Idaho History June 7, 2020

Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic

Part 8

Idaho Newspaper clippings October 22 – 25, 1918

1918Atlantic20-a
A girl stands next to her sister, who is lying in bed, in November of 1918. The young girl became so worried that she telephoned the Red Cross Home Service, which came to help the woman fight the influenza virus. Library of Congress via AP

source: Alan Taylor April 10, 2018 “30 Photos of the 1918 Flu Pandemic” The Atlantic
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American Falls Press. October 22, 1918, page 1

19181022AFP1-headline
Hundred and Fourteen Cases of Influenza Reported in Rockland and Vicinity.

One hundred and fourteen cases of influenza are reported from Rockland and vicinity, with no doctor nearer than American Falls. The state board of health has been appealed to to supply nurses, and has sent word that one trained nurse will be sent today if possible.

The disease has gotten a start in the Arbon country with no doctor within forty miles. West of the river it is reported there are suspected cases.

In American Falls the number of cases is small as yet, but there may be many very soon.

The entire family of Charles Goss, who occupies the M. D. Drake residence, is down with it and this morning appealed to the local Red Cross for a nurse. There is no graduate nurse available. Mrs. J. M. Booth, who has had some instruction, it is understood, will be sent.

Dr. Noth has the most serious case in town. He is being attended by Dr. Schiltz and Dr. Mackinnon comes down from Aberdeen as often as he has the time to do so. Noth was reported slightly better this morning, having been able to retain a little liquid food and get a little sleep, but is it said that he will be in bed two weeks yet if no more complications set in.

All the schools in the state have been closed by the state board of health. All the courts are closed, it is said, except such matters as can be heard in chambers and every effort is being made to keep the disease from getting beyond control by suppressing meetings, gathering and assemblages of all kinds.

The situation is serious enough to require the earnest co-operation of all in carrying out the instructions of the local board. It is not improbable that it will be much worse.
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Notice to Patrons of the American Falls Schools.

In view of the closing of the schools on account of the Spanish influenza, the Board of Trustees desire to impress upon the patrons the necessity of keeping their children at home as much as possible, so as to lessen the danger as much as possible.

Done by order of the Board.
R. F. Noth, Chairman.
R. O. Jones, Clerk.
Dated this 18th day of Oct., 1918.

source: American Falls Press. (American Falls, Idaho), 22 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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American Falls Press. October 22, 1918, page 4

People and Events.

Elmer Nye is a victim of influenza. He is getting along all right but will be confined to his home for several days.

Dr. Noth, who has been confined to his home for the past several days with influenza, suffered a relapse yesterday. Miss Virginia Nunnelly, who has been visiting in Salt Lake for several weeks, has been summoned to help care for him.

Mrs. R. Foster Lamm took down with influenza Saturday night. Mr. Lamm is just able to be up from an attack.
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Arbon Valley News.

Mr. Myler had been in ill health for several months past, and a few days before his death, contracted Spanish influenza, of which he died.

John Bowen received word last wee, that his son, David, was quite ill at Malad, with Spanish influenza. Later reports are that he is getting along nicely.

Central school opened here two weeks ago, with Mr. Perry H. Howell as teacher. But due to the Spanish influenza it was thought advisable to close last Friday until further notice. There are no cases in the school here yet.

The little baby of Mr, and Mrs. Eric Young, a few miles northeast of Arbon, died Saturday morning in a Pocatello hospital of influenza.
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To the Voters of Power County:

As I am a candidate for the office of Probate Judge of Power County, on the republican ticket and the present conditions existing in the country on account of the Spanish influenza not justifying a campaign of the country, I wish to say that any support that the voters of the county will see fit to give me will be appreciated, and I assure you that if elected my aim shall be to so conduct the business of the office in a fair and just manner, without prejudice or partiality, which with my previous experience I feel that I am qualified to do.

Very respectfully,
R. O. Jones
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One death is reported from influenza at Rockland, the child of a Mr. Allen. There are many cases there.

Dr. MacKinnon was here from Aberdeen today and was sent out to see four influenza cases. So great has been the demand that H. F. Fitzpatrick has gone out wherever he could be of service.
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Court Postponed.

The term of the Federal court has been postponed until Monday, November 11th. Jurors are excused until that date or until further notice. this is on account of the influenza quarantine.
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source: American Falls Press. (American Falls, Idaho), 22 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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American Falls Press. October 22, 1918, page 5

Letters From Power County Soldiers.

Auditor Bullfinch has received the following letter from the boys who left for Moscow last week:

Section B. S. A. T. C. Moscow, Idaho

Dear Sir: — We are at the barracks tonight all well and happy as can be. We had a fine trip coming up and have enjoyed ourselves every minute.

Our bunk house is an old livery barn remodeled. The mess house is a machine shop. They are both very comfortable and well arranged. The eats are very plain but we have all we want. Out of the three days we have been here there have lots of the fellows taken sick. Only five cases of influenza as yet. The men are immediately moved from the barracks to the hospital. Every day we have to take everything out of the barracks, clean everything up spick and span, to prevent all sickness possible.

The company of three hundred fellows here seem to be a fine crowd of boys. We have some very fine officers even if they are strict as the deuce, and bawl a fellow out every chance they get.

We are quarantined to the barracks for twenty-one days at the least, so there is no running around for us for some time.

The army life is no picnic but is good enough for us. We are proud that we are able to pass the examinations and give our service to Uncle Sam.

Very truly yours,
Thomas Davie,
Andress Watts,
Earl Cooper.

source: American Falls Press. (American Falls, Idaho), 22 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Republican. October 22, 1918, page 1

War Summary

Spanish Influenza grows worse in Salt Lake, spreading from east to westward.
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Improving

The Misses Nita and Grace Bingham of Groveland, who have been ill with the influenza, are now much improved.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 22 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Republican. October 22, 1918, page 2

Returned Home

The Misses Marie and Genevieve Millick returned home the last of the week from Missoula, Mont., where they have been attending the university.

The university has been closed on account of the influenza.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 22 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Republican. October 22, 1918, page 4

Grandview

Our school closed Friday for a two week’s vacation, which will enable the school children to help dig potatoes and harvest beets without missing any school.

Luther Saterfield drove to Pocatello Tuesday to take his sister, Mrs. Wm. Watts, over to help care for their brother’s A. Y. Satterfield’s family. A number of them have the Spanish Influenza. One child was taken to the hospital. Hopes for recovery were very doubtful.

Arnold Nugent and wife are among the sick, also Joe Maxwell, the symptoms resemble Influenza.

L. A. Watts is another victim of the grip.

Mr. MacKinnon was out to see the sick in this section Thursday evening.

Miss Lila Hutchingson was on the sick list the latter part of the week.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 22 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Republican. October 22, 1918, page 5

Local News

Miss Thelma Vaughn returned to her home in Aberdeen the last of the week, and will spend some time visiting with her parents. Miss Vaughn has been attending school in Pocatello, but the school is closed on account of the influenza.

George Miltenberger received work Thursday night of the death of his brother, Reid, who died of Spanish Influenza in one of the training camps in California.

Miss Vera Benzley returned to her home in Blackfoot Friday from Salt Lake. Miss Benzley had been attending school in Salt Lake, but on account of the influenza, was compelled to return home. She states that the epidemic is serious there.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 22 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Republican. October 22, 1918, page 7

Idaho Budget

The Idaho Falls school board on October 15, decided to close all departments of the school until the quarantine for Spanish Influenza has been raised. Several mild cases of the epidemic have developed in this vicinity, two of them being transients. The country schools have not been closed.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 22 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Republican. October 22, 1918, page 8

Annual Meeting Postponed.

The annual Red Cross meeting advertised for Wednesday, October 23, has been postponed indefinitely. The meeting can not be held until the influenza epidemic is under complete control, and the date will be announced later.
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Death of S. E. Roundy

S. E. Roundy, age twenty-nine years, died at his home here Wednesday night of influenza and pneumonia. Mr. Roundy is well-known and respected by his many acquaintances.

Deceased is survived by a father, mother, his wife and four children. The sympathy of the community is extended to the bereaved relatives.

Funeral services where held at the Groveland cemetery Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 22 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Bonners Ferry Herald. October 22, 1918, page 1

Close All the County Schools
Over 200 Cases of Spanish Influenza In The County Now

County Physician E. E. Fry was notified by wire yesterday by the state board of health that all the schools of the county should be closed immediately until further orders on the account of the Spanish influenza. This action was taken because the epidemic is spreading alarmingly in many localities and in some instances the physicians have failed to report cases.

The same instructions were received by County Superintendent of Schools, Mrs. Flood and she immediately notified the school trustees of the various districts.

Drs. Fry and Keller report that there are many cases of influenza in this county. At least 115 cases have been cared for in Bonners Ferry alone though but few have been more than mild cases. There are at least 50 people of Bonners Ferry confined to their beds at this time with the disease and in the county there are about 150 more cases.
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Call for Nurses Now

Mrs. H. A. Gale, chairman of the Red Cross auxiliary, announces that the women of this county who signed up last spring to serve as nurses as their services were required by the government, are now needed on account of the Spanish influenza epidemics and that application blanks are now at the Red Cross headquarters. All who registered last spring are requested to come to the Red Cross rooms on Wednesday afternoon between the hours of two and five o’clock to sign the applications.
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Oscar Brieman Dead

Oscar Brieman, a laborer employed at the camp of the Idaho Gold and Ruby Mining company at Lenia, died Wednesday of pneumonia. The funeral was held at the camp Sunday and services were conducted by Rev. E. R. Henderson. Interment was had in the camp cemetery.

The deceased was 34 years of age and is survived by a wife and five children. He as a native of South Dakota.

source: Bonners Ferry Herald. (Bonners Ferry, Idaho), 22 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Bonners Ferry Herald. October 22, 1918, page 2

Idaho News Paragraphs

Sandpoint has been touched by lightly by the influenza, there having been not to exceed 29 cases up to the present.

With a total of 19 cases of Spanish influenza under treatment at Wallace, health officials believe that the stringent measures taken to prevent its spread are yielding the desired results.

A second contingent of physicians and nurses organized by the workers of the Lewiston chapter of the Red Cross recently visited Nez Perce to help in handling the influenza epidemic which has been raging there.

All Schools Closed.

All public and private schools in Idaho have been ordered closed for an indefinite period by the state board of health. The order, which went to all county health officers, became effective Saturday. It applies to schools of religious denominations as well. District courts are expected to close except to hear arguments. The epidemic of Spanish influenza is given as the cause.

Students attending state educational institutions who are living on the institution’s ground are quarantined and will continue their studies. Those who are no can not continue to attend school, the state department holds.

