Idaho History May 31, 2020

Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic

Part 7

Idaho Newspaper clippings Oct 15 – 21, 2020

1918Atlantic6-streetsweeper
A mask is worn by a street sweeper in New York in 1918. The admonition of the New York Health Board to wear masks to check the spread of influenza epidemic was: “Better ridiculous than dead.” Library of Congress via AP, National Archives

source: Alan Taylor April 10, 2018 “30 Photos of the 1918 Flu Pandemic” The Atlantic
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The Idaho Republican. October 15, 1918, page 1

19181015IR1-headline
Health Official Adds More Rules
Hotels, Restaurants, Town Authorities and Railroads Given Instructions.

Orders issued by the state board of health to prevent and control Spanish influenza were supplemented and extended Thursday by J. K. White state sanitary inspector, in special instructions to mayors and chairmen of village boards, to hotels, restaurants and confectioneries, and to common carriers.

Health inspectors and county health officers were authorized “to peremptorily close any and all places failing to observe” the order applying to them.

“Dry Sweeping” Banned

Mayors and village chairmen were instructed to have streets swept only between 9 a. m. and 6 p. m. and then only after the streets and sidewalks have been well sprinkled with water.

Hotels, restaurants, eating houses, dining rooms, soda fountains, confectioneries, ice cream parlors and others were directed “to cause a thoro [sic] sterilization by washing and rinsing in warm water and then complete immersion in boiling water of all equipment, including dishes, knives, forks, spoons, glasses and so forth, used in the serving to the public foods and drinks, immediately after each individual use.

Also Common Drinking Cups

“The use of public, or common drinking cups and towels, in any place whatsoever,” the instructions continue, “and the use of broken or chipped drinking cups or glasses, is positively prohibited.

“Inspectors of this department and, all local health officers will enforce this order, and are directed to peremptorily close any and all places falling to observe this order, or refusing to comply with these provisions, making report of their action to this office.

“On the spirit in which this order is accepted and observed, depends whether or not it will be modified or strengthened, in order to get the desired results.”

Conductors of trains are charged by the state sanitary inspector with the responsibility, and “are requested to use their police power when and where necessary,” to enforce the following requirements to be observed by common carriers within the state in the operation of passenger coaches:

“Provide free and adequate ventilation at all times, maintain normal temperature.

“Prohibit dry sweeping at any and all times when coaches are occupied.

“At least an inch. of water to be kept in all cuspidors, and under no circumstances must they be permitted to become dry.

“The promiscuous spitting In the aisle or in any other other place than that provided will be strictly prohibited.

“The placing of feet on seats whether cushioned or not will be prohibited.”

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 15 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Republican. October 15, 1918, page 7

Fighting Influenza.

Washington. – In its fight to stop the spread of Spanish influenza, the public health service is investigating the causes of the disease, the conditions which promote its spread and the part played by carriers in epidemics of the malady.
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Idaho Budget

Owning to the prevalence of Spanish influenza the Child Welfare campaign at Caldwell has been indefinitely postponed.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 15 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Bonners Ferry Herald. October 15, 1918, page 1

19181015BFH1headline
No public Meetings Now
County Physician Fry is Sent Order by the State Board of Health
Local Schools Are Closed
Would Prevent Severe Epidemic In Boundary County

On account of the spreading of Spanish influenza in the west after a several weeks visit in the east and an appearance of the disease in some parts of Idaho, the state health board on Wednesday, issued orders to all county physicians to enforce on and after Thursday stringent restrictions against the congregating of crowds in places of public amusement or assemblage. The following wire was received by Dr. E. E. Fry. county physician, Wednesday afternoon from Biwer, secretary of the state board of health:

“State board of health directs you to in form mayors of cities and chairman board of village trustees in your county that because of Spanish influenza all public assemblages and places of amusement excepting private and public schools be prohibited from operation on and after Thursday, October 10, until further notice. Letter of verification follows. You are directed to secure compliance with this order.”

Dr. Fry immediately notified S. E. Henry, chairman of the board of village trustees and Mr. Henry issued an order in compliance with the instructions of the state health board. Consequently the Amazon theater is now closed, there were no church services Sunday and the pool rooms are closed except for the sale of tobaccos, candies, etc. No loitering in these places of business are permitted. The school trustees of Independent School District No. 4 on Wednesday night decided that the schools of the district should be closed until the danger of an epidemic is passed. Dr. Fry reported that there were possibly 50 cases of influenza, in a mild form, in the county and advised against closing the schools, stating that the students could be better watched in the school rooms and be given medical treatment at the first sign of disease. The schools of District No. 14 were also closed on Friday.

The government public health service has sent out a pamphlet on the disease which has already been given, the nickname of “the flu.” The report states that the disease is highly contagious and is passed from the nose and mouth mucous and is particularly serious in crowded and ill-ventilated quarters. Fresh air, exercise and a careful diet are its best preventatives. In most cases a person taken sick with influenza feels ill rather suddenly. He feels weak. has pains in the eyes, ears, head or back and may be sore all over. Many patients feel dizzy, some vomit. Most patients complain of feeling chilly and with this comes a fever in which the temperature rises to 100 or 104. In most cases the pulse remains relatively slow. …

source: Bonners Ferry Herald. (Bonners Ferry, Idaho), 15 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Bonners Ferry Herald. October 15, 1918, page 2

Idaho News Paragraphs

Recent Happenings in This State Given in Brief Items for Busy Readers.

There is no Spanish influenza in Potlatch.

Two cases of influenza have developed at the state normal school and City Health Officer Susan Bruce has ordered the school closed.

source: Bonners Ferry Herald. (Bonners Ferry, Idaho), 15 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Bonners Ferry Herald. October 15, 1918, page 4

Local Pick-ups

Gust Anderson and his baby child are both seriously ill with Spanish influenza.

Paul Peter, one of the Boundary county draft men assigned to duty in the spruce production department of the government and stationed in a camp near Aberdeen, Wash., came here last week to spend a 15 day furlough visiting with friends and relatives. His camp is new in quarantine on account of Spanish influenza.

source: Bonners Ferry Herald. (Bonners Ferry, Idaho), 15 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Bonners Ferry Herald. October 15, 1918, page 12

Local News

H. I. Monks has been confined to his home several days the past week with an attack of Spanish influenza.

The meeting of the Union Ladies’ Aid society has been postponed until further notice on account of Spanish influenza.

source: Bonners Ferry Herald. (Bonners Ferry, Idaho), 15 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., October 15, 1918, page 1

Adolf Hendrickson Died at Jefferson, MO.

