Idaho History June 14, 2020

Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic

Part 9

Idaho Newspaper clippings October 26 – 31, 1918

1916CampMorrisonFortBoise-a
Camp Morrison, Fort Boise, Boise, Idaho ca. 1916
photo from the Mike Fritz Collection

source: History of Idaho (FB)

On April 5, 1879, the Fort [Boise] was redesignated as Boise Barracks. Military units continued to serve and protect the citizens of Boise and southwestern Idaho until the Fort was formally abandoned in 1913. Soldiers returned briefly in 1916 to prepare for the Mexican border campaign, and again between 1942 and 1944. From 1920 to the present, the Boise VA Medical Center has occupied the main part of the grounds of the former Fort Boise, and continues to utilize the buildings and campus.
source: History of the Boise VA & Fort Boise

Note: this photo is not related to the 1918 pandemic, included to show an example of a “cantonment.”
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The Daily Star-Mirror., October 26, 1918, page 1

19181026DSM1-headline
Seventeen New Influenza Cases Reported Today

Seventeen new cases of influenza were admitted to the hospital for the S. A. T. C. and vocational training corps men today, and four were discharged as cured. All cases in the hospital with two exceptions are very mild. Robert Cross, who has been in a critical condition with pneumonia, is reported slightly better today with some chance of recovery. His parents arrived from Douglas, Wyo., at noon today. He is at a local hospital and is being given the best of care.

Conditions with the S. A. T. C. and vocational training men are regarded as very favorable and those in charge feel encouraged over the situation. The men not afflicted are being kept out of doors as much as possible and are being given military training mostly and very little shop work. The general health of the men is good.

Moscow people are helping in every way possible to care for the sick and convalescent. Today the Elks’ lodge turned its fine temple and club rooms over to the convalescents, and 10 who were discharged from hospitals were quartered there. The club rooms are among the finest in northern Idaho and the men enjoy the change immensely.

Mrs. May Davis, whose son Miles died here yesterday morning, left this afternoon at 3 o’clock with the body. She was accompanied by a friend, Mrs. Southworth, who came from Gillette, Wyo., with her, and a man from the vocational training corps accompanied the body as a military escort.

In the city proper there are few new cases and all are very mild. Most of them are among children. Dr. Adair, city health officer, has issued instructions that children must not congregate in homes or in crowds anywhere. There have been no serious cases in town and all of those who were attacked with the disease last week are released as cured.

Pullman Has Four Deaths.

Pullman, Wash., — Four additional deaths from influenza were recorded last night and today, bringing the total of deaths since last Sunday to 15, practically all of which have been from the vocational section of the S. A. T. C. The deaths reported today are: Joseph Anderson, Ritzville; Walter Davis, Dunsmuir, Cal.; Earl Dows, Seattle; Warren Clare, Albion, Wash.

The situation is rapidly clearing so far as new cases are concerned, a steady decrease in patients being shown each morning.
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19181026DSM2-headlineElks Temple for Convalescents
“Best People on Earth” Give Fine Club Rooms to Recovering Soldiers

An offer that will bring joy to the hearts of many a sick soldier in Moscow has been made by the Elks’ lodge of Moscow. The lodge offers the use of its temple on North Main street, with its club room equipment, including reading room, pool and billiard tables and lounging room for the use of the soldier convalescents who are recovering from influenza.

The Elks have one of the finest club rooms in the northern part of Idaho. It is luxuriously equipped with all of the comforts of a club room and is well heated and lighted. For the boys who have been confined in barracks or hospitals, especially the improvised hospitals which lack the comforts of a home, this fine club room will be a great treat.

Judge Steele and the other officers of the lodge have made it possible for the young men, many of whom are, no doubt, suffering with “homesickness,” to enjoy this fine home during the period of their convalescence, and the young men, who are the beneficiaries of this generosity, are loud in their praise of the spirit which prompted the offer.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 26 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., October 26, 1918, page 2

The influenza situation in Moscow is encouraging. With about 1300 students and soldiers quartered here in a city of 6000 inhabitants and only one death so far, the people are to be congratulated. Moscow people have risen to the occasion and are taking the right steps to stop the spread of the disease.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 26 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., October 26, 1918, page 4

19181026DSM3-headlineJuliaetta Has Some Influenza
Seven Mild Cases Reported In Town — Frost Has Not Killed Gardens

Seven cases of Spanish influenza have developed in Juliaetta up to date. Those ill are Charles G. Talbott, postmaster; Mrs. Charles Talbott, Miss Beatrice Buchanan, Mrs. Nellie Biddison, Mr. Eben Adams, Miss Lillian Ottosen, and Mr. B. F. Morgan. All are reported to be doing nicely, and no cases of pneumonia have developed.

Although two mornings this week have brought light frosts to Juliaetta, vegetables are still unhurt, and tomatoes are yet being picked fresh from the vines for table use.

From a half acre of watermelons G. Garrison has realized $240 this season. A rather unusual record.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 26 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., October 28, 1918, page 1

19181028DSM1-headline
Influenza Claims Three More Victims In Moscow

Three more deaths in Moscow, making a total of four as a direct result of influenza, are reported today. Albert Grover Nail, of Moscow, who has been in an army cantonment in California and was discharged because of ill health, reached here a week ago last night. He was sick when he got to Moscow and died at the home of his step-father, N. Peterson, on West A Street. He was 30 years old, unmarried, had lived in Moscow many years and was an employee of the Idaho National Harvester company prior to entering the army in August. He was a member of the Odd Fellows and the Modern Woodmen of America. He leaves his mother and two brothers.

Robert Cross, of Douglas, Wyoming, died last night. He was a member of the vocational training corps and was sick when he reached Moscow. His illness developed into pneumonia and his condition has been critical for many days. His parents, Mr. and Mrs. George Cross, reached Moscow Saturday and were with him when death came. The body will be sent to Douglas, Wyoming, for burial. A military escort will accompany it.

George Sparenberg, of Wardner, Idaho, died during the night. He came here October 15. His nearest relative is Mrs. Lillian McDonald, of Detroit, Michigan. Relationship is not given. The body will be held awaiting instructions from her as to its disposition.

Since yesterday there have been nine new cases and 12 have been discharged as cured. Those discharged are taken to the Elks’ temple where they are comfortably housed and well cared for.

George H. Cross, of Douglas, Wyo., whose son, Robert, died last night, is a member of the state senate of his state and a prominent citizen. He and Mrs. Cross leave with the body for their home tomorrow.

Moscow people are doing all in their power to care for the sufferers with this disease. Many homes have been thrower open to the care of the men. Mrs. Frank L. Moore, whose husband is candidate for United States senator, has their fine home filled with members of the S. A. T. C., to whom she is acting as a mother. Mrs. L. N. Roberts has also thrown her home open for the care of the convalescents.

Both of men who died last night were members of the vocational training corps or “class B” of the S. A. T. C.

It believed are no other serious cases in town and conditions generally are regarded as very satisfactory.
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19181028DSM2-headlineIdaho Teachers Will Draw Pay
Closing of Schools by Quarantine Does Not Stop Pay of the Teachers

The state of Idaho is out approximately $20,000 per day in maintaining its school system during the Spanish influenza epidemic, as all teachers will continue to receive their salaries during the closed period where their contracts do not expressly state otherwise. More than 3700 teachers are employed in the state, and the average salary is $100 per month. Other expenses bring the total cost of operating the schools to approximately $400,000 per school month of 20 days.

Much interest has been shown by teachers in the question of whether they were to receive their salaries or not while the schools are closed. The attorney general has rendered the following opinion regarding this matter in the case where a school was closed during a quarantine last year and it covers the present situation:

All Teachers Get Pay.

“By section 58, laws of 1913, page 442, power is given the board of trustees to employ and contract with teachers. As there is no provision of the laws which has come to our attention that governs this situation the question is one of the contract entered into between the school board and the teacher and the rights of the teacher to receive pay and the liability of the school board for salary will be governed solely by the contract.

“In the absence of terms in the contract permitting the school board to suspend the salary of the teachers during quarantine, it is the opinion of this department that the salary should continue throughout the period of the quarantine.”

— Coeur d’Alene Press.
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Sick Boys Are Thankful.

The S. A. T. C. boys in the A. K. E. fraternity hospital as The Star-Mirror to extend their thanks to Mr. McIntosh for ice cream furnished by him for every one in the house last Saturday.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 28 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., October 28, 1918, page 2

Quarantine Prevents Visit.

Mrs. L. H Seymour and Miss Vivian Dart of Palouse were in Moscow today to see their sister, Miss Genevieve Dart, at Ridenbaugh Hall, but found the quarantine preventing the visit. Mrs. Seymour, formerly Miss Lorena Dark, a student of the university, is visiting in the west, but lives in Cleveland, Ohio.
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Mr. and Mrs. Mills, of Kamiah, Idaho, are here to visit their son, who is ill with influenza. His condition is not regarded as serious.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 28 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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American Falls Press. October 29, 1918, page 1

19181029AFP1-headlineInfluenza Epidemic Sweeping The Country
Cases Increasing in Number and Securing of Nurses a Difficult Problem – Hospital Filled to Overflowing and Nurses Stricken.