There are now between 1000 and 1500 cases of influenza in Idaho. Conditions are bad at Pocatello, where the greatest increase is shown. Plummer has appealed to the state board for assistance, there being between 40 and 50 cases there and no physicians. An appeal was also received from Nez Perce, reciting the epidemic was spreading. One new case was reported in Ada county, two in Madison and 1-5 in Gooding.

source: Bonners Ferry Herald. (Bonners Ferry, Idaho), 22 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Bonners Ferry Herald. October 22, 1918, page 6

Larue McPherson Writes

… Mrs. Mildred McPherson is with her husband at Camp Lewis and is an attache of the Hostess house. Nearly every place at the camp and in the nearby cities is closed up on account of influenza and the soldiers are not allowed to go to Seattle.

source: Bonners Ferry Herald. (Bonners Ferry, Idaho), 22 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Bonners Ferry Herald. October 22, 1918, page 7

Local Pick-ups

Mrs. H. I. Monks has been sick the past week with Spanish influenza.

J. A. Transeau has been confined to his home for some time with an attack of Spanish influenza.

P. B. Duffy died at his home in Spokane Sunday of Spanish influenza. The deceased was formerly in business here and conducted the Bonner Bakery about three years ago with his partner, Mr. Bowling, tho whom he later sold his interests.
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19181022BFH1-headlineASpanish “Flu” Spreads Rapidly

According to late reports issued by State and Federal health authorities the Spanish Influenza epidemic is rapidly spreading to all parts of the country, and it now seems that practically every state in the Union will be seriously affected before it runs its course.

It has not only become a great and terrifying menace to the public health, but unless checked, it is apt to seriously affect the progress of war work in all its various departments. Already the Shipping Board has announced that ten per cent of its workers had been affected.

The disease has made its greatest progress in the East where it has claimed its victims by the thousands. Reports from other sections, however, are equally alarming; and both civil and military authorities have warned the public to take every precaution to prevent its further spread. In many cities schools, churches and theatres have been closed and public gatherings of all kinds forbidden.

Medical authorities agree that people who are weak and rundown are the earliest victims of the Influenza epidemic. If you find yourself tired, weak and losing flesh, or if you are in a generally run-down condition, or if you catch cold easily this warning should be heeded promptly. You are really in great danger, because the germ of this disease is very catching and you are apt to fall an easy victim if you come in contact with the germs. People who are well and strong are not likely to contract the disease because they are able to throw it off. The common-sense way to- keep from taking it is to fortify the system against attack by building up the constitution. …

source: Bonners Ferry Herald. (Bonners Ferry, Idaho), 22 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., October 22, 1918, page 1

Draft Calls to be Resumed.

Washington – Draft calls, which were suspended three weeks ago because of influenza epidemic are now going out again in certain zones where the surgeon’s office has decided it is safe to send men to the cantonments.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 22 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., October 22, 1918, page 2

Another Moscow Soldier Died Of Influenza

Lawrence A. Stephenson, son of Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Stephenson, of Moscow Mountain, is dead of influenza. The body will reach here tomorrow, it is believed and be buried here. The young man died at Port Angeles, in the extreme northwestern part of Washington, where he has been employed in the spruce division. The funeral will be held at the grave. The Rev. Mr. Smith, Norwegian Lutheran minister will have charge. The date of the funeral cannot be given until it is definitely learned when the body will reach Moscow.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 22 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., October 22, 1918, page 3

City News

Dr. J. J. Harrington, who came here recently from the state of Washington to practice medicine in Moscow, left this afternoon for Nezperce where he will assist in caring for that stricken city which has an influenza epidemic.
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Chamber of Commerce Will Have No Lunch Tomorrow

Owing to the orders forbidding public meetings while the influenza or grip is prevalent in the state, the chamber of commerce will not have its noon day luncheon tomorrow (Tuesday). There will be no further meeting of the chamber until the ban on public meetings is removed.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 22 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., October 22, 1918, page 4

Ohio Suffering From Influenza
Moscow Woman Writes of Conditions in That State – Epidemic Terrible

Glen Grice is in receipt of a letter from Mrs. Grice, who is at Columbus, Ohio, where the influenza is taking terrible toll. She writes that in 24 hours there were 163 deaths in Columbus alone and that the total of deaths in Ohio from the disease has reached 7,000.

Mrs. Grice says that there were 100 new cases in one day at one hospital in Columbus and conditions are so bad that the authorities are begging for women to help care for the sick. It is impossible to secure enough nurses and any woman who can work and help is urged to respond to the calls for women to care for the sick and dying. Despite the strictest regulations of quarantine the disease got a start and has spread like wild fire through the state.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 22 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., October 23, 1918, page 1

19181023DSM1-headline
Influenza Situation in Moscow Shows Improvement

Reports of the influenza situation in Moscow today are indeed gratifying. There are fewer cases than yesterday, the number discharged as cured being in excess of the new cases. There have been no deaths and none of the cases are regarded as serious excepting that of Robert Foss, of Wyoming, who was ill when he reached here and has developed a severe case of pneumonia. He is being given the best of care at a local hospital.

Lieutenant-Dr. Kotalik, of the army, who has charge of the cases in the S. A. T. C. and the vocational training school, with more than 800 men enrolled, reports five new cases yesterday and three new cases up to noon today, with eight discharged as cured yesterday and three discharged as cured today, a reduction of three cases in the two days.

Dr. W. A. Adair, city health officer, reports one new case today, four yesterday, five Monday, none Sunday and none Saturday, while many of those who were taken ill last week are now regarded as cured. Many of them were only seen by the doctor once. Dr. Adair says that none of the cases are regarded as dangerous.

The situation is well in hand. The university authorities are doing their best to check it. Dr. E. H. Lindley, president of the university, states that an official report will be made through The Star-Mirror every day and nothing will be kept from the public. He requests that parents of men who are reported sick remain away as the quarantine rules forbid outsiders calling on them.

Dr. Holland, president of Washington State College, at Pullman, and Dr. Lindley had a conference today and agreed that visiting between the schools will be prohibited. None of the students from the university will be permitted to visit Pullman, where the disease is spreading and where there have been eight deaths within 48 hours. Pullman students will not be permitted to visit the university. People not connected with the university are requested to remain away from it as the quarantine rules forbid them going upon the campus.

It is believed that the situation is very favorable and with the cooperation of the people will soon be under complete control.
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Pullman Has Eight Deaths.

Pullman, Wash. — Four deaths yesterday and three last night from pneumonia, have resulted in closing the state college in all departments, both S. A. T. C. and regular classes, for an indefinite period, as well as the issuing of more stringent emergency measures for the city by the city health officer. Of the four who died yesterday three. Messrs. Ridell; Wylie and Hardy, were members of the vocational training department of the S. A. T. C., while the fourth was Miss Ida Littleton, an employee of Robinson’s bakery. Those who died last night were Sergeant Harry C. Hartman, Walla Walla; Frank M. Colcord, Pullman, and David Roy, Dayton.

Sergeant Hartman came to Pullman with the first contingent, and was retained here as an instructor for the second and third groups. A few days ago he was appointed to an officers’ training school and was to leave as soon as he was able to travel. Private Colcord was formerly connected with the college of agriculture of the state college as an instructor and entered the vocational school with the third detachment. Private Roy of Dayton had been connected with the detachment but a short time.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 23 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., October 23, 1918, page 2

We Must Obey The Quarantine.

A Moscow woman called our attention to the fact that the quarantine is being treated lightly in Moscow and that many well-meaning persons violate some of the rules almost daily. She calls attention to the danger of these thoughtless actions.

The prohibiting of public meetings means that all such meetings are forbidden and that visiting should he indulged in very little, if any. We would all have liked to have heard the lectures at the university last week, but it was safer to not try to evade the rules.

Pullman delayed enforcing its quarantine until the disease had spread throughout the college and eight lives have been sacrificed since Sunday morning. Nezperce in stricken and eight deaths have occurred there.

Baltimore is rejoicing because there were only 170 deaths from influenza yesterday. Spokane has more than 1400 cases. The conditions are serious. Moscow has been very fortunate, due, no doubt, to the desire of the people to cooperate with the health officers in upholding the quarantine rules. As a result the encouraging report of five new cases yesterday and three new cases up to noon today, with eight discharged as cured yesterday and three discharged as cured this forenoon, has been issued. Let us all do our part to maintain the regulations and wipe out this scourge as soon as possible.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 23 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., October 23, 1918, page 5

City News

Mrs. A. H. Pell came to see her son, Allen Spauldig, of the S. A. T. C., who is sick in the hospital. She says she found him in the best of hands, receiving the best of care with every chance of recovering from the attack of influenza. Mrs. Pell will return immediately to her home.

E. J. Smithson of Colfax will leave Friday for Fort Warden, Wash., where the soldiers are now taken instead of Camp Lewis, on account of the prevalence of influenza.

Samuel F. Fuller, our veteran painter, received word of the death of his youngest brother, Charles Fuller, of Newport, Canada, who died of Spanish influenza.
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19181023DSMad

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 23 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Grangeville Globe. October 24, 1918, page 1

19181024GG1-headlineCourt Closes On Account Of Flu

The September term of the district court adjourned sine die Friday and all remaining eases on the calendar will automatically hold over until the February, 1919, term.

In order to cooperate with the health authorities in preventing the spread of Spanish Influenza and for the general public benefit Judge Wallace N. Scales decided upon a closing order. The few cases which demanded immediate action were rushed through and the judge signed the minutes closing the term until next spring.
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19181024GG2-headlineFlu Epidemic Widespread in County
All Schools in the County, Both Public and Private Ordered Closed.
250 Cases Reported
Health Authorities Take All Possible Precautions to Prevent Further Spread.

All public meetings including public and private schools throughout the county are closed on account of the “flu” epidemic.

It had been intended to close the schools on Friday evening of last week, but the discovery of a case or two of influenza among the high school students caused a sudden change of plans and the children came trooping home about the middle of the forenoon, Friday, most of them hilarious over their unexpected vacation. Three or four of the teachers have had the influenza this week as have a considerable number of the high school students and a few of the grade children. Most of the cases are mild.

On Sunday evening Margaret Sweet, county superintendent, received a telegram from the state board of health ordering all schools. public and private closed until further notice. It has been difficult to get the word to some of the remote districts, but about all of them have been reached. May of the teachers have returned to their homes. No cases of influenza have so far (Thursday) been reported from White Bird, Doumecq Joseph Plains, although there are a few cases above Meadows and one death in that section on Wednesday night.

It Is reported that there are some 250 cases under observation in the city and county and that one death has resulted from complications following the disease.