A telegram was received today by Mrs. Adolph Hendrickson announcing the death of her husband at Jefferson, Mo., of Spanish influenza. Mr. Hendrickson left here October 3 with the solders, although he was drafted from Clearwater county. Mr. Hendrickson’s parents live at Try and about Christmas he was married to Mrs. Schumacker, who has three children. Mr. Hendrickson was twenty-four years of age.
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Prof. Soulen returned yesterday from a week’s session of the Lemhi county teachers’ association at Salmon City. A fine spirit and good attendance characterized the sessions until Thursday, when the meetings were terminated by a message closing all public gatherings on account of the prevailing epidemic. No influenza cases were reported over the divide in Lemhi county.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 15 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., October 15, 1918, page 6

Deary and Vicinity Have Influenza Mildly

Mr. and Mrs. Archie Liddle, accompanied by Mr. and Mrs. Walter Weed, motored to Troy, Idaho, where Mrs. Weed took the train for Lewiston, to visit her daughter June, who is under quarantine in the school.

The play that was to have been given at the Pleasant Home and Bear Creek school house has been called off, owing to Spanish influenza making its appearance in the neighborhood.
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Planning to Save Tubercular Men
Idaho Anti-Tuberculosis Association asks Latah County to Help it.

Catharine R. Athey, executive secretary for the Idaho Anti-Tuberculosis association is in Moscow today and is interviewing those who should help the association. The calling of men for military service in Idaho has developed the fact that there are many who are suffering with tuberculosis. Miss Athey says that Latah county alone has 18 who were rejected because of this dread disease…

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 15 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Challis Messenger., October 16, 1918, page 3

Four hundred and eighty-seven men called to entrain from the state beginning October 7 for Camp Lewis were released from the call until further notice by Provost Marshal General Crowder last week in a telegram to the adjutant general, advising that this was necessary because of the epidemic of Spanish influenza.

source: The Challis Messenger. (Challis, Idaho), 16 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., October 16, 1918, page 1

[Moscow]

Great care is being exercised to prevent any cases of influenza reaching the university. Last night the kitchen at the harvester plant was not prepared to cook the entire supper for the men so food was cooked at the mess halls at the university and brought to the harvester plant. There is not a single case of influenza among the 600 men at the university and the authorities were taking no chances of them being exposed by permitting the new arrivals, who may have been exposed to the disease enroute to Moscow, to eat at the university. The men who have arrived all have a “clean bill of health” but as they come from many points and some of them have traveled long distances it was feared they might have come in contact with the disease and the greatest care is being taken to keep them from the men at the university who are in quarantine. The men are given a physical examination upon arrival here.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 16 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Grangeville Globe. October 17, 1918, page 1

Nezperce Appeals For Aid.
Entire Population Afflicted and None Able to Help Others.

The influenza situation at our neighboring town of Nezperce is indescribable, says Dr. E. L. White, of the White hospital at Lewiston, who visited that place Wednesday in an interview in tonight’s Tribune. There have been four deaths reports.

“There is not a family in Nezperce,” said Dr. White, “where there is not one to two cases and in some instances entire families are stricken. This is the genuine Spanish influenza. The situation is indescribable. I would not venture an estimate of the number of cases in Nezperce and environs. The serious situation is not confined to the town. There are cases in the country where whole families are ill and no one to attend to them. In some cases there was no person to notify neighbors of the illness in the house. No word could be sent to town and there is nobody in the town to go to their relief.”

In answer to the call relief was secured today, when through the escort of prominent Lewiston people it is reported here that 50 nurses and doctors arrived on tonight’s train to aid the stricken people.
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19181017GG1

source: The Grangeville Globe. (Grangeville, Idaho), 17 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Grangeville Globe. October 17, 1918, page 8

Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Chase and children left Tuesday morning for Lewiston and if the influenza wave lets up they will go on to Moscow and Spokane. The family will remain at one of the latter places for a short time and Mr. Chase will return to attend to some unfinished business.
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O. E. Collins

Most everybody in town remembers Orville Collins. He grew to manhood in Grangeville and went to school here. In writing to his sister, Mrs. Broyles, Orville gives some interesting information regarding the gas mask and other matters. He is stationed at Camp Lewis and is a member of Battery E, 37th Regiment, Field Artillery:

“Dear Sister: – I received the box of cigarettes today and was glad to get them. They were just the right kind; you are sure some good guesser.

“We are still in quarantine. Bill Criddlebaugh went to the hospital yesterday. There are two or three leaving our battery every day for hospital.

“We have been taking gas test, of which we have three lays. The gas mask is certainly some rig. The face piece is made of thin rubber with glass lenses so you can see. Inside the face piece is a rubber mouth-piece which you put in your mouth and surely makes a mouthful. There is a wire nose-clamp which you put on your nose and you have to breath through your mouth-piece. From the mouth-piece is a rubber tube going to a tin can which you pack in a sack. In the bottom of the can is a little valve through which the air comes. Inside the can are some things that purify the air and you can go through a gas attack without injury. Monday we are going in the gas house and try it. We are only allowed six seconds to take the mask out of the sack and put it on, mouth-piece in mouth and nose clamp on nose. Believe me you have to travel some to do it in that length of time.

“Seattle is quarantined, all schools, theatres and public places closed. Soldiers are not allowed to go to Seattle. I was in Tacoma last Saturday and Sunday and had a good time. There are a few cases of Spanish influenza in camp, but not many. Lots of measles and mumps. We have inspection twice a day now for measles.

“We have another new captain, he just returned from France. He gave us a talk today telling us about conditions over there and it was real interesting to hear him. He seems to be a fine fellow. All our officers are good. It has rained good and hard all day and still coming. Water is standing everywhere.”

source: The Grangeville Globe. (Grangeville, Idaho), 17 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Lincoln County Times., October 17, 1918, page 4

Orchard Valley

Miss Myrtle Journey, our country superintendent, visited our school last Thursday.