The influenza epidemic is growing, and difficulty is experienced in securing an adequate number of nurses to meet the demand.

Bethany Deaconess Hospital is filled and four of the five regular nurses are down with the disease. Miss Irene Oliver went to the hospital this morning to answer the telephone and give the remaining nurse all her time for the sick.

Four nurses were supposed to have started for American Falls yesterday, one from Boise, two from Pendleton, and one from some other Oregon point. Three more were ordered here last night by the secretary of the state board of health.

Miss Gweenty, the nurse sent to Rockland last week, has come down with the disease.

Due to a misunderstanding somewhere, the number of nurses expected have not been sent. Applications were sent by the secretary of the Red Cross, but Saturday night word was received that no attention was paid to them because they were not “official.” Saturday night at 11 o’clock D. W. Davis was called at Boise and told of the situation, and secured the nurses above referred to. Yesterday he induced the state board of health to provide five more. In the meantime the local Red Cross had wired for three, and the order for the five secured through Mr. Davis was revoked. Up to noon none of the nurses had arrived. There is work waiting for all of them and more.

The situation in Rockland is as bad as it was last week, and a hospital has been opened there in the dining room of the Atwood hotel, in charge of Mrs. Cora Darling. The number of serious cases in Rockland is said to be not large, but there are a large number of mild cases.

In American Falls the epidemic is getting a good start. The following families have one or more cases:

A. Rowberry, L. L. Evans. Jr., O. C. Hall, Chester Hall, W. D. Barnhart, Walter Sparks. Mrs. Joslyn, Mrs. J. M. Booth, Lee Atkins, Frank Barnard. Elmer Nye. Arthur West. W. Bennion. Mrs. Fred Walworth, H. F. Fitzpatrick, O. R. Baum, and the Telford family. There are reported to be many others. Every rooming house in town has its share.
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Influenza Victim.

Chris Poulson, son of Mr. and Mrs. E. H. Poulson of Moonshine, died last night at the Bethany Deaconess Hospital, of influenza. He was 21 years of age. Four other members of the family are ill, two of them, a young man and a young woman, are serious, having developed pneumonia. Two younger children are not so bad. Funeral services will be held at Neely today.
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Will Not Visit Voters.
Andrew May Kept at Home by Family Sickness and Neighborhood Duties.

Andrew May, Republican candidate for representative, will not make a campaign for the officer for which he was nominated. There has been so much sickness in the Rockland community that he has not gone anywhere except on strictly business or humanitarian matters.

It is understood that within the past few days all the members of Mr. May’s family, excepting himself and Mrs. May, are ill with influenza. He will not attempt to leave home to further his campaign. …
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Notice To The Public

Owing to the influenza epidemic all persons are warned against congregating in groups within doors, and advised to keep in the open air and avoid mingling with the public as much as possible. The wearing of masks in offices where the carrying on of business brings those in charge in contact with numbers of people is recommended as a precautionary measure.

Convalescents from influenza are hereby quarantined within their homes for a period of one week after recovery, or required in lieu of quarantine, to wear a mask on the streets at all times when they are liable to come into contact with other people.

By Order of the City Board of Health.
W. J. Hanson, Chairman.
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Victim of Influenza.
C. T. Cotant Interned at Home by the Spanish Bug.

C. T. Cotant came down with the influenza Friday last, and is confined to his home. While he has been quite uncomfortable he has not been dangerously ill, but will not be able to take any part in promoting his candidacy. Mr. Cotant is the Republican nominee for County Attorney. He has been a resident of the county for about nine years. The first five or six years he spent in proving a homestead in the Rockland valley, doing his part to improve the country. For the past three years he has been practicing law in American Falls. …
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Rockland Deaths

A son of Mr. and Mrs. H. S. Walker of Rockland, died of influenza yesterday, aged about 20 years.

A daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. P. Fifield, of Rockland, died Sunday, of influenza, aged about four years.

W. B. Joslyn died Saturday night. He had a complication of ailments, probably combined with influenza. He was found dead in his chair. All the members of the family, except Mrs. Joslyn, are ill with the influenza. Ben, a son at Camp Lewis, is expected home today, having been notified of the serious situation at home.

source: American Falls Press. (American Falls, Idaho), 29 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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American Falls Press. October 29, 1918, page 5

People and Events.

Charles Dollar is said to be very sick with influenza.

Frank Barnard is an influenza victim. He is reported to be getting along all right.

Miss Helen Zaring left yesterday for Neeley to assist in caring for the family of her uncle, Roy Zaring, who are down with influenza.

Miss Grace Reed and John Nix, of the First National Bank, R. E. Austin and Lee Atkins of the Fall Creek, are late influenza victims.

Dr. Altree, who went to Rockland Sunday to assist in the hospital there, returned Monday. Dr. Altree has plenty to do at Home.

O. H. Barber and J. H. DeWitt went to Rockland Sunday and got out the Rockland Times for Ernest Jones, who is an influenza victim. This week’s issue of the Times will be issued from the Press office.

source: American Falls Press. (American Falls, Idaho), 29 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Republican. October 29, 1918, page 1

Victim Of Influenza

Word has been received here of the death of Mrs. John A. Bagley, wife of former Attorney Bagley, at Montpelier last Wednesday. The cause of her death being influenza.

Mr. Bagley is also very ill with the disease.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 29 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Republican. October 29, 1918, page 2

19181029TIR1-headline
Shelley

Guy Mallory came home from Salt Lake City the first part of the week, and is now confined to his bed with a server case of the influenza.

Dr. F. E. Roberts took down with a severe case of influenza last Thursday and at the present is getting along as well as could be expected.

Frank Anderson of Jameston recently died of the influenza. His funeral was held last Wednesday.

The body of Piercel Humphreys arrived here last Wednesday morning and the funeral was held at the Humphrey home in the afternoon. Many friends and relatives were present at the funeral. Another Shelley boy who has given his life for the freedom of the world and another Shelly family has made the supreme sacrifice. God bless the mother of this dead soldier.

Isaac Patterson came down from Dillon, Mont. on Wednesday last, as school is closed there on account of the rapid spread of the influenza. Isaac expects to work at the sugar factory until school opens again.

Harold Woodward who is in the S. A. T. C. at Logan, Utah had a severe case of influenza, but at the present time is recovering.

Shelley has been lucky so far by not having much influenza there being only four or five cases in town at the present time and none being serious enough to cause any alarm as yet.

E. C. Miller is now improving in health, after being seriously ill for some time.

Guard against the influenza by taking good preventatives. Get also the good advise of a competent doctor if you feel at all ill.
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19181029TIR2-headline
Idaho Budget

No cases of Spanish influenza have appeared in Hailey or vicinity, and but two in Blaine county, these two being at Carey. Both cases are now considered out of danger.

Homer H. Lyon of Melba died at Jefferson Barracks, Mo., of Spanish influenza and pneumonia. Lyon was inducted under a call for special or limited service men on September 2.

On account of the spreading of the Spanish influenza epidemic in the southeast, the fall term of federal court that was to have been held in Pocatello beginning last Wednesday, has been postponed until November 11.

Letters received at Blackfoot from John Albert Anderson by his mother, preceding the announcement of his death from wounds in France, indicated that he had participated in much of the terrific fighting on the western front.

A communication has been addressed to the parents of school children in Bannock county, asking them to see to it that their boys and girls are kept busy during the enforced vacation which is now on owing to the influenza situation.

Mrs. Sam Koppel of Boise received a second staggering blow last week, when the news came of the death at Fort Leavenworth by Spanish influenza of her eldest son, Mose, her husband having been killed in an auto accident two months ago.

Official order has been issued to turn back the clocks one hour, thus bringing the time system to the old running order, or as near sun time as the zone limit established in the United States will admit. The change will be made at midnight October 27.

The health officer at Pocatello has sounded a warning to the people of the city not to become hysterical over the influenza situation, advising that if the rules and precautions continuously given out by health authorities are adhered to the situation will straighten itself out satisfactorily.

