Rebound – Idaho Governor’s phasing program
link:
— —

COVID 19: Recommendations and Resources for Safe Business Practices
link: (lots of info for businesses)
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Local Events:

June Yellow Pine Vet Clinic Canceled

In consultation with the Cascade Veterinary Clinic, we will not be hosting the June vaccination clinic in Yellow Pine this year. If you need your pet seen, please call Cascade Vet at (208) 382-4590 to arrange an appointment. Currently the protocol is to call the clinic from the parking lot when you arrive and someone will come out to your vehicle and take your pet inside. Due to space limitations they are not allowing people to accompany pets inside.
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Village News:

Yellow Pine Pioneer Cemetery Memorial Weekend

2020MemorialYPCemetery-a
Flags and photo courtesy Tim R
— — — —

Amerigas

Dan from Amerigas was up was up again on Wednesday, May 20th, filling up propane tanks – in the rain.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Tavern closed due to COVID-19 fears

Tavern is still closed until further notice. Will have gas available as well as take out beer, pop, candy, chips, pizza. Call 208 739-7086 or go to 355 Yellow Pine Ave. House across street from the Tavern next to the Silver Dollar.
— — — —

Voting Idaho Primary Election

Don’t forget to return your mail in Ballot before June 2nd.
— — — —

2020 Census

The 2020 Census Impacts All Valley County Residents

Inching closer. Each of our communities and Valley County as a whole have increased our response rate by a few percentage points over the last few weeks – but we still have a lot of room to grow! We are still ranked #42 of 44 counties in Idaho for our Census response rate. Let’s get that number up! Responding to the Census takes less than 10 minutes and mean $1,483 per person in federal funding for Valley County.

It is recommended that we all fill out the census online.

If you spend 50% of your time in Valley County, you can consider it your home per the Census. Where you register with the Census is confidential and never linked to other governmental requirements such as property taxes or mailing address. The deadline for the 2020 Census has been extended until October 31st. They will probably not be sending census takers up to Yellow Pine.

Link: to online census

You do not need an ID number. Go to the link. Click on “start questionnaire”. Then on the next page scroll down to “If you do not have a Census ID, click here” – when you click on that line it will start the census. (see below)

2020Census-a
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Boil Water Order issued

Update May 15: As usual in previous years, the water plant is experiencing high water in boulder Creek which brings more debris into the sand filter.

The high demand caused by leaks in the system plugs the sand filters prematurely. We will be on a boil order at least through spring thaw.

As of April 17th 2020, Yellow Pine is under another “Boil Order”

Boil Water Advisory Notice

Boil Your Water Before Using

Bring tap water to a rolling boil, boil for one minute, and cool before using or use bottled water. Boiled or bottled water should be used for drinking, making ice, washing dishes, brushing teeth, and preparing food until further notice.

This Boil Water Advisory Notice applies to The Yellow Pine Water System

The system is being monitored and checked daily for compliance. .

You will be informed when you no longer need to boil your water.

For more information, please contact:
Warren Drake of the Yellow Pine Water System
at 208-573-6261 or wdrake@drakediversified.com

Please share this information with other people who drink this water, especially anyone who may not get this notice directly (for example, people in apartments, nursing homes, schools, and businesses).

You can do this by posting this notice in a public place or distributing copies by hand or mail.

State Water System ID#: 4430059 Date distributed: 3-22-2020
— — — —

Critters:

Tick’s are plentiful this spring.

Bears are out of hibernation, protect your trash and pet food.

It is getting close to calving season, watch out for aggressive mother does and cows, they will stomp your dogs.
— — — —

Road News:

Work on the South Fork Salmon River road will begin on May 18th. This year’s work will be focused primarily on the Payette portions of the roadway. This initial work will not include road closures, but may cause some very short delays in traveling the road. The contractor will to begin implement the same closures as last year as soon as Lick Creek opens, which is expected to be right after the Memorial Day weekend. These closures will be from 0700 until 1600 every week day, just like last year. The Forest Service will provide weekly updates on Mile Post closures as we did last year.

April 9th the temporary road restrictions on the upper Stibnite Road went into effect.

The load restrictions on the South Fork Salmon River Road were lifted May 18th
— — — —

Forest Info

A report Saturday (May 23) of trees cut and stacked at the Yellow Pine Campground. Possibly hazard tree removal by the Boise NF.

The Krassel RD campgrounds are effectively open for use but currently with limited services – we advise all users to bring toilet paper, drinking water and strive to be as fully self-contained as possible as the District is not operating the campgrounds as open with full services. We have cleaned the restrooms in the South Fork paved road corridor, but water systems will take a little longer to bring on-line due to the need to sanitize and to receive water testing results.

All campgrounds and restroom facilities in the South Fork Corridor, Lick Creek/Secesh Corridor and along the East Fork South Fork Salmon River to Yellow Pine will begin seeing our regular restroom cleaning beginning this Friday, May 15th. Water systems will come online in the near future.

Rx Burns

All new prescribed burn ignitions have been paused across the Region in line with regional direction. The Forest will continue to prioritize keeping employees and the public safe during this time. The decision to temporarily postpone ignitions will prevent any effects from smoke that might further worsen conditions for those who are at risk in our communities while reducing exposure for Forest Service employees who might not otherwise need to travel.

We expect the pause on prescribed burn ignitions to be re-evaluated by the Regional Forester sometime in April.
– PNF
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Yellow Pine US Mail

The 3-day a week mail delivery started Nov 1st. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 55 cents. Support our local post office and purchase your holiday stamps here.
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Yellow Pine Transfer Station

May 20th – report that the trash strewn about by the bears has been cleaned up at the Transfer Station.

Lakeshore last emptied the bins on or before May 1st. Please keep the burn pile neat.

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

Yellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is located approximately 3 miles south on Johnson Creek Road.

The TRANSFER STATION is for household trash and yard waste:
* Household trash must be put inside (and fit) the dumpster;
* Yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, etc.) goes in the burn pile on the south end of the turn-around;
* Cardboard boxes should be flattened before putting the in the dumpster,

The DUMPSTERS are NOT for:
* Furniture (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station).

The BURN PILE is NOT for:
* Cardboard boxes (flatten and put in dumpster);
* Furniture and appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Drywall and building material (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wire or fencing (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Foam Rubber (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wood with metal (like nails) attached (take to Donnelly Transfer Station.)

When closing the DOORS on the front of the dumpsters:
* Make sure the “U” brackets at the top and bottom of the door are engaged;
* The retaining bar at the middle of the door is slid into the pipe;
* And the “L” bars at the bottom of the doors dropped into place.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: 208/634-7176
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Local Groups:

YPWUA News:

New Boil Water Order issued April 17, 2020. This could last until runoff is over.

Second half of the water bill is due June 15, 2020.

The last Yellow Pine Water Users Shareholders meeting was Sunday July 7, 2019.
link: 20190707YPWUAminutes
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VYPA News:

2020 Festival Meeting May 16, 2020

Note: at each meeting we simply add to info on the topic. That way, info from all meetings is included in a single document.

Next festival planning Meeting June 27th at 2pm at the Community Hall
link: 2020 Festival Planning Notes.pdf

Heat was installed in the community hall on April 30th.

Proposed VYPA Bylaws Changes

Attached is the compiled proposed changes to the bylaws the Council has received.

The proposed changes and the proposed addendum B, are being published to give folks plenty of time to read and process the information before the first reading.

link: 2020 Proposed changes to Yellow Pine Bylaws Adopted 9-12-2015.pdf

link: 2020 Addendum B-letter of interest.pdf

link: 2018 Midas Gold Community Partnership Agreement with the Village of Yellow Pine

Deb Filler – Chairperson
Village of Yellow Pine Association

The community hall committee’s goal is to have adequate heating installed in the main hall before the June VYPA meeting.

If folks have items for the community yard sale, please place them by the north wall in the community hall. If you see items you would like to purchase, you can pay Deb, Ronda, or Lynn. All funds support the community hall.

VYPA meetings for 2020 – June 13, 2pm; July 11, 2pm; August 8, 2pm; September 12, 2pm.

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting Minutes for September 21, 2019
link: 20190921 Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting
— — — —

YPFD News:

YPFD COVID19 Policy

link: Covid-19 EMS (1).pdf (May 23)

May 10th Burn Permits – contact the YPFD

Pile burning: Dress appropriately, have enough help on hand (people, water and tools) and make a firebreak before you start. Call your local fire protection district chief to let them know you’ll be conducting a debris burn. This saves them from sending emergency responders to your property if they are not needed. Do NOT burn on breezy afternoons.

Better yet, “Bring It, Don’t Burn It”, you can take your yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, etc.) to the burn pile at the Transfer Station on the south end of the turn-around. Remember, keep the pile neat. Woody debris only, no nails, no cardboard and no furniture! The Boise NF will burn the pile in the fall when it is safe and doesn’t pollute our fine YP air.

YP Fire Commissioners:
Sue Holloway – District 1
Dan Stiff – District 2
Merrill Saleen – District 3
Jeff Forster – Fire Chief

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice

The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.”

Click the link: to view 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation
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Biz Listings:

The Corner (208) 633-3325

Plan to open for Memorial Weekend with live music provided by Willie and the Singlewides.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233

Closed until further notice.
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Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377

Closed for Winter.
— — — —

Knotty Kat Crochet Works – 208-502-0940
FB page link
open Tue – Sat, 9-5
Yellow Pine eggs $3/doz
— — — —

Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Tom & Sarah Lanham
156 Yellow Pine Ave, Yellow Pine Id 83677
website:
Facebook:
Starting June 2020 We will be doing trail rides out of Yellow Pine along with summer pack / camping trips to high mountain lakes in the area!

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
— — — —

Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430
— — — —

Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

The Star-News

subscribe:
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine

Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, will service Yellow Pine

B&T Safety Solutions LLC
208-271-1600 Based out of Donnelly
Snow removal, cleaning chimneys and stoves, we do cabin staining/chinking as well
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Letter to Share:

Dear Yellow Pine residents:

Cascade Medical Center is here for you. When I (Tom Reinhardt) attended your community meeting in September, I mentioned that we were preparing to provide tele-video medical visits. We now have that up and running. If you want to schedule an appointment, call our clinic at 208-382-4285. Vicki or one of the MAs will ask you some questions to make sure that a tele-video visit is the right choice given your symptoms or need. If so, we will work with you to make sure you are set up on the Cascade Medical Center patient portal (with our EMR). We will also make sure that you are set up to be able to do a tele-video visit (laptop with camera, desktop with camera, or smart phone). We use the Zoom telemedicine system, which is confidential and secure (it works like Skype or Face-time). Before the appointment, we will email you a link for the tele-video visit. When it is time for your appointment, you will click on the link in the email and you will be connected with our provider and can begin your visit.

Regarding insurance coverage, the COVID legislation passed in March assures coverage of telemedicine visits for patients with Medicare, Medicaid, VA. Private insurers have also decided to provide coverage just as for regular in person visits, at least until the COVID epidemic crisis is declared over.

My advice is that if someone usually goes to the VA for care, they should call the VA and see if they can do a video visit with them. Or if they usually go to McCall St. Lukes, they should call their doctor there.

Tom Reinhardt, CEO
Cascade Medical Center
April 4, 2020

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Local Observations:

Monday (May 18) rained all night, 24 hour rain total = 0.59″ (more rain in 12 hours than fell the previous 17 days), overnight low of 43 degrees, overcast with fog hanging low on the mountains and raining. No swallows around, jays, finches and evening grosbeaks calling and visiting. Hawk in the neighborhood chasing songbirds during a break in the rain this morning. Raining at lunch time and quiet. Male black-headed grosbeak joined the finches and evening grosbeaks at the feeders, and a fluffed up female calliope hummer hung out in a state of torpor in the cold. Pretty much rained all day with a break early afternoon, high of 50 degrees. Report of a Lazuli Bunting in the neighborhood, robins are loving the wet weather chirping cheerily from all over the neighborhood. Rain late afternoon and early evening. Overcast and not raining at dusk and robins calling. Cloudy and calm before midnight.

Tuesday (May 19) overnight low of 37 degrees, overcast and rather dark this morning, 24 hour rain total = 0.24″. Swallows are back, several jays, male and female black-headed grosbeaks and lots of finches visiting. Overcast and rather dark at lunch time. Quiet rainy afternoon, high of 54 degrees. Low foggy clouds down on the mountains mid-afternoon and cooler. Not many hummingbirds visiting, although a couple stopped by today. Break in the rain late afternoon until early evening, then rained for less than an hour. Robins calling and female hairy woodpecker visiting. At dusk broken clouds and low fog on the flanks of the mountains, robins and a flicker calling. A trio of deer wandered by on the golf course before dark. Cloudy before midnight. Rain during the night.

Wednesday (May 20) overnight low of 39 degrees, low dark clouds this morning and ridges socked in, 24 hour rain total = 0.36″. Flicker and robins calling, finches, male and female hairy woodpeckers, black-headed grosbeaks and juvenile Clark’s nutcrackers visiting. Sprinkling rain before lunch time. Mail truck made it in on time. Amerigas truck up here topping off tanks. Lilac bushes have little sprigs of flower buds like bunches of grapes. Rain showers and sprinkles into the afternoon, low dark clouds draped across the mountains, high of 53 degrees. Cowbirds joined the finches at the feeders. Overcast, cool light breeze and a few drops of rain mid-evening. Overcast at dusk and robins calling. Rain before midnight. Probably rained most of the night.