The school board closed the school Monday on account of influenza.

source: Lincoln County Times. (Jerome, Idaho), 17 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Payette Enterprise., October 17, 1918, page 1

Call for Nurses

Owning to the present influenza epidemic, the Red Cross Department of Nursing desires to get in touch with every graduate nurse, every woman who has had any training, every practical nurse, and every woman who has taken the training to be a Nurses’ aid. The Red Cross offers to graduates $70.00 and expenses, and to undergraduates and Aids from $30.00 to $50.00 according to qualifications, with expenses. Division office will direct assignments. If interested apply to Dr. J. C. Woodward, Chairman, Payette County chapter American Red Cross.
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Do not burn the leaves from your lawn. Put them on the grade and plow them under. It is claimed by the board of health in some clinics that smoke from burning leaves have a tendency to irritate the throat making one more susceptible to the epidemic that is reported to be prevalent in some parts of this country, as well as other throat trouble.
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Miss Madeline Manning of Walla Walla, Wash., is visiting at the home of E. C. S. Brainard during the period the Walla Walla schools are closed on account of the prevalent influenza.

source: Payette Enterprise. (Payette, Canyon Co., Idaho), 17 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Payette Enterprise., October 17, 1918, page 2

Spanish influenza is a dangerous, serious malady, to be avoided if at all possible, but think how much worse it would be if they had named it “German influenza.”

source: Payette Enterprise. (Payette, Canyon Co., Idaho), 17 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Idaho County Free Press. October 17, 1918, page 1

19181017ICFP1-headline
Influenza Spreads over Central Idaho
300 Cases and Three Deaths at Nezperce – Cottonwood Schools are Closed
2 Cases Near Grangeville
James B White, Auditor of Lewis County and Former Grangeville Resident, Is Dead.

NOTICE TO PARENTS

The Grangeville school board has made an order closing the city schools on account of Spanish influenza until further notice. The board requests all parents and guardians to keep children at home as such as possible and by all means to keep them off the public streets and places where people usually congregate.

The epidemic of Spanish influenza is rapidly spreading over central Idaho. With more than 300 eases, and three deaths, on Wednesday, the town of Nezperce has sent an urgent call to Spokane for physicians and nurses to care for the ever increasing cases. There are not enough well persons in Nezperce to care for those who are ill. The epidemic has reached Grangeville and Cottonwood. Two cases were reported from Cottonwood Wednesday night. The public schools there have been closed.

Near Grangeville one or two cases are reported, with others under suspicion. The public schools here are to be closed Friday night, October 18. All other public gatherings, including churches, are forbidden. Pool halls and the picture show are closed.

James B. White, county auditor for Lewis county, was one of the victims of the malady. He died Wednesday evening after an illness of only a few days. Mr. White was born and reared in Grangeville. The body will be bought here for burial. Funeral services were set for Friday afternoon at 1 o’clock at the grave in Prairie View cemetery. Mr. White was 35 years old. Mrs. White is a daughter of Mrs. C. Overman of Grangeville. Mr. White was at one time a deputy in the county auditor’s office here.

source: Idaho County Free Press. (Grangeville, Idaho), 17 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Idaho County Free Press. October 17, 1918, page 4

G.H.S. School Notes

On account of Spanish influenza, teachers institute was not held at Lewiston this week, so the pupils found themselves without a vacation.

source: Idaho County Free Press. (Grangeville, Idaho), 17 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Idaho County Free Press. October 17, 1918, page 6

19181017ICFG2-headline
Courts to Decide Closing Order Legality
Suits Are Brought Against Pool Hall Men In The Capital City
Attorney General Rules
Mayor of Boise Bucks State Board of Health in Edict to Check Spanish Influenza

While S. H .Hays, mayor of Boise, was questioning the legality of the state board of health’s dosing order, to prevent spread of Spanish influenza, and suspended the order in Boise, until the attorney general ruled whether or not the board could issue such drastic edict, T. E. Edmundson, mayor of Grangeville, promulgated a closing order, at the request of the state board of health, which closed even the mayor’s own motion picture theatre.

Grangeville has shown a disposition to respect the order, without questioning its legality but Boise, has not. Because Boise has raised an objection, the courts must decide whether the state board of health acted within its powers in issuing the order, for at least ten complaints, according to word from Boise, have been filed charging the defendants, pool hall operators, with failure to observe the edict. The complaints were flied by the attorney general’s office.

Walters Rules for Board.

“Other municipalities in the state are warned to observe the order, because it will be enforced,” said Attorney General Walters. “The state board has power to issue such an order under the statutes, and municipalities cannot suspend orders made pursuant to statute.”

In support of his view, the attorney general quoted the following language from a legal authority:

“General provisions for the preservation of the life and health of the people of the state are no more suspended in the territory comprised within a municipality than are the criminal laws of the state. It would be obviously unwise for a state to delegate to any municipality full and complete control of matters pertaining to the public health. The municipality might in the preservation of sanitary conditions in its own territory work incalculable mischief to the health and comfort of people living in adjacent territory. To prevent this being done, it is primarily necessary that there shall be one central authority clothed with the power of affording equal protection to all.”

Fines Up to $300.

“Failure to observe an order issued by the state board of health pursuant to statute is punishable as a misdemeanor, and persons convicted are subject to fines of not less than $50 or more than $300, or imprisonment of not less than 30 or more than 90 days in the county jail, or both fine and imprisonment.

“The board ‘s authority,” said the attorney general, “to issue orders to prevent disease is set out in section 1086 of the state statutes.” This section is, in part as follows:

“Whenever the state hoard of health shall have cause to believe that there is any danger of cholera, smallpox or other contagious or infectious disease invading this state or country, it shall be the duty of said board to take such action, and adopt and enforce such roles and regulations as may be necessary to prevent the introduction of such infectious of contagious disease within the state, and any persons or persons or corporations refusing or neglecting to obey such rules and regulations shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor.”

source: Idaho County Free Press. (Grangeville, Idaho), 17 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Idaho County Free Press. October 17, 1918, page 8

Because of the epidemic of Spanish influenza, the September term of the district court has been adjourned sine die. This was deemed advisable by Judge Seales.

Because of Spanish influenza, all other cases must go over until next term.
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W. C. Michie and Family Will Remove to Lone Star State.

