Monthly Archives: June 2020

Roads Update June 29, 2020

Lick Creek: Open – Valley County sent a grader over the pass. Cleared trees and rocks from the road way did a little grading work – road is still in very rough condition.

Profile: Not Officially Open by Valley County – Locals in Yellow Pine have made it over the summit. No snow at the summit – cleared several trees from the roadway. Valley County has not sent equipment over the pass, but will drive it this week to determine timing of equipment working the roadway.

Goose Lake: Open beyond Hazard Lakes. Rough condition and has not been graded. Rock have been cleared from the point just beyond Brundage Resort.

Warren Wagon: Federal highways work just past McCall with hard closures. FS work north of Secesh Meadows with temporary traffic delays. From Warren Summit to the South Fork is open with a traffic advisory for rough road conditions.

Elk Summit: Not open – 5 to 6 feet of snow reported late last week.

Monumental/Thunder Mt Road: Opened by Yellow Pine locals to ATV width – 30 trees cut out of roadway. Vehicle access would require additional work. Travel not advisable.

Cuddy Mt.: Access further up with snow melt, but snow banks in shaded areas still preventing access. No access to Buck Park area yet.

South Fork: Open with hard closures 0700 to 1600 for reconstruction work. Closure is from mile post 14 to 16 – same as last week.

Johnson Creek: Open

info from Brian Harris Payette NF

June 28, 2020 The Yellow Pine Times

June 28, 2020 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Reminder: We are still under a boil water order until further notice.
The 2020 Harmonica Festival has been canceled.

Community Calendar:

The Corner is Open w/reservations
Yellow Pine Tavern is open for outside dining.
The General Store is open Tues-Sat
Yellow Pine Lodge Open
Murph’s RV park open (no cabins or showers)
April 17 – Boil water order issued
May 15 – Firewood Season starts
June 16 – Hard closure of South Fork Road (weekdays)
July 1 – Post Harmonica Meeting 2pm Community Hall
July 2 & 5 – Richter estate sale
July 4 – Yellow Pine Golf Gathering (1045am)
July 4 – Live Music at The Corner
July 5 – Annual YPWUA meeting 2pm Community Hall
2020 Harmonica Festival Canceled
(details below)
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From Valley County

We need Your Help to protect the place and the people we all Love.
link:
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Valley County Covid-19 Response Page
link:
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Valley County Emergency Operations Center
link:
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Rebound – Idaho Governor’s phasing program
link:
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COVID 19: Recommendations and Resources for Safe Business Practices
link: (lots of info for businesses)
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Local Events:


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Post Harmonica Meeting July 1 at 2pm in the Community Hall

The 2020 Harmonica Festival has been postponed until 2021 to be held August 5,6,7 2021. Now comes the process of un-scheduling all what has been scheduled, as we waited to see if we would proceed or not. Also to be considered are ideas to make up the shortfall in our Community Budget this year. Please help us with ideas by email or plan to attend our Post Harmonica Meeting to be held Wednesday July 1,2020 at 2pm in the Community Hall in Yellow Pine. There we will discuss all that must be done to close out this year and plan for next year. Also ideas and plans for Village fundraising for our Budget Items.

Thanks,
Lorinne N. Munn
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Richter Estate Sale

Nancy is planning to have an estate sale from 10am to 2pm on the 2nd and the [*correction] 5th of July from 11am to 2pm. The address is 980 Boulder Creek Rd.
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4th of July Yellow Pine Golf Gathering

Although the official YP Golf Tournament was called off, a few of us are hosting an “unofficial” Yellow Pine Golf Gathering. No entrance fees, just asking for donations (which we are already getting.) All proceeds will go to the Community Hall. There will be fun, funky trophies and prizes. We will provide bottled water and score cards. Tee time is 11am on Saturday the 4th so we’re asking people to show up about 10:45am.
Hope to see you all there enjoying the fresh air and the spectacular 18 holes.
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4th at The Corner

Live Music on the Fourth of July with Braid, local band from McCall playing 2-6 pm followed by Willie and the Singlewides till we shut the doors.
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Yellow Pine Water Users Association

Meeting July 5 at 2pm in the Community Hall. See agenda below under YPWUA News.
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2020 Festival is Cancelled

We have come to the decision that the 2020 Festival will be cancelled. We look forward to celebrating the 32nd year of the Festival August 5, 6, & 7, 2021.

Our decision was not made lightly. We had to consider the current situation we are in and examine the outlook for the coming months. This is the necessary and right decision for the safety of our community and all participants.

We all look forward to one big reunion with all of you in August 2021.
– DF
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Village News:

Please Return Borrowed Measuring Wheel

Would the person who borrowed the Village’s measuring wheel please return it to the Community Hall or one of the Council members? Thank you
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Village of Yellow Pine Association Minutes June 13, 2020

Called to order at 2:02.
Officers present: Deb Filler, Chr.; Ronda Rogers, Vice Chr.; Rhonda Egbert, Acting Treas.; Lynn Imel, Sec.
Absent: Ron Noel, Mem. At Large.
Residents: 11, Guests: 2

Temporary Acting Treasurer: Due to the resignation of elected Treasurer, Lorraine McIntosh, the VYPA officers met January 22, 2020 and voted to have Rhonda Egbert serve as Acting Treasurer until elections at the July, 2020 meeting.

Approval of Minutes: There being no objections the Minutes of the September 21, 2019 meeting were approved as posted.

Treasurer’s Report: Rhonda Egbert provided written copies of the financial status. Report was approved. (see attached)

Community Hall: Ronda Rogers reported that the propane heater has been installed, a larger propane tank has been installed to serve the kitchen and the heater, work has been done to improve the kitchen floor, ceiling panels are being replaced to mitigate mold damage.

Composting Toilets: Willie Sullivan reported that no action has occurred on this project since the last report. Volunteers will be used for construction. A concrete floor will be installed, hopefully this summer. Cecil Dallman should be consulted soon if backhoe work is needed.

Cemetery: Carey Belsher reported the kiosk with information identifying grave locations was donated by Linda Welch and was vandalized years ago. Willie Sullivan, previous Cemetery Commissioner, removed it to make repairs. The present Cemetery committee is planning to make the repairs and suggested that it be re-located into Yellow Pine to prevent vandalism. Discussion of that proposal indicated that it should be repaired and placed at the previous location outside the cemetery gate. Candy Sullivan offered to contact Linda Welch and convey her comments to the committee.

Music & Harmonica Festival: Dawn Brown reported that at the open Committee meeting June 27th at the Community Hall, 2:00, all comments will be considered in making a decision regarding possible cancellation of the Festival. No vendors have cancelled. Idaho has begun Phase 4. The Committee has consulted with Valley County Sheriff and the National Forests as part of the planning. Jeff and Anne Forster, speaking as emergency response personnel for Yellow Pine area, conveyed their concern that they should be included in the Festival planning. They have consulted with Valley County authorities regarding Covid 19 impact by Forest/Yellow Pine visitors and plans for the Valley Co. Fair & Rodeo. The County has limited ambulances for Covid 19 transport and the local ambulance does not qualify for that use. The consensus of the membership present and the Committee is that people will come to Yellow Pine even if the event is cancelled; in that situation the Festival committee should advertise the closure and not provide a stage, electricity, or encourage the crowd to gather in Yellow Pine. Bill McIntosh is prepared to advertise a cancellation.

Election VYPA Treasurer, Secretary, Vice Chairman: Deb Filler explained that the Treasurer position is presently filled by an Acting Treasurer and the elected Treasurer will complete the term ending in one year. Rhonda Egbert expressed her opinion that that person should be available in Yellow Pine all year. Candidates should contact Rhonda Egbert, 208-633-1976 Iamcreative@hotmail.com . Nominations may also be made from the floor at the July 11th meeting. Members must be present to vote.

Proposed By-Laws Changes – First Reading: All proposed changes to the By-Laws submitted by the review committee were read aloud and discussed. See the copies posted on bulletin boards and websites or request a copy from the Council. Items of most concern included: 2.1.d use of Robert’s Rules of Order and use of a parliamentarian to insure order; 7.7 Selection of representatives to serve on Stibnite Advisory Board and Stibnite Foundation. Motion was made and approved that those representatives will be elected annually by the membership at the September meeting.

Dust Abatement: Dust abatement on local roads will take place June 22. Contact Deb Filler.

Community Agreement/Midas Gold Payment: Comments regarding the use of the $10,000 donation included: (1) Valley County Road Supervisor, Jeff McFadden, recently visited and assessed the roads within the Yellow Pine Township. Valley County property tax money is not used for road, ditch and alley maintenance. Valley County has ownership of all roads and alleys within the Township. All work on those roads, ditches and alleys must be pre-approved by the Valley County Road Dept.

(2) The Yellow Pine Water User’s Assoc. is applying for grants to cover the expenses for repairs to the water facilities.

(3) The committee that negotiated the Community Agreement with Midas Gold prioritized uses for the $30,000 donation. Those uses were the YP Water Users, the helicopter landing area, and the YP roads and ditches located on public property. Motion was made and approved that the 2020 grant of $10,000 be used for infrastructure maintenance of public access roads, alleys and ditches. That work will be organized by the Infrastructure Standing Committee headed by Clayton Egbert and Tim Rogers.

Yellow Pine Water Users: Willie Sullivan reported that recent earthquake activity has impacted the facilities and lines. The engineering firm has been replaced by Mountain Water Engineering and they are studying the conditions so grant applications can be written. Present water use is about 30,000 gal. per day and it should be approximately 5,000 per day. No timeline has been established for grant writing; a notice of intent to apply for grants has been filed. Water users can make arrangements for monthly payments. Each property in the Yellow Pine area is allowed one, $100, share which entitles the owner to one vote at meetings. Presently 55 shares are owned. Contact Willie Sullivan prior to the July YPWUA meeting to discuss payments and purchase of a share.

Stibnite Advisory Council: Lynn Imel reported that the representatives of the eight Valley County towns have met monthly to discuss potential impacts that could develop with the opening of Stibnite mine by Midas Gold. Water quality, hospital, school, traffic, housing, and employment are some of the topics addressed. Meetings are now moved to bi-monthly, second Thursdays, with Zoom access.

Stibnite Foundation: Ronda Rogers reported that the eight community representatives are reviewing the grant applications received and will be announcing the grants in August. The Foundation gave each community a donation to assist with food purchase for residents. In Yellow Pine, there being no agency for food distribution, each winter resident was given a one-hundred dollar gift card for use at a grocery store.

Midas Gold: Kyle Fend, Midas employee, answered questions regarding the Stibnite road and the status of the mine operation plans. The Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) results are expected in August and that will open a period of time for public comment. Midas currently rents three houses in the community for their employees and contractors and they are complying with all Covid 19 prevention plans.

Museum: Rhonda Egbert reported that the Yellow Pine Backcountry Museum has forms for each donor to complete if that have loaned or donated artifacts. The old fire truck, owned by the VYPA has been purchased by the Museum for $37.40. The plan is to repair the tires and move it to the Museum area. A volunteer is needed to cut wood plaques to be awarded to Festival winners. Festival promotion face masks are available at local businesses, $5. Supplies are needed for silent-auction baskets, particularly wine which enhances the sales.

Yard Sale Donations for the July 4th yard sale can be placed in the Community Hall.

Adjournment: 4:00
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Yellow Pine Dust Abatement

Dust Abatement in Yellow Pine was applied June 22nd.
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Idaho Power Tree Trimming

Idaho Power contract crews with Asplundh have been in Yellow Pine trimming trees under power lines this week.

P1000601-20200622TreeTrimmers-a
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Aftershock 1120pm June 24

Did anyone else feel the aftershock? M 4.6 – 27 km NW of Stanley, Idaho (South east of Cape Horn Mtn near Hwy 21.)

link:
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June 27 Meetings

There was a YPFD meeting at 10am at the Fire Hall and a Festival Meeting at 2pm at the Community Hall. Will post minutes when received.
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From the YPFD Fire Commissioners;

On June 27, 2020, the Yellow Pine Fire District (YPFD) – Fire Commissioner’s meeting took place. Minutes will be forthcoming. Jeff Forster, Volunteer Fire Chief and Paramedic resigned as Volunteer Fire Chief from YPFD. His resignation was accepted by the Commissioners. Jeff plans to finally enjoy his retirement here in Yellow Pine. The YPFD will be in a restructuring period and will have limited, if any, availability or response during this time.

The Commissioners will be putting out an announcement for the Volunteer Fire Chief position along with requirements soon. Anyone interested in this position or in becoming a volunteer can request an application from one of your YPFD Fire Commissioners.

Jeff’s resignation includes a resignation as Paramedic from Cascade Fire/EMS. Therefore, the Cascade Fire/EMS ambulance stationed in Yellow Pine will be out of service indefinitely. The EMS providers in Yellow Pine affiliated with this service are also resigning their positions. Yellow Pine will continue to be covered, in case of emergencies, through Cascade Rural Fire/EMS with the ambulance stationed in Cascade. Should you have an emergency or need medical assistance, please dial 911.
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4th of July No Personal Fireworks

courtesy YPFD

Still waiting for confirmation, but it sounds like the fireworks show has been canceled.
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2020 Census

The 2020 Census Impacts All Valley County Residents

Inching closer. Each of our communities and Valley County as a whole have increased our response rate by a few percentage points over the last few weeks – but we still have a lot of room to grow! We are still ranked #42 of 44 counties in Idaho for our Census response rate. Let’s get that number up! Responding to the Census takes less than 10 minutes and mean $1,483 per person in federal funding for Valley County.

It is recommended that we all fill out the census online.

If you spend 50% of your time in Valley County, you can consider it your home per the Census. Where you register with the Census is confidential and never linked to other governmental requirements such as property taxes or mailing address. The deadline for the 2020 Census has been extended until October 31st. They will probably not be sending census takers up to Yellow Pine.

Link: to online census

You do not need an ID number. Go to the link. Click on “start questionnaire”. Then on the next page scroll down to “If you do not have a Census ID, click here” – when you click on that line it will start the census. (see below)

2020Census-a
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Boil Water Order issued

Update June 12: The boil order is still on. We still are experiencing excessive water use because of leaks. Not sure when this will be lifted. We are applying for grants to repair the system.

Update June 2: The water plant is experiencing high water in Boulder Creek which brings more debris into the sand filter.

The high demand caused by leaks in the system plugs the sand filters prematurely. We will be on a boil order until further notice.

As of April 17th 2020, Yellow Pine is under another “Boil Order”

Boil Water Advisory Notice

Boil Your Water Before Using

Bring tap water to a rolling boil, boil for one minute, and cool before using or use bottled water. Boiled or bottled water should be used for drinking, making ice, washing dishes, brushing teeth, and preparing food until further notice.

This Boil Water Advisory Notice applies to The Yellow Pine Water System

The system is being monitored and checked daily for compliance. .

You will be informed when you no longer need to boil your water.

Please share this information with other people who drink this water, especially anyone who may not get this notice directly (for example, people in apartments, nursing homes, schools, and businesses).

You can do this by posting this notice in a public place or distributing copies by hand or mail.

State Water System ID#: 4430059 Date distributed: 3-22-2020
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Critters

Tick’s are still very plentiful in June.

Bears are out of hibernation, protect your trash and pet food.

Watch out for aggressive mother does and cows, they will stomp your dogs – and you too.
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Road News

Johnson Creek road is open, not graded yet. Report June 10th of people having to cut trees on Johnson Creek road, and a large pot hole somewhere – it was marked for a while but by Wednesday the sticks and flagging were gone. Travel at your own risk and carry a saw.

YP to Stibnite: June 12 – Yesterday, OK Gravel completed grading the Stibnite road and North American Dust Control will be spraying it June 23rd, 24th and 25th.

South Fork: Hard closure will begin on Tuesday, June 16; 7am to 4pm daily with no closures on weekends.
Access to Yellow Pine during closure hours will only be via Johnson Creek. With the delay of the opening of Lick Creek Road, the contractor needs to start work that requires closures in order to keep his crews working.
The closure sites will change on a weekly basis, and will not always be adjacent to the last closure site. Refer to the current weekly newsletter or the project website to determine the closure point and access for each week.
Road project link:

Lick Creek is open, the county bladed the last of the snow drifts and pushed downed trees off the road June 24th. Grading started on the lower end on the McCall side. Reported to be very rough over there.

Profile Report June 28: “Big Creek Road is snow-free over Profile Summit. ” – SA

Monumental Report Semi-open to the adventurous ATV riders. Travel at your own risk.
June 26: “Lots of rocks and trees. One little patch of snow 20 ft long. But otherwise Thunder Mountain is open for 4×4 vehicles … we cut over 30 trees. The other guy with me didn’t cut them full width for a car, just for his ATV. So any trees I didn’t cut will need to be trimmed to get full-size vehicles through.” – SA

June 26, 2020

Elk Summit Report June 27: “Elk Summit Road is still severely blocked by snow, but we rode ATVs over the top of the snow across Goldman’s Cut and down through Smith Creek. There were severe avalanches and we barely made it through.” SA

Trees down from Avalanche on Smith Creek

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Forest Info

All campgrounds and restroom facilities in the South Fork Corridor, Lick Creek/Secesh Corridor and along the East Fork South Fork Salmon River to Yellow Pine will begin seeing our regular restroom cleaning beginning this Friday, May 15th. Water systems will come online in the near future. The Krassel RD
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Yellow Pine US Mail

The 6-day a week mail delivery started June 1st. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 55 cents. Support our local post office and purchase your holiday stamps here.
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Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Report June 6 – with community support more repairs have been made to the doors, and cement has been poured to stop the bear from digging under the building. A brave volunteer also climbed up on the roof and secured the loose roofing. The burn pile has been sorted as people have been dumping inappropriate items.

Report June 1 – the bins have been emptied. South doors are a bit stiff. The road from YP to the dump is really good.

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

Yellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is located approximately 3 miles south on Johnson Creek Road.

The TRANSFER STATION is for household trash and yard waste:
* Household trash must be put inside (and fit) the dumpster;
* Yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, etc.) goes in the burn pile on the south end of the turn-around;
* Cardboard boxes should be flattened before putting the in the dumpster,

The DUMPSTERS are NOT for:
* Furniture (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station).

The BURN PILE is NOT for:
* Cardboard boxes (flatten and put in dumpster);
* Furniture and appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Drywall and building material (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wire or fencing (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Foam Rubber (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wood with metal (like nails) attached (take to Donnelly Transfer Station.)

When closing the DOORS on the front of the dumpsters:
* Make sure the “U” brackets at the top and bottom of the door are engaged;
* The retaining bar at the middle of the door is slid into the pipe;
* And the “L” bars at the bottom of the doors dropped into place.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: 208/634-7176
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Local Groups

YPWUA News:

July 5th 2020 meeting at the Community Hall 2pm

Agenda

1. Financial Report Willie
A. Current Balance
B. Delinquent Accounts

2. Operations Warren
A. Current Boil Order
B. Current condition of system
– Leaks
– Earthquake Damage

3. Grants Steve and Willie
A. Current awarded grant status
B. Discontinued use of SPF Engineering
C. New Engineering Company Mountain Water Works
D. By-law update terms of office, agent

4. Final Issues
A. Future rate increases
B. Summer lawn watering
C. Election of Board Members: Steve Holloway and Willie Sullivan positions

New Boil Water Order issued April 17, 2020. This could last until runoff is over.

Notice of Intent to File an Application with USDA, Rural Development

The Yellow Pine Water Users Association, Yellow Pine, Idaho intends to file an Application with USDA, Rural Development to obtain a drinking water system facility Emergency Community Water Assistance Grant (ECWAG). Emergency Community Water Assistance Grant (ECWAG).

If any additional information is needed, please contact:
Willie Sullivan
Treasurer
ypwater@gmail.com

Distributed to Yellow Pine Water Users Association customers via Yellow Pine Times on June 12, 2020.

The last Yellow Pine Water Users Shareholders meeting was Sunday July 7, 2019.
link: 20190707YPWUAminutes
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VYPA News:

Last Village Meeting was June 13th, next meeting July 11th

Minutes from June 13, 2020 meeting
link: 20200613 VYPA Minutes.pdf

2020 Festival Meeting May 16, 2020 Notes
Note: at each meeting we simply add to info on the topic. That way, info from all meetings is included in a single document.
link: 2020 Festival Planning Notes.pdf

July 1 – Post Harmonica Meeting 2pm Community Hall

Heat was installed in the community hall on April 30th.

If folks have items for the community yard sale, please place them by the north wall in the community hall. If you see items you would like to purchase, you can pay Deb, Ronda, or Lynn. All funds support the community hall.

VYPA meetings for 2020 – June 13, 2pm; July 11, 2pm; August 8, 2pm; September 12, 2pm.
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YPFD News:

There was a YP Fire Commissioner meeting on June 27, 2020 at 10 AM at the Fire Station, minutes forthcoming.

YPFD COVID19 Policy

link: YPFD Covid 19 SOP.docx

link: Covid-19 EMS.pdf (May 23)

May 10th Burn Permits – contact the YPFD

Pile burning: Dress appropriately, have enough help on hand (people, water and tools) and make a firebreak before you start. Call your local fire protection district chief to let them know you’ll be conducting a debris burn. This saves them from sending emergency responders to your property if they are not needed. Do NOT burn on breezy afternoons.

Better yet, “Bring It, Don’t Burn It”, you can take your yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, etc.) to the burn pile at the Transfer Station on the south end of the turn-around. Remember, keep the pile neat. Woody debris only, no nails, no cardboard and no furniture! The Boise NF will burn the pile in the fall when it is safe and doesn’t pollute our fine YP air.

YP Fire Commissioners:
Sue Holloway – District 1
Dan Stiff – District 2
Merrill Saleen – District 3
(TBA) – Fire Chief

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice

The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.”

Click the link: to view 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation
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Biz Listings:

The Corner (208) 633-3325

Open 11am-8pm Closed Tuesdays
Calling ahead works best but not a huge deal. Groceries, Ice Cream, Beer and Soda. Our menu fluctuates but typically have Smoked Brisket, Tri Tip, Chicken, Burgers and Wings on hand. Live Music on the Fourth of July with Braid, local band from McCall playing 2-6 pm followed by Willie and the Singlewides till we shut the doors.
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Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233

Open Daily 8am to 10pm. Outside Dining and Bar. Breakfast and Bar Food.
20200624YPTavern-a
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Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377

Open.
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Yellow Pine General Store (208) 633-3300

The store is open now and will be open into October. Hours are 9 am to 6 pm Tuesday through Saturday. Closed Sunday and Monday.
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Murph’s RV Park & Mary’s Cabins (208) 633-6677

Cabins are not available in 2020. RV Spaces $25/night; $150/week; $300/month. Tent spaces $10/night. Shower house is closed for 2020.
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Knotty Kat Crochet Works – 208-502-0940
FB page link
open Tue – Sat, 9-5
Yellow Pine eggs $3/doz
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Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Tom & Sarah Lanham
156 Yellow Pine Ave, Yellow Pine Id 83677
website:
Facebook:
Starting June 2020 We will be doing trail rides out of Yellow Pine along with summer pack / camping trips to high mountain lakes in the area!

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
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Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430 open 830am-5pm Monday-Friday, closed weekends.
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Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

The Star-News

subscribe:
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine

Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, will service Yellow Pine

B&T Safety Solutions LLC
208-271-1600 Based out of Donnelly
Snow removal, cleaning chimneys and stoves, we do cabin staining/chinking as well
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Telehealth

Cascade Medical Center is set up for Telehealth.

If you want to schedule an appointment, call our clinic at 208-382-4285. Vicki or one of the MAs will ask you some questions to make sure that a tele-video visit is the right choice given your symptoms or need. If so, we will work with you to make sure you are set up on the Cascade Medical Center patient portal (with our EMR). We will also make sure that you are set up to be able to do a tele-video visit (laptop with camera, desktop with camera, or smart phone). We use the Zoom telemedicine system, which is confidential and secure (it works like Skype or Face-time). Before the appointment, we will email you a link for the tele-video visit. When it is time for your appointment, you will click on the link in the email and you will be connected with our provider and can begin your visit.

Regarding insurance coverage, the COVID legislation passed in March assures coverage of telemedicine visits for patients with Medicare, Medicaid, VA. Private insurers have also decided to provide coverage just as for regular in person visits, at least until the COVID epidemic crisis is declared over.

Today (June 3rd) Blue Cross extended telehealth services and reimbursement through the end of the year.

Tom Reinhardt, CEO
Cascade Medical Center


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Local Observations:

Monday (June 22) overnight low of 42 degrees, clear sky this morning. Group of airplanes buzzed over early. Grosbeaks, robins, swallows and finches calling. Loud gun shots started at 1045am for about 20 minutes, then started up again at 1142am for about 20 minutes. Clear sky and light breezes just before lunch time. Tree trimming crews for Idaho Power in the village. Clear sky, light breezes and warm afternoon, high of 83 degrees. Dust abatement truck spraying roads. Cooling off a little under clear sky mid-evening and slight breeze. Mama doe on the golf course before sundown. Clear before midnight.

Tuesday (June 23) overnight low of 44 degrees, clear sky this morning. Early air traffic. Robins, finches and swallows singing, evening grosbeaks and a pine squirrel visiting. Clear and warm at lunch time. A little high haze in the sky and hot by mid-afternoon, high of 89 degrees. Still pretty warm mid-evening and partly cloudy. Partly cloudy and warm at dusk. Airplanes flew over at 945pm, almost dark. Some high haze before midnight.

Wednesday (June 24) overnight low of 47 degrees, almost clear sky this morning and slight breeze. Early air traffic, extra loud one around 905am. Lots of swallows swooping, a few finches and robins calling. Partly cloudy and quite warm at lunch time. Mail truck made it in a little early. Rufus hummingbird stopped by. Windy, hot and mostly cloudy early afternoon, high of 90 degrees. Mid-afternoon loud thunder, dark clouds and big drops of rain for a minute or two. Overcast, muggy and calm mid-evening. Mostly clear at dusk, quiet and calm. Robins chirping at dark.

Thursday (June 25) overnight low of 52 degrees, partly cloudy sky and light breeze this morning. Early air traffic (and some loud ones mid-morning.) Swallows swooping around, a few jays and robins calling. Partly cloudy after lunch time and light breezes. Increased street traffic and getting a bit dusty. Heating up by mid-afternoon, light breezes and about half cloudy, high of 86 degrees. Tree trimming crew for Idaho Power still working in the village. Warm and clear sky mid-evening, starting to cool off a little. Barrage of gunfire (fireworks?) started at 850pm for about 20 minutes. Sounded like a big party up town. Clear at dusk.

Friday (June 26) overnight low of 46 degrees, mostly hazy sky this morning. Lots of early loud air traffic. Swallows, robins and finches calling. Pretty warm at lunch time, partly cloudy and some haze. Jays and a chipmunk visiting. Rather hot by mid-afternoon and partly hazy sky, high of 87 degrees. Very warm and mostly clear mid-evening. Female hairy woodpecker stopped by for a bite of suet. Mostly clear before dusk.

Saturday (June 27) overnight low of 49 degrees, mostly cloudy sky this morning. Early morning air traffic, some quite loud right over the village. Swallows, a few finches, pine siskins and grosbeaks hanging around. Mostly cloudy at lunch time and mild temperatures. Dark clouds mid-afternoon, high of 78 degrees. One hummingbird sighted. Breezy early evening, lighter by mid-evening and thinner overcast. Opinionated pine squirrel yelling from the trees. Shooting started at 828pm for about 20-30 minutes. Partly cloudy just before dusk.

Sunday (June 28) overnight low of 43 degrees, overcast sky this morning. Air traffic early this morning. Not many swallows flying around, females are setting on eggs. A few finches and a couple of pine siskins visiting. Cloudy and chilly breezes at lunch time. Mostly cloudy and chilly light breezes mid-afternoon. A few sprinkles late afternoon and overcast, high of 62 degrees. Female hairy woodpecker and a male rufus hummingbird dropped by. Overcast and chilly light breeze mid-evening.
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Letters to Share:

A Sad Loss to Yellow Pine

To whom it may concern.

Be careful of what you wish for because it just might happen.

With the resignation of both Jeff and Ann Forster from the Fire and EMS departments of Yellow Pine, the residents and visitors have lost one of the great benefits we have enjoyed in our area.

My wife and I have been loyal and avid supporters of Yellow Pine since Chris’ father, Idaho artist Robert Auth, first came here decades ago, served on the town council, helped initiate the first Harmonica Festival, and designed and helped create and construct the Yellow Pine Veterans’ Memorial. Our family has supported the Harmonica Contest/Festival since day one. I helped cook breakfast every year but the last three. I have tried to help with anything that would enhance the YP community. I have helped in building the helipad, putting doors on dumpsters at the transfer station with Cecil, Tom, and Tim, and cleaning up the golf course for fundraising for community needs, along with any other volunteer needs for the community.

Four years ago I had the opportunity — and saw the need for — continuing the EMS and Fire Departments following Dave’s retirement. I, along with several others, took the time and effort to get our EMR licenses. We took classes on extrication from vehicles. We have also been trained in over the edge ropes (taught by Jeff) on how to access the victim, using the equipment we now have, to treat and get the person out to the ambulance in minutes instead of hours. I am NOT trying to toot my own horn by bringing up what I and others have done to improve the the health and safety of both residents and visitors. We have done these things because of our love and respect for the wonderful area we have all been drawn to. We have always appreciated those in the community who tried to enhance our lifestyles here, from Dave McClintock who, for years, was our “Jack of All Trades,” to Railroad Sue who works to keep us updated on news, to Willy Sullivan, Steve Holloway, Dawn Brown, Stu Edwards, and Dave Prouty who are currently wrestling with our tired water system. Yellow Pine has been blessed with other generous people who have contributed positively to enhance our community. Now, it appears, we are losing a service that could jeopardize lives and homes.

With the resignation of Jeff and Ann, Yellow Pine stands to lose a great deal:

1. Quick EMS response and treatment within minutes instead of hours. Cascade medical response time will be now be about 2 and 1/2 hours under ideal conditions. EMS equipment will be taken out of service and mothballed.

2. A fully-equipped fire truck still in service, but no trained people on ropes for over the edge rescue. To my knowledge, no one other than a select few, has been trained on the jaws of life or cutters that remove victims from wrecked vehicles.

3. Firefighting and life-saving equipment that can quickly access sites. Only a few have been trained on this equipment, which has been at our disposal. Should anyone have an ATV wheeler accident, fall off a roof and break a leg, or experience a heart attack or stroke, he or she may have lost the golden hour needed for survival.

I could go on and on about what YP is losing. I do know that data indicate hundreds of cases where the Yellow Pine Team has responded. Anyone who had questions or issues regarding the equipment, donations for that equipment, training, and education should, certainly, have volunteered themselves, contacted any of the members of those departments, or taken the time to read updates posted by rrSue.

The tragic ending to this sad story is that Yellow Pine and its visitors are losing the value of all of the many training hours, educational classes, knowledge, and experience so sorely needed to protect everyone. In closing, Jeff and Ann’s departure means there will be no EMS services available to locals or visitors except Cascade Medical, which will result in a 2 and 1/2 hour response instead of in minutes. A person lying in pain for hours or dying is no one’s wish.

I wish to thank Jeff and Ann for all that I have learned. They have enhanced my life by giving me the opportunity to learn life-saving techniques that will be with me until I die. I am proud to have served next to both of them. Thank you, Jeff and Ann.

Gary Niebrand
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Keep the virus away rather than chase it after it has spread

You’re sick of it. The isolation, the mask wearing, the endless hand washing. We get it. We’d like to go to the store after working a 10-hour day and finally get to take off our masks too.

But here’s the deal. COVID is real. COVID is dangerous. COVID is here.

We can’t live under a rock until this thing is over. We want everyone to get out and be human and socialize and be mentally well. We want our businesses to start making money again. The best way to assure that is to honor the governor’s recommended guidelines for wearing a mask and social distancing.

Do you want another stay-at-home order that kills the economy right in the middle of tourist season? The best way to prevent COVID spread is to wear your mask when at stores and bars and other places you can’t socially distance.

We only need to look at Boise’s experience last week when COVID cases rose again, largely from people going out to bars and stores without masks. Now those same businesses in Boise are turning to masks to protect employees and patrons.

Why wait until the genie is out of the bottle? It’s easier to keep the virus away than to chase it after it has spread. Please wear your mask when at stores, bars, the library, the post office, the doctor’s office, etc.

If you’re outside and socially distanced, taking off your mask in the fresh air is relatively safe. Fifty people in a park are safer than two people in a phone booth.

We actually encourage people to get outside and get a break from the mask. Walk, fish, ride, garden, row, float, golf or sit on the beach and dig your toes in the sand. But when we’re inside public buildings and businesses, we’re going to wear our masks to protect you and we hope you’ll do the same for us.

Here are some misunderstandings we’ve personally heard from people (smart, good, caring people) who refuse to wear masks inside:

• “I’m healthy – I have a strong immune system.” Fact: “Healthy” people are the ones who are unknowingly and innocently spreading the virus.

People are spreading the virus even when they aren’t feeling ill themselves. Or they think their runny nose is just allergies. Why take the risk? Wearing a mask at the store is a minor inconvenience compared to your neighbor getting a deadly disease.

• “Wearing a mask is antisocial.” Fact: Giving someone an infectious disease is really antisocial

• “Christ my Savior will protect me.” Fact: We pray that you will wear a mask to help Him succeed. Wearing a mask is an act of love.

• “The media is making this stuff up.” Fact: Nope. Hospitals across the country are filled with actual people sick from COVID.

• “The people who have died from COVID were going to die anyway.” True: We’re all going to die anyway, eventually. Why rush it? Wear a mask to push that day off as long as possible.

Hang in there everyone. Wear a mask for each other. We’re all in this together.

Tom Reinhardt, CEO, Dr. Ron Ellsworth, Medical Director, Cascade Medical Center
— — — —

Virus spread precautions need to be followed by everyone

Last week, Gov. Little moved Idaho into Stage 4 of the plan to re-open Idaho, stating that the criteria for doing so were barely met. This week, Central District Health has downgraded Ada County to Stage 3 due to a large outbreak of new cases that are associated with large, ill-advised gatherings in bars, nightclubs and other public venues.

In Valley county, businesses have, thankfully, re-opened and most are following the advice and taking the precautions that have been proven to reduce the risk of viral transmission.

If we are going to keep businesses open through this summer, we must redouble our efforts at reducing risk. If we do not, we will likely experience a surge of cases and serious illness in Valley County. This could lead to community spread of the coronavirus, putting our county at risk for another shutdown.

I am confident that with common-purpose and resolve, the citizens and visitors of our communities can both support local businesses, allowing them to remain open, and prevent the spread of the novel coronavirus.

It is important to remember that, without effective treatment or a vaccine, prevention of the spread of the virus is all that we currently have at our disposal to fight it.

There are new documented cases of COVID19 in our local communities and Idaho, overall, is seeing a large increase in cases. This means that SARS CoV-2 is among us and risks creating an outbreak and community spread here.

Asymptomatic and pre-symptomatic shedders of the virus remain a substantial issue with this illness. None of us knows if an individual with whom we are interacting might be exposing us to the virus.

The techniques for reducing the risk of spread are, at this juncture, well-known to everyone. Wear a mask in public, physical distance yourself at least six feet from others and wash your hands frequently. To be effective, these precautions need to be followed by everyone.

The coronavirus lives by the rules of nature and biology, not by our rules. This is not a political issue, as it, unfortunately, has become. The virus is neither Republican nor Democrat. It is neither conservative nor liberal. All of us, regardless of our political philosophy, disobey the rules of biology and infectious disease transmission at our peril.

SARS CoV-2 is primarily spread by microscopic droplets from the respiratory tract of an infected individual. The guidelines are all designed to prevent this transmission of droplets from one person to another.

The infectious drops comes forth when a person breaths, talks, sings, shouts, coughs or sneezes. Keeping distance from others reduces exposure to another person’s droplets.

Wearing a mask, double-layer cloth, surgical, or N-95 has been unequivocally shown to reduce the spread of respiratory droplets by up to 90 percent. This statistic only applies if both members of an interaction are masked. I personally will not talk to anyone from outside my home within 15 feet who is not wearing a mask, and they should hold me to the same standard.

Indoor environments create a greater risk of exposure than outdoors settings. We need to respectfully and kindly request that all indoor businesses require masks on all staff and customers. Masks should be worn in outdoor settings where physical distancing cannot be strictly maintained.

The infectious droplets from the novel coronavirus are transmitted to each of us through our mouth, nose and eyes. Large group gatherings must be avoided as one infected individual in the crowd can infect many others leading to rapid spread of infection and illness.

Most of the citizens of Valley County have been phenomenal examples of citizenship and caring at reducing the spread of the novel coronavirus. Our success at delaying its arrival has not been accidental.

With the aforementioned measures, we can keep our economy open and reduce disease transmission. It is up to all of us to care enough to persist. We are truly, in this pandemic, our brothers’ keepers.

Gregory Irvine, MD, Chief of Staff, St. Luke’s McCall Medical Center

published in the Star-News June 25, 2020
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Idaho News:

COVID-19 community transmission identified in Valley County; case count increases

Valley County (June 26) –This week, Central District Health (CDH) has confirmed that three additional Valley County residents have tested positive for COVID-19, bringing the total number of cases at six. One of the recent cases was confirmed on Wednesday, June 24; the other two were confirmed today, June 25. Through follow-up case investigations, CDH has identified evidence of community transmission. Community transmission is determined when an individual has not had contact with a known infected person or recently traveled.

One of the infected individuals confirmed this week has required hospitalization. Case follow-up work is ongoing.

With community transmission identified in many counties throughout Idaho, and given Valley County’s robust tourism, which brings in Idahoans from other counties, and residents of other states, it is more important than ever that people follow public health recommendations to prevent the spread of COVID-19.