The health officers wish to especially impress it upon the public that the action taken is precautionary and that children permitted to roam the streets are in greater danger than they would be in school. No child should be allowed to come down town or go about the neighborhood except upon legitimate errands. Children found down town without a reason will be taken home in custody of an officer. So far no cases of pneumonia have developed in connection with these cases but it is only good sense to observe reasonable precautions. Some of these that are especially recommended for children is to cleanse the throat regularly with some antiseptic solution such as Listerine or peroxide reduced one-half, and spray the nostrils with weaker solutions of some sort. In the absence of other remedies it solution of salt and water is beneficial. Plenty of fresh air without exposure is also a great factor both as a preventative measure and keeping up the general resistance of the body.
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Local Hospital Open.

The local hospital is to be opened under the direction of Dr. Stockton. It is being placed in shape today, Friday, after which it will be open to the public.

source: The Grangeville Globe. (Grangeville, Idaho), 24 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Grangeville Globe. October 24, 1918, page 4

Salmon River News

Miss Chloe Berry, bookkeeper at the Salmon River State Bank was confined to her home several days this week owing to an attack of the influenza.

source: The Grangeville Globe. (Grangeville, Idaho), 24 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Grangeville Globe. October 24, 1918, page 8

Miss Florence Woods of last year’s Junior class in the local high school is finishing the course at the Lewis & Clark High school in Spokane. She returned home when the Spokane schools were closed on account of the influenza.

Three days after she arrived in Grangeville, to attend the funeral of her mother, Mrs. Lucy Buescher died early Wednesday morning of pneumonia, following Spanish influenza. Mrs. Buescher arrived in Grangeville Sunday morning from Chicago, to be present at the funeral of her mother, Mrs. Mary Arnold, who died last week.

source: The Grangeville Globe. (Grangeville, Idaho), 24 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Lincoln County Times., October 24, 1918, page 1

19181024LCT1-headlineDisease is More Deadly Than War
More American Fatalities From New Epidemic Here Than From German Guns in France

Within three short weeks Spanish Influenza has developed and spread so widely and rapidly that America’s death roll here at home is greater than of all of her huge armies in Europe. Moreover, the number of prostrations from this disease from day to day in America is probably greater than the combined casualty lists of all of the fighting forces engaged in this great World War. The number of cases in New York City alone has increased from a total of 47 cases to 4,293 new case and 393 deaths in a single day. Moreover, the statement is said to have been made by a prominent physician – Dr. Goldwater – that the actual number of cases in New York is about half a million.

This is not intended as an alarmist statement but is simply a brief summary of facts currently reported in the daily press. While there is every reason for swift action in the erection of effective barriers against the spread of this malady.
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Elizabeth Arps Bower Victim of Dread Disease
Former Jerome Young Lady Passes Away After Short Illness

On Monday morning A. W. Arps received a telegram announcing the death of his daughter, Mrs. Frank Bower, which occurred that day at Bower was sick but a short time with the influenza, which developed into pneumonia and soon sapped the life threads of the young lady. …
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Grim Reaper Claims Mrs. Hellema Schendal
Appleton Lady is Victim of Spanish Influenza

At her home north of Appleton on last Monday morning, October 20th, occurred the death of Mrs. Hellema Strobel Schendal, wife of Antoine Schendal, from the effects of Spanish influenza, which developed into pneumonia.

Deceased was sick but a few days and, although every thing was done to check the disease, the young woman was not spared. …

source: Lincoln County Times. (Jerome, Idaho), 24 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Lincoln County Times., October 24, 1918, page 4

Eldorado Heights

The meetings of the Eldorado Heights Civic Club has been temporarily discontinued by order of the health officer, on account of the influenza epidemic.
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Arcadia Valley

Mr. Willson has had word that Bert has an attack of influenza.
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Smallpox is preventable. Get vaccinated.
– Health Officer.

source: Lincoln County Times. (Jerome, Idaho), 24 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Payette Enterprise., October 24, 1918, page 1

Court House News

Notice has been received by the Local Board that Harold Golden and Lester Hooker have been accepted for induction into the U. S. Marine Corps and these boys will be inducted as soon as competent Orders arrive.

Physical examination was considerably delayed on Wednesday on account of the Doctors being so busy. Considerable influenza has developed in the community in the last few days.

source: Payette Enterprise. (Payette, Canyon Co., Idaho), 24 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Emmett Index. October 24, 1918, page 1

19181024EI1-headlineAll Schools Are Closed
Precautions Taken to Guard Against Influenza

County Superintendent Ella Breshears received a telegram Saturday from the State Board of Health ordering that all schools be closed, whereupon the following order was issued: “Pursuant to law and in compliance with directions from the Idaho State Board of Health, it is hereby ordered that all public schools within Gem county, be and remain closed from and after date of this order; and that this order shall be and remain effective until released by said state board of health. This order is designed to prevent the further spread of the disease known as Spanish influenza.”

The order was made applicable to private and church schools as well as public schools. Many of the teachers and students of both city and country schools returned to their homes, while some took the opportunity to visit friends near by. Dr. Cummings, city health officer, states that locally there are few, if any cases, and with sensible precaution on the part of the general public it is hoped to prevent the epidemic getting any hold here. There are a few cases at Bramwell, in the Tom Clark family.
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Miss Minnie Pipher write from the Naval hospital near Breammerton that influenza is working havoc among their sailors and nurses. She mentioned meeting Wayne Keith, a brother of W. S., who is stationed there at present.

source: The Emmett Index. (Emmett, Idaho), 24 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Emmett Index. October 24, 1918, page 4

Emmett News

From a registered government nurse, Thawt Gaigle, at Seattle, here is a preventive which every family can use unsparingly: 1 teaspoon of salt and 1 teaspoon of soda dissolved in 6 ounces of water, used frequently as a gargle will keep the throat cleansed and less susceptible to influenza germs.

source: The Emmett Index. (Emmett, Idaho), 24 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Emmett Index. October 24, 1918, page 5

Emmett News

Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Jensen and daughter Irene and Mrs. Lou Burton drove to Caldwell Sunday to bring home Miss Karen, who has been attending the College of Idaho. She states there are a few cases of influenza in the school.

source: The Emmett Index. (Emmett, Idaho), 24 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Emmett Index. October 24, 1918, page 10

Letha

School was closed in District 21 in compliance with the state orders Monday.

Mr. Hoyt received word day before yesterday of the death of his oldest son in Mississippi, where he was running a garage. Spanish influenza was the cause of his death.

The Tom Clark family have the Spanish influenza. They went to Boise to see a cousin lately arrived from California and brought it back with them.

source: The Emmett Index. (Emmett, Idaho), 24 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Idaho County Free Press. October 24, 1918, page 1

19181024ICFP1-headline
Two Deaths from Spanish Influenza Here; 50 Cases
19181024ICFP1-headline2
Epidemic is Believed to Have Reached Crest; Red Cross Aids in Many Cases; Dr. Scallon Ill
19181024ICFP1-headline3
Physician in Bed With Cold Due to Constant Work, Day and Night
Business At Standstill
Mrs. Lucy Buescher and John S. Yates Die – Situation Shows Improvement, Says Health Officer

Two deaths from Spanish influenza and more than fifty cases constitutes a summary of the situation in Grangeville and vicinity. Those who have died are:

Mrs. Lucy Buescher, of Chicago, who was here to attend the funeral of her mother, Mrs. Mary Arnold.

John S, Yates, 16-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Lee Yates, residing a mile northwest of Grangeville.

Dr. G. S. Stockton, county health officer, Thursday morning declared fifty cased to be a conservative estimate of the number in and near Grangeville. He declared, however, that the situation is satisfactory, and that few new cases are developing. He believes the epidemic has reached its crest.

Dr. P. J. Scallon, fatigued by calls that have been answered day and night, was in bed all day Thursday with a cold, which borders on influenza. He was ill earlier in the week, but had partially recovered and for two days had resumed his practice, when he was obliged to again take to his bed.

Business Quiet in Grangeville.

Business in Grangeville has been practically at a standstill, since Monday. Few persons are on the streets. Those who appear in the business section of the city are there for business only, and immediately their business is transacted, return to their homes. Customary night crowds are not in evidence.

Crowds no longer gather about the postoffice and await distribution of the evening mail. The postoffice lobby has been so strongly disinfected that no one can long remain therein.

Gauze masks are worn by many employees of business houses in the city, to prevent contraction of the contagion. Masks were first used Saturday evening, on recommendation of Mayor Edmundson as a precaution. Frank McGrane, manager of the Alexander-Freidenrich department store, announced that the masks would be distributed free to all applicants, and many were given out. Masks are worn in the stores and n the streets. Saturday night more ban half the persons who were on the streets wore the gauze masks about the nose and mouth.

Big Trade for Drug Stores.

The lull in business circles of the city is such as has never before been experienced in the annals of Grangeville. The drug stores, however, are having an unprecedented trade, selling large quantities of all kinds of disinfectants and preventatives to be used to disinfect residences and business establishments, and as gargles by persons who feel that may have been exposed to the contagion and contracted the germ.

Floyd Swank, printer for the Grangeville Globe was the first person in Grangeville to come down with the disease. He was taken ill last week. At first his case was not thought to be Spanish influenza, but later it was diagnosed as such. He has recovered.

Mayor T. E. Edmondson, who Saturday afternoon issued to the public a request that, as a precautionary measure, everyone wear a gauze mask, was himself stricken with Spanish influenza, on Sunday. His daughter, Genevieve, a high school pupil, was the first member of the family to be taken ill, and her case was followed by every member of the Edmundson family coming down with the contagion. Their cases were pronounced as not serious.

I. E. Zuver, auctioneer, is said to have had the disease in a mild form. He was at home all day Wednesday.

Laundrymen Are Stricken.

Mr. and Mrs. Madison Myers both were stricken with the disease. Mr. Myers, who is one of the proprietors of the Electric laundry, was taken ill Friday, after he had handled laundry work from Nezperce, where the epidemic claimed a number of lives. Mrs. Myers was stricken the day following. Mr. Myers’ condition for a time was considered serious, but the crisis was reached Sunday night and he now is said to be on the road to recovery.

Charles Smith, the other proprietor of the Electric laundry, also was taken ill on Friday.

Because both proprietors of the laundry were bedfast, Charles R. Campbell, landlord of the Imperial hotel, took charge of the Electric laundry, in order that laundry work for the hotel might be turned out.

Mr. and Mrs. Pearl Wright are ill with the disease. Mr. Wright was taken ill on Monday and Mrs. Wright the day following. Mr. Wright is associated with the Wright Grocery company. George Willey, also a member of the firm, is ill.

Public Schools Are Shut.

The public schools were closed Friday morning, and public gatherings of every nature, have been forbidden. Strangers are reluctant to visit the city, and also are not welcomed, for it is felt in some quarters that the epidemic was brought to Grangeville by persons from outside points who unknowingly were suffering from the disease.