The value of the nurse’s survey made by the woman’s committee, Council of National Defense, is now being shown. Through it, Mrs. J. M. Taylor, the chairman of the nursing committee has been able to give to Dr. E. T. Biwer, secretary of the state board of health, a list of all the nurses, either married or single, in southern Idaho, for quick reference should an epidemic break out in that section.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 29 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Republican. October 29, 1918, page 7

Accused I. W. W. Dies

Sacramento. — Edward Burns, one of the eighty alleged Industrial Workers of the World, awaiting trial here November 12 on a charge of conspiring to obstruct the war activities of the government is dead from influenza.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 29 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Bonners Ferry Herald. October 29, 1918, page 1

Charles Carlson “Flu” Victim

Charles Carlson, a blacksmith recently employed at the Perry Wilson logging camp, died at the Bonners Ferry hospital Sunday morning of pneumonia which had developed from an attack of Spanish influenza. The funeral will be held this afternoon. Undertaker Stookey was not able to communicate with any relatives of the deceased.
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Spanish influenza Epidemic Waning

Dr. E. E. Fry, county health officer, states that the Spanish influenza epidemic in this district seems to be on the wane and that there are few serious cases in the county now.

According to Dr. Fry’s records 88 known cases have developed the past week. It is estimated that about 300 people have been afflicted in the city and about 200 more in the county. There have been five deaths resultant from influenza. The percentage of the mortalities is therefore only about one per cent which is very low when it is considered that in many places the average percent is five and that this percentage has run up as high as ten per cent.
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Mrs. Skarr received word Sunday of the serious illness of her son, Paul Peter, who has been working in one of the government spruce camps on the coast. The telegram stated that Paul was ill with pneumonia.
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Mrs. W. F. Kinnear Passes Away
Died Thursday Afternoon of Pneumonia Following Influenza

Mrs. W. F. Kinnear passed away Thursday afternoon about 1:30 o’clock, following a four days illness with pneumonia which had developed from an attack of Spanish influenza.

Mrs. Kinnear’s sickness was very short. About tend days before her death she contracted Spanish influenza and a week ago Sunday seems to be getting much better. Monday, she suffered a relapse and pneumonia set in and she gradually sank until the end. …

Iva Pearl Jaquette was 27 years old; she was born in Elgin City, Iowa. She is survived by her husband an two children. Lee Isabel, aged five years and William Franklin, aged nine months, a brother residing at Elgin City, Iowa, a brother in the army in active service in France and a sister residing at Waterloo, Iowa. She was married to W. F. Kinnear at Newport, Wash., on June 10, 1908 and has been a resident of this city since that date. …
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Home Folks Sick in Spokane

Mrs. and Mrs. Malcolm Bruce received word last week of the illness of their daughter, Miss Verna, at St. Luke’s hospital, where she has been taking a course in nursing. At last reports she was getting better.

Miss Goldie Harding, a former Bonners Ferry girl, also a nurse at the St. Luke’s hospital, is seriously ill.

Both girls were taken ill with Spanish influenza at Ft. Wright where they had been sent to do nursing. Miss Harding’s illness developed into pneumonia. There are 21 nurses at St. Lukes’ hospital ill with the Spanish influenza.

Mr. and Mrs. Charles O’Callaghan went to Spokane Sunday in response to word telling of the serious illness of their daughter, Miss Lillian, with pneumonia. Miss Lilian has been taking a course in nursing at the Sacred Heart hospital. According to word received yesterday at noon Miss Lillian was in a very serious condition.

Mrs. I. W. Lindsey is seriously ill with pneumonia following an attack of the Spanish influenza.

source: Bonners Ferry Herald. (Bonners Ferry, Idaho), 29 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Bonners Ferry Herald. October 29, 1918, page 2

19181029BFH1-headlineIdaho News Paragraphs
Recent Happenings in This State Given in Brief Items for Busy Readers.

There are approximately 300 cases of Spanish influenza in Idaho county, according to the county physician.

Alcida Paimenk, age 16, died of influenza at Plummer. This is the second death there from that disease. There are about 50 cases in town, but most of them are convalescent.
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State Reports 3000 “Flu” Cases

There are approximately 3000 cases of Spanish influenza in this state. The records of the state board of health show the epidemic is particularly bad in Power and Lewis counties. Dr. Biwer, secretary of the board, has requested clerks in large stores, elevator operators, dentists and barbers to wear masks. He suggested that large stores close down Saturday nights because of the possibility of spreading the epidemic by the crowds therein.
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To Speed Up War Program.

Army training camp commanders have been ordered to eliminate from their schedules all work that can be done after the men arrive overseas as one of the moves of the war department to speed up the enlarge war program and overcome delays resulting from interference with draft calls by influenza.
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Refugees to Holland.

Weather-beaten refugees, mostly from the north of France, are trickling into the Dutch provinces of Braband and Limburg. Some 2000 are now accommodated in towns in these provinces. About 5 per cent are ill from fatigue or influenza or are being cared for in hospitals and convents.

source: Bonners Ferry Herald. (Bonners Ferry, Idaho), 29 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Bonners Ferry Herald. October 29, 1918, page 6

John G. Klopf Dead

John G. Klopf died at the Bonners Ferry hospital Thursday morning of pneumonia which developed from an attack of the Spanish influenza. The deceased was taken sick Sunday.

The deceased was 34 years old. He is survived by a wife and child residing in Butte, Mont., and a mother, who lives in Coolin, Idaho. The body was shipped to Opportunity, Wash., for burial.

Mr. Klopf was working as engineer for the Wilson Steamboat Co. prior to his last sickness. He had been a resident here for about two years. …
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19181029BFH2-headline
Local Pick-ups

Mrs. H. W. Bliss has been sick the past week with Spanish influenza. At last reports she was improving as rapidly as could be expected.

A. C. Gay, pharmacist at Simond’s Drug store, was sick last week with the “flu”. He is able to be up and around again.

A letter received recently from Chauncey Guthrie, who is with one of the government spruce camps near Clatsop, Oreg., gives the information that the Spanish influenza has just appeared in that district.

Mrs. E. M. Flood, county superintendent of schools, has received an opinion from the attorney general of the state to the effect that school districts will be required to pay teachers their regular salary for the time they miss on account of the Spanish influenza epidemic.

source: Bonners Ferry Herald. (Bonners Ferry, Idaho), 29 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Bonners Ferry Herald. October 29, 1918, page 11

Quinine Famine in El Paso.

El Paso, Texas. — A quinine famine was experienced here Sunday as a result of the influenza epidemic.

source: Bonners Ferry Herald. (Bonners Ferry, Idaho), 29 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., October 29, 1918, page 1

19181029DSM1-Headline
Six New Influenza Cases Today — Nine Are Released

There were six new cases of influenza admitted to the S. A. T. C. hospitals since yesterday’s report and nine were released as out of danger. There have been no further deaths. The situation is regarded as greatly improved and hopes are entertained that the disease will steadily decline until it is eradicated entirely.

There are two quite serious cases yet, but both of these are expected to recover. All of the new cases are mild.

The vocational training men began work in the big plant of the Idaho National Harvester works today, the first time since they arrived here on October 15. The health conditions required that they be kept in the open air as much as possible. They are now working and seem to be enjoying the change from “loafing.”

There are 300 men in the vocational training school and 150 are in the auto-mechanical department and 150 are divided between general mechanics and radio work. The foreman of each of the shops of the Idaho National Harvester company have been retained as instructors by the war department. The men are taking to the work with a relish and the instructors are well pleased with the prospects of completing their training in the limited time allowed, despite the fact that they lost nearly half a month because of influenza.

Guy Curtis, Ed. Cruver and H. Potter, heads of mechanical departments in the harvester works, are retained as instructors, but Mr. Cruver is laid up with a mild attack of influenza.

Pullman Has Five Deaths.

Five more deaths are reported at Pullman, making a total of 26, nearly all of whom are members of the S. A. T. C. Two died Sunday night and three more last night, bringing the total for eight days up to 26. The Pullman and W. S. C. authorities think they have the epidemic well in hand and look for a rapid decline of the number of cases. Conditions have been bad in Pullman for more than a week. A Pullman woman said; “I can look out of my window almost any hour and see the hearse going to or returning from the cemetery or the dead-wagon going to or returning from of the hospitals.”

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 29 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., October 29, 1918, page 2

Observe the quarantine rules and help save Moscow from the terrible experience of other towns. It is feared the crest of the influenza wave has not been reached here and careful observance of the regulations may save precious lives.

The Elks of Moscow are receiving words of commendation everywhere for their kindness is throwing open their fine club rooms to the convalescents of the influenza. People in other towns are talking of this kind act by the Elks.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 29 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., October 29, 1918, page 3

19181029DSM2-headlineMoscow People Care For The Sick
Victims of Influenza Are Being Cared For Better Here Than Elsewhere

It is not an accident that there have been so few deaths and that so many of the influenza cases in Moscow are mild. It is due to the splendid care the patients are getting and the excellent system of caring for the men as soon as they show symptoms of the disease. Great credit is due Captain Felker, commandant and head of the entire military department here and to Lieutenant-Doctor Kotalik as well as to President Lindley and the entire university staff. But these men are too modest to take the credit due them and they give the credit to others. A statement sent to The Star-Mirror by the university gives great credit to the people of Moscow, who, no doubt, deserve all of the kind things said about them. The statement follows:

The mothers throughout the state who have sons in the S. A. T. C. at the University of Idaho need have no fear lest their boys are not being given the best and most tender care.