“Valley County sees a considerable amount of tourism with people coming to enjoy our communities. We want to urge both members of our community and those visiting to protect one another. Wear face coverings in public and practice physical distancing. Let’s look out for one another so we don’t see continued spread and potentially harmful impacts to the health of our residents and local economy,” said Elt Hasbrouck, Valley County Commissioner and CDH Board of Health member.

CDH recommends that everyone:

· Follow statewide orders and any local orders in place

· Practice social distancing: avoid crowds, maintain at least 6 feet from others

· Wear face coverings in public or environments where physical distancing

· Stay home if you are sick, even if symptoms are mild

· Limit your trips in public

· Wash your hands frequently and disinfect high-touch surfaces

· Limit unnecessary travel

· Create a plan for how to safely care for a household member if they become ill

COVID-19 case counts for CDH’s four-county jurisdiction of Ada, Boise, Elmore and Valley counties are updated weekdays by 5 pm, unless otherwise indicated; weekly data is updated Mondays and Thursdays by noon at (link).

Community COVID-19 Resources

Central District Health continues to offer a COVID-19 call center Monday through Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. and will operate Saturday, June 27 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Call 208-321-2222. Find statewide data at (link)

Idaho Department of Health and Welfare offers a resource hotline for people feeling overwhelmed, isolated, or distress because of COVID-19. The hotline is available 24/7 at 888-330-3010.

[Note: Report Saturday that the case count in Valley County has risen to 11, the count doesn’t include visitors.]
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CDH confirms community spread in Valley County

Thursday, June 25, 2020

Central District Health confirmed that three additional Valley County residents have tested positive for COVID-19, bringing the total number of cases in the county to six. One of the recent cases was confirmed on Wednesday, while the other two were confirmed on Thursday.

The health district said it has confirmed evidence of community transmission, which is determined when an individual has not had contact with a known infected person or recently traveled.

One of the infected individuals confirmed this week required hospitalization, CDH said.

With community transmission identified in many counties throughout Idaho, and given Valley County’s robust tourism, which brings in Idahoans from other counties, and residents of other states, officials said it is more important than ever that people follow public health recommendations to prevent the spread of COVID-19.

“Valley County sees a considerable amount of tourism with people coming to enjoy our communities,” said Elt Hasbrouck, Valley County commissioner and CDH Board of Health member. “We want to urge both members of our community and those visiting to protect one another. Wear face coverings in public and practice physical distancing. Let’s look out for one another so we don’t see continued spread and potentially harmful impacts to the health of our residents and local economy,”

source: KTVB
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Valley County DMV

The Valley County driver’s license services in now open without an appointment. Please be advised that a mask is required upon entry into the DMV services at the Sheriff’s Office. If you have any information regarding DMV (driver’s license services, concealed weapons or sex offender registry) please contact them at 208-382-7158.

(via FB 6/22/2020)
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Adams County COVID-19 cases expose two McCall workers

By Tom Grote for The Star-News June 25, 2020

A shared workplace and a social gathering has led to a surge in coronavirus cases in Adams County from one to nine, according to Southwest District Health.

Two Adams County residents who work in McCall were exposed to someone with the virus, but later tested negative. Their work places were briefly closed.

“The Adams County cases have been linked to a shared workplace and a social gathering,” said Katrina Williams, spokesperson for Southwest District Health, which covers Adams, Canyon, Gem, Owyhee, Payette and Washington counties.

“All cases know their source of exposure and are isolating at home,” said Williams, who declined to provide further details.

One person exposed to someone who tested positive for the virus works at the MCPAWS Thrift Store in downtown McCall, MCPAWS Regional Animal Shelter Executive Director Amber Kostoff said.

The store was closed Friday, June 12, and Monday, June 15, until the employee could be tested and was determined to be free of the virus, Kostoff said.

The employee volunteered to go into self-quarantine for two weeks and has not been at the store since being informed she was exposed to the virus, Kostoff said.

All MCPAWS staff members were tested for COVID-19 on Monday as a precaution, she said.

A male Council resident exposed to the virus works at True North Construction in McCall, company representative Carrie Potter said.

The crew on which the employee worked was shut down until they could be tested, Potter said. All tests showed no signs of the virus, she said.

An employee of M&W Market in Council tested positive for COVID-19 on June 13, said Jim Tate, general manager of M&W Markets.

“We sanitized the areas this person might have touched in addition to the check stands, shopping carts, doors and other areas we are constantly sanitizing on a regular basis,” Tate said.

“All employees were tested for COVID-19 and they have come back negative,” he said.

Only one confirmed case of COVID-19 had been reported before the latest cases. A Council man was admitted to a hospital suffering symptoms, but recovered.

source: Copyright 2009-present Central Idaho Publishing Inc.
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Idaho coronavirus updates: 310 new cases reported, sets new record for cases in a single day

June 26, 2020 KTVB

310 new confirmed and probable cases announced, continuing the state’s spike

The Gem State added 290 confirmed and 20 probable cases of the coronavirus on Friday, according to data from the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare and the state’s health districts. This brings Idaho’s total of confirmed cases to 4,690 and to 5,148 confirmed and probable cases.

continued:
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Ada County rolled back to Stage 3, all bars will be forced to close

Health officials in the district say there have been “daily significant increases” in Ada County over the past week

June 22, 2020 KTVB

Ada County will be rolled back to Stage 3 of the reopening plan and all bars will be ordered to close after a spike in coronavirus cases.

The return to higher restrictions was announced Monday afternoon by Central District Health.

Bars must close down by 12:01 a.m. Wednesday morning, according to the health district. The rest of the state will continue to remain in Stage 4.

continued:
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‘We’re tapping on the brakes:’ Gov. Little extending Stage 4 across Idaho

Idaho did not meet the metrics to move forward to fewer restrictions, the governor said.

Katie Terhune June 25, 2020 KTVB

Most of Idaho will remain in Stage 4 for at least two more weeks after the state failed to meet the benchmarks necessary to move forward, Gov. Brad Little announced Thursday.

The announcement came Thursday during a press conference Little called to address the state’s Idaho Rebounds plan.

“The statewide approach to mitigating the spread of COVID-19 three months ago was the right thing to do. Three months ago, testing and contact tracing was limited, some areas of Idaho faced alarming healthcare capacity restraints, and there wasn’t enough personal protective equipment on hand for businesses and healthcare workers,” Little said. “But from the start, our plan was to eventually transition to a more regional approach in our response and that’s what we’ve begun.

continued:
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Idaho hoping residents, business take pledge to keep state open, safe

by CBS2 News Staff Wednesday, June 24th 2020

Earlier this month, the state launched a new campaign to encourage the people and businesses to do their part in keeping the state safe and its economy open.

One Idaho launched June 9.

“Idaho’s economy will rebound strongly when 1.7 million Idahoans unite around one common goal – keeping our state’s economy open and making Idaho a safe and healthy place for all through hard work, shared sacrifice, and care for our communities,” Little said in a news release earlier this month. “Our actions moving forward will help preserve the sacrifices we all made early on to slow the spread of coronavirus in our state.”

By taking the pledge, folks promise to practice good social distancing and hygiene practices and businesses work to maintain distance among customers as well as adhere to stepped up cleaning efforts.

source:

Take the ONE Idaho Pledge
link:
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Gov. Brad Little news conference on red tape during pandemic

by CBS2 News Staff Monday, June 22nd 2020

Governor Brad Little hosted a news conference on Monday to discuss red tape amid the coronavirus pandemic.

“Our loosening of healthcare rules since March helped to increase the use of telehealth services, made licensing easier, and strengthened the capacity of our healthcare workforce – all necessary to help our citizens during the global pandemic. We proved we could do it without compromising safety. Now it’s time to make those healthcare advances permanent moving forward,” Governor Little said.

The state identified 150 rules that help increase the state’s healthcare provider capacity and to reduce barriers to access for residents. Monday’s executive order makes those permanent “by asking the agencies to finalize the rule changes for presentation to the Idaho Legislature in January of 2021.”

continued:
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Brundage Mountain Resort

An Important Message from General Manager, Ken Rider:

Brundage Mountain has canceled the Fourth of July Music Fest and the TGIF Concert scheduled for July 10, out of an abundance of caution and concern for the well-being of our staff and community,

This has not been an easy decision to make on one hand, but a very easy decision to make on the other. With confirmed community spread in our area and a rise in cases in the Treasure Valley, we are taking the safe route and canceling events that have the potential to draw sizable crowds.

Brundage Mountain remains open Wednesdays through Sundays for Scenic Chairlift Rides, Mountain Biking, Hiking, Disc Golf and Dining at Smoky’s Bar & Grill. The Brundage team has put countless hours into designing and executing new protocols to reduce hazards during those primary summer operations.

Interested parties can view those detailed protocols at (link)

The free TGIF Concerts scheduled later in July and August will be continually assessed as conditions change and evolve. We are taking an optimistic, but informed approach. We’ve been monitoring the COVID-19 situation constantly since early March and will continue to do so as we move forward.

Future considerations will include case trends and community spread in the local area, as well as the behavior of visitors observed in other situations.

The more people we see engaging in social distancing and mask wearing protocols, the better we will feel about hosting larger events. As much as we enjoy providing these outdoor activities, safety will always come first at Brundage Mountain.

(via FB June 27, 2020)
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Boise Fourth of July fireworks show called off due to COVID-19

by Deni Hawkins Wednesday, June 24th 2020 CBS2

The City of Boise’s annual Fourth of July fireworks celebration will not happen in 2020.

The culprit? COVID-19…and the city’s new public health order, which went into effect Wednesday, June 24 at 12:01 a.m.

It will remain in effect for the next 30 days.

Under the order, groups or gatherings of more than 50 people will not be allowed in the city. Further, the order specifically mentions the cancellation of the fireworks show and celebration.

continued:
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Shoshone-Bannock cancels fireworks

June 22, 2020 Local News 8

Shoshone-Bannock Casino Hotel has canceled the Annual Treaty Day Fireworks on July 3, 2020.

Officials say there are concerns due to the coronavirus and other circumstances. Holding a large public gathering safely and responsibly would make this event difficult, the hotel said in a release.

“Shoshone-Bannock Casino Hotel will work to respect and honor the spirit and idea of the Fort Bridger Treaty.”

source:
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Ski & Mountain Trauma Conference Canceled

We are always excited and proud to host the Ski & Mountain Trauma Conference for all our first responder partners. However, the health and well-being of our attendees, their families, our colleagues and the communities we serve is our top priority. We are following the most recent Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) COVID-19 (Coronavirus Disease) recommendations and are acting with an abundance of caution to ensure we do not elevate the risk of exposure to the virus for anyone we serve.

With that in mind, Saint Alphonsus will be canceling the 2020 Ski & Mountain Trauma Conference scheduled November 5-7.

We apologize for any inconvenience this may cause you and appreciate your support as we work together, to ensure the safety of our community at large. We look forward to a successful conference in 2021 and encourage you all to stay safe.

Sincerely,
Ski & Mountain Trauma Conference
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Local miners and dairy farmers partnering to deliver cheese and butter to food banks

By Lynsey Amundson Jun 25, 2020 KIVI

Three local mining companies are working together to support dairy farmers by helping turn their milk into butter and cheese to give to local food banks.

The three mines, Midas Gold, Integra Resources and Itafos Conda are joining Dairy West’s Curds + Kindness initiative. This initiative started in May to help donate leftover dairy products to food banks.

“Hearing that the dairy industry was actually throwing product away, we started having some dialogue about how we bring that product to our communities and share it with those that have food insecurity,” said Midas Gold Community Relations Manager, Belinda Provancher.

continued:
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4.6-magnitude earthquake hits near Stanley

The shaking could be felt as far away as the Treasure Valley.

June 25, 2020 KTVB

Another earthquake struck late Wednesday night, rattling the Idaho mountains.

The 4.6-magnitude quake happened at about 11:20 p.m., followed by a second smaller aftershock registering at 3.0-magnitude not long after.

The earthquakes’ epicenter was about 17 miles northwest of Stanley, but the shaking could be felt as far away as the Treasure Valley for some.

continued:
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Census Bureau sending postcard reminders to P.O. Boxes

By Kristen Bolden Jun 25, 2020 KIVI

The U.S. Census Bureau is sending postcards between June 24 and July 3 to an estimated 1.3 million post office boxes in communities where P.O. boxes are the only mailing address available.

The postcards alert households that a census taker may drop off census invitations soon or will visit later to interview them. The postcards also provide information on how to respond to the 2020 Census online or by phone.

Households are encouraged to respond to the 2020 Census as soon as they receive their invitation packet. Households that receive mail in P.O. boxes should provide their street address (not their P.O. box number) when responding to ensure their response is associated with the physical location where they live, not where they receive mail.

continued:
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Health & Safety:


— — — — — — — — — —

FDA warns 9 brands of hand sanitizer may be toxic

June 24, 2020 KTVB

The coronavirus pandemic has led to a surge in hand sanitizer purchases, but now the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has issued a warning that nine brands may be potentially toxic.

The FDA said Friday that consumers should stop using any hand sanitizer from Mexico-based manufacturer Eskbiochem SA de CV, due to the potential presence of methanol, or wood alcohol, in its products. The FDA warned that methanol can be toxic when ingested or absorbed through the skin.

The agency said that it contacted Eskbiochem last week to recommend the company remove its hand sanitizer from the U.S. market, but it has yet to do so.

“Therefore, FDA recommends consumers stop using these hand sanitizers and dispose of them immediately in appropriate hazardous waste containers. Do not flush or pour these products down the drain,” the agency warned.

continued:
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Idaho History:

Masks were questioned during the Spanish Flu pandemic too but wearing them was required in parts of Idaho

The Spanish Flu hit the U.S. in 1918, with some of those lessons coming back during the coronavirus pandemic.

Brian Holmes June 26, 2020 KTVB

To mask or not to mask? Not only is that the question now, but it was also a question people asked before more than a century ago during the Spanish flu of 1918.

Back then, the answer was handed to Idahoans. Masks weren’t ‘strongly’ recommended, but wearing a mask was actually required in cities and small towns across the Gem State.

In the fall of 1918, newspapers of record from across Idaho were filled headlines and countless columns about the ongoing Spanish Flu pandemic.

continued:

[See also the 1918 Influenza history series in the Yellow Pine Times.]
— — — — — — — — — —

From Beer Springs to Soda Springs: How this tiny Idaho town became known for its carbonated water

Fur traders first referred to the area as ‘Beer Springs’ after tasting the water and reportedly said that one of the springs “tasted like beer… flat beer.”

June 22, 2020 KTVB

Soda Springs, Idaho — It was a pit stop for Oregon Trail pioneers and fur traders while traveling through Eastern Idaho. Often referred to as the ‘Oregon Trail Oasis,’ it’s now known as Soda Springs, a town of just over 3,000 people in Caribou County.

As one of the main water sites along the Oregon Trail, travelers would often stop to try the water at the sulfurous springs, which bubbles like boiling water on the surface and emits a destructive, rotten egg smell when the wind is blowing just right.

continued:
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Letter to Share:

from Valley County Sheriff’s Office

PSA Saturday –

We would like to take this opportunity to educate some folks on the usage of your UTV, ATV or Dirt Bikes on County roads in Valley County.

We get several questions and complaints during the spring, summer and fall on the use of these vehicles in neighborhoods and on County maintained roads, public and private. Remember, just because a road is marked private (blue signs), it’s still accessible to the public and you must still follow the rules of the road.

Use on City & County Roads (does not include private property)

The following requirements must be met on city, county, and highway district roads.

• Valid restricted vehicle license plate. [IC 49-402(4)]
• Valid IDPR OHV registration sticker affixed to restricted vehicle license plate. (IC 67-7122)
• Valid driver’s license. (IC 49-301) – Parents can be cited for allowing an unlicensed minor to operate an ATV or UTV. Please keep this in mind.
• Liability insurance or alternative insurance. (IC 49-1223 or IC 49-1232)
• A helmet under age 18. (IC 49-666) Please make sure it’s a DOT inspected helmet.
• Muffler and U.S. Forest Service approved spark arrestor. Your muffler has to pass 96 dB at the half-meter test, SAE J1287. The OHV cannot exceed 96dB. (IC 67-7125)
• If you are riding on a highway within city limits, you may NOT go beyond the 45 mph signs in Valley County. This may not be the case in other cities, please be sure to check city codes prior to operating an off road vehicle on state highways within other city jurisdictions, they vary.

For safe operation on roads the following equipment is recommended.

• Brake light.
• Headlight and taillight after dark/poor visibility.
• Horn audible at 200 feet.
• Mirror showing roadway 200 feet behind the OHV

License & Registration

Any OHVs being operated or transported on public lands, roads or trails of the state of Idaho must display a current IDPR OHV Registration Sticker. Idaho Code 67-7124. Registration has been extended until June 30th, due to COVID-19, however they are asking that you attempt to get this completed as soon as you can.

Non-resident Requirements

Non-residents are required to have either a valid OHV registration from their home state of residence or a valid IDPR OHV registration sticker. Nonresidents must purchase an Idaho restricted vehicle license plate with a valid IDPR OHV registration sticker if they don’t have a plate and wish to operate on Idaho’s local jurisdiction roads (i.e.county roads).

Please be courteous, pay attention to speed limits and remember when you are driving through neighborhoods there are lots of things going on, kids playing, family pets and people walking or biking their neighborhoods.

We are asking that if you would like to report traffic complaints in your neighborhood, to call at the time it’s occurring, get a good description of the vehicle, a plate would be great and a description of the occupants, if possible.

Some of the questions the dispatcher might ask you are; Which direction did they go? Do you know where they live? When did this occur?

All of this information helps us in assisting you in better serving your needs. A lot of these vehicles look the same and disappear quickly!

As always, Stay Safe, be healthy and practice social distancing.

(via FB May 23, 2020)
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Confused about where to get your recreation stickers and registration?


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Public Lands:


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New Frank Church-River of No Return Wilderness Trail Map Released

McCall, Idaho, June 23, 2020 – Building on the success of the Payette National Forest Trail Maintenance Status Map, and in partnership with the Salmon-Challis, Bitterroot and Nez-Perce-Clearwater National Forests, the Payette National Forest announces the release of the Frank Church-River of No Return Wilderness Trail Maintenance Status Map.

“This map is easy to use,” said Joshua Simpson, Krassel District Wilderness Manager and Recreation Specialist, “Just simply navigate to the area of interest, zoom in to the desired scale and click on your trail of interest.” A box will pop-up and display the following: Trail Name, Trail Number, Status, Maintainer (USFS, Idaho Trails Association, Selway-Bitterroot Frank Church Foundation, Montana Conservation Corps. etc), Comment, Date Last Maintained and Miles. You can also click on a link in this pop-up to zoom into the trail. Trails status is color coded based upon the Maintenance Status. Yellow is scheduled for maintenance, purple is not scheduled for maintenance, black is not maintained, red is closed and green denotes that maintenance has been completed this year.

As USFS trail crews and partner groups conduct maintenance throughout the main use-season, the Forest will provide updates to this map. You will know when your favorite trail has been maintained as it will change color from Yellow (Scheduled for Maintenance) to Green (Maintained).

This map works best when opened in Google Chrome or Firefox web browsers – a few glitches are noted when using Internet Explorer.

This map differs from the original format that the Payette Trail Maintenance Status map delivers in that users can now submit comments on what they have seen or experienced on a given trail or attach photos that pertain to conditions on the ground from personal experience or of anything awesome that they encountered on a given trail such as, rock slides, downed trees or failing trail tread, while exploring the vast FCRONRW.

The Forest Service asks that users keep their comments relevant and positive to make this tool the best it can be. The comments will be monitored and managed for content. Please read all disclaimers when using this information tool before submitting comments or photos.

Access the map here (link). This map is likely to undergo changes throughout the first year of use, and with any new technology there may be room for improvement. The public is encouraged to provide feedback on their experience to Joshua Simpson at Joshua.simpson@usda.gov
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Emmett Ranger District extends temporary closure orders around Sage Hen and Tripod areas for public safety

Boise, Idaho, June 23, 2020 –The Emmett Ranger District of the Boise National Forest is extending two closures for public safety through the summer , while numerous logging operations continue to remove dead and diseased trees around the Sage Hen Recreation Area and National Forest System road 626H (Tripod area).

“Our intent is to open up the area as soon as possible, yet public safety is our primary objective for this project. Unfortunately, due to uncharacteristic weather conditions including rain and snow, our timelines for completion have been moved back. Our contractors are working as quickly as possible,” said Katie Wood Emmett District Ranger.

These timber sales, which are located in developed campgrounds and along the roads, were implemented to remove dead and dying trees that have succumbed to tussock moth and beetles outbreaks. Timing is critical to remove hazardous fuels before wildfire season starts and to decrease the impact to the public. Once the projects are completed, visitors should be prepared to see a different landscape with fewer trees and less shade.

“We understand how important this area is to the public and while the closure is extended most likely through August, our goal is to reopen the area as quickly and as safely as possible,” said Wood.

To view all Boise National Forest closures visit the interactive closure map: (link)

To view the official Closure Orders and maps visit: (link)

To view related video visit: (link)
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Updated Map for Little Weiser Forest Resilience Project

Dear Interested Parties,

An updated map has been added to the Project webpage here. The proposed action document was missing the map at Figure 1. This document has also been updated to include the same map.

The Project webpage is located at (link). It includes a copy of the legal notice, the scoping letter, a map, the proposed action document, and vegetation treatment descriptions for the Project.

Thank you for your continued interest in natural resource management on the Payette National Forest.
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Justice Department: Helicopter hounded trail building crew near Red Fish Lake, Stanley

by Keith Ridler Associated Press Thursday, June 25th 2020

A low-flying helicopter last weekend harassed a work crew building a public trail on an easement crossing private land that connects the popular tourist destinations of Redfish Lake and Stanley in central Idaho, the U.S. Department of Justice said.

The department on Wednesday asked a federal judge to issue an order prohibiting future harassment during work on the trail that’s at the center of a federal lawsuit.

Workers said the helicopter flew within 10 feet (3 meters) of the ground and within 50 feet (15 meters) of them, kicking up debris and blowing off one person’s hat last Saturday.

continued:
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History comes alive at the Canyon Creek Stage Station

Date: June 23, 2020
Contact: Mike Williamson mwilliamson@blm.gov 208-384-3393

The historic Canyon Creek Stage Station offers a unique glimpse into Idaho’s past. One of only two remaining stage stops on the Oregon Trail, the Canyon Creek Stage Station is a fascinating piece of Idaho and American history.

Located 7 miles northwest of Mountain Home, the Canyon Creek Stage Station was built in 1874 by homesteader Archibald Daniel using native basalt stone. The station served emigrants and travelers in the final years of the Oregon Trail era, then became a stage stop on the Kelton Freight Road and Overland Stage Route. Archaeologists estimate that 30,000 to 35,000 Oregon Trail travelers passed through the site.

The site’s owners renovated the historic buildings in the mid-1960s, but a fire in 1976 reduced the buildings to stone walls. Deeded to the BLM in 2015, the station is slowly being restored. The BLM accepted the role as caretaker of the Canyon Creek Stage Station as part of a partnership that included the Norstebon family, the Idaho Chapter of the Oregon-California Trails Association, the Idaho Heritage Trust and the National Park Service.

Today, visitors can stand in the shade of the stone buildings and feel the rough rock, realizing the original stones were dressed and mortared in place nearly 150 years ago, when much of the West was still wild. Visitors to the site can also see the historic Canyon Creek Stage Station cemetery, located a few hundred feet west of the stage station.

To visit the Canyon Creek Stage Station, take Canyon Creek Road in Mountain Home from where it crosses under Interstate 84 and drive 7.3 miles north. When you visit, please keep your safety in mind. Stay clear of stone piles, stay off structures and watch out for snakes. Public land at the station includes the buildings and the lawn in their immediate vicinity. Please respect nearby private property and stay within the fenced area around the buildings.
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Fire Season:

Officials ask for help preventing wildfires

By Mike Sharp Jun 22, 2020 KIVI

With the official arrival of summer and warmer weather on its way, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is asking for the public’s help in preventing human-caused wildfires.

According to BLM officials, fire activity is currently affecting the American Southwest and Alaska, but Idaho could be in the next group of states hit by fire season in the coming months.

“Every year, human-caused wildfires comprise approximately 87% of all wildfire ignitions across the country, posing a considerable threat to public and firefighter safety,” said William Perry Pendley, BLM Deputy Director for Policy and Programs in a BLM release. “These wildfires are preventable and this year, more than ever, our wildland firefighters need the public’s help in reducing human-caused wildfire risk.”

continued:
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Range fire contained near Pocatello

June 28, 2020 Local News 8

Bureau of Land Management fire crews fully contained the Lead Draw Fire, 3 miles south of Pocatello, at 5:30 p.m. Saturday.

The fire started on Forest Service land at around 2 p.m. Eight BLM, Forest Service, and Pocatello Valley fire engines were sent to the fire, along with a helicopter.

The fire was mapped at about 18 acres.

The exact cause of the fire is under investigation.

source:
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Critter News:


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Program helps dogs recognize rattlesnakes

By Linda Larsen June 26, 2020 Local News 8

link: to video
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FDA warns pet owners to keep your dog socially distanced

By Ariel Schroeder June 22, 2020 Local News 8

The FDA is warning pet owners to keep your dog socially distanced six feet from other pets and owners to avoid catching the coronavirus.

Local Veterinarian Adam Peterson says you don’t need to take it to that extreme.

According to the CDC, a small number of pets worldwide, including cats and dogs, have been reported to be infected with the virus that causes COVID-19.

Dr. Peterson and the FDA both explain it is not clear if you can catch COVID-19 from your pet, but they can catch it from you.

continued:
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Pet talk – Ruptured salivary glands in dogs

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt Jun 19, 2020 IME

Ruptured salivary glands are called a salivary mucocele. This is an accumulation of saliva under the skin in a saclike swelling. Several sets of salivary glands are present on both sides of the mouth and head. Mucocele swellings are usually under or behind the lower jaw, alongside the face or occasionally under the tongue.

Salivary mucoceles develop when saliva leaks from a salivary duct or portion of a salivary gland. The specific cause of the salivary mucocele is often unclear. Blunt trauma or penetrating trauma to the jaw or side of the head and face can lead to rupture of a salivary duct and leakage of saliva into the surrounding soft tissues. When saliva leaks into the soft tissues, it stimulates a strong inflammatory reaction. Eventually, a saclike structure forms that keeps the saliva collected in one area.

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Moose seen enjoying the grass near Warm Lake

A KTVB viewer spotted the moose while camping in the area.

June 23, 2020 KTVB

Warm Lake, Idaho — Wendy Magnuson sent us this video from Warm Lake, which is east of Cascade.

She was camping when she spotted a moose enjoying the nice tall summer grass and a creek. It looks like it was enjoying the sunshine too.

source: w/video
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Wayward elk captured in Idaho Falls

June 28, 2020 Local News 8


IFPD

A young bull elk was tranquilized and moved back to the forest after wandering into an Idaho Falls neighborhood Saturday.

Idaho Falls Police were called around 6 a.m. after people saw the elk moving through neighborhoods near the Idaho Falls Airport. It was first reported on Carmel Street then Broadway and Grandview.

Police tracked the animal to N. Skyline and Federal Way, near the Fed Ex office at the airport. They called in Idaho Fish and Game personnel, who tranquilized and moved the elk.

source:
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Bobcat spotted on Boise Greenbelt

A small bobcat was seen near Warm Springs Golf Course and on the Boise Greenbelt on Sunday morning.


A KTVB viewer sent in photos of a small bobcat that was spotted on the Boise Greenbelt.

June 28, 2020 KTVB

Boise, Idaho — A KTVB viewer spotted a small bobcat near the Warm Springs Golf Course on Sunday morning. Shortly after, the bobcat was spotted again on the Boise Greenbelt.

The viewer said they were heading to Lucky Peak when they spotted the bobcat. The cat ran away after being seen, but was spotted again by the same person on the Greenbelt.

“On the way back it was laying next to the greenbelt, so I took a quick video and pics, and headed home,” the viewer said. “I called non-emergency dispatch and described the location. The police said they would send some bike-mounted officers to investigate since the Fish and Game offices are closed on the weekends. I don’t know what else happened after that ”

source:
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Two rabid bats found in separate Ada County homes

by CBS2 News Staff Monday, June 22nd 2020

Bats that tested positive for rabies were found in two separate homes in Ada County.

These were the first rabid bats found in Idaho this year, according to the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare.

“Rabies is a fatal viral illness without proper medical management. People should call their healthcare providers promptly if they believe they may have been bitten or scratched by a bat,” said Dr. Leslie Tengelsen. “It is extremely important for people to avoid all bats and other wild animals, particularly if they appear sick or are acting aggressively or abnormally.”

continued:
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Fish & Game drops 400,000 kokanee into Payette Lake

Planting hopes to restore population decimated by lake trout

By Max Silverson for The Star-News June 25, 2020

Payette Lake took on 400,000 new residents last Thursday when the Idaho Department of Fish and Game rocketed a throng of young, hatchery-raised kokanee salmon through a hose into the lake from a specialized tanker truck.

Assistant McCall Fish Hatchery manager Malia Gallagher opened the valve on the tanker truck at the North Beach boat launch to let the juvenile fish free into their new home.

It was the first time since 2014 that kokanee have been stocked in Payette Lake.

The 400,000 kokanee were raised in the Cabinet Gorge Fish Hatchery in Clark Fork before being transported to Payette Lake last week.

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Coeur d’Alene man sets Idaho state record with 21-inch cutthroat

by Ryan L Morrison Monday, June 22nd 2020


Coeur d’Alene man sets Idaho state record with 21-inch cutthroat (Photo by Tom Weadick Courtesy of IDFG)

A Coeur d’Alene man is celebrating a win this week after setting the state record with 21-inch Westslope cutthroat trout.

Tom Weadick caught the Westslope while flyfishing in the North Fork of the Coeur d’Alene River, earning a new catch/release state record.

Weadick beat the previous record of 19.5 inches held by Dwaine Hasenoehrl set in 2016.

continued:
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Fish & Game News:

Sorry folks: No Chinook fishing season on the South Fork of the Salmon River for 2020

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Supervisor
Tuesday, June 23, 2020

Not enough fish are returning to provide a fishing season

There will be no open fishery on the South Fork of the Salmon River in 2020 because hatchery returns are not projected to meet broodstock needs.

For information about where salmon fishing is available see the Chinook seasons and rules page.

source:
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Wandering bull trout makes Idaho its summer stop over

By Jordan Messner, Fisheries Regional Manager
Friday, June 26, 2020

Fish travels nearly 200 miles annually between Hells Canyon and Central Idaho

Salmon and steelhead are famous for their amazing migrations, but trout and char can pull off some pretty impressive migrations as well.

In the fish business, the term “fluvial” refers to a unique life-history where fish migrate between larger river systems where they spend winters and smaller streams where they spawn. Sometimes these migrations are quite extraordinary.

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More F&G News Releases

link:
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Crazy Critter Stuff:

Louisiana police warn of ‘aggressive chicken’ stalking bank customers

By Ben Hooper May 5, 2020 UPI

A Louisiana police department is warning residents to beware of an “aggressive chicken” that has been “terrorizing bank customers” at a drive-through and walk-up ATM.

The Walker Police Department said officers who responded to a report of a chicken attack at a bank on Walker South Road were told by employees that the foul fowl has been chasing customers and attempting to get into their cars for several days.

The department’s Facebook post said the chicken has also “failed to engage in proper social distancing.”

Officers were unable to locate the chicken, which the department said “apparently anticipated the imminent arrival of law enforcement and fled on foot from the scene.”

“The chicken is wanted on charges of assault, attempted battery, attempted burglary, terrorizing and ignoring an order of the governor,” the post said.

source:
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Seasonal Humor:

4thJulyCovid-a
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Idaho History June 28, 2020

Idaho 1918-1920 Influenza Pandemic

Part 11

Idaho Newspaper clippings November 5-8, 1918

1918 Burley Idaho

1918BurleyIdaho-a

courtesy: Marcus Rogers, Idaho State of Mind
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Nov 5

The Idaho Republican. November 05, 1918, Page 2

19181105TIR1
Springfield

Mrs. H. K. Wiley and son, Hugh, returned home Sunday from Boise. Mr. Wiley met her at American Falls with his car. Mrs. Wiley was unable to secure her house is Boise on account of the influenza epidemic.

The Bradford family is still seriously ill with influenza. Mrs. Thomas Blackburn is acting as nurse for the family.

Mr. and Mrs. Lyman Tanner are the proud parents of a baby son, born Monday morning. Both the parents are ill with influenza.

Word comes from Pocatello that the J. H. Isaac family, formerly of Springfield, are all recovering from the influenza.

Miss Hazel Quigley has been dangerously ill with the influenza, but is slightly improved at the present.
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Death of Miss Leach.

It is with deep regret that we write of the passing away Sunday night, of Miss Minnie Leach, daughter of W. M. Leach, as a victim of influenza. Miss Leach has suffered with spinal troubles since childhood, and in her weakened condition was unable to fight off the disease. Years of suffering had ennobled her character, and her sweet and patient disposition endeared her to all her acquaintances. Funeral services were postponed from Tuesday afternoon until Wednesday at 3:00, to permit Corp. Norval Leach to arrive from Fort Riley, Kansas. Open air services were held at the Springfield cemetery. …
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19181105TIR2
Shelley

The schools will not reopen here until the number of influenza cases have greatly decreased.

E. C. Miller, our jeweler is still very ill, but his many friends hope that he will soon take a course for the better.

Harold Woodward, who is at Logan, Utah sick in the hospital with the flue [sic], is reported to be recovering nicely at the present time. Also that his condition is such that there is now no cause for alarm.

Mrs. Howard Young’s daughter Lilly, has been ill for a short time and it was thought that she was coming down with the influenza tho her condition is not at all alarming.

Dr. Cutler is very busy at the present time as he is taking care of all of Dr. Robert’s patients while he is ill with the influenza.
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19181105TIR3
Jameston

Died of Influenza

Two deaths in one family in a week resulting from influenza. Mr. and Mrs. Chris Anderson of Jameston have lost two sons, Frank age twenty-six died October 21, after a few days’ illness. He leaves a wife and two little girls, ages one and two years, besides his parents, six brothers and six sisters to mourn his death.

And Dewey, age twenty died October 27 He has been sick for two weeks, being the first one in the family to come down with the influenza, and just returned from the military school at Moscow, on account of the schools being closed there.

Both were prominent young men here and their many friends in the community extend their deepest sympathy to the bereaved relatives.

Another Victim of Influenza

Virgil Fielding, another of our prominent young men died October 24 of influenza. He was the oldest son of Mr. and Mrs. James Fielding. Besides his father and other he leaves six sisters and two brother to mourn his death. The community extends their deepest sympathy to the bereaved family.

There have been about thirty cases of influenza in Jameston in the last two weeks, taking a toll of three.

Mr. and Mrs. Phil Longhurst were in Shelley last Friday to see Mrs. Longhurst’s father who is just recovering from the influenza.
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19181105TIR4
Upper Presto

Mr. and Mrs. Berkley Larson attended the funeral at Shelly Wednesday for Frank Anderson, who died of influenza.

Mrs. Ila Grover, who has been out to Camp Lewis to see her husband has returned and is at the home of R. P. Hansen. She is very ill with influenza.

Mr. Seaman is down with influenza.

Dr. Roberts was down to see the two Jap families. He thinks they have an attack of influenza.
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19181105TIR5
Rose

About twenty-five people of this district harvested F. G. Hale’s potato crop Saturday. Mr. Hale and his family are ill with the influenza.

H. A. Gardner is on the sick list this week.

C. L. Ranstrum, wife and baby are ill with the influenza.
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19181105TIR6
Taber

The Influenza has struck out in our locality. Several families have it.

Marie Derfler was called to Arco Tuesday by Dr. Simmons to nurse a patient who is under his care.

R. E. Hughes, who has been helping with the potatoes near Idaho Falls, was called home Monday on account of the illness of his son, Arden.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 05 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Republican. November 05, 1918, Page 4

Death of Charles Shafer

Charles Shafer, a former resident of Mackay, but for some years at Gooding, died of influenza the last of the week, leaving a wife and daughter.

Mrs. Shafer was a Miss Hulhull, and lived at Era and Mackay before her marriage.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 05 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Republican. November 05, 1918, Page 5

Deaths From Influenza

Mrs. Fred Keifer of Idaho Falls passed away on Sunday morning, November 3.

Will L. Young of South Shilling avenue, Blackfoot, died on Thursday, Oct. 31 and his brother Wesley Young passed away at Pocatello on Sunday the third of November.

Miss Elvada Halford of Blackfoot went to some point in Utah to care for her sister, and herself took the disease and died. We are unable to obtain further particulars.

George B. Parkinson, son of F. C. Parkinson of this city died Thursday at the students training camp at the A. C. in Logan.
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Another Passed Away

Mrs. N. E. Montgomery received word Monday morning, of the death of her mother Mrs. J. W. Phillips, who passed away at her home in Humboldt, Kan.

On account of the Montgomery family all being sick, they will not be able to attend the funeral.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 05 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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American Falls Press. November 05, 1918, Page 1

19181105AFP1Gave Life to Save Others.
American Falls Teacher Contracts Influenza While Ministering to Comfort of Others, and Dies.

Miss Lois Sargent, one of the teachers of the local schools, died Monday afternoon at the Hotel Remington, death being caused by pneumonia following an attack of influenza. Miss Sargent for a time assisted in nursing the victims of influenza at Rockland and later attended several sick people in this city. She was as much a soldier as the boys who volunteered for service on the battle front, and is as much entitled to honor and loving remembrance.