Grangeville physicians have since Friday been busy day and night, caring for patients, and have worked to almost the point of utter exhaustion.

Dr. P. J. Scallon contracted the disease early in the week. He had the contagion in a mild form, and although not fully recovered, on Tuesday was about his business, calling on the afflicted.

Mr. and Mrs, Walter McAdams are among those who early came down with the epidemic. Mr. McAdams was taken ill Saturday, and Monday Mrs. McAdams became ill. Mr. McAdams had planned on leaving Sunday morning for Spokane to enlist in the tank service of the U. S. army.

More Coffins Are Ordered.

Anticipating a possible large number of deaths, such as occurred in Nezperce, and found the city without coffins, Undertaker A. .J. Maugg on Tuesday wired for an additional supply of coffins.

Extraordinary precaution is being taken everywhere in and around Grangeville to prevent spread of Spanish influenza, and it is believed the high point in the epidemic has been reached.

Much good work has been done by the Grangeville branch of the American Red Cross in combating the epidemic. Nurses have been provided for homes in which two or more members of the family are ill, and hospital supplies have been furnished. Many Grangeville women have volunteered as nurses.

The Grangeville hospital which has not been in use for several months, is being fitted up as an isolation hospital for persons suffering from influenza. It is believed that if patients can be removed to the hospital the cases can be better treated than in the separate homes.

Grangeville has not quarantined cases of Spanish influenza. In Boise, a strict quarantine is enforced on all cases.

L. F. Zimmerman of Kooskia was the first Idaho county resident to die of Spanish influenza. Mr. Zimmerman succumbed on Tuesday of last week in his home in Kooskia. He is believed to have contracted the disease while at work in Nezperce. He was a concrete brick manufacturer.

Influenza in County Jail

Two prisoners in the county jail have been stricken with the malady. R. W. Bignell, Non-partisan league organizer, and Howard Bullard are the prisoners who are ill.

Sheriff Lafe Yates has Spanish influenza, as has Night Jailer John Byrom.

W. E. Reed, Republican nominee for sheriff, is reported critically ill of pneumonia, at his home in Whitebird.

Miss Dorothy Barker, local operator for the Western Union Telegraph company, is ill. The telegraph office on Wednesday was closed, and physicians declare Miss Barker will be unable to return to her duties for a week or more.

source: Idaho County Free Press. (Grangeville, Idaho Territory), 24 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Idaho County Free Press. October 24, 1918, page 5

Whitebird

Mrs. Lyle who was here visiting her daughter, Mrs. Reynolds and Mrs. Kennedy, was called to Grangeville to nurse her daughter, Mrs. Lee Yates, and two nephews, who were ill with Spanish influenza. Word was received that John Yates died shortly after his grandmother arrived.
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Funeral For James B. White
Services Are Held at the Grave in Prairie View Cemetery.

Funeral services for James B. White, county auditor of Lewis county, and former resident of Grangeville, were held Friday afternoon of last week at the grave in Prairie View cemetery. Mr. White died of Spanish influenza in Nezperce, on October 15. The funeral services were simple, but impressive. … Mr. White was born in Washington county, Ark., and was 35 years old. …
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Influenza Takes John Yates
High School Boy Succumbs to Disease in Home Near Town

John S. Yates, 16 year old, a sophomore in the Grangeville high school, died early Tuesday morning in the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Lee Yates, a mile northwest of Grangeville. Death was caused by pneumonia, following Spanish influenza. He had been at school on the previous Thursday. …

source: Idaho County Free Press. (Grangeville, Idaho Territory), 24 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., October 24, 1918, page 1

19181024DSM1-headline
Influenza Situation Is Improving Daily

The situation in Moscow is satisfactory. The influenza patients are recovering. While among the S. A. T. C. and vocational training men there have been 16 new cases admitted to the hospitals and only four released as cured, the real situation is not nearly as bad as this would indicate, for a large number are expected to be released tomorrow and some of those sent to the hospital are only “suspicious” cases and may not develop into influenza at all. To this care and forethought, which takes every case as soon as it becomes suspicious and gives it the best of care, is probably due the fact that there have been no deaths in Moscow.

There are two cases of pneumonia that are very serious and little hope of their recovery is held out. The men are named Davis and Cross and both hail from Wyoming. They were ill when they reached here. Dr. Kotalik, the medical lieutenant in charge of the men in the barracks which includes the vocational training corps at the harvester works and the Stewart building as well as those at the University of Idaho, is working almost day and night and has the situation well in hand.

Every physician in town, Drs. Rae, Adair, Grit man, Clarke and their assistants are doing all in their power to curb the spread of the disease and care for those afflicted with it. Dr. E. H. Lindley, president of the university, is getting little rest or sleep. He is giving his personal attention to the comfort and care and welfare of the men and is trying to see that they lack for nothing needed for their comfort.

The people of Moscow are doing splendidly. They have provided more than 100 beds, with comfortable bedding for the hospitals and for the men in the barracks. Delay in securing the cots that had been ordered made it necessary for Moscow people to provide beds and this has been freely done. One woman contributed five pairs of blankets. The soldiers have sent their thanks to the people and have asked The Star-Mirror to convey their heartfelt thanks for many acts of kindness and courtesy by Moscow men and women.

In Moscow, outside of the university and vocational training school, five new cases, all among children, are reported by Dr. W. A. Adair, city health officer up to the time of going to press. Dr. Adair wants to impress on the people the absolute necessity of keeping children at home while the epidemic is in Moscow.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 24 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., October 24, 1918, page 2

Moscow has done nobly in caring for the sick during the influenza epidemic and the results of this splendid cooperative work is apparent. Pullman, with a much smaller population, has had 11 deaths from influenza. Moscow has had none. No sacrifice is too great if by it a life is saved.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 24 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., October 24, 1918, page 3

City News

Miss Margaret Roberts of Boise has returned from an anticipated political tour of Camas prairie country, on account of the epidemic of influenza. Miss Roberts went to her home today.

Earl St. John of Davids’ is receiving many photographs of soldier boys for his patriotic window display. Mrs. St. John heard through a sister in the east of the influenza situation. In Philadelphia and Albany, N. Y., the restaurants are closed and even the street cars have suspended operations.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 24 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Nezperce Herald., October 24, 1918, page 1

19181024NH1-headlineThe Toll.
Influenza Claims Seven More Victims Here. – Total Eleven in Two Weeks.

Six more citizens of Nezperce have been added to list of fatalities from the present influenza epidemic since last Thursday. Up to that time four had succumbed here.

Given in the order of their passing, the six later victims were:

John Milner, who died at 8:30 o’clock Friday night, Oct. 18.

Mr. Frank Thompson, who died at 9:25 o’clock the same evening.

Carl Philip Price, who died at 12:30 o’clock, Saturday morning, October 19th.

Mrs. Flornee Fern Drake, who died at 4:30 p.m., Monday, Oct. 21st.

John Schwingler, who died 9 o’clock Tuesday evening, Oct. 22nd.

Mrs. Sue Bywaters, who died at 9:10 o’clock. Wednesday evening, October 23.

Edwin R. Garvin, who died at 8 p.m., Thursday night, Oct. 24.
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19181024NH2-headline
Stop the Influenza
Lewis County Knows by Bitter Experience That the “Stitch in Time” Rule Especially Applies to This Scourge
County Health Board, Doctors and Mayors of Stricken Communities Urge Attention to Following Instructions.
Disease Seldom Serious Where Proper Precautions Taken – Fatalities Mostly Due to Neglect.
Read These Rules on How to Avoid Influenza and Treat Those Who Have It

If you feel a sudden chill, followed by muscular pain, headache, backache, unusual tiredness and fever, go to bed at once.
See that there is enough bed clothing to keep you warm.
Open all windows in your bedroom and keep them open at all times, except in rainy weather.
Take medicine to open the bowels freely.
Take some nourishing food, such as milk, egg and milk, or broth every four hours.
Stay in bed until a physician tells you that it is sale to get up.
Allow no one else to sleep in the same room.
Protect others by sneezing and coughing into handkerchiefs or cloths, which should be boiled or burned.
Insist that whoever gives you water or food or enters the sick room for any purpose shall wear a gauze mask, which may be made at home of tour to six folds of gauze and which should cover the nose and mouth and be tied behind the head.
Remember that these masks must be kept clean, must be put on outside the sick room, must not be handled after they are tied on and must be boiled 30 minutes and thoroughly dried every time they are taken off.

To Nurse.

Keep clean. Isolate your patients.
When in attendance upon patients, wear a mask which will cover both the nose and the mouth When the mask is once in place, do not handle it.
Change the mask every two hours Owing to the scarcity of gauze boil for half an hour and rinse, then use the gauze again.
Wash your hands each time you come in contact with the patient. Use bichloride of mercury. 1-1000, or Liquor Cresol compound, 1-1000, for hand disinfection.
Walk in the fresh air daily.
Sleep with your windows open.
Insist that the patient cough, sneeze or expectorate into cloths that may be disinfected or burned.
Boil all dishes.

To Householders.

Keep out of the sick room unless attendance is necessary.
Do not handle articles coming from the sick room until they are boiled.
Allow no visitors, and do not go visiting.
Call a doctor for all inmates who show signs of beginning sickness.
The usual symptoms are: inflamed and watery eyes, discharging nose, backache, headache, muscular pain, fever.
Keep away from crowded places.
See to it that your children are kept warm and dry, both night and day.
Open your windows at night. If cool weather prevails, add extra bed clothing.

To Workers.

Walk to work if possible.
Avoid the person who coughs or sneezes.
Wash your hands before eating.
Make full use of all available sunshine.
Do not use a common towel. It spreads disease.
Should you cough or sneeze, cover nose and mouth with handkerchief.
Sleep is necessary for well being – avoid over exertion. Eat good, clean food.
Keep away from houses where there are cases of influenza.
If sick, no matter how slightly, see a physician.
If you have had influenza, stay in bed until your doctor says you can safely get up.

The germs of this disease are spread through the secretions of the mouth and nose of sick people and carriers, and not by books [?] clothing, etc.

Don’t Be Alarmed – Be Careful!
Neglect is the cause of practically all fatalities.
Dr. E. Taylor, County Health Officer
Dr. E. L. White, Advisory Director [?] in Lewis County.
Dr. John F. [?], Nezperce
Dr. R. E. D[?],
I M. Lowrey, Chairman County Board Health
E. D. S[?], Mayor, Nezperce
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19181024NH3-headlineFighting The Flu.
This Community Now Organized With Hospital, and Reducing Seriousness of Attack

Though there have been further fatalities at this point among the earlier serious influenza cases, the evidence is abundant that the situation is clearing up, and those more recently attacked are showing satisfactory recovery under the present system of treatment.