The citizens of Moscow with their customary generous and efficient aid are helping the military and University officials in every possible way to check the epidemic of influenza. Every woman in the city or surrounding country who has a boy in the service, or who feels for those who have, is tireless in her efforts to bring comfort and cheer to the sick lads in the hospitals.

The soliciting and preparing of the food for both the Inland and A. K. E. hospitals has been taken charge of by Miss Charlotte Lewis, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. M. E. Lewis, a government Red Cross dietitian. Mrs. Lewis has placed her well equipped kitchen with all its modern utensils and supplies at the disposal of the hospital.

Mrs. and Miss Lewis aided by Miss Florence Richardson and all the members of the household have spent every day since the epidemic began, planning and preparing nourishing and dainty dishes to tempt the appetite of the sickest and most homesick boy. The kitchen has been a scene of great activity from morning to night. Ladies from the country arrive at early hours bringing the supplies of chickens, milk and cream for the day.

Town ladies come with custards and puddings, orderlies arrive at noon and night to bear away the steaming kettles of fragrant broth and great pans of creamed chicken, junkets and jello.

The city of Moscow deserves the commendation of the state of Idaho for so ably “carrying on,” both thru individual and organized effort, in the present difficult circumstances.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 29 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., October 29, 1918, page 8

Juliaetta Jottings
Farmer Has Paralysis

Juliaetta. — Henry S. Irwin, a well-known farmer residing in the Big Potlatch canyon, a mile below Juliaetta, had a stroke of paralysis this forenoon. His condition was reported to be improved at 11 o’clock today. Mrs. Irwin is down with influenza, so “troubles never come singly.”

A son was born to Postmaster and Mrs. Charles G. Talbott at noon Sunday. This was Mr. Talbott’s first-born. Mr. Talbott was the first to take the influenza in Juliaetta, but when his son was born the fond parent felt so vigorous that the very next day he arose from his sick-bed and proceeded to celebrate the event by going out on the street.

Marvel, the 18-year-old son of Mr and Mrs. W, F, Albright, who live in Big Potlatch canyon, four miles below Juliaetta, is the latest to be stricken with the influenza. While in a local drug store yesterday the young man fainted twice.

Crystal Ottosen of Juliaetta also has the influenza, the second victim in this family.
— —

Clyde Madison Buried Today.

Clyde T. Madison, the oldest son of Martin and Etta Madison, was born twenty four years ago at Blaine, Idaho. The family have been living for several years at Warden, Washington, and it was from that town Clyde entered the S. A. T. C. at Pullman, Wash., about two weeks ago. He succumbed to influenza and pneumonia Sunday and was buried at the Moscow cemetery today at 12:30. His grandmother, Mrs. Ellen Madison, lives on Kenneth Avenue. He leaves his father, four brothers and one sister. One of his brothers is now seriously ill of influenza at Lynn, Wash. A military escort of the U. of I. boys accompanied the soldier to the cemetery.
— —

19181029DSM3-headline
City News

Mrs. Nickel of Kaimah arrives in Moscow today to visit her son William of the S. A. T. C., who is sick of influenza.

Miss Marie Shannon, who has spent the summer with her brother, Wm. Shannon, near Wallace, returned home yesterday. Miss Shannon will not attend to her work until after the cessation of the epidemic.

Ray Kessler and wife have been sick of influenza, but have recovered.

Mrs. D. D. Harshman and three children are ill of influenza, but their condition is not considered as serious.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 29 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Challis Messenger., October 30, 1918, page 3

Idaho Budget

Owing to the prevalence of Spanish influenza the Child Welfare campaign at Caldwell has been indefinitely postponed.

Emmett entertained the delegates to the thirty-second annual convention of the Woman’s Christian Temperance union October 8, 9 and 10.

The big round-up at Blackfoot last week was a success in every way. The attendance was large and the attractions were well patronized.

Word has been received at Midvale from France, telling of the death of Private Floyd Reavis from pneumonia. Mr. Reavis was in the June call and was in training less than a month before being sent overseas.

Brig. Gen. Noble of the hospital division, war department, will soon visit Boise to inspect the buildings at Boise barracks and determine the feasibility of establishing a reconstruction and educational hospital camp there.

The body of Jack Howard, known in the Warren mining district as “Miner Jack,” was found in the Salmon river near the Riggins place. …

An order of the board of health made public October 10 calls for the closing of all theatres, churches and assembly halls, including also dances, Liberty loan gatherings and all gatherings of a public character, but does not … [page torn.]

source: The Challis Messenger. (Challis, Idaho), 30 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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1918Atlantic25-a
A telephone operator wears protective gauze in 1918. Bettmann / Bettmann Archive

source: Alan Taylor April 10, 2018 “30 Photos of the 1918 Flu Pandemic” The Atlantic
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The Daily Star-Mirror., October 30, 1918, page 1

19181030DSM1-headline
Influenza Situation Shows Much Improvement

The influenza situation in Moscow shows marked improvement today. Since yesterday’s report eight new cases have been admitted to the hospital and 10 have been discharged as cured. All of the new eases ore very light. There have been no further deaths. Two cases are still quite serious but are improved and strong hopes of their recovery are entertained. One of these very sick men is Ralph Gochnauer, a student of the university, who was here last year. Captain Felker said of him: “He is putting up a strong fight and we believe he will pull through, but he has been and is yet, a very sick man.”

Dr. W. A. Adair, city health officer, reports a number of new cases in the town and country and again has issued a caution to people to not visit or permit their children to visit the homes of others if they have any symptoms of the disease. He told of a Moscow woman whose little girl had a bad cold and cough, who took the child to the home of a neighbor and spent the evening. In 48 hours five members of the family where she visited were down with the disease and the woman and her husband were both down with it. He told of another similar case in the country in which five members of a family were exposed to and taken down with the disease within 48 hours after the visit of a neighbor who had a had cold. Dr. Adair issued a warning today that all visiting must cease until after the epidemic is past.

Of the eight new cases in the S. A. T. C. reported today, five are in class B, vocational training men and the other three cases are from the students of the university who are taking military training and are known as class A of the S. A. T. C.

Captain Felker, commandant in charge, said: “We believe the crest is past. We have reached the top of the wave and are going down on the other side. The situation is very encouraging.”

Dr. E. H. Lindley, president of the University of Idaho “The situation seems much improved, but we must use the utmost diligence to care for the convalescents. These are mostly young men, who when released from the hospital think they are well and dare apt to go to extreme and we are watching them closely. We believe that with care the situation will continue to improve rapidly.”
— —

Please Don’t Ask the Time.

The telephone exchange is very sort of help, due to the influenza. Operators cannot be had from other places. Pullman’s exchange had only one operator for several days. Patrons of the telephone are requested to confine their calls only to the absolutely necessary business. Please do not call central and ask for the time. While the operator is giving you this information someone may be calling for a doctor or some important business may be neglected. As soon as the situation improves and the exchange has a full crew, the operators will be glad to accommodate all with the time or any other information at their disposal.
— —

Mrs. Otto Grice arrived yesterday from Portland to visit with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. S. H. Knepper, north of Moscow. Mrs. Grice says the influenza has been held in check quite well in Portland, although the epidemic has not yet subsided. Mrs. Grice, when at home devotes move of her time to the war work in different activities.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 30 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., October 30, 1918, page 4

19181030DSM2ad

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 30 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., October 30, 1918, page 5

City News

Mrs. H. Strong of Lewiston arrived yesterday to visit her son of the S. A. T. C., who is sick at the hospital.

Dr. J. J. Harrington of Moscow, who went to Nezperce to help fight the influenza, came home today. Dr. Harrington contracted the disease but is recovering.

Gerald Meeker is confined to his bed with the influenza.

Little Kenneth Stanton, who has been having the influenza for several days, is slightly improved.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 30 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., October 30, 1918, page 6

19181030DSM3-headlineEverybody Must Wear Flu Masks
Washington Orders Rush Local Red Cross and Aides

Orders to equip every member of the S. A. T. C. with influenza masks were received by Lieutenant Kotalik Tuesday morning. The orders were sent out from the Washington office. Lieutenant Kotalik has called upon all the organizations in Latah county to help him fill this requirement.

The first call sent out by the military authorities was for 2100 masks. A second call was issued Tuesday night for 400 additional to be made. Red Cross chapters, sorority houses, and other organizations were pressed into service.

It is understood on the campus that all members of the S. A. T. C. are to be provided with three masks apiece. These masks will be worn all the time.

As soon as the masks are completed they will be sent to the Inland Empire hospital for sterilization, according to the officials of the hospital.

Military authorities are very particular as to the people who work on the masks. No person who has a cold or who is not in perfect physical condition is permitted to come near the material.

