Idaho History June 21, 2020

Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic

Part 10

Idaho Newspaper clippings November 1 – 4, 1918

1918Atlantic24-a
A nurse takes the pulse of a patient in the influenza ward of the Walter Reed hospital in Washington, D.C., in November of 1918. Library of Congress via AP

source: Alan Taylor April 10, 2018 “30 Photos of the 1918 Flu Pandemic” The Atlantic
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The Rathdrum Tribune., November 01, 1918, Page 1

From Over The County

Spirit Lake

Dr. McCormick reports 10 cases of influenza, some of them developing into pneumonia. One is critical.

Coeur D’Alene

The first death in Coeur d’Alene resulting from the influenza epidemic was that of Frances Lucile Jessick, age 8 months, Oct. 29. On that date 59 cases were reported in Coeur d’Alene.

Dr. Drennan, county health officer is confined to his home with influenza.

source: The Rathdrum Tribune. (Rathdrum, Idaho), 01 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Rathdrum Tribune., November 01, 1918, Page 2

Health authorities of Des Moines are quoted in the Christian Science Monitor as directing attention to the value of common sense and a calm attitude of mind in conquering fear of infection during the present influenza epidemic. Know the truth about disease and the laws of health and be calm and cheerful of mind. These suggestions are worth passing on.

source: The Rathdrum Tribune. (Rathdrum, Idaho), 01 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Rathdrum Tribune., November 01, 1918, Page 5

Personal Mention.

E. W. Cady and family received word this week that Mr. Cady’s nephew, James Blair of the army spruce division, has died at Vancouver Barracks of influenza pneumonia. The young man’s home was in Montana. He visited in Rathdrum last summer while on furlough.
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Local Paragraphs.

On Wednesday Dr. Wenz, local health officer, reported 29 cases of influenza in Rathdrum and vicinity.

A report circulated here the first of the week that Forrest Metcalf of East Greenacres had succumbed to influenza at a naval station, is denied in letters received by his parents. He is recovering.
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Red Cross Shop Closed.

The chairman of the Rathdrum Branch authorizes the announcement that the Red Cross Shop has been closed until the influenza epidemic is over. However, donated articles will continue to be received and take care of. Red Cross Shop sales last Saturday amounted to $16.55.

source: The Rathdrum Tribune. (Rathdrum, Idaho), 01 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Republican. November 01, 1918, Page 2

Notice
Beware of Influenza, Resolutions

At a special meeting of the Board of Health of Bingham county, Idaho, held at the court house of said county, October 29, 1918, at 9:30 a.m., present F. T. Halverson, Chairman, W. C. Sollenberger, W. M. Christensen and Dr. C. A. Hoover, Secretary, after full investigation the following resolutions were passed:

Resolved, that owning to the spread of the influenza, and desiring if possible to prevent same, every person upon the public highway or in public places, like stores, etc, shall wear a protective mask, said mask to be not less than three or four layers of fine cheesecloth, or more layers of coarse gauze, where the coarsest is used, not less than ten layers.

Resolved, that all people are prohibited from remaining in any place of business longer than necessary to transact their legitimate business; no lounging or congregating of any kind shall be allowed at any point or place.

Resolved, that all meetings of whatever nature, either inside or outside are prohibited.

It is further ordered that all places of business, excepting such places as serve regular meals shall close at 6 p.m., all cafes and places where regular meals are furnished shall close at 9 p.m.

All county and local peace officers are instructed to see that these orders are enforced and observed.

All of the above to remain in force and effect until all restrictions as to influenza are removed by the State Board of Health.

The above resolutions are effective on and after November 1, 1918.

Board of Health of Bingham County, Idaho.
By F. T. Halverson, Chairman,
W. C. Sollenberger,
W. M. Christensen,
C. A. Hoover, Secretary.
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19181101TIR1-headlineSterling

School has been closed here indefinitely until the epidemic of the influenza has subsided somewhat.

Mrs. N. Tanner Jr. is very ill, which is reported to be the influenza.

All of the Leach family are confined to their beds with the “flue.” [sic] Claude Parsons, the only well one at the ranch is caring for the entire family.
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19181101TIR2-headlineSpringfield

Several families are reported ill with influenza. Among them are the Leach, Broadhead and Sullivan families. Minnie Leach is reported very sick.

Robert Wiley did not leave for Boise with his mother, but is staying here until the schools reopen. He has just recovered from an attack of the influenza.
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19181101TIR3-headlineMoreland

Miss Florence Wheeler who has been in Denver, Colo. since last spring on a mission for the L. D. S. church as returned to her home, where she will remain until the Spanish influenza epidemic has past. [sic]

Chester Grimmett has been sick with the Spanish influenza, but is now slowly recovering.

Everything is exceptionally quiet here. Everybody is staying close at home for fear of getting the Spanish influenza. But there are not so very many cases in this town now.

Medora Grimmett has gone to Blackfoot to take care of her sister’s family, who are all ill.
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19181101TIR4-headlineGrandview

Andrew Nelson of Sterling, was in Grandview Monday. He states they were quite uneasy about their two daughters as they were both ill with Spanish influenza. Adeline is in Provo, where she has been attending school and Hazel, the nurse, is stationed at Fort Riley, Kansas. She wrote that there 1000 cases in the hospital, so many they could not be given proper care. One train leaving there carried 60 dead soldiers and 6 nurses.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 01 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Republican. November 01, 1918, Page 5

19181101TIR5-headlineLocal News

Marvin Luton is about to be around again after a short illness.

Roy Bell is reported as having the influenza.

Mrs. Mae Sprague, who has been ill for several days is much improved.

Mrs. George Thompson has been very ill for several days but is now much improved.

C. Weaver, third trick operator at the O. S. L. depot, is suffering an attack of influenza.

Miss Laura Whittick, of the Brown-Hart company, was on the sick list the first of the week.

Miss Via Barton, who is in Pocatello, and very ill with the influenza, is now convalescent.

Ben Lyons has been seriously ill for the past few days. At last reports he was somewhat improved.

Carles Clark, who has been ill with influenza for the past few weeks is able to be out again.

James Martin, manager of the C. W. & M. Co., who has been very ill for the past several days, is now much improved.
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Glenn Bailey Passes Away

Glenn Bailey, son of George Bailey died at their home in Groveland Thursday morning at 2 o’clock, following an attack of influenza. Arrangements for funeral services have not been made.

His mother proceeded him only a few days ago, and he has another brother, who is seriously ill with the same disease.
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The R. B. Ferris sale advertised for Tuesday, Oct. 29 was called off in order to be in harmony with the Board of Health, prohibiting public gatherings of any nature. Another date will be set and the sale readvertised at some future time.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 01 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Oakley Herald. November 01, 1918, Page 1

19181101TOH1-headlineIdaho Budget

The Idaho Falls school board on October 15, decided to close all departments of the school until the quarantine for Spanish influenza has been raised. Several mild cases of the epidemic have developed in the vicinity, two of them being transients. The country schools have not been closed.

Methodists held their church services on the lawn on the east side of the church at Boise last Sunday. A piano was moved on to the main entrance and the program was given over largely to singing. Automobiles were drawn up to the curb and were used for church seats.

Prof. Solen W. Cunningham, formerly head of the department of agriculture and director of athletics at the Albion state normal school, died Wednesday, October 9, of bronchial pneumonia, caused by Spanish influenza.

source: The Oakley Herald. (Oakley, Idaho), 01 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Oakley Herald. November 01, 1918, Page 7

The last number of the Inland Empire reports that Idahome is still without a single case of Spanish influenza.

source: The Oakley Herald. (Oakley, Idaho), 01 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Oakley Herald. November 01, 1918, Page 8

George Fairchild Dead

George Harvey Fairchild died Sunday night of pneumonia, superseded by Spanish influenza. He as the son of Mrs. August Fairchild. He was born in Oakely, Idaho, June 21, 1885.. He leaves a wife and two children and many relatives to mourn his loss.
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19181101TOH2-headlineIn the Gem State

Word has been received at Malad of the death of John Daniels at Camp Fremont, Cal. The young man has been at Camp Fremont for the past two months. His death was caused by pneumonia, superinduced by Spanish influenza.

Teachers temporarily out of employment because of the health board’s order closing schools during the Spanish influenza epidemic will not lose their pay where they have contracts not making other provisions in cases of this kind, Miss Ethel E. Redfield, state superintendent of public instruction, announces.

