Idaho History June 28, 2020

Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic

Part 11

Idaho Newspaper clippings November 5-8, 1918

1918 Burley Idaho

1918BurleyIdaho-a

courtesy: Marcus Rogers, Idaho State of Mind
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Nov 5

The Idaho Republican. November 05, 1918, Page 2

19181105TIR1
Springfield

Mrs. H. K. Wiley and son, Hugh, returned home Sunday from Boise. Mr. Wiley met her at American Falls with his car. Mrs. Wiley was unable to secure her house is Boise on account of the influenza epidemic.

The Bradford family is still seriously ill with influenza. Mrs. Thomas Blackburn is acting as nurse for the family.

Mr. and Mrs. Lyman Tanner are the proud parents of a baby son, born Monday morning. Both the parents are ill with influenza.

Word comes from Pocatello that the J. H. Isaac family, formerly of Springfield, are all recovering from the influenza.

Miss Hazel Quigley has been dangerously ill with the influenza, but is slightly improved at the present.
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Death of Miss Leach.

It is with deep regret that we write of the passing away Sunday night, of Miss Minnie Leach, daughter of W. M. Leach, as a victim of influenza. Miss Leach has suffered with spinal troubles since childhood, and in her weakened condition was unable to fight off the disease. Years of suffering had ennobled her character, and her sweet and patient disposition endeared her to all her acquaintances. Funeral services were postponed from Tuesday afternoon until Wednesday at 3:00, to permit Corp. Norval Leach to arrive from Fort Riley, Kansas. Open air services were held at the Springfield cemetery. …
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19181105TIR2
Shelley

The schools will not reopen here until the number of influenza cases have greatly decreased.

E. C. Miller, our jeweler is still very ill, but his many friends hope that he will soon take a course for the better.

Harold Woodward, who is at Logan, Utah sick in the hospital with the flue [sic], is reported to be recovering nicely at the present time. Also that his condition is such that there is now no cause for alarm.

Mrs. Howard Young’s daughter Lilly, has been ill for a short time and it was thought that she was coming down with the influenza tho her condition is not at all alarming.

Dr. Cutler is very busy at the present time as he is taking care of all of Dr. Robert’s patients while he is ill with the influenza.
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19181105TIR3
Jameston

Died of Influenza

Two deaths in one family in a week resulting from influenza. Mr. and Mrs. Chris Anderson of Jameston have lost two sons, Frank age twenty-six died October 21, after a few days’ illness. He leaves a wife and two little girls, ages one and two years, besides his parents, six brothers and six sisters to mourn his death.

And Dewey, age twenty died October 27 He has been sick for two weeks, being the first one in the family to come down with the influenza, and just returned from the military school at Moscow, on account of the schools being closed there.

Both were prominent young men here and their many friends in the community extend their deepest sympathy to the bereaved relatives.

Another Victim of Influenza

Virgil Fielding, another of our prominent young men died October 24 of influenza. He was the oldest son of Mr. and Mrs. James Fielding. Besides his father and other he leaves six sisters and two brother to mourn his death. The community extends their deepest sympathy to the bereaved family.

There have been about thirty cases of influenza in Jameston in the last two weeks, taking a toll of three.

Mr. and Mrs. Phil Longhurst were in Shelley last Friday to see Mrs. Longhurst’s father who is just recovering from the influenza.
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19181105TIR4
Upper Presto

Mr. and Mrs. Berkley Larson attended the funeral at Shelly Wednesday for Frank Anderson, who died of influenza.

Mrs. Ila Grover, who has been out to Camp Lewis to see her husband has returned and is at the home of R. P. Hansen. She is very ill with influenza.

Mr. Seaman is down with influenza.

Dr. Roberts was down to see the two Jap families. He thinks they have an attack of influenza.
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19181105TIR5
Rose

About twenty-five people of this district harvested F. G. Hale’s potato crop Saturday. Mr. Hale and his family are ill with the influenza.

H. A. Gardner is on the sick list this week.

C. L. Ranstrum, wife and baby are ill with the influenza.
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19181105TIR6
Taber

The Influenza has struck out in our locality. Several families have it.

Marie Derfler was called to Arco Tuesday by Dr. Simmons to nurse a patient who is under his care.

R. E. Hughes, who has been helping with the potatoes near Idaho Falls, was called home Monday on account of the illness of his son, Arden.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 05 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Republican. November 05, 1918, Page 4

Death of Charles Shafer

Charles Shafer, a former resident of Mackay, but for some years at Gooding, died of influenza the last of the week, leaving a wife and daughter.

Mrs. Shafer was a Miss Hulhull, and lived at Era and Mackay before her marriage.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 05 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Republican. November 05, 1918, Page 5

Deaths From Influenza

Mrs. Fred Keifer of Idaho Falls passed away on Sunday morning, November 3.

Will L. Young of South Shilling avenue, Blackfoot, died on Thursday, Oct. 31 and his brother Wesley Young passed away at Pocatello on Sunday the third of November.

Miss Elvada Halford of Blackfoot went to some point in Utah to care for her sister, and herself took the disease and died. We are unable to obtain further particulars.

George B. Parkinson, son of F. C. Parkinson of this city died Thursday at the students training camp at the A. C. in Logan.
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Another Passed Away

Mrs. N. E. Montgomery received word Monday morning, of the death of her mother Mrs. J. W. Phillips, who passed away at her home in Humboldt, Kan.

On account of the Montgomery family all being sick, they will not be able to attend the funeral.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 05 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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American Falls Press. November 05, 1918, Page 1

19181105AFP1Gave Life to Save Others.
American Falls Teacher Contracts Influenza While Ministering to Comfort of Others, and Dies.

Miss Lois Sargent, one of the teachers of the local schools, died Monday afternoon at the Hotel Remington, death being caused by pneumonia following an attack of influenza. Miss Sargent for a time assisted in nursing the victims of influenza at Rockland and later attended several sick people in this city. She was as much a soldier as the boys who volunteered for service on the battle front, and is as much entitled to honor and loving remembrance.

Miss Sargent was taken ill last Friday, and despite the best care given by physicians and nurses, the end came quickly. Miss Nunnelly and Mrs. Noth gave all care possible to the patient, as did Mrs. Soell of the Hotel Remington.

Miss Sargent came here last fall from Hopkins, Mo., to take up her work as a teacher in the city schools. She at once made a place for herself in the esteem of all who met her. On the closing of the schools at the outbreak of the influenza epidemic she volunteered to nurse the sick, and in doing so overtaxed her strength and fell a victim to the disease herself.

Miss Sargent was a daughter of Dr. and Mrs. D. A. Sargent. Dr. Sargent will arrive in Pocatello tomorrow to receive the body of his daughter and take it to her old home for interment. The death of Miss Sargent has caused great sorrow among the teachers and others who had learned to admire her.
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Notice to the Public.

Owning to the influenza epidemic all persons are warned against congregating in groups within doors, and advised to keep in the open air and avoid mingling with the public as much as possible. The wearing of masks in offices where the carrying on of business brings those in charge in contact with numbers of people is recommended as a precautionary measure.

Convalescents from influenza are hereby quarantined within their homes for a period of one week after recovery, or required in lieu of quarantine, to wear a mask on the streets at all times when they are liable to come into contact with other people.

By Order of the City Board of Health.
W. J. Hanson, Chairman.

source: American Falls Press. (American Falls, Idaho), 05 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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American Falls Press. November 05, 1918, Page 4

People and Events.

Miss Grace Reed has recovered from the flu.

Frank Barnard is out after a siege with the flu.

Mr. and Mrs. C. Lee French are both influenza victims.

Mrs. H. A. Lang has been on the sick list this week.

Rev. and Mrs. West are both reported to be down with influenza, but doing nicely.

L. L. Evans Jr. is very much better and is considered out of danger unless unexpected complications arise.

Many people have obeyed the suggestion of the city board of health to “wear a mask and help check spread of disease.”

O. R. Baum recovered a little too quickly from the influenza, and had to retire from activity, Saturday, after he concluded that he was well enough to go to work again.

Mrs. Martin Garn, who has been a real fairy to sick families here and at Rockland during the past two weeks is now a victim of the flu herself, but is reported to be getting along well.

William Soell, manager of the Remington, who has been confined to his room by illness the past week, has nearly recovered and will be attending to his duties again by the end of the week.

Miss Irene Oliver, who assisted at the hospital here when the situation was the most serious, answering the telephone and doing whatever she was able to do to assist the one nurse who was about, was forced to give up Sunday, and is a flu victim.

The flu situation at Rockland was reported materially improved Sunday and hopes were entertained that the worst is over.

Mr. and Mrs. Ross Bolton, flu victims, are much improved. So far non of their children have taken the disease. Mrs. McCool is caring for them.

Frank Moench, who has been a flu victim, was out Sunday and thought he was as good as new. Like many other who got out too soon, he had a relapse and he been quite sick since.

Herbert Wilskie, who has been ill at his home on Cold Creek with influenza, is recovering. He is taking the advice of competent authorities and is staying at home for a period of a week or more in order to prevent the spread of the disease.

At Bethany Deaconess Hospital the number of influenza patients has been reduced within a week from about twenty to four, and all of them are getting along fine. Considering the fact that four of the five nurses in the hospital have been down, the reduction in the number of patients has been gratifying.

R. O. Jones, who has been in Rockland for the past ten days or more, keeping the drug store open while Mr. Sheer was having his turn at the flu, came home yesterday. While four new cases were reported Sunday he states that general conditions are better then they have been by far, and a feeling of optimism that the worst is over is prevalent. Ernest Jones is better, but will not be able to do much if anything for a few days.

John T. Hughes, the harness man, has been at the hospital since the middle of last week, a victim of influenza. Last Sunday the report was circulated that he had died during the night, but Mr. Hughes insists that the report was very much exaggerated. Mr. Hughes insists on a “square deal” in the matter of being alive, and today is up and around the hospital and threatening to run down his calumniators before the close of the week.
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19181105AFP2
Arbon News.

Several members of the family of J. R. Bailey are down with the flu. There were seven down at once. They are getting along fairly well.

Mrs. William Matthews received word Thursday of her daughter’s illness, Mrs. Castle, at Pocatello.

Herman Noth was called to American Falls last week on account of the serious illness of his brother, Dr. R. F. Noth.

Mrs. John Noble went to Preston last week to attend the funeral of her brother, I. B. Evans, who died of pneumonia. The day before the funeral Mrs. Noble was called home by the illness of her children, who were at the home of Mrs. T. B. Evans.

William Affleck was called to Logan, Utah, last week. His daughter, Modenna, was sick with influenza. Mt. Affleck returned Saturday, his daughter being much improved.

C. D. Porter and his son, Orville, who have been ill with influenza, are able to be up now.

Richard Bandy is still very ill with pneumonia. He is still very weak but Dr. Schlitz says he has a chance for recovery.

Newell Leishman is quite ill with pneumonia. He is at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Jerry Baker. Newell’s father was summoned from Wellsville, Utah, to be at his bedside.

There was no mail out of Arbon from Monday until Wednesday of last week, due to the illness of Heber Woods and family, who are all sick with influenza. E. A. Logan volunteered to take the mail out tree trips. Those who have not already had the flue [sic] or down with it, did not wish to go to Pocatello and expose themselves to the epidemic in that city. Mr. Logan stayed at the home of r. Rust, thus avoiding danger of staying at the hotels.

The family of David Roderick is reported to be much better.

L. B. Evans family are quite sick with the flu.

Mrs. Orville Affleck and children left Monday for Lewiston, Utah, [Cache County] where they will visit with relatives indefinitely.

Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Keeler received word from their son, Claude, in France that he had to enter the hospital the second time, influenza being the cause. He recovered from the first attack fairly well, and was given a furlough to recuperate, but was taken ill again.

Mrs. T. B. Evans is down with influenza. We hope that none of the other members of the family are taken down, as Mrs. Evans is the telephone operator here. Miss Connie Evans is now tending the switchboard.