Miss Sargent was taken ill last Friday, and despite the best care given by physicians and nurses, the end came quickly. Miss Nunnelly and Mrs. Noth gave all care possible to the patient, as did Mrs. Soell of the Hotel Remington.

Miss Sargent came here last fall from Hopkins, Mo., to take up her work as a teacher in the city schools. She at once made a place for herself in the esteem of all who met her. On the closing of the schools at the outbreak of the influenza epidemic she volunteered to nurse the sick, and in doing so overtaxed her strength and fell a victim to the disease herself.

Miss Sargent was a daughter of Dr. and Mrs. D. A. Sargent. Dr. Sargent will arrive in Pocatello tomorrow to receive the body of his daughter and take it to her old home for interment. The death of Miss Sargent has caused great sorrow among the teachers and others who had learned to admire her.
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Notice to the Public.

Owning to the influenza epidemic all persons are warned against congregating in groups within doors, and advised to keep in the open air and avoid mingling with the public as much as possible. The wearing of masks in offices where the carrying on of business brings those in charge in contact with numbers of people is recommended as a precautionary measure.

Convalescents from influenza are hereby quarantined within their homes for a period of one week after recovery, or required in lieu of quarantine, to wear a mask on the streets at all times when they are liable to come into contact with other people.

By Order of the City Board of Health.
W. J. Hanson, Chairman.

source: American Falls Press. (American Falls, Idaho), 05 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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American Falls Press. November 05, 1918, Page 4

People and Events.

Miss Grace Reed has recovered from the flu.

Frank Barnard is out after a siege with the flu.

Mr. and Mrs. C. Lee French are both influenza victims.

Mrs. H. A. Lang has been on the sick list this week.

Rev. and Mrs. West are both reported to be down with influenza, but doing nicely.

L. L. Evans Jr. is very much better and is considered out of danger unless unexpected complications arise.

Many people have obeyed the suggestion of the city board of health to “wear a mask and help check spread of disease.”

O. R. Baum recovered a little too quickly from the influenza, and had to retire from activity, Saturday, after he concluded that he was well enough to go to work again.

Mrs. Martin Garn, who has been a real fairy to sick families here and at Rockland during the past two weeks is now a victim of the flu herself, but is reported to be getting along well.

William Soell, manager of the Remington, who has been confined to his room by illness the past week, has nearly recovered and will be attending to his duties again by the end of the week.

Miss Irene Oliver, who assisted at the hospital here when the situation was the most serious, answering the telephone and doing whatever she was able to do to assist the one nurse who was about, was forced to give up Sunday, and is a flu victim.

The flu situation at Rockland was reported materially improved Sunday and hopes were entertained that the worst is over.

Mr. and Mrs. Ross Bolton, flu victims, are much improved. So far non of their children have taken the disease. Mrs. McCool is caring for them.

Frank Moench, who has been a flu victim, was out Sunday and thought he was as good as new. Like many other who got out too soon, he had a relapse and he been quite sick since.

Herbert Wilskie, who has been ill at his home on Cold Creek with influenza, is recovering. He is taking the advice of competent authorities and is staying at home for a period of a week or more in order to prevent the spread of the disease.

At Bethany Deaconess Hospital the number of influenza patients has been reduced within a week from about twenty to four, and all of them are getting along fine. Considering the fact that four of the five nurses in the hospital have been down, the reduction in the number of patients has been gratifying.

R. O. Jones, who has been in Rockland for the past ten days or more, keeping the drug store open while Mr. Sheer was having his turn at the flu, came home yesterday. While four new cases were reported Sunday he states that general conditions are better then they have been by far, and a feeling of optimism that the worst is over is prevalent. Ernest Jones is better, but will not be able to do much if anything for a few days.

John T. Hughes, the harness man, has been at the hospital since the middle of last week, a victim of influenza. Last Sunday the report was circulated that he had died during the night, but Mr. Hughes insists that the report was very much exaggerated. Mr. Hughes insists on a “square deal” in the matter of being alive, and today is up and around the hospital and threatening to run down his calumniators before the close of the week.
— —

19181105AFP2
Arbon News.

Several members of the family of J. R. Bailey are down with the flu. There were seven down at once. They are getting along fairly well.

Mrs. William Matthews received word Thursday of her daughter’s illness, Mrs. Castle, at Pocatello.

Herman Noth was called to American Falls last week on account of the serious illness of his brother, Dr. R. F. Noth.

Mrs. John Noble went to Preston last week to attend the funeral of her brother, I. B. Evans, who died of pneumonia. The day before the funeral Mrs. Noble was called home by the illness of her children, who were at the home of Mrs. T. B. Evans.

William Affleck was called to Logan, Utah, last week. His daughter, Modenna, was sick with influenza. Mt. Affleck returned Saturday, his daughter being much improved.

C. D. Porter and his son, Orville, who have been ill with influenza, are able to be up now.

Richard Bandy is still very ill with pneumonia. He is still very weak but Dr. Schlitz says he has a chance for recovery.

Newell Leishman is quite ill with pneumonia. He is at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Jerry Baker. Newell’s father was summoned from Wellsville, Utah, to be at his bedside.

There was no mail out of Arbon from Monday until Wednesday of last week, due to the illness of Heber Woods and family, who are all sick with influenza. E. A. Logan volunteered to take the mail out tree trips. Those who have not already had the flue [sic] or down with it, did not wish to go to Pocatello and expose themselves to the epidemic in that city. Mr. Logan stayed at the home of r. Rust, thus avoiding danger of staying at the hotels.

The family of David Roderick is reported to be much better.

L. B. Evans family are quite sick with the flu.

Mrs. Orville Affleck and children left Monday for Lewiston, Utah, [Cache County] where they will visit with relatives indefinitely.

Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Keeler received word from their son, Claude, in France that he had to enter the hospital the second time, influenza being the cause. He recovered from the first attack fairly well, and was given a furlough to recuperate, but was taken ill again.

Mrs. T. B. Evans is down with influenza. We hope that none of the other members of the family are taken down, as Mrs. Evans is the telephone operator here. Miss Connie Evans is now tending the switchboard.

Mr. and Mrs. John Bowen received a telephone message from their daughter, Mrs. Anna Smith, that her little two-year-old daughter, Wanda, had passed away at 5 o’clock Friday morning. Mrs. Smith’s children had had influenza and recovered, but the little child caught cold and died soon afterward. Mr. and Mrs. Bowen were driven to Pocatello Friday morning by John Payne.

source: American Falls Press. (American Falls, Idaho), 05 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Bonners Ferry Herald. November 05, 1918, Page 1

19181105BFH1aMany Deaths The Past Week
Dreaded Spanish Influenza Proves Fatal To Many People Of The County
Soldier Boy Buried Sunday
Paul Peter, U. S. Soldier, and Brother, Interred In Same Grave Sunday

Paul Frederick Carl Peter, son of Mrs. Anna Peter Skaar, died at Hoquiam, Wash., on October 29 of pneumonia following an attack of the Spanish influenza. The deceased was a private in the United States army and at the time of his death was serving in the spruce division attached to Camp D, 1-A, Bay City, Wash. He contracted the disease from which he died on the way to camp after having spent a few weeks furlough here visiting with his mother.

The deceased was born at Menominee, Wis., January 22, 1891. With his mother he came to this district several years ago and worked for the Bonners Ferry Lumber company until he was called into the service of his country. He was a steady, faithful worker, was esteemed and respected by his fellow workers and his employees and was highly popular among a host of acquaintances. He was the first soldier of this county to be buried in the local cemetery.

Gottlieb Frederick Ferdinand Peter, a brother of Paul Peter, died at the home of his mother on the Island, on November 2, of pneumonia. He had been a sufferer with tuberculosis for seven years. Owing to being an invalid he was not well known but all his acquaintances accorded him their deepest respect and love for he was always courageous and uncomplaining in his afflictions. He also was born at Menominee, Wis., and the date of his birth was December 16, 1893.

The two brothers were buried in the same grave Sunday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock, Rev. G. H. Wilbur conducting a brief funeral service at the cemetery. Owing to the regulations in regard to public gatherings on account of the Spanish influenza epidemic. it was not possible to hold a military funeral for the deceased soldier. The funeral services were attended by a large company of the friends of the deceased young men and their graves were covered with many beautiful wreaths and bouquets, the tributes of true friends who are all sorrowing with the bereaved mother and brothers and sisters in this their hour of tribulation and distress.

Last Thursday Marion D. Atkins received a telegram from Washington, D. C., telling that his son, William H. Atkins, died in a hospital in France on October 5th of broncho-pneumonia. The war department will send all particulars available by mail.

The deceased was one of four brothers in the service of Uncle Sam, three being in France.

William H. Atkins was born in the state of Nebraska. He was 29 years old on May 22, 1918. He was called into the service of his country last June and after a short training here was sent to France where he was assigned to the forestry engineers. The deceased was popular among a host of acquaintances in this county. He was a hard working man who paid strict attention to his own affairs but was always willing to lend a hand to help a neighbor or friend. He made the supreme sacrifice for his country.

Loren William Turner, the eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Turner, of this city, died at the home of his parents, on Sunday. Interment was had Tuesday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock and services were held at the grave, being conducted by Rev. E. R. Henderson.

The deceased was born in the state of Minnesota on June 5, 1899. He is survived by his father and mother and six brothers and sisters.

The last illness of the deceased began with Spanish influenza. Every member of the family is sick with this disease, with the exception of Mrs. E. E. Harding, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Turner, whose home is at Ione, Wash. Mrs. Harding has been here taking care of the sick ones.

Mr. and Mrs. Turner and children have the deepest sympathy of all in this their sad bereavement of their son and brother.

Lillian Lenora Travis, wife of Clyde Travis, of Naples, died Monday morning of pneumonia. The funeral services will be held Wednesday afternoon at the cemetery and will be conducted by Rev. G. H. Wilbur.

The deceased is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. L. P. Hill. She was born February 21, 1897. She was a native of Wisconsin.

The deceased was a highly respected young lady and numbered her friends by the score in all parts of the county where she was acquainted. The bereaved family have the deepest sympathy of all.

Ola Stockton, aged 16, the eldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. B. Stockton, of Copeland. died Wednesday morning at 10 o’clock of pneumonia, contracted following Spanish influenza.

The funeral was held at two o’clock Friday afternoon, short services being held at the cemetery by Rev. G. H. Wilbur.

The deceased had lived in this county with her parents for about two years. She was bright and cheerful, a great companion and help to her mother and a general favorite of all with whom she became acquainted. In their bereavement the members of the Stockton family have the deepest sympathy of their many friends and neighbors.

All the members of the Stockton family have been afflicted with Spanish influenza and at the time of the death of Miss Ola, her 13 year old brother, Boyd, was dangerously sick.

Barbara Ella Lindsey, wife of I. W. Lindsey, died November 1st at her home in this city of pneumonia resulting from Spanish Influenza.

Burial was had Sunday afternoon at one o’clock and services were held at the cemetery, Rev. E. R. Henderson officiating.

The deceased is survived by her husband and five children. She was born in Virginia on June 27, 1879.

The deceased had made her home in this district for many years and enjoyed the friendship and love and respect of many scores of people. She was a dutiful wife and a loving mother. The bereaved family have the heartfelt sympathy of the entire district.

Relatives here of Fred Hoagland received a telegram Friday telling of his death on October 31 at the home of his mother at Astoria, Ore. Death was caused by pneumonia resulting from Spanish influenza. The funeral was held Saturday at Astoria.

The deceased, was the youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. F. D. Hoagland and was born at Minneapolis, Minn., on March 30, 1888. He came here with his parents in 1902 and lived in this district up until about four years ago. At the time of his last sickness he was working in the government ship yards. The deceased is well known here. He numbered his friends by the score in this city and these all join in mourning his demise and in extending to the bereaved relatives their deepest sympathy.

source: Bonners Ferry Herald. (Bonners Ferry, Idaho), 05 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Bonners Ferry Herald. November 05, 1918, Page 2

Idaho News Paragraphs
Recent Happenings in This State Given in Brief Items for Busy Readers

William G. Murray, age 38, former game warden of Pend Oreille county for four years, recently died of influenza at Camp Colt, near Gettysburg.

At Avery the influenza situation has assumed grave proportions. With a town of about 300 population 60 people are ill and new cases are appearing every day.

source: Bonners Ferry Herald. (Bonners Ferry, Idaho), 05 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Bonners Ferry Herald. November 05, 1918, Page 5

Local Pick-ups

Edwin Charles has been very sick with the Spanish influenza for several weeks. He was able to be up and around a bit yesterday.

Byron N. Hawks, proprietor of the Brody Drug Store, became a “flu” victim Saturday and is now confined to his home with a high fever.

Miss Goldie Cave, secretary of the Boundary County Defense Council, is a victim of Spanish influenza and is confined to her room this week.

Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Burns have been sick the past week with Spanish influenza and as they were unable to get help [and] had to close down their restaurant for a few days.

Charles Smith, one of the well-to-do ranchers and stock growers of the Porthill district, was a business visitor in town Thursday. Mr. Smith reports that his whole family is sick with the Spanish influenza.

Mr. and Mrs. H. B. Kinnear have been quite sick the past week with the influenza, as has also, Miss Rawson, chief operator for the Interstate Utilities company. Mrs. A. J. Stauffer, of Sandpoint, sister of Mrs. Kinnear and Miss Rawson, is here taking care of the sick folks.

source: Bonners Ferry Herald. (Bonners Ferry, Idaho), 05 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Bonners Ferry Herald. November 05, 1918, Page 8

Local News

S. Okimo, a Japanese employee of the Great Northern railway at Troy, died at the Bonners Ferry hospital Monday of pneumonia. The body was shipped Wednesday to Seattle, Wn. for burial.

Word was received here Monday of the death of Ed Hood, formerly of this city, at a hospital in Spokane. Death resulted from pneumonia following an attack of Spanish influenza. The disease was contracted at Troy, Mont.

Mrs. A. A. McIntyre received a telegram Tuesday afternoon telling of the serious illness of her daughter-in-law, Mrs. D’Arcy, at Portland, Oregon. She left the same evening for Portland. Mrs. D’Arcy is ill with pneumonia.

source: Bonners Ferry Herald. (Bonners Ferry, Idaho), 05 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., November 05, 1918, Page 1

19181105DSM1
Influenza Situation in Moscow Is Very Favorable

Only three new cases of influenza are reported among the S. A. T. C. men since yesterday’s report and eight have been discharged as cured. This is the best day’s record since the epidemic struck Moscow. There have been no further deaths. The new cases are very mild and many of those who have been in the hospital for a few days are showing marked improvement.

This situation in town is not so encouraging. There are many cases widely scattered. None are regarded as very serious, although there are a number of cases of pneumonia. But the people outside of the university are not as easily controlled or managed as those inside where military rules govern and all must obey.

An error was made in reporting the deaths. It was stated that three of these were in class A, or the collegiate division of the S. A. T. C. This is an error. All of the six deaths of young soldiers have been in the vocational training or class B section. There are 300 of these men here and the six deaths mean a loss of just two per cent, which is regarded as very light. There has not been a death in the collegiate section where there are more than 500 young men enrolled.

Dr. Lindley, president of the university, has arranged to give a detailed report to The Star-Mirror every day. This is done religiously. Every death is reported as soon as it is learned at the university. Every new case is reported promptly. The full facts are given to The Star-Mirror and reported by it to its readers. There is no occasion for any of the sensational stories that are circulated on the streets without any foundation. There have been eight deaths from influenza in Moscow. Six of these were members of class B of the S. A. T. C. One was a soldier who had returned from California and the other was Mrs. St. John, whose death was reported yesterday. There are a few cases that are still doubtful, but these are being given the very best attention possible and strong hopes are entertained that all of them will recover.

The convalescents of the S. A. T. C. are being given the best of care. Many of them are cared for at the Elk’s temple. Others are cared for at other points, by Moscow people, the Red Cross, the civilian doctors and the people generally are responding to all calls for help for these.
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Convalescents Want Fruit.

The young men who are convalescing from influenza are in need of canned fruits. This has been prescribed for them but cannot be obtained. Persons who will give canned fruits for these young men are urged to bring the fruit to the office of The Star-Mirror; or, if they are unable to do this, if they will telephone to this office a messenger will be sent for the fruit.
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Council of Defense Wants Soldier’s Names

The council of defense will be glad to have press cuttings relative to Latah county boys who fall in action or die of influenza. Letters or signed accounts giving data of personal actions will assist also. The council desires to make a complete record of the actions of Latah county boys and earnestly invites the co-operation of the public. Address material to W. H. Bridge, Council of Defense office.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 05 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., November 05, 1918, Page 2

A local doctor told the writer last night that he has 12 well-developed cases of pneumonia following influenza in Moscow and he had been working since daylight yesterday morning until long after night. This is only one of the many physicians of Moscow who are working almost day and night to save the lives of the afflicted, but it brings home to us the seriousness of the situation and the absolute need to strict observance of every health law, rule and regulation laid down by these doctors who are fighting so hard to stamp out this dreadful contagion.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 05 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., November 05, 1918, Page 3

City News

Hunt Potter and family are sick of the lighter type of influenza.

Dean Poindexter of Farmington is here to assist the St. John family during their affliction of influenza.

The funeral of Mrs. Earl St. John occurred this morning at 10:30.

Mrs. Joseph of Salmon City, who has been visiting her son of the S. A. T. C. for the past 10 days, left for her home today. Her son had a light attack of influenza.

Mrs. H. A. Thatcher returned Monday from Lewiston, where she attended the funeral of her nephew, Linn Baughman, who died of influenza. Mr. Baughman was a fine young man, 20 years of age, and express messenger on the Northern pacific running through Moscow.
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Deary Neighborhood News of Past Week

Mrs. Josephine Taft accompanied by Miss Ruth Taft, who has been teaching at the Bear creek school and the Burt creek school have returned to their home at Iola, Idaho during the influenza siege.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 05 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Challis Messenger., November 06, 1918, Page 5

19181105CM1
Items About People You Know

Mrs. M. A. Dillingham and two children, Harry Dale and Bonnie Jean, who went to Salmon some time ago to be in attendance at the funeral of Mrs. Dillingham’s brother, have each contracted Spanish Influenza. At the present time Bonnie Jean is entirely over the disease; Mrs. Dillingham is quite ill with it and Harry Dale is just coming down.

One of the Sandy family is ill, and although it is not known definitely just what the nature of the sickness is, Dr. Kirtley is taking no chances and the family has been quarantined.

Several Mackay men were arrested the fore part of the week by Sheriff Huntington, charged with violating the quarantine law. They were released Wednesday morning by order of Judge Cowen. Their case will be tried when the “flu” epidemic is over.

All children under 14 are requested to stay in their own yards until the ‘Flu’ is stamped out. This action is taken by the Health Board to prevent the spread of the disease should it appear in this locality.

Mrs. Dell Bartlett has taken the “Flu” at the home of her sister in Butte. Mr. Bartlett left for Butte Thursday to be at her bedside. Mrs. Bartlett’s sister and her sister’s husband have both died from the disease.

source: The Challis Messenger. (Challis, Idaho), 06 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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1918RedCrossMakingMasks-a
Red Cross Making Masks (no citation given)

source: KRTV Great Falls, Montana
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Nov 6

The Daily Star-Mirror., November 06, 1918, Page 1

Influenza Situation Is Very Encouraging

The influenza situation in Moscow shows marked improvement today. There have been no deaths and some of the cases that were causing uneasiness are believed to now be out of danger. Only five new cases were admitted to the hospital for the S. A. T. C. men and two of those patients were released as cured and there are quite a number who will be released within a few days.
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Former Moscow Woman Dead.

Thressa Murdock, superintendent of the Spokane Influenza hospital, until her illness, and who died yesterday, was well known here. She was a nurse at one of the local hospitals several years ago and made many friends who deeply regret to hear of her heroic sacrifice. She was a graduate of the Spokane Deaconess hospital training school for nurses in 1912, and was a classmate of Mrs. E. T. Baker, of this city, who is recovering from a severe attack of the disease.
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19181106DSM1cartoon-a

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 06 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., November 06, 1918, Page 2

Now that the election is over and the war seems about to end, we have only the influenza epidemic to disturb us and that is being conquered, thanks to the efficient and untiring work of almost every one in Moscow, led by the university authorities and the army men.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 06 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., November 06, 1918, Page 3

City News

I. L. Osterhout of Collfax, who used to work at the First National bank in Moscow, has been in the hospital at Colfax over a week with an attack of influenza. He is recovering nicely. Mrs. Osterhout and little son is in Moscow with her mother, Mrs. Patterson.

The funeral of Clarke B. Jessup will occur this afternoon at 2:30. Mr. Jessup was a young man of 26 years of age, who entered the service at Cottonwood just a few weeks ago, and died of influenza in California. He is a brother of A. M. Jessup, with the Standard Dray company of this city.

Dr. Herrington was asked by Dr. Clark to visit Mr. C. W. Gregg at Viola. Dr. Herrington reports two of Mr. Gregg’s boys sick with influenza and a Mrs. Vanslicken, a daughter of Mr. Gregg, very seriously ill with influenza complicated with pneumonia.
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19181106DSM2ad
“This is true, BUT NOT DAMP AIR. Have plenty of fresh air in your room, BUT HEAT IT to a temperature so it will be DRY FRESH AIR, more like NATURE DEMANDS is for lung trouble. Do not be stingy by not having a stove to take care of your family and pay it out in doctor bills and funeral expense. Buy a stove and have it comfortable for yourself and children. We sell stoves and it does not take a fortune to buy one.”

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 06 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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1918Atlantic8-a
An open-air barber shop. Public events were encouraged to be held outdoors to hinder the spread of the disease during the influenza epidemic. Photographed at the University of California, Berkeley, in 1919. National Archives

source: Alan Taylor April 10, 2018 “30 Photos of the 1918 Flu Pandemic” The Atlantic
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Nov 7

The Grangeville Globe. November 07, 1918, Page 1

19181107GG1Grangeville Girl Dead.
Daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Robert N. Walker Victim of Influenza.

Mrs A,. F. Wendorf, aged 23 years, 7 months and 28 days, succumbed to pneumonia following influenza, at Spokane last Sunday. The remains were shipped to this place and internment made in Prairie View cemetery yesterday afternoon at 2:30, W. N. Nox conducting the services at the grave and Undertaker A. J. Maugg directing the funeral.

Nellie Vivian, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. R. N. Walker, was born on the Walker ranch four miles north of this city, where she lived until she was 12 years of age. The family then moved to Grangeville where she attended grammar and high school. She was married to A. F. Wendorf April 3, 1915, and moved to Walla Walla, Wash., at which place a baby girls was burn to them on September 21, 1916. They recently moved to Spokane where she died of pneumonia last Sunday, November 3. Besides her husband and infant daughter, Ruth Allene, she leaves father and mother, two sisters, Mrs. W. H. Mann and Mrs. Gay Golvin, and three brothers, Fred, Hugh C. and James S. Walker.
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Cottonwood Soldier Dead.

A message was received last Saturday at Cottonwood from Camp Fremont, Cal., announcing the death of Clark Jessup, from pneumonia following influenza. The deceased left Cottonwood several weeks ago and had resided in the Cottonwood section three or four years. A brother, Ed Jessup, is engaged in farming near Cottonwood and other relatives reside at Moscow. The remains were shipped to the latter place for internment.
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Prof. Luther Case, superintendent of the city schools, is now most entirely recovered from his recent attack of the influenza and is able to be about the city each day. Like all others who have been afflicted with the complaint, it requires some time to regain the lost strength.
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19181107GG2Grover Myers Buried
Passed Away at Emergency Hospital at Lewiston Last Saturday

Grover C. Myers, a former resident of Grangeville, but of late residing at Lewiston, passed away at the emergency hospital last Saturday morning from pneumonia following and attack of Spanish influenza. The remains were shipped to this city on Saturday’s train and internment was had at Fairview cemetery Sunday afternoon, Rev. J. A. Pine of the Christian church conducting the service and A. J. Maugg directing the funeral.

Grover as aged 27 years, 11 months and 26 days at the time of his death and had resided in Lewiston for the greater part of the last 15 years. …

He was a popular young man and enjoyed a wide acquaintance throughout the country. He was a member of the Lewiston band and his interest and activities in amateur athletics enlarged his acquaintance. He suffered a long period of illness during the spring and had not fully recovered his strength when taken with influenza. …

source: The Grangeville Globe. (Grangeville, Idaho), 07 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Grangeville Globe. November 07, 1918, Page 4

19181107GG3Grangeville Soldier Dead.
Left for Camp Rosencrans Three Weeks Ago, Died Wednesday Morning.

Edward Steinbaugh, aged 22 years died at Camp Rosencrans, Calif., Wednesday morning, November 6th. The remains are expected to reach here Sunday evening and the funeral will probably be held Tuesday, announcement of which will be made later. Edward left here the 1st of October with a contingent of seven young men from this county, two of whom are now deceased, Clark Jessup, of Cottonwood, being the first one called. It is reported here that three others of the party are very ill and were taken off the train before reaching their destination. Influenza was the cause of death in both instances. …

source: The Grangeville Globe. (Grangeville, Idaho), 07 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Grangeville Globe. November 07, 1918, Page 5

19181107GG4
Salmon River News

John Doumecq was transacting business in White Bird the first of the week. He reports that his brother Charlie, who is well and favorably known here, is in France and has been for some time. His brother, William, is at Camp Kearney, and was in the hospital with influenza, the last they heard from him.

W. E. Reed and children who have been suffering from an attack of influenza, are reported better and we hope will be able to be out before long.

source: The Grangeville Globe. (Grangeville, Idaho), 07 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Grangeville Globe. November 07, 1918, Page 8

Mrs. I. O. Blake is confined to her home this week with tonsillitis. It is such a relief to learn of a person being afflicted with something else than influenza.

The latest news from Portland states that the Harlan boys who have been very ill with the “Flu” are improving. Ray is about to be up for a short period, and Paul is still in a very weak condition.

Miss Bessie Elmers is back on the job as manager at the Nez Perce telephone office after being confined to her home for tend days or more. Miss Lovelace, her assistant, while considerably improved will not return to work until next week. While the young ladies have been taking their enforced vacation, Miss Alice Hawley of Cottonwood, had charge of the office, working both shifts. She will return to her home the first of the week.
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Obituary

Mrs. Emma Noyes was born at Pomeroy Wash. August 4, 1878. At the age of five years she came to Camas Prairie, where she has resided until her death, last Saturday, November 2, 1918. Her death resulted from pneumonia, following the influenza. …

source: The Grangeville Globe. (Grangeville, Idaho), 07 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Wallace Miner. November 07, 1918, Page 1

19181107WM1

Tarbox.

Richard Daxon, manager of the Tarbox, who has been confined to his home for the past week or two with influenza, stated yesterday evening that a telephone message from the mine announced the crosscut from the winze had broken through the footwall and disclosed considerable lead ore. …

source: The Wallace Miner. (Wallace, Idaho), 07 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Lincoln County Times., November 07, 1918, Page 1

19181107LCT1-headlineInvestigate Frazer Case.

The following article which deals with the death of Boyd Frazer last Tuesday week we take from the Sunday issue of the Boise Statesman:

Jerome — Citizens of this community are aroused over the treatment accorded Boyd Kelly Fraser, 19 years old, at the S. A.. T. C. school at Moscow and an investigation into the circumstances attending his discharge when suffering from Spanish influenza and his death three days after his arrival home, has been started to fix the blame for the seeming negligence on the part of the army officials in charge of the school.

Young Frazer was called to the colors by his local draft board on October 16 for entrainment to the Moscow school and from the statement of the boy to his parent on his return on Sunday, October 27, he was mustered into the service and had drilled with the other boys for two days. He was then taken ill with influenza and on October 24 was discharged from the service so ill that he was unable to take a train for his home until the following day. He arrived home on the 27th and died two days later from the effects of pneumonia following influenza.

Verdict of Physicians.

On reaching Jerome, the boys father called in two physicians and two trained nurses. The physicians were both agreed that the boy had been suffering from the dread malady for at least five days and informed Mr. Frazer that his boy could not recover.

Young Frazer turned in his equipment to the government on the 24th and it was receipted for by G. S. Marshall.

According to the conductor of the train on which he arrived in Jerome Frazer and another person occupied a lower berth in the sleeper from Pendleton although the boy is said to have had influenza at the time.

Boy’s Father Investigates.

R. S. Frazer, the boy’s father, and A. C. Alexander have gone to Boise to investigate the circumstances and will leave from there for Moscow to learn the details.

Carelessness is charged in the treatment accorded Frazer and it is understood that the local draft board is awaiting the investigation under way before sending any other draft men to Moscow.

source: Lincoln County Times. (Jerome, Idaho), 07 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Lincoln County Times., November 07, 1918, Page 2

Influenza on decline.

Washington. — Steady improvement in heath conditions at army camps and cantonments for the week ending October 25 is noted in the health report made public Friday at the office of the surgeon general of the army.

source: Lincoln County Times. (Jerome, Idaho), 07 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Lincoln County Times., November 07, 1918, Page 4

19181107LCT2Appleton

Miss Jennie Haun received word this week of the death of a nephew from influenza in California.

Mrs. Wm. Carver as on the sick list last week.

source: Lincoln County Times. (Jerome, Idaho), 07 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Lincoln County Times., November 07, 1918, Page 5

Dr. Boyd, of Twin Falls, was in Jerome Monday, being here to consult with the local physicians.

Dr. Parker, and eminent physician of Boise, is in Jerome helping the local physicians care for the unusual number of sick people.

The Eagle Lodge hall has been turned into an emergency hospital for the care of influenza patients. There are at present four cases confined at the hall.

Grover C. Newman, who has been very ill with pneumonia at the Inn, was removed to a Twin Falls hospital in an ambulance Tuesday. Reports from Twin Falls as to the condition of the suffering man state that he is improving.

Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Trask has returned to Jerome after a visit with relatives at Dillon, Mont., and Mr. Trask will again tack charge of the Franzers-Pence garage. While away both Mr. and Mrs. Trask had a siege of influenza.

For thos [sic] who are to send packages to the boys overseas, it may be well to state that instead of taking the Xmas parcels to the post office to be wrapped, it has been decided that they should be taken to the L’Herisson Furniture store. This change was deemed necessary on account of the influenza epidemic.
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Death of Arch Stanger.

B. B. Stanger of Jerome, received word Tuesday morning that his brother, Arch Stanger, had passed away that morning at Idaho Falls, a victim of Spanish influenza.

Mr. Stanger made his home at Jerome for some time, being employed by the Franzers-Pence garage, and will be remembered by many Jeromeites. He left Jerome recently for Idaho Falls, where he was employed up until the time of being stricken with the disease.
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Baby Passes Away After Brief Illness

Master Dallas Edwin O’Rourke, the three-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. L. J. O’Rourke, died Tuesday morning after a brief illness. The family resides seven miles west of Jerome on the old Chester brothers’ place. The infant took sick Sunday with the influenza, which developed into pneumonia. The remains were laid to rest Wednesday afternoon at three o’clock.
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19181107LCT3
“Flu” Epidemic Still Rages in Idaho

The Spanish influenza epidemic is still raging in Idaho. Although about ten days ago it seemed to be on the decline, the past week has showed an increase in the number of cases. In Idaho a great many votes were lost in the election on account of families being quarantined.

In Jerome, it has been estimated that there are between 125 and 175 cases of the disease and a few have developed into pneumonia. To date there have been about five deaths in this community from the effects of the disease.

source: Lincoln County Times. (Jerome, Idaho), 07 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Payette Enterprise., November 07, 1918, Page 1

19181107PE1
Death Visits Many Homes

Edna Elvira Johnson

Saturday morning death claimed one of Fruitland’s best young women when it called Miss Edna Elvira Johnson who was fitting herself to be of great use in this world of suffering. Vera, as she was called, was born February 1, 1898 in Santaguin, Utah, and came here with her parents where she has been educated and has grown to young womanhood. Three years ago she decided to become a nurse and entered St. Alphonsus hospital from which she would have graduated in June. She had enlisted for oversea service and was anxious that her life be one of usefulness. Last week she was stricken with influenza and on Thursday the family was called to Boise because of her serious condition. She seemed to be better and hopes were given, but pneumonia developed Friday. The disease had too strong a hold on Vera and she passed away Saturday morning. The body was brought to Payette Sunday morning accompanied by the mother, Mrs. J. O. Johnson and sister, Miss Iona. Funeral services were conducted at the grave by Rev. Ford M. Burtch, pastor of the Fruitland Baptist church which Vera attended when at home. …

Miss Vera was the second student nurse to die in St,. Alphonsus Hospital in over 23 years, the first one having died just the day before with Spanish influenza.
— —

Mae Anderson Keele

The hearts of the people of this community were saddened when it was learned that Mrs. G. C. Keele who went to Boise about a month ago to work in St. Luke’s Hospital, had passed away on Sunday as the result of Spanish influenza. She had lived in Payette for many years and was loved and respected by all who new her. …

Mae Anderson was born in Tennessee abut the year 1889 and died at St. Luke’s hospital November 3rd, 1918 at the age of 29 years. …
— — —

Mamie Reimers

Another young life was nipped in the bloom of youth when death entered the home of Mr. and Mrs. John Reimers November 6, at 10:30 a.m. and claimed the daughter, Miss Mamie, 18 years of age. Death caused from scarlet fever. The funeral was held this afternoon at two o’clock. As we were unable to learn the particulars an obituary will be published next week.
— —

19181107PE2
Personal and Local Mentions

The Board of heath of Payette County has secured the old Payette Hotel building as a hospital in case it should be needed on account of the Spanish influenza. We understand there is one patient there now.

Steve Clanton returned a few days ago from his old home in northern Iowa where he has been for the last three months. While Iowa crops in that part of the state are exceptionally good and every one seems to be prospering, Steve says Idaho looks best to him. He says land values in Idaho are much lower according to production than any place he has been. He reports the Spanish influenza as very bad back there. Doctors and all help for taking care of the sick are rushed beyond their capacity, and in many cases assistance cannot be had at all.
— —

Baptist Church.

To the members and friends of the Baptist Church of Payette:

With the quarantine still on we can pray and rededicate ourselves to Christ, meet in small groups, carry out the great movement inaugurated by the Laymen of the Northern Baptist Convention, go out two by two in team work as planned by the Convention, and particularly devote the Sunday School hour to the study of the Sunday School lesson in the home until the embargo is removed. …

source: Payette Enterprise. (Payette, Canyon Co., Idaho), 07 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Payette Enterprise., November 07, 1918, Page 2

The Spanish Influenza which has put terror into the people of this country, has brought true the old saying, “Every dog has his day.” It must be gratifying to the canine to see his master going about wearing a muzzle.
— —

19181107PE3
North Payette

Several members of the Cheek family have had sever attacks of the grip, Ted Cheek now has the pneumonia.
— —

19181107PE4
Sand Hollow

Vera Fee is in the Alphonsus Hospital in Boise with the Influenza.

source: Payette Enterprise. (Payette, Canyon Co., Idaho), 07 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Payette Enterprise., November 07, 1918, Page 5

19181107PE5Fruitland Department
Mrs. R. G. Wilson

“As ’twas told to me.”
Personal Notes

A letter from Schuyler Royston states they have a good deal of pneumonia in his ward, and he is kept very busy.

Miss Ruth Whealdon who is taking nurse training in Spokane Hospital, has been having the influenza.

Ever Enberg was a Boise visitor Sunday. His sister, Miss Mabel, who is a nurse in St. Alphonsus hospital, was ill with the influenza. Monday she was reported much improved.

Allen Newell of Letha is convalescing at the home of his sister, Mrs. E. A. Stegner.

Miss Myrtle Stegner returned to Letha Monday to help in the Newell-Stegner store.

Chas. Boor of Ironside was taken ill at the home of his mother, Mrs. J. W. Boor last Tuesday. At first it was feared it was influenza, but proved to be pneumonia.

Mrs. Harry Taylor came home from Boise, Sunday. Her brother, Emery Stillwell is sick in Boise with the influenza.

source: Payette Enterprise. (Payette, Canyon Co., Idaho), 07 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

The Emmett Index. November 07, 1918, Page 1

Body Brought Home

The body of George Dewey, who fell a victim to influenza in Portland, was brought home for burial. The funeral was held Tuesday morning. Brief services were held at the grave, being conducted by Bishop George Smith. The bereaved wife and four children, who were also sick with the disease, are recovering and expect to come to Emmett next week.
— —

Epidemic Stationary.

Dr. Cummings reports that Flu in Emmett appears to be gaining no ground, there being very few new cases, and no deaths from this cause thus far.
— —

Caught!

In the city of Emmett, a lady flirting with the Flu by doing her own washing. Ask Mack.
— —

The Harry Stanley family, who have been very will with Flu, are all about well, excepting Mr. Stanley, who is still very sick.

source: The Emmett Index. (Emmett, Idaho), 07 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Emmett Index. November 07, 1918, Page 2

19181107EI1
Tales Of Town

The Kiddies cannot see why anyone should object to a quarantine on the schools. But they will see why next June.

Better not throw aside your precautions against the influenza just yet. It is just as deadly as it ever was and – well, you don’t want to miss seeing the kaiser’s finish, do you, when it is drawing closer every day?

The health authorities have requested the barbers to wear masks when serving their clients, such should afford a great relief to the citizens who have opinions of their own about when the war is to end.

As usual, the farmer is the fortunate one in this influenza epidemic. Every time he steps out his front door he doesn’t have to duck back because some individual looking like a chicken with the roup [sic] and sneezing with the rapidity of a machine gun happens to be passing on his road home to hallelujah. If he takes the thing himself he can cough all over the calf lot at will or without fear. He can sneeze up one corn row and down another and the malignant bug ascending into the yellow circumambient of late autumn will get no further than the neighbor’s back forty, where, i contact with the sheep dip or the mortgage, it will languish unto death its malevolence merits. Between the farmers — blessed men – are those wide breathing spaces and that “elbow room” which some health of the human soul as well as writer declared were necessary to the body in which it resides.

source: The Emmett Index. (Emmett, Idaho), 07 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Emmett Index. November 07, 1918, Page 4

19181107EI2
News Of Gem County
By The Index’s Correspondents

Letha

Mr. Kiggins has decided to remain here awhile because of the prevalence of influenza and danger of quarantine. He is doing some fresnoing for Mr. Bott.