President E. H. Lindley, president of the University of Idaho, would make no statement on the matter because it referred directly to the military department. He said he expected the masks would be finished by Wednesday afternoon.

Sorority girls and ladies of Moscow worked until late last night filling the rush order of the government. Each sorority was asked to furnish a hundred and fifty masks. The work was carefully inspected as soon as complete.

This order does not indicate that the situation is growing worse here, but only that every precaution to preserve the health of the men is being taken, according to the authorities.

A news bulletin issued late last night said that masks are being worn all the time in the larger California towns. The wearing of masks at the university will be in line with the general practice all over the United States.
— —

Co-Eds Safe From Spanish Influenza

The women of the University have been very fortunate in escaping the influenza.

Every precaution has been taken to prevent the spread of the disease among them. A strict quarantine has been imposed thereby preventing the epidemic from getting a hole here.

Dean French believes that by a rigid observance of the quarantine the women of the University will be in no way endangered. They come in no contact with those infected, and since they spend much time in the open air the co-eds are very safe.
— —

19181030DSM4-headlineUniversity Library Being Fumigated
Authorities Take Advantage of Quarantine to Kill Mischievous Germs

Since the University library was ordered closed for a time, the health officers deemed it advisable to make the best of the opportunity to fumigate the library.

The library newspaper room, cataloging office, Miss Sweet’s office, and all the other rooms adjacent to the library were tightly closed and the formaldehyde put in Wednesday.

The windows were not opened until Friday, so any mischievous germs lingering about had no choice but to succumb to the foe. Miss Sweet states that these measures were taken largely on the general principles, and not wholly because of the influenza scare.

The library is used more, and by more people, than any other room in the Administration building. It has been used for a long time without being fumigated, and it was felt that a better time than now could not be chosen to thoroly [sic] disinfect it, since it was not to be used for several days.

It is not yet known just when the library will be open to students.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 30 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Grangeville Globe. October 31, 1918, page 1

19181031GG1-headlineHealthboard Given More Authority
Can Close Stores at 6 O’clock if Deemed Necessary Action.

Boise, Idaho, Oct. 28. — The state board of health today notified county physicians they could close all stores at six o’clock each night if they considered it a precautionary measure against the spread of Spanish influenza. Five counties have been hard hit by the epidemic – Power, Bannock, Franklin, Cassia and Lewis. In three days Bannock reported a total of 26 new cases while Cassia reported 162.

In the past three days there have been 14 deaths in Boise from the disease. All told there are 60 cases here. Most of those who died in Boise were Basques. The towns of St. Anthony and Rexburg have established quarantines.
— —

More Deaths at Nezperce.
Four Critical Cases Reported But General Conditions Improved.

General conditions at Nezperce are materially improved and no new cases have been reported, says the Tribune correspondent on the 28th. Another death was added to the toll taken by the Spanish influenza and pneumonia and four patients are reported in a critical condition.

Elmer Scholer, manager of the Nezperce station of the Grangeville Light & Power company, passed away today from pneumonia following influenza.

Mr. Scholer was about 33 years of age and is survived by his wife and baby daughter. He came to Nezperce five or six years ago and during his residence cultivated a wide acquaintance and enjoyed the high esteem of the townspeople. The remains will be shipped to Spokane tomorrow for interment.

Four patients are reported to be in a critical condition as follows: Mrs. Glen Day, Mrs. Nichol, Arthur Keith and the 4-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. William Hunsucker.

Thirteen patients were discharged from the hospital today and is it expected ten more patients will be discharged tomorrow. There were twenty patients in the hospital this evening.

The cases that have developed during the past few days are in milder form, the view being held the disease is running out in this section.
— —

19181031GG2-headlineTeachers Pay Will Go On As Usual
Cessation of School Will Not Bar Idaho Instructors’ Salaries.

Teachers in the public schools of this state who have been forced to take a vacation because of the closing of the schools to prevent a serious epidemic of Spanish influenza will receive their salaries. Attorney General T. A. Walters so ruled early this year and his ruling applies to the present situation it is held by school authorities.

There are more than 3700 teachers out of employment in Idaho at the present time because of the closing order which is costing the state a handsome sum which finally computed will run into several hundred thousand dollars before the closing ban is lifted.

The opinion of the attorney general which applies to the present situation is as follows:

“By section 58, laws of 1913, page 442, power is given to the board of trustees to employ and contract with teachers. As there is no provision of the laws which have come to our attention that governs this situation the question is one of the contract entered into between the school board and the teacher and the rights of the teacher to receive pay and the liability of the school board for salary will be governed solely by the contract.

“In the absence of terms in the contract permitting the school board to suspend the salary of the teachers during the quarantine, it is the opinion of this department that the salary should continue throughout the period of the quarantine.”
— —

Mrs. Clarence Jones Dead.

As we go to press we are informed through Madison Myers that Mrs. Clarence Jones, a former resident of this place, passed away at Lewiston today from the effects of an attack of influenza and that [her] brother, Grover, also a former resident of Grangeville, was not expected to last through the night. Mrs. Jones as the wife of Clarence Jones, at one time connected with the Pacific Telephone company. While here Mr. and Mrs. Jones made many friends who will be grieved to learn of Mrs. Jones’ death.
— —

Raphael Randall Buried.

The funeral of Raphael Randall was held from the residence of his daughter, Mrs. Fet Rhoades, at 2 o’clock Saturday afternoon. Rev. Knox preaching the funeral service. Only relatives of the deceased were permitted to attend on account of the prevalent influenza epidemic. …
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19181031GG3-headlineSpanish “Flu” on Wane in County
New Cases are Limited and of Mild Form; Many Early Sufferers Out.
Pneumonia Claims 2
Some Patients in Critical Condition; Nurses Now More Plentiful.

Few new cases of influenza have been reported to the county board of health and it is felt by Dr. G. S. Stockton that the epidemic is gradually dying out. Several victims of the malady have fully recovered and are attending to their regular duties, while a number of others have received backsets from getting out too soon. A few cases are reported in a critical condition, Mrs. Sophia Grattan and Mrs. Fred Noyes of this city being included in the number. Two deaths occurred this week from pneumonia following the influenza.

William Cyrus Squibb.

William Cyrus Squibb, aged 26 years, 6 months and 20 days, passed away at his home just northeast of the city Monday evening. and was interred at Prairieview cemetery at 11 o’clock Thursday forenoon. Mr. Squibb was born in Crawford county, Iowa, April 8, 1892. He came to Idaho county with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Squibb, in 1903. He was married to Myrtle Wann on Judy 2. 1903, and is survived by the widow, it two-year old daughter, his parents, four sisters, Mrs. John Powell, Elsie and Martha Squibb, and Mrs. Geo. Smith, and one brother, Marvin, who is in the service of his country. The funeral services were conducted at the cemetery by the Rev. H. J. Wood, with Undertaker A. J. Maugg in charge.

Bernice Miller

Bernice Miller. aged about 15 years, died at the family home near Winona, today after a short illness from pneumonia which followed Spanish influenza. Miss Bernice is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Bert Miller, and the entire family has been sorely afflicted with the malady, at one time every member being stricken. For a time it was thought Mr. Miller would be unable to withstand the ravages of the disease, but he is now reported improving, as are the other members of the family.

Len W. Kemp received a message from the surgeon at the Vancouver barracks stating that Cecil J. Rock was suffering from pneumonia at the hospital and was in serious condition. Mr. Kemp wired the military authorities to give Mr. Rock every possible attention and if necessary to move him to a private hospital and draw on him for any expense.

Mr. and Mrs. Chester Arnold and Wayne Arnold have also been having a siege with the disease but we are informed they are improving at this time.

We cannot attempt to mention all those who have had the affliction, but as far as we can secure information all are recovering. A number of eases in the Squibb family are recovering and Mrs. Sam Flynn and daughter, Miss Bessie and Mrs. Harlan Drake are able to be about.

The inmates of the local hospital will be discharged within a few days. Walter McAdams and wife have discharged their nurse and the former can be seen on the streets. The family of Gus Scholtz was down but are now on the mend and have been discharged. Mr. and Mrs. John Mundt and Miss Mabel Sorweide are also having their turn and Miss Louise Sorweide came in on Wednesday from the Dalles, Oregon, to assist in caring for them.

A. R. Harlan received a message yesterday morning calling him to Portland, to the bedside of his son, Paul who is seriously ill of pneumonia. Both Ray and Paul who have been working in Portland for last several months, were stricken with the influenza last week. Ray’s case did not developed into pneumonia, ad he is recovering, but in Paul’s case pneumonia developed, and as his case was considered critical, it was thought best to summon Mr. Harland to assist in caring for him. O. T. Lingo conveyed Mr. Harlan to Lewiston by auto, where they arrived in time to catch the Portland train. In the meantime a wire was received by the family here that Paul’s condition was somewhat improved. This good news reached Mr. Harlan just before his departure from Lewiston, which of course relieved the terrible strain somewhat. The many friends of the boys hope to hear in the near future that they are both on the highroad to recovery.

source: The Grangeville Globe. (Grangeville, Idaho), 31 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Grangeville Globe. October 31, 1918, page 8

Al White, who has been laid up for the past ten days with the “flu” is still confined to his bed having suffered a relapse. Mrs. White arrived here from Seattle Wednesday and is now taking care of her husband.