Mr. and Mrs. John Bowen received a telephone message from their daughter, Mrs. Anna Smith, that her little two-year-old daughter, Wanda, had passed away at 5 o’clock Friday morning. Mrs. Smith’s children had had influenza and recovered, but the little child caught cold and died soon afterward. Mr. and Mrs. Bowen were driven to Pocatello Friday morning by John Payne.

source: American Falls Press. (American Falls, Idaho), 05 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Bonners Ferry Herald. November 05, 1918, Page 1

19181105BFH1aMany Deaths The Past Week
Dreaded Spanish Influenza Proves Fatal To Many People Of The County
Soldier Boy Buried Sunday
Paul Peter, U. S. Soldier, and Brother, Interred In Same Grave Sunday

Paul Frederick Carl Peter, son of Mrs. Anna Peter Skaar, died at Hoquiam, Wash., on October 29 of pneumonia following an attack of the Spanish influenza. The deceased was a private in the United States army and at the time of his death was serving in the spruce division attached to Camp D, 1-A, Bay City, Wash. He contracted the disease from which he died on the way to camp after having spent a few weeks furlough here visiting with his mother.

The deceased was born at Menominee, Wis., January 22, 1891. With his mother he came to this district several years ago and worked for the Bonners Ferry Lumber company until he was called into the service of his country. He was a steady, faithful worker, was esteemed and respected by his fellow workers and his employees and was highly popular among a host of acquaintances. He was the first soldier of this county to be buried in the local cemetery.

Gottlieb Frederick Ferdinand Peter, a brother of Paul Peter, died at the home of his mother on the Island, on November 2, of pneumonia. He had been a sufferer with tuberculosis for seven years. Owing to being an invalid he was not well known but all his acquaintances accorded him their deepest respect and love for he was always courageous and uncomplaining in his afflictions. He also was born at Menominee, Wis., and the date of his birth was December 16, 1893.

The two brothers were buried in the same grave Sunday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock, Rev. G. H. Wilbur conducting a brief funeral service at the cemetery. Owing to the regulations in regard to public gatherings on account of the Spanish influenza epidemic. it was not possible to hold a military funeral for the deceased soldier. The funeral services were attended by a large company of the friends of the deceased young men and their graves were covered with many beautiful wreaths and bouquets, the tributes of true friends who are all sorrowing with the bereaved mother and brothers and sisters in this their hour of tribulation and distress.

Last Thursday Marion D. Atkins received a telegram from Washington, D. C., telling that his son, William H. Atkins, died in a hospital in France on October 5th of broncho-pneumonia. The war department will send all particulars available by mail.

The deceased was one of four brothers in the service of Uncle Sam, three being in France.

William H. Atkins was born in the state of Nebraska. He was 29 years old on May 22, 1918. He was called into the service of his country last June and after a short training here was sent to France where he was assigned to the forestry engineers. The deceased was popular among a host of acquaintances in this county. He was a hard working man who paid strict attention to his own affairs but was always willing to lend a hand to help a neighbor or friend. He made the supreme sacrifice for his country.

Loren William Turner, the eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Turner, of this city, died at the home of his parents, on Sunday. Interment was had Tuesday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock and services were held at the grave, being conducted by Rev. E. R. Henderson.

The deceased was born in the state of Minnesota on June 5, 1899. He is survived by his father and mother and six brothers and sisters.

The last illness of the deceased began with Spanish influenza. Every member of the family is sick with this disease, with the exception of Mrs. E. E. Harding, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Turner, whose home is at Ione, Wash. Mrs. Harding has been here taking care of the sick ones.

Mr. and Mrs. Turner and children have the deepest sympathy of all in this their sad bereavement of their son and brother.

Lillian Lenora Travis, wife of Clyde Travis, of Naples, died Monday morning of pneumonia. The funeral services will be held Wednesday afternoon at the cemetery and will be conducted by Rev. G. H. Wilbur.

The deceased is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. L. P. Hill. She was born February 21, 1897. She was a native of Wisconsin.

The deceased was a highly respected young lady and numbered her friends by the score in all parts of the county where she was acquainted. The bereaved family have the deepest sympathy of all.

Ola Stockton, aged 16, the eldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. B. Stockton, of Copeland. died Wednesday morning at 10 o’clock of pneumonia, contracted following Spanish influenza.

The funeral was held at two o’clock Friday afternoon, short services being held at the cemetery by Rev. G. H. Wilbur.

The deceased had lived in this county with her parents for about two years. She was bright and cheerful, a great companion and help to her mother and a general favorite of all with whom she became acquainted. In their bereavement the members of the Stockton family have the deepest sympathy of their many friends and neighbors.

All the members of the Stockton family have been afflicted with Spanish influenza and at the time of the death of Miss Ola, her 13 year old brother, Boyd, was dangerously sick.

Barbara Ella Lindsey, wife of I. W. Lindsey, died November 1st at her home in this city of pneumonia resulting from Spanish Influenza.

Burial was had Sunday afternoon at one o’clock and services were held at the cemetery, Rev. E. R. Henderson officiating.

The deceased is survived by her husband and five children. She was born in Virginia on June 27, 1879.

The deceased had made her home in this district for many years and enjoyed the friendship and love and respect of many scores of people. She was a dutiful wife and a loving mother. The bereaved family have the heartfelt sympathy of the entire district.

Relatives here of Fred Hoagland received a telegram Friday telling of his death on October 31 at the home of his mother at Astoria, Ore. Death was caused by pneumonia resulting from Spanish influenza. The funeral was held Saturday at Astoria.

The deceased, was the youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. F. D. Hoagland and was born at Minneapolis, Minn., on March 30, 1888. He came here with his parents in 1902 and lived in this district up until about four years ago. At the time of his last sickness he was working in the government ship yards. The deceased is well known here. He numbered his friends by the score in this city and these all join in mourning his demise and in extending to the bereaved relatives their deepest sympathy.

source: Bonners Ferry Herald. (Bonners Ferry, Idaho), 05 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Bonners Ferry Herald. November 05, 1918, Page 2

Idaho News Paragraphs
Recent Happenings in This State Given in Brief Items for Busy Readers

William G. Murray, age 38, former game warden of Pend Oreille county for four years, recently died of influenza at Camp Colt, near Gettysburg.

At Avery the influenza situation has assumed grave proportions. With a town of about 300 population 60 people are ill and new cases are appearing every day.

source: Bonners Ferry Herald. (Bonners Ferry, Idaho), 05 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Bonners Ferry Herald. November 05, 1918, Page 5

Local Pick-ups

Edwin Charles has been very sick with the Spanish influenza for several weeks. He was able to be up and around a bit yesterday.

Byron N. Hawks, proprietor of the Brody Drug Store, became a “flu” victim Saturday and is now confined to his home with a high fever.

Miss Goldie Cave, secretary of the Boundary County Defense Council, is a victim of Spanish influenza and is confined to her room this week.

Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Burns have been sick the past week with Spanish influenza and as they were unable to get help [and] had to close down their restaurant for a few days.

Charles Smith, one of the well-to-do ranchers and stock growers of the Porthill district, was a business visitor in town Thursday. Mr. Smith reports that his whole family is sick with the Spanish influenza.

Mr. and Mrs. H. B. Kinnear have been quite sick the past week with the influenza, as has also, Miss Rawson, chief operator for the Interstate Utilities company. Mrs. A. J. Stauffer, of Sandpoint, sister of Mrs. Kinnear and Miss Rawson, is here taking care of the sick folks.

source: Bonners Ferry Herald. (Bonners Ferry, Idaho), 05 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Bonners Ferry Herald. November 05, 1918, Page 8

Local News

S. Okimo, a Japanese employee of the Great Northern railway at Troy, died at the Bonners Ferry hospital Monday of pneumonia. The body was shipped Wednesday to Seattle, Wn. for burial.

Word was received here Monday of the death of Ed Hood, formerly of this city, at a hospital in Spokane. Death resulted from pneumonia following an attack of Spanish influenza. The disease was contracted at Troy, Mont.

Mrs. A. A. McIntyre received a telegram Tuesday afternoon telling of the serious illness of her daughter-in-law, Mrs. D’Arcy, at Portland, Oregon. She left the same evening for Portland. Mrs. D’Arcy is ill with pneumonia.

source: Bonners Ferry Herald. (Bonners Ferry, Idaho), 05 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., November 05, 1918, Page 1

19181105DSM1
Influenza Situation in Moscow Is Very Favorable

Only three new cases of influenza are reported among the S. A. T. C. men since yesterday’s report and eight have been discharged as cured. This is the best day’s record since the epidemic struck Moscow. There have been no further deaths. The new cases are very mild and many of those who have been in the hospital for a few days are showing marked improvement.

This situation in town is not so encouraging. There are many cases widely scattered. None are regarded as very serious, although there are a number of cases of pneumonia. But the people outside of the university are not as easily controlled or managed as those inside where military rules govern and all must obey.

An error was made in reporting the deaths. It was stated that three of these were in class A, or the collegiate division of the S. A. T. C. This is an error. All of the six deaths of young soldiers have been in the vocational training or class B section. There are 300 of these men here and the six deaths mean a loss of just two per cent, which is regarded as very light. There has not been a death in the collegiate section where there are more than 500 young men enrolled.

Dr. Lindley, president of the university, has arranged to give a detailed report to The Star-Mirror every day. This is done religiously. Every death is reported as soon as it is learned at the university. Every new case is reported promptly. The full facts are given to The Star-Mirror and reported by it to its readers. There is no occasion for any of the sensational stories that are circulated on the streets without any foundation. There have been eight deaths from influenza in Moscow. Six of these were members of class B of the S. A. T. C. One was a soldier who had returned from California and the other was Mrs. St. John, whose death was reported yesterday. There are a few cases that are still doubtful, but these are being given the very best attention possible and strong hopes are entertained that all of them will recover.

The convalescents of the S. A. T. C. are being given the best of care. Many of them are cared for at the Elk’s temple. Others are cared for at other points, by Moscow people, the Red Cross, the civilian doctors and the people generally are responding to all calls for help for these.
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Convalescents Want Fruit.

The young men who are convalescing from influenza are in need of canned fruits. This has been prescribed for them but cannot be obtained. Persons who will give canned fruits for these young men are urged to bring the fruit to the office of The Star-Mirror; or, if they are unable to do this, if they will telephone to this office a messenger will be sent for the fruit.
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Council of Defense Wants Soldier’s Names

The council of defense will be glad to have press cuttings relative to Latah county boys who fall in action or die of influenza. Letters or signed accounts giving data of personal actions will assist also. The council desires to make a complete record of the actions of Latah county boys and earnestly invites the co-operation of the public. Address material to W. H. Bridge, Council of Defense office.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 05 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., November 05, 1918, Page 2

A local doctor told the writer last night that he has 12 well-developed cases of pneumonia following influenza in Moscow and he had been working since daylight yesterday morning until long after night. This is only one of the many physicians of Moscow who are working almost day and night to save the lives of the afflicted, but it brings home to us the seriousness of the situation and the absolute need to strict observance of every health law, rule and regulation laid down by these doctors who are fighting so hard to stamp out this dreadful contagion.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 05 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., November 05, 1918, Page 3

City News

Hunt Potter and family are sick of the lighter type of influenza.

Dean Poindexter of Farmington is here to assist the St. John family during their affliction of influenza.

The funeral of Mrs. Earl St. John occurred this morning at 10:30.

Mrs. Joseph of Salmon City, who has been visiting her son of the S. A. T. C. for the past 10 days, left for her home today. Her son had a light attack of influenza.