A. W. Newell is getting along splendidly. His many friend will be glad to know it.

A brother of John Dewey died in Portland last week of influenza. The body was brought to Emmett.
— —

Montour
By Mrs. R. E. Noland

Otto Kinsinger, who has been ill so long at the rooming house, was able to call at the Schuler home Tuesday.

Mrs. Vaughn has received word from her son Victor that after a severe attack of pneumonia he is again able to be up and around. Mr. Vaughn is in a hospital at Vancouver Barracks.

Mr. and Mrs. Jones were very much pleased to hear that their son Vance had fully recovered from the influenza. Vance is still on the border guarding.
— —

Central Mesa
Regina Conrad

W. E. Buck has the Spanish influenza.
— —

Emmett News.

Henry Duberke received a telegram stating that his wife, who was enroute home from a visit East had been taken suddenly ill and had been removed from the train at Dubuque where she is being cared for. The little daughter is being cared for by members of the Red Cross of that place.

Word has been received from Portland that Joe W. Casper, who left about tend days ago to work in the ship yards, has been a Flu patient for several days. He is fortunate in having one of the successful physicians of Portland and was able to write home that he is doing nicely and hopes for an early recovery.

Mrs. Ethel Haylor-Smith is a Flu patient in Portland. She volunteered as an emergency nurse when the auditorium was converted into a temporary hospital, and after working four days was taken with the disease. She is recovering.

source: The Emmett Index. (Emmett, Idaho), 07 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Emmett Index. November 07, 1918, Page 8

Emmett News.

W. H. Adkins returned Tuesday from Portland, where he had been working in the ship yards. He says the influenza has taken five out of 84 working in his department.

W. H. Shane a few days ago received the sad news of the death from influenza of his niece, the only daughter of his sister, Mrs. Burdella Zabitz of Chicago. The young lady was an accomplished musician.

Alton Ausch returned Monday from Portland, where he has been working in the ship yards. Like others, he feels that home is a mighty good place to be with Flu so prevalent.

source: The Emmett Index. (Emmett, Idaho), 07 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

Idaho County Free Press. November 07, 1918, Page 1

19181107ICFP1
School On Saturdays and During Vacation To Make Up For Loss

Pupils of the Grangeville public schools who thought, because of the closing order, due to Spanish influenza, they would escape the entire nine months of school, will be disappointed, for it is planned to hold school on Saturdays and during the Christmas vacation, in order to make up for four weeks of school lost because of the epidemic.

The public schools will not be opened before November 18. If conditions continue to improve, it is thought that the schools can be opened on that day. This would mean the loss of four weeks, or twenty school days, and in order to make up for the loss, plans already are being completed.

The schools before closing were five days ahead of schedule, because the annual teachers’ institute was not held. This would leave the schedule only fifteen days behind, if the schools are not opened until November 18. School probably will be held on the Monday and Tuesday before Christmas and on the Thursday and Friday following New Year’s day, which would place the schools eleven days behind schedule. Five days in other vacations can be eliminated, it is pointed out, and if school is held on six Saturdays, the entire schedule can be made up.

Teachers, under the state law, are drawing pay during the time the schools are closed.
— —

Keuterville Woman Is Dead.
Mrs. Charles Beuttner Succumbs to Spanish Influenza.

Mrs Charles Beuttner, wife of a well known rancher residing five miles south of Keuterville, died Monday evening from complications following an attack of Spanish influenza. She leaves her husband and five children.
— —

Funeral For Grover Myers
Services Held in Grangeville Sunday Afternoon.

Funeral services for Grover Myers, former resident of Grangeville, who died last Saturday in Lewiston, as a result of Spanish influenza, were held Sunday afternoon from the Maugg parlors in Grangeville with burial in Prairie View Cemetery. The Rev. J. A. Pine, pastor of the Christian church, officiated. …
— —

Clark D. Jessup

Clark D. Jessup, a Cottonwood boy in the army, died on November 1 of Spanish influenza at Camp Rosencrans, Cal. Mr. Jessup who was 28 years of age, left Grangeville with the selective service contingent on October 21 to enter training for the military service. …
— —

Edward Steinbach.

Edward Steinbach, one of the last Grangeville boys to join the colors, died early Tuesday morning of Spanish influenza at Camp Rosencrans, Cal. He was 22 years old the day before he died. Mr. Steinbach left Grangeville with the selective service contingent on October 21. Previous to entering the military service, he had been employed in the Electric Laundry. …

source: Idaho County Free Press. (Grangeville, Idaho Territory), 07 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Idaho County Free Press. November 07, 1918, Page 3

Grateful For Assistance.

The publisher of the Idaho County Free Press regrets inability to produce the customary amount of reading matter in the present issue of this newspaper, and hopes that the public will again be lenient in that respect.

With two members of the Free Press ill with Spanish influenza at one time, the working force of the office has been greatly depleted, and it was only due to the spirit of helpfulness displayed by Probate Judge Wilbur L. Campbell and the Globe Printing company, that it was possible for last week’s issue of the Idaho County Free Press to be printed. In the production of this week’s issue, also, the Globe force has been of most valuable assistance.

The publisher of the Idaho County Free Press promises the patrons of this newspaper that, barring the unforeseen, the paper next will will resume its regulation size.

source: Idaho County Free Press. (Grangeville, Idaho Territory), 07 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Idaho County Free Press. November 07, 1918, Page 5

General Health Regulations.

It is very important that every citizen cooperate with officials in the conservation and preservation of health and in preventing the spread of the influenza now going the rounds, and to prevent the fatilities [sic] which sometimes follow improper care of the person having the disease. A general survey and knowledge of these regulations will therefore be useful, in assuring complete and effective cooperation. With that purpose the following is printed:

The School District.

As to school districts the law is quoted:

“It is the duty of the owner or agent of a house in which a person resides who has any contagious or infectious disease dangerous to public health, and the physicians called to attend the person or persons so afflicted, withing 24 hours after becoming cognizant of the fact to give notice to the clerk of the board of trustees of the school district of the disease and of the person afflicted. Such person shall be kept away and apart from all other persons except those who may be necessary for the spiritual and physical well-being of such a person.

“it is the duty of a teacher when she feels that any child may be afflicted with any contagious disease, to send him home and to report to the clerk of the school district. Any child afflicted with a contagious disease shall be kept out of school for at least two weeks after the death, recovery or removal of any person in his house so afflicted, and no child may be allowed to return to school until after a certificate of permission has been given him by the attending physician. When the child has any textbook or books belonging to the school district at the time of his sickness they shall not be returned until they have been thoroughly disinfected under the direction of the attending physician.”

In case of quarantine, the ;aw very properly provides that no district shall lose its share of school money because it cannot maintain a minimum term of school and unless the contrary is stated in the contract that the teacher shall lose no part of her salary.

City Health Officer.

The city has the power to pass all ordinances necessary for controlling the question of cess pools, outhouses, sewer, collection of garbage, contagious diseases, construction of buildings and other safeguards for health. Every city, too, has a health officer, whose duty is is to enforce such ordinances and regulation for the maintenance of health within the city.

Every county in the state has a board of health, consisting of the county board of commissioners and a physician appointed by them. This board has power to quarantine any particular district or place so as to prevent the spread of any contagious or infections disease, and by this means it may quarantine any person or persons so afflicted.

In the case of persons so afflicted who are not able to bear the expense of medical attendance, medicines, the services of a nurse and so on, such expenses are sometimes allowed by the board of county commissioners, so it is possible for all to be provided with suitable care and medical attendance.

State Board of Health

There is a state board of health composed of five members, two of which shall be experienced and regularly licenses physicians of different parts of the state and appointed by the governor, the attorney-general of the state and the state engineer being ex-officio members of this board.

It was this board that closed all the schools of the state, churches, moving picture shows, pool halls and public gatherings. By this means a concerted effort of the entire state may be had for the stamping out of any epidemic affecting it. This board also has charge of the asylums, the soldiers’ home, penitentiary and certain other state institutions, making all the rules necessary for the safeguarding of the health of the inmates of these places.
— —

19181107ICFP2
Whitebird

Mrs. Ed Wyatt of Joseph came to town Sunday to nurse her son, Glen Rice, who is quite ill with the influenza.

Recent rains and the influenza did not seem to hinder the election, as many of the country people were in town Tuesday.

source: Idaho County Free Press. (Grangeville, Idaho Territory), 07 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Idaho County Free Press. November 07, 1918, Page 8

19181107ICFP3
Local News In Brief

Al White Recovering

Al White, who suffered a severe attack of Spanish influenza, is recovering, and will be able to be out within a few days.

Critically Ill

Mrs. William Soltman is critically ill with influenza. Mr. Soltman, who has been suffering from the disease, is able to be out.

Sheriff’s Force Better

Sheriff Lafe Yates was at work in his office Tuesday after two weeks’ illness from Spanish influenza. Deputy Sheriff Quinlan also was at work, after a week’s illness. Deputy Sheriff Powell is recovering, but still is confined to his home.
— —

19181107ICFP4
Personal

Mrs. V. Knapp has returned to her home in Lewiston, after spending a week in Grangeville caring for her niece, Mrs. L. A. Wisener, who was critically ill from Spanish influenza. Mrs. Knapp was accompanied home by Robert Wisener.
— —

19181107ICFP5
Four Deaths From Influenza Here In Week
Epidemic, However, Believed To Have Been Definitely Checked
Few New Cases Developing
Contagion Spreads to Cottonwood – Two Deaths in Squibb Family Within Seven Days

Though four deaths from Spanish influenza have occurred in Grangeville and vicinity during the week and several cases remain serious, it is believed the epidemic has been definitely checked, and withing a short time will be entirely eliminated from the east side of Camas Prairie. At the same time, the disease has spread to Cottonwood, which heretofore has been free from the malady.

Few new cases are reported. Some however have developed in homes in which one or more members previously had been afflicted.

Those who have died during the week are:

Mrs. Fred Noyes, Grangeville.
Mrs. Sophia Gratton, Grangeville.
Mrs. William Squibb Jr., Grangeville.
Bernice Miller, Winona.
— —

Grangeville Girl Dead.
Daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Robert N. Walker Victim of Influenza.

Mrs. A. F. Wendorf, aged 23 years, 7 months and 28 days succumbed to pneumonia following influenza, at Spokane last Sunday. The remains were shipped to this place and interment made in Prairie View cemetery yesterday afternoon at 2:30, W. N. Knox conducting the services at the grave and Undertaker A. J. Maugg directing the funeral. …

source: Idaho County Free Press. (Grangeville, Idaho Territory), 07 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., November 07, 1918, Page 1

19181107DSM1
Influenza Cases Growing Fewer
Only Three New Cases Reported in Moscow Today and Three Released.

The report of the influenza epidemic in Moscow today is very encouraging. Only three new cases were reported in the S. A. T. C. and three have been released as cured. There were no deaths and the old cases are getting better.

Dr. W. A. Adair, city health officer, says no new cases have been reported to him in the town proper, outside of the S. A. T. C. men, and that conditions in Moscow are satisfactory. It is believed that the epidemic is under control and that from now on the number of cases will grow less daily. If people continue to take care of themselves and obey the regulations as they have the health officers believe that it will not be long before schools can be opened and everything move on as before the epidemic stuck Moscow.
— —

46 Die At Pullman.

Pullman, Wash., Nov. 6. — Clyde Richards, who recently came to Washington from Missouri, succumbed yesterday afternoon to influenza. He was a member of the S. A. T. C. This rings the total toll from the epidemic to 46 in Pullman, of which 40 were members of the training corps. Dr. J. B. Anderson, Spokane city health officer, and E. T. Coman of Spokane, president of the board of regents of the state college, visited Pullman yesterday and today, respectively, to survey the influenza situation.
— —

Genesee Red Cross Sends Soldiers Fruit

The Red Cross of Genesee, following the fine example set by Genesee people in every public enterprise, sent over literally “loads” of fruit to the sick and convalescent soldiers at Moscow. Sergeant Hatfield, who is supply sergeant for the hospitals, asks The Star-Mirror to convey the thanks of himself and every soldier in Moscow, to the Genesee Red Cross ladies for this magnificent offering. He said: “We have five big boxes of canned fruit here now and learn that two more automobile loads are on the way. It as brought direct to the hospitals and we have no words strong enough to express our appreciation.” Genesee has an enviable reputation for all public spirited work, having led in Red Cross, Liberty loan and other war fund drives and the people there are liberal, public spirited and very enterprising.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 07 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., November 07, 1918, Page 2

City News

Mrs. S. C. Williamson donated six quarts of fruit for the soldiers’ mess food, Mrs. Frank Kelly two quarts, and John E. Jernberg two boxes of fine apples.

Mrs. Nita Jester, who lives five miles south of Moscow, gave five sacks of apples and five fine squash to the soldier boys. The boys say the apples were delicious.

Miss Suma Hall, a nurse from Potlatch, has an attack of influenza, but is not seriously ill.

Mrs. T. A. Meeker and son Gerald are improving very well from their siege of influenza.

Mrs. L. F. Hare, who has been sick of influenza, is much improved.

Mrs. Roy Vansickle of Viola, who died of influenza, was buried this afternoon. Her two brothers by the name of Greeg are very ill.

The Christian Science lecture which was to be held here, with Mr. Graham of Boston as speaker, will be postponed until the quarantine is lifted.
— —

More Fruit for Soldiers.

The following have given canned fruits, preserves and jellies for the sick and convalescent soldiers; Perton Johnson, Mrs. James Nolan, Mrs. A. T. Mack, Mrs. H. B. Reed, Mrs Roise, Mrs. Garrison, Mrs. A. N. Coverdale, The Mokepohreca Club, Mrs. Frank Oberg, Mrs. C. C. Carpener, Mrs. Nellie Hall, Mrs. J. L. Naylor, Mrs. H. H. Simpson, Mrs. James Eggan, Mrs. S. C,. Williamson, Mrs. Langon.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 07 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

The Nezperce Herald., November 07, 1918, Page 5

19181107TNH1
Local and Personal News Notes

H. W. Keith, on leaving for his home in Walla Walla last Sunday, asked The Herald to express his deep gratitude to the Nezperce people for their assistance in helping his son, Arthur, through his serious attack of influenza.

The Lewiston stock show is to be held Nov. 28 to Dec. 4, inclusive. The influenza epidemic necessitated the postponement from the earlier dates.

Mrs. H. L. Campbell who helped this community keep up the efficiency of its hospital during the two weeks when the influenza epidemic was at its height, returned to her home in Winchester Friday.

P. H. Sanger, of Mohler, who has heretofore contributed so liberally to the Red Cross War Funds, as well as to the local branch, has signified his desire to buy the local branch an electric sewing machine. The great volume of work which has been done locally by the Red Cross workers has been done with old machines, some of which are difficult to operate, and the addition of a new electric driven machine will be greatly appreciated by the ladies.

Rubens this morning reported the influenza in epidemic form at that place and asked for hep from Nezperce. Harry Cranke volunteered the services of his car, and took Mrs. Nina V. Lyon over. Mrs. Lyon was one of the most untiring and efficient helpers in the Nezperce epidemic and will render our neighbor town very valuable assistance.

source: The Nezperce Herald. (Nezperce, Idaho), 07 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

1918Atlantic26-a
Recovering soldiers watch a motion picture show wearing flu masks at U.S. Army Hospital Number 30 in Royat, France. U.S. National Library of Medicine

source: Alan Taylor April 10, 2018 “30 Photos of the 1918 Flu Pandemic” The Atlantic
— — — — — — — — — —

Nov 8

The Rathdrum Tribune., November 08, 1918, Page 1

19181108TRT1
Idaho state News Items.

Cheesecloth face masks for the prevention of influenza are coming into wide use in Idaho. The regulations say that one mask should not be worn longer than three hours without boiling.

November 9 is Gas Mask Day in Idaho by proclamation of the governor. On that day all citizens are asked to make an especial effort to gather nuts and fruit pits and deliver them at central points. They are used in making carbon for gas masks used in the army.
— —

19181108TRT2From Over The County

Post Falls

The influenza cases are mild.
— —

Spirit Lake

Last week six new cases of influenza were reported daily.

The Red Cross room is being remodeled and kalsomined.

Mrs. William Barrett of Athol and 8-months old son died in Spokane and were buried Oct. 30 in the Spirit Lake cemetery. The husband and four small children survive.
— —

Coeur D’Alene

Simple and impressive services marked the funeral of Dorothy, the 8-year old daughter of Dr. and Mrs. John Wood, in Forest cemetery. This was the second death in Coeur d’Alene on account of influenza.

Three deaths in Coeur d’Alene due to influenza, reported Monday, are: Mrs. Plumb, Mrs. Knute Swanson and Ralph Eider age 17. John Carlson, age 74, and Camille Chappue, age 77, died of heart disease.

Despite precautionary measures the epidemic of Spanish influenza shows a steady increase in Coeur d’Alene. Notices were posted in all cigar stores notifying the public not to tarry after making purchases and not to congregate anywhere.

Dr. Drennan, county physician, and medical examiner on the Kootenai county exemption board, received orders Monday to report to the medical examiners at Fort Wright for induction into the medical corps of the Army.

source: The Rathdrum Tribune. (Rathdrum, Idaho), 08 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Rathdrum Tribune., November 08, 1918, Page 3

19181108TRT3
Local Paragraphs.

Only one new case of influenza is reported since last week. Practically all other cases are said to be convalescent or recovering satisfactorily.

A large crowd from Rathdrum was reported to have gone to Coeur d’Alene in autos last night to show the people of the county seat how to celebrate the surrender of Germany.

Reports from Connell, Wash., state that Louis and Van Richmond, sons of A. H. Richmond, have died of influenza, that Chas. Richmond, another son, and Mrs. Arter, a daughter, and Mr. Richmond, himself, are very ill. It is also stated that Perley H. Smith, who is also on Mr. Richmond’s farm at Connell, is ill with the disease.

Bells were rung in Rathdrum yesterday in celebration of the report that Germany had surrendered. Flags were flung and autos with cheering groups of jubilant citizens raced back and forth on the street. Everybody manifested gladness at the thought that the fighting was over and that it was now but a question of months or at most a year when nearly all the surviving heroes will come marching home. In the afternoon people paraded, the band played and the kaiser was dragged in effigy behind an auto.

source: The Rathdrum Tribune. (Rathdrum, Idaho), 08 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

The Idaho Republican. November 08, 1918, Page 2

Grandview

The meeting of the Domestic Science club, which was announced for November 6, will be postponed indefinitely owning to the influenza.

Hazel Quigley is reported much better this week.

Archie Jones is a victim of the flu.

Everything remains quiet as people are keeping pretty close at home to avoid the flu.

Mrs. A. J. Satterfield received a message Saturday that her daughter Mrs. Will Watts was very low with pneumonia at the hospital in Pocatello. She went over at once via automobile.

As far as we know there are no cases of influenza in Grandview, but Miss Hazel Quigley has been very low for several days at the Crystal Springs ranch, where she was employed. Her mother has been with her since Saturday.

Miss Leach passed away Sunday night. The sympathy of the community goes out to the bereaved family.

Miss Quigley was a trifle better Monday morning.

Grandview Red Cross has decided to postpone all meetings indefinitely on account of influenza.
— —

Thomas

With the death of our neighbor Mrs. Lucy Fackrell, who died on Monday from Spanish influenza, there passed away one of the kindest and most needed mothers of our community, and her passing away with many others, are causing many people to mourn. What are the health officers, who are responsible for the public health, doing to combat the enemy that is in our midst? And we feel with Dr. Middleton of Salt Lake that if these officials do not take a more determined course, that the condemnation of the public opinion is going to fall heavily in some quarters.

Paul Allred received word Monday from Idaho Falls of the death of his cousin, ex-Sheriff J. S. Mulliner, who died from the influenza. Mr. Mulliner served Bingham county one term as deputy assessor. He is well known to many people of this place and the surround towns. His two terms as sheriff on Bonneville county were strongly marked by his determined fight for the enforcement of the prohibition laws and his loss will be keenly felt by the public in his home town.

Andrew Anderson and his family have been stricken with influenza, but are reported to be on the way to recovery at this time.

Other cases in the community so far as we can learn are progressing satisfactorily.

The funeral of Mrs. Parley Fackrell was held on Thursday, there being but a small attendance. This fact being due to precautions on the part of the people to prevent the spread of the plague, and in no manner bespeaks the esteem in which Mrs. Fackrell was held in the community, for she was held in the highest esteem by all who knew her. Her kind and motherly ways and courteous, obloging [sic] manners having long since won the esteem of her neighbors far and near. Mr. Fackrell is caring for his little ones and nursing his sick alone save for the help that neighbors can render occasionally.

Mrs. Hazel Goodwin, daughter of Mrs. Parley Fackrell and a war ride of only a few months was stricken with the disease when her mother died and is in a very critical condition at the present time. Her husband LeRoy Goodwin left for the training camp in September.

I. H. Allred, who was at the Leach and Berryman ranch at Springfield a few days ago, when the Leach family was stricken with influenza and when the daughter Minnie leach died, has reported that he himself is not yet stricken with the disease, but that Mr. Leach who was compelled to take the house work and care of the sick family and hired girl upon himself is now very sick with the disease.
— —

Upper Presto

Charlie White, while working at the sugar factory, was taken seriously ill with the typhoid fever. He is somewhat improved.

Mr. Seamen is able to be out again attending to his work.
— —

Wapello

Harry Blackburn is seriously ill with the influenza.

Mrs. Henry Felt is quite ill with the rheumatism.
— —

Sterling

Curtis Loveless is still very ill with influenza and pneumonia.

Mrs. Nathan Tanner Jr. and Mrs. Layman Tanner are both very seriously ill.

Arnold Nugent is very ill with typhoid fever.

Miss Hazel Quigley is still very seriously ill with influenza and pneumonia at the Crystal Springs ranch.

Dr. Mitchell of Blackfoot was called here on professional business this week.

Everybody in town is wearing a mask now since it became prohibitive on account of influenza.

Minnie Leach the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. R. Leach passed away Sunday evening at 10 o’clock, after a week’s illness with influenza and pneumonia. The sympathy of this community goes out to the bereaved ones in their great hour of sadness.
— —

Jameston

Mrs. Will Ashment has been very sick with influenza, but is rapidly improving.

Little Millie Anderson has been sick with influenza that last few days.

Everybody has a gauze mask. But are they supposed to be worn around the neck? Many seem to think so.
— —

McDonaldville

Glen Baily, son of George R. Baily passed away Thursday morning at the age of four years, another member of the family is seriously ill and the mother passed away last week. Interment was made in the Groveland cemetery.

Sarah Gray is about to be around again, after being seriously ill with the influenza.
— —

Rose

Mrs. Samuel Norman received word that her niece Mrs. Hudson of Layton, Utah, died with the influenza.

Mr. and Mrs. Amos Whitehead and two children and George Christensen, who has been staying with them, have the influenza.

Mrs. H. A. Gardner and son are on the sick list this week.

Miss Zina Norman has recovered from a slight illness.

John Norman is on the sick list again.

Samuel Norman is recovering from an attack of the influenza.
— —

Sterling

Curtis Loveless is slowly recovering from a severe attack of the influenza and pneumonia.

Norval Leach came home from Fort Riley, Kan. to attend the funeral of his sister Miss Minnie Leach. Mr. and Mrs. Charles Neider motored to Pocatello to meet him. He reports there were 13,000 cases of the flu there, with approximately 1000 deaths. Mr. Leach returned to camp the next day.

The Neider family are reported to be the latest victims of the flu.

Mrs. Nathan Tanner Jr. has recovered from her recent attack of the flu.

Ralph Quigley died at the home of his parents Tuesday night, with influenza and pneumonia. Funeral arrangements have not been made.

Mrs. Veda Watts died at a hospital in Pocatello Tuesday night with influenza and pneumonia. Mrs. Watts went to Pocatello to nurse her brother’s family who were ill and succumbed to the disease herself. Her husband is on his way to France.
— —

Springfield

The Grover Paul family are recovering from the influenza. Mrs. Paul and the baby were dangerously ill.

Mrs. Lyman Tanner is improving from a severe attack of the influenza.

Mr. Fouch, who has been living on his ranch north of town is very ill with the influenza.

The funeral of Minnie Leach was held Wednesday. The floral contributions were most beautiful. After a family prayer at home, and open air service was held at the cemetery. Rev. Peterson of Blackfoot conducted the services. The sympathy of the community is extended to the bereaved family.

Corporal Norval Leach returned to Ft. Riley Friday.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 08 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Republican. November 08, 1918, Page 3

Victim of Influenza

Jack Ryan, age fifty eight years, died at his home in Idaho Falls Monday, after suffering from influenza for several days. … He is survived by his wife, a mother and sister, who live at Detroit, Mich.

Funeral services were held at the Grove City cemetery Wednesday, Nov. 5, at two o’clock, under the auspices of the masonic lodge.
— —

Wicks

The influenza epidemic which [is] prevalent in this district is now on the decline and none of the cases have proved fatal so far.
— —

Taken to Hospital

Word was received recently that Mrs. Fred T. Dubois is very ill with the influenza in Boise and was taken to the hospital there.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 08 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Republican. November 08, 1918, Page 5

Local News

W. F. Martin was very ill the fore part of the week with rheumatism.

Miss Minnie Park has been quite ill with the influenza, but is now improving.

Mrs. W. S. Richards and two children went to Salt Lake Monday to see her mother who is seriously ill.

Miss Eula Palmer was called home Tuesday on account of the illness of her mother.

Miss Milbury Pew has been on the sick list for several days and is now improving.

Miss Susa Gould resumed her duties at the Kinney Mercantile store the fore part of the week, after a few days illness.

Miss Marie Weise is rapidly recovering after her illness.

Miss Else Jordan of the Brosn-Hart store is slowly improving, after a serious attack of the flu.

Miss Grace Hoit has been ill for the past few days and is now improving rapidly.

Mrs. M. B. Butler went to Salt Lake Thursday to see her husband, who is in the hospital.

Bonnie Volpert went to Idaho Falls Tuesday to work in the Bybee grocery store there, during the illness of one of their clerks.

Mrs. Hilda Slater resumed her work at the Bingham County News office Thursday, after recovering from a several days’ illness.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 08 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Oakley Herald. November 08, 1918, Page 1

19181108TOH1
Locals and Personals

Kenneth Curtis has been ill this week.

Eugene Smith of Marion is seriously ill.

T. W. Workman has been very ill several days this week.

Pres. W. T. Jack was suffering with a bad cold the first of the week.

Miss Leona Bain is able to be out again after a season of mumps.

Dr. Neilson was in Burley this week in consultation on the case of Dr. Lowe.

Dr. Lowe, who recently moved from our city to Burley, has been very ill with influenza. Also his children have been sick, but are rapidly improving.

Friends of Mrs. Rosel Hale will be glad to know she is improving from an attack of influenza.

Joseph Boren died Wednesday morning of pneumonia. Obituary notice will appear in next week’s issue.

Dr. Nielson, the country health officer, reports 15 new cases of influenza in Oakley for the week ending last Saturday. Since Saturday there have been an improvement in the local situation as only two or three new cases have developed.

Halloween was rather quiet at Oakley, but it must be noted that a number of people had the privilege of seeing strange and wonderful faces peep in the windows.

Mrs. S. P. Worthington left Thursday for Nampa to visit her sister, Mrs. Viola Roman, who is very seriously ill.
— —

In The Gem State

Telephone service at Caldwell has been badly crippled due to the sickness of 11 of the 14 operators regularly employed.

The drive for the enrollment of student nurses, which was closed a month ago, and which was ordered reopened within a few weeks, is on in fore in Idaho again.

Money saved by people as a result of the closing of the movies by the state board of health would, if invested in war Savings Stamps, aid considerably in raising the Thrift Stamp quota of the state.

source: The Oakley Herald. (Oakley, Idaho), 08 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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American Falls Press. November 08, 1918, Page 1

The Press force has not got the influenza, but it is all run down and is taking a half-holiday to recuperate. “Micky says” people are not interested in anything just now, anyhow, so it does not make much difference whether any news is printed or not.

source: American Falls Press. (American Falls, Idaho), 08 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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American Falls Press. November 08, 1918, Page 4

People and Events

Six patients are at the hospital, five of them sufferers from influenza, and all of them are getting along nicely.

Mrs. P. H. Sheer of Rockland who has been a patient at the Bethany Deaconess hospital, a victim of the influenza, left today for her home, fully recovered.

C. Lee French is quite sick, but not in a dangerous condition. Mrs. French is getting along nicely.

For the first time in three weeks the family of Andrew May of Rockland are all able to be at the table at the same time. His case is but an illustration of many others in different parts of the county, and indicates how serious the epidemic has been.

David Walker, the 17-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Walker of Rockland, died in Lava Hot Springs last Tuesday. The funeral occurred in Rockland yesterday. The boy had been working at Lava Hot Springs and was taken down with influenza. On his recovery he ventured out too soon and quickly succumbed to a setback.

American Falls joined the other cities and towns of the state and nation in celebrating prematurely, the joyful news that the great way had come to an end by the unconditional surrender of Germany. A flash went out over the wires about 10:30 announcing that the war had come to an end. All over the town flags were raised, and shortly after the dinner hour several blasts of dynamite were set off. A large pile of boxes was erected in the public square in readiness for the celebration in the evening. As soon as darkness had set in crowds began to assemble on the streets. Everyone who owned or could borrow a firearm was busy adding to the noise made by the members of the tin-can band, which comprised about every person, large and small, in the community who was able to be out. When the time arrived to set ablaze the bonfire a truck filled with a shouting crowd drove to the residence of Governor-elect Davis and brought him to the square to address the crowd. In a brief talk he set forth the appreciation and the thanks due our boys in France who were the deciding factor in bringing about the abject surrender. He closed his address by calling for three cheers for our soldiers and sailors. Then the bonfire was set ablaze amid the cheers of the crowd and the cheers became a shout of derision when the effigy of the kaiser, which surmounted the pile, was quickly devoured by the flames. It was the first public assembly since the embargo was put on all meetings owning to the influenza epidemic, but the crowd was so cheerful and turned out in so cheerful a cause, that any old sort of a germ had no terrors.

source: American Falls Press. (American Falls, Idaho), 08 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Clearwater Republican. November 08, 1918, Page 1

Red Cross Notes

Any one having influenza masks that are not in use please return them to Red Cross rooms.

On account of the influenza epidemic work at the Red Cross rooms has fallen behind. This county has received an allotment of 75 suits of pajamas. The Red Cross rooms will be open every afternoon except Saturday. The following supervisors have been appointed. Monday, Mrs. Edwards; Tuesday, Mrs Herbert Ripley; Wednesday, Mrs. Canton; Thursday, Mrs. A. E. Holmberg; Friday, Mrs. Rodgers.
— —

Local News.

Elk River is reported to be suffering with a severe attack of the influenza, there being fifty-nine cases in that village yesterday. It is said that every available building in the town has been turned into a hospital.

Dr. Horswill is reported as improving nicely at the hospital in Lewiston and it is announced will return to Orofino next week. Mrs. Horswill returned home last Wednesday evening. Dr. Reese of Gilbert has been successfully looking after the afflicted in the vicinity during the doctor’s absence, and it was fortunate that his services could have been obtained.

source: Clearwater Republican. (Orofino, Idaho), 08 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Kendrick Gazette. November 08, 1918, Page 1

Mrs. Marie Carmichael

Mrs. Marie Carmichael of Spokane, formerly Miss Marie Zimmerman of Crescent, died at the Sacred Heart Hospital Monday morning after a short illness from influenza. Her husband, W. D. Carmichael and son George, age ten, were also afflicted with influenza and it was through her unceasing care of her husband and little son that her strength gave out so that she was unable to recover from the first attack of the disease. …

source: The Kendrick Gazette. (Kendrick, Idaho), 08 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Kendrick Gazette. November 08, 1918, Page 6

Gleanings

Nearly all of the voters in Kendrick came out of the election booth crying. This would no doubt be a very gratifying sight to the bystanders, that the election privilege should e taken so seriously. However, those who voted could tell the reason – formaldehyde. So far as known, all election officials survived the effects of the fumes but it is believed the flu died.

Dr. and Mrs. Smith received a message a few days ago that Dr. Patton while attending his patients at the hospital in Silverton, California, was taken with the “flu” which soon developed pneumonia. He was hurriedly brought back to Denver and a second message announces him to be improving.

Mrs. M. V. Thomas returned from Clarkston Thursday after spending a week there caring for her brother, who was very ill with influenza.

source: The Kendrick Gazette. (Kendrick, Idaho), 08 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Kendrick Gazette. November 08, 1918, Page 2

There is a noticeable disposition among the people here to comply with any demands which are made to advance the interests of the public in general. Before the war there was a tendency to argue any piece of legislation that took away privileges which had become customary. Today the people simply fall in line as a matter of course and carry out the wishes of the Government without complaint. This was particularly noticeable when the health department asked that all stores be closed at six o’clock in the evening. The order was carried out to the letter and no complaints were heard.
— —

Owing to the influenza epidemic the creamery directors did not hold their meeting Tuesday evening. However, in discussing the matters informally, they decided to continue the creamery in operation as long as they could secure patronage. They will not close down on November 1, and urged that the farmers bring in cream as usual, furnishing all that they can produce. There is an increase in cream receipts over that of a month ago, owing to good late pasture, and it is possible that the plant will operate all winter.
– Latah County Press.

source: The Kendrick Gazette. (Kendrick, Idaho), 08 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Kendrick Gazette. November 08, 1918, Page 5

Big Bear Ridge

Mrs. Rufus May and daughter, Miss Pearl are slowly recovering from a severe attack of influenza and pneumonia.

The other children are much improved as the flu was checked while in a mild form.
— —

Linden Items

Mrs. Addison Alexander who has been at her sister’s, Mrs. Dicks on Bear Ridge returned home Monday. She reports her sister much better but not able to be up and around yet.

source: The Kendrick Gazette. (Kendrick, Idaho), 08 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Recorder. November 08, 1918, Page 1

Young Woman Taken

Miss Sabra Melvina Griffith, aged 18 years, died in Salmon November 4th of pneumonia, following an attack of influenza. Her step parents, Mr. and Mrs. Nels Croney, came here from Idaho Falls and she made her home with them in Brooklyn.

Mrs. Van Stratt

Mrs. Agnes Van Stratt, wife of Chris Van Stratt passed away at 7:30 this morning from the effects of influenza illness. She had been ill about two weeks. …

source: The Idaho Recorder. (Salmon City, Idaho), 08 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Recorder. November 08, 1918, Page 2

Idaho State News

Under the direction of the state board of health the Albion State Normal school has been placed under quarantine in an attempt to prevent the Spanish influenza from obtaining a foothold.

Word has been received at Malad of the death of John Daniels at Camp Fremont, Cal. The young man has been at Camp Fremont for the past two months His death was cased by pneumonia, superinduced by Spanish influenza.
— —

Northwest Notes

Lifting of the quarantine at Camp Lewis will depend on the decrease of influenza cases in cities and town near camp, officers at headquarters announced last week.

Influenza seems to be gaining headway at Butte, Ekalaka and Eureka, but elsewhere in Montana the situation is unchanged, reports to the state board of health indicate.

Free entertainment on a large scale will be furnished the men of Camp Lewis while they are held on the military reservation because of the influenza quarantine and until further notice.

In a statement from the United States public health service, 2000 cases of influenza were reported at Billings, Mont. The federal authorities attribute the spread of the disease in Billings largely to the failure to close the schools.

A hotel building at Kalispell, Mont., has been secured as a detection hospital for influenza cases, through the efforts of the local health authorities and the Red Cross society, which have bee working in conjunction on the matter.

source: The Idaho Recorder. (Salmon City, Idaho), 08 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Recorder. November 08, 1918, Page 5

19181108TIR1
The Sick List

Sheriff Frazier and Earl Gilbreath are both getting on their feet again after a siege with influenza. the family of W. C. Smith are kept at home but are not seriously ill, and so are the C. W. Snook family, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Andrews. Numerous other patients are recovering, including Mrs. Frank Kirtley, who has been ill and Shirley Johnson, Dr. Ashley, Mrs. Keys and children, Mrs. Dan Chase and the Billbrey family, all on the sick list, besides a great many others.

In some parts of the county there are victims of the epidemic that count all the people or nearly all of them. One of these communities is Sandy creek where there has been great suffering. In other localities there is no influenza at all. A telephone message received from May yesterday afternoon said that not a single case had been reported there.

source: The Idaho Recorder. (Salmon City, Idaho), 08 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Montpelier Examiner. November 08, 1918, Page 1

W. R. Johnson Dies From Influenza at Camp Fremont

Wm. R. Johnson, who went from this county to Camp Fremont last August, died there of influenza on Oct. 23. He was 27 years of age. In response to his request his body was taken to Alliance, Neb., for burial. Besides his wife, he is survived by his mother and one sister. Before entering the service he was employed as a fireman on the Short Line.
— —

Mrs. Wm. Graff Dies From Influenza in Pocatello.