… While in the south, Mr. Michie suffered an attack of Spanish influenza, which is prevalent throughout Texas. He was in bed two days with the epidemic, which left him in a weakened condition. When in Dallas, Mr. Michie said he was advised the platform of the railroad station was lined with coffins, containing bodies of persons who had died of influenza. The bodies were mostly of soldiers, and were being sent to their homes for burial.
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Red Cross Rooms Are Open
Influenza Closing Order Does Not Apply to War Work

The recent state-wide closing order, as a precaution against spread of Spanish influenza, does not apply to war work, according to word just received here from Boise. Consequently, the Red Cross rooms will be open as usual.

source: Idaho County Free Press. (Grangeville, Idaho), 17 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., October 17, 1918, page 4

Former Moscow Man is Recovering From Influenza

Mrs. Clara Boemeke received word from her grandson that her son, John Crow, well known in Moscow, is recovering from a severe attack of influenza at Bremerton, where he has been employed in the shipyards. His wife is now quite sick with the disease. Mrs. Boemeke has two nephews in the service, both of who have had the disease but are recovering.
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Juliaetta Notes

All public gatherings except the public schools have been closed, but so far no cases of the influenza have been reported in Juliaetta.

The cannery is still running full time and will continue to do so as long as the nice warm weather ripens the tomatoes.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 17 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Rathdrum Tribune., October 18, 1918, page 1

Post Falls

The school was closed by an order of the board Oct. 9 and will remain closed until the county physician deems it safe to reopen. The action was taken owing to the threatened epidemic of influenza.
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Coeur D’ Alene

The Hayden Lake fair, scheduled for October 18, and the farmers’ union convention have been postponed indefinitely because of the influenza quarantine.
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19181018TRT1-headline
Ask Parents’ Help
Official Action In Interest Of Public Health.

The Rathdrum public schools were closed by order of the school board and have not been in session this week. The action was taken in the interest of the public health, as it is believed if the children were kept at home and not allowed to congregate, there would be less likelihood of the influenza becoming epidemic in the community.

It was observed, however, that instead of remaining at home, many children, including those of the high school had a tendency to gather in groups in public places down town and to form parties to visit neighboring communities where influenza prevails to some extent. To combat this tendency on the part of the young people, the board of village trustees held a special meeting Tuesday, night and, in cooperation with the school board and health officer, issued a public health notice as follows:

At the request of the school board, it is hereby ordered by the board of trustees of the Village of Rathdrum, in cooperation with the health officer, that all children of school age in the village be required to remain at their homes and to refrain from congregating together or visiting with one another, and to keep off the streets except when running errands, until notice shall be given that the danger of an epidemic of influenza is over. It is urged upon the parents, in the interest of the public health and safety, that they give all possible assistance in enforcing this order upon the children of our community.”

source: The Rathdrum Tribune. (Rathdrum, Idaho), 18 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Rathdrum Tribune., October 18, 1918, page 2

The influenza epidemic in the military camps is abating, but continues to spread through the civilian population. About 500 cases are now reported in Idaho.

source: The Rathdrum Tribune. (Rathdrum, Idaho), 18 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Rathdrum Tribune., October 18, 1918, page 3

Personal Mention

F. L. Coon and family, ill with the influenza last week, are reported recovering.
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Local Paragraphs

An extra gang on the N. P. railroad, brought here last week, was quarantined in the car near the depot Saturday by local officials when it was discovered some of the men had influenza.

source: The Rathdrum Tribune. (Rathdrum, Idaho), 18 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Oakley Herald. October 18, 1918, page 1

J. C. De La Mare left today for Salt Lake City to attend the funeral of his daughter-in-law, Mrs. Robert De La Mare, who died of Spanish influenza. The sympathy of the city goes out to the family in their bereavement.
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Influenza.

As we go to press, one hundred and twenty cases of Spanish influenza are reported in Cassia County. A hundred of these are in Burley. It is rumored that a man died of the disease at Clearcreer [sic] last night.

source: The Oakley Herald. (Oakley, Idaho), 18 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Oakley Herald. October 18, 1918, page 11

To Battle with Influenza.

Washington. – The following telegram, which is self-explanatory, relates to the emergency medical and nursing relief work furnished through the United States public health service to communities unable to cope with the present situation even with state aid:

“Public health service will mobilize with aid volunteer medical service all outside medical aid required in combating present influenza epidemic. Red Cross upon specific request from this service will mobilize nursing personnel and furnish necessary emergency hospital supplies which cannot be obtained otherwise. Inform all city and county health officers your state that all appeals for aid must be made to state health department, which will make request of surgeon general, public health service, whenever local needs require. Whenever necessary public health service will establish district officer to co-operate with state officials and distribute medical and nursing personnel.

(signed) Blue, Surgeon General, U.S. Public Health Service.”

source: The Oakley Herald. (Oakley, Idaho), 18 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Clearwater Republican. October 18, 1918, page 1

Open Air Meeting

Unless there is an outbreak of influenza before Sunday, permission is granted for an open air meeting. It will be held at the band stand on the school grounds at 11 a.m., Sunday, October 20. Preaching, singing and an interesting service. You are invited.

F. L. Moore, Pastor
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The Orofino schools were closed this week as a precaution against the spread of Spanish Influenza, and parents are urged to keep their children off the streets.

source: Clearwater Republican. (Orofino, Idaho), 18 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Clearwater Republican. October 18, 1918, page 4

Village Health Order.

Supplementing orders Nos. 42. 43 and 44 have been issued by the Idaho State Board of Health, in co-operation with the United States Health Service, in the control of Spanish. Influenza. In substance they are as follows.

Thorough sterilization by washing and rinsing in warm water and then complete immersion In boiling water of all equipment, including dishes, knives, forks, spoons, glasses. etc., used in the serving to the public of foods and drinks, immediately after each individual use.

The use of public or common drinking cups and towels in any place whatsoever, and the use of broken or chipped drinking cups or glasses Is positively prohibited.

Inspectors of this department and all local health officers will enforce this order, and are directed to peremptorily close any and all places failing to observe this order, or refusing to comply with these provisions, making report of their action to this office.

On the spirit in which this order is accepted and observed depends whether or not It will he modified or strengthened. In order to get the required results.

J. B. Loomis, Village Clerk.

source: Clearwater Republican. (Orofino, Idaho), 18 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Kendrick Gazette. October 18, 1918, page 1

School Notes

Some of the pupils are leaving school because of the influenza, but school will be closed before any danger arises from the disease.

