Monthly Archives: July 2020

Road Reports July 29, 2020

Please share road reports. Conditions can change quickly any time of year. Some high elevation roads still have snow. Be prepared for rocks and trees in the road and remember there is no cell phone service.

Highway 95: Sho-fly detour open around the slide.
July 27 ITD update:
The temporary gravel road around the base of the slide opened to two lanes today. Flaggers are on site to help traffic in the event that movement is detected on the slope.
At night, flaggers will shift from their current positions closer to the slide to maintain the closure on Old Pollock Road so it may remain viable for future use as a detour.
continued:
ITD (link)
French Creek Road is not an official, nor a recommended detour for Highway 95.

Yellow Pine: No street closures anticipated this weekend. Local streets are dry and dusty except where people paid for dust abatement. Deer, dogs and kids are wandering around. Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN. Report that a dog was hit injured on Main street in June.
link: Local Forecast
Yellow Pine Webcam: (check date on image)

Warm Lake Highway: No problems reported.
link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

Highway 55 Webcams Link:
Note: Bridge construction at Horseshoe Bend.

South Fork Road: Closed 7am to 4pm daily with no closures on weekends.
Report from Saturday (July 25) the road is really rough in the construction zones on weekends.
The closure sites will change on a weekly basis, and will not always be adjacent to the last closure site. Refer to the current weekly newsletter or the project website to determine the closure point and access for each week. South Fork Road Project page (link)
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Saturday (July 25) mail truck driver (Kaleb) reports the road is getting rough in some spots but overall pretty good.

Johnson Creek Road: Open.
Wednesday (July 29) mail truck driver (Kaleb) reports the road is getting washboards in the usual spots.
link: Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam
link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
Note: The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Opened by the county June 24th.
Last reported to be really rough on the McCall side.
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Open and rough.
Summit was reported snow free on Sunday June 28.
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcam: (check date on image)

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Old report: Semi-open to the adventurous ATV riders. Travel at your own risk.
Old report June 26: “Lots of rocks and trees. One little patch of snow 20 ft long. But otherwise Thunder Mountain is open for 4×4 vehicles … we cut over 30 trees. The other guy with me didn’t cut them full width for a car, just for his ATV. So any trees I didn’t cut will need to be trimmed to get full size vehicles through.” – SA
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Cinnabar: Report received July 11: “UTV group made it into Cinnabar [via the upper road] about two days ago. Lots of snow drifts. Rough going. But they cut the trees out of the road.” -SA

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Old report of OHVs making it over. Travel at your own risk.
Smith Creek Trees down from Avalanche

Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Warrens Wagon Road: Construction update: The road is CLOSED from 8am-Noon and 1pm-5pm Monday-Friday. The road is OPEN with a PILOT CAR from Noon-1pm and after 5pm Monday-Friday. The road is OPEN without a pilot car on Saturday and Sunday.
Update June 4: be aware that the Long Gulch Culvert Installation Project along Warren Wagon Road from Chinook Campground to Steamboat Summit will begin on June 15 and end in mid-July. The project involves the installation of numerous cross drain culverts. Delays of under 1 hour can be expected. This area of Warren Wagon is between Secesh Meadows and Warren.

Deadwood Summit: Open, travel with caution.
Scott Mountain is also open.
Note: The approx elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′
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July 26, 2020 The Yellow Pine Times

July 26, 2020 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Reminder: We are still under a boil water order until further notice.

The 2020 Harmonica Festival has been canceled.

Community Calendar:

April 17 – Boil water order issued
May 15 – Firewood Season starts
June 16 – Hard closure of South Fork Road (weekdays)
2020 Harmonica Festival Canceled
Aug 8 – VYPA meeting at 2pm
Sept 12 – VYPA meeting at 2pm
(details below)
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From Valley County

We need Your Help to protect the place and the people we all Love.
link:
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Valley County Covid-19 Response Page
link:
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Valley County Emergency Operations Center
link:
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Rebound – Idaho Governor’s phasing program
link:
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COVID 19: Recommendations and Resources for Safe Business Practices
link: (lots of info for businesses)
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Local Events:

2020 Festival is Cancelled

We have come to the decision that the 2020 Festival will be cancelled. We look forward to celebrating the 32nd year of the Festival August 5, 6, & 7, 2021.

Our decision was not made lightly. We had to consider the current situation we are in and examine the outlook for the coming months. This is the necessary and right decision for the safety of our community and all participants.

We all look forward to one big reunion with all of you in August 2021.
– DF
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Village News:

Boil Water Order issued April 17 still in effect.

Update July 5: the boil order is in effect do to extremely high use due to leaks.