Mrs. Wm. Graff died at her home in Pocatello on Thursday, Oct. 31. Death was caused from pneumonia, which followed quickly after she was stricken with the influenza. The body was brought to Montpelier on No. 18 lasts Friday afternoon and open air services were held at the cemetery. Mrs. Graff was the youngest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Theo. Closner of this city, and was a native of Montpelier, having been born here 18 years old. At the time of her death her husband and her brother, Edward, were also victims of the influenza but both are now convalescing. Besides her parents and husband, she is survived by four sisters and two brothers.
— —

Montpelier Again Hoaxed by Premature Paris Report

Montpelier went through the delirium yesterday afternoon when a report went over the wires saying Germany had accepted the peace terms of the allies at 10 o’clock a.m. and that fighting on all fronts would cease at 3 p.m. We were not the only celebrators, however, New York City especially becoming delirious with joy over the unfounded report, as did also the whole country. …

While Montpelier did not go to this extreme, yet everybody believed the report to be true in fact and the jubilant people were not interfered with in the least by the authorities who are dispersing crowds of people in compliance with the mandate of the board off health. In fact the people seems to forget that Montpelier had ever heard of a case of Spanish influenza in their midst, and no one wore a broader smile than did Chief Hillier. …

source: Montpelier Examiner. (Montpelier, Idaho), 08 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Montpelier Examiner. November 08, 1918, Page 3

Idaho State News

Robert Henry of Rigby, in the vocational section of the S. A. T. C., died in the Inland Empire hospital at Moscow from pneumonia. His death is the fourth in the vocational section.

The influenza epidemic has been making rapid strides in Idaho Falls and Bonneville county and stringent measures are being taken to overcome it. Every person has been ordered to wear a mask over the nose and mouth and all businesses houses except drug stores and cafes, are closed at 6 p.m.

A supply of vaccine for the prevention of pneumonia consequent upon influenza was received by a Idaho Falls drug firm from Seattle last week, and has been distributed among the physicians of the city. The first lot of the vaccine received was sufficient for the immunization of about 120 persons.

source: Montpelier Examiner. (Montpelier, Idaho), 08 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Montpelier Examiner. November 08, 1918, Page 4

Sergeant G. W. Irving Writes From Camp Logan

… There has been no end to the Spanish Influenza here, but conditions are much better now. At its worst stage it has all the hospitals full and there were from 20 to 30 deaths every 24 hours. The “flu” has just about run its course here, there being very few new cases. Camp Logan has the health record for camps in the United States. …

source: Montpelier Examiner. (Montpelier, Idaho), 08 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Montpelier Examiner. November 08, 1918, Page 8

John Ishimaru Victim of The Spanish Influenza

Another sudden death occurred last night when influenza claimed another victim in the person of Mt. Ishimaru, proprietor of the Japanese store and head of the Montpelier Steam Laundry, who died at the emergency hospital at the city hall, where he was taken only a week ago and was reported as doing well and on the road to a rapid recovery only two days before his death. … He leaves a wife and two small children, one only a few months old.

source: Montpelier Examiner. (Montpelier, Idaho), 08 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Meridian Times., November 08, 1918, Page 3

19181108TMT1
Inland Northwest

Seattle’s stores may be closed in an effort to prevent the spread of Spanish Influenza, City Health Commission J. S. McBride has announced.

Arrangements have been made whereby nutritious soup and other food will be taken to homes in Lewiston, Mont., where the influenza has made the preparation of good food for any patient difficult.

Druggists will be permitted under certain restrictions to refill prescriptions calling for morphine, codeine or heroin, written by registered practitioners for patients suffering from influenza and any pulmonary or bronchial afflictions, according to notice received at Helena.

Being peculiarly susceptible to pneumonia, the disease is wreaking great toll among the Cheyenne Indians on lower Tongue river, according to reports last week, and some 53 of them have died within the past two weeks between Kirby and Busby, Mont.

source: The Meridian Times. (Meridian, Idaho), 08 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Meridian Times., November 08, 1918, Page 8

19181108TMT2
Meridian News Notes

Word has been received of the death from influenza of George Beasley, formerly a well known farmer in this section. He died at Portland.

source: The Meridian Times. (Meridian, Idaho), 08 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Shoshone Journal. November 08, 1918, Page 1

Died of Influenza

Mrs. Malheur, who was in from the ranch Monday, received the sad news of the death of her son, from influenza, on the eve of his departure for France, from a New York training station. The remains have been shipped to Shoshone. Mrs. Malheur will have the sympathy of all her many friends and neighbors in the sad homecoming of her soldier son.

source: Shoshone Journal. (Shoshone, Idaho), 08 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Shoshone Journal. November 08, 1918, Page 5

Local and Personal News

Miss Wiggins and Miss Mabel Euhoim came up from Gooding Friday and Miss Edna Euhoim, who is well on the way toward recovery from influenza, returned with them to Gooding.

Miss Tress McMahod [?] is ill with influenza at her home in Richfield.

Mrs. William Thorpe is recovering from an attack of the “flu.”
— —

Died Of Pneumonia

John Speed, cook for a construction crew on the O. S. L., died Monday of Pneumonia at the Baugh rooming house. The remains were taken care of a Brennan’s undertaking rooms and relatives of the deceased notified.

source: Shoshone Journal. (Shoshone, Idaho), 08 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., November 08, 1918, Page 1

19181108DSM1Fewer Influenza Cases in Moscow
Five New Cases Admitted to Hospital and Nine Discharged Today

The influenza situation here today is regarded as very favorable. No further deaths have occurred. In the S. A. T. C. of the university, five new cases were admitted to the hospital since yesterday’s report and nine were discharged as cured. The new cases are very mild. These are all in class A, the collegiate class of the S. A. T. C. There has not been a death among the collegiate students, of which more than 500 are in the S. A. T. C. and about an equal number of other students enrolled.

There are a few cases that are causing some uneasiness, but these are slightly better today. In class B, the vocational training corps, conditions show marked improvement. Many of the convalescents have returned to work and are entirely cured. There are no new cases reported in town, outside of the university and most of the towns people who had the disease have recovered. Taken as a whole the situation is regarded as more favorable than at any time since the disease struck Moscow. The total number of deaths from the disease to date remains at eight. Six of these were class B men in the S. A. T. C. The other two were Moscow people.
— —

19181108DSM2
Moscow Nurse Died From Pneumonia
Miss Fridley, Well Known Here, Died at Spokane Wednesday Evening

Callie L. Fridley, a graduate nurse, died at St. Luke’s hospital last evening. death was caused by pneumonia. She was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George C. Fridley of Wasco Ore.

She is survived by her parents, two brothers, Clifford Fridley, of Lexington, Ore., and Clyde Fridley of Wasco, and by two sisters, Dora and Nettie Fridley, of Lexington. …

Miss Fridley was well known in Moscow, having worked in local hospitals for a long time She has many friends here to whom news of her death will be a sever shock.
— —

Another S. A. T. C. Man Influenza Victim

Herman Greaser of Laramie, Wyo., died today making the ninth death in Moscow as a result of the influenza epidemic and the seventh death in class B of the S. A. T. C. The young man came here with the Wyoming contingent and was taken with influenza soon after reaching Moscow. His condition has been serious from the start. He developed pneumonia and two slight operations were performed in hopes of saving his life. He rallied from the operations but could not overcome the pneumonia. His parents were notified several days ago of the seriousness of his condition, but have not reached Moscow A telegram telling of his death was sent to them this afternoon.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 08 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., November 08, 1918, Page 3

City News

Mrs. Lindgren of Orofino came up today to see her son Paul, who has been quite sick with influenza, but is convalescent and is now in the Elks’ temple. Mrs. Lindgren was very uneasy about her boy and feared she would not be permitted to see him. She rode up town in the automobile of a Moscow family, a member of who was on the train and made her acquaintance and was driven to the Elks’ temple. Her joy was almost overpowering when she saw her son standing out in front of the temple, apparently well and happy. She will return to her home tomorrow a very happy woman.

Mrs. J. E. Nessly, who has been at Greer, Idaho, taking care of her brother-in-law and sister, Mr. and Mrs. Matt C. Miles, formerly of Moscow, returned home today after an absence of 10 days. Mr. and Mrs. Miles are much improved and both are able to be out.

Harold Magnus of Denver, Colorado, who formerly worked with the J. C. Penny company of Moscow, died of pneumonia recently at Grace, Idaho, in the southern part of the state, where he was manager of a similar store. He leaves a wife and three children.

L. A. Dodge, who has had a very severe attack of influenza, is now able to be out again.

St. Mark’s church has kindly donated the use of Guild hall for the convalescent soldiers. The boys are very comfortable there with room for exercise and a phonograph for amusement.

Dr. Leitch reports Earl st. John’s condition of influenza as somewhat improved, but his is yet seriously ill. His mother is improving slowly.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 08 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Further Reading (S. A. T. C.)

1918 Spanish Flu didn’t forget the Palouse

By Mark O’English

19181111Pullman-a
Red Cross volunteers hit the downtown Pullman streets for the Armistice Day celebration marking the end of World War 1. Courtesy of the WSU Manuscripts, Archives and Special Collections.

In 1918, the Spanish Flu swept across the globe, ultimately killing between 50 million and 100 million people, or about 1 in 25 worldwide. The Inland Northwest was not exempted, and as the flu peaked nationwide in October and November of that year, Pullman and Moscow found themselves visited as well.

With the United States involved in the war in Europe, both WSC and UI were part of the Student Army Training Corps program. Soldiers were transported by train to 500 colleges nationwide, where they’d receive military training and useful educations simultaneously. SATC training began here in June 1918; the second cohort arrived in August and was first to feel the effects, albeit slightly, of the flu.

Pullman’s third cohort of 600 began arriving in early October, to begin training on Oct. 15. As soldiers from all over the country came in on crowded trains, they inevitably carried the flu with them. With the influenza making its presence felt, by Oct. 10, Pullman reacted strongly. While no strict quarantine was put in place, all public gathering places were closed and sentries prevented SATC trainees from leaving campus. The sickest 150 of the earlier soldiers were asked to remain in Pullman, and, of course, college students were present as well. The travel and the compact housing conditions proved to be excellent incubators for the flu.

The college would close Oct. 21, though all the soldiers and most of the students remained on campus. Former WSC president E.A. Bryan reported that across all three cohorts, about 825 soldiers came down with the flu. When Pullman’s Northwest Sanitarium (today’s Kimball Funeral Home) and the small medical facility on campus quickly filled to capacity, some floors of the Ferry Hall men’s dorm were used as hospital space, as was the gymnasium, the ATO and the SPE fraternity houses, and the St. James Episcopal Church, the Federated Church and the Christian Church. Not enough can be said of the efforts of the staff, faculty, students and soldiers who volunteered as nurses, or who organized to provide as many as 900 sick meals per day.

Moscow, with a smaller SATC training corps, was not hit as hard or as quickly, but responded even more forcefully. While the school remained open, a strict quarantine was imposed between the town and the college. People wishing to come on campus were forced to spend four days in quarantine in a town church to ensure they were uninfected. For a short period, Idaho’s SATC soldiers were required to wear gauze masks when out in public. By Nov. 1, almost 37 were dead in Pullman – almost exclusively SATC trainees – while only 3 had died at the University of Idaho.

On Nov. 11, each town’s quarantines failed with the announcement of the armistice ending the Great War. Celebrants from town and campus mixed in jubilation over the course of the day’s parades, parties and dances, but apparently the worst of the flu had passed, and no large outbreaks followed.

In the following weeks, public schools resumed, public gathering places reopened and the colleges resumed full activity. While Moscow weathered this comparatively well, in Pullman, the flu moved from the college to the town, and by Dec. 9, the SATC soldiers were again banned from the city. And while Moscow and Pullman had been at the forefront of the flu in the Palouse due to the military influx, it had now moved into the myriad of smaller, more isolated towns; Tekoa in particular appears to have been hard hit, and was begging for medical help in early December. The state of Washington ordered the state’s entire public school system closed; it reopened a month later on Jan. 6 before closing again from Jan. 17 through Feb. 2.

While January marked the end of the serious flu for most of the region, Moscow, possibly as a side effect of their more successful earlier quarantines, suffered at least one late struggle with the flu, having to put a town quarantine in place for a few weeks in March.

The final death counts for the region are difficult, if not impossible, to calculate. At least 42 died on the WSC campus, while by Nov. 15, only six non-campus residents had died in Pullman. While that is believed to be the final campus number, more did follow in town in the succeeding weeks. Moscow and the UI fared better, with 10 deaths by Nov. 27, though more undoubtedly followed. With the flu having a reported worldwide fatality rate of about 4 percent, our region fared better, with something like 3 percent deaths in the SATC but probably less than 1 percent in the general populations in Moscow and Pullman. Nonetheless, those months remain some of the darkest in the history of the region.

** Mark O’English is the university archivist at Washington State University Libraries Manuscripts, Archives and Special Collections.

source: Moscow-Pullman Daily News Oct 8, 2018
————————-

Back to Table of Contents
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 1)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 2)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 3)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 4)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 5)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 6)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 7)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 8)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 9)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 10)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 11)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 12)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 13)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 14)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 15)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 16)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 17)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 18)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 19)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 20)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 21)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 22)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 23)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 24)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 25)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 26)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 27)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 28)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 29)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 30)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 31)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 32)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 33)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 34)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 35)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 36)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 37)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 38)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 39)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 40)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 41)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 42)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 43)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 44)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 45)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 46)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 47)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 48)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 49)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 50)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 51)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 52)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 53)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 54)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 55)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 56)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 57)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 58)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 59)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 60)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 61)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 62)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 63)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 64)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 65)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 66)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 67)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 68)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 69)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 70)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 71)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 72)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 73)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 74)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 75)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 76)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 77)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 78)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 79)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 80)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 81)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 82)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 83)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 84)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 85)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 86)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 87)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 88)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 89)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 90)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 91)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 92)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 93)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 94)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 95)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 96)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 97)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 98)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 99)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 100)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 101)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 102)

Updated Road Reports June 28, 2020

Please share road reports. Conditions can change quickly any time of year. Some high elevation roads still have snow. Be prepared for rocks and trees in the road and remember there is no cell phone service.

Yellow Pine: Local streets are bare and starting to get dusty, except where people paid for dust abatement. The dust abatement was applied Monday, June 22rd. Deer are wandering around at dusk. Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN. Report that a dog was hit and mildly injured on Main street recently.
link: Local Forecast
Yellow Pine Webcam: (check date on image)

Warm Lake Highway: No problems reported.
link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

Highway 55 Webcams Link:

South Fork Road: Closed 7am to 4pm daily with no closures on weekends.
The closure sites will change on a weekly basis, and will not always be adjacent to the last closure site. Refer to the current weekly newsletter or the project website to determine the closure point and access for each week.
South Fork Road Project page (link)
Report from Saturday (June 20) the road is rough in places where they have been working.
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Wednesday (June 24) report to watch out for rocks in the Bowling Alley area.

Johnson Creek Road: Open.
Wednesday (June 24) mail truck driver (Kaleb) reports the road is bumpy.
link: Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam
link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
Note: The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Opened by the county June 24th.
Report Monday afternoon (June 24) local traveler met the road grader on Lick Creek, it had pushed the snow drifts and trees off the road. Work has started on the lower end of the McCall side.
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Report Sunday June 28: “Big Creek Road is snow-free over Profile Summit. ” – SA
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcam: (check date on image)

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Semi-open to the adventurous ATV riders. Travel at your own risk.
Report June 26: “Lots of rocks and trees. One little patch of snow 20 ft long. But otherwise Thunder Mountain is open for 4×4 vehicles … we cut over 30 trees. The other guy with me didn’t cut them full width for a car, just for his atv. So any trees I didn’t cut will need to be trimmed to get fullsize vehicles through.” – SA
20200626MonumentalRoad-a
photo and report courtesy SA
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Report June 27: “Elk Summit Road is still severely blocked by snow, but we rode atvs over the top of the snow across Goldman’s Cut and down through Smith Creek. There were severe avalanches and we barely made it through.” SA
20200627ElkSummitSnow-a
Trees down from Avalanche
20200627AvalancheTrees-a
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Warrens Wagon Road: Construction update: The road is CLOSED from 8am-Noon and 1pm-5pm Monday-Friday. The road is OPEN with a PILOT CAR from Noon-1pm and after 5pm Monday-Friday. The road is OPEN without a pilot car on Saturday and Sunday.
Update June 4: be aware that the Long Gulch Culvert Installation Project along Warren Wagon Road from Chinook Campground to Steamboat Summit will begin on June 15 and end in mid-July. The project involves the installation of numerous cross drain culverts. Delays of under 1 hour can be expected. This area of Warren Wagon is between Secesh Meadows and Warren.

Deadwood Summit: Open, travel with caution.
Scott Mountain is also open.
Note: The approx elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′
——————————-

Weather Reports June 21-27, 2020

Jun 21 Weather:

At 9am it was 58 degrees and mostly cloudy. Mostly cloudy and a little breezy at 1pm. At 315pm it was 73 degrees, light breeze and broken overcast. At 7pm it was 73 degrees, light breeze and partly cloudy/clear. At 9pm it was 66 degrees, light breeze and partly cloudy. Partly cloudy at 1030pm. Clear after midnight.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time June 22, 2020 at 09:00AM
Clear
Max temperature 77 degrees F
Min temperature 42 degrees F
At observation 55 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Jun 22 Weather:

At 9am it was 55 degrees and clear. Clear sky and light breezes at 1150am. At 315pm it was 81 degrees, light breezes and clear, and at 4pm it was 82 degrees. At 7pm it was 78 degrees, clear sky and slight breeze. Clear at midnight.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time June 23, 2020 at 09:00AM
Clear
Max temperature 83 degrees F
Min temperature 44 degrees F
At observation 58 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Jun 23 Weather:

At 9am it was 58 degrees and clear. Clear and warm at 1pm. At 3pm it was 88 degrees, a little high thin haze across the sky. At 630pm it was 86 degrees and partly cloudy. Partly hazy at midnight.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time June 24, 2020 at 09:00AM
Almost clear, slight breeze
Max temperature 89 degrees F
Min temperature 47 degrees F
At observation 58 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Jun 24 Weather:

At 9am it was 58 degrees, almost clear (a few tiny clouds) and slight breeze. At 12pm it was 80 degrees and partly cloudy. Wind gusting up by 150pm. At 2pm it was 85 degrees, mostly cloudy and windy. Thunder started at 342pm. Just before 4pm big drops of rain for about 2 minutes, loud thunder, breezy and dark clouds overhead, by 410pm it was quiet. At 650pm it was 80 degrees, overcast, muggy and almost calm. At 845pm it was 70 degrees and mostly clear. Looked cloudy at 2am.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time June 25, 2020 at 09:00AM
Partly cloudy, light breeze
Max temperature 90 degrees F
Min temperature 52 degrees F
At observation 63 degrees F
Precipitation Trace
— — — — — — — — — —

Jun 25 Weather:

At 9am it ws 63 degrees, partly cloudy and light breeze. At 1pm partly cloudy and breezy. At 320pm it was 79 degrees, at 345pm it was 83 degrees partly clear/cloudy and light breeze. At 630pm it was 83 degrees and clear. Breezes kicking up before 730pm. At 9pm it was 67 degrees and clear.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time June 26, 2020 at 09:00AM
Mostly high thin haze
Max temperature 86 degrees F
Min temperature 46 degrees F
At observation 59 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Jun 26 Weather:

At 9am it was 59 degrees, mostly high thin haze. At 1215pm it was 80 degrees and partly cloudy/hazy. At 3pm it was 86 degrees and partly hazy, at 315pm it was 87 degrees. At 6pm it was 83 degrees and mostly clear. At 915pm it was 66 degrees and mostly clear.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time June 27, 2020 at 09:00AM
Mostly cloudy
Max temperature 87 degrees F
Min temperature 49 degrees F
At observation 61 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Jun 27 Weather:

At 9am it was 61 degrees and mostly cloudy. Mostly cloudy at 1pm. At 3pm it was 75 degrees and mostly (dark) cloudy. Getting breezy around 6pm. At 630pm it was 72 degrees, lighter overcast and breezes. At 830pm it was 67 degrees, partly cloudy and light breeze.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time June 28, 2020 at 09:00AM
Overcast
Max temperature 78 degrees F
Min temperature 43 degrees F
At observation 48 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
————————–

Flash Flood Watch from June 28, 6pm to June 29, 6pm

Flash Flood Watch from June 28, 6pm to June 29, 6pm

Yellow Pine Forecast

Today Showers and possibly a thunderstorm after noon. High near 60. Calm wind becoming north northwest 5 to 8 mph in the afternoon. Chance of precipitation is 90%. New rainfall amounts between a tenth and quarter of an inch, except higher amounts possible in thunderstorms.

Tonight Showers and possibly a thunderstorm before midnight, then rain after midnight. Low around 42. North wind 6 to 9 mph. Chance of precipitation is 100%. New precipitation amounts between a quarter and half of an inch possible.

Monday Rain, with thunderstorms also possible after noon. High near 51. North wind around 6 mph. Chance of precipitation is 100%. New rainfall amounts between a quarter and half of an inch possible.

Monday Night Rain. Low around 42. Light and variable wind. Chance of precipitation is 90%. New precipitation amounts between a quarter and half of an inch possible.

Tuesday Showers, with thunderstorms also possible after noon. High near 62. Southwest wind 3 to 8 mph. Chance of precipitation is 80%. New rainfall amounts between a tenth and quarter of an inch, except higher amounts possible in thunderstorms.

Flash Flood Watch

Flood Watch
National Weather Service Boise ID
800 AM MDT Sun Jun 28 2020

...AREAS OF HEAVY RAIN TONIGHT AND MONDAY...

.Upper level low pressure directly over eastern Oregon and
western Idaho will develop areas of moderate to heavy rain
tonight through Monday.

West Central Mountains-Boise Mountains-
Including the cities of McCall, Cascade, Idaho City, Lowman,
Garden Valley, and Pine
800 AM MDT Sun Jun 28 2020

...FLASH FLOOD WATCH REMAINS IN EFFECT FROM 6 PM MDT THIS EVENING
THROUGH MONDAY AFTERNOON...

The Flash Flood Watch continues for

* a portion of west central Idaho, including the following
  areas, Boise Mountains and West Central Mountains.

* from 6 PM MDT this evening through Monday afternoon.

* Heavy rain will create a potentially dangerous situation for
  campers and travelers in areas of steep terrain in the Idaho
  Mountains.

* Travelers should avoid areas of steep terrain during heavy
  rain and campers should stay well away from creeks and
  streams. Idaho state highway 21 northeast of Lowman and the
  Banks-Lowman road may be risky for travel due to the
  possibility of mud and debris falling down the steep terrain.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...

A Flash Flood Watch means that conditions may develop that lead
to flash flooding. Flash flooding is a VERY DANGEROUS SITUATION.

You should monitor later forecasts and be prepared to take action
should Flash Flood Warnings be issued.

Updated Road Reports June 24, 2020

Update: Lick Creek: Opened by the county June 24th.

Please share road reports. Conditions can change quickly any time of year. Some high elevation roads still have snow. Be prepared for rocks and trees in the road and remember there is no cell phone service.

Yellow Pine: Local streets are bare and starting to get dusty, except where people paid for dust abatement. The dust abatement was applied Monday, June 23rd. Elk and deer are wandering around at dusk. Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN. Report that a dog was hit and mildly injured on Main street recently.
June 22 – Yellow Pine Dust Abatement Day
link: Local Forecast
Yellow Pine Webcam: (check date on image)

Warm Lake Highway: No problems reported.
link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

Highway 55 Webcams Link:

South Fork Road: Closed 7am to 4pm daily with no closures on weekends.
June 22 update: The hard closure this week is between mile post 14 to 16 which is between Poverty Flat Campground and approximately Four Mile Campground. (link)
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1Oc8zHo0lzxcrwoJ4ef1OYsjqzZg-zOsw/view
The closure sites will change on a weekly basis, and will not always be adjacent to the last closure site. Refer to the current weekly newsletter or the project website to determine the closure point and access for each week.
South Fork Road Project page (link)
Report from Saturday (June 20) the road is rough in places where they have been working.
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Wednesday (June 24) report to watch out for rocks in the Bowling Alley area.

Johnson Creek Road: Open.
Wednesday (June 24) mail truck driver (Kaleb) reports the road is bumpy.
link: Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam
link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
Note: The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Opened by the county June 24th.
Update Monday afternoon (June 24) local traveler met the road grader on Lick Creek, it has pushed the snow drift and trees off the road. Work has started on the lower end of the McCall side.
Report Sunday (June 21) folks in an SUV got stuck in the snow. Side-by-sides are making it over OK.
June 12: Folks made it over the top with 4x4s.

photo and report courtesy SA
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Still be Closed to regular vehicles.
Report June 20: “Still about 3-4 ft of snow on Profile Summit.” – SA

Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcam: (check date on image)

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open
June 12 update: Yesterday, OK Gravel completed grading the Stibnite road and North American Dust Control will be spraying it June 23rd, 24th and 25th.
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Closed to wheeled vehicles (no current report.)
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Warrens Wagon Road: Construction update: The road is CLOSED from 8am-Noon and 1pm-5pm Monday-Friday. The road is OPEN with a PILOT CAR from Noon-1pm and after 5pm Monday-Friday. The road is OPEN without a pilot car on Saturday and Sunday.
Update June 4: be aware that the Long Gulch Culvert Installation Project along Warren Wagon Road from Chinook Campground to Steamboat Summit will begin on June 15 and end in mid-July. The project involves the installation of numerous cross drain culverts. Delays of under 1 hour can be expected. This area of Warren Wagon is between Secesh Meadows and Warren.

Deadwood Summit: Open, travel with caution.
Scott Mountain is also open.
Note: The approx elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′
——————————-

June 21, 2020 The Yellow Pine Times

June 21, 2020 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Reminder: We are still under a boil water order until further notice.

Happy Father’s Day

Community Calendar:

The Corner is Open w/reservations
Yellow Pine Tavern is open for outside dining.
The General Store is open Tues-Sat
Yellow Pine Lodge Open
Murph’s RV park open (no cabins or showers)
April 17 – Boil water order issued
May 15 – Firewood Season starts
June 16 – Hard closure of South Fork Road (weekdays)
June 22 – YP Dust Abatement
June 23-25 Dust Abatement YP to Stibnite Road
June 27 – YP Fire Commissioner meeting 10am Fire Hall
June 27 – Fest Meeting 2pm Community Hall
July 4 – Yellow Pine Golf Gathering (1045am)
July 5 – Annual YPWUA meeting 2pm Community Hall
(details below)
———-

From Valley County

We need Your Help to protect the place and the people we all Love.
link:
— —

Valley County Covid-19 Response Page
link:
— —

Valley County Emergency Operations Center
link:
— —

Rebound – Idaho Governor’s phasing program
link:
— —

COVID 19: Recommendations and Resources for Safe Business Practices
link: (lots of info for businesses)
——————-

Local Events:

Yellow Pine Dust Abatement

Dust Abatement in Yellow Pine is scheduled for June 22nd. The cost is the same as last year, .0709/sq ft + tax. If you want dust abatement of your property, please let Deb Filler know by June 18th. Checks can be made out to North American Dust Control. Give the checks or your payment to Deb by June 21st.
— — — —

4th of July Yellow Pine Golf Gathering

Although the official YP Golf Tournament was called off, a few of us are hosting an “unofficial” Yellow Pine Golf Gathering. No entrance fees, just asking for donations (which we are already getting.) All proceeds will go to the community. There will be fun, funky trophies and prizes. We will provide bottled water and score cards. Tee time is 11am on Saturday the 4th so we’re asking people to show up about 10:45am.
Hope to see you all there enjoying the fresh air and the spectacular 18 holes.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Water Users Association

Meeting July 5 at 2pm in the Community Hall. See agenda below under YPWUA News.
———-

Village News:

Sunday Wreck on Johnson Creek

On June 14th, 89 year old Jack Walker from Yellow Pine, went off of Johnson Creek Road in his 1994 Dodge pickup. Walker sustained non-life threatening injuries. No other vehicles or people were involved in the crash.

20200614WalkerCrash-a

(Info and photo from Lt. Kevin Copperi, Valley County Sheriff’s office via The Star-News)

The local Cascade EMS ambulance crew and YP Fire volunteers responded. Jack was treated and taken to Cascade Medical Center for further treatment and evaluation and was then sent to Boise by ambulance.
— — — —

Harmonica Festival Meeting June 27

Thanks to all of you for your emails and social media comments regarding the Yellow Pine Harmonica Festival. Hopefully this has helped you formulate your feelings and ideas on the Village of Yellow Pine holding our 31st Annual Harmonica Meeting this year 2020.
If you want your voice to be heard please attend our next Yellow Pine Harmonica Meeting to be held Saturday June 27th at 2PM at the Yellow Pine Village Community Hall.
Thank You
Lorinne N. Munn
— — — —

Please Return Borrowed Measuring Wheel

Would the person who borrowed the Village’s measuring wheel please return it to the Community Hall or one of the Council members? Thank you
— — — —

Local Road Work

20200618EllisonRoadWork2-a
Ellison Street

20200618EllisonRoadWork3-a
OK Gravel

20200619EllisonStreetAfter-a
Ellison Street work completed.

The road work is authorized by the county and the VYPA Infrastructure Committee is working with OK Gravel to get it done. The roads being worked on are Westside Ave., Ellison Street, Arnold Alley, Profile Street, Yellow Pine Ave. (main street), and other places that need attention. Additional work will be done as funding is available.
— — — —

4th of July No Fireworks

2020NoYPfireworks-a

courtesy YPDF
— — — —

Food Box Friday

The mail truck brought in another load of food boxes from the Food Bank and Grasmicks on Friday, June 19th. Lots of veggies, fruit, milk, cheese, butter and chicken.
— — — —

2020 Census

The 2020 Census Impacts All Valley County Residents

Inching closer. Each of our communities and Valley County as a whole have increased our response rate by a few percentage points over the last few weeks – but we still have a lot of room to grow! We are still ranked #42 of 44 counties in Idaho for our Census response rate. Let’s get that number up! Responding to the Census takes less than 10 minutes and mean $1,483 per person in federal funding for Valley County.

It is recommended that we all fill out the census online.

If you spend 50% of your time in Valley County, you can consider it your home per the Census. Where you register with the Census is confidential and never linked to other governmental requirements such as property taxes or mailing address. The deadline for the 2020 Census has been extended until October 31st. They will probably not be sending census takers up to Yellow Pine.

Link: to online census

You do not need an ID number. Go to the link. Click on “start questionnaire”. Then on the next page scroll down to “If you do not have a Census ID, click here” – when you click on that line it will start the census. (see below)

2020Census-a
— — — —

Boil Water Order issued

Update June 12: The boil order is still on. We still are experiencing excessive water use because of leaks. Not sure when this will be lifted. We are applying for grants to repair the system.

Update June 2: The water plant is experiencing high water in Boulder Creek which brings more debris into the sand filter.

The high demand caused by leaks in the system plugs the sand filters prematurely. We will be on a boil order until further notice.

As of April 17th 2020, Yellow Pine is under another “Boil Order”

Boil Water Advisory Notice

Boil Your Water Before Using

Bring tap water to a rolling boil, boil for one minute, and cool before using or use bottled water. Boiled or bottled water should be used for drinking, making ice, washing dishes, brushing teeth, and preparing food until further notice.

This Boil Water Advisory Notice applies to The Yellow Pine Water System

The system is being monitored and checked daily for compliance. .

You will be informed when you no longer need to boil your water.

For more information, please contact:
Warren Drake of the Yellow Pine Water System
at 208-573-6261 or wdrake@drakediversified.com

Please share this information with other people who drink this water, especially anyone who may not get this notice directly (for example, people in apartments, nursing homes, schools, and businesses).

You can do this by posting this notice in a public place or distributing copies by hand or mail.

State Water System ID#: 4430059 Date distributed: 3-22-2020
— — — —

Critters

Tick’s are still very plentiful in June.

Bears are out of hibernation, protect your trash and pet food.

Watch out for aggressive mother does and cows, they will stomp your dogs – and you too.
— — — —

Road News

Johnson Creek road is open, not graded yet. Report June 10th of people having to cut trees on Johnson Creek road, and a large pot hole somewhere – it was marked for a while but by Wednesday the sticks and flagging were gone. Travel at your own risk and carry a saw.

YP to Stibnite: June 12 – Yesterday, OK Gravel completed grading the Stibnite road and North American Dust Control will be spraying it June 23rd, 24th and 25th.

South Fork: Hard closure will begin on Tuesday, June 16; 7am to 4pm daily with no closures on weekends.
Access to Yellow Pine during closure hours will only be via Johnson Creek. With the delay of the opening of Lick Creek Road, the contractor needs to start work that requires closures in order to keep his crews working.
The closure sites will change on a weekly basis, and will not always be adjacent to the last closure site. Refer to the current weekly newsletter or the project website to determine the closure point and access for each week.
Road project link:

Lick Creek is getting closer to opening, still some drifts across the road.

June 12, 2020

Profile Report June 20: “Still about 3-4 ft of snow on Profile Summit.” – SA

June 20, 2020
— — — —

Forest Info

A report Saturday (May 23) of trees cut and stacked at the Yellow Pine Campground. Possibly hazard tree removal by the Boise NF.

The Krassel RD campgrounds are effectively open for use but currently with limited services – we advise all users to bring toilet paper, drinking water and strive to be as fully self-contained as possible as the District is not operating the campgrounds as open with full services. We have cleaned the restrooms in the South Fork paved road corridor, but water systems will take a little longer to bring on-line due to the need to sanitize and to receive water testing results.

All campgrounds and restroom facilities in the South Fork Corridor, Lick Creek/Secesh Corridor and along the East Fork South Fork Salmon River to Yellow Pine will begin seeing our regular restroom cleaning beginning this Friday, May 15th. Water systems will come online in the near future.

Rx Burns

All new prescribed burn ignitions have been paused across the Region in line with regional direction. The Forest will continue to prioritize keeping employees and the public safe during this time. The decision to temporarily postpone ignitions will prevent any effects from smoke that might further worsen conditions for those who are at risk in our communities while reducing exposure for Forest Service employees who might not otherwise need to travel.

We expect the pause on prescribed burn ignitions to be re-evaluated by the Regional Forester sometime in April.
– PNF
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Yellow Pine US Mail

The 6-day a week mail delivery started June 1st. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 55 cents. Support our local post office and purchase your holiday stamps here.
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Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Report June 6 – with community support more repairs have been made to the doors, and cement has been poured to stop the bear from digging under the building. A brave volunteer also climbed up on the roof and secured the loose roofing. The burn pile has been sorted as people have been dumping inappropriate items.

Report June 1 – the bins have been emptied. South doors are a bit stiff. The road from YP to the dump is really good.

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

Yellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is located approximately 3 miles south on Johnson Creek Road.

The TRANSFER STATION is for household trash and yard waste:
* Household trash must be put inside (and fit) the dumpster;
* Yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, etc.) goes in the burn pile on the south end of the turn-around;
* Cardboard boxes should be flattened before putting the in the dumpster,

The DUMPSTERS are NOT for:
* Furniture (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station).

The BURN PILE is NOT for:
* Cardboard boxes (flatten and put in dumpster);
* Furniture and appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Drywall and building material (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wire or fencing (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Foam Rubber (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wood with metal (like nails) attached (take to Donnelly Transfer Station.)

When closing the DOORS on the front of the dumpsters:
* Make sure the “U” brackets at the top and bottom of the door are engaged;
* The retaining bar at the middle of the door is slid into the pipe;
* And the “L” bars at the bottom of the doors dropped into place.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: 208/634-7176
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Local Groups

YPWUA News:

July 5th 2020 at the community center 2 PM

1. Financial Report Willie
A. Current Balance
B. Delinquent Accounts

2. Operations Warren
A. Current Boil Order
B. Current condition of system
– Leaks
– Earthquake Damage

3. Grants Steve and Willie
A. Current awarded grant status
B. Discontinued use of SPF Engineering
C. New Engineering Company Mountain Water Works
D. By-law update terms of office, agent

4. Final Issues
A. Future rate increases
B. Summer lawn watering
C. Election of Board Members: Steve Holloway and Willie Sullivan positions

New Boil Water Order issued April 17, 2020. This could last until runoff is over.

Notice of Intent to File an Application with USDA, Rural Development

The Yellow Pine Water Users Association, Yellow Pine, Idaho intends to file an Application with USDA, Rural Development to obtain a drinking water system facility Emergency Community Water Assistance Grant (ECWAG). Emergency Community Water Assistance Grant (ECWAG).

If any additional information is needed, please contact:
Willie Sullivan
Treasurer
ypwater@gmail.com

Distributed to Yellow Pine Water Users Association customers via Yellow Pine Times on June 12, 2020.

The last Yellow Pine Water Users Shareholders meeting was Sunday July 7, 2019.
link: 20190707YPWUAminutes
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VYPA News:

Last Village Meeting was June 13th, next meeting July 11th

2020 Festival Meeting May 16, 2020 Notes
Note: at each meeting we simply add to info on the topic. That way, info from all meetings is included in a single document.
link: 2020 Festival Planning Notes.pdf

Next festival planning Meeting June 27th at 2pm at the Community Hall

Heat was installed in the community hall on April 30th.

If folks have items for the community yard sale, please place them by the north wall in the community hall. If you see items you would like to purchase, you can pay Deb, Ronda, or Lynn. All funds support the community hall.

VYPA meetings for 2020 – June 13, 2pm; July 11, 2pm; August 8, 2pm; September 12, 2pm.

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting Minutes for September 21, 2019
link: 20190921 Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting
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YPFD News:

The next YP Fire Commissioner meeting will be held on June 27, 2020 at 10 AM at the Fire Station.

YPFD COVID19 Policy

link: YPFD Covid 19 SOP.docx

link: Covid-19 EMS.pdf (May 23)

May 10th Burn Permits – contact the YPFD

Pile burning: Dress appropriately, have enough help on hand (people, water and tools) and make a firebreak before you start. Call your local fire protection district chief to let them know you’ll be conducting a debris burn. This saves them from sending emergency responders to your property if they are not needed. Do NOT burn on breezy afternoons.