Thursday (May 21) overnight low of 39 degrees, 24 hour rain total = 0.35″, mostly cloudy and light breeze this morning, EFSF sounds louder, snow above 6500′ on VanMeter. Elk grazing on the edge of the golf course, male and female black-headed grosbeaks, jays and finches visiting. Short little sprinkle of rain after lunch time. Dark-eyed juncos visited, joining the female hairy woodpecker, black-headed grosbeaks and cassin’s finches at the feeders. Blustery early afternoon, light sprinkle of rain mid-afternoon – just enough to dampen the roof, high of 48 degrees. Dark clouds and sprinkles mid evening. Happy robins chirping at dusk. Rain ended sometime after dark. Cloudy before midnight.

Friday (May 22) overnight low of 34 degrees, 24 hour rain total = 0.07″, low overcast sitting down on the peaks and ridges, sprinkling and a few minutes of snow flakes this morning. The swallows are back (got snowed on and left), lots of black-headed grosbeaks, cassin’s finches, cowbirds and a few jays visiting, robins calling, later a dark-eyed junco and a hummingbird stopped by. Airplane circling at 1017am. Broken clouds and scattered sunshine before lunch time. Mail truck made it in on time (a few rocks down on the lower EFSF road.) Broken cloud cover and chilly breezes after lunch time. Increasing traffic. Patches of blue sky early afternoon and gusty breezes, high of 55 degrees. A couple of pine squirrels, a chipmunk, a golden mantel and several columbian ground squirrels running about. Partly clear to mostly cloudy evening and breezy. Black-chinned hummingbird, male hairy woodpecker and clark’s nutcracker visited. Partly cloudy and nearly calm at dusk, golden light reflecting off a large cloud to the east. Partly clear before midnight.

Saturday (May 23) overnight low of 34 degrees, sky is overcast this morning. Swallows came back for the morning then left. Loud twin engine flew directly over the village just after 930am. Black-headed and evening grosbeaks and finches visiting, a pine squirrel scolding from a tree. Increasing traffic. Gray overcast and light breezes at lunch time. Adult clark’s nutcracker brought 2 noisy juveniles to visit, a few dark-eyed juncos still around, not many humming birds. Early afternoon broken cloud cover, light 5 minute sprinkle of rain with about a minute of pellet sized hailstones. More traffic than we have had all year. Broken clouds with bits of sunshine mid-afternoon, high of 55 degrees. Mostly dark chunky clouds and calmer by early evening. Mostly cloudy at dusk, no swallows. Partly clear before midnight.

Sunday (May 24) overnight low of 28 degrees, mostly high thin clouds this morning. Loud air traffic over the village this morning for about half an hour. Tree swallows came back, lots of finches visiting. Gunfire at 940am. Noisy juvenile clark’s nutcrackers begging for food. Partly cloudy and breezy after lunch time. More air and street traffic. Partly cloudy, warmer and breezy by mid-afternoon, high of 67 degrees. Mostly clear mid-evening and calmer.
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Memorial Day:

MemorialDayGraves-a
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Letter to Share:

from Valley County Sheriff’s Office

PSA Saturday

We would like to take this opportunity to educate some folks on the usage of your UTV, ATV or Dirt Bikes on County roads in Valley County.

We get several questions and complaints during the spring, summer and fall on the use of these vehicles in neighborhoods and on County maintained roads, public and private. Remember, just because a road is marked private (blue signs), it’s still accessible to the public and you must still follow the rules of the road.

Use on City & County Roads (does not include private property)

The following requirements must be met on city, county, and highway district roads.

• Valid restricted vehicle license plate. [IC 49-402(4)]
• Valid IDPR OHV registration sticker affixed to restricted vehicle license plate. (IC 67-7122)
• Valid driver’s license. (IC 49-301) – Parents can be cited for allowing an unlicensed minor to operate an ATV or UTV. Please keep this in mind.
• Liability insurance or alternative insurance. (IC 49-1223 or IC 49-1232)
• A helmet under age 18. (IC 49-666) Please make sure it’s a DOT inspected helmet.
• Muffler and U.S. Forest Service approved spark arrestor. Your muffler has to pass 96 dB at the half-meter test, SAE J1287. The OHV cannot exceed 96dB. (IC 67-7125)
• If you are riding on a highway within city limits, you may NOT go beyond the 45 mph signs in Valley County. This may not be the case in other cities, please be sure to check city codes prior to operating an off road vehicle on state highways within other city jurisdictions, they vary.

For safe operation on roads the following equipment is recommended.

• Brake light.
• Headlight and taillight after dark/poor visibility.
• Horn audible at 200 feet.
• Mirror showing roadway 200 feet behind the OHV

License & Registration

Any OHVs being operated or transported on public lands, roads or trails of the state of Idaho must display a current IDPR OHV Registration Sticker. Idaho Code 67-7124. Registration has been extended until June 30th, due to COVID-19, however they are asking that you attempt to get this completed as soon as you can.

NON-RESIDENT REQUIREMENTS

Non-residents are required to have either a valid OHV registration from their home state of residence or a valid IDPR OHV registration sticker. Nonresidents must purchase an Idaho restricted vehicle license plate with a valid IDPR OHV registration sticker if they don’t have a plate and wish to operate on Idaho’s local jurisdiction roads (i.e.county roads).

Please be courteous, pay attention to speed limits and remember when you are driving through neighborhoods there are lots of things going on, kids playing, family pets and people walking or biking their neighborhoods.

We are asking that if you would like to report traffic complaints in your neighborhood, to call at the time it’s occurring, get a good description of the vehicle, a plate would be great and a description of the occupants, if possible.

Some of the questions the dispatcher might ask you are; Which direction did they go? Do you know where they live? When did this occur?

All of this information helps us in assisting you in better serving your needs. A lot of these vehicles look the same and disappear quickly!

As always, Stay Safe, be healthy and practice social distancing.

(via FB May 23, 2020)
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Idaho News:

Valley County opens with new protocols for visitors

By Kelsie Rose May 17, 2020 KIVI

Valley County, Idaho — As the State of Idaho begins to reopen and travel resumes, the mountain communities in and around Valley County have launched the “Protect Your Mountain Playground” initiative, which asks visitors to take a few simple steps to protect themselves and the communities they visit.

The initiative includes knowing about new protocols at local businesses and recreation areas, continuing social distancing, wearing a mask in public, practicing good hand hygiene, and staying home when feeling sick.

“This is really a know-before-you-go request,” McKenzie Kraemer, marketing director for the McCall Area Chamber of Commerce & Visitors Bureau, says. “There are a lot of variables right now, so understanding what businesses and recreation areas are open, closed, or have new protocols in place will help limit surprises and make time spent in our communities much more enjoyable.”

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Donnelly community yard, craft sale canceled due to COVID-19

The Star-News May 21, 2020

The annual Community Yard and Craft Sale normally held Memorial Day weekend has been canceled due to restrictions resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic.

During previous events, community members and crafters would bring their items to display along Main Street (Idaho 55).

The community yard sale is sponsored by the Greater Donnelly Area Chamber of Commerce.

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Congregational church cancels annual plant sale

The Star-News May 21, 2020

The McCall Community Congregational Church has decided not to hold its annual plant sale for the first time in 80 years due to COVID-19 precautions. The sale had been scheduled for May 30.

“We considered the safety of gathering together of all our many members and faithful friends, who have bought plants from us for years, to be of utmost importance,” Pastor Charlottie Havlicak said.

Previous sales included hanging baskets, annuals, perennials, vegetable and tomato plants, herbs, soil amendments, and pre-planted pots.

Proceeds from the 2019 plant sale benefited The Shepherd’s Home, Heartland Hunger Resource Center, the Woodstock firewood community service day, Young Life and community mission work.

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Valley County passes rules on multiple RVs on single properties

By Max Silverson for The Star-News May 21, 2020

Valley County commissioners on Monday finalized rules on “recreational vehicle campgrounds” that allow multiple recreational vehicles to camp on a single property.

Monday’s hearing was a continuation of a public hearing started on Feb. 18.

The ordinance defined both recreational vehicle campground and recreational vehicle park and placed requirements on each for sewage disposal, garbage, rentals, lighting, campfires and other rules.

A recreational vehicle campground was defined as a parcel of land under one ownership which has been planned and improved for the placement of two or three recreational vehicles specifically for the recreational use of the parcel by friends and family.

A recreational vehicle campground could not include multiple family groups camping on holiday weekends, the ordinance said.

One RV is allowed without a permit. Two or three units that are kept on site for more than an occasional weekend will now require a permit and fee. More than three units require a separate permit.

The ordinance requires each campground to comply with Central District Health regulations for sewage, wastewater and the use of portable toilets.

RV campsites are only to be allowed when one of the RV units on the property is occupied by the owner.

The ordinance also set standards for quiet hours and lighting.

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Valley County adopts rules on short-term rentals

Standards set on occupancy, campfires, quiet hours

By Max Silverson for The Star-News May 21, 2020

Valley County commissioners adopted a short-term rental ordinance on Monday that will require a permit and sets uniform standards.

The hearing was streamed online, with testimony allowed in advance and over the phone during the proceedings. Monday’s hearing was a continuation of a public hearing on Feb. 18.

The rules require short-term rentals to apply for an annual permit and set standards on maximum occupancy, sewage, garbage, setbacks, rules of operation, lighting, camp fires, quiet hours, and notification to adjacent property owners.

The new law does not apply within the cities of McCall, Donnelly and Cascade or within the McCall Area of Impact, which is governed by McCall land-use planning laws.

McCall already has a law on its books regulating short-term rentals in the city and impact area.

Short term rental refers to any residence that is rented for 30 days or less. The maximum occupancy was set at 12 people unless a permit is obtained.

The rules require that the number of occupants not exceed the limits of the septic system as approved by Central District Health. Portable toilets could not be used to increase the maximum occupancy.

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Valley commissioners OK rules on secondary residences

The Star-News May 21, 2020

Valley County commissioners on Monday adopted an ordinance regulating accessory dwelling units in the county in a public hearing on Monday.

The ordinance changed the previous definition of accessory dwelling units, added requirements for long-term and short-term rentals and established parking regulations.

Accessory dwelling units are defined as a secondary residence on a single-family lot containing its own kitchen, sleeping area and bathroom. They can be attached or detached from the primary residence.

The units can be rented as long as the primary structure on the property is occupied by the owner. A permit would be required for a short-term rental.

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Commissioners working on new waterways ordinance in Valley County

If approved, the ordinance would create 300-foot no-wake safe zones in both Lake Cascade and Payette Lake.

Author Joey Prechtl May 19, 2020 KTVB

Valley County commissioners are working on drafting an ordinance that would put in certain restrictions along waterways – specifically Lake Cascade and Payette Lake.

The new ordinance will actually replace one that had been in effect between 2008 and 2018, but was rescinded due to an administrative error.

The purpose of the new regulation is to make sure all different kinds of recreationists can use the lakes and enjoy them.

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One person shot dead following fight in New Meadows

by CBS2 News Staff Saturday, May 23rd 2020

New Meadows, Idaho (CBS2) — One person was shot dead following a fight in the small community of New Meadows.

The Adams County Sheriff’s Office says there was a report of a fight a little before 9 p.m. on Friday at a home. Deputies and Idaho State Police arrived and found a male dead.

The suspect, who has not been identified, was taken into custody. No other details were released, but the sheriff’s office says additional details will be released at a late time.

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State wants roundabout on Idaho 55 at Cascade

Traffic circle would regulate traffic from The River District

By Max Silverson for The Star-News May 21, 2020

Traffic on the south end of Cascade would flow through an oval-shaped roundabout on Idaho 55 if The River District development is completed as planned.

The Idaho Transportation Department decided that a roundabout would be the best way to regulate traffic coming in and out of the proposed 443-unit development.

Traffic on Idaho 55 would move around the traffic circle, which could be one of the first roundabouts on a state highway in Idaho, ITD officials said.

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Officials cancel Idaho Memorial Day Veterans Ceremony

By Steve Bertel May 20, 2020 KIVI

Boise, Idaho — To reduce the spread of the COVID-19 virus and comply with government rules of limited gatherings at large venues, Idaho Division of Veterans Services has made what officials call “the difficult decision” to cancel this year’s ceremony at the Idaho Veterans Cemetery in Boise as a condition of continued public safety.

“Even during this difficult and challenging time, we must never forget that as a nation we have a solemn responsibility to recognize and honor those that have served and died in defense of our freedom and the freedom of those oppressed throughout the world,” said Veterans Cemetery Bureau Chief James Earp.

“This year’s honorable display for Memorial Day at the Idaho State Veterans Cemetery north of Boise, will include a single U.S. flag hand-placed with dignity and respect at each gravesite by Captain Art Jackson, Young Marines and volunteers from Veterans Service Organizations. These flags will complement the cemetery’s Avenue of Flags raised with respect and honor by members from The Mission Continues of Boise,” said Idaho Division of Veterans Services Executive Assistant Kevin Wallior.