The authorities of Gooding college are congratulating themselves that no case of influenza has appeared at the institution. Every precaution is going taken to prevent the disease from reaching the college. All teachers who have been residing in the city are now living in the college dormitory, and there is no visiting between the college population and that of the city.

source: The Oakley Herald. (Oakley, Idaho), 01 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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American Falls Press. November 01, 1918, Page 1

19181101AFP1-headlineCity Health Board Acts
Quarantine Established on Influenza Infected Homes.

The city board of health this morning placed under quarantine all homes where there is influenza.

It continued in force its requirements that all convalescents, who are discharged from quarantine, be required to wear masks for a period of seven days.
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19181101AFP2-headlineInfluenza Situation Is Somewhat Improved
Peak of Epidemic Probably Not Reached. But Fewer Serious Cases are Reported Than in the Past – Many Entire Families Down.

It is believed the influenza situation is slightly improved, although there are many distressing cases and a few dangerously ill. The entire families of Andrew May, and W. P. Fifield of Rockland are ill. There are six cases at the Frodsham hotel, including Mrs. Will Oliver and children. There are fifteen cases in the Rockland hospital and four more were expected last night, and all are reported as getting along reasonably well.

Pneumonia has developed or is threatening in several cases. John Thorne is very ill and so is Moses Kinnear. Ernest Jones is not doing well, and is threatened with pneumonia. H. C. Boley’s children are ill and the family of one of the Perry’s is reported all down. There are many other cases. Half the families, possibly, have sick on convalescents.

In the Arbon country there are several entire families ill, and single cases in many others. West of town there are no reports.

In American Falls the number of cases is increasing although there are few serious ones. L. L. Evans, Jr., is one of the more serious cases. He was reported better last night. The hospital is full, and four of the five nurses are down. Two of them are recovering rapidly and expect to be up soon. The rooming houses are pretty well filled. There are several at the Baugh and one case is reported from the Remington, a man named Cannon from Salt Lake.

Eight members of the Butter’s family, living hear the hospital, are ill with influenza.

Ross Bolton is also down, and quite sick.

Greater care is being exercised and it is hoped this will result in checking the spread of the disease.

Mrs. Hunter of Pocatello, in charge of volunteer nurses for this part of the state, was here and in Rockland yesterday, and was well satisfied with conditions. The situation, she stated, was as satisfactory and well handled as could be expected. Coming from Pocatello, where there are a thousand cases or more, the conditions here appeared better to her than they do to those afflicted.

Five Deaths Reported.

The following deaths have been reported since Tuesday;

Newell Young, hospital, American Falls.
Joe Klum, hospital, American Falls.
Mrs. Lawrence Roy, Roy.
Mrs. Ingleberg Wanke, American Falls.
Mrs. Alma Wood, American Falls.
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Wear masks and stop spread of disease.

source: American Falls Press. (American Falls, Idaho), 01 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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American Falls Press. November 01, 1918, Page 3

19181101AFP3-headlinesNotice To Patrons of The American Falls Schools.

In view of the closing of the schools on account of the Spanish influenza, the Board of Trustees desire to impress upon the patrons the necessity of keeping their children at home as much as possible, so as to lessen the danger as much as possible.

Done by the order of the Board.
R. F. Noth, Chairman.
R. O. Jones, Clerk.
Dated this 18t day of Oct., 1918.

source: American Falls Press. (American Falls, Idaho), 01 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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American Falls Press. November 01, 1918, Page 5

19181101AFP4-headlinePeople and Events

Wear masks and stop spread of disease.

Dr. Noth is improving slowly, but is still very weak.

DeWitt Brown, chief clerk of the local draft board, is down with influenza.

O. R. Baum is getting along nicely and will be out soon, from every indication.

Moses Kinnear, of Rockland, is said to be very ill with influenza, having developed pneumonia.

Mrs. and Mrs. Martin Garn returned from Rockland yesterday, where they have been assisting with the sick.

Ernest Jones, who is down with influenza is reported to be quite sick, and is threatened with pneumonia.

W. L. Newton and son, Walter,m are out again after a severe attack of the influenza.

Mrs. L. H. Dorne is here from Butte, making final proof on her homestead. She reports influenza conditions in Butte very bad.

Henry Reiman was down from Roy Wednesday and reported that the family of Lawrence Roy were down with influenza, Mrs. Roy being very sick.

Mrs. Lawrence Roy, of Roy, died of influenza yesterday. Mr. Roy and the children are ill and have been removed to a hospital.

C. T,. Contant is making satisfactory progress with his influenza, and hopes to be out in time to vote for his choice for prosecuting attorney.

The entire family of Andrew May, of Rockland, are down with influenza. The are reported to be getting along as well as could be expected.

L. L. Evans, Jr., is said to have a severe type of influenza and to be quite a sick man. Mrs. Evans has a lighter form. They are being cared for by Mrs. W. W. Beecksted.
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Election Place Changed.

Owing to the influenza epidemic and advisability of having a roomy place for holding the election to avoid crowding, the polling place for American Falls precinct is hereby changed to the Auditorium.

W. S. Sparks, Chairman Board of County Commissioners.
Paul Bulfinch, Clerk.
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19181101AFP5-headlineArbon Valley News.

There is an influenza epidemic here in Arbon. Several families of six and eight to a family, are all down. There have been several calls for physicians but due to the influenza at Rockland, American Falls, Malad and vicinity, the doctors can not come when first called, but Dr. Schlitz of American Falls and Dr. Ray are doing their best for the sufferers, coming out whenever they possibly can. There is an urgent call for doctors here every day.

Mr. Perry Howell came down with the influenza Saturday.

Mrs. Mable Catherine Floyd, wife of E. L. Floyd, of Arbon, died last Thursday at their home here of pneumonia, after an illness of short duration. Remains were taken to Pocatello, where funeral services were held Friday afternoon. Deceased was a lovable woman, wife and mother and is survived by her husband and five small children; also a brother, Harry Hill of this place.

The family of Frank C. Turner have been seriously ill with influenza, all being down at once. Mrs. Arbon and Mrs. Davis are doing what they can for them.

Rennie Evans took the U. S. mail to Pocatello last Friday, as all of Herber Wood’s family were ill with the Spanish Flu.

Dr. Ray, of Malad, came over Sunday morning to the home of Mr. Geo. Bandy. His son, Richard, was seriously ill with pneumonia, but Dr. Ray thinks he has a chance to recover now, although his left lung is badly affected.

Mr. C. D. Porter, Orville Porter and Mrs. C. W. Weidmann are quite ill at the Porter home with influenza. Mrs. Porter, who had been ill in bed with the same thing, had to get up to nurse the others.

Mrs. Melvin Bailey has been quite ill with influenza, but is recovering now.

Mrs. James Payne, who had been ill with influenza, is reported much better. Her husband and little daughter are now ill in bed.

The family of E. H. Davis are all taking turns with the “flu,” two or three being down in bed at a time. Dr. Davis is away on a hunting trip and doesn’t know of the sickness at home.

Mr. Newell Leishermann is slowly recovering from a severe attack of the influenza.

Mr. Cotant of American Falls, brot [sic] two of his thresher crews back Friday, they having recovered from a slight attack of influenza. All of the crew took sick and had to be taken to town for medical aid, the thresher having to lay idle for two weeks. There are several waiting to have their grain threshed as soon as the Cotant machine can resume work.

Messrs. T. B. and L. B. Evans received word of the death of their brother, I. B. Evans, at Preston, Saturday morning of pneumonia. They left Saturday to attend the funeral. I. B. Evans was well known by many of the old timers here. His daughter, Miss Mary Evans, taught at the Pauline school here last term. A sister Mrs. John Noble, resides at Pauline.

The Davis store is closed until the family of E. H. Davis recover from their siege of sickness.

Mr. and Mrs. Gus Brahmstadt are ill with influenza. Also the children of Emmett Lee.

Miss Mae Ripley received a letter from her brother, Ralph, who is in training at the university at Moscow, that there were forty cases of the flu there. He has escaped it so far.

Mr. Litz of American Falls, returned from American Falls Friday night, where he went to recover from the influenza.