Mrs. H. A. Thatcher returned Monday from Lewiston, where she attended the funeral of her nephew, Linn Baughman, who died of influenza. Mr. Baughman was a fine young man, 20 years of age, and express messenger on the Northern pacific running through Moscow.
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Deary Neighborhood News of Past Week

Mrs. Josephine Taft accompanied by Miss Ruth Taft, who has been teaching at the Bear creek school and the Burt creek school have returned to their home at Iola, Idaho during the influenza siege.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 05 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Challis Messenger., November 06, 1918, Page 5

19181105CM1
Items About People You Know

Mrs. M. A. Dillingham and two children, Harry Dale and Bonnie Jean, who went to Salmon some time ago to be in attendance at the funeral of Mrs. Dillingham’s brother, have each contracted Spanish Influenza. At the present time Bonnie Jean is entirely over the disease; Mrs. Dillingham is quite ill with it and Harry Dale is just coming down.

One of the Sandy family is ill, and although it is not known definitely just what the nature of the sickness is, Dr. Kirtley is taking no chances and the family has been quarantined.

Several Mackay men were arrested the fore part of the week by Sheriff Huntington, charged with violating the quarantine law. They were released Wednesday morning by order of Judge Cowen. Their case will be tried when the “flu” epidemic is over.

All children under 14 are requested to stay in their own yards until the ‘Flu’ is stamped out. This action is taken by the Health Board to prevent the spread of the disease should it appear in this locality.

Mrs. Dell Bartlett has taken the “Flu” at the home of her sister in Butte. Mr. Bartlett left for Butte Thursday to be at her bedside. Mrs. Bartlett’s sister and her sister’s husband have both died from the disease.

source: The Challis Messenger. (Challis, Idaho), 06 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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1918RedCrossMakingMasks-a
Red Cross Making Masks (no citation given)

source: KRTV Great Falls, Montana
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Nov 6

The Daily Star-Mirror., November 06, 1918, Page 1

Influenza Situation Is Very Encouraging

The influenza situation in Moscow shows marked improvement today. There have been no deaths and some of the cases that were causing uneasiness are believed to now be out of danger. Only five new cases were admitted to the hospital for the S. A. T. C. men and two of those patients were released as cured and there are quite a number who will be released within a few days.
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Former Moscow Woman Dead.

Thressa Murdock, superintendent of the Spokane Influenza hospital, until her illness, and who died yesterday, was well known here. She was a nurse at one of the local hospitals several years ago and made many friends who deeply regret to hear of her heroic sacrifice. She was a graduate of the Spokane Deaconess hospital training school for nurses in 1912, and was a classmate of Mrs. E. T. Baker, of this city, who is recovering from a severe attack of the disease.
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19181106DSM1cartoon-a

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 06 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., November 06, 1918, Page 2

Now that the election is over and the war seems about to end, we have only the influenza epidemic to disturb us and that is being conquered, thanks to the efficient and untiring work of almost every one in Moscow, led by the university authorities and the army men.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 06 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., November 06, 1918, Page 3

City News

I. L. Osterhout of Collfax, who used to work at the First National bank in Moscow, has been in the hospital at Colfax over a week with an attack of influenza. He is recovering nicely. Mrs. Osterhout and little son is in Moscow with her mother, Mrs. Patterson.

The funeral of Clarke B. Jessup will occur this afternoon at 2:30. Mr. Jessup was a young man of 26 years of age, who entered the service at Cottonwood just a few weeks ago, and died of influenza in California. He is a brother of A. M. Jessup, with the Standard Dray company of this city.

Dr. Herrington was asked by Dr. Clark to visit Mr. C. W. Gregg at Viola. Dr. Herrington reports two of Mr. Gregg’s boys sick with influenza and a Mrs. Vanslicken, a daughter of Mr. Gregg, very seriously ill with influenza complicated with pneumonia.
— —

19181106DSM2ad
“This is true, BUT NOT DAMP AIR. Have plenty of fresh air in your room, BUT HEAT IT to a temperature so it will be DRY FRESH AIR, more like NATURE DEMANDS is for lung trouble. Do not be stingy by not having a stove to take care of your family and pay it out in doctor bills and funeral expense. Buy a stove and have it comfortable for yourself and children. We sell stoves and it does not take a fortune to buy one.”

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 06 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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1918Atlantic8-a
An open-air barber shop. Public events were encouraged to be held outdoors to hinder the spread of the disease during the influenza epidemic. Photographed at the University of California, Berkeley, in 1919. National Archives

source: Alan Taylor April 10, 2018 “30 Photos of the 1918 Flu Pandemic” The Atlantic
— — — — — — — — — —

Nov 7

The Grangeville Globe. November 07, 1918, Page 1

19181107GG1Grangeville Girl Dead.
Daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Robert N. Walker Victim of Influenza.

Mrs A,. F. Wendorf, aged 23 years, 7 months and 28 days, succumbed to pneumonia following influenza, at Spokane last Sunday. The remains were shipped to this place and internment made in Prairie View cemetery yesterday afternoon at 2:30, W. N. Nox conducting the services at the grave and Undertaker A. J. Maugg directing the funeral.

Nellie Vivian, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. R. N. Walker, was born on the Walker ranch four miles north of this city, where she lived until she was 12 years of age. The family then moved to Grangeville where she attended grammar and high school. She was married to A. F. Wendorf April 3, 1915, and moved to Walla Walla, Wash., at which place a baby girls was burn to them on September 21, 1916. They recently moved to Spokane where she died of pneumonia last Sunday, November 3. Besides her husband and infant daughter, Ruth Allene, she leaves father and mother, two sisters, Mrs. W. H. Mann and Mrs. Gay Golvin, and three brothers, Fred, Hugh C. and James S. Walker.
— —

Cottonwood Soldier Dead.

A message was received last Saturday at Cottonwood from Camp Fremont, Cal., announcing the death of Clark Jessup, from pneumonia following influenza. The deceased left Cottonwood several weeks ago and had resided in the Cottonwood section three or four years. A brother, Ed Jessup, is engaged in farming near Cottonwood and other relatives reside at Moscow. The remains were shipped to the latter place for internment.
— —

Prof. Luther Case, superintendent of the city schools, is now most entirely recovered from his recent attack of the influenza and is able to be about the city each day. Like all others who have been afflicted with the complaint, it requires some time to regain the lost strength.
— —

19181107GG2Grover Myers Buried
Passed Away at Emergency Hospital at Lewiston Last Saturday

Grover C. Myers, a former resident of Grangeville, but of late residing at Lewiston, passed away at the emergency hospital last Saturday morning from pneumonia following and attack of Spanish influenza. The remains were shipped to this city on Saturday’s train and internment was had at Fairview cemetery Sunday afternoon, Rev. J. A. Pine of the Christian church conducting the service and A. J. Maugg directing the funeral.

Grover as aged 27 years, 11 months and 26 days at the time of his death and had resided in Lewiston for the greater part of the last 15 years. …

He was a popular young man and enjoyed a wide acquaintance throughout the country. He was a member of the Lewiston band and his interest and activities in amateur athletics enlarged his acquaintance. He suffered a long period of illness during the spring and had not fully recovered his strength when taken with influenza. …

source: The Grangeville Globe. (Grangeville, Idaho), 07 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Grangeville Globe. November 07, 1918, Page 4

19181107GG3Grangeville Soldier Dead.
Left for Camp Rosencrans Three Weeks Ago, Died Wednesday Morning.

Edward Steinbaugh, aged 22 years died at Camp Rosencrans, Calif., Wednesday morning, November 6th. The remains are expected to reach here Sunday evening and the funeral will probably be held Tuesday, announcement of which will be made later. Edward left here the 1st of October with a contingent of seven young men from this county, two of whom are now deceased, Clark Jessup, of Cottonwood, being the first one called. It is reported here that three others of the party are very ill and were taken off the train before reaching their destination. Influenza was the cause of death in both instances. …

source: The Grangeville Globe. (Grangeville, Idaho), 07 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Grangeville Globe. November 07, 1918, Page 5

19181107GG4
Salmon River News

John Doumecq was transacting business in White Bird the first of the week. He reports that his brother Charlie, who is well and favorably known here, is in France and has been for some time. His brother, William, is at Camp Kearney, and was in the hospital with influenza, the last they heard from him.

W. E. Reed and children who have been suffering from an attack of influenza, are reported better and we hope will be able to be out before long.

source: The Grangeville Globe. (Grangeville, Idaho), 07 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Grangeville Globe. November 07, 1918, Page 8

Mrs. I. O. Blake is confined to her home this week with tonsillitis. It is such a relief to learn of a person being afflicted with something else than influenza.

The latest news from Portland states that the Harlan boys who have been very ill with the “Flu” are improving. Ray is about to be up for a short period, and Paul is still in a very weak condition.

Miss Bessie Elmers is back on the job as manager at the Nez Perce telephone office after being confined to her home for tend days or more. Miss Lovelace, her assistant, while considerably improved will not return to work until next week. While the young ladies have been taking their enforced vacation, Miss Alice Hawley of Cottonwood, had charge of the office, working both shifts. She will return to her home the first of the week.
— —

Obituary

Mrs. Emma Noyes was born at Pomeroy Wash. August 4, 1878. At the age of five years she came to Camas Prairie, where she has resided until her death, last Saturday, November 2, 1918. Her death resulted from pneumonia, following the influenza. …

source: The Grangeville Globe. (Grangeville, Idaho), 07 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Wallace Miner. November 07, 1918, Page 1

19181107WM1

Tarbox.

Richard Daxon, manager of the Tarbox, who has been confined to his home for the past week or two with influenza, stated yesterday evening that a telephone message from the mine announced the crosscut from the winze had broken through the footwall and disclosed considerable lead ore. …

source: The Wallace Miner. (Wallace, Idaho), 07 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Lincoln County Times., November 07, 1918, Page 1

19181107LCT1-headlineInvestigate Frazer Case.

The following article which deals with the death of Boyd Frazer last Tuesday week we take from the Sunday issue of the Boise Statesman:

Jerome — Citizens of this community are aroused over the treatment accorded Boyd Kelly Fraser, 19 years old, at the S. A.. T. C. school at Moscow and an investigation into the circumstances attending his discharge when suffering from Spanish influenza and his death three days after his arrival home, has been started to fix the blame for the seeming negligence on the part of the army officials in charge of the school.

Young Frazer was called to the colors by his local draft board on October 16 for entrainment to the Moscow school and from the statement of the boy to his parent on his return on Sunday, October 27, he was mustered into the service and had drilled with the other boys for two days. He was then taken ill with influenza and on October 24 was discharged from the service so ill that he was unable to take a train for his home until the following day. He arrived home on the 27th and died two days later from the effects of pneumonia following influenza.

Verdict of Physicians.

On reaching Jerome, the boys father called in two physicians and two trained nurses. The physicians were both agreed that the boy had been suffering from the dread malady for at least five days and informed Mr. Frazer that his boy could not recover.

Young Frazer turned in his equipment to the government on the 24th and it was receipted for by G. S. Marshall.

According to the conductor of the train on which he arrived in Jerome Frazer and another person occupied a lower berth in the sleeper from Pendleton although the boy is said to have had influenza at the time.

Boy’s Father Investigates.

R. S. Frazer, the boy’s father, and A. C. Alexander have gone to Boise to investigate the circumstances and will leave from there for Moscow to learn the details.

Carelessness is charged in the treatment accorded Frazer and it is understood that the local draft board is awaiting the investigation under way before sending any other draft men to Moscow.

source: Lincoln County Times. (Jerome, Idaho), 07 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Lincoln County Times., November 07, 1918, Page 2

Influenza on decline.

Washington. — Steady improvement in heath conditions at army camps and cantonments for the week ending October 25 is noted in the health report made public Friday at the office of the surgeon general of the army.

source: Lincoln County Times. (Jerome, Idaho), 07 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Lincoln County Times., November 07, 1918, Page 4

19181107LCT2Appleton

Miss Jennie Haun received word this week of the death of a nephew from influenza in California.

Mrs. Wm. Carver as on the sick list last week.

source: Lincoln County Times. (Jerome, Idaho), 07 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Lincoln County Times., November 07, 1918, Page 5

Dr. Boyd, of Twin Falls, was in Jerome Monday, being here to consult with the local physicians.