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Lab in Idaho Falls decontaminates N95 masks for healthcare professionals across the state for free

By Jilliana Colina May 18, 2020 Local News 8

As more and more things begin to open, Governor Brad Little says there’s a bigger risk of having a COVID-19 outbreak.

“At one point in time they were the critical weak link and we couldn’t do testing, we couldn’t do anything without enough in N95 masks. Now that we can clean them here, that just makes everything a lot easier,” said Gov. Little.

The Battelle Critical Care Decontamination System uses concentrated vapor phase hydrogen peroxide to decontaminate thousands of N95 masks of the novel coronavirus.

Research scientist at Battelle, Kendra Versendaal tells us the process used was researched years ago.

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Two more earthquakes hit near Cascade

A 3.4 earthquake hit at 5:05 a.m., followed by a 4.4-magnitude quake almost 30 minutes later.

May 21, 2020 KTVB

Cascade, Idaho — Two more earthquakes rattled Central Idaho Thursday morning, sending out tremors that could be felt in the Treasure Valley.

The quakes happened in the mountains about 40 miles east of Cascade. The first, which struck at 5:05 a.m., registered as a 3.4 in magnitude, and was followed at 5:33 a.m. by a 4.4-magnitude quake.

Multiple people in the Boise area reported feeling shaking from the second earthquake.

The two quakes follow another 4.4-magnitude earthquake in that same area on May 13.

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[Note: These aftershocks were over near Cape Horn Mountain on both sides of the Valley/Custer county line.]

link: M 2.5 – 72km NE of Idaho City, Idaho 828pm May 20

link: M 3.4 – 60km ESE of Cascade, Idaho 505am May 21

link: M 4.4 – 66km E of Cascade, Idaho 533am May 21
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The shaking continues almost two months after 6.5 magnitude earthquake hit Stanley

by Haley Kramer Thursday, May 21st 2020 CBS2

Thursday morning, people in Stanley woke up to a 3.4 magnitude quake, followed by a 4.4 magnitude quake less than an hour later.

Most people in the Treasure Valley felt their home shake on March 31; the result of a 6.5 magnitude earthquake near Stanley.

Since then, there have been more than 840 aftershocks larger than 1.5 in magnitude.

“It’s a little unnerving to a number of people just because of the uncertainty as to what’s coming next. And, how long this may last,” said Stanley Mayor Steve Botti.

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Need to renew license or registration? Don’t go to the DMV

By Frankie Katafias May 19, 2020 KIVI

DMV’s across the state of Idaho service about a quarter of a million transactions every month.

With restrictions in place due to COVID-19 concerns, data from the Idaho Transportation Department shows that approximately, “40,000 driver’s license/ID card customers and 50,000 vehicle registrations statewide.” are on the backlog with Idaho’s Department of Motor Vehicles.

The backlogs have county officials and the Idaho Transportation Department urging drivers to utilize their online services to reduce crowds and wait times.

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Scam Alert:

Don’t get scammed by buying inaccurate COVID-19 tests

By Jilliana Colina May 20, 2020 Local News 8

The FDA has sent more than 50 warning letters to companies illegally selling inaccurate COVID-19 tests, according to the Better Business Bureau.

The BBB says with new studies showing that up to 50 percent of people with the virus don’t show any symptoms, a lot of people are curious to get tested to know if they’ve had it.

Scammers know this and are offering at-home tests or tests at a clinic though different platforms like robocalls and the internet. Many times, to get the test they ask you to complete a form and enter your credit card information.

The BBB says if you do get one of these tests, they are not FDA approved and will not give accurate results.

BBB’s Jeremy Johnson tells us the only person you should contact about getting tested is your doctor.

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Public Lands:

Payette reopens lower South Fork Salmon for floaters, kayakers

The Star-News May 21, 2020

The Payette National Forest reopened the lower South Fork of the Salmon River on Friday to coincide with the reopening of the Middle Fork and main Salmon River.

The rivers had been closed to rafting and kayaking to promote social distancing regarding COVID-19. Access to the Payette remains open with 10-person group limitations in place.

Free permits are required for boaters floating between the confluence of the East Fork of the South Fork of the Salmon River and the confluence of the main Salmon. The permit is used to help officials track the number of visitors and assist in county emergency search and rescue operations as needed.

The Payette asks that permits be submitted seven to ten days before any float trip. Permit information can be found at (link) and following the Passes and Permits link.

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Payette National Forest to open for Memorial Day weekend with limitations

by CBS2 News Staff Thursday, May 21st 2020

The Payette National Forest has stayed open with only a few closures in place. Those closures will be lifted in time for Memorial Day weekend with a few limitations.

Only groups of less than 10 people are aloud. This goes along with Governor Little’s Rebound Idaho plan and CDC social distancing guidelines.

A majority of the campgrounds are still closed for the season due to snow levels. Snow only recently melted at the 5,000 ft. elevation and snow is still sticking around at higher elevations.

On average, Payette National Forest campgrounds open in late May and into early June.

“While we understand there is excitement from the public to return to beloved recreation areas, with Memorial Day coming early this year, please bear with us as we prepare our campgrounds for opening, and please continue to follow local, state, and federal guidelines on staying safe,” said Linda Jackson, Payette National Forest Supervisor. “There is work to be done.”

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The Forest is Open with some Recreation Limitations Over the Memorial Day Weekend

McCall, Idaho, May 21, 2020 – Throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, the Payette National Forest has remained open for public use with only a few closures having been put in place. As we approach the Memorial Day weekend, these closures have been rescinded, and only a group size limit of 10 people or less is in place in accordance with Rebound Idaho and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention social distancing protocols.

As snow has only recently melted at the 5000 foot elevation level and snow remains at higher elevations, many of our campgrounds are not yet open for the season. On an annual basis, most of the Payette National Forest campgrounds open in late May and into early June as access to our campgrounds becomes available, recreation crews are preforming annual maintenance and repairs.

“While we understand there is excitement from the public to return to beloved recreation areas, with Memorial Day coming early this year, please bear with us as we prepare our campgrounds for opening, and please continue to follow local, state, and federal guidelines on staying safe,” said Linda Jackson, Payette National Forest Supervisor. “There is work to be done – ensuring cleanliness of facilities, conducting proper maintenance, and assessing campground for health and safety. We anticipate some campground openings may take additional time.”

Dispersed camping opportunities and trail use are available throughout the Payette National Forest in areas that are accessible without snow. Visitors should come with all the essentials, including food, emergency supplies, and resources to pack-out trash. The Forest Service is asking visitors to recreate locally and responsibly, as this will help prevent the capacity of areas to accommodate visitors from being exceeded. Rainy weather is forecasted over much of the Forest for the next several days and nighttime temperatures are reaching into the low to mid 30s, so plan accordingly. Sunshine may appear over the weekend, but roads and camping sites may be muddy.

Campgrounds:

Council, Weiser, McCall and New Meadows Ranger Districts: Developed campgrounds on these districts will not be open for Memorial Day weekend and campground gates, where they exist, will remain closed. Higher elevation campgrounds are not yet accessible due to snow. Those campgrounds that are accessible are not open because cleaning supplies and personal protective equipment for adequately cleaning restroom facilities have been difficult to obtain. Most restroom facilities across the districts are either not accessible or are not currently being maintained or stocked, and potable drinking water and trash removal services are not available.

Krassel Ranger District: All developed campgrounds on the Krassel Ranger District are open and available for the Memorial Day weekend. Due to limitations of personnel and appropriate PPE, some amenities, such as potable water, or fully stocked and open restrooms may not be fully available in all campgrounds. Fees will be charged as posted in each campground. Due to the popularity of many of the South Fork Salmon River campgrounds, visitor use over the previous two weekends has been abnormally high. Users may encounter limited site availability within developed campgrounds and may want to seek dispersed camping opportunities. Please practice Pack It In, Pack It Out, and leave your campsite better than you found it.

Road Access: Valley County is in the process of plowing open Warren Wagon Road. Lick Creek Road and Profile Gap will not be open by the County for Memorial Day weekend – for more information, contact the Valley County Road Department. Adams County has opened Goose Lake Road to just past Brundage Mountain Resort, but will not be plowing further for the Memorial Road weekend – for more information contact the Adams County Road Department.

For the latest information on Forest conditions, please contact the Forest supervisor’s Office at 208-634-0700; the McCall Ranger District at 208-634-0400; the News Meadows Ranger District at 208-347-0300; and the Council and Weiser Ranger Districts at 208-253-0100.

Brian Harris
Forest Service
R4 COVID-19 Communications
Intermountain Region (R4)
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Local Vendors Now Selling Fuelwood Permits

McCall, Idaho, May 22, 2020 – The Payette National Forest is pleased to announce that local commercial vendors are now selling fuelwood permits.

Fuelwood permits can be purchased at these locations:

* Weiser: Ridley’s Food and Drug (208) 549-1332
Open: Everyday 7 a.m. – 11 p.m.

* Weiser Farmer’s Supply Cooperative (208) 549-0654
Open: Everyday 5 a.m. – 10 p.m.

* Cambridge: Jay’s Sinclair (208) 257-5000
Open: Everyday 6 a.m. – 10 p.m.

* Council: Farmer’s Supply Co-op (208) 253-4266
Open: Everyday 6 a.m. – 10 p.m.

* McCall: Albertsons (208) 634-8166
Open: Everyday 6 a.m. -11 p.m.

Personal use fuelwood permits went on sale beginning May 15 through a mail-in and call-in system from Forest Offices – these options are still available, and mail-in applications can be found in front of the McCall, New Meadows, Council and Weiser Ranger District Offices. Applications are also on our Fuelwood webpage, and our U.S. Forest Service-Payette National Forest Facebook page. The call-in system can be used by calling the Forest Service offices listed below.

Weiser Ranger District, Monday & Friday 208-549-4200
Council Ranger District, Monday & Friday 208-253-0100
McCall Ranger District, Tuesday & Thursday 208-634-0400
New Meadows Ranger District, Tuesday & Wednesday 208-347-0300

Brian Harris
Forest Service
R4 COVID-19 Communications
Intermountain Region (R4)
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Popular campground, hot spring in Boise National Forest temporarily closed due to COVID-19

by Deni Hawkins Friday, May 22nd 2020 CBS2


Kirkham Hot Springs (Courtesy: Boise National Forest)

Lowman, Idaho (CBS2) — The Lowman Ranger District has temporarily closed a popular hot spring and campground in the Boise National Forest because of public safety concerns related to COVID-19.

Kirkham Campground and Hot Spring, located off Highway 21 near Lowman, are both shut off to public entry. The closure will remain in effect through June 30, unless the Forest Supervisor decides the area can open sooner, safely.

Visit the Boise National Forest’s closure page for more information. (link)

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US plans reimagine fighting wildfires amid crews’ virus risk

By Rebecca Boone – 5/18/20 Associated Press

In new plans that offer a national reimagining of how to fight wildfires amid the risk of the coronavirus spreading through crews, it’s not clear how officials will get the testing and equipment needed to keep firefighters safe in what’s expected to be a difficult fire season.

A U.S. group instead put together broad guidelines to consider when sending crews to blazes, with agencies and firefighting groups in different parts of the country able to tailor them to fit their needs. The wildfire season has largely begun, and states in the American West that have suffered catastrophic blazes in recent years could see higher-than-normal levels of wildfire because of drought.

“This plan is intended to provide a higher-level framework of considerations and not specific operational procedures,” the National Multi-Agency Coordination Group, made up of representatives from federal agencies who worked with state and local officials, wrote in each of the regional plans. “It is not written in terms of ‘how to’ but instead provides considerations of ‘what,’ ‘why,’ and ‘where.’”

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Tips & Advice:

Tips for living in bear country

* Keep garbage in bear-resistant containers or in a secured building.

* Empty and remove bird feeders during the summer months when songbirds are able to forage on food provided by nature.

* Clean up fruit that has fallen in your yard. Rotting fruit will attract bears as well as raccoons and skunks.

* Feed pets inside or during daylight hours; don’t leave pet food or food scraps outside of your home or camp, as it can attract bears and other animals.

* Store horse and livestock grains inside closed barns.

* Keep barbeque grills stored in secured buildings.

Tips around camp:

* Keep a clean camp. Pick up garbage and store it in a closed vehicle, bear- resistant container, or in a bag tied high between two trees. Never keep food in a tent.

* Don’t cook near tents or sleeping areas, and never wear clothes you cook in to bed.

* Don’t bury food scraps, pour out cooking grease, or leave anything that might be tasty on the ground or in the fire pit. Also, store barbecue grills or other smelly cooking gear inside your vehicle or within a sealed bear resistant container.

* Make game meat unavailable by hanging it at least 10 feet high and 4 feet from the nearest tree.

* If you see a bear, watch it from a distance and leave it alone.

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Letter to Share:

Don’t Be A Fawn Napper!

Every year, fawns are reported by the caring public as being orphaned or abandoned. Sometimes it is a case of death of the doe, leaving the fawn obviously orphaned. Sometimes it is a case of an injured fawn, causing the doe to abandon her baby. But, unfortunately, it is often a case of not being orphaned at all, but rather the mother just being out of sight.