Miss Dupertuis received word Tuesday of the death of her brother’s wife at Portland. The brother is with General Pershing in France. The death of his wife, which was due to influenza, leaves two little children homeless. One has influenza. They will be taken care of by a sister of Miss Dupertuis, who lives in Portland.
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Influenza at Nez Perce

Reports from Nez Perce are to the effect that there are over 250 cases of influenza in that town and adjoining community. About ten cases have developed into pneumonia and a number of cases are reported critically ill. Only three physicians have been available and one of these is now ill and unable to render services.

source: The Kendrick Gazette. (Kendrick, Idaho), 18 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Kendrick Gazette. October 18, 1918, page 6

Gleanings

Last week there was an influenza scare in this community, the report being circulated that there was a case in town. So far there has been nothing to indicate that there are any grounds for the report. There have been no cases reported to Dr. Rothwell, local health officer.

source: The Kendrick Gazette. (Kendrick, Idaho), 18 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Recorder. October 18, 1918, page 5

“Flu” in Starr Family

Mr. and Mrs. Clyde Starr and a young lady of the same household are the only sufferers in Lemhi county from Spanish influenza, according to reports made to the county health officer, Dr. Wright. The Starrs reside on the Barrack ranch. The health officer reports the malady in light form and under control.
— —

Two Salmon Boys Victims of Spanish Influenza

The wires have brought the sad news to Salmon that two of our boys Harry Bullock and Jack Kirkham, the former in Camp Fremont and the latter in Camp Lewis, have been taken as victims of the Spanish influenza.

Young Bullock died October 12 and his body is expected to arrive in Salmon today. The death of young Kirkham was announced by telegram received by Mrs. Roy Buchanan, his sister, yesterday afternoon. The funeral arrangements have not been announced. The home of the Kirkhams is near Tendoy. Mrs. Margaret Kirkham is the mother of this stricken home and the father was the late Robert Kirkham. The mother and elder daughter, Miss Olive, went to Camp Lewis upon being appraised of the dangerous condition of the soldier. They will return with the body. There are two other sisters and a younger brother surviving.

source: The Idaho Recorder. (Salmon City, Idaho), 18 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Idaho Recorder. October 18, 1918, page 6

19181018IR1-headline
Influenza Epidemic Has Not Yet Reached Its Peak
Nearly a Quarter of a Million Cases Have Been Reported From Army Camps

Washington, Oct. 12. — The epidemic of Spanish influenza which has reached practically every section of the country, continues to spread with no signs of abatement. Detailed reports as to its spread among the civilian populations are not available at the public health service bureau, but officials say nothing has been received to indicate that the malady has reached its peak.

New cases of influenza in army camps showed a slight decline in the 24 hours ending at noon yesterday, but pneumonia cases increased over the day previous. Influenza cases reported to the surgeon general of the army numbered 12,024; pneumonia cases 2,824, and deaths 892. Thursday’s reports showed 12,321 new cases of influenza; 2,797 new cases of pneumonia, and 889 deaths.

The total number of influenza cases at camps since the beginning of the epidemic has reached 223,000; pneumonia cases 27,907, and deaths 8,335.

source: The Idaho Recorder. (Salmon City, Idaho), 18 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Idaho Recorder. October 18, 1918, page 7

Northwest Notes

With Spanish influenza already raging at Libby, in Northwestern Montana, at Chateau, in central Montana, at Billings and Scobey, in eastern Montana, an at Whitehall and Twin Bridges in southern Montana, health official are of the opinion that only good luck, coupled with hard work can prevent a widespread epidemic of this disease in Montana.
— —

News Review of The Great War

On Monday the master numbers in the new draft were drawn. President Wilson taking the first from the bowl. The classification of the men is progressing well, but the sending of those selected to the training camps may be delayed by the serious spread of the epidemic of influenza. Rigorous measures are being adopted to check the disease, with prospects of success. Considering its nature the number of deaths is not extraordinary.

source: The Idaho Recorder. (Salmon City, Idaho), 18 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

1918Atlantic6-streetcar
A conductor checks to see if potential passengers are wearing required masks in Seattle, in 1918. Library of Congress via AP, National Archives

source: Alan Taylor April 10, 2018 “30 Photos of the 1918 Flu Pandemic” The Atlantic
— — — — — — — — — —

Montpelier Examiner. October 18, 1918, page 1

19181018ME1-headline
Influenza Still Raging Thruout United States
Despite the Drastic Measures Which are Being Used the Disease Numbers Its Victims by Hundreds — Local Condition Still Good.

The Spanish influenza still has a strong grip on this country, despite the hard fight that is being made against it However, in some sections of the country, where the disease first appeared, the conditions are much improved, but it is continuing to spread throughout the land and there are but few places in the United States where it has not made its appearance.

In Utah the disease has spread rapidly the past week, but the percentage of deaths has been light. The Utah State board and the Salt Lake city board of health are working in conjunction to keep the situation as well in hand as possible. However, Dr. Beatly stated Tuesday that, according to all indications, the disease had just started in Utah and a long and bitter fight could be expected.

Wednesday the Idaho state board of health said that there were between 400 and 1100 cases of influenza in the state, Bannock county, with 140 cases, having the largest number of any county that had reported to the state board. The state board has directed the county and city boards of health to use every means possible to stamp out and prevent the spread of the disease.

At this writing, Thursday afternoon, the situation in Montpelier is good, which is due largely to the stringent orders that have been put into effect by the city board of health. The great trouble in keeping the disease out, is the handling of people who come into the city from infected districts. So far this phase of matters has been well handled.

A quarantine has been placed against the people of Star Valley, in which there were two deaths up to Wednesday and a large number of cases. In fact, a telephone message was received here from Afton Wednesday evening, asking if nurses or help of some kind could be sent there, as there were 14 cases in the town with no nurses and very limited medical assistance.

If the people will co-operate with the local board of health in carrying out the latter’s orders, it is barely possible that anything like an epidemic of the disease can be averted in Montpelier.

Dr. Woods Hutchinson, the noted, American authority on health and sanitation, was in Salt Lake Tuesday, having come from Boston where he went through the epidemic of influenza in that city. He gave out some statements relative to the disease and its action, which are of interest. Probably the most startling announcement made by Dr. Hutchinson was to the effect that medical treatment won’t prevent or cure the malady. He stated that no medicine has been found that would prevent a person who was susceptible from taking the disease if he were exposed and medicine would not cure him after he got it.