Better yet, “Bring It, Don’t Burn It”, you can take your yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, etc.) to the burn pile at the Transfer Station on the south end of the turn-around. Remember, keep the pile neat. Woody debris only, no nails, no cardboard and no furniture! The Boise NF will burn the pile in the fall when it is safe and doesn’t pollute our fine YP air.

YP Fire Commissioners:
Sue Holloway – District 1
Dan Stiff – District 2
Merrill Saleen – District 3
Jeff Forster – Fire Chief

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice

The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.”

Click the link: to view 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation
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Biz Listings:

The Corner (208) 633-3325

Open 11am-8pm Closed Tuesdays
The best way to ensure we meet our social distancing guidelines is to call 208-633-3325 before dropping in but we will accommodate everyone, it just may take a bit more time. We will do breakfast on request and always have good coffee going.
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Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233

Yellow Pine Tavern Reopening, Open Daily 8am to 10pm. Outside Dining and Bar. Breakfast and Bar Food.
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Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377

Open.
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Yellow Pine General Store (208) 633-3300

The store is open now and will be open into October. Hours are 9 am to 6 pm Tuesday through Saturday. Closed Sunday and Monday.
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Murph’s RV Park & Mary’s Cabins (208) 633-6677

Cabins are not available in 2020. RV Spaces $25/night; $150/week; $300/month. Tent spaces $10/night. Shower house is closed for 2020.
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Knotty Kat Crochet Works – 208-502-0940
FB page link
open Tue – Sat, 9-5
Yellow Pine eggs $3/doz
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Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Tom & Sarah Lanham
156 Yellow Pine Ave, Yellow Pine Id 83677
website:
Facebook:
Starting June 2020 We will be doing trail rides out of Yellow Pine along with summer pack / camping trips to high mountain lakes in the area!

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
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Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430 open 830am-5pm Monday-Friday, closed weekends.
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Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

The Star-News

subscribe:
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine

Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, will service Yellow Pine

B&T Safety Solutions LLC
208-271-1600 Based out of Donnelly
Snow removal, cleaning chimneys and stoves, we do cabin staining/chinking as well
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Telehealth

Cascade Medical Center is set up for Telehealth.

If you want to schedule an appointment, call our clinic at 208-382-4285. Vicki or one of the MAs will ask you some questions to make sure that a tele-video visit is the right choice given your symptoms or need. If so, we will work with you to make sure you are set up on the Cascade Medical Center patient portal (with our EMR). We will also make sure that you are set up to be able to do a tele-video visit (laptop with camera, desktop with camera, or smart phone). We use the Zoom telemedicine system, which is confidential and secure (it works like Skype or Face-time). Before the appointment, we will email you a link for the tele-video visit. When it is time for your appointment, you will click on the link in the email and you will be connected with our provider and can begin your visit.

Regarding insurance coverage, the COVID legislation passed in March assures coverage of telemedicine visits for patients with Medicare, Medicaid, VA. Private insurers have also decided to provide coverage just as for regular in person visits, at least until the COVID epidemic crisis is declared over.

Today (June 3rd) Blue Cross extended telehealth services and reimbursement through the end of the year.

Tom Reinhardt, CEO
Cascade Medical Center


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Cascade Medical Center needs your opinion!

Dear neighbor – as we plan for the future of healthcare in Cascade and the surrounding area, we need your input. Would you be so kind as to click on the link below and take this survey for us? We want to make sure we are meeting your needs now and long into the future. (link)

We want input from you whether you are a permanent resident, weekender, or occasional visitor. Please feel free to forward this survey link on to others as well.

Thank you, and stay healthy!

Tom Reinhardt, CEO
Cascade Medical Center
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Local Observations:

Monday (June 15) a little rain early this morning, overnight low of 32 degrees, 24 hour rain total = 0.09″. Overcast sky this morning, light chilly breeze and a few drops of rain. Hairy woodpecker drumming on the power pole, nutcrackers and jays calling, not many swallows around, appears to be 4 eggs in the swallow nest we are watching. Rain late morning until after lunch time. A few grosbeaks and finches joined the jays and nutcrackers at the feeders. Low clouds, chilly breezes and steady light rain this afternoon, high of 53 degrees. A break in the rain at dusk and overcast. Cloudy before midnight. Showers during the night.

Tuesday (June 16) overnight low of 40 degrees, 24 hour rain total = 0.39″, this morning low overcast and damp. No swallows flying around, female on the nest. Jays, grosbeaks, a few finches and a trio of nutcrackers (2 noisy juveniles) calling and visiting. Little sprinkle of rain before 10am, then breezy before lunch time. After lunch a few breaks in the clouds. Hard rain for about 10 minutes late-afternoon, dark overcast sky and light breezes, high of 60 degrees. Quiet day. Early evening dark clouds and a few tiny drops of rain. Mamma doe wandering around the neighborhood. Low dark overcast and steady rain before dusk. Light sprinkles just before full dark and robins calling. Cloudy before midnight and raining after midnight. Rained all night.

Wednesday (June 17) rained all night, overnight low of 37 degrees, 24 hour rain total = 0.59″, low foggy overcast and still raining this morning. No swallows around. Jays, happy robins and noisy young nutcrackers visiting. Rained until just after lunch time. Mail truck was a little late, but reported no travel problems. Low airplane at 235pm. A few finches and grosbeaks showed up at the feeders, still no sign of swallows. Dark overcast mid-afternoon and cooler, high of 52 degrees. A couple of hummingbirds stopped by, have not seen many around this year. Dark overcast mid-evening. A doe and a yearling wandered by. At dusk breaks in the cloud cover and robins calling. Swallows returned right at dark. Mostly cloudy before midnight.

Thursday (June 18) overnight low of 36 degrees, yesterday’s rain total = 0.03″, partly cloudy sky this morning and light breezes. Tree swallows flying around and taking feathers to nests, robins chirping. Mostly cloudy by lunch time. A few finches visiting, chipmunks, ground squirrels and pine squirrels running about. A little more traffic this afternoon. A pine siskin, a few grosbeaks and a couple of jays joined the finches at the feeders by early afternoon. Road grader blading the main street, dump truck hauling gravel. Mostly cloudy and higher humidity mid-afternoon, high of 66 degrees. Increasing air traffic. Larger patches of blue sky but mostly cloudy mid-evening, breezy and a little humid. Mostly clear and calm at dusk. Swallows and robins calling. Lots of stars before midnight.

Friday (June 19) overnight low of 36 degrees, clear very blue sky this morning. Early airplanes buzzing the village. Lots of tree swallows swooping around. Finches and a pine squirrel visiting. Slow internet this morning. Mail truck brought in more food boxes. Mostly cloudy, warm and light breezes after lunch time. Increased air and street traffic. Warm, light breezes and mostly cloudy mid-afternoon, high of 77 degrees. Smaller clouds and more open patches of sky by early evening. Thin high haze and cooling off at dusk. Hazy before midnight.

Saturday (June 20) overnight low of 41 degrees, overcast sky this morning. Early morning airplanes taking short cuts over the village. Tree swallows active, hunting feathers for nests, females are setting on eggs. A few finches and evening grosbeaks visiting. Several shots fired beginning at 1035am. Dark and cloudy at lunch time. Sprinkle of rain for an hour early afternoon, dark overcast and a little breezy, high of 69 degrees. A couple of little pine siskins joined the grosbeaks and finches at the feeders, clark’s nutcracker stopped by for a suet snack. Broken overcast and a bit humid mid-evening. Shooting started around 9pm. Mostly cloudy and calm at dusk.

Sunday (June 21) overnight low of 47 degrees, 24 hour rain total = 0.01″, mostly cloudy sky this morning. Early airplanes buzzing overhead. Tree squirrels “barking”, swallows swooping, a few finches and evening grosbeaks calling. Increased road traffic. Mostly cloudy and a little breezy after lunch time. Flock of airplanes went over around 230pm. Broken overcast and light breezes mid-afternoon, high of 77 degrees. Partly cloudy/clear mid-evening and light pleasant breeze.
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Idaho News:

Idaho’s open but health officials say “we are not done” with COVID-19

By Frankie Katafias Jun 15, 2020 KIVI

Who wants to wear face masks to the bar or sit six feet from a close friend? Our guess, not you.

But as Idaho entered the fourth and final step for re-opening, the State’s health officials stress the importance of protecting the community’s most vulnerable people by practicing “social responsibility.”

… We asked Atkins, “how can people socialize responsibly?” He says, “you need to be wearing face coverings when you’re out in public you still need to be social distancing appropriately you need to be mindful about how much time you’re spending in a small enclosed space.”

full story:
— — — — — — — — — —

Idaho COVID-19 cases top 4,000; 135 new cases reported today

by CBS2 News Staff Saturday, June 20th 2020

The state of Idaho reached a new milestone Saturday, when the Department of Health and Welfare reported 135 new confirmed and probable cases of COVID-19.

The new cases bring the state’s total to 4,006. 89 people have died.

Saturday also marks the third day in a row that the state has seen more than 100 cases in a single day. 66 of the 135 cases on Saturday were in Ada County.

Of the cases, 3,305 are presumed recovered.

Of the 4,006 cases, 1,082 are among people ages 18-29.

source:
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COVID-19 illness cluster from Downtown Boise bars rises to 69 cases

by Ryan L Morrison Thursday, June 18th 2020 CBS2

The Central District Health said the COVID-19 illness cluster associated with Downtown Boise bar patrons increased to include 69 cases.

That’s twice as many cases from Tuesday.

In the first two weeks of June, nine bars in Boise were identified as potential exposure spots for COVID-19. People found to be infected had visited specific locations and the CDH announced those locations this week and last.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Sabala foundation cancels fireworks over Payette Lake

The Star-News June 18, 2020

The Richard J. Sabala Foundation has canceled its annual fireworks display over Payette Lake that had been scheduled for June 27.

The fireworks were canceled in support of the City of McCall’s decision to cancel the city’s July 4 fireworks display to control possible exposure to the COVID-19 virus, a statement from the foundation said.

“The mayor, city manager, chief of police, city council and chamber of commerce have a huge responsibility overseeing the welfare of our community,” the statement said. “We support their responsible decision to not feature this year’s Fourth of July fireworks.”

The fireworks were scheduled to be held during the 28th annual RJS Memorial Invitational Golf Classic to support the youth and families of the McCall and Donnelly communities.

The event will go on in a modified format, with proceeds donated for the maintenance and operational needs of Manchester Ice and Event Centre.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Woodstock firewood project canceled due to COVID-19

The Star-News June 18, 2020

Humanitarian Wood Working Day, also known as Woodstock, has been canceled to protect volunteers from exposure to the COVID-19 virus.

The board of the sponsoring Heartland Hunger Resource Center decided to cancel the event for this summer, Executive Director Linda Klind said.

“We did not think it was fair to ask 200 volunteers to come together and take a risk that something might happen,” Klind said.

Those in need to winter firewood will still be served, however. The board is working to use a combination of smaller groups of volunteers as well as donations from local businesses over a period of time, as well as support from local organizations and individuals to ensure the demand is met, Klind said.

“Adaptations are in process in order to best meet our primary goals of providing firewood support to families in need,” she said

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

MDEF cancels Taste of McCall that had been set for June 27

The Star-News June 18, 2020

The McCall-Donnelly Education Foundation has canceled the 2020 Taste of McCall, scheduled for June 27, due to COVID-19 precautions.

The Taste of McCall is the foundation’s primary fundraiser for its educational grant program, and showcases area restaurants and beverage vendors.

The popular event draws people from all over the region to sample some of the best food and drink that McCall has to offer, along with a silent auction of local recreational packages, artwork, and must-have items from local businesses.

Planning for next year’s event is now underway, and the foundation anticipates it will be held in late June 2021. For more information, visit (link)

source:
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Progressive club cancels summer luncheon, fashion show

The Star-News June 18, 2020

The Payette Lakes Progressive Club has canceled its annual June luncheon and fashion show due to coronavirus-related issues.

The club will concentrate its efforts on its major yearly fundraiser, the Festival of Trees, which will be held over Thanksgiving weekend.

A membership meeting is set for Tuesday, Aug. 11, at noon at Ponderosa State Park and will include the induction of newly elected officers Gail DiBenedetto as president, Camilla Switzer as vice president, Treone Cooley as treasurer, Joyce Haley as secretary and Penny Williamson as member-at-large.

The meeting will be at the pavilion next to the visitor center in the park.

The 100-person strong women’s organization has served the community of McCall and surrounding areas since 1930. For more information, contact Linda Hallock at 208-634-7049.

source:
— — — — — — — — — —

Amateur radio operators to celebrate Field Day at home

The Star-News June 18, 2020

Local amateur radio operators will hunker down and train at home during the American Radio Relay League’s annual Field Day event on Saturday and Sunday, June 27-28.

Due to COVID-19 concerns, the Central Idaho Amateur Radio Club will not host public outreach events. Instead, local operators will help less experienced members train on their own stations and expand their station capabilities.

The American Radio Relay League’s Field Day is a 24-hour emergency communication demonstration in the United States and Canada with more than 35,000 amateur operators participating.

Participating local stations will include K6JMQ, KG6MRX, KE7FST, KG7CW, KG7MFC, KJ7AIB, K7TPH, N7IBC, W7ELE and W7TID. Also involved will be the club station operated by W7BOB and N7EZQ.

For more information on becoming an amateur radio operator or the Central Idaho Amateur Radio Club, visit http://ciarc.org

source:
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Braun Brothers Reunion Festival canceled for 2020

“We are devastated to share this news with you,” organizers wrote, adding that the risk of exposing fans, performers and staff to coronavirus was simply too high.

June 15, 2020 KTVB

Challis, Idaho — A popular music festival in the central Idaho town of Challis has been canceled this year because of coronavirus concerns, organizers announced Monday.

The 2020 Braun Brothers Reunion Festival was scheduled for Aug. 6-8.

“We held out as long as we possibly could in hopes that we would be able to pull off the festival safely this year but after carefully considering all options, due to dozens of issues that are beyond our control concerning the Covid-19 pandemic, we must do what’s best for our fans, friends, family, artists, the community of Challis and our fellow Idahoans,” the Braun family, who hosts the festival, wrote. “We are devastated to share this news with you. ‘The show must go on’ is in our DNA, and this is the first time in the history of the event that we’ve had to cancel. It is our hope that everyone understands how difficult this decision was, and why we feel this is the right thing to do.”

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

2020 Western Idaho Fair canceled due to COVID-19

by CBS2 News Staff Tuesday, June 16th 2020

The Western Idaho Fair has been canceled this summer.

Fair officials made the announcement on Tuesday and said it was a difficult decision “after reviewing many possible scenarios and receiving advice from Western Idaho Fair’s Advisory Board and Ada County officials.”

It’s the state’s largest event and attracts a quarter of a million people every year.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Canyon County Fair to host youth 4-H, FFA exhibits despite fair being canceled

by CBS2 News Staff Monday, June 15th 2020

Canyon County Fair announced Monday it will host 4-H and FFA despite usual fair operations being canceled.

“After many months of deliberating, weighing options, and reflecting on the one-of-a-kind experience that is the Canyon County Fair, the Canyon County Commissioners have come to an operational decision that makes the most sense for our exhibitors, patrons, vendors, and staff,” said a spokesperson for Canyon County.

Unfortunately the usual fair activities – concerts, entertainment, carnival, commercial vendors, food concessions and competitive exhibits – will not take place.

But, that isn’t stopping the county’s officials from figuring out a way to give the 4-H and FFA youth an opportunity to exhibit their livestock, static projects, and participate in a market livestock sale.

source:
— — — — — — — — — —

Blaine County Fair to be held virtually this year

Alejandra Buitrago Jun 11, 2020 IME

The Blaine County Fair, typically scheduled to take place in August or early September at the fairgrounds in Carey, will go virtual this year, due to COVID-19.

In a statement from the Blaine County Fair Board on June 4, the board announced that in conjunction with the Blaine County Commissioners, the decision was made to move the 2020 Blaine County Fair to a virtual format.

“This was not an easy decision but was made in the interest of the health of our community,” Blaine County Fair Board President Morgan Drage said in the statement, shared on the fair’s website.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Monday deadline noted to pay Adams, Valley property taxes

The Star-News June 18, 2020

Monday at 5 p.m. is the deadline for property owners in Adams and Valley counties to pay the second half of their yearly property taxes.

Late charges and interest will begin on Tuesday, with interest retroactive from Jan. 1, so mailed payments should be correctly stamped by date.

The treasurers’ offices in both counties are open during the lunch hour Mondays through Fridays.

Valley County accepts credit card payments at http://co.valley.id.us or by calling 208-382-7110.

In Adams County, payments can be placed in the drop box at the main courthouse entrance in Council.

The office has credit card, debit card or echeck payment options online at co.adams.id.us or by calling 208-253-4263 Ext. 6 for questions.

source:
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Idaho census return tops national average

June 16, 2020 Local News 8

Six Idaho counties have surpassed their 2010 Census response rate.

About 490,000 Idahoans have responded to the 2020 Census, for a self-response rate of 64.9%. The national average is 61.4%.

With a 70% response rate, Bonneville County has the 4th highest response rate, behind Canyon, Gem, and Ada County at 74.7%.

continued:

[Note: Valley County response rate = 28.1%, of which 17.5% were done via the internet.] link:
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Letter to Share:

from Valley County Sheriff’s Office

PSA Saturday –

We would like to take this opportunity to educate some folks on the usage of your UTV, ATV or Dirt Bikes on County roads in Valley County.

We get several questions and complaints during the spring, summer and fall on the use of these vehicles in neighborhoods and on County maintained roads, public and private. Remember, just because a road is marked private (blue signs), it’s still accessible to the public and you must still follow the rules of the road.

Use on City & County Roads (does not include private property)

The following requirements must be met on city, county, and highway district roads.

• Valid restricted vehicle license plate. [IC 49-402(4)]
• Valid IDPR OHV registration sticker affixed to restricted vehicle license plate. (IC 67-7122)
• Valid driver’s license. (IC 49-301) – Parents can be cited for allowing an unlicensed minor to operate an ATV or UTV. Please keep this in mind.
• Liability insurance or alternative insurance. (IC 49-1223 or IC 49-1232)
• A helmet under age 18. (IC 49-666) Please make sure it’s a DOT inspected helmet.
• Muffler and U.S. Forest Service approved spark arrestor. Your muffler has to pass 96 dB at the half-meter test, SAE J1287. The OHV cannot exceed 96dB. (IC 67-7125)
• If you are riding on a highway within city limits, you may NOT go beyond the 45 mph signs in Valley County. This may not be the case in other cities, please be sure to check city codes prior to operating an off road vehicle on state highways within other city jurisdictions, they vary.

For safe operation on roads the following equipment is recommended.

• Brake light.
• Headlight and taillight after dark/poor visibility.
• Horn audible at 200 feet.
• Mirror showing roadway 200 feet behind the OHV

License & Registration

Any OHVs being operated or transported on public lands, roads or trails of the state of Idaho must display a current IDPR OHV Registration Sticker. Idaho Code 67-7124. Registration has been extended until June 30th, due to COVID-19, however they are asking that you attempt to get this completed as soon as you can.

Non-resident Requirements

Non-residents are required to have either a valid OHV registration from their home state of residence or a valid IDPR OHV registration sticker. Nonresidents must purchase an Idaho restricted vehicle license plate with a valid IDPR OHV registration sticker if they don’t have a plate and wish to operate on Idaho’s local jurisdiction roads (i.e.county roads).

Please be courteous, pay attention to speed limits and remember when you are driving through neighborhoods there are lots of things going on, kids playing, family pets and people walking or biking their neighborhoods.

We are asking that if you would like to report traffic complaints in your neighborhood, to call at the time it’s occurring, get a good description of the vehicle, a plate would be great and a description of the occupants, if possible.

Some of the questions the dispatcher might ask you are; Which direction did they go? Do you know where they live? When did this occur?

All of this information helps us in assisting you in better serving your needs. A lot of these vehicles look the same and disappear quickly!

As always, Stay Safe, be healthy and practice social distancing.

(via FB May 23, 2020)
— — — — — — — — — —

Confused about where to get your recreation stickers and registration?


—————————–

Public Lands:

Plan would trade 28,000 acres of state land

Boise firm proposes ‘responsible development’ around Payette Lake

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News June 18, 2020

A land exchange encompassing 28,000 acres of land around Payette Lake and the City of McCall has been proposed to the Idaho Department of Lands.

2020McCallDLMap-a
Map courtesy Trident Corp. Blue lines on map show boundaries of state endowment land around McCall that a Boise company wants to trade for timber land.

In return, the state would receive timberlands in northern Idaho that could yield about $2.9 million per year in revenue and cost savings, according to an analysis commissioned by Trident.

The proposal was briefly discussed at the State Board of Land Commissioners meeting in Boise on Tuesday, where Idaho Gov. Brad Little urged moving slowly.

“This is a big, hairy piece of ground with all kinds of conflicting issues and a place that’s very special to lots of people, including me,” said Little, who chairs the land board.

“I have a conflict in the fact that I love McCall, so we want to do this right,” Little said.

The McCall lands are a drain on the state to the tune of about $276,000 per year due to restrictions on harvesting, leasing and limited accessibility, the Trident analysis said.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Road and Recreation Update

June 19, 2020 Payette NF

The Payette National Forest is open for recreational use with access via roads that are clear of snow.

* Goose Lake Road is operated by Adams County to just beyond the Brundage Mountain Resort. This paved section of the road is fully open.

* Goose Lake Road beyond the Brundage Mountain Resort is accessible to the Twin Lakes Trailhead just north of Goose Lake. The road to Brundage Reservoir is accessible to nearly ¾ along the reservoir before hitting a large snow drift.

* Lick Creek Road has not been plowed open by Valley County – some people have made it through, but encountered snow banks – travel is not advisable at this time.

* South Fork of the Salmon River Road has construction with hard closures Monday through Friday from 7a.m. to 4p.m., but no closures over the weekends.

* Warren Wagon Road is open to Warren Summit – check with Valley County Roads Department for access to the South Fork from Warren Summit. Elk Creek Summit is not passable.

* Profile Summit/Edwardsburg Road is maintained by Valley County and has not been plowed open at this time.

* Monumental Summit has not been plowed open at this time.

* No Business/West Mountain Road is open, but minor snow drifts may be encountered.

* Access to Cuddy Mountain is limited with persistent snow drifts in shaded draws that block access to high elevations areas.

The majority of campgrounds on the Forest are open for use – refer to specific information below.
Dispersed camping is available across the Forest where sites are accessible.
For additional information, please call the Forest Supervisor’s Office at office at (208) 634-0700.

Campground Information:

McCall – New Meadow Ranger Districts Opening Dates

* Cold Springs Campground Open
* Burgdorf Campground Open
* Jeanette Campground Open
* Chinook Campground Open
* Lake Fork Campground Closed- wet & muddy
* Kennally Creek Campground Open
* Grouse Campground Closed – snow, wet & muddy
* Hazard Campground Not accessible – snow
* Upper Payette Lake Campground June 22 – reservations begin July 1
* Last Chance Campground Closed, opening TBD – tree insect outbreak
* Cold Springs Group Camp Open
* Upper Payette Group Camp June 22 – reservations begin July 1

Council – Weiser Ranger Districts Opening Dates

* Mann Creek Campground Open
* Spring Creek Campground Open
* Spring Creek Group Campground Open
* Big Bar dispersed area Campground Open
* Paradise Campground Open
* Kiwanis Campground Open
* Justrite Campground Open
* Big Flat Campground Open
* Cabin Creek Campground Open
* Evergreen Campground Open – no water available
* Lafferty Campground Open
* Huckleberry Campground Open

Krassel Ranger District Opening Dates

* Poverty Flat Campground Open
* Fourmile Campground Open
* Camp Creek Campground Open
* Buckhorn Campground Open
* Ponderosa Campground Open
* Secesh Horse Camp Open
* Big Creek Campground Projected for July 1

Closure Orders: No COVID-19 related closures are in effect.

April 29 – The Forest Service Intermountain Regional Office group size of 10 order has been RESCINDED.

April 3 – Float boating closure on the Lower South Fork of the Salmon River has been RESCINDED.

March 25 – Snowmobile Parking Lot Closure has been RESCINDED.
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Idaho increasing harvest of trees that are vulnerable to insects, disease, and wildfire

State officials say about a 33 percent increase of timber harvesting is needed to keep up with tree growth.

June 16, 2020 KTVB


Credit: IDL

Aged and over-crowded trees are at the most risk for insects, disease, and wildfire. The Idaho Department of Lands say they are now able to better determine where those trees are located and better manage endowment forests.

“The harvest increase allows us to address the excess standing volume, or in other words, the too many overly mature trees that should be harvested rather than left at risk for insects, disease and wildfire,” said Jim Elbin, Trust Land Division Administrator. “Our endowment forests will be more resilient and resistant to those threats because the forests will be healthier, and our state will be helped by the increased revenue in timber sales.”

The inventory process has shown that about a 33 percent increase of timber harvesting is needed to keep up with tree growth.

continued:
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Idaho Power opens ALL campgrounds, parks, boat ramps and access sites

by CBS2 News Staff Tuesday, June 16th 2020

Idaho Power announced Tuesday that all of its campgrounds, parks, boat ramps, and recreation access sites are now open.

The recreation sites had mostly been closed since March due to COVID-19 concerns, but a phased reopening started in May. And now, they are all open.

The company said requests for campsites at the company’s campgrounds in Hells Canyon and at C.J. Strike Reservoir had been pouring in. Many locations have, and are, filling up on the weekends.

continued:
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Lowman WUI Project-Objection Period Notification

6/172020 Boise NF

The Boise National Forest, Lowman Ranger District has completed the Environmental Assessment /Finding of No Significant Impact (EA/FONSI) and the draft Decision Notice (DN) for the Lowman Wildland Urban Interface (WUI) Project. The EA/FONSI and draft DN are available on the project website at (link)

The Responsible Official for this project has selected to implement the Proposed Action as identified in the draft DN. The project area surrounds the community of Lowman, Idaho. The proposed action will implement vegetation management treatments (commercial and noncommercial thinning, prescribed burning) on approximately 8,953 acres. All treatments with commercial product removal will be followed by noncommercial tree thinning and activity fuel abatement treatments. No road building is proposed as part of this project. Commercial thinning, non-commercial thinning and prescribed burning treatments would utilize existing road infrastructure. Maintenance of existing roads in support of project activities would likely occur.

Eligibility to File Objection

This project is subject to objection pursuant to 36 CFR 218, subparts A and B. Objections will be accepted only from those who have previously submitted specific written comments regarding the proposed project either during scoping or other designated opportunity for public comment in accordance with § 218.5(a). Issues raised in objections must be based on previously submitted timely, specific, written comments regarding the proposed project unless they are based on new information arising after designated opportunities.

Individual members of organizations must have submitted their own comments to meet the requirements of eligibility as an individual. Objections received on behalf of an organization are considered as those of the organization only. If an objection is submitted on behalf of a number of individuals or organizations, each individual or organization listed must meet the eligibility requirement of having previously submitted comments on the project (§ 218.7). Names and addresses of objectors will become part of the public record.

Content of an Objection

Incorporation of documents by reference in the objection is permitted only as provided for at § 218.8(b). Minimum content requirements of an objection identified at § 218.8(d) include:

* Objector’s name and address with a telephone number if available, with signature or other verification of authorship supplied upon request;
* Identification of the lead objector when multiple names are listed, along with verification upon request;
* Name of project, name and title of the responsible official, national forest/ranger district where project is located;
* Sufficient narrative description of those aspects of the proposed project objected to, specific issues related to the project, how environmental law, regulation, or policy would be violated, and suggested remedies, which would resolve the objection; and
* Statement demonstrating the connection between prior specific written comments on this project and the content of the objection, unless the objection issue arose after the designated opportunities for comment.

Filing an Objection

The Objection Reviewing Officer is the Boise National Forest, Forest Supervisor, Tawnya Brummett. Written, facsimile, and electronic objections will be accepted. The responsible official is not accepting hand-delivered comments at this time as there are limited office functions as part of precautions in response to the coronavirus.

Send written objections, including any attachments, to: Objection Reviewing Officer, Boise National Forest, 1249 South Vinnell Way, Suite 200, Boise, Idaho, 83709; or fax to 208-373-4111; or by email to: objections-intermtn-boise@usda.gov, within 45 days following the publication date of this legal notice in the newspaper of record. Email objections must be submitted in a format such as an email message, portable document format (.pdf), plain text (.txt), rich text format (.rtf), and Word (.doc or .docx). It is the responsibility of Objectors to ensure their objection is received in a timely manner (§ 218.9). Objections may also be submitted through a web form on the Lowman WUI Project webpage (link). To submit an objection using the web form, select “Comment/Object on Project” under “Get Connected” on the right panel of the project’s webpage.

Objections received in response to this request will be available for public inspection in the “Public Comment/Objection Reading Room” on the Project webpage. An objection, including attachments, must be filed with the appropriate reviewing officer within 45 days of the publication of the legal notice in the Idaho World. The publication date of this legal notice is the exclusive means for calculating the time to file an objection to this project. The legal notice and project documents are available at the link provided above.

Those wishing to object to this proposed project should not rely upon dates or timeframe information provided by any other source. Additional information about this project may be obtained from Ryan Shannahan, Team Leader, at ryan.shannahan@usda.gov or by phone at 208-259-3361.
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Little Weiser Forest Resilience Project

6/17/2020 Payette NF

Dear Interested Party:

The Forest Service is seeking public comment on a forest management project known as the Little Weiser Forest Resilience Project on the Council Ranger District, Payette National Forest. You are being contacted because you have expressed an interest in projects on the Forest, and/or because you live adjacent to the project area. Please see the How to Comment section of this letter for information on how to provide input into this proposal. Comments will help inform the environmental analysis and decision-making process.

Project Location and Description

The Project area is in Management Area (MA) 3 (Weiser River), is currently identified as approximately 14,150 acres in size and located approximately 15 miles southeast of Council, Idaho in Adams County. The Project is within the boundary of the Council Ranger District on the Payette National Forest, also within the Weiser River drainage, primarily the Upper Little Weiser River HU6 subwatershed and partially within the Anderson Creek HU6 subwatershed.

The project and analysis will be completed under the direction and guidance of the 2003 Payette National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan. The Management Prescription Category (MPC) for the Project area is: 5.2 – Commodity Production Emphasis within Forested Landscapes. The proposed action will be consistent with the Forest Plan standards, guidelines, and management direction, Section 603 of Title VI of the Healthy Forests Restoration Act as amended by the 2014 Farm Bill, and other applicable law, regulation, and policy.

Purpose and Need for Action

Portions of the project area are experiencing high insect activity and/or are at high risk for insect infestation and mortality according to a recent USDA Forest Health and Protection survey. A trail also within the Project area is need of maintenance and improvement.

The purpose of proposed treatments within the project area include:

* Move forest stands toward desired conditions by increasing forest resiliency to insects, and disease, and by promoting the development of large tree forest structures mixed with a mosaic of size classes and seral species composition.
* Reduce the risk of additional tree mortality and subsequent hazard trees to forest visitors.
* Improve the alignment and condition of the Little Weiser trail.

Proposed Action

Proposed treatments would occur on up to 3,000 acres identified within the larger 14,150-acre area and would be designed to move towards desired conditions addressed above. In order to quickly address this emerging insect outbreak and subsequent tree mortality, this project would focus vegetation treatments in those areas with high levels of insect activity and current and anticipated high levels of tree mortality, as well as adjacent stands which are at risk due to high stand density. Treatments are summarized below; more detailed vegetation treatment descriptions as well as project design features are posted on the project webpage (link to the webpage is included in the How to Comment section below).

The following activities are proposed:

* Commercial thinning
* Noncommercial thinning
* Slash treatments (lop and scatter or pile burning)
* Broadcast prescribed burning
* Improvement of Little Weiser Trail at specific trouble locations
* Related transportation actions

These treatments would be designed to promote species adapted to disturbance and desired forest and wildlife habitat conditions in accordance with the Payette Forest Land and Resource Management Plan (LRMP) (2003). Treatments would maximize the retention of old-growth and large trees, as appropriate for the forest type, to the extent that the trees promote stands that are resilient to insects and disease. Additionally, the project will consider the best available scientific information to maintain or restore the ecological integrity, including maintaining or restoring structure, function, composition, and connectivity.

Maintenance burning (burning after initial application of fire) would occur as necessary according to Fire Regime conditions to maintain desired conditions, especially density management, forest structural and species composition diversity. Prescribed burning operations may occur at any time of year when conditions permit, typically spring (April, May, June) and fall (August, September, October). Prescribed fires would be designed to achieve a mosaic of burned and unburned areas resulting in low soil severities and low-moderate vegetation severities in treatment areas.

Road maintenance activities to facilitate commercial harvest may occur on NFS roads within and around the project area. Temporary roads may be constructed for project implementation and would be reclaimed within three years of project completion.

Anticipated Analysis

The Council Ranger District has made a preliminary assessment for the project proposal and has determined it will fall within a category of action that is excluded from documentation in an Environmental Assessment (EA) or Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). Specifically, under the authority of Section 603 of HFRA (16 U.S.C.6591b). An insect and disease project may be categorically excluded under Secretary authority in a project that is designed to reduce the risk or extent of, or increase the resilience to, insect or disease infestation (HFRA, Sections 602(d) and 603(a)). If the analysis process determines that there are no extenuating circumstances that would preclude the use of this categorical exclusion, the project would adhere to the specifications of that authority.

Deciding Official

The Deciding Official is anticipated to be the Payette Forest Supervisor.

How to Comment:

More information including location will be posted to the project webpage. The legal notice regarding the scoping process is anticipated to be published in the Idaho Statesman on June 17, 2020. Copies of the legal notice will be posted to the project web page for reference. Comments will be accepted until July 20, 2020.

To be most helpful, please make your comments as specific as possible. Comments may pertain to the nature and scope of the environmental, social, and economic issues, and possible modifications to the proposed action. Your comments will help the Forest Service refine the proposal, ensure issues are identified and addressed appropriately, and will also assist the agency in making a well-informed decision. Comments received in response to this request will become part of the project record and will be available for public inspection on the “Public Comment/Objection Reading Room” on the Little Weiser Forest Resilience Project web site: (link)

Written, facsimile, hand-delivered, and electronic comments concerning this project will be accepted. Send written comments to Ronda Bishop, Council District Ranger, Payette National Forest, 2092 Highway 95, Council, Idaho 83612. Comments may also be sent via facsimile to 208-253-0109. The office hours for those submitting hand-delivered comments are 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, excluding holidays. Oral comments may also be provided at the Council Ranger District Office during normal business hours via telephone 208-253-0100 or in person. Comments may also be submitted through the Little Weiser Forest Resilience Project webpage at: (link) To submit comments using the web form select “Comment/Object on Project” under “Get Connected” on the right panel of the project’s web page.

Thank you for your interest and participation in the Little Weiser Forest Resilience Project.

Sincerely,
Ronda Bishop
Council District Ranger
Payette National Forest
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Fire Season:

Wildfire season expected to be above-average despite all the rain

By Steve Dent Jun 17, 2020 KIVI

The rain kept coming down this month, and so far, it ranks as the third most precipitation Boise has ever had in June.

So what does that mean for the wildfire season, which forecasters expected to be worse than usual because of a below-average snowpack this year?

“Idaho has had in excess of 300 percent of the average precipitation over the past month,” said Brian Henry, the national fire weather program manager at NIFC. “That’s just amazing, it is slowing down the drying and the curing of the grasses.”

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Letter to Share:

Don’t Be a Fawn Napper!

Every year, fawns are reported by the caring public as being orphaned or abandoned. Sometimes it is a case of death of the doe, leaving the fawn obviously orphaned. Sometimes it is a case of an injured fawn, causing the doe to abandon her baby. But, unfortunately, it is often a case of not being orphaned at all, but rather the mother just being out of sight.

If you come across a lone fawn, DO NOT TOUCH! Keep a distance and call Mystic Farm Wildlife Rescue or your local Idaho Department of Fish and Game officer. An assessment of the situation will be made and proper measures taken if warranted. In the event the fawn truly is orphaned and is deemed a viable candidate for rehabilitation, Mystic Farm Wildlife Rescue is available. By providing shelter, food and medical care, trained Mystic Farm staff can help orphaned and/or injured wildlife until they can be ‘soft released’ back into their natural habitat.

Some facts to know:

* Mother deer will leave their fawn for many hours while they go off to feed nearby. The mother does this so predators will not see a vulnerable fawn when they see her. She can be gone many hours, leaving the camouflaged and scent free fawn motionless, avoiding detection by predators.
* Is it injured? If a fawn is seen lying upright, eyes wide open, but flattened to the ground, do not touch it! This is a fawn’s camouflage position to blend in with its surroundings. When the fawn is picked up, it will allow its body to become limp and dangle in your hands. The legs are not broken! Put the baby down, walk away, and leave the area.
* If a fawn is obviously ill or injured – lying on its side, kicking and crying, bleeding, etc. – gently pick it up and place in a safe, quiet place. A light cloth placed over the eyes will often calm it. Keep the fawn away from pets and other human activity. Touch, odors, and the sound of the human voice will only add to the stress of the situation and may cause additional harm. Keep the fawn free from cold drafts or keep it cool if the weather is warm. Please do not feed the fawn. Call Mystic Farm immediately.
* The fawn is on the road! Mystic Farm receives many calls regarding fawns in the middle of the road. Why are they there? Because the mom is nearby! If the fawn is in danger of being hit by cars, gently pick it up and place it about twenty feet off the side of the road and leave the area.
* Is it too late to return to the mother if the fawn has been handled by humans? Will she then reject it? NO! That is an “Old Wives Tale.” Though we strongly encourage you to not touch the fawn, the mother will not abandon it if you do – she just wants her baby back. She is around human scent all the time. Her maternal instinct is much stronger than her ability to rationalize human scent on her baby.
* What happens to the fawn if a rescue is warranted? After arrival at Mystic Farm, the fawn is evaluated and checked for any injuries, dehydration, etc. Wounds are treated either on the premises or through the services of local veterinarians. The fawn is put on an appropriate diet and feeding schedule. Once the fawns gain strength and can nurse from a bottle on their own, the ‘blind feeding method’ is utilized using “hands off” bottle racks. Human contact is kept to a minimum. The fawns are kept in an isolated area – free from predators and forming their own little “herd.” They are free to browse and live in a large, safe, enclosure. Over the course of the season, the fawns are slowly introduced back into the wild.