If you come across a lone fawn, DO NOT TOUCH! Keep a distance and call Mystic Farm Wildlife Rescue or your local Idaho Department of Fish and Game officer. An assessment of the situation will be made and proper measures taken if warranted. In the event the fawn truly is orphaned and is deemed a viable candidate for rehabilitation, Mystic Farm Wildlife Rescue is available. By providing shelter, food and medical care, trained Mystic Farm staff can help orphaned and/or injured wildlife until they can be ‘soft released’ back into their natural habitat.

Some facts to know:

* Mother deer will leave their fawn for many hours while they go off to feed nearby. The mother does this so predators will not see a vulnerable fawn when they see her. She can be gone many hours, leaving the camouflaged and scent free fawn motionless, avoiding detection by predators.

* Is it injured? If a fawn is seen lying upright, eyes wide open, but flattened to the ground, do not touch it! This is a fawn’s camouflage position to blend in with its surroundings. When the fawn is picked up, it will allow its body to become limp and dangle in your hands. The legs are not broken! Put the baby down, walk away, and leave the area.

* If a fawn is obviously ill or injured – lying on its side, kicking and crying, bleeding, etc. – gently pick it up and place in a safe, quiet place. A light cloth placed over the eyes will often calm it. Keep the fawn away from pets and other human activity. Touch, odors, and the sound of the human voice will only add to the stress of the situation and may cause additional harm. Keep the fawn free from cold drafts or keep it cool if the weather is warm. Please do not feed the fawn. Call Mystic Farm immediately.

* The fawn is on the road! Mystic Farm receives many calls regarding fawns in the middle of the road. Why are they there? Because the mom is nearby! If the fawn is in danger of being hit by cars, gently pick it up and place it about twenty feet off the side of the road and leave the area.

* Is it too late to return to the mother if the fawn has been handled by humans? Will she then reject it? NO! That is an “Old Wives Tale.” Though we strongly encourage you to not touch the fawn, the mother will not abandon it if you do – she just wants her baby back. She is around human scent all the time. Her maternal instinct is much stronger than her ability to rationalize human scent on her baby.

*What happens to the fawn if a rescue is warranted? After arrival at Mystic Farm, the fawn is evaluated and checked for any injuries, dehydration, etc. Wounds are treated either on the premises or through the services of local veterinarians. The fawn is put on an appropriate diet and feeding schedule. Once the fawns gain strength and can nurse from a bottle on their own, the ‘blind feeding method’ is utilized using “hands off” bottle racks. Human contact is kept to a minimum. The fawns are kept in an isolated area – free from predators and forming their own little “herd.” They are free to browse and live in a large, safe, enclosure. Over the course of the season, the fawns are slowly introduced back into the wild.

Mystic Farm Wildlife Rescue, Inc. is a non-profit 501 (c) 3 organization. We are a licensed facility available to provide rehabilitation and release back into the wild of orphaned and/or injured fawns. None of the caring staff or volunteers at Mystic Farm receive a salary or payment for service. Operating out of love and caring for our precious wildlife, we ask our community to do the same. “Don’t Be A Fawn Napper.” Help us to help the wildlife remain wild!

Mystic Farm Wildlife Rescue, Inc.
710 Sanctuary Hills
Sagle, ID 83860
208 241-7081

*Mystic Farm Wildlife Rescue, Inc. is not open for tours. The animals in our care are kept to a minimum of human contact. Thank you for your understanding and support.

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Critter News:

Grizzly sow and cub in Island Park captured, relocated


Curtis Hendricks IDFG

Island Park, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) – Idaho Department of Fish and Game staff captured a sow grizzly and her yearling cub in the Yale Creek area of Island Park Sunday after the bears were seen getting into garbage.

Wildlife officials placed a trap to capture the two grizzlies after they had been reported in the area several times over the past week.

Both sow and cub were captured safely and in good condition, according to IDFG.

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Calving elk create hazards for Yellowstone visitors

May 19, 2020 Local News 8


Elk often bed their calves near buildings and cars.

As Yellowstone National Park reopens its gates for limited access, park officials are advising visitors to be cautious around wildlife.

Officials are particularly concerned about elk calving season. At this time, they say cow elk are much more aggressive towards people and may charge or kick.

People should stay at least 25 yards from elk. Because they bed their calves near buildings and cars, people should look around corners before exiting buildings or walking around blind spots.

If an elk charges, find shelter in your vehicle or behind a tall, sturdy barrier as quickly as possible.

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Multistate salmonella outbreak linked to backyard poultry puts 17 in hospital

Nearly 100 people in 28 states have gotten sick, including several young children.

TEGNA May 22, 2020


Credit: Getty Images/iStockphoto

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says it is investigating a multistate outbreak of salmonella infections linked to backyard poultry, such as chicks and ducklings. Nearly one-third of those sickened were children under five years old.

The CDC says there has been 97 cases in 28 states. Seventeen people have been hospitalized. There have been no deaths.

In interviews with 44 off the people who got sick, 38 reported contact with chicks and ducklings, the CDC said. They reported getting the animals from agricultural stores, hatcheries and websites.

The CDC reminds owners of backyard flocks that the birds can carry salmonella while showing no signs of illness.

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Fish & Game News:

F&G offices reopened for license services on Monday, May 18

By Brian Pearson, Conservation Public Information Specialist
Monday, May 18, 2020

Idaho Fish and Game offices around the state reopened to the public Monday, May 18 for license services, having been closed to the public since March 27 due to COVID-19. Although open, Fish and Game continues to encourage use of online purchase (idfg.idaho.gov/buy-online) and telesales (1-800-554-8685) to meet licensing needs.

In accordance with Governor Brad Little’s guidance for Stage 2 of Idaho Rebounds, people should expect some changes when visiting their local Fish and Game office to buy a license, tag or permit, including social distance requirements and limitations on the number of people who can be in the lobby at one time. Also, at this time, all Fish and Game offices are not accepting cash payments, and people will only be able to pay using a debit card or check.

Some services will continue to be available by appointment, including the sale of outfitter tags and checking in harvested black bears, mountain lions, and wolves according to big game regulations. Some regional offices will be accepting walk-ins for checking in animals, but hunters should call ahead of time to find out if that is the case in their region.

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Spring bear hunters reminded of baiting rules

By Mike Demick, Staff Biologist
Friday, May 22, 2020

With spring black bear hunting season well underway, Idaho Department of Fish and Game reminds hunters that using bait comes with easy to follow rules. Yet each spring, some run afoul with the law when their blunders could easily be avoided.

Here are a few reminders every bear baiter should follow:

Review the rules: “Being a responsible bear hunter starts with carefully reviewing the seasons and rules booklet,” says David Silcock, Fish and Game enforcement supervisor based in Salmon. “Take the time to read the rules and don’t hesitate to contact us if you have any questions.”

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As you prepare for 2020 big game season, here’s a look at 2019 deer and elk harvest statistics

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Supervisor
Thursday, May 21, 2020

Deadline for controlled hunt applications for deer, elk, pronghorn and fall bear is June 5

Here’s an overview of the 2019 deer and elk harvests, and links to more stories to let you know where we’re headed for 2020.

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F&G taking applications for Access Yes! Program

By Brian Pearson, Conservation Public Information Specialist
Wednesday, May 20, 2020

Interested landowners can start by contacting their local Landowner Sportsmen Coordinator

Fish and Game is seeking to enroll new properties in its Access Yes! Program, which improves public access to private land or through private land by compensating willing landowners who provide access.

Fish and Game recently received a $900,000 federal grant through the 2020 Voluntary Public Access and Habitat Incentive Program (VPA-HIP), which will help them do just that.

That funding will be split up over the next three years (2020-2022), providing an additional $300,000 annually to the Access Yes! Program for landowner compensation. Fish and Game is currently soliciting applications from interested landowners for enrollment in the program this fall, and is accepting applications through early June.

continued:
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More F&G News Releases

link:
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Crazy Critter Stuff:

53-year-old tortoise needs new home after owner dies of COVID-19

by Jessica A. Botelho, WJAR Thursday, May 21st 2020


Photo courtesy of MSPCA-Angell

A 53-year-old tortoise named “Ms. Jennifer” needs a new home because her owner died due to complications caused by coronavirus, according to the Massachusetts Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals-Angell in Boston.

“At just four pounds and about the size of a large dinner plate — tortoises grow very large in the wild but tend to stay small when raised in smaller homes — Ms. Jennifer would make a wonderful addition to any turtle or reptile-loving home,” Rob Halpin, who is the director of communications for the MSPCA-Angell noted in an email to NBC 10 News.

“And even though she’s 53 — and may be the oldest ever adoptable animal the MSPCA has ever cared for — she’s only just reached middle age, as tortoises routinely live upwards of 100 years,” he added.

continued:
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Seasonal Humor:

CovidNaps-a

Use Your Handkerchief (1945)

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Idaho History May 24, 2020

Idaho 1918-1920 Influenza Pandemic

Part 6

Idaho Newspaper clippings October 4 – 14, 1918

Liberty Bond Parade Moscow, Idaho October 1918

1918LibertyParadeMoscow-a
Looking south at Main Street in Moscow from 1st Street, during a Liberty Bond parade in October 1918. Courtesy of Ott Historical Collection, University of Idaho Library Digital Initiatives

source: courtesy Keith Gunther
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The Meridian times., October 04, 1918, page 1

No case of the Spanish influenza has as yet been reported in Meridian.

19181004LibertyBondsAd

source: The Meridian times. (Meridian, Idaho), 04 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Meridian times., October 04, 1918, page 8

19181004MT-headline

Another Meridian Boy Gives Life For His Country

Wallace Atkinson, son of Mr. and Mrs. Joe Atkinson, residing northwest of Meridian, died in the service at Washington, D. C. according to a telegram received from the department Saturday. It has been rumored that his death resulted from the prevailing influenza, but no official word to that effect has been received. The body is expected to arrive in Meridian the last of the week, when the funeral service, to be held at the Christian church in Meridian, will be announced.

Wallace attended school in Meridian for several years, the last years being in the high school.

source: The Meridian times. (Meridian, Idaho), 04 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Bonners Ferry Herald. October 08, 1918, page 7

Steve Garvey returned to Bonners Ferry Thursday evening after spending several months in the shipyards in Seattle, Tacoma and other coast points. Mr. Garvey states that he likes the shipyard work, but left the coast on account of the epidemic of Spanish influenza, which is prevalent there.

source: Bonners Ferry Herald. (Bonners Ferry, Idaho), 08 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., October 09, page 1

19181009DSM-headline

Cease All Public Meetings in State

Spanish Influenza Causes Drastic Order Against Public Gatherings

The quarantine has been placed in Idaho. All public gatherings, excepting schools, both public and private, are forbidden by an order issued today by the state board of health. The order for this county came to Dr. Rae, acting county health officer and directs the closing of all places of public amusement excepting schools. This is taken to mean the closing of churches, and it is feared will prohibit the meetings to be held next Tuesday for the bond rally throughout the county. The telegram received by Dr. Rae follows:

“County Health Officer.
“Moscow, Idaho.

“State board of health directs you to inform mayors of cities and chairmen boards of village trustees in your county that because of Spanish influenza all public assemblages and places of public amusement excepting private and public schools, will be prohibited from operation on and after Thursday, October 10, 1918, until further notice. Letter of verification follows. You are directed to secure compliance with this order.
“Biwer, Secy.”

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 09 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Grangeville Globe. October 10, 1918, page 1

Proclamation.

By virtue of and pursuant to an order issued by the State Board of Health of the State of Idaho, issued on the 9th day of October, 1918, and to me directed, I, T. E. Edmundson. Mayor of the City of Grangeville, Idaho, do hereby make and publish the following proclamation. to wit:

That because of Spanish influenza, all public assemblages and all places of public amusement, except public and private schools within the City of Grangeville, Idaho, are hereby prohibited from operating on and after Thursday. October Tenth, 1918, until further notice.

Signed and dated at Grangeville, Idaho this October 9, 1918.
T. E. Edmundson, Mayor of the City of Grangeville, Idaho.
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19181010GG1-headline

Boise, Oct. 8. — The state board of health issued a drastic order tonight closing all public places of amusement in Idaho, the order to go into effect Thursday.

The action In taken to head off any possible epidemic of Spanish influenza that may develop and is precautionary in form. They will not be reopened until it Is certain that there is no possibility of an epidemic.

The public schools of the state are not included in the order at the present time. That may become necessary later if the disease develops.

Spanish influenza has already broken out in Canyon and Ada counties with isolated eases at some other points in the state. The members of the board authorizing the order are: Attorney General Walters, State Engineer Wilkie, Dr. W. R. Hamilton, Weiser; Dr. Floyd Wendell, Hope, and Dr. M. T. Biwer, Boise.

In obeying the closing order it should be remembered that there are no cases of influenza reported in this county at the present time and if this precautionary measure is strictly obeyed the chance that the epidemic will secure a foothold will be mitigated.

The disease has become quite prevalent throughout the west and all through Washington similar orders are in effect at the present time.