In the outstart the large number of cases distributed over a considerable territory and often in quarters not conducive to best results made the work of handling the situation most difficult and caused so much lost motion that even after outside help arrived it was hard to keep up with the increasing demands for succor.

These facts became more and more, impressive, until last Saturday. when the Fraternal Temple building — brick, clean, steam heated and electric lighted — was requisitioned and a small army set to work converting it into a hospital.

The work of conversion was pressed through Saturday night and Sunday morning the first patients were moved in, and since then, 21 to 40 — including the more serious — have been. under direct and continuous care of the efficient force in charge there.

It has taken much effort to keep this force up to the requirements, owing to the wide demand for nurses and doctors, and even yet some of our citizens are required to bear more than their share of the community’s burden to maintain the service. (Yes, if you are able, the hospital need your help, neighbor.)

source: The Nezperce Herald. (Nezperce, Idaho), 24 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Nezperce Herald., October 24, 1918, page 2

Pulling Through The Flu.

The magnitude of the influenza attack on Nezperce cannot be appreciated by the people outside; the fact is patent that this community of over a thousand souls was almost prostrated within two days after the appearance of the epidemic. Hundreds were sent to their beds. When asked, yesterday, by a visiting physician if a list of the patients in the town and environs was obtainable, a director of the local work answered in the negative — that all available workers had been kept too busy at the absolute essentials — that over 300 people, at least, had been stricken. The physician rather questioningly replied: “Three hundred is a good many, you know.”

The citizen’s estimate was modest — to say nothing of the suddenness with which it all happened. But the heroic spirits of the community have met the disaster wonderfully, and with the never-to-be-forgotten assistance from the outside communities, order was in reasonable time brought out of the chaos, and today a hospital with 40 cases is being efficiently operated here, and a working force is ready to take care of any new attacks; which are rapidly growing fewer. From this place assistance was sent to Ilo-Vollmer, and there helped materially in establishing hospital service and an organized system of fighting the plague.

When one reflectively looks from the inside of the matter, he realizes that truly wonderful work has been done, and knows that if all who can will keep up their efforts, this county will be saved from further devastation from the epidemic.

Over-caution to the extent of fear is bad for any constitution, but caution tempered with reason saves many a regret. The form of influenza which has ravaged this community the past two weeks indelibly impresses this thot [sic]. Hundreds of people in this county have been attacked by the malady and the vast majority of them have recovered or are well on the road to recovery. With few exceptions, the fatal cases were instances where the attack became too deep seated before proper preventatives were applied … [?] … the custom in the past with attacks of the grippe. The plan does not work well with the current epidemic, and strict adherence to the simple rules laid down on the first page of this paper is urged upon every citizen of the county. Those rules, carefully followed, will bring the conditions back to normal and blot the epidemic out in the county before cold weather sets in. This result must be attained.

source: The Nezperce Herald. (Nezperce, Idaho), 24 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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1918Atlantic7
A typist wears her influenza mask in October of 1918. Worried by the hold that disease had taken in New York City, practically all workers covered their faces in gauze masks as a protection against disease. National Archives

source: Alan Taylor April 10, 2018 “30 Photos of the 1918 Flu Pandemic” The Atlantic
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The Rathdrum Tribune., October 25, 1918, page 5

Personal Mention.

Dr. F. Wenz as been at Pullman, Wash., to attend his daughter, Miss Belle, who was reported ill with the influenza.
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Local Paragraphs.

Three members of W. R. Borthwick’s family on the prairie south of town are reported ill with influenza but are recovering. Their sickness is said to have followed a visit in Spokane.

Since school closed two weeks ago on account of influenza, John Papendick and H. C. Whittaker have thoroughly cleaned and fumigated the rooms.
— —

The Idaho state board of health issued an order Wednesday closing all public libraries in the state, as an additional precaution against the spread of influenza.
— —

Miss Florence Woutchick, aged 18 years, died of influenza last Friday, Oct. 18, at her home in Newport and was buried in Rathdrum cemetery Saturday afternoon. She leaves her father, Peter Woutchick, and three sisters, Misses Ruth and Irene of Newport, and Mrs. W. E. Jones of Hanford, Wash. She formerly resided in Rathdrum.
— —

Spokane reports 1600 cases of influenza and 35 deaths from pneumonia since the outbreak of the disease.

source: The Rathdrum Tribune. (Rathdrum, Idaho), 25 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Rathdrum Tribune., October 25, 1918, page 1

19181025RT1-headlineTo Stamp Out Flu
Rathdrum Authorities Took Further Steps Monday.

The alarming spread of Influenza throughout Idaho, caused the state board of health to order all public and private schools in the state to be closed indefinitely. A prior order closed all public meeting places, Including halls, churches, lodges, theatres, etc., and a later edict also put open air meetings under the ban.

The Rathdrum board of trustees, which constitutes the local board of health, adopted an emergency ordinance to safeguard the health of the community. The proclamation and ordinance follow:

A proclamation is hereby made that the following ordinance will be in full force and effect on and after October 23, 1918, and until its operation is suspended by official action of the Board of Trustees of the Village of Rathdrum, Idaho:

ORDINANCE NO. 63.

An Ordinance Providing for the Prevention and Suppression of an Infectious Disease, Dangerous to the Public Health, Known as Influenza or “Spanish Influenza” in the Village of Rathdrum, Idaho; Prohibiting persons under 16 years of age to be Abroad Upon the Streets, Alleys or other Public Grounds of the Village of Rathdrum; Prohibiting all Public Meetings or Assemblages of Persons; Prohibiting Persons from Congregating Together in Public Buildings and Places of Business, etc.; Prohibiting Assemblages of Persons Having Such Disease to be Made to Village Clerk, Providing a Penalty for the Violation of this Ordinance and Declaring an emergency.

Be it ordained by the Chairman and Board of Trustees of the Village of Rathdrum, State of Idaho:

Section 1. It shall be unlawful for any person under the age of 16 years to be abroad upon the streets, alleys, sidewalks or public grounds in the Village of Rathdrum, at any and all times, night or day, hereafter, until this ordinance is repealed, provided however, such person may go to and from work or upon necessary errands under the direction of the parent, guardian or employer of said person.

Section 2. Any person who violates the provisions of the preceding section shall be deemed a Juvenile Delinquent Person as defined by the Laws of the State of Idaho, and shall be subject to arrest by any peace officer of the Village without process and upon such arrest he or she shall be taken and delivered into the custody of the parent, guardian or employer of such person, and, if after investigation by the Village Board of Trustees such action is deemed necessary, an information or complaint in writing shall be filed by the Village Attorney, with the Probate Court of Kootenai County, Idaho, stating in a general way the act constituting such person a juvenile delinquent child or person accordingly and in manner provided by laws of Idaho, relative to Juvenile Delinquent persons.

Section 3. All Public meetings or assemblages within the Village of Rathdrum are prohibited and it shall be unlawful for any person or persons to attend any public meeting or assemblage.

Section 4. It shall be unlawful for any person or persons to congregate together, in groups or bodies upon the public streets, alleys, grounds or in any public buildings, business houses, etc., in the Village of Rathdrum, during the life of this ordinance.

Section 5. The provisions of section 4 of this ordinance apply to persons who congregate together in any auto, motor car or other vehicle for pleasure riding or for any other purpose not essential or necessary in the usual course of business.

Section 6. The owner or tenant or agent of the owner or tenant of a house in which a person resides who has the disease known as Influenza or “Spanish Influenza,” and the physician called to attend the person or persons so afflicted shall, within 24 hours after becoming cognizant of the fact, give notice thereof to the Clerk of the Board of Village Trustees of said Village of Rathdrum, and said persons so afflicted shall be kept away and apart from all other persons except those whose presence may be necessary to the physical or spiritual well being of such person or persons.

Section 7. That the Village Marshal shall be charged with the enforcement of this ordinance.

Section 8. Any person or persons violating the provisions of Sections 3, 4, 5, and 6 of this ordinance shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor, and on conviction thereof shall be punished by fine of not more than One Hundred and No 100 ($100.) Dollars, recoverable with costs, and in default of payment, to be imprisoned in the County Jail, at the rate of one (1) day for each two ($2.) dollars of the amount of the fine so imposed.

Section 9. That, an emergency existing by reason of the prevalence of Influenza or “Spanish Influenza”, an infectious disease dangerous to the public health, in the Village of Rathdrum and vicinity, and impending danger of the spreading of the disease among citizens of Rathdrum, this ordinance shall be in force and effect upon proclamation of the Village Board posted as provided by Statutes of the State of Idaho.

Passed under suspension of the rules October 21st, 1918.
O. W. Stone, Chairman, Pro Tem., Board of Trustees of the Village of Rathdrum, Idaho.
J. R. M. Culp, Village Clerk.
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Spirit Lake

Mrs. Walter Brown and five children were reported ill with influenza last week. Several additional cases are no reported.

Mrs. C. E. Starling is ill with pneumonia in Spokane.
— —

Coeur D’Alene

Coeur d’Alene has about 30 cases of influenza.

Carles F. Perrault, who died of pneumonia at Jefferson Barracks, Mo., was brought home for burial. A son of Alfred Esgate also died in a military camp, the body to be send home.

Dr. Drennan, county health officer, reports 15 cases of influenza at Post Falls and eight at Rathdrum. He states that the physicians in the county have been negligent in reporting cases.

source: The Rathdrum Tribune. (Rathdrum, Idaho), 25 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Rathdrum Tribune., October 25, 1918, page 3

The influenza is making the political campaign a noiseless one, but he who reads may see that it is not an altogether inactive on in Idaho.
— —

On Wednesday influenza cases reported in Idaho had reached 2200 in number and the reported deaths 25.

source: The Rathdrum Tribune. (Rathdrum, Idaho), 25 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Oakley Herald. October 25, 1918, page 2

19181025OH1-headlineUnnecessary Calls Made on Physicians
Proper Treatment of Mild Cases of Spanish Influenza.
Use of Gauze Masks Is Recommended for Those Nursing Sick – Handkerchiefs Are Out of Place – Rest is Important.

Washington. – In an effort to reduce unnecessary calls on the over-worked physicians throughout the country because of the present epidemic of Influenza, Surgeon General Blue of the United States public health service calls upon the people of the country to learn something about the home care of patients ill with influenza. Physicians everywhere have complained about the large number of unnecessary calls they have had to make because of the inability of many people to distinguish between the cases requiring expert medical care and those which could readily be cared for without as physician. With influenza continuing to spread In many parts of the country, and with an acute shortage of doctors and nurses everywhere, every unnecessary call on either physician, or nurses makes it so much harder to meet the urgent needs of the patients who are seriously ill.