Dr. Parker, and eminent physician of Boise, is in Jerome helping the local physicians care for the unusual number of sick people.

The Eagle Lodge hall has been turned into an emergency hospital for the care of influenza patients. There are at present four cases confined at the hall.

Grover C. Newman, who has been very ill with pneumonia at the Inn, was removed to a Twin Falls hospital in an ambulance Tuesday. Reports from Twin Falls as to the condition of the suffering man state that he is improving.

Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Trask has returned to Jerome after a visit with relatives at Dillon, Mont., and Mr. Trask will again tack charge of the Franzers-Pence garage. While away both Mr. and Mrs. Trask had a siege of influenza.

For thos [sic] who are to send packages to the boys overseas, it may be well to state that instead of taking the Xmas parcels to the post office to be wrapped, it has been decided that they should be taken to the L’Herisson Furniture store. This change was deemed necessary on account of the influenza epidemic.
— —

Death of Arch Stanger.

B. B. Stanger of Jerome, received word Tuesday morning that his brother, Arch Stanger, had passed away that morning at Idaho Falls, a victim of Spanish influenza.

Mr. Stanger made his home at Jerome for some time, being employed by the Franzers-Pence garage, and will be remembered by many Jeromeites. He left Jerome recently for Idaho Falls, where he was employed up until the time of being stricken with the disease.
— —

Baby Passes Away After Brief Illness

Master Dallas Edwin O’Rourke, the three-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. L. J. O’Rourke, died Tuesday morning after a brief illness. The family resides seven miles west of Jerome on the old Chester brothers’ place. The infant took sick Sunday with the influenza, which developed into pneumonia. The remains were laid to rest Wednesday afternoon at three o’clock.
— —

19181107LCT3
“Flu” Epidemic Still Rages in Idaho

The Spanish influenza epidemic is still raging in Idaho. Although about ten days ago it seemed to be on the decline, the past week has showed an increase in the number of cases. In Idaho a great many votes were lost in the election on account of families being quarantined.

In Jerome, it has been estimated that there are between 125 and 175 cases of the disease and a few have developed into pneumonia. To date there have been about five deaths in this community from the effects of the disease.

source: Lincoln County Times. (Jerome, Idaho), 07 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Payette Enterprise., November 07, 1918, Page 1

19181107PE1
Death Visits Many Homes

Edna Elvira Johnson

Saturday morning death claimed one of Fruitland’s best young women when it called Miss Edna Elvira Johnson who was fitting herself to be of great use in this world of suffering. Vera, as she was called, was born February 1, 1898 in Santaguin, Utah, and came here with her parents where she has been educated and has grown to young womanhood. Three years ago she decided to become a nurse and entered St. Alphonsus hospital from which she would have graduated in June. She had enlisted for oversea service and was anxious that her life be one of usefulness. Last week she was stricken with influenza and on Thursday the family was called to Boise because of her serious condition. She seemed to be better and hopes were given, but pneumonia developed Friday. The disease had too strong a hold on Vera and she passed away Saturday morning. The body was brought to Payette Sunday morning accompanied by the mother, Mrs. J. O. Johnson and sister, Miss Iona. Funeral services were conducted at the grave by Rev. Ford M. Burtch, pastor of the Fruitland Baptist church which Vera attended when at home. …

Miss Vera was the second student nurse to die in St,. Alphonsus Hospital in over 23 years, the first one having died just the day before with Spanish influenza.
— —

Mae Anderson Keele

The hearts of the people of this community were saddened when it was learned that Mrs. G. C. Keele who went to Boise about a month ago to work in St. Luke’s Hospital, had passed away on Sunday as the result of Spanish influenza. She had lived in Payette for many years and was loved and respected by all who new her. …

Mae Anderson was born in Tennessee abut the year 1889 and died at St. Luke’s hospital November 3rd, 1918 at the age of 29 years. …
— — —

Mamie Reimers

Another young life was nipped in the bloom of youth when death entered the home of Mr. and Mrs. John Reimers November 6, at 10:30 a.m. and claimed the daughter, Miss Mamie, 18 years of age. Death caused from scarlet fever. The funeral was held this afternoon at two o’clock. As we were unable to learn the particulars an obituary will be published next week.
— —

19181107PE2
Personal and Local Mentions

The Board of heath of Payette County has secured the old Payette Hotel building as a hospital in case it should be needed on account of the Spanish influenza. We understand there is one patient there now.

Steve Clanton returned a few days ago from his old home in northern Iowa where he has been for the last three months. While Iowa crops in that part of the state are exceptionally good and every one seems to be prospering, Steve says Idaho looks best to him. He says land values in Idaho are much lower according to production than any place he has been. He reports the Spanish influenza as very bad back there. Doctors and all help for taking care of the sick are rushed beyond their capacity, and in many cases assistance cannot be had at all.
— —

Baptist Church.

To the members and friends of the Baptist Church of Payette:

With the quarantine still on we can pray and rededicate ourselves to Christ, meet in small groups, carry out the great movement inaugurated by the Laymen of the Northern Baptist Convention, go out two by two in team work as planned by the Convention, and particularly devote the Sunday School hour to the study of the Sunday School lesson in the home until the embargo is removed. …

source: Payette Enterprise. (Payette, Canyon Co., Idaho), 07 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Payette Enterprise., November 07, 1918, Page 2

The Spanish Influenza which has put terror into the people of this country, has brought true the old saying, “Every dog has his day.” It must be gratifying to the canine to see his master going about wearing a muzzle.
— —

19181107PE3
North Payette

Several members of the Cheek family have had sever attacks of the grip, Ted Cheek now has the pneumonia.
— —

19181107PE4
Sand Hollow

Vera Fee is in the Alphonsus Hospital in Boise with the Influenza.

source: Payette Enterprise. (Payette, Canyon Co., Idaho), 07 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Payette Enterprise., November 07, 1918, Page 5

19181107PE5Fruitland Department
Mrs. R. G. Wilson

“As ’twas told to me.”
Personal Notes

A letter from Schuyler Royston states they have a good deal of pneumonia in his ward, and he is kept very busy.

Miss Ruth Whealdon who is taking nurse training in Spokane Hospital, has been having the influenza.

Ever Enberg was a Boise visitor Sunday. His sister, Miss Mabel, who is a nurse in St. Alphonsus hospital, was ill with the influenza. Monday she was reported much improved.

Allen Newell of Letha is convalescing at the home of his sister, Mrs. E. A. Stegner.

Miss Myrtle Stegner returned to Letha Monday to help in the Newell-Stegner store.

Chas. Boor of Ironside was taken ill at the home of his mother, Mrs. J. W. Boor last Tuesday. At first it was feared it was influenza, but proved to be pneumonia.

Mrs. Harry Taylor came home from Boise, Sunday. Her brother, Emery Stillwell is sick in Boise with the influenza.

source: Payette Enterprise. (Payette, Canyon Co., Idaho), 07 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Emmett Index. November 07, 1918, Page 1

Body Brought Home

The body of George Dewey, who fell a victim to influenza in Portland, was brought home for burial. The funeral was held Tuesday morning. Brief services were held at the grave, being conducted by Bishop George Smith. The bereaved wife and four children, who were also sick with the disease, are recovering and expect to come to Emmett next week.
— —

Epidemic Stationary.

Dr. Cummings reports that Flu in Emmett appears to be gaining no ground, there being very few new cases, and no deaths from this cause thus far.
— —

Caught!

In the city of Emmett, a lady flirting with the Flu by doing her own washing. Ask Mack.
— —

The Harry Stanley family, who have been very will with Flu, are all about well, excepting Mr. Stanley, who is still very sick.

source: The Emmett Index. (Emmett, Idaho), 07 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Emmett Index. November 07, 1918, Page 2

19181107EI1
Tales Of Town

The Kiddies cannot see why anyone should object to a quarantine on the schools. But they will see why next June.

Better not throw aside your precautions against the influenza just yet. It is just as deadly as it ever was and – well, you don’t want to miss seeing the kaiser’s finish, do you, when it is drawing closer every day?

The health authorities have requested the barbers to wear masks when serving their clients, such should afford a great relief to the citizens who have opinions of their own about when the war is to end.

As usual, the farmer is the fortunate one in this influenza epidemic. Every time he steps out his front door he doesn’t have to duck back because some individual looking like a chicken with the roup [sic] and sneezing with the rapidity of a machine gun happens to be passing on his road home to hallelujah. If he takes the thing himself he can cough all over the calf lot at will or without fear. He can sneeze up one corn row and down another and the malignant bug ascending into the yellow circumambient of late autumn will get no further than the neighbor’s back forty, where, i contact with the sheep dip or the mortgage, it will languish unto death its malevolence merits. Between the farmers — blessed men – are those wide breathing spaces and that “elbow room” which some health of the human soul as well as writer declared were necessary to the body in which it resides.

source: The Emmett Index. (Emmett, Idaho), 07 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Emmett Index. November 07, 1918, Page 4

19181107EI2
News Of Gem County
By The Index’s Correspondents

Letha

Mr. Kiggins has decided to remain here awhile because of the prevalence of influenza and danger of quarantine. He is doing some fresnoing for Mr. Bott.

A. W. Newell is getting along splendidly. His many friend will be glad to know it.

A brother of John Dewey died in Portland last week of influenza. The body was brought to Emmett.
— —

Montour
By Mrs. R. E. Noland

Otto Kinsinger, who has been ill so long at the rooming house, was able to call at the Schuler home Tuesday.

Mrs. Vaughn has received word from her son Victor that after a severe attack of pneumonia he is again able to be up and around. Mr. Vaughn is in a hospital at Vancouver Barracks.

Mr. and Mrs. Jones were very much pleased to hear that their son Vance had fully recovered from the influenza. Vance is still on the border guarding.
— —

Central Mesa
Regina Conrad

W. E. Buck has the Spanish influenza.
— —

Emmett News.

Henry Duberke received a telegram stating that his wife, who was enroute home from a visit East had been taken suddenly ill and had been removed from the train at Dubuque where she is being cared for. The little daughter is being cared for by members of the Red Cross of that place.

Word has been received from Portland that Joe W. Casper, who left about tend days ago to work in the ship yards, has been a Flu patient for several days. He is fortunate in having one of the successful physicians of Portland and was able to write home that he is doing nicely and hopes for an early recovery.

Mrs. Ethel Haylor-Smith is a Flu patient in Portland. She volunteered as an emergency nurse when the auditorium was converted into a temporary hospital, and after working four days was taken with the disease. She is recovering.

source: The Emmett Index. (Emmett, Idaho), 07 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Emmett Index. November 07, 1918, Page 8

Emmett News.

W. H. Adkins returned Tuesday from Portland, where he had been working in the ship yards. He says the influenza has taken five out of 84 working in his department.

W. H. Shane a few days ago received the sad news of the death from influenza of his niece, the only daughter of his sister, Mrs. Burdella Zabitz of Chicago. The young lady was an accomplished musician.

Alton Ausch returned Monday from Portland, where he has been working in the ship yards. Like others, he feels that home is a mighty good place to be with Flu so prevalent.

source: The Emmett Index. (Emmett, Idaho), 07 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

Idaho County Free Press. November 07, 1918, Page 1

19181107ICFP1
School On Saturdays and During Vacation To Make Up For Loss

Pupils of the Grangeville public schools who thought, because of the closing order, due to Spanish influenza, they would escape the entire nine months of school, will be disappointed, for it is planned to hold school on Saturdays and during the Christmas vacation, in order to make up for four weeks of school lost because of the epidemic.

The public schools will not be opened before November 18. If conditions continue to improve, it is thought that the schools can be opened on that day. This would mean the loss of four weeks, or twenty school days, and in order to make up for the loss, plans already are being completed.

The schools before closing were five days ahead of schedule, because the annual teachers’ institute was not held. This would leave the schedule only fifteen days behind, if the schools are not opened until November 18. School probably will be held on the Monday and Tuesday before Christmas and on the Thursday and Friday following New Year’s day, which would place the schools eleven days behind schedule. Five days in other vacations can be eliminated, it is pointed out, and if school is held on six Saturdays, the entire schedule can be made up.