Mystic Farm Wildlife Rescue, Inc. is a non-profit 501 (c) 3 organization. We are a licensed facility available to provide rehabilitation and release back into the wild of orphaned and/or injured fawns. None of the caring staff or volunteers at Mystic Farm receive a salary or payment for service. Operating out of love and caring for our precious wildlife, we ask our community to do the same. “Don’t Be A Fawn Napper.” Help us to help the wildlife remain wild!

Mystic Farm Wildlife Rescue, Inc.
710 Sanctuary Hills
Sagle, ID 83860
208 241-7081


*Mystic Farm Wildlife Rescue, Inc. is not open for tours. The animals in our care are kept to a minimum of human contact. Thank you for your understanding and support. If in doubt, call me! 208 241-7081.
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Critter News:

FDA cautions pet owners about infecting their pets in new video

June 16, 2020 Local News 8

Pets might not infect people with coronavirus, but pet owners need to protect cats, dogs and other companion animals, the US Food and Drug Administration cautioned in a new YouTube video.

The video pushes the “aww” button with images of adorable furry kittens, ferrets, puppies and loving owners.

“Though it doesn’t seem like animals can give you the virus, it appears you can give it to them. So if you’re sick, avoid direct contact with your pets. If possible, have someone else care for them until you’re well again,” the FDA says in the video.

continued:

Pet Safety & COVID-19

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MCPAWS animal shelter receives $5,000 COVID-19 relief grant

The Star-News June 18, 2020

MCPAWS Regional Animal Shelter has received a $5,000 Rachael Ray Save Them All COVID-19 Relief Grant from Best Friends Animal Society,

“This grant allows us to continue our lifesaving work by helping us with the day-to-day expenses of running the shelter,” MCPAWS Executive Director Amber Kostoff.

MCPAWS has suffered “major” financial losses since the closure of the MCPAWS Thrift Store and the postponement of major fundraising events, Kostoff said.

The grant will go directly toward the food, veterinary, and care costs, she said.

source:
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Fish and Game gets reports of aggressive deer protecting fawns

The Star-News June 18, 2020

The Idaho Department of Fish and Game has received reports of aggressive deer throughout McCall this summer.

“People have called to report that mule deer have charged towards walkers, or threatened to kick or stomp their dogs,” Regional Wildlife Manager Regan Berkley said.

Mule deer have fawns between late May and early June. During the first 6 weeks of their lives, the fawn’s primary survival mechanism is hiding, Berkley said.

Does will hide their fawns for several hours each day while they forage nearby.

“When humans or dogs unknowingly come too close to a hidden fawn, mule deer moms will often become aggressive,” she said.

While deer are generally docile, they can cause harm when they are defending their young. Adult does weigh over 100 pounds and their sharp hooves can cause plenty of damage.

“Trust me, they can run faster than you can,” Berkley said.

Fish and Game advises the following to avoid conflicts:

• Keep dogs on a leash while walking in town.
• Give deer a wide berth, and never approach a deer on purpose.
• Anyone who finds a hidden fawn should move away quickly.
• Never pick up a deer fawn. Removing a hidden deer fawn can cause the mother to abandon the area.

source:
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Chinook fishing closes on Lower Salmon River

By Kristen Bolden Jun 18, 2020 KIVI

Idaho Fish and Game has closed the Chinook salmon fishing season on the Lower Salmon River. Starting Saturday, June 20, the Little Salmon River will also see the end of fishing hours.

Fish and Game previously closed the Chinook salmon fishing season on the section of the Lower Salmon River from Rice Creek Bridge upstream to the Hammer Creek boat ramp on June 10.

The closure on the Lower Salmon is intended to protect Chinook salmon broodstock returning to hatcheries in the South Fork Salmon and Upper Salmon Rivers, and the harvest objective in the Little Salmon River is expected to be met by the end of fishing hours this weekend.

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State health officials issue fish advisory for Coeur d’Alene Basin due to mercury levels

by CBS2 News Staff Thursday, June 18th 2020 CBS2

State health officials have issued a fish advisory for the Coeur d’Alene Basin after high levels of mercury have been found in some species of fish.

The Idaho Department of Health and Welfare said Thursday that bass, bullhead, northern pike, panfish and kokanne recently showed high levels of mercury caught in the Coeur d’Alene Basin area.

Eating high levels of mercury can cause damage to the brain and nervous system, especially to children and pregnant women, state health officials say.

continued:
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Fish & Game News:

Controlled hunt drawing results available for deer, elk, pronghorn and fall bear and turkey

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Supervisor
Friday, June 19, 2020

Tags must be bought by Aug. 1 or they will be forfeited

Results of the deer, elk, pronghorn, fall black bear and turkey controlled hunt drawings are available online and applicants who provided an email address will receive notification of their draw results. Hunters who drew a controlled hunt must purchase the tag by Aug. 1 or it will be forfeited.

Postcards will be mailed to successful applicants only by July 10, but applicants are responsible to check if they were drawn and purchase their tags. People without an online license system account can get step-by-step instructions on the Controlled Hunt Results web page.

continued:
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F&G Commission approves Chinook season for Upper Salmon River starting June 26

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Supervisor
Tuesday, June 16, 2020

Fishing will be allowed from lower boundary near Clayton upstream to 100 yards of the weir at the Sawtooth Hatchery

The Idaho Fish and Game Commission met via conference call and approved a Chinook fishing season to start June 26 on about 38 miles of river from the posted boundary at the South Butte boat ramp near Clayton, upstream to the posted boundary about 100 yards downstream of the weir and trap at Sawtooth Fish Hatchery. About 300-350 adult Chinook are expected to be available for harvest as well as “Jack” salmon, which are salmon less than 24 inches and don’t need to be recorded on the permit.

Fishing for Chinook Salmon in the Upper Salmon River will be open three days per week; Friday, Saturday, and Sunday from 5:30 a.m. to 10 p.m. MDT. Fishing will close Aug. 9, or by Closure Order signed by the Director of the Idaho Department of Fish and Game.

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More F&G News Releases

link:
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Crazy Critter Stuff:

A bear attacks a woman. She fights it off — with her laptop

June 18, 2020 Local News 8

A Southern California teen had a rude awakening when an outdoor nap turned into a bear attack.

She survived by fighting the bear off with her only weapon — a laptop.

The 19-year old Sierra Madre woman fell asleep in backyard chair Monday evening, Fish and Wildlife Capt. Patrick Foy told CNN.

“She awoke to the sound of a bear approaching her,” Foy said. “It immediately attacked.”

continued:
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Seasonal Humor:

BearSmokeyBury-a

CovidMurderHornets-a
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Idaho History June 21, 2020

Idaho 1918-1920 Influenza Pandemic

Part 10

Idaho Newspaper clippings November 1 – 4, 1918

1918Atlantic24-a
A nurse takes the pulse of a patient in the influenza ward of the Walter Reed hospital in Washington, D.C., in November of 1918. Library of Congress via AP

source: Alan Taylor April 10, 2018 “30 Photos of the 1918 Flu Pandemic” The Atlantic
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The Rathdrum Tribune., November 01, 1918, Page 1

From Over The County

Spirit Lake

Dr. McCormick reports 10 cases of influenza, some of them developing into pneumonia. One is critical.

Coeur D’Alene

The first death in Coeur d’Alene resulting from the influenza epidemic was that of Frances Lucile Jessick, age 8 months, Oct. 29. On that date 59 cases were reported in Coeur d’Alene.

Dr. Drennan, county health officer is confined to his home with influenza.

source: The Rathdrum Tribune. (Rathdrum, Idaho), 01 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Rathdrum Tribune., November 01, 1918, Page 2

Health authorities of Des Moines are quoted in the Christian Science Monitor as directing attention to the value of common sense and a calm attitude of mind in conquering fear of infection during the present influenza epidemic. Know the truth about disease and the laws of health and be calm and cheerful of mind. These suggestions are worth passing on.

source: The Rathdrum Tribune. (Rathdrum, Idaho), 01 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Rathdrum Tribune., November 01, 1918, Page 5

Personal Mention.

E. W. Cady and family received word this week that Mr. Cady’s nephew, James Blair of the army spruce division, has died at Vancouver Barracks of influenza pneumonia. The young man’s home was in Montana. He visited in Rathdrum last summer while on furlough.
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Local Paragraphs.

On Wednesday Dr. Wenz, local health officer, reported 29 cases of influenza in Rathdrum and vicinity.

A report circulated here the first of the week that Forrest Metcalf of East Greenacres had succumbed to influenza at a naval station, is denied in letters received by his parents. He is recovering.
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Red Cross Shop Closed.

The chairman of the Rathdrum Branch authorizes the announcement that the Red Cross Shop has been closed until the influenza epidemic is over. However, donated articles will continue to be received and take care of. Red Cross Shop sales last Saturday amounted to $16.55.

source: The Rathdrum Tribune. (Rathdrum, Idaho), 01 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Republican. November 01, 1918, Page 2

Notice
Beware of Influenza, Resolutions

At a special meeting of the Board of Health of Bingham county, Idaho, held at the court house of said county, October 29, 1918, at 9:30 a.m., present F. T. Halverson, Chairman, W. C. Sollenberger, W. M. Christensen and Dr. C. A. Hoover, Secretary, after full investigation the following resolutions were passed:

Resolved, that owning to the spread of the influenza, and desiring if possible to prevent same, every person upon the public highway or in public places, like stores, etc, shall wear a protective mask, said mask to be not less than three or four layers of fine cheesecloth, or more layers of coarse gauze, where the coarsest is used, not less than ten layers.

Resolved, that all people are prohibited from remaining in any place of business longer than necessary to transact their legitimate business; no lounging or congregating of any kind shall be allowed at any point or place.

Resolved, that all meetings of whatever nature, either inside or outside are prohibited.

It is further ordered that all places of business, excepting such places as serve regular meals shall close at 6 p.m., all cafes and places where regular meals are furnished shall close at 9 p.m.

All county and local peace officers are instructed to see that these orders are enforced and observed.

All of the above to remain in force and effect until all restrictions as to influenza are removed by the State Board of Health.

The above resolutions are effective on and after November 1, 1918.

Board of Health of Bingham County, Idaho.
By F. T. Halverson, Chairman,
W. C. Sollenberger,
W. M. Christensen,
C. A. Hoover, Secretary.
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19181101TIR1-headlineSterling

School has been closed here indefinitely until the epidemic of the influenza has subsided somewhat.

Mrs. N. Tanner Jr. is very ill, which is reported to be the influenza.

All of the Leach family are confined to their beds with the “flue.” [sic] Claude Parsons, the only well one at the ranch is caring for the entire family.
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19181101TIR2-headlineSpringfield

Several families are reported ill with influenza. Among them are the Leach, Broadhead and Sullivan families. Minnie Leach is reported very sick.

Robert Wiley did not leave for Boise with his mother, but is staying here until the schools reopen. He has just recovered from an attack of the influenza.
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19181101TIR3-headlineMoreland

Miss Florence Wheeler who has been in Denver, Colo. since last spring on a mission for the L. D. S. church as returned to her home, where she will remain until the Spanish influenza epidemic has past. [sic]

Chester Grimmett has been sick with the Spanish influenza, but is now slowly recovering.

Everything is exceptionally quiet here. Everybody is staying close at home for fear of getting the Spanish influenza. But there are not so very many cases in this town now.

Medora Grimmett has gone to Blackfoot to take care of her sister’s family, who are all ill.
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19181101TIR4-headlineGrandview

Andrew Nelson of Sterling, was in Grandview Monday. He states they were quite uneasy about their two daughters as they were both ill with Spanish influenza. Adeline is in Provo, where she has been attending school and Hazel, the nurse, is stationed at Fort Riley, Kansas. She wrote that there 1000 cases in the hospital, so many they could not be given proper care. One train leaving there carried 60 dead soldiers and 6 nurses.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 01 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Republican. November 01, 1918, Page 5

19181101TIR5-headlineLocal News

Marvin Luton is about to be around again after a short illness.

Roy Bell is reported as having the influenza.

Mrs. Mae Sprague, who has been ill for several days is much improved.

Mrs. George Thompson has been very ill for several days but is now much improved.

C. Weaver, third trick operator at the O. S. L. depot, is suffering an attack of influenza.

Miss Laura Whittick, of the Brown-Hart company, was on the sick list the first of the week.

Miss Via Barton, who is in Pocatello, and very ill with the influenza, is now convalescent.

Ben Lyons has been seriously ill for the past few days. At last reports he was somewhat improved.

Carles Clark, who has been ill with influenza for the past few weeks is able to be out again.

James Martin, manager of the C. W. & M. Co., who has been very ill for the past several days, is now much improved.
— —

Glenn Bailey Passes Away

Glenn Bailey, son of George Bailey died at their home in Groveland Thursday morning at 2 o’clock, following an attack of influenza. Arrangements for funeral services have not been made.

His mother proceeded him only a few days ago, and he has another brother, who is seriously ill with the same disease.
— —

The R. B. Ferris sale advertised for Tuesday, Oct. 29 was called off in order to be in harmony with the Board of Health, prohibiting public gatherings of any nature. Another date will be set and the sale readvertised at some future time.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 01 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Oakley Herald. November 01, 1918, Page 1

19181101TOH1-headlineIdaho Budget

The Idaho Falls school board on October 15, decided to close all departments of the school until the quarantine for Spanish influenza has been raised. Several mild cases of the epidemic have developed in the vicinity, two of them being transients. The country schools have not been closed.

Methodists held their church services on the lawn on the east side of the church at Boise last Sunday. A piano was moved on to the main entrance and the program was given over largely to singing. Automobiles were drawn up to the curb and were used for church seats.

Prof. Solen W. Cunningham, formerly head of the department of agriculture and director of athletics at the Albion state normal school, died Wednesday, October 9, of bronchial pneumonia, caused by Spanish influenza.

source: The Oakley Herald. (Oakley, Idaho), 01 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Oakley Herald. November 01, 1918, Page 7

The last number of the Inland Empire reports that Idahome is still without a single case of Spanish influenza.

source: The Oakley Herald. (Oakley, Idaho), 01 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Oakley Herald. November 01, 1918, Page 8

George Fairchild Dead

George Harvey Fairchild died Sunday night of pneumonia, superseded by Spanish influenza. He as the son of Mrs. August Fairchild. He was born in Oakely, Idaho, June 21, 1885.. He leaves a wife and two children and many relatives to mourn his loss.
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19181101TOH2-headlineIn the Gem State

Word has been received at Malad of the death of John Daniels at Camp Fremont, Cal. The young man has been at Camp Fremont for the past two months. His death was caused by pneumonia, superinduced by Spanish influenza.

Teachers temporarily out of employment because of the health board’s order closing schools during the Spanish influenza epidemic will not lose their pay where they have contracts not making other provisions in cases of this kind, Miss Ethel E. Redfield, state superintendent of public instruction, announces.

The authorities of Gooding college are congratulating themselves that no case of influenza has appeared at the institution. Every precaution is going taken to prevent the disease from reaching the college. All teachers who have been residing in the city are now living in the college dormitory, and there is no visiting between the college population and that of the city.

source: The Oakley Herald. (Oakley, Idaho), 01 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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American Falls Press. November 01, 1918, Page 1

19181101AFP1-headlineCity Health Board Acts
Quarantine Established on Influenza Infected Homes.

The city board of health this morning placed under quarantine all homes where there is influenza.

It continued in force its requirements that all convalescents, who are discharged from quarantine, be required to wear masks for a period of seven days.
— —

19181101AFP2-headlineInfluenza Situation Is Somewhat Improved
Peak of Epidemic Probably Not Reached. But Fewer Serious Cases are Reported Than in the Past – Many Entire Families Down.

It is believed the influenza situation is slightly improved, although there are many distressing cases and a few dangerously ill. The entire families of Andrew May, and W. P. Fifield of Rockland are ill. There are six cases at the Frodsham hotel, including Mrs. Will Oliver and children. There are fifteen cases in the Rockland hospital and four more were expected last night, and all are reported as getting along reasonably well.

Pneumonia has developed or is threatening in several cases. John Thorne is very ill and so is Moses Kinnear. Ernest Jones is not doing well, and is threatened with pneumonia. H. C. Boley’s children are ill and the family of one of the Perry’s is reported all down. There are many other cases. Half the families, possibly, have sick on convalescents.

In the Arbon country there are several entire families ill, and single cases in many others. West of town there are no reports.

In American Falls the number of cases is increasing although there are few serious ones. L. L. Evans, Jr., is one of the more serious cases. He was reported better last night. The hospital is full, and four of the five nurses are down. Two of them are recovering rapidly and expect to be up soon. The rooming houses are pretty well filled. There are several at the Baugh and one case is reported from the Remington, a man named Cannon from Salt Lake.

Eight members of the Butter’s family, living hear the hospital, are ill with influenza.

Ross Bolton is also down, and quite sick.

Greater care is being exercised and it is hoped this will result in checking the spread of the disease.

Mrs. Hunter of Pocatello, in charge of volunteer nurses for this part of the state, was here and in Rockland yesterday, and was well satisfied with conditions. The situation, she stated, was as satisfactory and well handled as could be expected. Coming from Pocatello, where there are a thousand cases or more, the conditions here appeared better to her than they do to those afflicted.

Five Deaths Reported.

The following deaths have been reported since Tuesday;

Newell Young, hospital, American Falls.
Joe Klum, hospital, American Falls.
Mrs. Lawrence Roy, Roy.
Mrs. Ingleberg Wanke, American Falls.
Mrs. Alma Wood, American Falls.
— —

Wear masks and stop spread of disease.

source: American Falls Press. (American Falls, Idaho), 01 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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American Falls Press. November 01, 1918, Page 3

19181101AFP3-headlinesNotice To Patrons of The American Falls Schools.

In view of the closing of the schools on account of the Spanish influenza, the Board of Trustees desire to impress upon the patrons the necessity of keeping their children at home as much as possible, so as to lessen the danger as much as possible.

Done by the order of the Board.
R. F. Noth, Chairman.
R. O. Jones, Clerk.
Dated this 18t day of Oct., 1918.

source: American Falls Press. (American Falls, Idaho), 01 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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American Falls Press. November 01, 1918, Page 5

19181101AFP4-headlinePeople and Events

Wear masks and stop spread of disease.

Dr. Noth is improving slowly, but is still very weak.

DeWitt Brown, chief clerk of the local draft board, is down with influenza.

O. R. Baum is getting along nicely and will be out soon, from every indication.

Moses Kinnear, of Rockland, is said to be very ill with influenza, having developed pneumonia.

Mrs. and Mrs. Martin Garn returned from Rockland yesterday, where they have been assisting with the sick.

Ernest Jones, who is down with influenza is reported to be quite sick, and is threatened with pneumonia.

W. L. Newton and son, Walter,m are out again after a severe attack of the influenza.

Mrs. L. H. Dorne is here from Butte, making final proof on her homestead. She reports influenza conditions in Butte very bad.

Henry Reiman was down from Roy Wednesday and reported that the family of Lawrence Roy were down with influenza, Mrs. Roy being very sick.

Mrs. Lawrence Roy, of Roy, died of influenza yesterday. Mr. Roy and the children are ill and have been removed to a hospital.

C. T,. Contant is making satisfactory progress with his influenza, and hopes to be out in time to vote for his choice for prosecuting attorney.

The entire family of Andrew May, of Rockland, are down with influenza. The are reported to be getting along as well as could be expected.

L. L. Evans, Jr., is said to have a severe type of influenza and to be quite a sick man. Mrs. Evans has a lighter form. They are being cared for by Mrs. W. W. Beecksted.
— —

Election Place Changed.

Owing to the influenza epidemic and advisability of having a roomy place for holding the election to avoid crowding, the polling place for American Falls precinct is hereby changed to the Auditorium.

W. S. Sparks, Chairman Board of County Commissioners.
Paul Bulfinch, Clerk.
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19181101AFP5-headlineArbon Valley News.

There is an influenza epidemic here in Arbon. Several families of six and eight to a family, are all down. There have been several calls for physicians but due to the influenza at Rockland, American Falls, Malad and vicinity, the doctors can not come when first called, but Dr. Schlitz of American Falls and Dr. Ray are doing their best for the sufferers, coming out whenever they possibly can. There is an urgent call for doctors here every day.

Mr. Perry Howell came down with the influenza Saturday.

Mrs. Mable Catherine Floyd, wife of E. L. Floyd, of Arbon, died last Thursday at their home here of pneumonia, after an illness of short duration. Remains were taken to Pocatello, where funeral services were held Friday afternoon. Deceased was a lovable woman, wife and mother and is survived by her husband and five small children; also a brother, Harry Hill of this place.

The family of Frank C. Turner have been seriously ill with influenza, all being down at once. Mrs. Arbon and Mrs. Davis are doing what they can for them.

Rennie Evans took the U. S. mail to Pocatello last Friday, as all of Herber Wood’s family were ill with the Spanish Flu.

Dr. Ray, of Malad, came over Sunday morning to the home of Mr. Geo. Bandy. His son, Richard, was seriously ill with pneumonia, but Dr. Ray thinks he has a chance to recover now, although his left lung is badly affected.

Mr. C. D. Porter, Orville Porter and Mrs. C. W. Weidmann are quite ill at the Porter home with influenza. Mrs. Porter, who had been ill in bed with the same thing, had to get up to nurse the others.

Mrs. Melvin Bailey has been quite ill with influenza, but is recovering now.

Mrs. James Payne, who had been ill with influenza, is reported much better. Her husband and little daughter are now ill in bed.

The family of E. H. Davis are all taking turns with the “flu,” two or three being down in bed at a time. Dr. Davis is away on a hunting trip and doesn’t know of the sickness at home.

Mr. Newell Leishermann is slowly recovering from a severe attack of the influenza.

Mr. Cotant of American Falls, brot [sic] two of his thresher crews back Friday, they having recovered from a slight attack of influenza. All of the crew took sick and had to be taken to town for medical aid, the thresher having to lay idle for two weeks. There are several waiting to have their grain threshed as soon as the Cotant machine can resume work.

Messrs. T. B. and L. B. Evans received word of the death of their brother, I. B. Evans, at Preston, Saturday morning of pneumonia. They left Saturday to attend the funeral. I. B. Evans was well known by many of the old timers here. His daughter, Miss Mary Evans, taught at the Pauline school here last term. A sister Mrs. John Noble, resides at Pauline.

The Davis store is closed until the family of E. H. Davis recover from their siege of sickness.

Mr. and Mrs. Gus Brahmstadt are ill with influenza. Also the children of Emmett Lee.

Miss Mae Ripley received a letter from her brother, Ralph, who is in training at the university at Moscow, that there were forty cases of the flu there. He has escaped it so far.

Mr. Litz of American Falls, returned from American Falls Friday night, where he went to recover from the influenza.

Mr. and Mrs. D. Daniels of Pauline, received word Sunday of the death of their son, John, at Camp Fremont, California. His death was due to the Spanish influenza. The young man left here about six weeks ago, on draft call. The body was sent to Malad for burial. About seven weeks ago Mr. and Mrs. Daniels’ only daughter died. The sympathy of their many friends is extended to the bereaved family.

Dr. Hartvigsen, of McCammon, was summoned here last week to attend Mrs. Floyd; also several other people who were afflicted with severe cases of la grippe or Spanish influenza.

source: American Falls Press. (American Falls, Idaho), 01 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Kendrick Gazette. November 01, 1918, Page 1

19181101TKG1-headlineStores Must Close at Six

All stores and other places of business in Idaho must be closed at 6 o’clock each evening under orders of the state board of health. The only exception to the ruling is the prescription department of drug stores and only prescriptions can be handled by the drug stores after 6 o’clock in the evening.

This means the usual Saturday evening trading will be eliminated, that cigar stores, candy and ice cream parlors and all other lines of business must close promptly at 6 o’clock. The order will remain effective until an improvement in the influenza situation warrants the raising of the embargo.
— —

19181101TKG2-headlineTeachers Will Draw Pay

The state of Idaho is out approximately $20,000 per day in maintaining its school system during the Spanish Influenza epidemic, as all teachers will continue to receive their salaries during the closed period where their contracts do not expressly state otherwise. More than 3700 teachers are employed in the state, and the average salary is $100 per month. Other expenses bring the total cost of operating the schools to approximately $400,000 per school month of 20 days.

Much interest has been shown by teachers in the question of whether they were to receive their salaries or not while the schools are closed. The attorney general has rendered a decision making the fact clear that the teachers can draw their salaries.

source: The Kendrick Gazette. (Kendrick, Idaho), 01 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Kendrick Gazette. November 01, 1918, Page 4

The sad news reached here of the death of Mrs. Elmo Dole, formerly Miss Nannie Galloway, at her home in Montana, after a weeks illness of influenza. She is well known here where she lived an attended school several years. She is survived by her husband and daughter Beulah, aged four, her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Galloway, two sisters, two brothers and a large umber of relatives and friends.

Dr. Faust of Deary was called to the Rufus May home Tuesday, owning to the serious illness of Mrs. May and six children.

source: The Kendrick Gazette. (Kendrick, Idaho), 01 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Kendrick Gazette. November 01, 1918, Page 6

19181101TKG3-headlineGleanings

Mayor Peterson has been directed by the state sanitary inspector to prohibit the dry sweeping of streets and sidewalks at any time. This order has been issued to prevent in a measure the spread of influenza. Streets and sidewalks shall be swept only between the hours of 9 p.m. and 6 a.m., and then only after being well sprinkled with water.

source: The Kendrick Gazette. (Kendrick, Idaho), 01 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Recorder. November 01, 1918, Page 1

19181101IR1-headline
Death Stalks in Wake of “Flu”

F. S. Wright, county health man, reports a total of 76 cases of so-called Spanish influenza in the county to date. … [First column of story tucked into a fold and not legible.]

Horace Pope is seriously sick at the family home in Salmon. The prevailing malady attacked him last Sunday and he passed to the pneumonia stage of the disease on Monday. He was reported to be improving Wednesday noon.

Roy Snodgrass, 18-year old native son of Lemhi county, died of flu in Montana Tuesday.

Christ Grieber, 24 years of age, died last Friday, October 25, at Butte, where he was with his other. A telegram was received in Salmon Friday night bringing the news. He was a victim of the prevailing malady.

James Bruener, a strong man who had been employed as a laborer, died Sunday night or early Monday morning at his home in Salmon. He had been around the day before, on Saturday, though suffering from influenza. Monday morning Jack Gaver called at the house and found Mrs. Bruener sitting in a chair in a cold room. She too was ill and helpless. She did not now her husband had passed away but reported he was probably asleep.

Later one of the young sons of Mr. Gaver was directed to start a fire for the family when he found the head of the house had expired. A physician reported soon afterward that the man had been dead perhaps for hours, for the lifeless body was cold. Lynn Fowler, in the absence of the undertaker, was called upon to prepare the body for burial. Mrs. Bruener died the dame day in the house where her husband still lay.

Miss Gladys Webb was enabled to reach her Carmen home on Monday last from having been quarantined at Butte. She came in on the regular train. …

The wife and child of John Steele are dead at Mackay, according to notice received in Salmon Tuesday morning. Mr. and Mrs. Steele, Sr., were in Salmon Tuesday morning early as soon as they were apprised of the deaths to arrange to go to the stricken home. This was difficult to understate with the Salmon river road blocked.

Sheriff Emerson C. Frazier has been a very sick man this week, another victim of flu. He was considered much improved Wednesday morning but had passed through a long period of high fever the day before.

Walter Riggle, a lineman in the employ of the telephone company was one of the first to be attacked in Salmon. Two of his sisters, Mrs. Bruener and Mrs. Patterson, were among the stricken sufferers, the former at her Salmon home a few hours after the death of her husband and the latter a few days before at her Montana home.

Harry Holden and George Keyes, two well known members of the bar, the one at Idaho Falls and the other at Challis, but both practicing at Salmon, died last week from influenza. One of the Salmon attorneys, Senator Whitcomb, received a letter from Mr. Holden which he wrote the day before his death. Both passed away at a Pocatello hospital.

Illness came very nearly putting out of business the Salmon news store, with Ray Kinsey, Mrs. Kinsey and the latter’s son Robert all kept at home this week. Mrs. E. W. Whitcomb promptly volunteered to look after the store upon being apprised of the affliction that had come to the Kinseys and she took her place, mask on, behind the counter to wait upon the patrons, saying she was new to the business but willing to learn and showing her great good heartedness at the same time.

Dr. J. M. Ashley has been away from his office most of the week with an attack of influenza.

The entire families of Eldridge and Doebler were abed for more [than] a week from early attacks. Three of the W. B. Fowler family are afflicted with Mr. Fowler left to care for the others. Mrs. Emigh is with the Eldridge family and Mrs. Rae with the Doeblers.

A telegram received in Salmon Saturday morning told of the sudden death of Victor Bell at Moline, Ill. He and Seth Ball had gone out with a sheep train a few days before for the Chicago market. The family of Mr. Bell had left Salmon for a visit to their old home at Roberts where Mrs. Bell had been ill. Numerous other relatives there have been critically ill also, all victims of the dread disease.

Johnny Hunt, another well known stock man of the same locality where Mr. Bell came from when he moved to Lemhi county, was on the train with Mr. Bell but was not taken ill until he reached home. He had contracted the disease, however, but being seized upon arrival home has since died.

O. D. Bell and wife, father and mother of Victor Bell were spending their retiring years with their son-in-law, John Burggraf, at the sheep headquarters. His son-in-law received the wire advising him of the death at Moline and asking that he take the parents to Roberts. Accordingly Mr. Burggraf set out at once, being met at the divide by another car.

Mrs. Burns was called from Leadore on Monday to lend help in the Salmon office of the telephone company where the staff of operators had been crippled by the appearance of the epidemic. New help was called in, so that the answers received from central were frequently from unfamiliar voices. Four operators and the messenger were all off duty this week from time to time.

The Shenon dining room was closed during the entire week because of the sickness of Mrs. Taylor and those assisting her.
— —

19181101TKG5-headlineJudge Padgham on Long Visit to Outside Counties

Judge Padgham is making an extended and perhaps partly enforced visit to the outside. The judge went forth two weeks ago to see some of his old time friends in the counties comprising the sixth judicial district. He found himself in the second week after being away in the midst of the epidemic, when some practical joker solemnly told the jurist that he was quarantined. Judge Padgham is a stickler for obeying law, and not wanting to break his life-long ideas on that subject he just staid [sic] where he was, in the towns within one county of the district, which the joker found had been given a more thorough canvass by him than in all its history. Everywhere he went he met and made friends. Then the joker told him he might go his way so the judge journeyed forth to come home by way of the Pashimaroi, being expected in Salmon this week. The nearest place on earth to this fine old gentleman is his home in Salmon. It is pleasing to know that after his election he will not be enticed to give up his home residence here, even though his duties will compel his absence for much of his time.
— —

Hanmer Hospital Notes

There are no flu cases at the Hanmer hospital.
— —

Red Cross Notes

The Red Cross is asking masks to be worn as a precaution during the influenza epidemic. Samples may be had at the Red Cross rooms and the masks made at home by those who are willing to help in this work. Boil the masks before using and change occasionally.

Nursing survey committees have been appointed to take census of all nurses in Lemhi county. The Salmon committee: Mrs. Whitcomb, Mrs. J. H. Wright and Mrs. R. M. Murdoch. Those comprising the committee in the Pahsimaroi: Mrs. Cora McJilton and Mrs. Harry Bates, while in Gilmore and Leadore committees have not been reported.
— —

19181101IR2-headlineSalmon Merchant is Latest Victim

Arthur E. Everett, Salmon merchant, died last night, another victim of the scourge. He had been ill for less than a week, with a favorable turn in condition three days after the attack but a fatal relapse came on Tuesday night when his lungs were involved beyond the power of remedy. He passed away at 9:40 o’clock. The announcement of the death came as a shock to the city.

Mr. Everett was one of Salmon’s best known business men, a familiar figure in the activities of the community and a genial, popular gentleman in all the relations of life. He is survived by Mrs. Everett, who was before her marriage Miss Winnie White, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Harry White of this city. Mr. Everett was in the prime of vigorous manhood in his 48th year. …
— —

Dr. J. M. Ashley, who has been seriously ill, is reported better today!

source: The Idaho Recorder. (Salmon City, Idaho), 01 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Idaho Recorder. November 01, 1918, Page 5

19181101IR3-headlineSalmon Locals

The Cannon-McKinney sheep case was called for trial Wednesday at 10 o’clock, and was postponed till the quarantine is raised.

Mr. and Mrs. John Steele, their son John and the latter’s son, a child of four years, are in Salmon this morning, having just arrived from Mackay, after they had buried Mrs. Steele Jr., and child. Reports from Mackay are to the effect that influenza there has appeared in most virulent form, with many deaths resulting on all sides. The father and son who are bereft of the head of their home themselves passed through safely after the disease held them for two weeks.

Mrs. Ethel White Brown, wife of John Brown, returned to Salmon from Portland on Wednesday. The only other passenger on the train in from Armstead was Mrs. Charles Webb who came from Butte where she had been in quarantine. The ladies told of their lonesome trip, saying that at Leadore permission was refused them to alight from the train even to get a luncheon. They had been informed of conditions but were not prepared for their reception at Leadore, where a deputy sheriff firmly but politely waved them to stay where they were aboard the car. And so they came on to Salmon where relatives awaited them.

source: The Idaho Recorder. (Salmon City, Idaho), 01 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Recorder. November 01, 1918, Page 6

No Influenza Cases in Three Army Camps

Washington, Oct. 26, — Three army camps did not report a single new case of influenza yesterday and only two, Kearney, Cal., and Lewis, Wash., reported more than 100 cases.

The total of new cases for all camps, a statement from the office of the surgeon general said, was 2,375, as against 2,772 the day before. Pneumonia cases decreased from 699 to 500, and deaths from 307 to 241.
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19181101IR4-headlineWorld News in Condensed Form

Seventy thousand miners of the central Pennsylvania bituminous coals fields have voted to work Sundays to overcome the falling off in production due to the Spanish influenza epidemic. Fuel Administrator Garfield announces.

Sick and wounded soldiers landed in the United States from the American expeditionary forces during the week ended October 18, numbered 637, the war department announces.

Dr. John Dill Robertson, health commissioner of Chicago, is going to vaccinate everybody in Chicago against pneumonia following influenza. Those who had had influenza are excepted.

source: The Idaho Recorder. (Salmon City, Idaho), 01 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Recorder. November 01, 1918, Page 9

19181101IR5-headlineNorthwest Notes

Fewer than 3 1/2 per cent of the persons stricken with influenza in Salt Lake have met death from pneumonia following, it is indicated in the reports to the city health department since the disease became prevalent.

Three men held in the county jail at Fort Benton, Mont., made their escape by sawing the bars from the windows. The prisoners evidently took advantage of a time when the whole sheriff’s force were laid up with the Spanish influenza.

Clarence Tooley, prominent banker and realty man of Harlowton, Mont., former member of the house of representatives and the state senate from Meagher county, and Republican candidate for the state seat from Wheatland county at the coming election, died last week from influenza.

Reno is now churchless, cabaretless and saloonless, all places have been closed by the city and county boards of health, due to the influenza. Lawyers are fearful that an order will be made closing the courts, which would make this state divorceless, a calamity which to the legal fraternity would be appalling.

While in the delirium of pneumonia in its last stages, Malcom McLea, 24 years old, attempted to escape from the third floor of a hospital at Butte and succeeded in making the ground by way of the fire escape, but was caught by one of the nurses, who, after a tussle, took him again into the building. He died the next day.

source: The Idaho Recorder. (Salmon City, Idaho), 01 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Recorder. November 01, 1918, Page 10

19181101IR6-headlineLemhi

Abe Bergerson, one more of our soldier boys died at Omaha, Nebrasks, October 26 of Spanish influenza followed by bronchial pneumonia. The young patriot joined the colors August 8, and has been at Camp Fremont until his entrainment for overseas in October. He was taken ill on the train, left at the Methodist hospital at Omaha on the 25 of October and died the next day. Abe Bergeron was 24 years of age. Born near Butte, Mont., and came to Lemhi, Idaho five years ago and had made his home here since that time. He leaves a brother, Charles Bergeron, now at Camp Merritt, N. J., in a hospital, and a sister, Mrs. Pheobe Mahoney at Lemhi, Idaho. The brother Charles has been in training since April last. Abe was a fine young man and well thought of by all who knew him.

Rena Holbrook, the daughter of Charles Holbrook of Hayden basin, has been quite sick at Missoula, Mont., with Spanish influenza.

source: The Idaho Recorder. (Salmon City, Idaho), 01 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Montpelier Examiner. November 01, 1918, Page 1

19181101ME1-headline“Flu” Still Prevails; Two More Deaths

The influenza situation in the city is about the same as it was a week, ago. While there are probably a few more cases than there were at this time last week, most of the victims have it in mild form. The health officers are doing everything possible to prevent its spread and it is believed that by another week the situation will be much improved. However, this depends to a large extent upon the people themselves. If they will continue to observe closely the board of health rules, it will materially aid in stamping out the disease. We believe that everybody has come to fully realize that it is a matter that is not to be treated lightly and are gladly submitting to ail rules in an effort to stamp out the disease.