“It is true that a vaccine has been developed which has been found to give fairly good results in prevention And has quite effective in reducing fatalities, but this is so limited in quantity, and the possibilities of its manufacture are so limited that it cannot be gotten in quantities sufficient to be of material use in this epidemic,” said Dr Hutchinson.

“Hence the only thing to do is to take every possible precaution to protect yourself from infection. Using medicines for this purpose is useless. Nothing has been found that is effective. The only thing that is at all effective is the gauge mask and people who want to protect themselves should wear them, even in street cars, on the streets and other places where they are likely to come into contact with the disease.

“If you get the disease you don’t need a hospital, a physician and a trained nurse They cannot do anything more for you than any other person who will wait upon you and see that you have what you want. No medicine has been found which has any effect upon the disease, so you don’t need medicine. If you get the disease in the pneumonia stage, what you need is not a hospital with doctors and nurses, but a tent out in the fresh air with someone, protected by a mask, to see that you have water to drink and nourishing food. If the resistance powers of your constitution are sufficient to throw off the poison you will get well. If they are not you will he dead in about three days. But you stand far better chances for recovery out in the fresh air than in a most modern hospital. Fresh air is the only medicine and the only treatment that seems to have any effect at all. But experience has demonstrated that fresh air is effective, therefore it should be used to the fullest extent.”

“If a susceptible person gets a dose of the germs in his nose,” said the doctor, “he is going to get the disease in spite of everything. Whether he will throw it off or will die from it depends entirely upon whether his constitutional resistance is sufficient to overcome the poison,”

In short, for Hutchinmon says that if you wish to guard against infection wear a gauze mask, and if you get the disease, go to bed in the fresh air and stay there.

“It is a peculiarity of the disease that it attacks the physically strong and robust just as quickly and as fatally as it does a weak person. In fact, it seems to hit the strong more fatally than the weak. But it is also peculiar that the malady does not seem to attack children and old people to any extent. It is persons from 26 to 35 or 40 among whom it seems to spread most.”

The doctor explains that the bacilli of the disease have the queer habit of disappearing from the nose and mouth of the infected person in light cases within two or three days and the patient thinks he is well. Then he suddenly develops a lung infection that is highly fatal. The bacili merely move from the mouth and nose to the lunge, he explained, and there gather force for the infection which is so quick and so fatal.

Pathological tests that have been made, the doctor stated, have shown that the lung infection in fatal cases was neither pneumoccus nor strepoccocus pneumonia, but pure influenza. He says that the influenza bacilli are found in pure culture and without mixed infection.

source: Montpelier Examiner. (Montpelier, Idaho), 18 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Meridian Times., October 18, 1918, page 1

Many of the people who rush to the drug stores to buy influenza remedies, are the same ones who shut out of their rooms the best remedy of all, and one that cost nothing, fresh air.
— —

1918PharmacyAdMeridian

source: The Meridian Times. (Meridian, Idaho), 18 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Meridian Times., October 18, 1918, page 2

In Its fight to stop the spread of Spanish influenza the public health service is investigating the causes of the disease, the conditions which promote its spread and the part played by carriers in epidemics of the malady.

source: The Meridian Times. (Meridian, Idaho), 18 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Meridian Times., October 18, 1918, page 7

In the Gem State

Drastic closing regulations have been passed by the state board of health, owing to the Spanish influenza epidemic. Theatres, churches and all public meetings are put under the ban, but the public and private schools have not been closed.

Earl Oakley, a teacher in Caldwell high school, has contracted smallpox, and two other teachers near town are reported afflicted with the disease. It is thought that the disease can be traced to the teachers’ institute, held in Boise some time ago.

source: The Meridian Times. (Meridian, Idaho), 18 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Meridian Times., October 18, 1918, page 8

The doctors in Meridian report not less than seven suspected cases of Spanish influenza in this vicinity. The majority of these cases are in the Kuna district south of town.

source: The Meridian Times. (Meridian, Idaho), 18 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Republican. October 18, 1918, page 1

Stop Burning of Leaves

As soon as a strong autumn wind sweeps down the valley Boise’s streets, sidewalks and yards will be ankle deep with fallen leaves, and then, it the plan of the past years is followed, these leaves will be raked into piles and burned. The result will be that the city will be full of an acrid smoke which will irritate the membrane of the nose and throat, aggravate all “colds” and create an inflammation that will make hundreds of persons more susceptible to the germs of Spanish Influenza.

In Salt Lake the health authorities have forbidden the burning of leaves this year because the smoke will probably aggravate the influenza danger. Boise physicians have long been opposed to the burning practice and this year, of all times, the local authorities, here and elsewhere in the state, should listen to and follow the advise which physicians give.

Fallen leaves make nearly the best mulch that is known. The cash value of the leaves burned in Boise every autumn is probably several thousand dollars, when their worth as mulch and fertilizer is taken into account. This year besides being wasteful, the burning of leaves will also prove an unusual menace to the health of the community. Other plans should be made at once for their disposition before the annual drop begins.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 18 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Idaho Republican. October 18, 1918, page 2

Moreland

Mrs. Jennie Williams who has one to Camp Fremont to spend the winter, wrote to her home folks and said that the camp was quarantined for influenza.
— —

McDonaldville

School has been closed here for two weeks on account of sickness and the parents needing their children to help harvest crops.

The Baily family who are suffering with Spanish influenza are in a very serious condition. Mr. Baily’s sister from Salt Lake arrived here the first of the week to take care of the sick folks.

The Fred Cooper family are reported ill with the Spanish influenza.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 18 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Idaho Republican. October 18, 1918, page 4

“Nod” Mulville Heard From

Mrs. Emma Ashton received a letter from her son, “Nod,” the first of the week stating that he was recovering from an attack of Spanish Influenza. He also stated there were 1300 cases at Camp Pike at the present time.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 18 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Idaho Republican. October 18, 1918, page 5

Local News

The Kirk families of Centerville, who have been ill with the Spanish Influenza, are now somewhat improved.

To quit burning leaves and thash [sic] may seem a remote preventative of influenza, but that is recommended for towns and villages because the smoke and ashes irritates the tender membranes.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 18 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Idaho Republican. October 18, 1918, page 8

Shelley

Mr. Waller has been seriously ill with the influenza for about ten days, but the last reports are that he is improving

Clifford Dean and William Fly both recently came home from Salt Lake City, where they have been in the S. A. T. C. at the University of Utah. There being no school or drilling at the university until the danger from influenza is overcome.