Mr. and Mrs. D. Daniels of Pauline, received word Sunday of the death of their son, John, at Camp Fremont, California. His death was due to the Spanish influenza. The young man left here about six weeks ago, on draft call. The body was sent to Malad for burial. About seven weeks ago Mr. and Mrs. Daniels’ only daughter died. The sympathy of their many friends is extended to the bereaved family.

Dr. Hartvigsen, of McCammon, was summoned here last week to attend Mrs. Floyd; also several other people who were afflicted with severe cases of la grippe or Spanish influenza.

source: American Falls Press. (American Falls, Idaho), 01 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Kendrick Gazette. November 01, 1918, Page 1

19181101TKG1-headlineStores Must Close at Six

All stores and other places of business in Idaho must be closed at 6 o’clock each evening under orders of the state board of health. The only exception to the ruling is the prescription department of drug stores and only prescriptions can be handled by the drug stores after 6 o’clock in the evening.

This means the usual Saturday evening trading will be eliminated, that cigar stores, candy and ice cream parlors and all other lines of business must close promptly at 6 o’clock. The order will remain effective until an improvement in the influenza situation warrants the raising of the embargo.
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19181101TKG2-headlineTeachers Will Draw Pay

The state of Idaho is out approximately $20,000 per day in maintaining its school system during the Spanish Influenza epidemic, as all teachers will continue to receive their salaries during the closed period where their contracts do not expressly state otherwise. More than 3700 teachers are employed in the state, and the average salary is $100 per month. Other expenses bring the total cost of operating the schools to approximately $400,000 per school month of 20 days.

Much interest has been shown by teachers in the question of whether they were to receive their salaries or not while the schools are closed. The attorney general has rendered a decision making the fact clear that the teachers can draw their salaries.

source: The Kendrick Gazette. (Kendrick, Idaho), 01 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Kendrick Gazette. November 01, 1918, Page 4

The sad news reached here of the death of Mrs. Elmo Dole, formerly Miss Nannie Galloway, at her home in Montana, after a weeks illness of influenza. She is well known here where she lived an attended school several years. She is survived by her husband and daughter Beulah, aged four, her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Galloway, two sisters, two brothers and a large umber of relatives and friends.

Dr. Faust of Deary was called to the Rufus May home Tuesday, owning to the serious illness of Mrs. May and six children.

source: The Kendrick Gazette. (Kendrick, Idaho), 01 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Kendrick Gazette. November 01, 1918, Page 6

19181101TKG3-headlineGleanings

Mayor Peterson has been directed by the state sanitary inspector to prohibit the dry sweeping of streets and sidewalks at any time. This order has been issued to prevent in a measure the spread of influenza. Streets and sidewalks shall be swept only between the hours of 9 p.m. and 6 a.m., and then only after being well sprinkled with water.

source: The Kendrick Gazette. (Kendrick, Idaho), 01 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Recorder. November 01, 1918, Page 1

19181101IR1-headline
Death Stalks in Wake of “Flu”

F. S. Wright, county health man, reports a total of 76 cases of so-called Spanish influenza in the county to date. … [First column of story tucked into a fold and not legible.]

Horace Pope is seriously sick at the family home in Salmon. The prevailing malady attacked him last Sunday and he passed to the pneumonia stage of the disease on Monday. He was reported to be improving Wednesday noon.

Roy Snodgrass, 18-year old native son of Lemhi county, died of flu in Montana Tuesday.

Christ Grieber, 24 years of age, died last Friday, October 25, at Butte, where he was with his other. A telegram was received in Salmon Friday night bringing the news. He was a victim of the prevailing malady.

James Bruener, a strong man who had been employed as a laborer, died Sunday night or early Monday morning at his home in Salmon. He had been around the day before, on Saturday, though suffering from influenza. Monday morning Jack Gaver called at the house and found Mrs. Bruener sitting in a chair in a cold room. She too was ill and helpless. She did not now her husband had passed away but reported he was probably asleep.

Later one of the young sons of Mr. Gaver was directed to start a fire for the family when he found the head of the house had expired. A physician reported soon afterward that the man had been dead perhaps for hours, for the lifeless body was cold. Lynn Fowler, in the absence of the undertaker, was called upon to prepare the body for burial. Mrs. Bruener died the dame day in the house where her husband still lay.

Miss Gladys Webb was enabled to reach her Carmen home on Monday last from having been quarantined at Butte. She came in on the regular train. …

The wife and child of John Steele are dead at Mackay, according to notice received in Salmon Tuesday morning. Mr. and Mrs. Steele, Sr., were in Salmon Tuesday morning early as soon as they were apprised of the deaths to arrange to go to the stricken home. This was difficult to understate with the Salmon river road blocked.

Sheriff Emerson C. Frazier has been a very sick man this week, another victim of flu. He was considered much improved Wednesday morning but had passed through a long period of high fever the day before.

Walter Riggle, a lineman in the employ of the telephone company was one of the first to be attacked in Salmon. Two of his sisters, Mrs. Bruener and Mrs. Patterson, were among the stricken sufferers, the former at her Salmon home a few hours after the death of her husband and the latter a few days before at her Montana home.

Harry Holden and George Keyes, two well known members of the bar, the one at Idaho Falls and the other at Challis, but both practicing at Salmon, died last week from influenza. One of the Salmon attorneys, Senator Whitcomb, received a letter from Mr. Holden which he wrote the day before his death. Both passed away at a Pocatello hospital.

Illness came very nearly putting out of business the Salmon news store, with Ray Kinsey, Mrs. Kinsey and the latter’s son Robert all kept at home this week. Mrs. E. W. Whitcomb promptly volunteered to look after the store upon being apprised of the affliction that had come to the Kinseys and she took her place, mask on, behind the counter to wait upon the patrons, saying she was new to the business but willing to learn and showing her great good heartedness at the same time.

Dr. J. M. Ashley has been away from his office most of the week with an attack of influenza.

The entire families of Eldridge and Doebler were abed for more [than] a week from early attacks. Three of the W. B. Fowler family are afflicted with Mr. Fowler left to care for the others. Mrs. Emigh is with the Eldridge family and Mrs. Rae with the Doeblers.

A telegram received in Salmon Saturday morning told of the sudden death of Victor Bell at Moline, Ill. He and Seth Ball had gone out with a sheep train a few days before for the Chicago market. The family of Mr. Bell had left Salmon for a visit to their old home at Roberts where Mrs. Bell had been ill. Numerous other relatives there have been critically ill also, all victims of the dread disease.

Johnny Hunt, another well known stock man of the same locality where Mr. Bell came from when he moved to Lemhi county, was on the train with Mr. Bell but was not taken ill until he reached home. He had contracted the disease, however, but being seized upon arrival home has since died.

O. D. Bell and wife, father and mother of Victor Bell were spending their retiring years with their son-in-law, John Burggraf, at the sheep headquarters. His son-in-law received the wire advising him of the death at Moline and asking that he take the parents to Roberts. Accordingly Mr. Burggraf set out at once, being met at the divide by another car.

Mrs. Burns was called from Leadore on Monday to lend help in the Salmon office of the telephone company where the staff of operators had been crippled by the appearance of the epidemic. New help was called in, so that the answers received from central were frequently from unfamiliar voices. Four operators and the messenger were all off duty this week from time to time.

The Shenon dining room was closed during the entire week because of the sickness of Mrs. Taylor and those assisting her.
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19181101TKG5-headlineJudge Padgham on Long Visit to Outside Counties

Judge Padgham is making an extended and perhaps partly enforced visit to the outside. The judge went forth two weeks ago to see some of his old time friends in the counties comprising the sixth judicial district. He found himself in the second week after being away in the midst of the epidemic, when some practical joker solemnly told the jurist that he was quarantined. Judge Padgham is a stickler for obeying law, and not wanting to break his life-long ideas on that subject he just staid [sic] where he was, in the towns within one county of the district, which the joker found had been given a more thorough canvass by him than in all its history. Everywhere he went he met and made friends. Then the joker told him he might go his way so the judge journeyed forth to come home by way of the Pashimaroi, being expected in Salmon this week. The nearest place on earth to this fine old gentleman is his home in Salmon. It is pleasing to know that after his election he will not be enticed to give up his home residence here, even though his duties will compel his absence for much of his time.
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Hanmer Hospital Notes

There are no flu cases at the Hanmer hospital.
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Red Cross Notes

The Red Cross is asking masks to be worn as a precaution during the influenza epidemic. Samples may be had at the Red Cross rooms and the masks made at home by those who are willing to help in this work. Boil the masks before using and change occasionally.