Teachers, under the state law, are drawing pay during the time the schools are closed.
— —

Keuterville Woman Is Dead.
Mrs. Charles Beuttner Succumbs to Spanish Influenza.

Mrs Charles Beuttner, wife of a well known rancher residing five miles south of Keuterville, died Monday evening from complications following an attack of Spanish influenza. She leaves her husband and five children.
— —

Funeral For Grover Myers
Services Held in Grangeville Sunday Afternoon.

Funeral services for Grover Myers, former resident of Grangeville, who died last Saturday in Lewiston, as a result of Spanish influenza, were held Sunday afternoon from the Maugg parlors in Grangeville with burial in Prairie View Cemetery. The Rev. J. A. Pine, pastor of the Christian church, officiated. …
— —

Clark D. Jessup

Clark D. Jessup, a Cottonwood boy in the army, died on November 1 of Spanish influenza at Camp Rosencrans, Cal. Mr. Jessup who was 28 years of age, left Grangeville with the selective service contingent on October 21 to enter training for the military service. …
— —

Edward Steinbach.

Edward Steinbach, one of the last Grangeville boys to join the colors, died early Tuesday morning of Spanish influenza at Camp Rosencrans, Cal. He was 22 years old the day before he died. Mr. Steinbach left Grangeville with the selective service contingent on October 21. Previous to entering the military service, he had been employed in the Electric Laundry. …

source: Idaho County Free Press. (Grangeville, Idaho Territory), 07 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Idaho County Free Press. November 07, 1918, Page 3

Grateful For Assistance.

The publisher of the Idaho County Free Press regrets inability to produce the customary amount of reading matter in the present issue of this newspaper, and hopes that the public will again be lenient in that respect.

With two members of the Free Press ill with Spanish influenza at one time, the working force of the office has been greatly depleted, and it was only due to the spirit of helpfulness displayed by Probate Judge Wilbur L. Campbell and the Globe Printing company, that it was possible for last week’s issue of the Idaho County Free Press to be printed. In the production of this week’s issue, also, the Globe force has been of most valuable assistance.

The publisher of the Idaho County Free Press promises the patrons of this newspaper that, barring the unforeseen, the paper next will will resume its regulation size.

source: Idaho County Free Press. (Grangeville, Idaho Territory), 07 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Idaho County Free Press. November 07, 1918, Page 5

General Health Regulations.

It is very important that every citizen cooperate with officials in the conservation and preservation of health and in preventing the spread of the influenza now going the rounds, and to prevent the fatilities [sic] which sometimes follow improper care of the person having the disease. A general survey and knowledge of these regulations will therefore be useful, in assuring complete and effective cooperation. With that purpose the following is printed:

The School District.

As to school districts the law is quoted:

“It is the duty of the owner or agent of a house in which a person resides who has any contagious or infectious disease dangerous to public health, and the physicians called to attend the person or persons so afflicted, withing 24 hours after becoming cognizant of the fact to give notice to the clerk of the board of trustees of the school district of the disease and of the person afflicted. Such person shall be kept away and apart from all other persons except those who may be necessary for the spiritual and physical well-being of such a person.

“it is the duty of a teacher when she feels that any child may be afflicted with any contagious disease, to send him home and to report to the clerk of the school district. Any child afflicted with a contagious disease shall be kept out of school for at least two weeks after the death, recovery or removal of any person in his house so afflicted, and no child may be allowed to return to school until after a certificate of permission has been given him by the attending physician. When the child has any textbook or books belonging to the school district at the time of his sickness they shall not be returned until they have been thoroughly disinfected under the direction of the attending physician.”

In case of quarantine, the ;aw very properly provides that no district shall lose its share of school money because it cannot maintain a minimum term of school and unless the contrary is stated in the contract that the teacher shall lose no part of her salary.

City Health Officer.

The city has the power to pass all ordinances necessary for controlling the question of cess pools, outhouses, sewer, collection of garbage, contagious diseases, construction of buildings and other safeguards for health. Every city, too, has a health officer, whose duty is is to enforce such ordinances and regulation for the maintenance of health within the city.

Every county in the state has a board of health, consisting of the county board of commissioners and a physician appointed by them. This board has power to quarantine any particular district or place so as to prevent the spread of any contagious or infections disease, and by this means it may quarantine any person or persons so afflicted.

In the case of persons so afflicted who are not able to bear the expense of medical attendance, medicines, the services of a nurse and so on, such expenses are sometimes allowed by the board of county commissioners, so it is possible for all to be provided with suitable care and medical attendance.

State Board of Health

There is a state board of health composed of five members, two of which shall be experienced and regularly licenses physicians of different parts of the state and appointed by the governor, the attorney-general of the state and the state engineer being ex-officio members of this board.

It was this board that closed all the schools of the state, churches, moving picture shows, pool halls and public gatherings. By this means a concerted effort of the entire state may be had for the stamping out of any epidemic affecting it. This board also has charge of the asylums, the soldiers’ home, penitentiary and certain other state institutions, making all the rules necessary for the safeguarding of the health of the inmates of these places.
— —

19181107ICFP2
Whitebird

Mrs. Ed Wyatt of Joseph came to town Sunday to nurse her son, Glen Rice, who is quite ill with the influenza.

Recent rains and the influenza did not seem to hinder the election, as many of the country people were in town Tuesday.

source: Idaho County Free Press. (Grangeville, Idaho Territory), 07 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Idaho County Free Press. November 07, 1918, Page 8

19181107ICFP3
Local News In Brief

Al White Recovering

Al White, who suffered a severe attack of Spanish influenza, is recovering, and will be able to be out within a few days.

Critically Ill

Mrs. William Soltman is critically ill with influenza. Mr. Soltman, who has been suffering from the disease, is able to be out.

Sheriff’s Force Better

Sheriff Lafe Yates was at work in his office Tuesday after two weeks’ illness from Spanish influenza. Deputy Sheriff Quinlan also was at work, after a week’s illness. Deputy Sheriff Powell is recovering, but still is confined to his home.
— —

19181107ICFP4
Personal

Mrs. V. Knapp has returned to her home in Lewiston, after spending a week in Grangeville caring for her niece, Mrs. L. A. Wisener, who was critically ill from Spanish influenza. Mrs. Knapp was accompanied home by Robert Wisener.
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19181107ICFP5
Four Deaths From Influenza Here In Week
Epidemic, However, Believed To Have Been Definitely Checked
Few New Cases Developing
Contagion Spreads to Cottonwood – Two Deaths in Squibb Family Within Seven Days

Though four deaths from Spanish influenza have occurred in Grangeville and vicinity during the week and several cases remain serious, it is believed the epidemic has been definitely checked, and withing a short time will be entirely eliminated from the east side of Camas Prairie. At the same time, the disease has spread to Cottonwood, which heretofore has been free from the malady.

Few new cases are reported. Some however have developed in homes in which one or more members previously had been afflicted.

Those who have died during the week are:

Mrs. Fred Noyes, Grangeville.
Mrs. Sophia Gratton, Grangeville.
Mrs. William Squibb Jr., Grangeville.
Bernice Miller, Winona.
— —

Grangeville Girl Dead.
Daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Robert N. Walker Victim of Influenza.

Mrs. A. F. Wendorf, aged 23 years, 7 months and 28 days succumbed to pneumonia following influenza, at Spokane last Sunday. The remains were shipped to this place and interment made in Prairie View cemetery yesterday afternoon at 2:30, W. N. Knox conducting the services at the grave and Undertaker A. J. Maugg directing the funeral. …

source: Idaho County Free Press. (Grangeville, Idaho Territory), 07 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., November 07, 1918, Page 1

19181107DSM1
Influenza Cases Growing Fewer
Only Three New Cases Reported in Moscow Today and Three Released.

The report of the influenza epidemic in Moscow today is very encouraging. Only three new cases were reported in the S. A. T. C. and three have been released as cured. There were no deaths and the old cases are getting better.

Dr. W. A. Adair, city health officer, says no new cases have been reported to him in the town proper, outside of the S. A. T. C. men, and that conditions in Moscow are satisfactory. It is believed that the epidemic is under control and that from now on the number of cases will grow less daily. If people continue to take care of themselves and obey the regulations as they have the health officers believe that it will not be long before schools can be opened and everything move on as before the epidemic stuck Moscow.
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46 Die At Pullman.

Pullman, Wash., Nov. 6. — Clyde Richards, who recently came to Washington from Missouri, succumbed yesterday afternoon to influenza. He was a member of the S. A. T. C. This rings the total toll from the epidemic to 46 in Pullman, of which 40 were members of the training corps. Dr. J. B. Anderson, Spokane city health officer, and E. T. Coman of Spokane, president of the board of regents of the state college, visited Pullman yesterday and today, respectively, to survey the influenza situation.
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Genesee Red Cross Sends Soldiers Fruit

The Red Cross of Genesee, following the fine example set by Genesee people in every public enterprise, sent over literally “loads” of fruit to the sick and convalescent soldiers at Moscow. Sergeant Hatfield, who is supply sergeant for the hospitals, asks The Star-Mirror to convey the thanks of himself and every soldier in Moscow, to the Genesee Red Cross ladies for this magnificent offering. He said: “We have five big boxes of canned fruit here now and learn that two more automobile loads are on the way. It as brought direct to the hospitals and we have no words strong enough to express our appreciation.” Genesee has an enviable reputation for all public spirited work, having led in Red Cross, Liberty loan and other war fund drives and the people there are liberal, public spirited and very enterprising.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 07 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., November 07, 1918, Page 2

City News

Mrs. S. C. Williamson donated six quarts of fruit for the soldiers’ mess food, Mrs. Frank Kelly two quarts, and John E. Jernberg two boxes of fine apples.

Mrs. Nita Jester, who lives five miles south of Moscow, gave five sacks of apples and five fine squash to the soldier boys. The boys say the apples were delicious.

Miss Suma Hall, a nurse from Potlatch, has an attack of influenza, but is not seriously ill.

Mrs. T. A. Meeker and son Gerald are improving very well from their siege of influenza.

Mrs. L. F. Hare, who has been sick of influenza, is much improved.

Mrs. Roy Vansickle of Viola, who died of influenza, was buried this afternoon. Her two brothers by the name of Greeg are very ill.

The Christian Science lecture which was to be held here, with Mr. Graham of Boston as speaker, will be postponed until the quarantine is lifted.
— —

More Fruit for Soldiers.

The following have given canned fruits, preserves and jellies for the sick and convalescent soldiers; Perton Johnson, Mrs. James Nolan, Mrs. A. T. Mack, Mrs. H. B. Reed, Mrs Roise, Mrs. Garrison, Mrs. A. N. Coverdale, The Mokepohreca Club, Mrs. Frank Oberg, Mrs. C. C. Carpener, Mrs. Nellie Hall, Mrs. J. L. Naylor, Mrs. H. H. Simpson, Mrs. James Eggan, Mrs. S. C,. Williamson, Mrs. Langon.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 07 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Nezperce Herald., November 07, 1918, Page 5

19181107TNH1
Local and Personal News Notes

H. W. Keith, on leaving for his home in Walla Walla last Sunday, asked The Herald to express his deep gratitude to the Nezperce people for their assistance in helping his son, Arthur, through his serious attack of influenza.

The Lewiston stock show is to be held Nov. 28 to Dec. 4, inclusive. The influenza epidemic necessitated the postponement from the earlier dates.

Mrs. H. L. Campbell who helped this community keep up the efficiency of its hospital during the two weeks when the influenza epidemic was at its height, returned to her home in Winchester Friday.

P. H. Sanger, of Mohler, who has heretofore contributed so liberally to the Red Cross War Funds, as well as to the local branch, has signified his desire to buy the local branch an electric sewing machine. The great volume of work which has been done locally by the Red Cross workers has been done with old machines, some of which are difficult to operate, and the addition of a new electric driven machine will be greatly appreciated by the ladies.