Spanish Influenza

The disease now occurring in this country and called “Spanish Influenza” resembles a very contagious kind of a “cold” accompanied by fever, pains in the head, eyes, ears, back or other parts of the body, and a feeling of severe sickness. In most of the cases the symptoms disappear after three or four days, the patient then rapidly recovering; some of the patients, however, develop pneumonia, or inflammation of the ear, or meningitis, and many of these complicated cases die. It is not known whether this so called “Spanish Influenza” is identical with the epidemics of influenza of earlier years.

Epidemics of influenza have visited this country since 1647. It is interesting to know that this first epidemic was brought here from Valencia, Spain. Since that time there has been numerous epidemics of that disease. In 1889 and 1890 an epidemic of influenza starting somewhere in the Orient, spread to Russia, and thence over practically the entire civilized world. Three years later there was another flare-up of the disease. Both times the epidemic spread widely over the United States.

Although the present epidemic is called “Spanish Influenza,” there is no reason to believe that it originated in Spain. Some writers who have studied the question believe that the epidemic came from the Orient and they call attention to the fact that the Germans mention the disease as occurring along the eastern front in the summer and fall of 1917.
— — — —

How to Guard Against Influenza?

In guarding against diseases of all kinds, it is important that the body be kept strong and able to fight off disease germs. This it be done by having a proper proportion of work, play and rest, by keeping the body well and by eating sufficient, wholesome, and properly selected food. In connection with diet, it is well to remember that milk is one of the best all-around foods obtainable for adults as well as children. in far as a disease like influenza is concerned, health authorities everywhere recognize the very close relation between its spread and over crowded homes. While it is not always possible, especially in times like the present, to avoid such overcrowding, people should consider the health danger and make every effort to reduce the home overcrowding to a minimum. The value of fresh air through open windows can not be over emphasized.

Where crowding is unavoidable, as in street cars, care should be taken to keep the face so turned as not to inhale directly the air breathed out by another person.

It is especially important to beware of the person who coughs or sneezes without covering his mouth and nose. It also follows that one should keep out of crowds and stuffy places as much as possible, keep homes, offices and workshops well aired, spend some time out of doors each day, walk to work if at all practicable – in short make every possible effort to breath as much pure air as possible.

“Cover up each cough and sneeze. If you don’t you’ll spread disease.”
— — — —

WM. Shields Dead.

Former Clerk at Imperial Hotel Victim Influenza.

William Shields. a young man about 20 years of age, formerly in the employ of the Imperial Hotel as day clerk, passed away at Camp Lewis last Monday from an attack of influenza.

The news was received by his sister, Mrs. James Heath, and caused a shadow of gloom among those who had known him best. He received his call while in the employ of the hotel.

The remains were shipped to the family home at Colfax and were laid to rest this Thursday afternoon.
— — — —

Soldier Has Influenza.

Dr. and Mrs. Stockton received a letter this week from their son Andrew who is a midshipman in the U. S. Naval Academy at Baltimore, Md. Andrew states that he has been quite ill with Spanish Influenza, having been in quarantine for two weeks, but that he has been discharged from the hospital, and was on the road to recovery. Some 1500 cases were in quarantine at one time, many deaths occurring. Andrew says it was a rather “spooky” experience as the doctors and nurses were covered from head to foot in white robes, the face concealed behind white masks, and breathing through disinfected gauze.

source: The Grangeville Globe. (Grangeville, Idaho), 10 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Grangeville Globe. October 10, 1918, page 5

School Notes

The Sophomore Party has been postponed to a future date on account of the notice by the Health Department, stating that all social gatherings and amusements should be stopped on account of the Influenza.

source: The Grangeville Globe. (Grangeville, Idaho), 10 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Lincoln County Times., October 10, 1918, page 1

19181010LCT1-headline

Owing to the prevalence of Spanish influenza in this state the State Board of Health has ordered all public meeting places closed until further orders. This order includes all indoor gatherings, and is to take effect today, October 10th.

The local Red Cross chapter has a committee of the doctors and nurses to assist the State Board in checking the epidemic.

A few cases have appeared in Jerome, and as a result the local health officers have ordered the schools to be. closed. From the United States Public Health Service, Rupert Blue, Surgeon General, we are in receipt of a bulletin on Spanish Influenza, a few extracts from which we give below:

How can “Spanish Influenza” Be Recognized

There is as yet no certain way in which a single case of “Spanish influenza” can he recognized; on the other hand, recognition is easy where there is a group of cases. In contrast to the outbreaks of ordinary coughs and colds, which usually occur in the cold months, epidemics of influenza may occur at any season of the year, thus the present epidemic raged most intensely in Europe in May, June and July. Moreover, in the case of ordinary colds, the general symptoms. (fever. pain, depression) are by no means as severe or as sudden in their onset as they are in influenza. Finally, ordinary colds do not spread through the community so rapidly or so extensively as does influenza.

In most cases a person taken sick with influenza feels sick rather suddenly. He feels weak, has pains in the eyes, ears, head or back, and may be sore all over. Many patients feel dizzy, some vomit. Most of the patients complain of feeling chilly, and with this comes a fever in which the temperature rises to 100 to 104. In most eases the pulse remains relatively slow.

In appearance one is struck by the fact that the patient looks sick. His eyes and the inner side of his eyelids may be slightly “bloodshot,” or “congested,” as the doctors say. There may be running from the nose, or there may be some cough. These signs of a cold may not be marked; nevertheless the patient looks and feels very sick.

What Causes the Disease and How it Is Spread?

No matter what particular kind of germ causes the epidemic, it is now believed that influenza is always spread from person to person, the germs being carried with the air along with the very small droplets of mucus, expelled by coughing or by sneezing, forceful talking, and the like, by one who already has the germs of the disease. They may also be carried about in the air in the form of dust coming from dried mucus, from coughing and sneezing, or from careless people who spit on the floor and on the sidewalk. As in most other catching diseases, a person who has only a mild attack of the disease himself may give a very severe attack to others.

What Should Be Done by Those Who Catch the Disease

It in very important that every person who becomes sick with influenza should go home at once and go to bed. This will help keep away dangerous complications and will, at the same time, keep the patient from scattering the disease far and wide. It is highly desirable that no one be allowed to sleep In the same room with the patient. In fact, no one but the nurse should he allowed in the room.

If there is cough and sputum or running of the eyes and nose, care should be taken that all such discharges are collected on bits of gauze or rag or paper napkins and burned. If the patient complains of fever and headache, he should be given water to drink. a cold compress to the forehead and a light sponge. Only such medicine should be given as Is prescribed by the doctor.
— —

Reception Postponed

The Civic Club meeting and the reception for the teachers will not be held until the danger from the Spanish influenza epidemic has passed and it becomes safe to hold public meetings or gatherings.

source: Lincoln County Times. (Jerome, Idaho), 10 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Lincoln County Times., October 10, 1918, page 4

Notice

On account of the suspicious cases of Spanish influenza having appeared in this community, and in co-operation with the State Board of Health, all public schools in Jerome district will be closed until October 21st, 1918.

In order to make this quarantine effective we must have the intelligent co-operation of the public.

Dated, Jerome, Idaho, October 9th, 1918.
J. F. Schmershall, M. D., Health officer

source: Lincoln County Times. (Jerome, Idaho), 10 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Lincoln County Times., October 10, 1918, page 5

Word received from John A. Thomas is to the effect that this gentleman is held under quarantine in Chicago, being ill with Spanish influenza.
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19181010LCT2-headline

The annual election of officers will take place Monday, October 14th, at a meeting to be held at 3 p. m. in the Methodist church. After the business meeting the Junior Red Cross girls will serve tea in the Red Cross room below. All Red Cross members are urged to be present.

Owing to the present influenza epidemic, the Red Cross department of Nursing desires to get in touch with every graduate nurse, every woman who has had any training, every practical nurse and every woman who has taken the training to be nurses’ aid. The Red Cross offers to graduates $75.00 and expenses, and to undergraduates and aids from $30.00 to $50.00, according to qualifications, with expenses. If there are any in this locality who can serve, please communicate at once with Mrs. Maude Piper.

The linen shower was very successful; more than quota of each article asked for being received, except the hand towels, of which we need eighty more.

Two more boxes of second-hand clothing were packed and sent the last of the week, making twenty-one boxes in all.

We are still behind with the little girls’ dresses and pinafores. Will those who have these little garments out please finish them and bring them in at once, so that the box can be dispatched? We are sorry for this delay, as this is the first allotment on which we have fallen behind.

source: Lincoln County times. (Jerome, Idaho), 10 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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1918Atlantic3-a
Combating influenza in Seattle in 1918, workers wearing masks on their faces in a Red Cross room. National Archives

source: Alan Taylor April 10, 2018 “30 Photos of the 1918 Flu Pandemic” The Atlantic
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The Emmett Index. October 10, 1918, page 1

19181010EI1-headline

The state board of health took a drastic but precautionary action late Tuesday, to control the spread of Spanish influenza, for it directed that on and after Thursday all churches, places of public assemblage, opera houses and places of amusement close down and remain closed for an indefinite period. Public and private schools are not included in the order. They will remain open. Acting upon this order, Mayor Rose this morning issued a proclamation calling upon all prohibited public meeting places in Emmett to close and remain closed until the ban is lifted. The order includes pool and billiard halls, lodges dance halls and church social activities well as theaters, churches and public meetings of all kinds. As no official notice was received by county and city officials until this morning, the order will not be put into effect until tomorrow morning.

Additional cases of influenza were reported from Twin Falls and Lincoln counties, but the number was not given. Physicians of the state have been notified to report all cases promptly to county health officers.

“Some objection has been raised to exemption of schools while other public assemblies are banned. On this point, Dr. Biwer said: “We have not deemed it necessary to close the schools yet, because the children are now under close observation, and the disease seems to be most prevalent among robust, young adults. While no age is exempt, our attitude is to encourage the people to refrain from gathering in considerable assemblages, especially in crowded, poorly ventilated quarters.”
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19181010EI2-headline

On account of the scourge of Spanish Influenza, which is causing the death of so many of our people throughout the Nation, and in order to prevent its spread in the state and to isolate the few cases that are at present in the state, the State Board of Health has issued the following order:

“State Board of Health directs you to inform Mayors and Chairmen of Village Trustees in your county that because of Spanish influenza, all public assemblages and places of amusement, excepting private and public schools, be prohibited from operation on and after Thursday, October 10, 1918, until further orders.”

I am further directed by the State Board of Health to say that this order includes pool halls, but that the soda fountains are to be allowed to run, also that open air meetings will be allowed.

Now, therefore, I, R. E. Rose, Mayor Emmett, Idaho, direct that all the provisions of the order of the State Board of Health be observed and that all public assemblages, other than the ones specially excepted above, be prohibited until further notice.

Given at the office of the City Mayor this 10th day of October, 1918.
R. E. Rore, Mayor.

source: The Emmett Index. (Emmett, Idaho), 10 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Emmett Index. October 10, 1918, page 2

Tales of Town

Old Bill Misgivens thinks it is a good joke about people in this country thinking they have Spanish influenza. “Here the paper says, “says he, “that an Italian doctor has had the influenza isolated away over there in Italy all the time.”

Health authorities urge everybody to combat Spanish influenza by refraining from sneezing, coughing, spitting or kissing. One may stop coughing and spitting by proper exercise of will power, bu the other two offenses are more or less involuntary.

source: The Emmett Index. (Emmett, Idaho), 10 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Idaho County Free Press. October 10, 1918, page 1

19181010ICFP1-headline

Body Taken to Colfax, Wn., for Funeral Services and Burial — Has Sister Living Here

Grangeville is mourning the death of another of her soldier boys. William Shields, formerly clerk at the Imperial hotel, died Monday at Camp Lewis, of Spanish influenza. His body was taken to his home at Colfax, Wn., where funeral services will be held probably Friday.

Mr. Shields, who was aged 27 years, left Grangeville on July 7, for a visit with his parents at Colfax, before going into the army. He had been in the army almost three months, when he died.

Sister Advised of Illness.

Word that Mr. Shields was critically ill from Spanish influenza, was received Sunday by his sister, Mrs. Thomas Heath, in a telegram. Word came Monday that he had died. Mr. and Mrs. Heath left at once for Colfax, to be present at the funeral.

William Shields first came to Grangeville last fall. He was for a short time employed at the Camas Prairie railroad station, and then became night clerk at the Imperial hotel. His promotion at the hotel was rapid, and before he bad been there long, he was made day clerk. Mr. Shields was an accomplished musician. He had traveled with a carnival band, before coming to Grangeville.

Well Liked in Grangeville.

During the period he spent in Grangeville, Mr. Shields enjoyed a wide acquaintance with local persons, as well as with the traveling public, which he met in the capacity of clerk at the hotel. The impression that he made while here was most favorable, and everywhere, on the street, Monday, when the Free Press posted a bulletin that he had died, were heard expressions of profound regret and sorrow in his early passing.

Besides his sister, Mrs. Heath, Mr. Shields is survived by his parents, at Colfax, a brother, in the army in France and other relatives.
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19181010ICFP2-headline

Churches, Theaters and Lodges in Idaho Are Closed — Schools Remain Open

All places of public gathering in the state of Idaho, with the lone exception of the public schools, were on Wednesday ordered closed by the state board of health, in order to prevent spread of Spanish influenza. The closing is to be enforced on and after today, until such time as danger from an influenza epidemic has passed.