Nursing survey committees have been appointed to take census of all nurses in Lemhi county. The Salmon committee: Mrs. Whitcomb, Mrs. J. H. Wright and Mrs. R. M. Murdoch. Those comprising the committee in the Pahsimaroi: Mrs. Cora McJilton and Mrs. Harry Bates, while in Gilmore and Leadore committees have not been reported.
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19181101IR2-headlineSalmon Merchant is Latest Victim

Arthur E. Everett, Salmon merchant, died last night, another victim of the scourge. He had been ill for less than a week, with a favorable turn in condition three days after the attack but a fatal relapse came on Tuesday night when his lungs were involved beyond the power of remedy. He passed away at 9:40 o’clock. The announcement of the death came as a shock to the city.

Mr. Everett was one of Salmon’s best known business men, a familiar figure in the activities of the community and a genial, popular gentleman in all the relations of life. He is survived by Mrs. Everett, who was before her marriage Miss Winnie White, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Harry White of this city. Mr. Everett was in the prime of vigorous manhood in his 48th year. …
— —

Dr. J. M. Ashley, who has been seriously ill, is reported better today!

source: The Idaho Recorder. (Salmon City, Idaho), 01 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Recorder. November 01, 1918, Page 5

19181101IR3-headlineSalmon Locals

The Cannon-McKinney sheep case was called for trial Wednesday at 10 o’clock, and was postponed till the quarantine is raised.

Mr. and Mrs. John Steele, their son John and the latter’s son, a child of four years, are in Salmon this morning, having just arrived from Mackay, after they had buried Mrs. Steele Jr., and child. Reports from Mackay are to the effect that influenza there has appeared in most virulent form, with many deaths resulting on all sides. The father and son who are bereft of the head of their home themselves passed through safely after the disease held them for two weeks.

Mrs. Ethel White Brown, wife of John Brown, returned to Salmon from Portland on Wednesday. The only other passenger on the train in from Armstead was Mrs. Charles Webb who came from Butte where she had been in quarantine. The ladies told of their lonesome trip, saying that at Leadore permission was refused them to alight from the train even to get a luncheon. They had been informed of conditions but were not prepared for their reception at Leadore, where a deputy sheriff firmly but politely waved them to stay where they were aboard the car. And so they came on to Salmon where relatives awaited them.

source: The Idaho Recorder. (Salmon City, Idaho), 01 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Recorder. November 01, 1918, Page 6

No Influenza Cases in Three Army Camps

Washington, Oct. 26, — Three army camps did not report a single new case of influenza yesterday and only two, Kearney, Cal., and Lewis, Wash., reported more than 100 cases.

The total of new cases for all camps, a statement from the office of the surgeon general said, was 2,375, as against 2,772 the day before. Pneumonia cases decreased from 699 to 500, and deaths from 307 to 241.
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19181101IR4-headlineWorld News in Condensed Form

Seventy thousand miners of the central Pennsylvania bituminous coals fields have voted to work Sundays to overcome the falling off in production due to the Spanish influenza epidemic. Fuel Administrator Garfield announces.

Sick and wounded soldiers landed in the United States from the American expeditionary forces during the week ended October 18, numbered 637, the war department announces.

Dr. John Dill Robertson, health commissioner of Chicago, is going to vaccinate everybody in Chicago against pneumonia following influenza. Those who had had influenza are excepted.

source: The Idaho Recorder. (Salmon City, Idaho), 01 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Recorder. November 01, 1918, Page 9

19181101IR5-headlineNorthwest Notes

Fewer than 3 1/2 per cent of the persons stricken with influenza in Salt Lake have met death from pneumonia following, it is indicated in the reports to the city health department since the disease became prevalent.

Three men held in the county jail at Fort Benton, Mont., made their escape by sawing the bars from the windows. The prisoners evidently took advantage of a time when the whole sheriff’s force were laid up with the Spanish influenza.

Clarence Tooley, prominent banker and realty man of Harlowton, Mont., former member of the house of representatives and the state senate from Meagher county, and Republican candidate for the state seat from Wheatland county at the coming election, died last week from influenza.

Reno is now churchless, cabaretless and saloonless, all places have been closed by the city and county boards of health, due to the influenza. Lawyers are fearful that an order will be made closing the courts, which would make this state divorceless, a calamity which to the legal fraternity would be appalling.

While in the delirium of pneumonia in its last stages, Malcom McLea, 24 years old, attempted to escape from the third floor of a hospital at Butte and succeeded in making the ground by way of the fire escape, but was caught by one of the nurses, who, after a tussle, took him again into the building. He died the next day.

source: The Idaho Recorder. (Salmon City, Idaho), 01 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Recorder. November 01, 1918, Page 10

19181101IR6-headlineLemhi

Abe Bergerson, one more of our soldier boys died at Omaha, Nebrasks, October 26 of Spanish influenza followed by bronchial pneumonia. The young patriot joined the colors August 8, and has been at Camp Fremont until his entrainment for overseas in October. He was taken ill on the train, left at the Methodist hospital at Omaha on the 25 of October and died the next day. Abe Bergeron was 24 years of age. Born near Butte, Mont., and came to Lemhi, Idaho five years ago and had made his home here since that time. He leaves a brother, Charles Bergeron, now at Camp Merritt, N. J., in a hospital, and a sister, Mrs. Pheobe Mahoney at Lemhi, Idaho. The brother Charles has been in training since April last. Abe was a fine young man and well thought of by all who knew him.

Rena Holbrook, the daughter of Charles Holbrook of Hayden basin, has been quite sick at Missoula, Mont., with Spanish influenza.

source: The Idaho Recorder. (Salmon City, Idaho), 01 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Montpelier Examiner. November 01, 1918, Page 1

19181101ME1-headline“Flu” Still Prevails; Two More Deaths

The influenza situation in the city is about the same as it was a week, ago. While there are probably a few more cases than there were at this time last week, most of the victims have it in mild form. The health officers are doing everything possible to prevent its spread and it is believed that by another week the situation will be much improved. However, this depends to a large extent upon the people themselves. If they will continue to observe closely the board of health rules, it will materially aid in stamping out the disease. We believe that everybody has come to fully realize that it is a matter that is not to be treated lightly and are gladly submitting to ail rules in an effort to stamp out the disease.

There are a few cases in the county outside of Montpelier but all victims were yesterday reported as getting along nicely.

So far we believe that there have boon only three deaths from the disease – Mrs. John A. Bagley, Ezra Vere Phelps and Fred A. Gurnig.

Vere Phelps, as he was familiarly known. died at 6 o’clock last Monday morning. He was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Ezra J. Phelps, and was 24 years of age. A week ago last Sunday he west to Salt Lake to take the examination for promotion from fireman to engineer on the Short Line. He passed a successful examination and last Thursday he returned from Salt Lake to Pocatello. At that time he felt ill and came on to Montpelier Thursday night on No. 4. He was given the best of care and his condition was not considered serious until last Saturday night, when pneumonia took such a strong hold on him that his system could not combat it and the end came Monday morning. Open air funeral services were held at the cemetery that afternoon. Besides his parents, he is survived by his wife, two small children, one sister and four brothers. one now being in service in France.

The third victim of the influenza was Fred A., the son of Mrs. Fred Grunig, who died Tuesday morning from pneumonia following the influenza. The deceased was 18 years of age and for the past six years he had been partly paralyzed, this condition resulting from injuries received when the tines of a pitchfork penetrated his back. Funeral services were held at the cemetery late Tuesday afternoon.
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Club Girls Have Made Excellent Records

The end of the season has come for the girls’ canning clubs, and their final reports and stories of their summer’s work are now being sent in. These are the government reports, and are the more important part of the summer’s work. On account of the influenza quarantine, no meetings have been held for several weeks. With reports in from only four out of the ten clubs in the county, the amount of canning bids fair to far exceed the estimates which had been made. The amounts from the four clubs which have reported aggregate about 5,500 quarts of fruit, vegetables, pickles, jelly and jam.