Rubens this morning reported the influenza in epidemic form at that place and asked for hep from Nezperce. Harry Cranke volunteered the services of his car, and took Mrs. Nina V. Lyon over. Mrs. Lyon was one of the most untiring and efficient helpers in the Nezperce epidemic and will render our neighbor town very valuable assistance.

source: The Nezperce Herald. (Nezperce, Idaho), 07 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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1918Atlantic26-a
Recovering soldiers watch a motion picture show wearing flu masks at U.S. Army Hospital Number 30 in Royat, France. U.S. National Library of Medicine

source: Alan Taylor April 10, 2018 “30 Photos of the 1918 Flu Pandemic” The Atlantic
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Nov 8

The Rathdrum Tribune., November 08, 1918, Page 1

19181108TRT1
Idaho state News Items.

Cheesecloth face masks for the prevention of influenza are coming into wide use in Idaho. The regulations say that one mask should not be worn longer than three hours without boiling.

November 9 is Gas Mask Day in Idaho by proclamation of the governor. On that day all citizens are asked to make an especial effort to gather nuts and fruit pits and deliver them at central points. They are used in making carbon for gas masks used in the army.
— —

19181108TRT2From Over The County

Post Falls

The influenza cases are mild.
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Spirit Lake

Last week six new cases of influenza were reported daily.

The Red Cross room is being remodeled and kalsomined.

Mrs. William Barrett of Athol and 8-months old son died in Spokane and were buried Oct. 30 in the Spirit Lake cemetery. The husband and four small children survive.
— —

Coeur D’Alene

Simple and impressive services marked the funeral of Dorothy, the 8-year old daughter of Dr. and Mrs. John Wood, in Forest cemetery. This was the second death in Coeur d’Alene on account of influenza.

Three deaths in Coeur d’Alene due to influenza, reported Monday, are: Mrs. Plumb, Mrs. Knute Swanson and Ralph Eider age 17. John Carlson, age 74, and Camille Chappue, age 77, died of heart disease.

Despite precautionary measures the epidemic of Spanish influenza shows a steady increase in Coeur d’Alene. Notices were posted in all cigar stores notifying the public not to tarry after making purchases and not to congregate anywhere.

Dr. Drennan, county physician, and medical examiner on the Kootenai county exemption board, received orders Monday to report to the medical examiners at Fort Wright for induction into the medical corps of the Army.

source: The Rathdrum Tribune. (Rathdrum, Idaho), 08 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Rathdrum Tribune., November 08, 1918, Page 3

19181108TRT3
Local Paragraphs.

Only one new case of influenza is reported since last week. Practically all other cases are said to be convalescent or recovering satisfactorily.

A large crowd from Rathdrum was reported to have gone to Coeur d’Alene in autos last night to show the people of the county seat how to celebrate the surrender of Germany.

Reports from Connell, Wash., state that Louis and Van Richmond, sons of A. H. Richmond, have died of influenza, that Chas. Richmond, another son, and Mrs. Arter, a daughter, and Mr. Richmond, himself, are very ill. It is also stated that Perley H. Smith, who is also on Mr. Richmond’s farm at Connell, is ill with the disease.

Bells were rung in Rathdrum yesterday in celebration of the report that Germany had surrendered. Flags were flung and autos with cheering groups of jubilant citizens raced back and forth on the street. Everybody manifested gladness at the thought that the fighting was over and that it was now but a question of months or at most a year when nearly all the surviving heroes will come marching home. In the afternoon people paraded, the band played and the kaiser was dragged in effigy behind an auto.

source: The Rathdrum Tribune. (Rathdrum, Idaho), 08 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Republican. November 08, 1918, Page 2

Grandview

The meeting of the Domestic Science club, which was announced for November 6, will be postponed indefinitely owning to the influenza.

Hazel Quigley is reported much better this week.

Archie Jones is a victim of the flu.

Everything remains quiet as people are keeping pretty close at home to avoid the flu.

Mrs. A. J. Satterfield received a message Saturday that her daughter Mrs. Will Watts was very low with pneumonia at the hospital in Pocatello. She went over at once via automobile.

As far as we know there are no cases of influenza in Grandview, but Miss Hazel Quigley has been very low for several days at the Crystal Springs ranch, where she was employed. Her mother has been with her since Saturday.

Miss Leach passed away Sunday night. The sympathy of the community goes out to the bereaved family.

Miss Quigley was a trifle better Monday morning.

Grandview Red Cross has decided to postpone all meetings indefinitely on account of influenza.
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Thomas

With the death of our neighbor Mrs. Lucy Fackrell, who died on Monday from Spanish influenza, there passed away one of the kindest and most needed mothers of our community, and her passing away with many others, are causing many people to mourn. What are the health officers, who are responsible for the public health, doing to combat the enemy that is in our midst? And we feel with Dr. Middleton of Salt Lake that if these officials do not take a more determined course, that the condemnation of the public opinion is going to fall heavily in some quarters.

Paul Allred received word Monday from Idaho Falls of the death of his cousin, ex-Sheriff J. S. Mulliner, who died from the influenza. Mr. Mulliner served Bingham county one term as deputy assessor. He is well known to many people of this place and the surround towns. His two terms as sheriff on Bonneville county were strongly marked by his determined fight for the enforcement of the prohibition laws and his loss will be keenly felt by the public in his home town.

Andrew Anderson and his family have been stricken with influenza, but are reported to be on the way to recovery at this time.

Other cases in the community so far as we can learn are progressing satisfactorily.

The funeral of Mrs. Parley Fackrell was held on Thursday, there being but a small attendance. This fact being due to precautions on the part of the people to prevent the spread of the plague, and in no manner bespeaks the esteem in which Mrs. Fackrell was held in the community, for she was held in the highest esteem by all who knew her. Her kind and motherly ways and courteous, obloging [sic] manners having long since won the esteem of her neighbors far and near. Mr. Fackrell is caring for his little ones and nursing his sick alone save for the help that neighbors can render occasionally.

Mrs. Hazel Goodwin, daughter of Mrs. Parley Fackrell and a war ride of only a few months was stricken with the disease when her mother died and is in a very critical condition at the present time. Her husband LeRoy Goodwin left for the training camp in September.

I. H. Allred, who was at the Leach and Berryman ranch at Springfield a few days ago, when the Leach family was stricken with influenza and when the daughter Minnie leach died, has reported that he himself is not yet stricken with the disease, but that Mr. Leach who was compelled to take the house work and care of the sick family and hired girl upon himself is now very sick with the disease.
— —

Upper Presto

Charlie White, while working at the sugar factory, was taken seriously ill with the typhoid fever. He is somewhat improved.

Mr. Seamen is able to be out again attending to his work.
— —

Wapello

Harry Blackburn is seriously ill with the influenza.

Mrs. Henry Felt is quite ill with the rheumatism.
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Sterling

Curtis Loveless is still very ill with influenza and pneumonia.

Mrs. Nathan Tanner Jr. and Mrs. Layman Tanner are both very seriously ill.

Arnold Nugent is very ill with typhoid fever.

Miss Hazel Quigley is still very seriously ill with influenza and pneumonia at the Crystal Springs ranch.

Dr. Mitchell of Blackfoot was called here on professional business this week.

Everybody in town is wearing a mask now since it became prohibitive on account of influenza.

Minnie Leach the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. R. Leach passed away Sunday evening at 10 o’clock, after a week’s illness with influenza and pneumonia. The sympathy of this community goes out to the bereaved ones in their great hour of sadness.
— —

Jameston

Mrs. Will Ashment has been very sick with influenza, but is rapidly improving.

Little Millie Anderson has been sick with influenza that last few days.

Everybody has a gauze mask. But are they supposed to be worn around the neck? Many seem to think so.
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McDonaldville

Glen Baily, son of George R. Baily passed away Thursday morning at the age of four years, another member of the family is seriously ill and the mother passed away last week. Interment was made in the Groveland cemetery.

Sarah Gray is about to be around again, after being seriously ill with the influenza.
— —

Rose

Mrs. Samuel Norman received word that her niece Mrs. Hudson of Layton, Utah, died with the influenza.

Mr. and Mrs. Amos Whitehead and two children and George Christensen, who has been staying with them, have the influenza.

Mrs. H. A. Gardner and son are on the sick list this week.

Miss Zina Norman has recovered from a slight illness.

John Norman is on the sick list again.

Samuel Norman is recovering from an attack of the influenza.
— —

Sterling

Curtis Loveless is slowly recovering from a severe attack of the influenza and pneumonia.

Norval Leach came home from Fort Riley, Kan. to attend the funeral of his sister Miss Minnie Leach. Mr. and Mrs. Charles Neider motored to Pocatello to meet him. He reports there were 13,000 cases of the flu there, with approximately 1000 deaths. Mr. Leach returned to camp the next day.

The Neider family are reported to be the latest victims of the flu.

Mrs. Nathan Tanner Jr. has recovered from her recent attack of the flu.

Ralph Quigley died at the home of his parents Tuesday night, with influenza and pneumonia. Funeral arrangements have not been made.

Mrs. Veda Watts died at a hospital in Pocatello Tuesday night with influenza and pneumonia. Mrs. Watts went to Pocatello to nurse her brother’s family who were ill and succumbed to the disease herself. Her husband is on his way to France.
— —

Springfield

The Grover Paul family are recovering from the influenza. Mrs. Paul and the baby were dangerously ill.

Mrs. Lyman Tanner is improving from a severe attack of the influenza.

Mr. Fouch, who has been living on his ranch north of town is very ill with the influenza.

The funeral of Minnie Leach was held Wednesday. The floral contributions were most beautiful. After a family prayer at home, and open air service was held at the cemetery. Rev. Peterson of Blackfoot conducted the services. The sympathy of the community is extended to the bereaved family.

Corporal Norval Leach returned to Ft. Riley Friday.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 08 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Republican. November 08, 1918, Page 3

Victim of Influenza

Jack Ryan, age fifty eight years, died at his home in Idaho Falls Monday, after suffering from influenza for several days. … He is survived by his wife, a mother and sister, who live at Detroit, Mich.

Funeral services were held at the Grove City cemetery Wednesday, Nov. 5, at two o’clock, under the auspices of the masonic lodge.
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Wicks

The influenza epidemic which [is] prevalent in this district is now on the decline and none of the cases have proved fatal so far.
— —

Taken to Hospital

Word was received recently that Mrs. Fred T. Dubois is very ill with the influenza in Boise and was taken to the hospital there.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 08 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Republican. November 08, 1918, Page 5

Local News

W. F. Martin was very ill the fore part of the week with rheumatism.

Miss Minnie Park has been quite ill with the influenza, but is now improving.

Mrs. W. S. Richards and two children went to Salt Lake Monday to see her mother who is seriously ill.

Miss Eula Palmer was called home Tuesday on account of the illness of her mother.

Miss Milbury Pew has been on the sick list for several days and is now improving.

Miss Susa Gould resumed her duties at the Kinney Mercantile store the fore part of the week, after a few days illness.

Miss Marie Weise is rapidly recovering after her illness.

Miss Else Jordan of the Brosn-Hart store is slowly improving, after a serious attack of the flu.

Miss Grace Hoit has been ill for the past few days and is now improving rapidly.

Mrs. M. B. Butler went to Salt Lake Thursday to see her husband, who is in the hospital.

Bonnie Volpert went to Idaho Falls Tuesday to work in the Bybee grocery store there, during the illness of one of their clerks.

Mrs. Hilda Slater resumed her work at the Bingham County News office Thursday, after recovering from a several days’ illness.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 08 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Oakley Herald. November 08, 1918, Page 1

19181108TOH1
Locals and Personals

Kenneth Curtis has been ill this week.

Eugene Smith of Marion is seriously ill.

T. W. Workman has been very ill several days this week.

Pres. W. T. Jack was suffering with a bad cold the first of the week.