There are a few cases in the county outside of Montpelier but all victims were yesterday reported as getting along nicely.

So far we believe that there have boon only three deaths from the disease – Mrs. John A. Bagley, Ezra Vere Phelps and Fred A. Gurnig.

Vere Phelps, as he was familiarly known. died at 6 o’clock last Monday morning. He was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Ezra J. Phelps, and was 24 years of age. A week ago last Sunday he west to Salt Lake to take the examination for promotion from fireman to engineer on the Short Line. He passed a successful examination and last Thursday he returned from Salt Lake to Pocatello. At that time he felt ill and came on to Montpelier Thursday night on No. 4. He was given the best of care and his condition was not considered serious until last Saturday night, when pneumonia took such a strong hold on him that his system could not combat it and the end came Monday morning. Open air funeral services were held at the cemetery that afternoon. Besides his parents, he is survived by his wife, two small children, one sister and four brothers. one now being in service in France.

The third victim of the influenza was Fred A., the son of Mrs. Fred Grunig, who died Tuesday morning from pneumonia following the influenza. The deceased was 18 years of age and for the past six years he had been partly paralyzed, this condition resulting from injuries received when the tines of a pitchfork penetrated his back. Funeral services were held at the cemetery late Tuesday afternoon.
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Club Girls Have Made Excellent Records

The end of the season has come for the girls’ canning clubs, and their final reports and stories of their summer’s work are now being sent in. These are the government reports, and are the more important part of the summer’s work. On account of the influenza quarantine, no meetings have been held for several weeks. With reports in from only four out of the ten clubs in the county, the amount of canning bids fair to far exceed the estimates which had been made. The amounts from the four clubs which have reported aggregate about 5,500 quarts of fruit, vegetables, pickles, jelly and jam.

As soon as the quarantine permits, and schools are in session again the winter clubs for both boys and girls will be organized. One of the principal fall projects is to be a large calf club. This work will be carried on in connection with the Farm Bureau cattle project for the adults, and it is expected that many boys will take advantage of this most interesting club. Other phases of the winter work will be cooking and sewing for the girls and handicraft for the boys.

source: Montpelier Examiner. (Montpelier, Idaho), 01 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Montpelier Examiner. November 01, 1918, Page 4

Order Modifying Refilling of Narcotic Prescriptions

To collectors and internal revenue and others concerned: Owing to the extent of the epidemic of Spanish influenza now prevailing in this country and consequent difficulty of persons in getting immediate medical attention and medicaments upon prescriptions issued by physicians, the provisions of narcotic prescription are modified as follows:

Prescriptions calling for morphine, codeine, or heroin, which are written by registered practitioners for patients suffering from Spanish influenza and any pulmonary or bronchial affections may, until further notice, be refilled, provided that at the time of issuance by physicians instructions are noted in the body of such prescriptions, “Repeat if necessary,” and the druggist filling and refilling the same shall note thereon each and every date upon which such prescription is refilled.

Daniel C. Roper, Commissioner of Internal Revenue.
Approved: October 22, 1918.

source: Montpelier Examiner. (Montpelier, Idaho), 01 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Montpelier Examiner. November 01, 1918, Page 5

19181101ME4-headlineLocal News

The local Red Cross chapter has cleared about $50 the past week, making gauze masks.

John Bagley and Miss Perniz Bagley were released from quarantine Wednesday morning. They and the children are now at the home of Mr. Bagley’s father, and all are getting along nicely.

Judge Budge writes us that his son, Alfred, who is in the medical corps and a student in the medical department of the Columbia university in New York, was stricken about a month ago with influenza, followed by pneumonia and then followed by an abscess in the region of the ear, which may necessitate an operation.

The “flu” victims at the city hall and Montpelier hospital, who are now on the road to recovery, would appreciate anything in the way of dainty eatables that people might care to take them. Good home made bread and jelly would no doubt taste mighty fine to them.
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City Hall Served as Maternity Hospital

The city hall has been useful in more ways than one during the past year. In addition to becoming an emergency hospital for influenza patients during the past week, it has served as a maternity hospital. Last Friday Mrs. Leland Bolles, who was ill with the disease, was taken to the city hall and on Saturday night she gave birth to a nine pound son. For about 48 hours her condition was serious, but she has passed the critical state and she and the babe are doing nicely under the care of a competent nurse. Mr. Bolles left her last August for Camp Fremont and is now at some point in the east awaiting orders to sail for France.

source: Montpelier Examiner. (Montpelier, Idaho), 01 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Montpelier Examiner. November 01, 1918, Page 7

19181101ME5ad

source: Montpelier Examiner. (Montpelier, Idaho), 01 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Montpelier Examiner. November 01, 1918, Page 8

Bodies of Two Soldier Boys Brought Home For Burial.

The body of Ira L. Hymas, who died from influenza at Camp Fremont on Oct. 23, arrived here last Monday morning. A large number of relatives and friends were present from Liberty to meet the body and escort it to the Liberty cemetery, where open air funeral services were held. A number of friends from Montpelier, including a firing squad, also accompanied the body to its final resting place.

Ira Hymas as the son of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Hymas of Liberty, and was 22 years of age. On the 5th of last August he answered his country’s call and in company with some 30 other young men, left for Camp Fremont, where he entered actively into the military duties. He was enjoying good health up to the time he was stricken with the influenza. Besides other relatives, he is survived by his parents, four brothers and one sister. One brother, Milton, is now in the service in France, and other brother, Wm. R., is serving on a mission in Montana.

The body of Archie Jensen, who died from influenza at Pueblo, on Oct. 23, while en route with his comrades from Camp Fremont to some embarkation point in the east, did not arrive here until Wednesday morning of this week. Delay in shipment of the body was due to the fact that he died at a hospital instead of at a cantonment, and it required several days to secure the necessary permit from the government to ship the body.

Relatives and friends from Ovid met the body and accompanied by the firing squad and friends from Montpelier, it was conveyed to the Ovid cemetery where services where held.

Archie was the same age as his comrade, Ira Hymas, and they had chummed together almost constantly while at Cap Fremont. He was in good health when the order came for his company to entrain for the east and it was with deep regrets that he was compelled to leave his comrade and friend behind. Little did the boys dream that their parting at Cap Fremont would be their final one. Shortly after the train left Salt Lake he was stricken with the dread disease, and was taken there from at Pueblo, the first town where hospital accommodation could be secured for him.

He was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Lars P. Jensen of Ovid. Six brothers ad four sisters, mourn with their parents the untimely death of the one who had been called to serve his country in the great world war.

source: Montpelier Examiner. (Montpelier, Idaho), 01 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Meridian Times., November 01, 1918, Page 2

19181101TMT1-headlineNews of a Week in Condensed Form
Record of the Important Events Told in Briefest Manner Possible.
Happenings That Are Making History – Information Gathered from All Quarters of the Glove and Given in a Few lines.

Intermountain.

J. W. and W. A. Alexander, brothers, who had left Duchesne, Utah, for the railroad with a shipment of cattle, were found dead in a tent after some of the stock had wandered into a nearby town. Both had died from influenza.

Glad to put up with the discomforts of a quarantine to be hear their boys who lie ill with influenza and pneumonia in the base hospital at Camp Lewis, Wash., nearly 100 women are quartered in the Y. W. C. A. hostess house and the Salvation Army rooms.

Domestic.

Three army camps did not report a single new case of influenza on Saturday and only two, Kearny, Cal., and Lewis, Wash., reported more than 100 cases.

Spanish influenza as an epidemic is subsiding rapidly in the military camps of the country, but among the civilian population generally the peak has not yet been reached.

Washington.

Continued improvement in the influenza situation in army camps and in a number of states is shown by reports received by the surgeon general of the army and the public health service.

Foreign.

Prince Maximillan of Baden, the German chancellor, has been stricken by influenza, Berlin advices [sic] state. In some quarters the question is raised whether it is the diplomatic brand of influenza that usually precedes the retirement of statesmen.
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19181101TMT2-headlineIn The Gem State

Word has been received at Malad of the death of John Daniels at Camp Fremont, Cal. The young man has been at Camp Fremont for the past two months. His death was cause by pneumonia, superinduced by Spanish influenza.

Teachers temporarily out of employment because of the health board’s order closing schools during the Spanish influenza epidemic will not lose their pay where they have contracts not making other provisions in cases of this kind, Miss Ethel E. Redfield, state superintendent of public instruction, announces.

The authorities of Gooding college are congratulating themselves that no cause of influenza has appeared at the institution. Every precaution is being taken to prevent the disease from reaching the college.. All teachers who have been residing in the city are now living in the college dormitory, and there is no visiting between the college population and that of the city.

source: The Meridian Times. (Meridian, Idaho), 01 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Meridian Times., November 01, 1918, Page 1

19181101TMT3ad

source: The Meridian Times. (Meridian, Idaho), 01 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Meridian Times., November 01, 1918, Page 4

Dwight M. Gruber Writes About Fort Worden.

Mrs. John Gruber, residing near Meridian, has received a letter from her son, Dwight, now of the 40th Co. C. A. P. S., Fort Worden, Wash. in which he says: [excerpts]

“We are quarantined in our barracks for two weeks as usual and also the whole post is quarantined.

“Out of our brave and gallant company of 100 there were only about 40 out for retreat to-night. The rest are in the hospital with colds and grippe. Fred Gracey went yesterday, but there is nothing to be afraid of as there are only a few cases of the real “flu.” They spray our throats every night to prevent sore throat etc.

“Will close, hoping to hear from all soon. Affectionately, Dwight.”

Note — Fred Gracey mentioned in the above letter died this week of influenza. He was a Boise boy, and was a very warm friend of Dwight Gruber. — (Ed.)

source: The Meridian Times. (Meridian, Idaho), 01 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Meridian Times., November 01, 1918, Page 14

19181101TMT4-headlineMeridian News Notes

Jack Ellis who had a slight attack of Spanish influenza, is improving.

Mrs. M. W. Kellar, who came here recently from California, is quarantined with small pox.

J. M. Jackson who has been ill with the grippe for the last few days is improving.

Mrs. Guy Humphrey and five children who have been in quarantine with the Spanish influenza, are improving.

O. Singrey is now in charge of the Meridian water works pumping plant in the place of Guy Humphrey, whose family is in quarantine with the Spanish flu.

We were just wondering if this epidemic and seclusion continues until after election, and nobody comes or goes, what will the editor do for items to put in the paper.

Reports made by the physicians before going to press indicate that the Spanish influenza in the vicinity around Meridian is not on the wane but increasing. While in Meridian up to the present time, there have been but six cases of influenza, a rigid quarantine is being kept by those suffering with colds or lagrippe.

The Meridian teachers were called upon Thursday to donate their services for the day in work for the Council of Defense. A house to house canvas was made to get donations to aid the girls who wish to become Red Cross nurses, but not affording the tuition for the training. A canvas was also made of the number of trained nurses in the town, and also each family who has a soldier in the service.
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19181101TMT4ad

source: The Meridian Times. (Meridian, Idaho), 01 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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1918Atlantic27-a
An American soldier has his throat sprayed to prevent influenza in December of 1918 at Love Field in Dallas, Texas. Everett Historical / Shutterstock

source: Alan Taylor April 10, 2018 “30 Photos of the 1918 Flu Pandemic” The Atlantic
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The Idaho Republican. November 01, 1918, Page 1

Seeger-Bundlie’s Influenza Message

We are in accord with the order of the State Board of Health. We believe in prevention wherever possible, and we think that wearing a mask helps to prevent getting the disease.

The salespeople in our store all wear masks. We are selling masks to people at cost and doing what we can to help break up the epidemic. We believe in taking every reasonable precaution.

But we do other things to promote public health. We always sweep our floors with a preparation that absorbs the dust instead of stirring it up. We wipe our floors with a preparation of oil that keep them in the most sanitary conditions possible. These methods prevent the accumulation of dust and link on our good, shelves and counters, and when people come into our store they are protected to the utmost. Our store is new, clean, modern and sanitary. If you have been dealing with us you are aware of this; if you have not been in, this is a good time to come.

Seeger-Bundlie Company “Everybody’s Store” Broadway – Blackfoot
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Health Board Makes Rules Regarding Influenza.

The seriousness of the influenza epidemic caused the local Board of Health to hold a meeting at the Court House Tuesday morning, and they adopted the following rules, which will be enforced Friday, November 1st:

Everyone appearing on the public highway or in public places must wear gauze masks.

All business places, including Cigar Stores and Drug Stores will close promptly at six o’clock.

All restaurants, cafes, and eating places must close at nine o’clock.

This will remain in effect until the Influenza epidemic is completely under control.
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Influenza Situation in the County

The influenza situation is very prevalent in all places, and in all parts of Bingham county.

At present the reports show that the disease is on the increase. Since the epidemic started in this county, the reports show there were 105 cases the first week, 115 the second week, 179 cases the third week, and up to date there are 100 cases of influenza under the care of a physician. The last report was taken at noon Thursday and by evening there may be more cases reported to the Board of health.

The gauze mask is considered the only real protection and if everyone would wear a mask the disease would soon be checked.

Beginning November 1 everyone appearing on the public highways must wear a gauze mask.
— —

Influenza Precautions Taken Elsewhere

Passengers getting off the trains at Gooding are required to register, stating where they came from and the status of the influenza in the towns visited.

Boise and other cities throut [sic] the state are taking the precaution to quarantine people who are ill with same disease.
— —

Cleansing The Masks

Physicians advise people that the best way to cleanse and sterilize the flu masks is to boil them five or ten minutes every evening, then dry and use again next day.

If you take the flu, go to bed at once. Delay is dangerous. Lie still, keep covered up, eat and drink sufficient and provide plenty of fresh air. Don’t get out too soon.
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Funeral Services for Minnie Leach

Funeral services for Miss Minnie Leach, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. R. Leach of Springfield, were held Wednesday afternoon. Interment was made at Springfield.

Miss Leach succumbed to pneumonia following an attack of influenza.
— —

Blackfoot Woman Dies in Los Angeles

Mrs. Octa Cambell, a former resident of North Shilling avenue, went to Los Angeles recently with her children and died of influenza on the 25th of October. She was cared for in a hospital by the associated charities, and all of the five children were afflicted at last reports. …
— —

Death of Mrs. Parley Fackrell

Mrs. Parley Fackrell, age 40 years, died at their home Tuesday morning at 3:30 o’clock, following an attack of influenza-pneumonia. … Deceased is survived by her husband and 7 children, all of whom are living in this community. …
— —

Two Brothers Victims of Influenza

Virgil, the eighteen-year-old son, and Lorin, the twelve-year-old son, of Mr. and Mrs. S. B. Talbot, of Groveland, were both victims of influenza-pneumonia.

Virgil passed away Wednesday morning at 3 o’clock, and Lorin passed away at 12:30 Tuesday afternoon. …
— —

Victim of Influenza

Miss Margaret Bischoff, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Bischoff of Blackfoot, died at her home Monday morning, after suffering an attack of influenza and pneumonia. …

Deceased is survived by her parents, two sisters and five brothers.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 01 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Shoshone Journal. November 01, 1918, Page 1

Influenza Serums.

Every one hopes that some serum or other preparation may be discovered which will prevent or alleviate the dangers of the influenza. The Journal of American Medical association is the highest authority in existence on such matters and the following report on the subject of vaccines or serums, in the issue of Oct. 19, 1918, will be of interest to our readers:

Vaccines in Influenza.

With the appearance of the epidemic of influenza, reports began to appear, chiefly in newspapers, as to new serums, vaccines, drugs and other methods for checking and even for curing the disease.

A few samples of such as have come to the Journal appear in our Tonics and Sedatives department this week. In Massachusetts Commissioner E. R. Kelly appointed two committees to investigate the value of influenza vaccines as a preventive agent and as a treatment of the disease. The first committee, a special board for scientific investigation, consisting of Dr. M. J. Rosenau, chairman, and Frederick P. Gay and George W. McCoy, was appointed to consider the evidence available on the prophylactic and therapeutic use of vaccines against influenza. This committee presented the following conclusions:

1. The evidence at hand affords no trustworthy basis for regarding prophylactic vaccination against influenza as of value in preventing the spread of the disease, or of reducing its severity. The evidence from the present epidemic, though meager, suggests that the incidence of the disease among the vaccinated is smaller than among the nonvaccinated. The board, therefore, concludes that further experimental evidence should be collected.

2. The evidence at hand convinces the board that the vaccines we have considered have no specific value in the treatment of influenza.

3. There is evidence that no unfavorable results have followed the use of vaccines.

The second committee, known as the Special Board of Statistical Investigation, consisted of Dr. George C. Whipple, chairman. William H. Davis and F. C. Crum. This committee reported:

1. The weight of such statistical evidence as we have been able to accumulate indicates that the use of the influenza vaccine which we have investigated is without therapeutic benefit. Exceptional cases where apparent benefit has resulted from the use of the vaccine can be matched off by other cases where similar recoveries have been made without vaccination.

2. The statistical evidence, as far as it goes, indicates a probability that the use of this influenza vaccine has some prophylactic value.

3. There is also some evidence to the effect that other methods of protection, such as open-air treatment and the use of proper masks, are effective in protecting exposed attendants, and the use of vaccine should not be taken as an excuse for omitting such safeguards.

As a result, the following recommendations were made:

That the state encourage the distribution of influenza vaccine intended for prophylactic use, but in such manner as will secure scientific evidence of the possible value of the agent. The use of such vaccine is to be regarded as experimental.

That the state shall neither furnish nor endorse any vaccine at present in use for the treatment of influenza.

These reports are conservative, and offer to other health commissioners and their communities a reliable guide as to procedures that should be adopted before subjecting or trying out on the public any method of prevention or treatment that may be offered. These matters are the domain of medical science, and medical scientists of recognized ability should be called on to make the decision.

Of Interest to Nurses.

Word comes from Red Cross headquarters to the effect that some nurses have refused to sign and return the questionaires sent out to them, fearing they might be called to service they did not desire. The Supervisor of Nurse Survey requests the Journal to state that the questionaire sent to nurses is sent at the request of the Surgeon General of the army and the information is desired purely for statistical purposes and places the nurse answering the same under no obligations whatever. She will be at liberty to do as she pleases as to accepting service.

source: Shoshone Journal. (Shoshone, Idaho), 01 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Shoshone Journal. November 01, 1918, Page 2

19181101SJ2-headlineIdaho State News

Under the direction of the state board of health the Albion State Normal school has been placed under quarantine in an attempt to prevent the Spanish influenza from obtaining a foothold.

Five young women members of the Twin Falls high school faculty, during the enforced vacation taken pursuant to the order of the board of health, are spending their time in a nearby beet field, topping sugar beets.

Word has been received at Malad of the death of John Daniels at Camp Fremont, Cal. The young man has been at Camp Fremont for the past two months. His death was caused by pneumonia, superinduced by Spanish influenza.

source: Shoshone Journal. (Shoshone, Idaho), 01 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Shoshone Journal. November 01, 1918, Page 4

Please Tell It!

With the spread of “Flu,” the quarantining of towns, the closing of public places, and the forbidding of public gatherings, the reporter is certainly “up against it.” If you hear of any item of general interest, will you please tell us, or phone? The Journal will greatly appreciate the kindness.
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One More Account to Settle.

Miss Georgia Farrell was called to Jerome Wednesday morning to the bedside of her friend, Boy Frazer, who is very low with influenza.

Later: – Since the above was written word has come that Mr. Frazer died Tuesday night. The circumstances connected with Mr. Frazer’s death are particularly sad. When he developed symptoms of influenza in Moscow, instead of being cared for, he was put onto the train and started for home. He arrived in Shoshone on No. 18 Sunday morning, October 20, so ill that Mr. Murray protested against his making the stage trip to Jerome, but, being anxious (naturally) to be at home, the young man continued his journey, which has terminated in the benign light beyond “The Valley of the Shadow.” Another home is shrouded in mourning and there is one more account to settle with “The Beast of Berlin.”

source: Shoshone Journal. (Shoshone, Idaho), 01 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Shoshone Journal. November 01, 1918, Page 8

Wood River Center Grange.

Walter Hastings is ill with influenza.

Dietrich

The John W. Satory’s family were Wednesday informed by official telegram of the death of Mr. Satory’s soldier son, Harry Satory in France on the 4th of October, dying in the hospital from pneumonia. Harry is the first of our brave Dietrich boys to pay his greatest of a soldier’s debt.

Two others, Leslie Eddy and Lyal Shelman have been severely wounded perhaps maimed for life. Thus these living and dead have well won the love and honor of those at home for whom they sacrificed so much.

source: Shoshone Journal. (Shoshone, Idaho), 01 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., November 01, 1918, Page 1

19181101DSM1-headline
Another Influenza Victim Makes Six Deaths in Moscow

Another death, the sixth to occur in Moscow from influenza, occurred last night when Lafayette Marsing of Claytonia, near Caldwell, Idaho, died at a local hospital. He had been in a serious condition for several days and his death was not unexpected. His father, H. P. Marsing, is enroute to Moscow, when funeral arrangements will be made. The young man was a member of class B of the S. A. T. C., and is the third member of that class of 300 to succumb to the disease. Two members of class A have died and one soldier, whose home was in Moscow, but who was taken ill at an army camp in California and sent him. He died after his arrival here.

Only three new cases are reported in the S. A. T. C. today and two have been released as cured. The situation is regarded as much better, but still requires care. President Lindley, of the University of Idaho, said: “While the situation is encouraging, the danger point is not passed. We are maintaining a strict quarantine on the girls, with the result that none of them have had the disease. A woman, whose daughter is quarantined here, came to Moscow to see her daughter and has written that she considers the young lady much better off here than almost any other place. The girls are given an opportunity to study and are going on with their work, but are being closely quarantined in Ridenbaugh hall and there has not been a case of influenza among the girl students.”

There are two students that are quite ill in one of the hospitals and their condition is causing alarm, but hope has not been given up in either case.

The convalescents quartered in the Elks’ Club building are getting along nicely and most of them will soon return to their wok.

Dr. Rae, county health officer, is considering forbidding special sales days in the stores, as it is feared that the drawing of many persons in a store might cause a spread of the disease.
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Pullman Has Three More Deaths.

Pullman, Wash., Oct. 31. – Three S. A. T. C. soldier-students and one civilian succumbed to the effects of Spanish influenza last night and this morning, bringing the total for the 12-day period to 35, 29 military deaths and six civilians.

Mrs. George Walters, age about 55, passed away at the home of her son, Harry Walters, last night after an illness of a few days. Mrs. Walters is survived by her husband, George W. Walters, two sons, Harry of Pullman an Leland H. of Camp Lewis, and two daughters, Mrs. Alice Keys of Zillah and Georgia.

Donald Atwood of Tennessee, Charles William Billings and Clayton and Edward Frances Hawkins of Divide, Colo., were the military deaths.

Few new cases are being reported among the military contingent, although the disease has probably not yet reached its height among the civilian population. Several serious cases are still in the hospitals.

The Rev. G. W. Laidlaw, rector of St. James Episcopal church, who turned the church and parish house into hospitals at the outset of the epidemic, contracted the disease today. Mt. Laidlaw has worked night and day fighting the epidemic and comforting the sufferers.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 01 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., November 01, 1918, Page 3

City News

Joe Clayton is sick at home with the influenza.

Charles Gerlough is reported very ill at the Inland hospital.

Victor Anderson gave two fine chickens to the convalescent soldiers today.

Mrs. Kippen, who has been nursing the sick, is ill now at her apartments at the Idaho.

C. A. Salisbury came to Moscow last evening from Wyoming to see his son who is with the S. A. T. C. and sick of influenza.

Miss Suma Hall, Miss Adele Lampert and Miss Irma Harrison arrived today from Potlatch to assist in nursing the sick soldiers.

Word has been received by A. M. Jessup of this city that his brother, C. D. Jessup, died today at Fort Rosecrans, California, from Spanish influenza. Mr. Jessup has been in camp only a week.

Mesdames M. M. Preston, Guy Wolfe and Homer Estes and Miss Carrie Brownwach donated a fine lot of canned fruits and jellies for the soldiers who are recovering from influenza today.

Dr. W. B. Reese of Orofino, who has practiced somewhat for the last 27 years in Latah and Nezperce counties, is here from Orofino to visit his son, John Reese, of the S. A. T. C., who has the influenza.

Arlie Decker, who is teaching at the Pullman college, has been sick ten days of influenza. As yet no complications have set in and his many friends at Moscow hope for his speedy recovery.

Mr. and Mrs. C. A. Strong, who have been in Moscow to see their son, Arthur Strong, who is sick of influenza, returned last evening to their home in Lewiston. They report their son as slowly recovering.

G. G. Pickett came home today from Sacramento, Cal., where he left his mother somewhat improved for one of the advanced age of 84 years. Mr. Pickett says that most cities on the coast are wearing the gauze masks everywhere to prevent infections from influenza.

The Red Cross women of Joel and Cornwall have given three dozen chickens to make broth for the sick soldiers. Mrs. John Sumner delivered them. People in and around Moscow have been donating six or eight chickens a week for the same loyal purpose.

The convalescent soldiers are needing more jellies, canned fruit, etc. The people of Moscow have been generous but these boys convalescing need more such delicacies to temp the appetite. Mrs. Jessie Warren gave nine quart of fruit. Mrs. A. C. Thoman, Mrs. R. McMahan, Mrs. Clarence Jain and Mrs. James Buchanan gave a collection of jellies and marmalade. These were delivered at the Inland hospital.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 01 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Clearwater Republican. November 01, 1918, Page 8

The state board of health of Idaho wishes to suggest, in the interest of public health that you refrain from posting bulletins of returns of the election, so as to avoid the congregation of considerable numbers of people, because of the danger of infection of Influenza.

We earnestly hope you will accept this suggestion as it is intended as a precautionary measure to conserve the public health.

Very truly yours,
Edward T. Biward, Secretary.
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A number of the girls attending the University, returned home Thursday, during the quarantine there.

source: Clearwater Republican. (Orofino, Idaho), 01 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., November 02, 1918, Page 1

Young Man Dies at Bovill.

Undertaker Anderson was called to Bovill Wednesday morning to take charge of the body of B. L. Jones, a young man who had died the night previous at the Bovill hospital of influenza. The young man, who was 23 years of age, was a son of Jacob E. Jones, a farmer in the Bovill district, and a nephew of T. P. Jones, woods superintendent for the Potlatch Lumber company. He and a brother had arrived about two weeks ago from Minnesota to visit their father, and were taken sick shortly after arriving at Bovill. The brother is in the hospital, sick with influenza and is in a critical condition.

— Palouse Republic.
— —

Jay Carithers of the S. A. T. C. of Pullman is quite sick of influenza.
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19181102DSM1-headlineForbids Students To Go Visiting
President Lindley Requests Students and Instructors to Stay Home

Dr. E. H. Lindley, president of the University of Idaho, strongly urged students and instructors not to leave Moscow for the weekend.

He said: “I am receiving letters from parents every day telling me how glad they are that their sons and daughters are here where the mortality rate is comparatively much lower than other places.

“Students and instructors have no moral right to endanger the health of members of other communities by traveling and possibly carrying disease.

“The military department requires that all persons arriving in Moscow from other towns be isolated for a period of four days to guard against the spreading of infection. In case the quarantine should be lifted Monday, this isolation would seriously interfere with the efficient operation of the university.”
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19181102DSM2-headlineUniversity Will Play Foot Ball
Will Play Marines at Spokane on November 30 – Hard Game Expected

Although football practice has been indefinitely postponed because of the epidemic of influenza here, Lieutenant Meehan who is acting as coach, is looking forward to a brilliant season for the S. A. T. C. teams. Games have been scheduled at Spokane and Pullman. Lieutenant Meehan believes he has material enough to build up an excellent scrappy team. …
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19181102DSM3-headlineAll S. A. T. C. Men Must Wear Masks
New Order Went Into Effect Today – Rules Must Be Strictly Obeyed

All members of the students army training corps were given influenza masks this morning. They will be required to wear masks whenever indoors under penalty of courtmartial.

Only one mask was given to each man instead of the three required by government orders, because of the difficulty in completing 2400 in three days. Others are being made however, and it is expected that all the men will be supplied with his full quota within two days.

Military regulations covering the wearing of masks are very strict. The masks must be worn whenever indoors and they must be washed in good soapy water every day. Infringement of these rules will be considered a most serious offense.

Dr. E. H. Lindley, president of the University of Idaho recommended this morning that all instructors wear masks while giving instruction. He said:

“Every precaution is being taken to keep the epidemic from spreading and students and instructors are urged to safeguard themselves in this and every other way.”

Work on the 2500 influenza masks ordered by the federal government is progressing rapidly, according to Prof. R. E. Neidig, chairman of the Red Cross. A Red Cross official said:

“The stringent requirements made by the government debarring all persons from working on the masks unless they were in first class physical condition caused some hardship at first. Volunteers have come forward with wonderful spirit. The masks are being rushed to the Inland Empire hospital for sterilization as soon as complete.”
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19181102DSM4-headline
Influenza Situation Shows Great Improvement

The influenza situation today is regarded as better than at any time since the epidemic struck Moscow. There have been no more deaths; all of the patients are believed to be making satisfactory progress toward recovery and only four new cases were admitted to the hospital while eight were discharged as cured.

Not all of those admitted to hospitals are regarded as necessarily having influenza. The men in the S. A. T. C. are being watched very closely and just as soon as a man complains of feeling ill, whether is be a headache, cold or other ailments, he is taken from the others and isolated. If he does not recover soon he is sent to the hospital.

At the big plant of the Idaho National Harvester company where more than 120 men are now working as auto mechanics, general mechanics and radio work, this rule is being carried out rigidly. Every man is instructed to report to the foreman any symptoms of illness and he is at once sent by automobile to a place of isolation and given close care and attention. It is believed that this system of watchfulness is largely responsible for there being so few cases among the more than 800 S. A. T. C. men, 500 students and 6,000 inhabitants of Moscow.

The weather is more favorable today, with bright, warm sunshine, and the convalescents are allowed to go out doors and “sun themselves” and they have been enjoying it.

A few new cases in town have been reported but all are very mild. There has not been a death in Moscow from influenza outside of the students or army men, who brought the disease from other places or were exposed to it in their travels here. The situation in the town proper is regarded as very satisfactory. While there have been many cases all have been mild and all of those first stricken have recovered.
— —

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 02 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., November 02, 1918, Page 2

Dr. Adair, city health officer requests the election board of the different precincts to wear masks on election day. Doubtless there will be a number of cases who have just taken influenza and likewise a number who are just recovering. Crowds will not be allowed to congregate.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 02 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., November 02, 1918, Page 4

19181102DSM5-headlineHealth Officer Issues Warning
Dr. Adair Calls On People To Use More Care To Prevent Influenza

Dr. Adair has issued a number of warnings to the public and asks the press to repeat them. First he insists that children be not permitted to congregate in groups and that, at the fist sign of a cold or illness they be kept in doors and cared for. He thinks is a bad idea to let children visit other homes and tells of numerous cases where the disease has been carried in this way.

Dr. Adair suggested that merchants can help greatly if they will watch their employees and when one has a cold or shows any signs of being ill let him or her go home and be cared for until it can be told whether it is influenza or something less harmful. He also suggests that merchants do not advertise special sales days or sales hours that might crowd their stores.

“If anyone in your home has influenza do not admit anyone into your home,” said Dr. Adair. He told of one case where a woman lay sick and permitted a piano tuner to come into their home to tune a piano. The man was baldly frightened when he heard that he was been exposed to influenza.

Dr. Adair says the disease is being spread through thoughtlessness of persons who do not take the situation seriously. He cautions all to be more careful and to observe the rules mentioned above. Treat the first symptoms of a cold as if it were serious and thus prevent a serious sickness, he regards as a good plan to follow.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 02 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., November 04, 1918, Page 1

19181104DSM1-headline
Influenza Causes Two More Deaths In Moscow

Two more deaths in Moscow from influenza make a total of eight since the epidemic struck town, all but one being members of the S. A. T. C. Mrs. Earl St. John died last night, being he only civilian who has died as a result of the epidemic. The other victim is Ralph Gochnour, of Burley, Idaho, a student in the University of Idaho, who was enrolled in the S. A. T. C. Gochnour has been sick for a long time and there has been little hop of his recover for the past week.

Mrs. St. John has been ill for some time. Her husband, Earl t. John, is window dresser at David’s store. Several other members of the family are sick.

Gochnour has been a very popular student at the university, this being his sophomore year. He was taken desperately ill at the start, but, being young and vigorous, has made a gallant fight and it was thought for several days that he would win. This makes three deaths in the Class A. men and three in the class B of the S. A. T. C., one soldier who came back from cantonment ill with the disease and one civilian.

The situation is said to be improving today, the number of new cases admitted to the hospital being only two and the number released as cured the same. …

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 04 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., November 04, 1918, Page 2

Moscow brings forcibly to mind the need of greater precautions to prevent the spread of influenza. We are not only the custodian of the health of our own families and our own citizens, but 1300 young men who came from all parts of Idaho and some from other states are here and we must protect them. Every precaution advocated by the medical men should be religiously observed by the people of Moscow.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 04 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., November 04, 1918, Page 3

City News

Mr. and Mrs. F. A. Robinson went to Davenport yesterday, called by the illness of their son, who is seriously sick of influenza.

Martin F. Masse, a former piano turner of Moscow is reported dead of influenza in France. Mr. Masse enlisted in the infantry in June from Lewiston. …
— —

Contribution Box

S. Mark’s Rectory, Moscow, 2 Nov.

Dear Sir: … I ask the privilege of saying a word through your columns. The country is suffering from a devastating epidemic which already has carved off ten times as many boys as we have lost in the war. We have been obliged to close the churches and so far as I know the churches have made no effort to exercise the faith that is in them. I am making no complaint against the closing order. It is inevitable. But I do want to appear to christian believers in Moscow to use the force of prayer on behalf of our boys. I would suggest that every such believer might obtain day by day, the names of boys or other sick persons who are in danger and pray each according to his personal or church prayer, definitely and with such directed personal prayer, as he would use for his own dear ones in a like case. I do not understand how the thing works but I cannot think but that the daily mental and spiritual effort of five hundred people in Moscow would mean something – unless Christianity is altogether a fraud.

Yours faithfully, W. H. Bridge.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 04 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

LibertyBond-a
WWI Liberty Bond poster scanned by Pritzker Military Museum & Library

source: w/more info Wikipedia
——————-

Back to Table of Contents
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 1)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 2)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 3)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 4)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 5)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 6)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 7)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 8)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 9)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 10)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 11)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 12)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 13)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 14)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 15)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 16)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 17)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 18)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 19)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 20)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 21)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 22)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 23)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 24)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 25)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 26)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 27)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 28)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 29)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 30)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 31)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 32)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 33)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 34)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 35)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 36)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 37)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 38)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 39)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 40)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 41)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 42)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 43)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 44)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 45)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 46)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 47)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 48)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 49)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 50)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 51)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 52)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 53)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 54)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 55)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 56)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 57)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 58)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 59)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 60)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 61)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 62)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 63)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 64)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 65)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 66)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 67)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 68)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 69)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 70)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 71)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 72)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 73)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 74)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 75)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 76)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 77)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 78)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 79)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 80)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 81)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 82)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 83)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 84)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 85)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 86)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 87)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 88)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 89)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 90)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 91)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 92)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 93)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 94)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 95)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 96)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 97)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 98)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 99)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 100)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 101)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 102)

Road Reports June 21, 2020

Please share road reports. Conditions change very quickly this time of year. High elevation roads still have snow. Be prepared for rocks and trees in the road and remember there is no cell phone service.

Yellow Pine: Local streets are bare and will be dusty soon. Elk and deer are wandering around at dusk. Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN. Report that a dog was hit and mildly injured on Main street recently.
June 22 – Yellow Pine Dust Abatement Day
link: Local Forecast
Yellow Pine Webcam: (check date on image)

Warm Lake Highway: No problems reported.
link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

Highway 55 Webcams Link:

South Fork Road: Closed 7am to 4pm daily with no closures on weekends.
The closure sites will change on a weekly basis, and will not always be adjacent to the last closure site. Refer to the current weekly newsletter or the project website to determine the closure point and access for each week.
South Fork Road Project page (link)
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Monday (June 8) report the EFSF road is in good shape.

Johnson Creek Road: Open.
Wednesday (June 17) mail truck driver (Kaleb) reports no problems coming in today. (3″ of snow on Landmark that morning, melted by now.) Johnson Creek road is “bumpy”.
link: Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam
link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
Note: The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Sort of open but not advisable – some snow drifts across the road. Travel at your own risk.
June 12: Folks made it over the top with 4x4s.

photo and report courtesy SA
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Still be Closed to regular vehicles.
Report June 20: “Still about 3-4 ft of snow on Profile Summit.” – SA
20200620ProfileSnow-a
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcam: (check date on image)

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open
June 12 update: Yesterday, OK Gravel completed grading the Stibnite road and North American Dust Control will be spraying it June 23rd, 24th and 25th.
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Closed to wheeled vehicles (no current report.)
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Warrens Wagon Road: Construction update: The road is CLOSED from 8am-Noon and 1pm-5pm Monday-Friday. The road is OPEN with a PILOT CAR from Noon-1pm and after 5pm Monday-Friday. The road is OPEN without a pilot car on Saturday and Sunday.
Update June 4: be aware that the Long Gulch Culvert Installation Project along Warren Wagon Road from Chinook Campground to Steamboat Summit will begin on June 15 and end in mid-July. The project involves the installation of numerous cross drain culverts. Delays of under 1 hour can be expected. This area of Warren Wagon is between Secesh Meadows and Warren.

Deadwood Summit: Might be open or close to opening, no current report.
Note: The approx elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′
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