As soon as the quarantine permits, and schools are in session again the winter clubs for both boys and girls will be organized. One of the principal fall projects is to be a large calf club. This work will be carried on in connection with the Farm Bureau cattle project for the adults, and it is expected that many boys will take advantage of this most interesting club. Other phases of the winter work will be cooking and sewing for the girls and handicraft for the boys.

source: Montpelier Examiner. (Montpelier, Idaho), 01 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Montpelier Examiner. November 01, 1918, Page 4

Order Modifying Refilling of Narcotic Prescriptions

To collectors and internal revenue and others concerned: Owing to the extent of the epidemic of Spanish influenza now prevailing in this country and consequent difficulty of persons in getting immediate medical attention and medicaments upon prescriptions issued by physicians, the provisions of narcotic prescription are modified as follows:

Prescriptions calling for morphine, codeine, or heroin, which are written by registered practitioners for patients suffering from Spanish influenza and any pulmonary or bronchial affections may, until further notice, be refilled, provided that at the time of issuance by physicians instructions are noted in the body of such prescriptions, “Repeat if necessary,” and the druggist filling and refilling the same shall note thereon each and every date upon which such prescription is refilled.

Daniel C. Roper, Commissioner of Internal Revenue.
Approved: October 22, 1918.

source: Montpelier Examiner. (Montpelier, Idaho), 01 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Montpelier Examiner. November 01, 1918, Page 5

19181101ME4-headlineLocal News

The local Red Cross chapter has cleared about $50 the past week, making gauze masks.

John Bagley and Miss Perniz Bagley were released from quarantine Wednesday morning. They and the children are now at the home of Mr. Bagley’s father, and all are getting along nicely.

Judge Budge writes us that his son, Alfred, who is in the medical corps and a student in the medical department of the Columbia university in New York, was stricken about a month ago with influenza, followed by pneumonia and then followed by an abscess in the region of the ear, which may necessitate an operation.

The “flu” victims at the city hall and Montpelier hospital, who are now on the road to recovery, would appreciate anything in the way of dainty eatables that people might care to take them. Good home made bread and jelly would no doubt taste mighty fine to them.
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City Hall Served as Maternity Hospital

The city hall has been useful in more ways than one during the past year. In addition to becoming an emergency hospital for influenza patients during the past week, it has served as a maternity hospital. Last Friday Mrs. Leland Bolles, who was ill with the disease, was taken to the city hall and on Saturday night she gave birth to a nine pound son. For about 48 hours her condition was serious, but she has passed the critical state and she and the babe are doing nicely under the care of a competent nurse. Mr. Bolles left her last August for Camp Fremont and is now at some point in the east awaiting orders to sail for France.

source: Montpelier Examiner. (Montpelier, Idaho), 01 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Montpelier Examiner. November 01, 1918, Page 7

19181101ME5ad

source: Montpelier Examiner. (Montpelier, Idaho), 01 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Montpelier Examiner. November 01, 1918, Page 8

Bodies of Two Soldier Boys Brought Home For Burial.

The body of Ira L. Hymas, who died from influenza at Camp Fremont on Oct. 23, arrived here last Monday morning. A large number of relatives and friends were present from Liberty to meet the body and escort it to the Liberty cemetery, where open air funeral services were held. A number of friends from Montpelier, including a firing squad, also accompanied the body to its final resting place.

Ira Hymas as the son of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Hymas of Liberty, and was 22 years of age. On the 5th of last August he answered his country’s call and in company with some 30 other young men, left for Camp Fremont, where he entered actively into the military duties. He was enjoying good health up to the time he was stricken with the influenza. Besides other relatives, he is survived by his parents, four brothers and one sister. One brother, Milton, is now in the service in France, and other brother, Wm. R., is serving on a mission in Montana.

The body of Archie Jensen, who died from influenza at Pueblo, on Oct. 23, while en route with his comrades from Camp Fremont to some embarkation point in the east, did not arrive here until Wednesday morning of this week. Delay in shipment of the body was due to the fact that he died at a hospital instead of at a cantonment, and it required several days to secure the necessary permit from the government to ship the body.

Relatives and friends from Ovid met the body and accompanied by the firing squad and friends from Montpelier, it was conveyed to the Ovid cemetery where services where held.

Archie was the same age as his comrade, Ira Hymas, and they had chummed together almost constantly while at Cap Fremont. He was in good health when the order came for his company to entrain for the east and it was with deep regrets that he was compelled to leave his comrade and friend behind. Little did the boys dream that their parting at Cap Fremont would be their final one. Shortly after the train left Salt Lake he was stricken with the dread disease, and was taken there from at Pueblo, the first town where hospital accommodation could be secured for him.

He was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Lars P. Jensen of Ovid. Six brothers ad four sisters, mourn with their parents the untimely death of the one who had been called to serve his country in the great world war.

source: Montpelier Examiner. (Montpelier, Idaho), 01 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Meridian Times., November 01, 1918, Page 2

19181101TMT1-headlineNews of a Week in Condensed Form
Record of the Important Events Told in Briefest Manner Possible.
Happenings That Are Making History – Information Gathered from All Quarters of the Glove and Given in a Few lines.

Intermountain.

J. W. and W. A. Alexander, brothers, who had left Duchesne, Utah, for the railroad with a shipment of cattle, were found dead in a tent after some of the stock had wandered into a nearby town. Both had died from influenza.

Glad to put up with the discomforts of a quarantine to be hear their boys who lie ill with influenza and pneumonia in the base hospital at Camp Lewis, Wash., nearly 100 women are quartered in the Y. W. C. A. hostess house and the Salvation Army rooms.

Domestic.

Three army camps did not report a single new case of influenza on Saturday and only two, Kearny, Cal., and Lewis, Wash., reported more than 100 cases.

Spanish influenza as an epidemic is subsiding rapidly in the military camps of the country, but among the civilian population generally the peak has not yet been reached.

Washington.

Continued improvement in the influenza situation in army camps and in a number of states is shown by reports received by the surgeon general of the army and the public health service.

Foreign.

Prince Maximillan of Baden, the German chancellor, has been stricken by influenza, Berlin advices [sic] state. In some quarters the question is raised whether it is the diplomatic brand of influenza that usually precedes the retirement of statesmen.
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19181101TMT2-headlineIn The Gem State

Word has been received at Malad of the death of John Daniels at Camp Fremont, Cal. The young man has been at Camp Fremont for the past two months. His death was cause by pneumonia, superinduced by Spanish influenza.

Teachers temporarily out of employment because of the health board’s order closing schools during the Spanish influenza epidemic will not lose their pay where they have contracts not making other provisions in cases of this kind, Miss Ethel E. Redfield, state superintendent of public instruction, announces.

The authorities of Gooding college are congratulating themselves that no cause of influenza has appeared at the institution. Every precaution is being taken to prevent the disease from reaching the college.. All teachers who have been residing in the city are now living in the college dormitory, and there is no visiting between the college population and that of the city.

source: The Meridian Times. (Meridian, Idaho), 01 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Meridian Times., November 01, 1918, Page 1

19181101TMT3ad

source: The Meridian Times. (Meridian, Idaho), 01 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Meridian Times., November 01, 1918, Page 4

Dwight M. Gruber Writes About Fort Worden.

Mrs. John Gruber, residing near Meridian, has received a letter from her son, Dwight, now of the 40th Co. C. A. P. S., Fort Worden, Wash. in which he says: [excerpts]

“We are quarantined in our barracks for two weeks as usual and also the whole post is quarantined.

“Out of our brave and gallant company of 100 there were only about 40 out for retreat to-night. The rest are in the hospital with colds and grippe. Fred Gracey went yesterday, but there is nothing to be afraid of as there are only a few cases of the real “flu.” They spray our throats every night to prevent sore throat etc.

“Will close, hoping to hear from all soon. Affectionately, Dwight.”

Note — Fred Gracey mentioned in the above letter died this week of influenza. He was a Boise boy, and was a very warm friend of Dwight Gruber. — (Ed.)

source: The Meridian Times. (Meridian, Idaho), 01 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Meridian Times., November 01, 1918, Page 14

19181101TMT4-headlineMeridian News Notes

Jack Ellis who had a slight attack of Spanish influenza, is improving.

Mrs. M. W. Kellar, who came here recently from California, is quarantined with small pox.

J. M. Jackson who has been ill with the grippe for the last few days is improving.

Mrs. Guy Humphrey and five children who have been in quarantine with the Spanish influenza, are improving.