Update June 12: The boil order is still on. We still are experiencing excessive water use because of leaks. Not sure when this will be lifted. We are applying for grants to repair the system.

Update June 2: The water plant is experiencing high water in Boulder Creek which brings more debris into the sand filter.

The high demand caused by leaks in the system plugs the sand filters prematurely. We will be on a boil order until further notice.

As of April 17th 2020, Yellow Pine is under another “Boil Order”

Minutes from July 5, 2020 Meeting

Yellow Pine Water Users Association Annual Shareholders Meeting 7/05/2020

Directors in Attendance:

Steve Holloway, Willie Sullivan, Stu Edwards, Dawn Brown

Steve called the meeting to order and gave a brief description of the agenda.

Willie gave the Treasurers Report. Current balance is $37,699.08. There are 14 accounts in arrears with 4 accounts seriously delinquent. Recommends following with legal action i.e. liens, water shut off, etc. Willie handed out a 3 year financial statement for the department showing 2017, 2018 and 2019 income and expenses.

Steve asked if anyone had questions.

Question from attendee: Should delinquent accounts be shut off first and then file liens? Steve indicated that we are looking at all options.

Question from attendee: They asked 3 years ago to have water line repaired to their place and not done yet so they haven’t paid yet. Willie indicated they tried to repair but gate was not open. Steve and Willie agreed that they would schedule repair with the user and coordinate access.

Steve indicated that we are still under a boil order.

Warren (Operator) gave an update as to status of plant. Indicated that as our plant is a surface water plant, has to be monitored every day and we report monthly to DEQ. He also indicated that the boil order is in effect do to extremely high use. He indicated that leaks in the lines are the reason for the high usage. Hard to detect where leaks are as our soil type does not allow leaks to surface and be seen. We also sustained damage from the recent earthquake to the plant. There are big cracks in the cement building 1/8” to 3/16” in very important part of structure. He indicated that it is still functioning properly and there is no danger now. He indicated he has spoken with Mtn Water Works and they are working on improvements and finding grant money and low interest loans. He said Nikki (employee) works every day to maintain adequate chlorine levels. Warren checks several locations when he is in town. Warren asked for questions.

Question from attendee: If you drill your own well do you still have to pay?

Warren: No, there are no restrictions from YPWUA but DEQ restrictions apply.

Question from attendee: Visitors have access to water and might not know about boil order. Should we put up signs at public access points?

Warren: DEQ requires that we make that information available to all. Steve and Willie indicated they would put up signs.

Nikki asked Warren to explain gravity feed water system. Warren gave brief description and indicated it could create air pockets. Nikki indicated that at high usage people on the upper end of the system sometimes have no water.

Warren said we need a new master plan to control leaks, take care of repairs, etc. He indicated we need a new tank but probably won’t be up and running until next year.

Steve said we are working on grants with Mtn Water Works and are hoping to get 1.25 million in grants to make all necessary repairs and get new tank up and running.

Willie indicated that they have a person assigned to our department helping to make sure we are doing everything we can. There is also a plan to repair line coming in to town. He said a 20’ section of pipe by the apple orchard was replaced. Said there were approximately 12 leaks in that 20’ section. Said pipes were not installed correctly originally so now seeing problems.

Steve spoke about rate increases. Said there will be no rate increases in the coming year as they would not be nearly enough to make a difference in repairs. He asked that if you do lawn watering please do not water after 2 pm and try to use the even and odd day schedule.

There are two officers up for election this year. Last year, Stu and Dawn were reelected. This year Steve and Willie are up for reelection.

Attendees nominated both for reelection and both were reelected.

Question from attendee: Is there an estimate from engineer on total cost of all repairs?

Willie: Not yet but it is being worked on.

Meeting adjourned.
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2020 Census

The 2020 Census Impacts All Valley County Residents

Inching closer. Each of our communities and Valley County as a whole have increased our response rate by a few percentage points over the last few weeks – but we still have a lot of room to grow! We are still ranked #42 of 44 counties in Idaho for our Census response rate. Let’s get that number up! Responding to the Census takes less than 10 minutes and mean $1,483 per person in federal funding for Valley County.

It is recommended that we all fill out the census online.

If you spend 50% of your time in Valley County, you can consider it your home per the Census. Where you register with the Census is confidential and never linked to other governmental requirements such as property taxes or mailing address. The deadline for the 2020 Census has been extended until October 31st. They will probably not be sending census takers up to Yellow Pine.

Link: to online census

You do not need an ID number. Go to the link. Click on “start questionnaire”. Then on the next page scroll down to “If you do not have a Census ID, click here” – when you click on that line it will start the census. (see below)

2020Census-a
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Critters

Tick’s are still very plentiful in early July.