Mrs. V. Knapp of Lewiston is in the city, having come up to assist in caring for Mr. and Mrs. L. A. Wisener, who are laid up with the influenza. they are now reported as much improved as Mr. Wisener is able to be out.

Editor J. C. Safely and Mrs. Safely have both been confined to their home this week with the influenza. They are on the mend and will soon be about as usual. Geo. Medved, one of Mr. Safely’s employees on the Free Press, has been stricken with the disease, which puts the editor in rather an unfortunate position.
— —

Mrs. Lou Drake Dead.

Among the many deaths at Nezperce, none has excited more sympathy that that of Mrs. Lou Drake, who died Saturday. Her husband is serving with the colors in France and the couple were married but a short time before he went into the army about a year ago. It will be sad news for him to receive. The influenza seems to be no respecter of persons or conditions and reaps its harvest among all classes of people.
— Kamiah Progress.
— —

19181031GG4ad

source: The Grangeville Globe. (Grangeville, Idaho), 31 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Wallace Miner. October 31, 1918, page 1

Death of George Sparenburg.

It was with real sorrow that the news of the death of George Sparenburg was received in this district. He left here only about two weeks ago to take up military training at Moscow, where he contracted influenza which was followed by pneumonia. Mr. Sparenburg owned a promising group of mining claims on Big creek. He was a practical miner and had worked in the various mines of the district, his last mining work being a contract to sink a shaft on the Amazon-Dixie. He was a genial, companionable young man who had many warm friends in the district. He was a member of the Wallace lodge of Elks. Mr. Sparenburg was buried at Fort Wright with military honors.

source: The Wallace Miner. (Wallace, Idaho), 31 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Wallace Miner. October 31, 1918, page 6

19181031WM1-headlineUnited War Workers Pushing For Pershing
Every Dollar of Great Fund for the Benefit of Our Fighting Forces.

“One grand push for Pershing” — that is the word to the workers in the united war work campaign, State Director Richard E. Randall asks the newspapers of Idaho to give to the workers in the big drive for the $170,-500,000 fund for the seven welfare organizations and which begins the week of November 11-18.

“Nothing stops our boys over there — nothing must be permitted to stop those who are loyally backing them up at home. Public meetings to arouse enthusiasm can not be held. The influenza epidemic has made that impossible. But the spirit of love and service, the spirit of devotion to our lads overseas and in the cantonments at home, will find opportunity for expression notwithstanding this great handicap.” …

source: The Wallace Miner. (Wallace, Idaho), 31 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Lincoln County Times., October 31, 1918, page 1

19181031LCT1-headlineBoyd K. Frazer Passes Away After Brief Illness
Well Known Young Man Succumbs to Pneumonia.

Wednesday morning the whole community was grieved when it was learned that Boyd Frazer, son of R. S. Frazer, had passed to the Great Beyond after a brief illness.

Boyd Frazer was reared in Jerome and reached his nineteenth birthday the 16th day of last September. On October 15th, the young man was inducted into the Student’s Army Training Corps and left that day for training. He had been at the school but three days when he was taken ill and was confined to a hospital for ten days. He then came home and arrived here Sunday. From Sunday until the end the young man declined and, although the fondest care and aid that could be given,m he passed to his reward at 3 o’clock Wednesday morning. …
— —

Volunteers Called For.

The local Red Cross Chapter again issues an urgent call for volunteer nurses to aid in the present influenza epidemic. Mrs. Piper is receiving call after call from people who need someone to come in and help them for two or three days during the sudden illness of some member of the family, and as these calls are likely to continue and become more numerous she is very anxious to get in touch with those who can serve in this way. All who feel that they can help the work of the Red Cross to this extent are most earnestly requested to register with Mrs. Piper.
— —

Hospital Assistants.

Do not forget the position of hospital assistants offered by the army school of nursing. Eligibles must be married women between the ages of 21 and 40 whose husbands are overseas, also single women between ages of 35 and 45 – graduates of high schools or its acceptable equivalent. They will be assigned to convalescent hospitals in this country where training school units are not established. For further information inquire of Surgeon General’s Office, Washington D. C.
— —

Student Nurses.

Idaho now has 184 registrants for student nurses with their papers all sent in to Washington, D. C. Some have received their appointments; others are anxiously waiting. The request comes that the campaign for more be continued. County chairmen are requested to send for this blanks they actually need as Mrs. J. M. Taylor, who has this work in charge, now has a limited supply.

source: Lincoln County Times. (Jerome, Idaho), 31 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Lincoln County Times., October 31, 1918, page 7

Miss Marie Worthington returned from Boise Saturday. She has been attending college at that place and came home until the “fly” epidemic subsides.

On account of help shortage in the post office, it was deemed necessary to change the mail routes and delivery from 2 p.m. to 9 a.m. While this change is inconvenient to many, it had to be made on account of lack of help and everybody is asked to co-operate with the postal authorities as much as possible.

The Spanish Influenza epidemic seems to be gaining headway in Jerome and at the present writing there are several cases reported and several that act like grippe but may turn out to be the “flu.” With proper precautions and co-operation upon the part of the public with the health officials it is believed that the disease can be successfully combated and that it will subside in a few days.

source: Lincoln County Times. (Jerome, Idaho), 31 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Payette Enterprise., October 31, 1918, page 1

19181031PE1-headlineBoard Orders Quarantine

At a special meeting of the Payette County Board of Health held at the Court House on the 31st day of October, 1918 it was ordered that on account of the prevailing epidemic of Spanish Influenza, a quarantine of Payette County be declared, and that the bringing in and debarking of passengers from points without the county be any common carrier be prohibited.

It is furthered ordered: That all open air meeting and social gatherings be prohibited. That all stores and places of business be closed at 6 p.m. daily with the exception of Drug Stores, which may be allowed to remain open provided that no drinks or ice cream be served after 6 p.m., and that the news stands be allowed to open after 6 p. m., provided patrons be not allowed to congregate in the room while awaiting the mail. Restaurants and Cafes must close at 8:30 p.m. Garages may remain open provided no loafing is permitted.

Parents are requested to see that children do not congregate in groups about their neighborhood, and the City police and health officers and regular authorities are instructed to aid in enforcing this request and to disperse groups of persons found congregating at any place in the County.

Homes in which cases of Spanish Influenza exist shall be rigidly quarantined until all members of the household are free from infection.

It is further moved and carried that the city and village authorities and health officers throughout the county be empowered to detain and place in quarantine any person or persons arriving within Payette county by common carrier, and to carry out the above rules of the Board of Health in every respect.
— —

Personal and Local Mention

John C. Hickey, who is stationed at Mare’s Island in the Navy; was taken some two weeks ago with Spanish Influenza, and was reported in a serious condition, is now out of danger. A message to his grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Bennett, conveyed the good news.

source: Payette Enterprise. (Payette, Canyon Co., Idaho), 31 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Payette Enterprise., October 31, 1918, page 3

Will a person who had had influenza before catch the disease again?

“It is well known that an attack of measles or scarlet fever or smallpox usually protects a person against another attack of the same disease. This appears not to be true of ‘Spanish influenza.’ According to newspaper reports the Kind of Spain suffered an attack of influenza during the epidemic thirty years ago, and was again stricken during the recent outbreak in Spain.”

source: Payette Enterprise. (Payette, Canyon Co., Idaho), 31 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Payette Enterprise., October 31, 1918, page 5

North Payette

Several families in the neighborhood have been having the grip, but no cases of influenza have been reported.

source: Payette Enterprise. (Payette, Canyon Co., Idaho), 31 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Emmett Index. October 31, 1918, page 1

19181031EI1-headlineInfluenza Takes Its Toll
George Dewey Succumbs to Disease – Wife and Children Critically Ill

John C. Dewey yesterday morning received the sad news by telegram of the death of his son George at Portland. Later in the day another message told of the critical illness of Mrs. Dewey and the four children – all victims of influenza.

George Dewey’s death took place at the Auditorium Emergency hospital, where the wife and children also were being cared for. The family went to Portland last spring, where George was working in the ship yards. Mrs. Dewey is a daughter of H. P. Hanson, a former Emmett farmer, now living at Burley.

Two other deaths in that city of former Emmett residents, from the same cause, are reported. One of them is E. C. Vahlberg’s brother Fred and the other is Percy Chase, who worked on the construction of the sawmill here and was a foreman of the mill for nearly a year.