O. Singrey is now in charge of the Meridian water works pumping plant in the place of Guy Humphrey, whose family is in quarantine with the Spanish flu.

We were just wondering if this epidemic and seclusion continues until after election, and nobody comes or goes, what will the editor do for items to put in the paper.

Reports made by the physicians before going to press indicate that the Spanish influenza in the vicinity around Meridian is not on the wane but increasing. While in Meridian up to the present time, there have been but six cases of influenza, a rigid quarantine is being kept by those suffering with colds or lagrippe.

The Meridian teachers were called upon Thursday to donate their services for the day in work for the Council of Defense. A house to house canvas was made to get donations to aid the girls who wish to become Red Cross nurses, but not affording the tuition for the training. A canvas was also made of the number of trained nurses in the town, and also each family who has a soldier in the service.
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19181101TMT4ad

source: The Meridian Times. (Meridian, Idaho), 01 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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1918Atlantic27-a
An American soldier has his throat sprayed to prevent influenza in December of 1918 at Love Field in Dallas, Texas. Everett Historical / Shutterstock

source: Alan Taylor April 10, 2018 “30 Photos of the 1918 Flu Pandemic” The Atlantic
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The Idaho Republican. November 01, 1918, Page 1

Seeger-Bundlie’s Influenza Message

We are in accord with the order of the State Board of Health. We believe in prevention wherever possible, and we think that wearing a mask helps to prevent getting the disease.

The salespeople in our store all wear masks. We are selling masks to people at cost and doing what we can to help break up the epidemic. We believe in taking every reasonable precaution.

But we do other things to promote public health. We always sweep our floors with a preparation that absorbs the dust instead of stirring it up. We wipe our floors with a preparation of oil that keep them in the most sanitary conditions possible. These methods prevent the accumulation of dust and link on our good, shelves and counters, and when people come into our store they are protected to the utmost. Our store is new, clean, modern and sanitary. If you have been dealing with us you are aware of this; if you have not been in, this is a good time to come.

Seeger-Bundlie Company “Everybody’s Store” Broadway – Blackfoot
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Health Board Makes Rules Regarding Influenza.

The seriousness of the influenza epidemic caused the local Board of Health to hold a meeting at the Court House Tuesday morning, and they adopted the following rules, which will be enforced Friday, November 1st:

Everyone appearing on the public highway or in public places must wear gauze masks.

All business places, including Cigar Stores and Drug Stores will close promptly at six o’clock.

All restaurants, cafes, and eating places must close at nine o’clock.

This will remain in effect until the Influenza epidemic is completely under control.
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Influenza Situation in the County

The influenza situation is very prevalent in all places, and in all parts of Bingham county.

At present the reports show that the disease is on the increase. Since the epidemic started in this county, the reports show there were 105 cases the first week, 115 the second week, 179 cases the third week, and up to date there are 100 cases of influenza under the care of a physician. The last report was taken at noon Thursday and by evening there may be more cases reported to the Board of health.

The gauze mask is considered the only real protection and if everyone would wear a mask the disease would soon be checked.

Beginning November 1 everyone appearing on the public highways must wear a gauze mask.
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Influenza Precautions Taken Elsewhere

Passengers getting off the trains at Gooding are required to register, stating where they came from and the status of the influenza in the towns visited.

Boise and other cities throut [sic] the state are taking the precaution to quarantine people who are ill with same disease.
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Cleansing The Masks

Physicians advise people that the best way to cleanse and sterilize the flu masks is to boil them five or ten minutes every evening, then dry and use again next day.

If you take the flu, go to bed at once. Delay is dangerous. Lie still, keep covered up, eat and drink sufficient and provide plenty of fresh air. Don’t get out too soon.
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Funeral Services for Minnie Leach

Funeral services for Miss Minnie Leach, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. R. Leach of Springfield, were held Wednesday afternoon. Interment was made at Springfield.

Miss Leach succumbed to pneumonia following an attack of influenza.
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Blackfoot Woman Dies in Los Angeles

Mrs. Octa Cambell, a former resident of North Shilling avenue, went to Los Angeles recently with her children and died of influenza on the 25th of October. She was cared for in a hospital by the associated charities, and all of the five children were afflicted at last reports. …
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Death of Mrs. Parley Fackrell

Mrs. Parley Fackrell, age 40 years, died at their home Tuesday morning at 3:30 o’clock, following an attack of influenza-pneumonia. … Deceased is survived by her husband and 7 children, all of whom are living in this community. …
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Two Brothers Victims of Influenza

Virgil, the eighteen-year-old son, and Lorin, the twelve-year-old son, of Mr. and Mrs. S. B. Talbot, of Groveland, were both victims of influenza-pneumonia.

Virgil passed away Wednesday morning at 3 o’clock, and Lorin passed away at 12:30 Tuesday afternoon. …
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Victim of Influenza

Miss Margaret Bischoff, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Bischoff of Blackfoot, died at her home Monday morning, after suffering an attack of influenza and pneumonia. …

Deceased is survived by her parents, two sisters and five brothers.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 01 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Shoshone Journal. November 01, 1918, Page 1

Influenza Serums.

Every one hopes that some serum or other preparation may be discovered which will prevent or alleviate the dangers of the influenza. The Journal of American Medical association is the highest authority in existence on such matters and the following report on the subject of vaccines or serums, in the issue of Oct. 19, 1918, will be of interest to our readers:

Vaccines in Influenza.

With the appearance of the epidemic of influenza, reports began to appear, chiefly in newspapers, as to new serums, vaccines, drugs and other methods for checking and even for curing the disease.

A few samples of such as have come to the Journal appear in our Tonics and Sedatives department this week. In Massachusetts Commissioner E. R. Kelly appointed two committees to investigate the value of influenza vaccines as a preventive agent and as a treatment of the disease. The first committee, a special board for scientific investigation, consisting of Dr. M. J. Rosenau, chairman, and Frederick P. Gay and George W. McCoy, was appointed to consider the evidence available on the prophylactic and therapeutic use of vaccines against influenza. This committee presented the following conclusions:

1. The evidence at hand affords no trustworthy basis for regarding prophylactic vaccination against influenza as of value in preventing the spread of the disease, or of reducing its severity. The evidence from the present epidemic, though meager, suggests that the incidence of the disease among the vaccinated is smaller than among the nonvaccinated. The board, therefore, concludes that further experimental evidence should be collected.

2. The evidence at hand convinces the board that the vaccines we have considered have no specific value in the treatment of influenza.

3. There is evidence that no unfavorable results have followed the use of vaccines.

The second committee, known as the Special Board of Statistical Investigation, consisted of Dr. George C. Whipple, chairman. William H. Davis and F. C. Crum. This committee reported:

1. The weight of such statistical evidence as we have been able to accumulate indicates that the use of the influenza vaccine which we have investigated is without therapeutic benefit. Exceptional cases where apparent benefit has resulted from the use of the vaccine can be matched off by other cases where similar recoveries have been made without vaccination.

2. The statistical evidence, as far as it goes, indicates a probability that the use of this influenza vaccine has some prophylactic value.

3. There is also some evidence to the effect that other methods of protection, such as open-air treatment and the use of proper masks, are effective in protecting exposed attendants, and the use of vaccine should not be taken as an excuse for omitting such safeguards.

As a result, the following recommendations were made:

That the state encourage the distribution of influenza vaccine intended for prophylactic use, but in such manner as will secure scientific evidence of the possible value of the agent. The use of such vaccine is to be regarded as experimental.

That the state shall neither furnish nor endorse any vaccine at present in use for the treatment of influenza.

These reports are conservative, and offer to other health commissioners and their communities a reliable guide as to procedures that should be adopted before subjecting or trying out on the public any method of prevention or treatment that may be offered. These matters are the domain of medical science, and medical scientists of recognized ability should be called on to make the decision.

Of Interest to Nurses.

Word comes from Red Cross headquarters to the effect that some nurses have refused to sign and return the questionaires sent out to them, fearing they might be called to service they did not desire. The Supervisor of Nurse Survey requests the Journal to state that the questionaire sent to nurses is sent at the request of the Surgeon General of the army and the information is desired purely for statistical purposes and places the nurse answering the same under no obligations whatever. She will be at liberty to do as she pleases as to accepting service.

source: Shoshone Journal. (Shoshone, Idaho), 01 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Shoshone Journal. November 01, 1918, Page 2

19181101SJ2-headlineIdaho State News

Under the direction of the state board of health the Albion State Normal school has been placed under quarantine in an attempt to prevent the Spanish influenza from obtaining a foothold.