Affected by the order are theaters of every sort, including motion picture theaters, churches, lodges, dances, and every public assemblage. It will mean a halt in Liberty loan rallies, political meetings, and every line where the public gathers.

Although the epidemic has been discovered in only a few places in Idaho, the closing order was issued by the state board of health to prevent spread of the disease, which has claimed thousands of lives, mainly in the cantonments in the United States.

The closing order was received in Grangeville Wednesday by Dr. G. S. Stockton, county health officer, and was by him transmitted to all parts of the county.

The epidemic first was discovered on the Atlantic seaboard, and spread rapidly throughout the United States, until it reached the Pacific coast, taking a heavy toll in lives of both soldiers, sailors and civilians. Influenza soon develops into pneumonia, which is followed by death.

Influenza cases up to Monday, reported from all camps since the disease became epidemic, September 13, now total 167,000; pneumonia eases 17,102, and deaths 4,910. Camp Dodge, Ia., reported the largest number of new influenza cases during the 48-hour period to Monday noon, with 3092 cases; Camp Funston, Kas., the next largest, 2070.

No case of Spanish influenza has been reported in Grangeville or Idaho county. The closing order, so far as this part of the state is concerned, is merely precautionary.
— — — —

Institute Postponed.

The teachers’ institute, which was to have been held next week in Lewiston, and which was to have been attended by many Idaho county school teachers, has been indefinitely postponed because of the closing order as a precaution against spread of Spanish influenza.

source: Idaho County Free Press. (Grangeville, Idaho Territory), 10 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Idaho County Free Press. October 10, 1918, page 8

Influenza at Nezperce.

Seventy cases of Spanish influenza were reported in Nezperce by traveling salesmen who have just arrived in Grangeville. Great alarm is felt in the Lewis county capital, they say, and the disease is spreading rapidly.

source: Idaho County free press. (Grangeville, Idaho Territory), 10 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., October 10, 1918, page 1

19181010DSM1-headline

A meeting was held last night in the Red Cross rooms for the purpose of taking measures to combat the Spanish influenza.

Chairman Neidig of the Red Cross presided, and those in attendance were Lieut. Kotalik of the U. S. army; Drs. Rae, Clarke, Adair, Stevenson, and the committee on nursing survey ; Mrs. Baker, Mrs. Livingston, Mrs. C. J. Orland, Mrs. Nisbet and Mrs. MacCaughey.

After a spirited discussion of the present serious condition, a resolution was unanimously adopted to the effect that Moscow appoint immediately a city health physician and a city and school nurse.

By the supervision of a school nurse in promptly detecting and reporting all suspicious cases of disease to the city physician, epidemics might be held in check without closing schools.

With hundreds of young men in training at the S. A. T. C., Moscow should take every precaution as her part in safeguarding her soldiers as well as the civilian population.

The following rules are issued by the surgeon-general for army use, and applies to everyone:

1. Avoid needless crowding — influenza is a crowd disease.
2. Smother your coughs and sneezes — others do not want the germs which you would throw away.
3. Your nose, not your mouth. was made to breathe through — get the habit.
4. Remember the three C’s — a clean mouth, clean skin and clean clothes.
5. Try to keep cool when you walk and warm when you ride and sleep.
6. Open the windows — always at home at night; at the office when practicable.
7. Food will win the war if you give it a chance — help by choosing and chewing your food well.
8. Your fate may be in your own hands — wash your hands before eating.
9. Don’t let waste products of digestion accumulate — drink a glass or two of water upon getting up.
10. Don’t use a napkin, towel, spoon, fork, glass or cup which has been used by another person and not washed.
11. Avoid tight clothes, tight shoes, tight gloves — seek to make nature your ally, not your prison.
12. When the air is pure breathe all of it you can — breathe deeply.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 10 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., October 10, 1918, page 2

Dr. Adair Health Officer.

Mayor Warren Truitt appointed Dr. W. A. Adair city health officer this afternoon and Dr. Adair has accepted the appointment. So far as known there are no cases of influenza in Moscow. The order of the state board of health will be observed here. Schools will not be closed at present, but no other public meetings will be permitted. Even women’s sewing circles, when engaged in Red Cross work, are not omitted from the order and will not be permitted to meet until the embargo is lifted.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 10 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Rathdrum Tribune., October 11, 1918, page 1

19181011TRT1-headline

A telegram was received Wednesday morning by County Physician Drennan from the state board of health at Boise authorizing him to notify public officials throughout the county that all public meetings, with the exception of public and private schools, are ordered closed, the order becoming effect Thursday morning, Oct. 10.

The action is taken in an effort to head off an epidemic of influenza, which has already begun to appear in various parts of Idaho.

It is understood the order cancels all patriotic meetings that had been planned in the state; also, church services, lodge sessions and shows.

Members of the state board of health authorizing the closing order are: Attorney General Walters, State Engineer Wilkie, Dr. W. R. Hamilton, Dr. Floyd Wendell and Dr. E. T. Biwer.

source: The Rathdrum tribune. (Rathdrum, Idaho), 11 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Oakley Herald. October 11, 1918, page 1

Locals and Personals.

On account of the State Board of Health order prohibiting public assemblages, during the Spanish influenza epidemic, the splendid Liberty Day program arranged for Oakley on Saturday, has been cancelled.

source: The Oakley Herald. (Oakley, Idaho), 11 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Oakley Herald. October 11, 1918, page 5

Four hundred and eighty-seven men called to entrain from the state beginning October 7 for Camp Lewis were released from the call until further notice by Provost Marshal General Crowder last week in a telegram that this was necessary because of the epidemic of Spanish influenza.

An Idahoan back from France after six months’ service, says: “The Americans ridicule the French potatoes, which are really tiny tubers about the size of marbles, which are harvested before the tops have died down. But the Americans have not contented themselves with ridicule. They have constructed an irrigation system and are growing big crops of spuds that make the eyes of our allies pop out.”

On Monday the master numbers in the new draft were drawn, President Wilson taking the first from the box. The classification of the men is progressing well, but the sending of those selected to the training camps may be delayed by the serious spread of the epidemic of influenza. Rigorous measures are being adopted to check the disease, with the prospects of success. Considering its nature, the number of deaths is not extraordinary.

source: The Oakley Herald. (Oakley, Idaho), 11 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Oakley Herald. October 11, 1918, page 6

The Oakley council is meeting today to pass measures to enforce the State Board of Health order that all public indoor meetings, except public and private schools, be prohibited during the Spanish influenza epidemic.

CoughsandSneezesSpreadDiseases1918-a

1918OctUncleSamAdvice1-headline

Uncle Sam’s Advice on Flu

U. S. Public Health Service Issues Official Health Bulletin on Influenza.
Latest Word on Subject.

Epidemic Probably Not Spanish In Origin – Germ Still Unknown – People Should Guard Against “Droplet Infection” – Surgeon General Blue Makes Authoritative Statement.

Washington, D. C. — (Special.) — Although King Alfonso of Spain was one of the victims of the influenza epidemic in 1893 and again this summer, Spanish authorities repudiate any claim to influenza as a “Spanish” disease. If the people of this country do not take care the epidemic will become so widespread throughout the United States that soon we shall hear the disease called “American” influenza.

In response to a request for definite information concerning Spanish influenza, Surgeon General Rupert Blue of the U. S. Public Health Service has authorized the following official interview:

What Is Spanish Influenza? is It something new? Does it come from Spain?

“The disease now occurring in this country and called ‘Spanish influenza’ resembles a very contagious kind, of ‘cold,’ accompanied by fever, pains in the head, eyes, ears, back or other parts of the body and a feeling of severe sickness. In most of the cases the symptoms disappear after three or four days, the patient then rapidly recovering. Some of the patients, however, develop pneumonia, or inflammation of the ear or meningitis, and many of these complicated cases die. Whether this so-called ‘Spanish’ influenza is identical with the epidemics of influenza of earlier years is not yet known.

“Epidemics of influenza have visited this country since 1647. It is interesting to know that this first epidemic was brought here from Valencia, Spain. Since that time there have been numerous epidemics of the disease. In 1889 and 1890 an epidemic of influenza, starting somewhere in the Orient, spread first to Russia and thence over practically the entire civilized world. Three years later there was another flare-up of the disease. Both times the epidemic spread widely over the United States.

“Although the present epidemic is called `Spanish influenza,’ there is no reason to believe that It originated in Spain. Some writers who have studied the question believe that the epidemic came from the Orient and they call attention to the fact that the Germans mention the disease as occurring along the eastern front in the summer and fall of 1917.”

How can “Spanish Influenza” be recognized?

“There is as yet no certain way in which a single case of ‘Spanish influenza’ can be recognized. On the other hand, recognition is easy where there is a group of cases. In contrast to the outbreaks of ordinary coughs and colds, which usually occur in the cold months, epidemics of influenza may occur at any season of the year. Thus the present epidemic raged most intensely in Europe in May, June and July. Moreover, in the case of ordinary colds, the general symptoms (fever, pain, depression) are by no means as severe or as sudden in their onset as they are in influenza. Finally, ordinary colds do not spread through the community so rapidly or so extensively as does influenza.

“In most cases a person taken sick with influenza feels sick rather suddenly. He feels weak, has pains in the eyes, ears, head or back, and may be sore all over. Many patients feel dizzy, some vomit. Most of the patients complain of feeling chilly, and with this comes a fever in which the temperature rises to 100 to 104. In most cases the pulse remains relatively slow.

“In appearance one is struck by the fact that the patient looks sick. His eyes and the inner side of his eyelids may be slightly ‘bloodshot,’ or `congested,’ as the doctors say. There may be running from the nose, or there may be some cough. These signs of a cold may not be marked; nevertheless the patient looks and feels very sick.

“In addition to the appearance and the symptoms as already described, examination of the patient’s blood may aid the physician in recognizing ‘Spanish influenza,’ for It has been found that in this disease the number of white corpuscles shows little or no increase above the normal. It is possible that the laboratory investigations now being made through the National Research Council and the United States Hygienic Laboratory will furnish a more certain way In which individual cases of this disease can he recognized.”

What Is the course of the disease? Do people die of it?

“Ordinarily, the fever lasts from three to four days and the patient recovers. But while the proportion of deaths in the present epidemic has generally been low, in some places the outbreak has been severe and deaths have been numerous. When death occurs it is usually the result of a complication.”

What causes the disease and how is It spread?

“Bacteriologists who have studied Influenza epidemics in the past have found in many of the cases a very small rod-shaped germ called, after its discoverer, Pfeiffer’s bacillus. In other cases of apparently the same kind of disease there were found pneumococci, the germs of lobar pneumonia. Still others have been caused by streptococci, and by others germs with long names.

“No matter what particular kind of germ causes the epidemic, It is now believed that influenza is always spread from person to person, the germs being carried with the air along with the very small droplets of mucus, expelled by coughing or sneezing, forceful talking, and the like by one who already has the germs of the disease. They may also be carried about in the air in the form of dust coming from dried mucus, from coughing and sneezing, or from careless people who spit on the floor and on the sidewalk. As in most other catching diseases, a person who has only a mild attack of the disease himself may give a very, severe attack to others.”

What should be done by those who catch the disease?

“It Is very important that every person who becomes sick with influenza should go home at once and go to bed. This will help keep away dangerous complications and will, at the same time, keep the patient from scattering the disease far and wide. It is highly desirable that no one be allowed to sleep in the same room with the patient. In fact, no one but the nurse should be allowed in the room.

“If there is cough and sputum or running of the eyes and nose, care should be taken that all such discharges are collected on bits of gauze or rag or paper napkins and burned. If the patient complains of fever and headache, he should be given water to drink, a cold compress to the forehead and a light sponge. Only such medicine should be given as is prescribed by the doctor. It is foolish to ask the druggist to prescribe and may be dangerous to take the so-called ‘safe, sure and harmless’ remedies advertised by patent medicine manufacturers.

“If the patient is so situated that he can be attended only by some one who must also look after others in the family, it is advisable that such attendant wear a wrapper, apron or gown over the ordinary house clothes while in the sick room and slip this off when leaving to look after the others.

“Nurses and attendants will do well to guard against breathing in dangerous disease germs by wearing a simple fold of gauze or mask while near the patient.”

Will a person who has had Influenza before catch the disease again?

“It is well known that an attack of measles or scarlet fever or smallpox usually protects a person against another attack of the same disease. This appears not to be true of ‘Spanish influenza.’ According to newspaper reports the King of Spain suffered an attack of influenza during the epidemic thirty years ago, and was again stricken during the recent outbreak in Spain.”

How can one guard against Influenza?

“In guarding against disease of all kinds, it is important that the body be kept strong and able to fight off disease germs. This can be done by having a proper proportion of work, play and rest, by keeping the body well clothed, and by eating sufficient wholesome and properly selected food. In connection with diet, it is well to remember that milk is one of the best all-around foods obtainable for adults as well as children. So far as a disease like influenza is concerned, health authorities everywhere recognize the very close relation between its spread and overcrowded homes. While it is not always possible, especially in times like the present, to avoid such overcrowding, people should consider the health danger and make every effort to reduce the home overcrowding to a minimum. The value of fresh air through open windows cannot be over emphasized.