The pools halls will remain closed until further notice from the government. People may go into the pool halls for a drink or ice cream, but should absolutely not loaf around such places as long as there is any danger of the Spanish influenza spreading. The picture show will not open until notified by the government that they can do so.

It is reported that there are several cases of influenza in Jameston. Everything should be done that is possible to keep the disease from spreading.
— —

Taber

Mrs. Siesser received a telegram Wednesday reporting the death of her sister Mrs. H. C. Watson of Spanish Influenza at Springfield, Mo.

Mrs. Fred Lee and two children are working in the potatoes at Moreand this week. The hogs that were infected with cholera are all O. K. now.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 18 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

Shoshone Journal. October 18, 1918, page 7

Idaho State News

Many of the wood-working plants in Idaho have been forced to suspend operations, and the workingmen, feeling that they could serve their country in a more direct way, have gone into the shipyards and other active war industries.

The courts will decide whether or not the state board of health acted within its powers in issuing the closing order as a preventive against possible spread of Spanish influenza in the state, as all violators are to be arrested.

J. Darling was fined $17 and costs for being drunk on the streets of Boise, and upon his inability to pay the fine was committed to serve his time in the city jail or work in Julia Davis park. Darling claims he was drinking hard cider.

As far as known there has been no case of Spanish influenza in Idaho Falls or Bonneville county. Every precaution is being taken to prevent its appearance. All public indoor gatherings are prohibited. Theaters are closed and no church services are being held.

source: Shoshone Journal. (Shoshone, Idaho), 18 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., October 18, 1918, page 1

Camp Lewis is Quarantined.

Camp Lewis, Wash. — This camp will be placed under strict quarantine tomorrow as a preventative measure against influenza which is now epidemic in the northwest.
— —

19181018DSM1-headline
Eldon G. Phelps Died Early Today
Moscow Young Man Expired In Naval Hospital At Puget Sound Yard

Eldon Phelps, of Moscow, died this morning at the naval hospital at the Puget Sound navy yard, of influenza. Mrs. Pearl Phelps, his wife, received a telegram yesterday from Dr. C. C. Grieve, commanding officer, stating that her husband was seriously sick. Today she received another telegram announcing that he had died at 4:42 this morning.

Mr. Phelps enlisted in the naval reserve on June 28 and was called on October 2 and left here on that date. He was well and favorably known here. He is a son of C. H. Phelps, of Moscow and leaves a widow and young child. He had been employed as driver of the truck for Williamson’s department store.

Eldon left Moscow October 2 with the contingent of boys to join the navy. He was born in Illinois, but had lived in Idaho since he was nine years of age, and at the time of his death was 24 years of age. He was married in September, 1917, to Miss Pearl Buchanan, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James Buchanan, of this city. Besides his wife, he leaves a young son, nine weeks of age. The body will be brought to Moscow Saturday and the funeral will probably occur Sunday.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 18 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., October 18, 1918, page 5

19181018DSM2-headline
Nezperce Stricken With Influenza
Lewiston Asked To Help Town Where Disease Has Been Fatal To Four

Lewiston. — Dr. E. L. White of the White hospital, Lewiston, who has been assisting in handling the influenza epidemic in Nez Perce, made an urgent appeal today that 25 or more Lewiston people go to Nez Perce today to act as nurses there and that as many physicians as possible also go. Dr. White states “there is not a family in Nez Perce where there is not one to two cases, and in some instances entire families are stricken. The situation is not confined to the town. There are cases in the country where whole families are ill and no one to attend them”

It was stated that Dr. Gist, Dr. Taylor and Dr. Dunlap have been trying to meet the situation, but that Dr. Gist is ill and the remaining two physicians are worked to the point of exhaustion. Dr. White urged quick action on the part of Lewiston people today, asking that those who can make the trip by automobile reach Nez Perce at the earliest possible moment.

Mayor Osmers and P. R. Bevis, president of the Lewiston Commercial club, in cooperation with Dr. Susan Bruce, city health officer, and Dr. Alley, county physician, are making arrangements for relief work. The Lewiston Red Cross chapter urges that all women who have taken home nursing courses report.

Four Deaths Reported.

County Auditor J. B. White died yesterday evening about 6 o’clock.

Clarence Brown, son of the Nezperce butcher, died about 8 p. m. yesterday.

Henry Berry, aged about 17, died at 4 o’clock this morning.

Fred Hillenbrand, the Nezperce drayman, died at 5 o’clock this morning.
— —

Telephone Raise To Be Protested
Moscow Citizens Will Object to Local Company Increasing Its Rates

The hearing on the application of the Moscow Telephone company for the privilege of increasing its rates, which was to have been held here on October 22, has been indefinitely postponed because of the influenza order which forbids the holding of any public meetings. George G. Pickett, city attorney, received notice from the public utilities commission of Idaho, by telegraph today, that the hearing has been “indefinitely postponed.” …

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 18 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., October 19, 1918, page 1

Influenza Causes U. To Close Temporarily

The Classes in the University of Idaho were dismissed today owning to a mild attack of influenza developed in cases of two of the S. A. T. C. men. There is some doubt as to whether the men really have influenza but it was thought best to close the school for today and call off all meetings for Sunday. The three cases under suspicion are in quarantine and will be closely watched. The other men will be kept in the open air as much as possible and it is believed there will be no danger of the disease.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 19 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

1919Atlantic10-a
Physics class, University of Montana, Missoula, 1919. During the influenza epidemic, classes were held outdoors. National Archives

source: Alan Taylor April 10, 2018 “30 Photos of the 1918 Flu Pandemic” The Atlantic
— — — — — — — — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., October 21, 1918, page 1

19181021DSM2-headline
Influenza Closes The University
State Board Of Health Closed All Schools In State Of Idaho Today

The University of Idaho was closed today for indoor classes, but a number of classes were held out doors and the S. A. T. C. and vocational training men worked as usual. The closing of indoor classes was ordered in compliance with the instructions from the state board of health and not because of any local conditions that would warrant it.