Miss Leona Bain is able to be out again after a season of mumps.

Dr. Neilson was in Burley this week in consultation on the case of Dr. Lowe.

Dr. Lowe, who recently moved from our city to Burley, has been very ill with influenza. Also his children have been sick, but are rapidly improving.

Friends of Mrs. Rosel Hale will be glad to know she is improving from an attack of influenza.

Joseph Boren died Wednesday morning of pneumonia. Obituary notice will appear in next week’s issue.

Dr. Nielson, the country health officer, reports 15 new cases of influenza in Oakley for the week ending last Saturday. Since Saturday there have been an improvement in the local situation as only two or three new cases have developed.

Halloween was rather quiet at Oakley, but it must be noted that a number of people had the privilege of seeing strange and wonderful faces peep in the windows.

Mrs. S. P. Worthington left Thursday for Nampa to visit her sister, Mrs. Viola Roman, who is very seriously ill.
— —

In The Gem State

Telephone service at Caldwell has been badly crippled due to the sickness of 11 of the 14 operators regularly employed.

The drive for the enrollment of student nurses, which was closed a month ago, and which was ordered reopened within a few weeks, is on in fore in Idaho again.

Money saved by people as a result of the closing of the movies by the state board of health would, if invested in war Savings Stamps, aid considerably in raising the Thrift Stamp quota of the state.

source: The Oakley Herald. (Oakley, Idaho), 08 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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American Falls Press. November 08, 1918, Page 1

The Press force has not got the influenza, but it is all run down and is taking a half-holiday to recuperate. “Micky says” people are not interested in anything just now, anyhow, so it does not make much difference whether any news is printed or not.

source: American Falls Press. (American Falls, Idaho), 08 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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American Falls Press. November 08, 1918, Page 4

People and Events

Six patients are at the hospital, five of them sufferers from influenza, and all of them are getting along nicely.

Mrs. P. H. Sheer of Rockland who has been a patient at the Bethany Deaconess hospital, a victim of the influenza, left today for her home, fully recovered.

C. Lee French is quite sick, but not in a dangerous condition. Mrs. French is getting along nicely.

For the first time in three weeks the family of Andrew May of Rockland are all able to be at the table at the same time. His case is but an illustration of many others in different parts of the county, and indicates how serious the epidemic has been.

David Walker, the 17-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Walker of Rockland, died in Lava Hot Springs last Tuesday. The funeral occurred in Rockland yesterday. The boy had been working at Lava Hot Springs and was taken down with influenza. On his recovery he ventured out too soon and quickly succumbed to a setback.

American Falls joined the other cities and towns of the state and nation in celebrating prematurely, the joyful news that the great way had come to an end by the unconditional surrender of Germany. A flash went out over the wires about 10:30 announcing that the war had come to an end. All over the town flags were raised, and shortly after the dinner hour several blasts of dynamite were set off. A large pile of boxes was erected in the public square in readiness for the celebration in the evening. As soon as darkness had set in crowds began to assemble on the streets. Everyone who owned or could borrow a firearm was busy adding to the noise made by the members of the tin-can band, which comprised about every person, large and small, in the community who was able to be out. When the time arrived to set ablaze the bonfire a truck filled with a shouting crowd drove to the residence of Governor-elect Davis and brought him to the square to address the crowd. In a brief talk he set forth the appreciation and the thanks due our boys in France who were the deciding factor in bringing about the abject surrender. He closed his address by calling for three cheers for our soldiers and sailors. Then the bonfire was set ablaze amid the cheers of the crowd and the cheers became a shout of derision when the effigy of the kaiser, which surmounted the pile, was quickly devoured by the flames. It was the first public assembly since the embargo was put on all meetings owning to the influenza epidemic, but the crowd was so cheerful and turned out in so cheerful a cause, that any old sort of a germ had no terrors.

source: American Falls Press. (American Falls, Idaho), 08 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Clearwater Republican. November 08, 1918, Page 1

Red Cross Notes

Any one having influenza masks that are not in use please return them to Red Cross rooms.

On account of the influenza epidemic work at the Red Cross rooms has fallen behind. This county has received an allotment of 75 suits of pajamas. The Red Cross rooms will be open every afternoon except Saturday. The following supervisors have been appointed. Monday, Mrs. Edwards; Tuesday, Mrs Herbert Ripley; Wednesday, Mrs. Canton; Thursday, Mrs. A. E. Holmberg; Friday, Mrs. Rodgers.
— —

Local News.

Elk River is reported to be suffering with a severe attack of the influenza, there being fifty-nine cases in that village yesterday. It is said that every available building in the town has been turned into a hospital.

Dr. Horswill is reported as improving nicely at the hospital in Lewiston and it is announced will return to Orofino next week. Mrs. Horswill returned home last Wednesday evening. Dr. Reese of Gilbert has been successfully looking after the afflicted in the vicinity during the doctor’s absence, and it was fortunate that his services could have been obtained.

source: Clearwater Republican. (Orofino, Idaho), 08 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Kendrick Gazette. November 08, 1918, Page 1

Mrs. Marie Carmichael

Mrs. Marie Carmichael of Spokane, formerly Miss Marie Zimmerman of Crescent, died at the Sacred Heart Hospital Monday morning after a short illness from influenza. Her husband, W. D. Carmichael and son George, age ten, were also afflicted with influenza and it was through her unceasing care of her husband and little son that her strength gave out so that she was unable to recover from the first attack of the disease. …

source: The Kendrick Gazette. (Kendrick, Idaho), 08 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Kendrick Gazette. November 08, 1918, Page 6

Gleanings

Nearly all of the voters in Kendrick came out of the election booth crying. This would no doubt be a very gratifying sight to the bystanders, that the election privilege should e taken so seriously. However, those who voted could tell the reason – formaldehyde. So far as known, all election officials survived the effects of the fumes but it is believed the flu died.

Dr. and Mrs. Smith received a message a few days ago that Dr. Patton while attending his patients at the hospital in Silverton, California, was taken with the “flu” which soon developed pneumonia. He was hurriedly brought back to Denver and a second message announces him to be improving.

Mrs. M. V. Thomas returned from Clarkston Thursday after spending a week there caring for her brother, who was very ill with influenza.

source: The Kendrick Gazette. (Kendrick, Idaho), 08 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Kendrick Gazette. November 08, 1918, Page 2

There is a noticeable disposition among the people here to comply with any demands which are made to advance the interests of the public in general. Before the war there was a tendency to argue any piece of legislation that took away privileges which had become customary. Today the people simply fall in line as a matter of course and carry out the wishes of the Government without complaint. This was particularly noticeable when the health department asked that all stores be closed at six o’clock in the evening. The order was carried out to the letter and no complaints were heard.
— —

Owing to the influenza epidemic the creamery directors did not hold their meeting Tuesday evening. However, in discussing the matters informally, they decided to continue the creamery in operation as long as they could secure patronage. They will not close down on November 1, and urged that the farmers bring in cream as usual, furnishing all that they can produce. There is an increase in cream receipts over that of a month ago, owing to good late pasture, and it is possible that the plant will operate all winter.
– Latah County Press.

source: The Kendrick Gazette. (Kendrick, Idaho), 08 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Kendrick Gazette. November 08, 1918, Page 5

Big Bear Ridge

Mrs. Rufus May and daughter, Miss Pearl are slowly recovering from a severe attack of influenza and pneumonia.

The other children are much improved as the flu was checked while in a mild form.
— —

Linden Items

Mrs. Addison Alexander who has been at her sister’s, Mrs. Dicks on Bear Ridge returned home Monday. She reports her sister much better but not able to be up and around yet.

source: The Kendrick Gazette. (Kendrick, Idaho), 08 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Recorder. November 08, 1918, Page 1

Young Woman Taken

Miss Sabra Melvina Griffith, aged 18 years, died in Salmon November 4th of pneumonia, following an attack of influenza. Her step parents, Mr. and Mrs. Nels Croney, came here from Idaho Falls and she made her home with them in Brooklyn.

Mrs. Van Stratt

Mrs. Agnes Van Stratt, wife of Chris Van Stratt passed away at 7:30 this morning from the effects of influenza illness. She had been ill about two weeks. …

source: The Idaho Recorder. (Salmon City, Idaho), 08 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Recorder. November 08, 1918, Page 2

Idaho State News

Under the direction of the state board of health the Albion State Normal school has been placed under quarantine in an attempt to prevent the Spanish influenza from obtaining a foothold.

Word has been received at Malad of the death of John Daniels at Camp Fremont, Cal. The young man has been at Camp Fremont for the past two months His death was cased by pneumonia, superinduced by Spanish influenza.
— —

Northwest Notes

Lifting of the quarantine at Camp Lewis will depend on the decrease of influenza cases in cities and town near camp, officers at headquarters announced last week.

Influenza seems to be gaining headway at Butte, Ekalaka and Eureka, but elsewhere in Montana the situation is unchanged, reports to the state board of health indicate.

Free entertainment on a large scale will be furnished the men of Camp Lewis while they are held on the military reservation because of the influenza quarantine and until further notice.

In a statement from the United States public health service, 2000 cases of influenza were reported at Billings, Mont. The federal authorities attribute the spread of the disease in Billings largely to the failure to close the schools.

A hotel building at Kalispell, Mont., has been secured as a detection hospital for influenza cases, through the efforts of the local health authorities and the Red Cross society, which have bee working in conjunction on the matter.

source: The Idaho Recorder. (Salmon City, Idaho), 08 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Recorder. November 08, 1918, Page 5

19181108TIR1
The Sick List

Sheriff Frazier and Earl Gilbreath are both getting on their feet again after a siege with influenza. the family of W. C. Smith are kept at home but are not seriously ill, and so are the C. W. Snook family, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Andrews. Numerous other patients are recovering, including Mrs. Frank Kirtley, who has been ill and Shirley Johnson, Dr. Ashley, Mrs. Keys and children, Mrs. Dan Chase and the Billbrey family, all on the sick list, besides a great many others.

In some parts of the county there are victims of the epidemic that count all the people or nearly all of them. One of these communities is Sandy creek where there has been great suffering. In other localities there is no influenza at all. A telephone message received from May yesterday afternoon said that not a single case had been reported there.

source: The Idaho Recorder. (Salmon City, Idaho), 08 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Montpelier Examiner. November 08, 1918, Page 1

W. R. Johnson Dies From Influenza at Camp Fremont

Wm. R. Johnson, who went from this county to Camp Fremont last August, died there of influenza on Oct. 23. He was 27 years of age. In response to his request his body was taken to Alliance, Neb., for burial. Besides his wife, he is survived by his mother and one sister. Before entering the service he was employed as a fireman on the Short Line.
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Mrs. Wm. Graff Dies From Influenza in Pocatello.

Mrs. Wm. Graff died at her home in Pocatello on Thursday, Oct. 31. Death was caused from pneumonia, which followed quickly after she was stricken with the influenza. The body was brought to Montpelier on No. 18 lasts Friday afternoon and open air services were held at the cemetery. Mrs. Graff was the youngest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Theo. Closner of this city, and was a native of Montpelier, having been born here 18 years old. At the time of her death her husband and her brother, Edward, were also victims of the influenza but both are now convalescing. Besides her parents and husband, she is survived by four sisters and two brothers.
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Montpelier Again Hoaxed by Premature Paris Report

Montpelier went through the delirium yesterday afternoon when a report went over the wires saying Germany had accepted the peace terms of the allies at 10 o’clock a.m. and that fighting on all fronts would cease at 3 p.m. We were not the only celebrators, however, New York City especially becoming delirious with joy over the unfounded report, as did also the whole country. …

While Montpelier did not go to this extreme, yet everybody believed the report to be true in fact and the jubilant people were not interfered with in the least by the authorities who are dispersing crowds of people in compliance with the mandate of the board off health. In fact the people seems to forget that Montpelier had ever heard of a case of Spanish influenza in their midst, and no one wore a broader smile than did Chief Hillier. …

source: Montpelier Examiner. (Montpelier, Idaho), 08 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Montpelier Examiner. November 08, 1918, Page 3

Idaho State News

Robert Henry of Rigby, in the vocational section of the S. A. T. C., died in the Inland Empire hospital at Moscow from pneumonia. His death is the fourth in the vocational section.