“When crowding is unavoidable, as in street cars, care should be taken to keep the face so turned as not to inhale directly the air breathed out by another person.

“It is especially important to beware of the person who coughs or sneezes without covering his mouth and nose. It also follows that one should keep out of crowds and stuffy places as much as possible, keep homes, offices and workshops well aired, spend some time out of doors each day, walk to work if at all practicable — in short, make every possible effort to breathe as much pure air as possible.

“In all health matters follow the advice of your doctor and obey the regulations of your local and state health officers.”

“Cover up each cough and sneeze, If you don’t you’ll spread disease.”

Note: this article was posted in: The Oakley Herald, also The Daily Star-Mirror, The Idaho Republican, The Challis Messenger, Lincoln County Times, Payette Enterprise, Idaho County Free Press, The Nezperce Herald, The Rathdrum Tribune, The Kendrick Gazette, Shoshone Journal between Oct 11 and Oct 18, 1918

source: The Oakley Herald. (Oakley, Idaho), 11 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

American Falls Press. October 11, 1918, page 1

19181011APF1-headline

The State Board of Health. Wednesday, issued orders suspending all public assemblages and closing all places of amusement where people congregate. Churches, lodges, picture shows, theatres, patriotic and political meetings, are all under the ban. Public schools are the only exceptions, and they will be closed if influenza breaks out in them. Pool halls and Red Cross meetings were added in a supplementary statement issued yesterday by the secretary of the state board of health.

The purpose of the drastic order is to prevent the spread of influenza in Idaho if possible. It exists now in six counties, Twin Falls, Gooding, Canyon, Ada. Nez Perce and Bonner. So far as known there are only thirty cases but the disease spreads rapidly and owing to its severity in some localities the state board deemed it wise to take every precaution.

In a statement yesterday, Dr. Biwer, secretary of the state board of health, said the reason schools were excluded from the order was because it was believed the children could be watched better if they were kept together than if mingling with other people in the streets, or playing with each other without supervision. But that if the disease broke out In the schools they would be promptly closed along with other places.

It was reported yesterday that there were three cases in Power county, two at Neeley and one at American Falls, but the rumor proved to be untrue.

The greatest watchfulness should be kept, however, as it is likely to appear in unexpected places. For the benefit of the public the suggestions of Surgeon General Blue, of the U. S. Health department, are printed elsewhere in this issue. They are a little lengthy. but it will be time well spent to read them.

The epidemic, runs its course in about three months, according to the secretary of the state board of health, and this will be the maximum limit of time in which the closing order may be in effect. In all probability it will be in effect a much shorter time.
— — — —

One hundred and thirty-six deaths from pneumonia occurred at Camp Sherman, Ohio, between noon and 3 o’clock Tuesday afternoon. The total deaths since the outbreak of influenza at the camp are 576.
— — — —

The order regarding the closing of picture shows, churches, etc., on account of Spanish influenza, does not apply to Red Cross rooms. Rather, we are asked to redouble our efforts and be ready to render every possible assistance, should this epidemic strike our vicinity.

source: American Falls Press. (American Falls, Idaho), 11 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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1918Atlantic5-a
Influenza victims crowd into an emergency hospital near Fort Riley, Kansas in 1918. National Museum of Health / AP

source: Alan Taylor April 10, 2018 “30 Photos of the 1918 Flu Pandemic” The Atlantic
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American Falls Press. October 11, 1918, page 3

Owing to the influenza epidemic the Ladies Aid of the St. John’s Lutheran church will not serve the chicken supper advertised for Saturday, October 12th.

source: American Falls Press. (American Falls, Idaho), 11 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Clearwater Republican. October 11, 1918, page 1

Public Assemblages Are Strictly Forbidden.

Boise, Idaho, Oct. 9, 1918
County Health Officer, Orofino, Idaho:

State Board of Health directs you to inform mayors of cities and chairmen boards of village trustees in your county that because of Spanish influenza all public assemblages and places of public amusement, excepting private and public schools, be prohibited from operation on and after Thursday, October 10, 1918, until further notice. Letter of verification follows. You are directed to secure compliance with this order.

Biwer, Secretary.

source: Clearwater Republican. (Orofino, Idaho), 11 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Kendrick Gazette. October 11, 1918, page 1

Will Not Lecture Tonight

On account of the ruling by the State Board of Health the lecture by Dean Eldredge, scheduled to take place tonight, will have to be postponed. There will be no more public gatherings until the Spanish Influenza epidemic has been checked.

source: The Kendrick Gazette. (Kendrick, Idaho), 11 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Montpelier Examiner. October 11, 1918, page 1

19181011ME1-headline

At a meeting of the state board of health, held in Boise last Tuesday, drastic closing regulations were passed owing to the Spanish influenza epidemic that has besieged the country. The order of the board called for the closing of all theatres, churches and public assembly halls on and after October 10. County health officers were notified that they would be expected to enforce the order, which was contained in the following telegram:

State board of health directs you to inform mayors of cities and chairman board of village trustees in your county that because of Spanish influenza, all public assemblages and places of public amusements excepting private and public schools be prohibited from operation on and after Thursday, October 10, 1918, until further orders. Letter of verification follows. You are directed to secure compliance with this order.

The city board of health met with the council Wednesday night and the local situation was discussed. While it was admitted that the disease had not made its appearance in Montpelier, the health board decided to rigidly enforce the order of the state board, and went a step further by adopting a motion ordering the public schools closed, and directing that all parsons coming from places where the disease is prevalent be detained in temporary quarantine for a period of ten days.

County Physician King was present and after learning the action taken by the Montpelier public board of health stated that he would direct the trustees in every district in the county to close their schools and would see that the order of the state board, prohibiting the holding of public gatherings, was strictly enforced.

There Is no occasion for the public to become excited over the situation. Just use ordinary precaution and common sense and the quarantine can soon be raised. The Salt Lake Herald, in discussing the situation there, very aptly remarks:

“Remain composed and keep confidence. It Is unpleasant to be sick and Salt Lake may be In for a share of this sickness, but do not invite it by dire imaginations and worry. The thought should make all people cautious but it should not destroy ordinary horse sense.”

source: Montpelier Examiner. (Montpelier, Idaho), 11 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Montpelier Examiner. October 11, 1918, page 4

Species of Frightfulness

As the spread of the scourge called the Spanish influenza goes on with its alarming rapidity one’s memory goes back to the summer of 1916 when infantile paralysis swept especially the lower districts of New York city and from there spread throughout the entire country. And when it was finally whispered about that the epidemic was another demonstration of German hate, the product of a military autocracy that could look far enough into the future to desire to bring harm to future generations in the United States, the people could scarcely believe that Prussian soldiers hacked Belgian babies to pieces.

After thousands of children had died American secret service agents learned that the germs of infantile paralysis had been isolated in Germany. They knew that if it was possible to isolate the germ, then it also was possible to spread the disease by artificial means. If it was possible to do such a terrible thing the secret service knew that Germany at least must be trying to do it.

Then began a series of investigations, and it was learned that a certain physician had come to America from Germany and that he was receiving money from the German government. It was also discovered that blue-bottle flies were placed in bits of germ culture and then turned loose in the crowded tenement districts of New York. The blue-bottle flies did the rest – the plague was spreading at a terrible rate. But before the secret service could round up its facts, Fate intervened. The German doctor became inoculated with the germ and died in the frightful agony that he had brought upon countless innocent children. Then the plague began to die down, proving conclusively that the physician was the sole cause of it.

And even now it is more than a suspicion that the Spanish influenza that is sweeping the United States, that is killing thousands of the brave boys in the cantonments, is not the Spanish influenza, but another German scourge, made in Germany and especially distributed throughout the United States in an attempt to murder and destroy our soldiers and our morale before our men get on the other side. This germ also has been isolated in Germany and can be produced whenever they desire, and that it is really, to use an unscientific word, a composite germ, produced by the grippe germ and pneumonia germ. Almost unerringly pneumonia is created by the pneumonia qualities of this composite germ. Another species of Hun frightfulness which no doubt would burn at the stake every man, woman and child in the world, if that would enable them to win this war.

Isn’t it awful even to believe that such inhuman monsters can exist In the form of human beings as these Germans are showing themselves to be?
— — — —

To Prevent Contagious Disease

Is alike the duty of the citizens and the health authorities. Neither can succeed without the co-operation of the other. By their combined faithful discharge of the obligations resting upon them, many lives may be saved and much suffering prevented. No fact is better established than that contagious diseases may be positively prevented by means of the restriction and destruction of the germs, which are the solo cause, and the practical methods by which this may be accomplished are quarantine and disinfection.

Owing to the numerous cases of Spanish influenza throughout our state, the Board of Health have closed the city schools, churches, Sunday schools, theatres, moving picture houses, ward meetings, dance halls, private dances, pool halls, card rooms, social gatherings of all kinds, and all public gatherings of any kind or nature.

A strict quarantine will be enforced and the Board of Health ask the support and co-operation of all citizens until this epidemic Is stamped out.

Dated this 9th day of Oct. 1918.
By order of Board of Health City of Montpelier.
Geo. F. Ashley, Chairman.
C. H. Toomer.
J. G. Merrill.
M. B. Cherry.
Approved by City Council October 9th, 1918.
R. N. Sneddon, Mayor.

source: Montpelier Examiner. (Montpelier, Idaho), 11 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Meridian Times., October 11, 1918, page 1

All public Places Closed For A Time

By an order from the state board of health, in effect to-day (Friday) all public places are closed, as a health measure, as a result of the appearance of the Spanish influenza.

Dr. E. T. Biwer, secretary of the state board says:

“The closing order applies to all public gatherings for whatsoever purpose – all theatres, dace halls, churches, Natatorium, Liberty Loan rallies, political rallies – in fact all indoor meetings, public and private schools alone excepted.”

source: The Meridian Times. (Meridian, Idaho), 11 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Republican. October 11, 1918, Page 5, page 5

Notice By Health Officer

Dr. C. A. Hoover, the county physician, received the following telegram Monday from the state board of health at Boise, Idaho:

“The state board of health directs you to inform mayors of cities and the chairmen of boards of village trustees in the county that because of Spanish influenza, all public assemblies and places of public amusement, excepting public and private schools be prohibited from operation on and after October 10, 1918. Letter of instructions follows. You are directed to secure compliance with this order until further instructions.

Biwer, Secretary.”
— —

The following instructions were received later:

“It is ruled this order includes theatres, moving picture shows, dance halls, lodges, pool and billiard halls, public swimming pools, public meetings of any character political, patriotic church socials etc. Health officers to report each Monday number of cases of influenza in county. Physicians required to report cases to county health officer.”

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 11 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., October 11, 1918, page 1

19181011DST1-headline
Moscow has no cases of Spanish influenza, so far as known, and the most rigid enforcement of regulations to prevent the disease from becoming established here have been ordered by the authorities. Even funerals must be private and no assemblages of people except in the schools, will be permitted. The proclamation by the city health officer, Dr. W. A. Adair, elsewhere in this issue tells what must be done in Moscow.

This city is fortunate in escaping the disease so far. Spokane has more than 100 cases and has had several deaths. Colfax has 14 cases, it is reported and has had one death. The county fair at Colfax was not held this week although everything was in readiness for it, but the influenza caused the closing of the fair, a great event for Whitman county.

Pullman has 25 cases and the churches, schools, pool halls, lodges, and Washington State College has been closed. All classes have been dismissed. The question of holding open air drills and training for the men of the S. A. T. C. at Pullman was left to the discretion of the army officers. It is to avoid such a situation here that the rigid enforcement of the rules forbidding meetings in Moscow are being urged.

Endicott, west of Colfax, has many cases and has had two deaths from the disease. Spokane closes all public places including the schools and is fighting a spread of the disease with all available means.

Mayor Truitt says that the schools will be permitted to continue as long as it is not regarded as dangerous for them to do so, but if it becomes necessary to close the schools this will be done.
— — —

Official Notice

Notice is hereby given to all persons concerned that because of a epidemic form of Spanish influenza having made its appearance in localities near Moscow, if not in the city, therefore, for civic and military reasons, and also in compliance with the official order of the state board of health; it is hereby ordered that all public assemblages and places of amusement, except private and public schools, are prohibited from meeting, or operating, on and after Friday October 11, 1918, until further order.

Dated at Moscow, Idaho, October 11, 1918
W. A. Adair – City Health Officer

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 11 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

The Daily Daily Star-Mirror., October 11, 1918, page 2

Moscow is fortunate in not having any cases of Spanish influenza. With the great crowd of students at the university and epidemic of that disease now would be a calamity.
— —

Red Cross Rooms Closed.

The Red Cross rooms in the government building will be closed during the quarantine.

Those contributing new sheets, pillow cases, towels and napkins to the Red Cross, may leave them at the home of Mrs. T. A. Meeker on Third street.

The hospital linen has not been coming in as expected. Since none has been shipped from the Moscow chapter since April, more is desired for our soldier boys much be cared for.

source: The Daily Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 11 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., October 14, 1918, page 1

No Cases of Influenza Discovered in Potlatch

Potlatch. – There have been false rumors circulated throughout the surrounding country that Potlatch has a number of influenza cases and Mr. A. A. McDonald, manager of the Potlatch Mercantile company has been kept busy at the telephone denying the report. As yet Potlatch is absolutely free from the epidemic which prevails and there has not been a single case of it reported thus far.