Five young women members of the Twin Falls high school faculty, during the enforced vacation taken pursuant to the order of the board of health, are spending their time in a nearby beet field, topping sugar beets.

Word has been received at Malad of the death of John Daniels at Camp Fremont, Cal. The young man has been at Camp Fremont for the past two months. His death was caused by pneumonia, superinduced by Spanish influenza.

source: Shoshone Journal. (Shoshone, Idaho), 01 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Shoshone Journal. November 01, 1918, Page 4

Please Tell It!

With the spread of “Flu,” the quarantining of towns, the closing of public places, and the forbidding of public gatherings, the reporter is certainly “up against it.” If you hear of any item of general interest, will you please tell us, or phone? The Journal will greatly appreciate the kindness.
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One More Account to Settle.

Miss Georgia Farrell was called to Jerome Wednesday morning to the bedside of her friend, Boy Frazer, who is very low with influenza.

Later: – Since the above was written word has come that Mr. Frazer died Tuesday night. The circumstances connected with Mr. Frazer’s death are particularly sad. When he developed symptoms of influenza in Moscow, instead of being cared for, he was put onto the train and started for home. He arrived in Shoshone on No. 18 Sunday morning, October 20, so ill that Mr. Murray protested against his making the stage trip to Jerome, but, being anxious (naturally) to be at home, the young man continued his journey, which has terminated in the benign light beyond “The Valley of the Shadow.” Another home is shrouded in mourning and there is one more account to settle with “The Beast of Berlin.”

source: Shoshone Journal. (Shoshone, Idaho), 01 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Shoshone Journal. November 01, 1918, Page 8

Wood River Center Grange.

Walter Hastings is ill with influenza.

Dietrich

The John W. Satory’s family were Wednesday informed by official telegram of the death of Mr. Satory’s soldier son, Harry Satory in France on the 4th of October, dying in the hospital from pneumonia. Harry is the first of our brave Dietrich boys to pay his greatest of a soldier’s debt.

Two others, Leslie Eddy and Lyal Shelman have been severely wounded perhaps maimed for life. Thus these living and dead have well won the love and honor of those at home for whom they sacrificed so much.

source: Shoshone Journal. (Shoshone, Idaho), 01 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., November 01, 1918, Page 1

19181101DSM1-headline
Another Influenza Victim Makes Six Deaths in Moscow

Another death, the sixth to occur in Moscow from influenza, occurred last night when Lafayette Marsing of Claytonia, near Caldwell, Idaho, died at a local hospital. He had been in a serious condition for several days and his death was not unexpected. His father, H. P. Marsing, is enroute to Moscow, when funeral arrangements will be made. The young man was a member of class B of the S. A. T. C., and is the third member of that class of 300 to succumb to the disease. Two members of class A have died and one soldier, whose home was in Moscow, but who was taken ill at an army camp in California and sent him. He died after his arrival here.

Only three new cases are reported in the S. A. T. C. today and two have been released as cured. The situation is regarded as much better, but still requires care. President Lindley, of the University of Idaho, said: “While the situation is encouraging, the danger point is not passed. We are maintaining a strict quarantine on the girls, with the result that none of them have had the disease. A woman, whose daughter is quarantined here, came to Moscow to see her daughter and has written that she considers the young lady much better off here than almost any other place. The girls are given an opportunity to study and are going on with their work, but are being closely quarantined in Ridenbaugh hall and there has not been a case of influenza among the girl students.”

There are two students that are quite ill in one of the hospitals and their condition is causing alarm, but hope has not been given up in either case.

The convalescents quartered in the Elks’ Club building are getting along nicely and most of them will soon return to their wok.

Dr. Rae, county health officer, is considering forbidding special sales days in the stores, as it is feared that the drawing of many persons in a store might cause a spread of the disease.
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Pullman Has Three More Deaths.

Pullman, Wash., Oct. 31. – Three S. A. T. C. soldier-students and one civilian succumbed to the effects of Spanish influenza last night and this morning, bringing the total for the 12-day period to 35, 29 military deaths and six civilians.

Mrs. George Walters, age about 55, passed away at the home of her son, Harry Walters, last night after an illness of a few days. Mrs. Walters is survived by her husband, George W. Walters, two sons, Harry of Pullman an Leland H. of Camp Lewis, and two daughters, Mrs. Alice Keys of Zillah and Georgia.

Donald Atwood of Tennessee, Charles William Billings and Clayton and Edward Frances Hawkins of Divide, Colo., were the military deaths.

Few new cases are being reported among the military contingent, although the disease has probably not yet reached its height among the civilian population. Several serious cases are still in the hospitals.

The Rev. G. W. Laidlaw, rector of St. James Episcopal church, who turned the church and parish house into hospitals at the outset of the epidemic, contracted the disease today. Mt. Laidlaw has worked night and day fighting the epidemic and comforting the sufferers.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 01 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., November 01, 1918, Page 3

City News

Joe Clayton is sick at home with the influenza.

Charles Gerlough is reported very ill at the Inland hospital.

Victor Anderson gave two fine chickens to the convalescent soldiers today.

Mrs. Kippen, who has been nursing the sick, is ill now at her apartments at the Idaho.

C. A. Salisbury came to Moscow last evening from Wyoming to see his son who is with the S. A. T. C. and sick of influenza.

Miss Suma Hall, Miss Adele Lampert and Miss Irma Harrison arrived today from Potlatch to assist in nursing the sick soldiers.

Word has been received by A. M. Jessup of this city that his brother, C. D. Jessup, died today at Fort Rosecrans, California, from Spanish influenza. Mr. Jessup has been in camp only a week.

Mesdames M. M. Preston, Guy Wolfe and Homer Estes and Miss Carrie Brownwach donated a fine lot of canned fruits and jellies for the soldiers who are recovering from influenza today.

Dr. W. B. Reese of Orofino, who has practiced somewhat for the last 27 years in Latah and Nezperce counties, is here from Orofino to visit his son, John Reese, of the S. A. T. C., who has the influenza.

Arlie Decker, who is teaching at the Pullman college, has been sick ten days of influenza. As yet no complications have set in and his many friends at Moscow hope for his speedy recovery.

Mr. and Mrs. C. A. Strong, who have been in Moscow to see their son, Arthur Strong, who is sick of influenza, returned last evening to their home in Lewiston. They report their son as slowly recovering.

G. G. Pickett came home today from Sacramento, Cal., where he left his mother somewhat improved for one of the advanced age of 84 years. Mr. Pickett says that most cities on the coast are wearing the gauze masks everywhere to prevent infections from influenza.

The Red Cross women of Joel and Cornwall have given three dozen chickens to make broth for the sick soldiers. Mrs. John Sumner delivered them. People in and around Moscow have been donating six or eight chickens a week for the same loyal purpose.

The convalescent soldiers are needing more jellies, canned fruit, etc. The people of Moscow have been generous but these boys convalescing need more such delicacies to temp the appetite. Mrs. Jessie Warren gave nine quart of fruit. Mrs. A. C. Thoman, Mrs. R. McMahan, Mrs. Clarence Jain and Mrs. James Buchanan gave a collection of jellies and marmalade. These were delivered at the Inland hospital.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 01 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Clearwater Republican. November 01, 1918, Page 8

The state board of health of Idaho wishes to suggest, in the interest of public health that you refrain from posting bulletins of returns of the election, so as to avoid the congregation of considerable numbers of people, because of the danger of infection of Influenza.

We earnestly hope you will accept this suggestion as it is intended as a precautionary measure to conserve the public health.

Very truly yours,
Edward T. Biward, Secretary.
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A number of the girls attending the University, returned home Thursday, during the quarantine there.

source: Clearwater Republican. (Orofino, Idaho), 01 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., November 02, 1918, Page 1

Young Man Dies at Bovill.

Undertaker Anderson was called to Bovill Wednesday morning to take charge of the body of B. L. Jones, a young man who had died the night previous at the Bovill hospital of influenza. The young man, who was 23 years of age, was a son of Jacob E. Jones, a farmer in the Bovill district, and a nephew of T. P. Jones, woods superintendent for the Potlatch Lumber company. He and a brother had arrived about two weeks ago from Minnesota to visit their father, and were taken sick shortly after arriving at Bovill. The brother is in the hospital, sick with influenza and is in a critical condition.