The influenza epidemic has been making rapid strides in Idaho Falls and Bonneville county and stringent measures are being taken to overcome it. Every person has been ordered to wear a mask over the nose and mouth and all businesses houses except drug stores and cafes, are closed at 6 p.m.

A supply of vaccine for the prevention of pneumonia consequent upon influenza was received by a Idaho Falls drug firm from Seattle last week, and has been distributed among the physicians of the city. The first lot of the vaccine received was sufficient for the immunization of about 120 persons.

source: Montpelier Examiner. (Montpelier, Idaho), 08 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Montpelier Examiner. November 08, 1918, Page 4

Sergeant G. W. Irving Writes From Camp Logan

… There has been no end to the Spanish Influenza here, but conditions are much better now. At its worst stage it has all the hospitals full and there were from 20 to 30 deaths every 24 hours. The “flu” has just about run its course here, there being very few new cases. Camp Logan has the health record for camps in the United States. …

source: Montpelier Examiner. (Montpelier, Idaho), 08 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Montpelier Examiner. November 08, 1918, Page 8

John Ishimaru Victim of The Spanish Influenza

Another sudden death occurred last night when influenza claimed another victim in the person of Mt. Ishimaru, proprietor of the Japanese store and head of the Montpelier Steam Laundry, who died at the emergency hospital at the city hall, where he was taken only a week ago and was reported as doing well and on the road to a rapid recovery only two days before his death. … He leaves a wife and two small children, one only a few months old.

source: Montpelier Examiner. (Montpelier, Idaho), 08 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Meridian Times., November 08, 1918, Page 3

19181108TMT1
Inland Northwest

Seattle’s stores may be closed in an effort to prevent the spread of Spanish Influenza, City Health Commission J. S. McBride has announced.

Arrangements have been made whereby nutritious soup and other food will be taken to homes in Lewiston, Mont., where the influenza has made the preparation of good food for any patient difficult.

Druggists will be permitted under certain restrictions to refill prescriptions calling for morphine, codeine or heroin, written by registered practitioners for patients suffering from influenza and any pulmonary or bronchial afflictions, according to notice received at Helena.

Being peculiarly susceptible to pneumonia, the disease is wreaking great toll among the Cheyenne Indians on lower Tongue river, according to reports last week, and some 53 of them have died within the past two weeks between Kirby and Busby, Mont.

source: The Meridian Times. (Meridian, Idaho), 08 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Meridian Times., November 08, 1918, Page 8

19181108TMT2
Meridian News Notes

Word has been received of the death from influenza of George Beasley, formerly a well known farmer in this section. He died at Portland.

source: The Meridian Times. (Meridian, Idaho), 08 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Shoshone Journal. November 08, 1918, Page 1

Died of Influenza

Mrs. Malheur, who was in from the ranch Monday, received the sad news of the death of her son, from influenza, on the eve of his departure for France, from a New York training station. The remains have been shipped to Shoshone. Mrs. Malheur will have the sympathy of all her many friends and neighbors in the sad homecoming of her soldier son.

source: Shoshone Journal. (Shoshone, Idaho), 08 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Shoshone Journal. November 08, 1918, Page 5

Local and Personal News

Miss Wiggins and Miss Mabel Euhoim came up from Gooding Friday and Miss Edna Euhoim, who is well on the way toward recovery from influenza, returned with them to Gooding.

Miss Tress McMahod [?] is ill with influenza at her home in Richfield.

Mrs. William Thorpe is recovering from an attack of the “flu.”
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Died Of Pneumonia

John Speed, cook for a construction crew on the O. S. L., died Monday of Pneumonia at the Baugh rooming house. The remains were taken care of a Brennan’s undertaking rooms and relatives of the deceased notified.

source: Shoshone Journal. (Shoshone, Idaho), 08 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., November 08, 1918, Page 1

19181108DSM1Fewer Influenza Cases in Moscow
Five New Cases Admitted to Hospital and Nine Discharged Today

The influenza situation here today is regarded as very favorable. No further deaths have occurred. In the S. A. T. C. of the university, five new cases were admitted to the hospital since yesterday’s report and nine were discharged as cured. The new cases are very mild. These are all in class A, the collegiate class of the S. A. T. C. There has not been a death among the collegiate students, of which more than 500 are in the S. A. T. C. and about an equal number of other students enrolled.

There are a few cases that are causing some uneasiness, but these are slightly better today. In class B, the vocational training corps, conditions show marked improvement. Many of the convalescents have returned to work and are entirely cured. There are no new cases reported in town, outside of the university and most of the towns people who had the disease have recovered. Taken as a whole the situation is regarded as more favorable than at any time since the disease struck Moscow. The total number of deaths from the disease to date remains at eight. Six of these were class B men in the S. A. T. C. The other two were Moscow people.
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19181108DSM2
Moscow Nurse Died From Pneumonia
Miss Fridley, Well Known Here, Died at Spokane Wednesday Evening

Callie L. Fridley, a graduate nurse, died at St. Luke’s hospital last evening. death was caused by pneumonia. She was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George C. Fridley of Wasco Ore.

She is survived by her parents, two brothers, Clifford Fridley, of Lexington, Ore., and Clyde Fridley of Wasco, and by two sisters, Dora and Nettie Fridley, of Lexington. …

Miss Fridley was well known in Moscow, having worked in local hospitals for a long time She has many friends here to whom news of her death will be a sever shock.
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Another S. A. T. C. Man Influenza Victim

Herman Greaser of Laramie, Wyo., died today making the ninth death in Moscow as a result of the influenza epidemic and the seventh death in class B of the S. A. T. C. The young man came here with the Wyoming contingent and was taken with influenza soon after reaching Moscow. His condition has been serious from the start. He developed pneumonia and two slight operations were performed in hopes of saving his life. He rallied from the operations but could not overcome the pneumonia. His parents were notified several days ago of the seriousness of his condition, but have not reached Moscow A telegram telling of his death was sent to them this afternoon.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 08 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., November 08, 1918, Page 3

City News

Mrs. Lindgren of Orofino came up today to see her son Paul, who has been quite sick with influenza, but is convalescent and is now in the Elks’ temple. Mrs. Lindgren was very uneasy about her boy and feared she would not be permitted to see him. She rode up town in the automobile of a Moscow family, a member of who was on the train and made her acquaintance and was driven to the Elks’ temple. Her joy was almost overpowering when she saw her son standing out in front of the temple, apparently well and happy. She will return to her home tomorrow a very happy woman.

Mrs. J. E. Nessly, who has been at Greer, Idaho, taking care of her brother-in-law and sister, Mr. and Mrs. Matt C. Miles, formerly of Moscow, returned home today after an absence of 10 days. Mr. and Mrs. Miles are much improved and both are able to be out.

Harold Magnus of Denver, Colorado, who formerly worked with the J. C. Penny company of Moscow, died of pneumonia recently at Grace, Idaho, in the southern part of the state, where he was manager of a similar store. He leaves a wife and three children.

L. A. Dodge, who has had a very severe attack of influenza, is now able to be out again.

St. Mark’s church has kindly donated the use of Guild hall for the convalescent soldiers. The boys are very comfortable there with room for exercise and a phonograph for amusement.

Dr. Leitch reports Earl st. John’s condition of influenza as somewhat improved, but his is yet seriously ill. His mother is improving slowly.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 08 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Further Reading (S. A. T. C.)

1918 Spanish Flu didn’t forget the Palouse

By Mark O’English

19181111Pullman-a
Red Cross volunteers hit the downtown Pullman streets for the Armistice Day celebration marking the end of World War 1. Courtesy of the WSU Manuscripts, Archives and Special Collections.

In 1918, the Spanish Flu swept across the globe, ultimately killing between 50 million and 100 million people, or about 1 in 25 worldwide. The Inland Northwest was not exempted, and as the flu peaked nationwide in October and November of that year, Pullman and Moscow found themselves visited as well.

With the United States involved in the war in Europe, both WSC and UI were part of the Student Army Training Corps program. Soldiers were transported by train to 500 colleges nationwide, where they’d receive military training and useful educations simultaneously. SATC training began here in June 1918; the second cohort arrived in August and was first to feel the effects, albeit slightly, of the flu.

Pullman’s third cohort of 600 began arriving in early October, to begin training on Oct. 15. As soldiers from all over the country came in on crowded trains, they inevitably carried the flu with them. With the influenza making its presence felt, by Oct. 10, Pullman reacted strongly. While no strict quarantine was put in place, all public gathering places were closed and sentries prevented SATC trainees from leaving campus. The sickest 150 of the earlier soldiers were asked to remain in Pullman, and, of course, college students were present as well. The travel and the compact housing conditions proved to be excellent incubators for the flu.

The college would close Oct. 21, though all the soldiers and most of the students remained on campus. Former WSC president E.A. Bryan reported that across all three cohorts, about 825 soldiers came down with the flu. When Pullman’s Northwest Sanitarium (today’s Kimball Funeral Home) and the small medical facility on campus quickly filled to capacity, some floors of the Ferry Hall men’s dorm were used as hospital space, as was the gymnasium, the ATO and the SPE fraternity houses, and the St. James Episcopal Church, the Federated Church and the Christian Church. Not enough can be said of the efforts of the staff, faculty, students and soldiers who volunteered as nurses, or who organized to provide as many as 900 sick meals per day.

Moscow, with a smaller SATC training corps, was not hit as hard or as quickly, but responded even more forcefully. While the school remained open, a strict quarantine was imposed between the town and the college. People wishing to come on campus were forced to spend four days in quarantine in a town church to ensure they were uninfected. For a short period, Idaho’s SATC soldiers were required to wear gauze masks when out in public. By Nov. 1, almost 37 were dead in Pullman – almost exclusively SATC trainees – while only 3 had died at the University of Idaho.

On Nov. 11, each town’s quarantines failed with the announcement of the armistice ending the Great War. Celebrants from town and campus mixed in jubilation over the course of the day’s parades, parties and dances, but apparently the worst of the flu had passed, and no large outbreaks followed.

In the following weeks, public schools resumed, public gathering places reopened and the colleges resumed full activity. While Moscow weathered this comparatively well, in Pullman, the flu moved from the college to the town, and by Dec. 9, the SATC soldiers were again banned from the city. And while Moscow and Pullman had been at the forefront of the flu in the Palouse due to the military influx, it had now moved into the myriad of smaller, more isolated towns; Tekoa in particular appears to have been hard hit, and was begging for medical help in early December. The state of Washington ordered the state’s entire public school system closed; it reopened a month later on Jan. 6 before closing again from Jan. 17 through Feb. 2.

While January marked the end of the serious flu for most of the region, Moscow, possibly as a side effect of their more successful earlier quarantines, suffered at least one late struggle with the flu, having to put a town quarantine in place for a few weeks in March.

The final death counts for the region are difficult, if not impossible, to calculate. At least 42 died on the WSC campus, while by Nov. 15, only six non-campus residents had died in Pullman. While that is believed to be the final campus number, more did follow in town in the succeeding weeks. Moscow and the UI fared better, with 10 deaths by Nov. 27, though more undoubtedly followed. With the flu having a reported worldwide fatality rate of about 4 percent, our region fared better, with something like 3 percent deaths in the SATC but probably less than 1 percent in the general populations in Moscow and Pullman. Nonetheless, those months remain some of the darkest in the history of the region.

** Mark O’English is the university archivist at Washington State University Libraries Manuscripts, Archives and Special Collections.

source: Moscow-Pullman Daily News Oct 8, 2018
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Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 1)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 2)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 3)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 4)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 5)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 6)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 7)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 8)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 9)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 10)