However, as a precautionary measure the state board of health has seen fit to close up theatres, etc., and has abandoned public meetings for the time being and this also applies to the Peoples Theatre of this city, which will be closed until further notice. As yet the public schools are still open and will continue as long as it is free from any cases of influenza.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 14 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., October 14, 1918, page 3

City News

Mayor Edmundson and wife, from Grangeville, were visiting friends in Moscow Friday and Saturday. He reports no cases of influenza so far in Grangeville.

Miss Frances Wiley, Delta Gamma, was called to her home at Waterville, Wash., by a telegram announcing the death of her brother-in-law, Sherman Gregory, a graduate of the university and a member of the Kappa Sigma fraternity. Mrs. Gregory was formerly Miss Marion Wiley. Mr. Gregory was first lieutenant, located at Elpaso [sic], Texas, and his death was caused by influenza and pneumonia.
— — — —

19181014DSM-headlineSchool Board Hires Nurse For Moscow

At a special meeting of the school board, held Saturday afternoon, the board authorized H. D. Martin, the president of the board, to employ a trained nurse during the period of danger from Spanish influenza, to supervise the health of the pupils and prevent as far as possible, an outbreak of the disease in our schools.

The patrons of the school are asked to refrain from sending their children to school if they show any suspicious symptoms of the disease, or if there be any possibility of any members of their family being inflicted.

It is the desire of the board that the schools be keep open if possible. If the patrons will use the necessary care they will lend material assistance to that end.

source: The Daily star-mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 14 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
———————

Back to Table of Contents
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 1)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 2)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 3)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 4)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 5)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 6)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 7)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 8)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 9)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 10)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 11)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 12)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 13)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 14)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 15)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 16)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 17)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 18)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 19)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 20)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 21)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 22)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 23)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 24)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 25)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 26)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 27)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 28)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 29)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 30)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 31)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 32)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 33)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 34)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 35)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 36)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 37)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 38)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 39)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 40)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 41)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 42)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 43)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 44)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 45)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 46)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 47)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 48)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 49)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 50)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 51)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 52)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 53)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 54)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 55)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 56)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 57)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 58)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 59)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 60)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 61)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 62)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 63)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 64)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 65)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 66)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 67)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 68)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 69)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 70)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 71)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 72)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 73)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 74)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 75)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 76)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 77)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 78)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 79)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 80)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 81)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 82)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 83)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 84)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 85)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 86)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 87)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 88)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 89)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 90)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 91)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 92)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 93)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 94)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 95)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 96)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 97)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 98)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 99)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 100)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 101)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 102)

Road Reports May 24, 2020

Please share road reports. Conditions change very quickly this time of year. High elevation roads still have several feet of snow. Be prepared for rocks and trees in the road and remember there is no cell phone service.

Yellow Pine: Local streets are bare. Elk and deer are wandering around at dusk. Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN.
link: Local Forecast
Yellow Pine Webcam: (check date on image)

Warm Lake Highway: No problems reported.
link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

Highway 55 Webcams Link:

South Fork Road: Thursday (May 21) “South Fork was light traffic and in good shape. Brush cutting going on right now and it’s looking good.” -AP
Wednesday (May 20) mail truck driver (Robert) reports a few rocks in the road this morning.
Road work will begin May 18th. “This initial work will not include road closures, but may cause some very short delays in traveling the road.” – PNF
Weight restrictions were lifted May 18th.
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Friday (May 22) mail truck driver reported some rocks (bigger than a bread box) on the lower EFSF road this morning.
Thursday (May 21) “East Fork is clear with scattered rocks but nothing major.” – AP
Wednesday (May 20) mail truck driver (Robert) reports the road was good this morning, no rocks or trees down.

Lower Johnson Creek Road: Last report Wednesday (May 13) The road is pretty good between YP and Wapiti Meadow Ranch. The county graded parts of the road recently.
Landmark and upper Johnson Creek still closed to wheeled vehicles.
link: Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam
link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
Note: The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Closed to wheeled vehicles (no current report.)
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Closed to wheeled vehicles. No current report.
Last report April 10: [summit] “between 6-7 ft. Continuous snow floor from the Big Creek turnoff. About 3 ft remaining at the Big Creek turnoff.” – SA
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcam: (check date on image)

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open with restrictions. No current report.
April 9 – Temporary Spring Restrictions on upper Stibnite Rd in effect.
Update from Midas March 30: As Spring nears, snow and ice on the Stibnite road is beginning to melt, leaving some sections of the road bare and others still covered in snow. The road is soft in places so Midas Gold crews are minimizing traffic and utilizing UTV’s when possible to prevent erosion. Warmer temperatures in the afternoons bring rocks down daily so caution for all travelers is advised. Midas Gold crews are vigilant and exercising extra caution to watch out for falling rocks and remove fallen rocks in order to maintain access to Stibnite.
We also received notice from the County that due to spring melt conditions there will be temporary travel restrictions on Stibnite Road. These restrictions are both to keep the road from further damage, reduce erosion and to keep the public safe.
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Closed to wheeled vehicles (no current report.)
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Warrens Wagon Road: Report May 22 that the county plowed the road open to Secesh Meadows.

Deadwood Summit: Closed to wheeled vehicles (no current report.)
Note: The approx elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′
——————————-

Weather Reports May 17-23, 2020

May 17 Weather:

At 930am it was 46 degrees, overcast and light rain falling. Stopped raining before 1120am. Raining again at 1150am. Sprinkling at 1pm. Sprinkles at 2pm. At 3pm it was 52 degrees, had stopped raining shortly beforehand and cracks in the cloud cover. At 630pm it was 63 degrees, broken cloud cover, calm and muggy. At 840pm it was 46 degrees, cloudy, calm and humid. Cloudy at 1130pm. It had been raining long enough to make things wet at 1245am. Steady rain at 130am. Rained all night.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time May 18, 2020 at 09:30AM
Low overcast, raining
Max temperature 65 degrees F
Min temperature 43 degrees F
At observation 44 degrees F
Precipitation 0.59 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

May 18 Weather:

At 930am it was 44 degrees, low overcast – ridges socked in low and raining. Light sprinkles 1015am, break in the rain at 1025am. Raining at 1045am. Not raining at 1225pm. Started raining at 205pm. Light sprinkles and breezes just before 3pm, and not raining at 305pm. At 355pm it was 48 degrees and starting to rain, low overcast and a bit breezy. Not raining at 510pm. Sprinkling again at 530pm. At 7pm it was 46 degrees, overcast and sprinkling. At 840pm it was 44 degrees, overcast and not raining. Cloudy and calm at 11pm.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time May 19, 2020 at 09:30AM
Overcast
Max temperature 50 degrees F
Min temperature 37 degrees F
At observation 42 degrees F
Precipitation 0.24 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

May 19 Weather:

At 930am it was 42 degrees and overcast. Overcast at 1pm. Raining by 150pm. Not raining at 215pm. Raining at 250pm. At 315pm it was 49 degrees, light steady rain, overcast and ridges socked in. Breaks in the clouds and not raining at 335pm. Raining at 6pm. At 640pm it had stopped raining and 48 degrees, overcast. At 845pm it was 48 degrees, broken cloud cover and low fog on the mountains, calm and not raining. At 1120pm it appeared cloudy and not raining. Not raining 1230am. Sprinkling at 4am.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time May 20, 2020 at 09:30AM
Low overcast
Max temperature 54 degrees F
Min temperature 39 degrees F
At observation 43 degrees F
Precipitation 0.36 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

May 20 Weather:

At 930am it was 43 degrees and low overcast down onto the mountains. Sprinkling at 1155am. At 1230pm it was 49 degrees and sprinkling. Not raining at 1pm, breaks in the clouds to the south. Raining at 250pm. At 330pm it was 45 degrees, still raining and low dark overcast. Not raining at 420pm. At 645pm it was 48 degrees, overcast and sprinkled enough to poka-dot the roofs. Rained at 725pm for less than 20 minutes. At 840pm it was 45 degrees and overcast. Appears to have been raining a while at 1115pm. Raining at 1am. Probably rained most of the night. Not raining at 7am.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time May 21, 2020 at 09:30AM
Mostly cloudy, light breeze
Max temperature 53 degrees F
Min temperature 39 degrees F
At observation 43 degrees F
Precipitation 0.35 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

May 21 Weather:

At 930am it was 43 degrees, mostly cloudy and light breeze, snow above 6500′, and EFSF river sounds louder. Started sprinkling around 1pm, lasted about 15 minutes. Breezy and cloudy at 215pm. At 310pm it was 45 degrees, about a 5 minute sprinkle, mostly cloudy and gusty breezes. At 645pm it was 42 degrees, dark overcast and sprinkling lightly. At 830pm it was 41 degrees, still sprinkling lightly and mostly cloudy with a slight breeze. Looked cloudy and probably not raining at 11pm. Started sprinkling at 920am.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time May 22, 2020 at 09:30AM
Low foggy overcast, sprinkling, breezy
Max temperature 48 degrees F
Min temperature 34 degrees F
At observation 40 degrees F
Precipitation 0.07 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

May 22 Weather:

At 930am it was 40 degrees, sprinkling, low foggy overcast (peaks and ridges socked in) and breezy. Snow falling at 950am, then rain snow mix at 1005am. Not raining 1015am. Broken clouds and scattered sunshine by 1130am. At 1230pm it was 47 degrees, broken cloud cover and breezy. Partly clear and breezy at 110pm. At 3pm it was 52 degrees, gusty breezes and patches of blue sky, at 330p it was 55 degrees. At 6pm it was 49 degrees, mostly cloudy and breezy. At 7pm thicker, darker clouds and breezy. May have missed a brief sprinkle of rain? At 850pm it was 44 degrees, partly clear and nearly calm. Partly clear at 1130pm with some bright stars out.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time May 23, 2020 at 09:30AM
Overcast
Max temperature 55 degrees F
Min temperature 34 degrees F
At observation 42 degrees F
Precipitation Trace
Snowfall Trace
Snow depth 0 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

May 23 Weather:

At 930am it was 42 degrees and overcast. Gray overcast and light breezes at 12pm. At 1pm breaks in the clouds and light breezes. At 305pm it was 51 degrees, very light sprinkle of rain with pellet sized hailstones for about a minute, all ending by 310pm. At 425pm breaks in the clouds and scattered sunshine. At 535pm gusty breezes kicking up, broken clouds. At 630pm it was 50 degrees and mostly cloudy (dark chunky clouds.) At 855pm it was 44 degrees and mostly cloudy. At 11pm it was partly clear, stars out to the east. More clouds at 2am.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time May 24, 2020 at 09:30AM
Mostly cloudy – thin
Max temperature 55 degrees F
Min temperature 28 degrees F
At observation 44 degrees F
Precipitation Trace
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 0 inch
———————–

Road Reports May 20, 2020

Please share road reports. Rock Migration Season has begun. Conditions change very quickly this time of year. High elevation roads still have several feet of snow. Be prepared for rocks and trees in the road and remember there is no cell phone service.

Yellow Pine: Local streets are bare. Elk and deer are wandering around at dusk. Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN.
link: Local Forecast
Yellow Pine Webcam: (check date on image)

Warm Lake Highway: No problems reported.
link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

Highway 55 Webcams Link:

South Fork Road: Wednesday (May 20) mail truck driver (Robert) reports a few rocks in the road this morning.
Road work will begin May 18th. “This initial work will not include road closures, but may cause some very short delays in traveling the road.” – PNF
Weight restrictions were lifted May 18th.
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Wednesday (May 20) mail truck driver (Robert) reports the road was good this morning, no rocks or trees down.

Lower Johnson Creek Road: Last report Wednesday (May 13) The road is pretty good between YP and Wapiti Meadow Ranch. The county graded parts of the road recently.
Landmark and upper Johnson Creek still closed to wheeled vehicles.
link: Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam
link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
Note: The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Closed to wheeled vehicles (no current report.)
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Closed to wheeled vehicles. No current report.
Last report April 10: [summit] “between 6-7 ft. Continuous snow floor from the Big Creek turnoff. About 3 ft remaining at the Big Creek turnoff.” – SA
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcam: (check date on image)

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open with restrictions. No current report.
April 9 – Temporary Spring Restrictions on upper Stibnite Rd in effect.
Update from Midas March 30: As Spring nears, snow and ice on the Stibnite road is beginning to melt, leaving some sections of the road bare and others still covered in snow. The road is soft in places so Midas Gold crews are minimizing traffic and utilizing UTV’s when possible to prevent erosion. Warmer temperatures in the afternoons bring rocks down daily so caution for all travelers is advised. Midas Gold crews are vigilant and exercising extra caution to watch out for falling rocks and remove fallen rocks in order to maintain access to Stibnite.
We also received notice from the County that due to spring melt conditions there will be temporary travel restrictions on Stibnite Road. These restrictions are both to keep the road from further damage, reduce erosion and to keep the public safe.
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Closed to wheeled vehicles (no current report.)
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: Closed to wheeled vehicles (no current report.)
Note: The approx elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′
——————————-