Present Generation Spoiled.

“The present generation,” said the surgeon general, “has been spoiled by having had expert medical and nursing care readily available. It was not so in the days of our grandmothers, when every good housewife was expected to know a good deal about the care of the sick.

“Every person who feels sick and appears to be developing an attack of influenza should at once be put to bed in a well-ventilated room. If his bowels have moved regularly, it is not necessary to give a physic; where a physic needed, a dose, of castor oil or Rochelle salts should be given.

“The room should be cleared of all unnecessary furniture, bric-a-brac and rugs. A wash basin, pitcher, and slop bowl, soap and towel should be at hand, preferably in the room or just outside the door.

“If the patient is feverish a doctor should be called, and this should be done in any case if the patient appears very sick, or coughs up pinkish (blood-stained) sputum, or breathes rapidly and painfully.

“Most of the patients cough up considerable mucus; in some, there is much mucus discharged from the nose and throat. This material should not be collected in handkerchiefs, but rather in bits of old rags, or toilet paper, of on paper napkins. As soon as used, these rags or papers should be placed in a paper bag kept beside the bed. Pocket handkerchiefs are out of place in the sick room and should not be used by patients. The rags or papers In the paper bag should be burned.

“The patients will not be hungry, and the diet should therefore be light. Milk, a soft-boiled egg, some toast or crackers, a bit of jelly or jam, stewed fruit, some cooked cereal like oatmeal. hominy or rice – these will suffice In most cases.

Comfort of Patient.

“The comfort of the patient depends on a number of little things, and these should not be overlooked. Among these may be mentioned a well-ventilated room; a thoroughly clean bed with, fresh, smooth sheets and pillowcases; quiet, so that refreshing sleep may he had; cool drinking water conveniently placed; a cool compress to the forehead if there is headache, keeping the patient’s hands and clean, and the hair combed; keeping his mouth clean, preferably with some pleasant mouth wash; letting the patient know that someone is within call but not annoying him with too much fussing; giving the patient plenty of opportunity to rest and sleep.

“It is advisable to give the sick room a good airing several times a day.

“So much for the patient. It is equally important to consider the person who is caring for him. It is important to remember that the disease is spread by breathing germ-laden matter sprayed into the air by the patient in coughing or even in ordinary breathing. The attendant should therefore wear a gauze mask over her mouth and nose while she is in the sick room. Such a mask is easily made by folding a piece of gauze four fold, sewing a piece of tape at the four corners.

Observe Cleanliness.

“The attendant should, If possible, wear a washable gown or an apron which covers the dress. This will make It much simpler to avoid infection.

“It Is desirable that all attendants learn how to use a fever thermometer. This is not it all a difficult matter, and the use of such a thermometer is a great help in caring for the patients. The druggist who sells these thermometers will be glad to show how they are used.

“In closing, and lest I be misunderstood, I wish to leave one word of caution: if In doubt, call the doctor.”

source: The Oakley Herald. (Oakley, Idaho), 25 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Oakley Herald. October 25, 1918, page 4

Peak of Flu Not Yet Reached.

Washington. — Spanish influenza as an epidemic is subsiding rapidly in the military camps of the country, but among the civilian population generally the peak has not yet been reached.

source: The Oakley Herald. (Oakley, Idaho), 25 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Oakley Herald. October 25, 1918, page 6

Court Adjourns.

The term of the district court is about over at Albion due to the influenza epidemic. There were a great many cases standing for trial but owing to the influenza scare and at the request of state authorities, Judge Babcock feels that it was advisable not to bring juries and witnesses together as a matter of precaution and he, therefore, continued all cases for the term.

source: The Oakley Herald. (Oakley, Idaho), 25 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Oakley Herald. October 25, 1918, page 7

Raise Price of Oranges.

Chicago. — With approximately 120,000 Chicagoans confined to their homes with Spanish influenza, the prices of oranges, which are prescribed for many sufferers by physicians, have advanced from 60 dents per dozen to $1.25, and in sections of the city to $1.50.

source: The Oakley Herald. (Oakley, Idaho), 25 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Oakley Herald. October 25, 1918, page 8

Additional Locals.

A telegram came Monday announcing the death of Frank Ambler and wife at Logmont, Colorado, from Spanish influenza. Mr. and Mrs. Ambler were formerly residents of Oakley, and the news of their death came as a great shock to their many friends at this place.

J. S. Hansel has recovered from an attack of lagrippe.

William Ramary of Boulder has been ill with lagrippe.

source: The Oakley Herald. (Oakley, Idaho), 25 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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American Falls Press. October 25, 1918, page 1

Call For Aid From Red Cross.

It is urgently requested by the members of the Red Cross that all persons who have had any experience in nursing, and are willing to assist in taking care of influenza cases send in their names to Florence Barber, Secretary of the Red Cross telephone 76 or 115J. Please report any cases of influenza to Miss Barber so that nurses or other necessary aid can be promptly provided.
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19181025AFP1-headlineInfluenza Cases Greatly Increase
Demand Is Increasing To Stop All Gatherings.
Number of Cases in Rockland Largely Increased – Threshing Crew at Arbon All Have Disease – Cases Reported From All Parts of the County – Three Deaths so Far, and Several Serious Cases.

The influenza situation is growing more serious, according to every report that comes in. It is difficult to get accurate information, for the reason that it is assumed, in the absence of positive knowledge, that every case of illness is influenza.

The Rockland situation is worse than it was Tuesday, according to street report. It was reported Tuesday that there were 114 cases in Rockland and vicinity. Yesterday the mail carrier said there were then 156 cases, that there were only three nurses to look after all these, and that one of the nurses was coming down. Rockland has no doctor, but a woman who has been a practitioner, or has had some medical experience, has taken charge of Dr. Logan’s office and is using his medicines to the best of her knowledge.

The Cotant threshing crew of eight men were brought in from Arbon Wednesday, all ill with influenza. They were at the Bullock place when taken ill. A sister-in-law of George S. Butler is ill. and presumably has influenza.

Dr. Schiltz with a driver for his car, is virtually sleeping on the road between patients. It is hardly possible to see him to learn the exact situation. But the fact that he is gone all the time, and needing more nurses than are to be had, indicates that the situation is bad enough.

Mrs. Jacob Neu and L. C. Adolf are reported to be down with it in Pleasant Valley. Mrs. Chris Neu died Wednesday, reported to be from influenza. One death in Rockland and one in Arbon make all the deaths known, but there are some serious cases.

Dr. Schiltz went to Pleasant Valley last night and from there to Rockland, a fifty or sixty mile trip at the least, if he had no other calls.

A nurse came in from Burley last night and was driven to Rockland by by H. C. Allen, where her immediate services were in demand by a family of seven, all down, and the mother, delirious.

T. C. Elgin, who has been staying at the home of C. F. Goss. in American Falls, all the family being ill, was taken to the hospital yesterday, quite ill. John A. Brandt. living east of town, is at the hospital with a mild case.

The state board of health has authorized local boards of health to prevent all assemblages, open air or other wise.

Judge Guheen has discontinued the hearing of all court cases in the district until further notice.

Four county hoards of health have stopped open air meetings, public sales and all other gatherings. There is a growing demand in this county for similar action.

source: American Falls Press. (American Falls, Idaho), 25 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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American Falls Press. October 25, 1918, page 5

People and Events

A nurse for Rockland arrived on train from Burley tonight.

L. C. Adolf of Pleasant valley is reported to be quite ill with influenza.

Mrs. Chris Neu of Pleasant Valley died yesterday, leaving a husband and five children, the oldest of which is ten. Her babe died Saturday. Mrs. Neu, it is reported, died of influenza.

The banks were closed yesterday afternoon as a token of respect to Leonard Allen, the first victim of influenza in this part of the country. The deceased was a brother of H. C. Alley, cashier of the Evans State Bank.

Joseph Lambert, the oil burner man, has been in Rupert for the past two weeks or more, where his wife and children have been sick. They are improving and he expects to return to American Falls in the near future.

The condition of Dr. Noth was so serious Wednesday night that hopes for his life were abandoned, and his brother at Arbon was sent for. He rallied yesterday and it is believed the crisis has passed. He is a very sick man, however.

A nephew of Dr. Schlitz died at Pocatello today. He was en route with nine other young men to an army cantonment, and three of the number were taken from the train at Pocatello to a hospital. It is understood the young man had a wife and small child.

Leonard Alley, a young man whose home was in Rockland, died Tuesday in Bethany Deaconess Hospital, of influenza. His wife and mother were both too ill to attend the funeral. He was married a little more than a year ago to Miss Fern Halling of Rockland. Mrs. Allen’s mother came up from Loan, Utah, to attend the funeral, but was too ill to do so. The body was taken to Rockland today for interment. The deceased was a brother of H. C. Allen and John W. Allen of American Falls. He was the first victim of influenza, so far as known, from the Rockland valley, where about 150 cases are reported.
— —

Court Hearings Postponed

Auditor Bulfinch is in receipt of instructions from Judge Guheen, senior judge of this district, requesting him to notify all attorneys that there will be no more court hearings until further notice.

source: American Falls Press. (American Falls, Idaho), 25 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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American Falls Press. October 25, 1918, page 7

Notice To Patrons Of The American Falls Schools.

In view of the closing of the schools on account of the Spanish influenza, the Board of Trustees desire to impress upon the patrons the necessity of keeping their children at home as much as possible, so as to lessen the danger as much as possible.

Done by the order of the Board.
R. F. Noth, Chairman.
R. O. Jones, Cler.
Dated this 18th day of Oct., 1918.
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All Public Meetings May Be Prohibited
Spread of Spanish Influenza in State Shown by Report of 2227 Cases with 25 Deaths; Public Libraries Closed.

All state political headquarters were requested Wednesday by the state board of health to discontinue all public meetings, says the Boise Statesman, whether indoors or out, until the epidemic of Spanish influenza is over. County health officers, where it is deemed necessary, may prohibit assemblies which might cause the disease to spread.

J. K. White, state sanitary inspector, ordered public libraries to be closed after Wednesday because of the epidemic.

General Order May Come.

Dr. E. T. Biwer, secretary of the health board, stated Wednesday that the demand for discontinuing outdoor meetings was becoming more and more insistent, and that a general order against meetings of all kinds may be issued at any time by the health board. In response to a petition from Butte county he authorized local health authorities to issue such an order for that county. The Malad Council of Defense also requested that meeting be prohibited in Oneida county until the disease shows signs of decreasing.

Nurse Needed at Rockland.

An urgent call for a nurse to be sent to the Rockland district, in Power county, where 50 cases of influenza have broken out, was received by the health board from Mrs. R. F. Noth of American Falls. The total report Wednesday from Power county was 200 cases.