— Palouse Republic.
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Jay Carithers of the S. A. T. C. of Pullman is quite sick of influenza.
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19181102DSM1-headlineForbids Students To Go Visiting
President Lindley Requests Students and Instructors to Stay Home

Dr. E. H. Lindley, president of the University of Idaho, strongly urged students and instructors not to leave Moscow for the weekend.

He said: “I am receiving letters from parents every day telling me how glad they are that their sons and daughters are here where the mortality rate is comparatively much lower than other places.

“Students and instructors have no moral right to endanger the health of members of other communities by traveling and possibly carrying disease.

“The military department requires that all persons arriving in Moscow from other towns be isolated for a period of four days to guard against the spreading of infection. In case the quarantine should be lifted Monday, this isolation would seriously interfere with the efficient operation of the university.”
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19181102DSM2-headlineUniversity Will Play Foot Ball
Will Play Marines at Spokane on November 30 – Hard Game Expected

Although football practice has been indefinitely postponed because of the epidemic of influenza here, Lieutenant Meehan who is acting as coach, is looking forward to a brilliant season for the S. A. T. C. teams. Games have been scheduled at Spokane and Pullman. Lieutenant Meehan believes he has material enough to build up an excellent scrappy team. …
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19181102DSM3-headlineAll S. A. T. C. Men Must Wear Masks
New Order Went Into Effect Today – Rules Must Be Strictly Obeyed

All members of the students army training corps were given influenza masks this morning. They will be required to wear masks whenever indoors under penalty of courtmartial.

Only one mask was given to each man instead of the three required by government orders, because of the difficulty in completing 2400 in three days. Others are being made however, and it is expected that all the men will be supplied with his full quota within two days.

Military regulations covering the wearing of masks are very strict. The masks must be worn whenever indoors and they must be washed in good soapy water every day. Infringement of these rules will be considered a most serious offense.

Dr. E. H. Lindley, president of the University of Idaho recommended this morning that all instructors wear masks while giving instruction. He said:

“Every precaution is being taken to keep the epidemic from spreading and students and instructors are urged to safeguard themselves in this and every other way.”

Work on the 2500 influenza masks ordered by the federal government is progressing rapidly, according to Prof. R. E. Neidig, chairman of the Red Cross. A Red Cross official said:

“The stringent requirements made by the government debarring all persons from working on the masks unless they were in first class physical condition caused some hardship at first. Volunteers have come forward with wonderful spirit. The masks are being rushed to the Inland Empire hospital for sterilization as soon as complete.”
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19181102DSM4-headline
Influenza Situation Shows Great Improvement

The influenza situation today is regarded as better than at any time since the epidemic struck Moscow. There have been no more deaths; all of the patients are believed to be making satisfactory progress toward recovery and only four new cases were admitted to the hospital while eight were discharged as cured.

Not all of those admitted to hospitals are regarded as necessarily having influenza. The men in the S. A. T. C. are being watched very closely and just as soon as a man complains of feeling ill, whether is be a headache, cold or other ailments, he is taken from the others and isolated. If he does not recover soon he is sent to the hospital.

At the big plant of the Idaho National Harvester company where more than 120 men are now working as auto mechanics, general mechanics and radio work, this rule is being carried out rigidly. Every man is instructed to report to the foreman any symptoms of illness and he is at once sent by automobile to a place of isolation and given close care and attention. It is believed that this system of watchfulness is largely responsible for there being so few cases among the more than 800 S. A. T. C. men, 500 students and 6,000 inhabitants of Moscow.

The weather is more favorable today, with bright, warm sunshine, and the convalescents are allowed to go out doors and “sun themselves” and they have been enjoying it.

A few new cases in town have been reported but all are very mild. There has not been a death in Moscow from influenza outside of the students or army men, who brought the disease from other places or were exposed to it in their travels here. The situation in the town proper is regarded as very satisfactory. While there have been many cases all have been mild and all of those first stricken have recovered.
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source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 02 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., November 02, 1918, Page 2

Dr. Adair, city health officer requests the election board of the different precincts to wear masks on election day. Doubtless there will be a number of cases who have just taken influenza and likewise a number who are just recovering. Crowds will not be allowed to congregate.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 02 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., November 02, 1918, Page 4

19181102DSM5-headlineHealth Officer Issues Warning
Dr. Adair Calls On People To Use More Care To Prevent Influenza

Dr. Adair has issued a number of warnings to the public and asks the press to repeat them. First he insists that children be not permitted to congregate in groups and that, at the fist sign of a cold or illness they be kept in doors and cared for. He thinks is a bad idea to let children visit other homes and tells of numerous cases where the disease has been carried in this way.

Dr. Adair suggested that merchants can help greatly if they will watch their employees and when one has a cold or shows any signs of being ill let him or her go home and be cared for until it can be told whether it is influenza or something less harmful. He also suggests that merchants do not advertise special sales days or sales hours that might crowd their stores.

“If anyone in your home has influenza do not admit anyone into your home,” said Dr. Adair. He told of one case where a woman lay sick and permitted a piano tuner to come into their home to tune a piano. The man was baldly frightened when he heard that he was been exposed to influenza.

Dr. Adair says the disease is being spread through thoughtlessness of persons who do not take the situation seriously. He cautions all to be more careful and to observe the rules mentioned above. Treat the first symptoms of a cold as if it were serious and thus prevent a serious sickness, he regards as a good plan to follow.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 02 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., November 04, 1918, Page 1

19181104DSM1-headline
Influenza Causes Two More Deaths In Moscow

Two more deaths in Moscow from influenza make a total of eight since the epidemic struck town, all but one being members of the S. A. T. C. Mrs. Earl St. John died last night, being he only civilian who has died as a result of the epidemic. The other victim is Ralph Gochnour, of Burley, Idaho, a student in the University of Idaho, who was enrolled in the S. A. T. C. Gochnour has been sick for a long time and there has been little hop of his recover for the past week.

Mrs. St. John has been ill for some time. Her husband, Earl t. John, is window dresser at David’s store. Several other members of the family are sick.

Gochnour has been a very popular student at the university, this being his sophomore year. He was taken desperately ill at the start, but, being young and vigorous, has made a gallant fight and it was thought for several days that he would win. This makes three deaths in the Class A. men and three in the class B of the S. A. T. C., one soldier who came back from cantonment ill with the disease and one civilian.

The situation is said to be improving today, the number of new cases admitted to the hospital being only two and the number released as cured the same. …

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 04 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., November 04, 1918, Page 2

Moscow brings forcibly to mind the need of greater precautions to prevent the spread of influenza. We are not only the custodian of the health of our own families and our own citizens, but 1300 young men who came from all parts of Idaho and some from other states are here and we must protect them. Every precaution advocated by the medical men should be religiously observed by the people of Moscow.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 04 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., November 04, 1918, Page 3

City News

Mr. and Mrs. F. A. Robinson went to Davenport yesterday, called by the illness of their son, who is seriously sick of influenza.

Martin F. Masse, a former piano turner of Moscow is reported dead of influenza in France. Mr. Masse enlisted in the infantry in June from Lewiston. …
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Contribution Box

S. Mark’s Rectory, Moscow, 2 Nov.

Dear Sir: … I ask the privilege of saying a word through your columns. The country is suffering from a devastating epidemic which already has carved off ten times as many boys as we have lost in the war. We have been obliged to close the churches and so far as I know the churches have made no effort to exercise the faith that is in them. I am making no complaint against the closing order. It is inevitable. But I do want to appear to christian believers in Moscow to use the force of prayer on behalf of our boys. I would suggest that every such believer might obtain day by day, the names of boys or other sick persons who are in danger and pray each according to his personal or church prayer, definitely and with such directed personal prayer, as he would use for his own dear ones in a like case. I do not understand how the thing works but I cannot think but that the daily mental and spiritual effort of five hundred people in Moscow would mean something – unless Christianity is altogether a fraud.

Yours faithfully, W. H. Bridge.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 04 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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LibertyBond-a
WWI Liberty Bond poster scanned by Pritzker Military Museum & Library

source: w/more info Wikipedia
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Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 1)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 2)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 3)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 4)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 5)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 6)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 7)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 8)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 9)