Four Basque sheepherders from the VanDeusen ranch contracted the flu at the Spanish rooming house in Boise and died Saturday in a Boise hospital.
— —

Emmett physicians report 10 cases of influenza here. None of them is serious. All persons can assist in stamping out the disease by avoiding crowds; taking care of themselves; when sneezing or coughing place a handkerchief over the nose and mouth; don’t get excited; wash out nose and throat two or three times daily by a nasal spray and by a gargle with a salt solution (half teaspoonful salt to one of clean water).
— —

Cases of influenza should be isolated, but no quarantine is necessary, according to the health board. The only danger of infection is from the patient himself.

source: The Emmett Index. (Emmett, Idaho), 31 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Emmett Index. October 31, 1918, page 2

Tales of Town

A poetic gem for today; “Cover up each cough and sneeze, if you don’t you’ll spread disease.”

Cover up your mouth when you are compelled to sneeze, just as you wish the other fellow would do when he makes a smart remark.

Brown October never looked so dark brown before to the fellow who now has his blood full of “flu” and his stomach full of vile medicine.

There is the comforting feature about having the Spanish influenza – your friends don’t call and tell you what to do for it.

A man called to take off some scratches from the finish of the piano in a certain home one day last week. When he left, by mistake he left his bottle of piano polish and took the old man’s influenza medicine. The old man is nearly well, and wants the piano man to tell him where he can have the prescription refilled.

source: The Emmett Index. (Emmett, Idaho), 31 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Emmett Index. October 31, 1918, page 4

Pearl

No one here has got the influenza yet.
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Masks from Red Cross

A committee from the Red Cross surgical dressing department delivered Flu masks to the barbers and will do so to other in public places who desire to wear them. Authorities differ as to the efficacy of their use, but as a precautionary measure they are recommended by most of the leading physicians and surgeons of the camps. In Frisco and several other coast cities the use of the mask is compulsory – persons appearing in public places without them being arrested.

source: The Emmett Index. (Emmett, Idaho), 31 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Idaho County Free Press. October 31, 1918, page 1

Close Stores At 6 O’clock
State Board Has Issued this Influenza Order.

All stores and other places of business in Idaho must be closed at 6 o’clock each evening under orders of the state health board. the only exception to the rule is the prescription department of drug stores and only prescriptions can be handled by the drug stores after 6 o’clock in the evening.

This means that usual Saturday evening trading will be eliminated, that cigar stores, candy and ice cream parlors and all other lines of business must close promptly at 6 o’clock. The order will remain effective until and improvement in the influenza situation warrants the raising of the embargo.
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Editor and Wife Ill.

J. C. Safley and Mrs. Safely have both been confined to their home since the latter part of last week on account of an attack of the influenza. Both are getting along nicely at present. Mr. Safley was forced to call for outside help in getting out this issue of the Free Press, and W. L. Campbell who used to furnish copy for the Free Press consented to take charge and get this issue to the press. Readers will therefore overlook the errors and shortcomings of this issue which has been prepared in spare moments and may expect to be repaid by the redoubled efforts of the editor and proprietor when he is able to be back to work again.
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Sheriff’s Force Ill.

Influenza slighted no one in the sheriff’s office. The three men confined in the county bastille were the first to be attacked and went down one two, three and after a short siege, under the are of Dr. Stockton were soon up and around with no very bad effects. John Byrom, deputy and jailer was the next to be effected, and then Sheriff Lafe Yates yielded. Tim Quinlan kept the office shinning for a while and then went home to his bed. John Powell, next in line held the fort for a few days and at last had to give in. the only one who has recovered and is back on duty is John Byrom, and Ben Shaw is assisting in the office as deputy. The others are reported as getting along very nicely.
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19181031ICFP1-headlineSpanish Influenza Has Reached Crest
Burden of Care of Influenza Patients has Fallen on Dr. G. S. Stockton.
Several Are Seriously Ill
One Death Comes as Result of Disease – Epidemic Believed to Have Reached Crest.

One person has succumbed to pneumonia following influenza since last week, and several people are reported to be seriously ill. The number of cases in the community has not been estimated but it can be stated with fair accuracy that almost every family in the community has been visited with the disease, and in some cases whole families have been down. Complication has only occurred in a small percentage of the cases, and these have followed where persons who have been worn out nursing the afflicted have come down with the disease. Recovery of many has reduced the number reported ill last week.

With Doctor Scallon ill, the burden of visiting the sick people has fell upon Doctor Stockton. Dr. Orr of Cottonwood was over several days of last week and assisted Dr. Stockton until he was called home to attend to his own practice in the city of Cottonwood. This assistance was vital however as it came at a time when the most urgent calls were coming in and after Doctor Stockton had been worked almost to the point of exhaustion.

Dr. Scallon has been getting along very well and has been able to be up, but the condition of his health has not permitted his visiting patients although he has given what assistance he could render from his home. It is hoped that he will be able to be out and help in ministering to those at present afflicted.

Hospital Treats Some.

The latter part of last week the hospital was put in shape by local citizens ready to receive some cases where parties had no place to go, and Mrs. J. M. Richmond has been caring for three patients who have been taken ill with influenza and who are getting along well at the present writing, one of these being a daughter of John Oliver who was taken ill while working here in Grangeville. The hospital will be available at any time to receive any cases where home accommodations will not be available.

One Death This Week.

William Squibb, a young farmer living northeast of Grangeville died Monday evening and was buried in the Prairieview cemetery Thursday. The young man, his wife and their child were all ill at the same time. Mrs. Squibb is very low at the present writing and for a time her life hung in the balance in spite of all that the doctors, and a trained nurse could do.

No Business Activity.

Business is almost at a standstill. There are few visitors from the country, and this is caused more from the reason that a large number of families in the surrounding country have been taken with the disease and trips are only made to town for supplies and medicine. Although some of the cases in the country have been serious, in most cases there have been complete recoveries and former patients are around attending to their work, and ministering to those of their neighbors who are still afflicted. A few are wearing the masks in Grangeville as a means of preventing the contagion but the majority have discarded the masks as inconvenient.

Some Up and Around.

A number of those reported to be ill last week are up and around again, having exercised the greatest care to avoid complications and while professing to be weak from the effects of the ‘flu’ will be themselves in a few days. It is believed that within a week when most of the cases will be recovering that the epidemic will begin to pass fast. In fact the preset attack has been quite general in Grangeville, and nearly every man you meet reports that someone in his family has been ill is at present sick or has recovered. In some cases entire families were taken, and one family of twelve were down at the same time. In other instances only one in a family has been affected. Nearly all of the high school children, and children attending the grade have been ill or are still ill.

Not General Throughout County.

Reports from other sections of the county indicate that as yet they have not been visited although some few cases have been held under suspicion Deputy Sheriff Shaw visited Cottonwood this week and he reports that Cottonwood has been practically free of any cases, and that they are exercising the greatest precautions to prevent an epidemic in the city or community. A like report comes from Ferdinand, and the sections of the Clearwater and Salmon river countries. It is sincerely to be hoped that the epidemic will soon pass and that health conditions will soon regain the normal. Preset indications to that effect are good.

source: Idaho County Free Press. (Grangeville, Idaho Territory), 31 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Idaho County Free Press. October 31, 1918, page 3

To The Public.

Owing to war-times, the fact that the general public is busy at work, also the epidemic of Spanish influenza, and that I am bush with my regular work, which is essential, I shall make but little campaign for election to the office of sheriff of Idaho county. I believe that the voters of the county will appreciate the situation, and will pardon me for not again meting every voter previous to the election. My qualification for the office of sheriff, I believe, are well known to each and every one of you. My record as deputy sheriff is before you for investigation.

Sincerely, W. H. Eller

source: Idaho County Free Press. (Grangeville, Idaho Territory), 31 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Idaho County Free Press. October 31, 1918, page 8

William Squibb Dies Monday
Death Comes to Young Man Following Attack Pneumonia.

William Clarence Squibb, who with his family are widely known in Grangeville and community died at his home north east of Grangeville Monday evening from pneumonia following an attack of influenza. Mr. Squibb and his young wife have been in a very serious condition for the past week, and Monday all hopes of his recovery had passed. The widow and her small child are still in a very serious condition at the present writing. This is the third death in the community following an attack of Spanish influenza. …
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Ferdinand

Miss Myrtle Mills, nurse at the Alcorn hospital is convalescing after a serious attack of influenza.

source: Idaho County Free Press. (Grangeville, Idaho Territory), 31 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., October 31, 1918, page 1

19181031DSM1-headline
Influenza Causes Another Death In Moscow

One more death from influenza is reported today. The victim is Robert Henry of Rigby, Idaho, a member of “class B” of the S. A. T. C. He came here with the southern Idaho contingent of October 16 and was taken ill soon after arriving. He has been at a local hospital for several days and his condition has been regarded as critical. This makes the fifth death in Moscow, four of them being members of “class B” (the vocational training corps) of the S. A. T. C. Two were from Idaho and two from Wyoming. The fifth case was that of a Moscow man taken ill in the cantonment in California and invalided home.