There are few cases that are suspicious among students, but every one has been put in close quarantine for observation. Every case of a severe cold is being watched and the person suffering with it is not permitted on the campus. Students who live at home are not permitted to attend the open air classes, but an opportunity has been given them to take their bed and bedding to the barracks and remain under the same rules as the S. A. T. C. men, but they will be required to pay for their meals.

There is one case of pneumonia in the vocational training squad. but it is slight. The patient reached Moscow the last of last week from a distant point.

The Red Cross is doing all that it can for the men under quarantine and will take charge of the nursing, should any be required. With more than 1250 students and soldiers here it is regarded as remarkable that there are so few cases.

Dr. Lindley, president of the university, is giving his personal attention to the work of caring for all who are under suspicion and has been rushing from one barracks to another to see that every one is comfortable and the health board’s rules are strictly obeyed.

The situation at the university is not regarded as at all serious and it is hoped to receive permission before long to reopen the school for its regular work.

A sensational story was published in today’s Spokesman-Review to the effect that Spokane women are working over time on influenza masks for Moscow, where 1000 had been ordered for the S. A. T. C. and the vocational training men. Dr. Lindley knows nothing of this and no one here knows who gave such an order. The story says these masks are being made for Gonzaga University, Spokane, and for W. S. C. at Pullman. They may have been ordered by the war department. It is certain they were not ordered from Moscow.

Does Not Effect S. A. T. C.

The University of Idaho today received the following telegram which is self-explanatory:

“President, University of Idaho,
“Moscow, Idaho.
“You are advised that State Board of Health has today closed all public and private schools in the state. State institutions are by this order quarantined from date — this quarantine to include administrative forces, instructors and student body, and will apply to those living on premises of university. Students living in Moscow to be excluded from school. Nothing in this order applies to the operation of the S. A. T. C.
“Biwer, Secy.”
— —

Two Funerals and One Death Today
Two Soldiers Buried With Military Honors – aged Woman Passed Away

The funeral of Adolph Hendrickson, who died at Jefferson Barracks, Mo., a few days ago, was held at the Moscow cemetery today at 10:30. Rev. J. Quincy Biggs conducted the services. There was a military escort for the body. Corporal James E. Shoptaw, of the 18th company at Jefferson Barracks accompanied the body to Moscow.

At 2:30 this afternoon the funeral of Eldon Phelps, of Moscow, who died at Bremerton, Ore., Friday, was held at the Moscow cemetery. Rev. Mr. Biggs delivered the sermon and conducted the services, which were attended by many friends. A military escort accompanied the body to the grave.

Mrs. Margaret Eri died at the family home in the southeast part of town yesterday. She was 77 years old and leaves a husband and one daughter, Mrs. T. Grendahl. The funeral will be held at 10:30 tomorrow forenoon.
— —

Children Must Not Congregate in Moscow

Dr. Adair, city health officer, asks all families who have cases of influenza to remain at home until cured. If the people will obey the voluntary quarantine regulations and keep all who are afflicted with the disease at home until they fully recover, there will be no flag placed at that home. But if the people will not do this they will be officially quarantined, flags placed at the homes and they will not be permitted to leave until the quarantine is raised and the names of all persons having the disease will be published. Parents are requested to not permit children to congregate in their homes nor allow them to run to the homes of neighbors. Every child should be kept, as nearly as possible, on the premises of its parents. If these rules are obeyed the disease may be stamped out without an epidemic.
— —

B. Y. O. F. Club Gives Fruit to Soldiers

The Star-Mirror office is in receipt of a large box of fruit, jelly and other delicacies for the soldiers’ mess from the B. Y. O. F. club. Mrs. J. Shannon brought two large jars of fruit and preserves to the office today for the soldiers’ mess. A lady called and asked where she could deliver apples for the soldiers and was told to send them here and they will be sent to the men who are in training. This fruit is especially needed now when a number are in the hospital suffering with slight cases of influenza.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 21 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., October 21, 1918, page 4

19181021DSM1-headline
Say Spanish Influenza is Camouflaged Grip

The following circular was issued to physicians yesterday by Dr. John B. Anderson, city health officer of Spokane:

“The local profession has loyally assisted the health department in the past and no valid reason can be advanced why that staunch support will not be continued.

“As long as time exists men capable of independent thinking will be more or less individualistic in their ideas as to methods of effectually developing fundamental problems. However, the potential of action in unity has been handed down through the experience of ages, and has become an axiomatic principle of democratic government.

New in Name Only.

“As a result of the prevalence abroad of the so-called ‘Spanish influenza,’ the health officer is taking such precautions to safeguard the health of the city as are indicated by conditions and the apparent nature of the malady.

“Doctor, you may have laudable convistions [sic] as to methods of fighting a crisis like the present at variance with the routine established by those now in authority. However, our mutual aim is identical — suppress the ‘flu ;’ save life. To that end we request during the period of this present epidemic of influenza, that you treat every case of cold coming to your attention as influenza until the contrary is established, at least to the extent of insisting on the same exacting requirements, to-wit: Keep the patient isolated; deny visitors to his presence, and have him remain isolated from the public for at least three days after the temperature shall have been normal. Inform your patients that the only thing new about ‘Spanish influenza’ is the adjective that it is none other than the old fashioned familiar influenza, alias la grippe, dolled up in a new dress.

How to Avoid Infection.

“Much good will be accomplished if you will take the time to tell your patient that colds and grippe are communicated by droplet infection, explain what droplet infection is, and that the present restrictions are established with the idea of preventing people from massing, thereby minimizing the danger incident, to close proximity of infected persons.

“The state board of health has made influenza a reportable disease, as well as pneumonia, both broncho and lobar.

“In reporting pneumonia, please state whether or not the primary cause was thought to be influenza. With pneumonia report include name, address and age of patient.

“In reporting influenza, total daily number of new cases is the information desired. Instruct your office attendant to look after this detail.

Prompt Report Urged.

“The surgeon general’s office requests of the health office accumulated influenza data by wire daily. This is an additional reason for your making prompt daily reports.

“Enclosed is a leaflet issued by the surgeon general’s office. If you can make use of more copies of this leaflet, on your request we will see that you are supplied.

“Permit, me, doctor, to thank you for the execution of the within formulated requests. In so doing, I anticipate, as my experience justifies, a full compliance.”

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 21 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
———————————

Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 1)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 2)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 3)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 4)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 5)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 6)