Some difficulty is being experienced in getting medical help to answer a call from Nez Perce. Dr. J. Carl Hill, who had been asked to take charge, was unable to arrange his affairs to that end, and the health board appointed Dr. P. P. French in this stead. Doctor French left Wednesday evening.

Death Roll Is 25.

Twenty-five deaths had been the influenza toll up to Wednesday afternoon, and the total number of cases on the official record was 2217. Wednesday’s reports were:

Ada county, 12; Bear Lake, 10; Bingham, 110 (two deaths); Butte, 8; Clearwater, 8; Elmore, 21 (one death); Fremont, 3 (one death); Gem, 2; Lincoln, 2; Owyhee, 8 (one death); Power, 200; Teton, 2.

source: American Falls Press. (American Falls, Idaho), 25 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Clearwater Republican. October 25, 1918, page 2

19181025CRad

source: Clearwater Republican. (Orofino, Idaho), 25 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Kendrick Gazette. October 25, 1918, page 1

Influenza Creeping Nearer

Dr. Rothwell reports a number of cases of influenza in this community but so far non in town. John Gentry and the James Holt family on Bear ridge are will with the disease. Mrs. Biddison, Eben Adams, Charles Talbott and wife of Juliaetta are also reported to have contracted influenza. Dr. Rothwell states that so far, none of the cases are serious.
— —

Southwick Items

School is closed here on account of the epidemic, altho there are no cases of influenza reported.

Miss Hazel Longeteig is home from her school at Fraser, on account of the influenza.

source: The Kendrick Gazette. (Kendrick, Idaho), 25 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Kendrick Gazette. October 25, 1918, page 3

19181025TKGad

source: The Kendrick Gazette. (Kendrick, Idaho), 25 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Kendrick Gazette. October 25, 1918, page 6

Gleanings

Wallace McKeever returned the first of the week from Seattle, Wa. He is recovering from an attack of the influenza and secured a furlough to remain at home until he had recovered.

The state board of health sent out an order late Saturday evening that all schools, both public and private, would be closed indefinitely, on account of the influenza epidemic. The state university was closed but the S. A. T. C. will continue as before.

Mat Riley returned Saturday from a special service training camp in Missouri. He received a temporary discharge from the army on account of ill health.

source: The Kendrick Gazette. (Kendrick, Idaho), 25 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Recorder. October 25, 1918, page 2

19181025TIR1-headlineInfluenza In Country Continues To Spread
Disease Apparently Standing Still in Army Camps After Recent Marked Decrease

Washington, Oct. 19. — Reports to the public health service yesterday from 35 states show that Spanish influenza still is on the increase in most parts of the country. Conditions in army camps also were less favorable, the 4,791 new cases reported to noon yesterday showing the disease apparently stationary after the marked decline noted for several days.

The epidemic still is more pronounced in the eastern section of the country than it is west of the Mississippi river, due, undoubtedly, to the more crowded conditions in the large cities. Up to October 16, New Jersey had reported 107,839 cases with 2,232 deaths, while in New York city 4,733 cases of influenza with 336 deaths and 646 cases of pneumonia with 287 deaths, were reported Thursday.

Minnesota reported epidemics in 36 districts, Colorado in seven cities, and Kansas in seven cities and my counties. There is a serious epidemic at Oklahoma City, many cases in other parts of Oklahoma. The disease was increasing in nine counties in North Dakota and was reported from six cities and several counties in New Mexico. The epidemic also is wide spread in Arizona.

Idaho reported new cases from five cities; South Dakota reported the disease throughout the state; Wisconsin had new cases in 10 cities and Wyoming reported 2,500 cases during the past week. Montana reported 2,000 new cases during the week ending October 12.
— —

Wold News in Condensed Form

Dr. John Dill Robertson, health commissioner of Chicago, is going to vaccinate everybody in Chicago against pneumonia following influenza. Those who have had influenza are excepted.

source: The Idaho Recorder. (Salmon City, Idaho), 25 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Montpelier Examiner. October 25, 1918, page 1

19181025MR1-headline
Four Bear Lake Citizens Victims Of Influenza
Mrs. John A. Bagley Dies at Home in Montpelier; Geo. McDonald, Ira Hymas and Archie Jensen, Soldier Boys, Also Victims.

The seriousness of the influenza epidemic, which has prevailed In this country for the past month, was brought home to the people of Montpelier yesterday morning, when the news of the death of Mrs. John A. Bagley spread throughout the city. A week ago Mrs Bagley was enjoying the best of health and being a woman In the prime of life, she little dreamed that in a few abort days she would be numbered among the victims of this terrible scourge which has swept over the United States. The first symptoms of influenza were manifested by Mrs. Bagley last Friday. Her condition quickly developed into pneumonia and although she had the best care possible under the circumstances, pneumonia developed and the end came yesterday morning shortly after one o’clock.

Mrs. Bagley was the daughter of Nels Peterson of Bloomington, and was born in that village 40 years ago. Besides her husband, who is also a victim of the influenza and whose condition is serious at this writing, Thursday afternoon. She is survived by her father, three sons and one daughter, and three brothers, one brother, Harold, being at the officers’ training school at Camp Zachary Taylor, Louisville, Ky. The other brothers are Earl and William, the latter being a member of the faculty of the agricultural college at Logan.

Her funeral was held yesterday afternoon, short services only being held at the cemetery.

To add to the sorrow caused by the death of Mrs. Bagley, came the news of the death of three of Bear Lake county’s young men who recently entered the services of Uncle Sam. They were:

George C. McDonald of Montpelier, Ira Hymas of Liberty and Archie Jensen of Ovid. The first two named died at Camp Fremont on Oct. 23 and the latter at Pueblo, Colo., he having been taken ill while en route from Camp Fremont to some point in the east.

George McDonald was the only son of Mr. and Mrs. George W. McDonald of this city. He was 33 years of age. He left here on August 12th for Camp Fremont, a strong and healthy young man. He was stricken with the influenza the latter part of last week. Last Saturday his parents received a telegram stating that he was seriously ill. This was the last they heard from him until the message came Wednesday night that he was dead.

Ira Hymas was the son of Mr. and Mrs. William Hymas of Liberty. He was one of the 1918 registrants, who volunteered for service and left here on August 5.

Archie Jensen was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Lars P. Jensen of Ovid. He registered for military service in June 1917, and left with the Bear Lake contingent on Aug. 5 for Camp Fremont. He wan taken ill with influenza while on the train en route from Camp Fremont to the east. He was removed from the train at Pueblo, Colo., and died there Wednesday afternoon.

The bodies of the three young men will be shipped to their respective homes in this county for burial.

With the rigid quarantine which had been put in force in this city, it was hoped that there would be no victims of the influenza here, but the quarantine, together with the diligent efforts of the health officers, has not prevented this terrible malady from making its appearance in the city, and today the conditions are much more serious than they were a week ago.

The Short Line officials directed that employees here who were stricken with the disease be taken to the Montpelier hospital, as long as accommodations could be given, and yesterday afternoon the following named employees of the road were registered as “flu” patients at the hospital: Messrs. Windham, Jackson, Hughes, Margetta and Lish. All are reported as getting along nicely.

The second floor of the city hall has also been converted into an emergency hospital and three “flu” victims are being cared for there. They are M. L. Bee, Miss Nina Sorensen and Miss Cornett, the latter being one of the Montpelier school teachers. She was taken ill last Monday at her room in the Hotel Burgoyne and was removed to the city hall Wednesday morning. A trained nurse is in charge at the hall and the three victims give promise of recovering.

Several homes in Montpelier are under quarantine, on account of members of the family having symptoms of the influenza, but up to yesterday afternoon no serious cases had developed.

Strict quarantine regulations are being maintained throughout the county, as well as in Montpelier, and the health officers believe that, with the co-operation of the public, anything like a serious epidemic in this county can be averted.

The disease is gradually subsiding in the east, but in Utah it is much worse than it was a week ago, despite the efforts that have been made by the state and city health officers to stamp it out.

At this writing the Montpelier health officers have no idea when the quarantine will be raised. Despite the effects it is having on many lines of business, they say that they propose to maintain a rigid quarantine until the disease is completely stamped out.
— — — —

Montpelier Examiner. October 25, 1918, page 5

Local News

On account of the influenza epidemic in Salt Lake Miss Virginia Brough, who is a student in the St. Mary’s Episcopal school of that city, arrived home last Friday.

The influenza alarm prompted the school board of Ovid to guard against its spread and no school sessions have been held there for two weeks. This affords teachers with sprained wrists a chance to “recuperate.”

Denver, which city has had even more than its quota of influenza victims, promises to raise the quarantine next Monday. Montpelier is not liable to do likewise quite that soon.

In sending a year’s subscription to the Examiner from Burley, Mrs. Jack Kelly says: “Burley is having its share of influenza; there are about 100 cases now, but there have been only two deaths so far.”

The Misses Charlotte and Adaline Kunz of Bern, who are graduate nurses, will leave next Monday for Camp Travis, Texas, for a month’s instruction in army nursing, preparatory to sailing for France.

Mrs. Marion Fitzpatrick died at her home in Weston, Idaho, last Saturday from influenza. Besides her husband, she is survived by four small children. Mrs. Ben Fitzpatrick, who went down from Pocatello to be with her daughter-in-law, is now ill with influenza, but was reported yesterday as getting along nicely.

We were in error last week in stating that Mr. Harrison and wife had arrived in the city on Wednesday and on the following day were taken down with the influenza. They had been in the city for several weeks – Mr. Harrison at Lynn’s hospital, where he died last week. While he was at the hospital his wife had rooms at the Hunter house, and on Thursday she was taken down with the influenza.

Russell Groo, who left for Jefferson Barracks, Missouri, three weeks ago, has gone through a siege with the influenza and came through all O. K. He has since passed a physical examination and was accepted for general military service.

source: Montpelier Examiner. (Montpelier, Idaho), 25 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Meridian Times., October 25, 1918, page 2

19181025TMT1-headline
News of a Week in Condensed Form

Record Of The Important Events Told In Briefest Manner Possible.
Happenings That Are Making History – Information Gathered From All Quarters of the Globe and Given in a Few Lines

 

Intermountain.

A strict quarantine has been established at Camp Lewis, Wash., which forbids soldiers, including officers, enlisted men and civilian employees, from leaving the military reservation and prohibiting civilians from entering.

Reports compiled October 18 by the city board of health showed 1279 cases of influenza had developed in Salt Lake since the outbreak of the disease about two week previous.

Arthur Morse Moon, Sale Lake actor and playwright, died in Helena, Mont., a victim of influenza, being stricken while playing on the Pantages circuit.