There are believed to be no more serious cases. One that has been regarded as critical for several days is now believed to be past the danger point, although still quite sick.

Today’s report is more encouraging than that of any previous day, the number discharged as cured being twice as large as the number of new cases. There were seven new cases admitted to the hospital for the S. A. T. C, since yesterday’s report and 14 were discharged as cured.

Captain Luther Felker, commandant and head of the army work here said: “The situation is improving and we expect a steady diminution of cases from now on. We want to give special credit and thanks to the civilian doctors of Moscow, Drs. Gritman, Adair, Stevenson and Clarke, who have been working day and night, with almost no rest to help with the S. A. T. C. men in addition to their own heavy practice.”

Dr. Lieutenant Kotalik, medical officer for the soldiers, has been working almost constantly with his more than 800 men, who have had to be vaccinated and cared for as well as those who were taken sick, and Captain Felker and President Lindley give him special praise for his work, but alto give the Red Cross, under Professor Neidig, county chairman, credit for much of the success in stamping out the disease or preventing its spread to epidemic dimensions.

Today the last of the registrants of September 12, 1918, are being given their physical examination by Dr. D. F. Rae, Sheriff Campbell and J. C. VanBuskirk, with their assistants. Thirty-three men were examined yesterday and 30 today. Influenza masks are worn by the examining board and by each man admitted to the room and the greatest care is being used to prevent any influenza in this work.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 31 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., October 31, 1918, page 4

The influenza situation is getting better, but that is no cause for relaxation of vigilance in fighting it or in taking precautions against its further spread. Dr. Adair gives some splendid advice which should be heeded by all.
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Federal Court Term Continued Three Weeks

The term of federal court which was to have opened here next Monday has been postponed until November 25 because of the influenza situation, it being regarded by Judge Dietrick as dangerous to hold a term of court when the disease is so prevalent.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 31 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., October 31, 1918, page 5

City News

Mr. and Mrs. C. W. Walton are victims of the epidemic. Mr. Walton is the shoe man at Davids.

D. M. Gochnour and daughter arrived today from Burley, Idaho, called by the illness of Ralph Gochnour of the S. A. T. C.

Lieut. Bloomquist, who has been ill of the influenza, is out again and will report for duty tomorrow.

Mrs. Verna Commings of Lewiston, sister of Mrs. E. St. John of this city, is reported seriously ill of pneumonia. Mrs. Cummings formerly worked in the Moscow Telephone office.
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High Prices for Hogs to Continue
Department of Agriculture Fears Dangerous Shortage of Pork Products

… The entire marketing situation has so changed since the September joint conference as to necessitate and entire alteration in the plans and price stabilization. The current peace talk has alarmed the holders of corn, and there has been a price decline of from twenty-five cents to forty cents per bushel. … This decline has spread fear among swine growers that a similar reduction in the price of hogs would naturally follow. … In view of these changed conditions many swine producers anticipated lower prices and as a result rushed their hogs to market in large numbers, and this over-shipment has added to and aggravated the decline. …

Another factor contributing to the break in prices during the month has been the influenza epidemic. It has sharply curtailed consumption of pork products and temporarily decreased the labor staff of the packers about twenty-five per cent. …
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Pleiades Club Donates Much Fruit

The Star-Mirror office is filled with canned fruits, jellies and other delicacies brought by members of the Pleiades club for the convalescent soldiers at the hospitals. The fruit completely filled a large touring car and will be sent to the boys who are recovering from influenza. It is the largest single donation from any organization to the sick soldiers who will be delighted to receive it.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 31 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., October 31, 1918, page 8

Mrs. E. T. Baker is ill of influenza at her home on So. Washington. Since the attack was taken charge of in time, no complications are expected.

Mrs. D. C. Livingston, who has had charge of the Inland hospital, is sick of influenza at her home on N. Polk.
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Volunteer Nurse Takes Place of Sick Doctor

Potlatch. — Owning to the fact that Dr. Givson, his wife and nurse at the Bovill hospital are ill with influenza, Mrs. Viola Nelson and her sister Mamie Gehrke, both graduates of Sacred Heart hospital at Spokane, who were visiting their parents here, have gone to Bovill to take charge of the hospital there. D. Gibson has pneumonia which followed an attack of influenza.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 31 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Nezperce Herald., October 31, 1918, page 1

19181031NPH1-headlineInfluenza Claims Four More At NezPerce.
Twelve in Town and Three from Country Taken In Scourge’s Sweep Through Community.

William Lang died at 2:00 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 26.

Elmer T. Scholer died at 7:00 a.m., Monday, Oct. 28

Mrs. Lula G. Nichols died at 3:30 a.m. Wednesday, Oct. 30.

Mrs. Celia B. Day died at 4:30 a.m., the same date.

This community has been called upon to witness the passing of four more citizens withing the past sic days as the result of the influenza malady which became epidemic here on Wednesday, Oct. 9. This brings the total fatalities among the town’s inhabitants up to 12, and three from the surrounding country. …
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The Plague Subsides.

The present outlook in Nezperce is that the emergency hospital, which held as many as 57 patients at one time during the past three weeks of this influenza epidemic, will be cleared Saturday. At present there are no extreme cases in the community, and conditions bid fair to improve until the normal state of good health again prevails here. This must not be taken to mean, however, that the community should in the least relax its precautions against the dread malady. On the contrary, the costly experience gained should be taken every advantage of and strict care maintained to prevent any occurrence of the dilemma. …

source: The Nezperce Herald. (Nezperce, Idaho), 31 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Nezperce Herald., October 31, 1918, page 4

Stores Must Close at 6:00

All stores and other places of business in Idaho must be closed at 6 o’clock each evening under orders of the state health board received last night by County Health Officer Dr. E. Taylor. The only exception to the rule is the prescription department of drug stores and only prescriptions can be handled by the drug stores after 6 o’clock in the evening.

The order is effective from Oct. 29 This means the usual Saturday evening trading will be eliminated, that cigar stores, candy and ice cream parlors and all other lines of business must close promptly at 6 o’clock. This order will remain effective until an improvement in the influenza situation warrants the raising of the embargo.

source: The Nezperce Herald. (Nezperce, Idaho), 31 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Nezperce Herald., October 31, 1918, page 6

Kamiah Loses Two.

For the first time since the war began Kamiah has been called on to receive the message of a soldier’s death, which is the greatest grief that can come to a community. A double sorrow is our portion, too, for the first of the week two of Kamiah’s representatives in the army were called on to make the supreme sacrifice. Sunday evening word came of the death of Axtell Hays at Camp Fremont and the next mourning Mrs. T. A. Curtis received a message apprising her of the death of her husband at Fr. Sill, Okla. Both were victims of pneumonia, superinduced by the influenza.

Axtell Hays was one of the best known Indian boys of the Nezperce reservation. He was the son of Mrs. Anna Hayes, his father being the late Alex Hayes, and uncles, Jas. and Harry Hayes, all leaders of Nez Perce affairs. Axtell was educated at Carlisle.

Axtell was born in Kamiah 28 years ago and excepting when away at school, spent his entire life here. Besides his widowed mother he leaves two sisters and three brothers – Mrs. Adair Harsche, Edna, Joseph, Noah and Andrew Hays.

The remains of Tom Curtis were shipped to his old home — Lisbon, N. D. – for burial, and Mrs. Curtis and the children left for that place Tuesday morning to attend the funeral. He was born in Janesville, Wis., March 2, 1876.

– Kamiah Progress.
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Local News

Winchester reports the influenza situation well in hand there, and no threatened serious results from the outbreak.

Fourteen cases of influenza were reported from the Steele section – eight being at the home of Chas. Coon, but all are recovering satisfactorily.

John A. Conger, student in the Washington University at Seattle, returned home Sunday to await the reopening of the U. which is closed on account of the influenza epidemic.

Miss Frances Jacobs and her cousin, Miss Alvina Jacobs, students in the Lewiston high school, returned to the former’s home here yesterday as the schools there have closed because of the influenza.

Leo. L. Robertson, 75th Inf., Headquarters Division, Camp Lewis, came home last night, having been given a 30-day leave of absence at the urgent request of Mayor Stoufer and this community, to relieve the local congested condition in the pharmacy service during the influenza epidemic.

source: The Nezperce Herald. (Nezperce, Idaho), 31 Oct. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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1918Atlantic21-a
Red Cross Motor Corps members on duty during the influenza epidemic in the United States, in St. Louis, Missouri, in October of 1918. National Archives

source: Alan Taylor April 10, 2018 “30 Photos of the 1918 Flu Pandemic” The Atlantic
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Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 1)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 2)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 3)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 4)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 5)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 6)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 7)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 8)