In spite of drastic action on the part of state and municipal authorities the spread of influenza throughout Colorado continues.

Dr. O. M. Lanstrum, candidate for United States senator from Montana, has abandoned his speaking dates and volunteered his services to the state in fighting the influenza epidemic.

Domestic.

“Public gatherings of all kinds” are prohibited under the Spanish influenza quarantine order issued by the Iowa state board of health, and this includes football games and other outdoor gatherings, it was explained.

Influenza at Camp Kearny is being kept well in hand, the few cases that have developed being of a mild type and no deaths attributed to the disease having occurred for the last ten days.

Officers and men at Camp Kearny are being put through a rigorous course of calisthenics daily during the period of quarantine, with the idea of keep the men in the bet possible physical condition.

Congressman Jacob E. Meeker died at St. Louis, October 16, of Spanish influenza, after his marriage at midnight the previous night to his private secretary.
— —

In The Gem State

The body of Private Charles E. Dudley, son of Mr. and Mrs. John Dudley of Hollister, who died October 9 at Camp Lewis from pneumonia, was interred in the Twin Falls cemetery with military honors.

State health official, when they started out to serve warrants upon a number of Boise pool hall men who had been reported as failing to observe the board’s closing order, were unable to find a single violator in the city.

Grover Anderson died at Malad from pneumonia, superinduced by Spanish influenza. Mr. Anderson came to Malad four years ago from Hryum and has a farm in Pocatello valley. He was 25 years of age, and was born in Hyrum. He contracted influenza in Salt Lake City about ten days previous to his death.

As far as known there has been no case of Spanish influenza in Idaho Falls or Bonneville county. Every precaution is being taken to prevent its appearance. All public indoor gathering are prohibited. Theaters are closed and no church services are behind held.

source: The Meridian Times. (Meridian, Idaho), 25 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Meridian Times., October 25, 1918, page 7

It is the opinion of Dr. E. T. Biwer secretary of the state board of health that the Spanish influenza in this state is being held under control, as new outbreaks of the disease are less frequent and precautionary measures are having their effect.

source: The Meridian Times. (Meridian, Idaho), 25 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Meridian Times., October 25, 1918, page 9

Soldiers Over Peak of “Flu.”

Washington. — While Spanish influenza continues to spread among the civilian population, a continued decrease in the number of new cases at army camps has let army medical officials to believe the peak of the epidemic among the soldiers has been passed.
— —

British Official Flu Victim.

Washington. — With full military honors, the body of Captain A. A. Mackintosh, assistant military attache at the British embassy, who died recently from Spanish influenza, was buried Wednesday in Arlington National cemetery.
— —

Blood Serum as Influenza Cure.

Chicago. — A blood serum used as a curative in the east only in desperate cases of influenza will be tried out in Chicago and Illinois, the state influenza commission agreed Friday.

source: The Meridian Times. (Meridian, Idaho), 25 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Meridian Times., October 25, 1918, page 10

19181025TMTad

source: The Meridian Times. (Meridian, Idaho), 25 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Republican. October 25, 1918, page 1

Victim Of Influenza

Fred Rogers, age twenty-four years, son of Mr. and Mrs. John R Rogers of this city, died at his home in Lost River Wednesday evening, following an attack of influenza.

Fred was well known in this community having lived here a few years ago.

Deceased is survived by his wife, mother, father, eight sisters and brothers.

Funeral arrangements have not been made as yet and will be announced later.
— —

Died At Camp Lewis

Percil J. Humphrey, son of Andrew Hanseen of Shelley died at Camp Lewis the first of the week, following an attack of influenza. The body was brought home and funeral services were held at Shelly Wednesday, Oct. 23. Internment was made at the Shelly cemetery.
— —

Received A Promotion

Word has been received here that Corporal Norval Hinds, has been promoted to the rank of sergeant. Norval is stationed at Camp Funston, and expects to go to France as soon as the influenza epidemic is over.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 25 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Idaho Republican. October 25, 1918, page 2

Shelley

Antone Christensen came home from the University of Utah at Salt Lake City last Tuesday, and will stay until the university open again. It is now closed on account of the influenza.

The town was not very lively last Saturday because the pool halls and Virginia theatre were closed. The Shelley people must remember that there is only one cast of influenza in town and this case is practically cured, so every available means must be taken to keep it from spreading.
— —

Springfield

School closed Friday due to the illness of Mr. Robbins and a scare over the influenza.
— —

McDonaldville

Miss Sarah Gray, who has been ill during the past week with influenza is able to be up again.

Mrs. Jared Anderson, who has been staying with the Baily family was called home on account of the illness of her brother Emeron Yancy.

The Cooper family are recovering from an attack of influenza.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 25 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Republican. October 25, 1918, page 8

Upper Presto

School has been stopped for an extended time on account of the Spanish influenza.
— —

Sterling

Everything seems unusually quite here this week, due probably to the stormy weather, and the prevalence of the Spanish influenza. People are staying home very closely, trying to avoid the epidemic.
— —

Springfield

The school trustees have closed the schools for at least a week as several cases of influenza were reported.

Ed Shelman is out again, after an attack of influenza.

Marguerite Chandler is quite ill with influenza.
— —

Kimball

H. Pope, who has been seriously ill with typhoid fever, is improving slowly.

Mrs. Milburn started to Blackfoot last Friday to do some shopping, but when she heard that the influenza was there she decided it would be safest to stay at home.
— —

Rose

Lloyd Carlos was very ill for a few days last week.

John Norman was on the sick list last week.

Miss Melba Norman is ill with the influenza.
— —

Moreland

Vern Wray who has had a bad case of the Spanish influenza is now recovering.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 25 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Shoshone Journal. October 25, 1918, page 1

Dietrich.

Now that school is closed, Red Cross meetings adjourned, church services discontinued and all social gatherings suspended on account of the influenza epidemic, news items from Dietrich are as scarce as any good deeds among the war lords of Germany.

It is a bad wind that blows no good. School is being closed gives the big boys a chance to do some good work in helping their folks in the potato harvest.

Miss Harris, one of our popular teachers, suspending her vocation on account of the closed schools, is now helping C. F. Borden with his clerical work during the rush of shipments.
— —

Big Wood River News.

No Spanish influenza on the North Shoshone tract that we know of.

Our school was dismissed Friday on account of influenza.

source: Shoshone Journal. (Shoshone, Idaho), 25 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Shoshone Journal. October 25, 1918, page 5

Local and Personal News

The Library was closed Wednesday by order of the State Board of Health as a safeguard against the spread of influenza.

Mrs. E. G. Gooding notified the members of the executive committee of the Red Cross that the regular meeting would be held on the lawn at her home Monday evening, but the west wind arose and objected, so the meeting was postponed.

source: Shoshone Journal. (Shoshone, Idaho), 25 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., October 25, 1918, page 1

19181025TDSM1-headline
One Death From Influenza
General Situation Is Better

The first death from influenza occurred early this morning when Miles Jordan Davis, of Gillette, Wyoming, died after a lingering illness with pneumonia, following influenza. The young man was just 21 years old and was a member of the vocational training corps. He was taken sick before entraining for Moscow and was quite ill when he reached here. His condition has been critical for several days. He had never been able to take the physical examination.

His mother, Mrs. May Davis, and a friend, Mrs. Southworth, of Gillette, Wyoming, arrived at noon today and are being cared for at the home of President and Mrs. Lindley. They will return to their home with the body tomorrow, leaving on the morning train. An escort from the vocational training school will accompany the body.

The other case of pneumonia, that of Private Cross, also of Wyoming, who was not expected to live, is regarded as slightly improved with some chance of recovery.

The general situation is reported better today. In the S. A. T. C. and vocational training corps, with more than 800 members, six new cases were admitted to the hospital and two were discharged as cured. All of the cases are light and the situation is regarded as greatly improved. It is believed the worst is over.

All Doctors Helping.

In reporting the influenza situation yesterday the statement was made that all of the doctors of Moscow are doing all in their power to control the situation, and the names of several were given. Inadvertently the names of Drs. Hatfield and Leitch were omitted from the list. These men are doing as much as any men can do to help in the great work that is taxing the strength of all of the doctors of Moscow.

Capt. Felker Optimistic.

Capt. Luther Felker, commanding officer of the University of Idaho S. A. T. C. said late Thursday afternoon that the Spanish influenza situation was well in hand. Captain Felker said: “The situation is well in hand. Weather conditions are good for the stamping out of the epidemic. We have every reason to believe that the [?] All those are being cared for better than they would be in their own homes. All those who show any temperature are immediately put in bed. They are in comfortable quarters with ample care and every convenience.”
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19181025TDSM2-headlineRalph Brownlow’s Wife Is Stricken
Former Resident Of Moscow Escapes From Spokane Hospital While Sick

Mrs. Emma Brownlow, wife of Ralph Brownlow, former linotype operator for the Idaho Post and a resident of Moscow for a long time, is seriously ill with influenza at Spokane and while delirious escaped from the hospital. Mr. Brownlow is “over-seas” having been sent across after he had completed two months of training in the vocational training school at the University of Idaho, being a member of the first class of 100 at the university. The following from the Spokane Chronicle tells of Mrs. Brownlow’s escape from the hospital:

Mrs. Emma Brownlow, a delirious patient at the influenza hospital, escaped through a rear window, and, after obtaining a nickel from the landlady of a nearby lodging house, called the police station yesterday afternoon. She asked that officers be sent with the patrol wagon to take her home.

The police responded and returned Mrs. Brownlow to the hospital, but she was later taken to her home at S128 Thorpe street, as there is not sufficient help at the hospital for a personal guard. Her condition is said to be much improved today.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 25 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., October 25, 1918, page 3

City News

V. L. Nelson, formerly with the First Trust bank, now a bookkeeper with M. P. Miller Co., has had an attack of influenza for five days but is now improving in health.

Mrs. J. A. Thornton of Coeur d’Alene came to Moscow today to see her son, Robert J. Thornton of the S A. T. C., who is sick of influenza.

Mrs. Davis Of Gennett, Wyoming, came to Moscow on the noon train today, called by the death of her son of S. A. T. C. Mrs. Davis was accompanied by Miss Southwick.

Rev. W. H. Bridge, rector of St. Mark Episcopal church, who was sick with influenza for several days, is again able to be out, having made a rapid recovery.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 25 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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1918Atlantic11-a
The congregation prays on the steps of the Cathedral of Saint Mary of the Assumption, where they gathered to attend mass and pray during the influenza epidemic, in San Francisco, California. Bettmann / Bettmann Archive

source: Alan Taylor April 10, 2018 “30 Photos of the 1918 Flu Pandemic” The Atlantic
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Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 1)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 2)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 3)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 4)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 5)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 6)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 7)