Mosquitoes and no-see-ums are hungry. This year’s batch of tree swallow chicks have fledged and learning to hunt.

Bears are out of hibernation, protect your trash and pet food.

Watch out for aggressive mother does and cows, they will stomp your dogs – and you too.
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Road News

Link: to current road reports.
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Forest Info

All campgrounds and restroom facilities in the South Fork Corridor, Lick Creek/Secesh Corridor and along the East Fork South Fork Salmon River are open. -Krassel RD
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Yellow Pine US Mail

The 6-day a week mail delivery started June 1st. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 55 cents. Support our local post office and purchase your holiday stamps here.
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Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Update July 19: The bins are half full. Road has been graded.

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

Yellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is located approximately 3 miles south on Johnson Creek Road.

The TRANSFER STATION is for household trash and yard waste:
* Household trash must be put inside (and fit) the dumpster;
* Yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, etc.) goes in the burn pile on the south end of the turn-around;
* Cardboard boxes should be flattened before putting the in the dumpster,

The DUMPSTERS are NOT for:
* Furniture (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station).

The BURN PILE is NOT for:
* Cardboard boxes (flatten and put in dumpster);
* Furniture and appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Drywall and building material (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wire or fencing (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Foam Rubber (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wood with metal (like nails) attached (take to Donnelly Transfer Station.)

When closing the DOORS on the front of the dumpsters:
* Make sure the “U” brackets at the top and bottom of the door are engaged;
* The retaining bar at the middle of the door is slid into the pipe;
* And the “L” bars at the bottom of the doors dropped into place.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: 208/634-7176
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Local Groups

YPWUA News:

The annual Water meeting for 2020 was held July 5th at the Community Hall 2pm.
link: minutes 20200705YPWUA.docx

New Boil Water Order issued April 17, 2020. This could last until runoff is over.

Boil Water Advisory Notice

Boil Your Water Before Using

Bring tap water to a rolling boil, boil for one minute, and cool before using or use bottled water. Boiled or bottled water should be used for drinking, making ice, washing dishes, brushing teeth, and preparing food until further notice.

This Boil Water Advisory Notice applies to The Yellow Pine Water System

The system is being monitored and checked daily for compliance. .

You will be informed when you no longer need to boil your water.

Please share this information with other people who drink this water, especially anyone who may not get this notice directly (for example, people in apartments, nursing homes, schools, and businesses).

You can do this by posting this notice in a public place or distributing copies by hand or mail.

State Water System ID#: 4430059 Date distributed: 3-22-2020

Notice of Intent to File an Application with USDA, Rural Development

The Yellow Pine Water Users Association, Yellow Pine, Idaho intends to file an Application with USDA, Rural Development to obtain a drinking water system facility Emergency Community Water Assistance Grant (ECWAG). Emergency Community Water Assistance Grant (ECWAG).

If any additional information is needed, please contact:
Willie Sullivan
Treasurer
ypwater @ gmail.com

Distributed to Yellow Pine Water Users Association customers via Yellow Pine Times on June 12, 2020.

The 2019 Yellow Pine Water Users Shareholders meeting was Sunday July 7, 2019.
link: 20190707YPWUAminutes
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VYPA News:

2020 Festival has been canceled.

The Community Yard Sale raised $1024 for the Community Hall maintenance.

Next VYPA meeting: August 8 at 2pm

Minutes from June 13, 2020 VYPA meeting
link:

Minutes from June 13, 2020 VYPA meeting
link:

July 1 – Post Harmonica Meeting 2pm Community Hall
Note: at each meeting we simply add to info on the topic. That way, info from all meetings is included in a single document.
Link to notes:

Heat was installed in the community hall on April 30th.

VYPA meeting schedule for 2020 – June 13, 2pm; July 11, 2pm; August 8, 2pm; September 12, 2pm.
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YPFD News:

There was a YP Fire Commissioner meeting on June 27, 2020 at 10am at the Fire Station.
Link: 20200627 Fire Dept minutes June 27_final.docx

YPFD COVID19 Policy

link: YPFD Covid 19 SOP.docx

link: Covid-19 EMS.pdf (May 23)

May 10th Burn Permits – contact the YPFD

Pile burning: Dress appropriately, have enough help on hand (people, water and tools) and make a firebreak before you start. Call your local fire protection district chief to let them know you’ll be conducting a debris burn. This saves them from sending emergency responders to your property if they are not needed. Do NOT burn on breezy afternoons.

Better yet, “Bring It, Don’t Burn It”, you can take your yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, etc.) to the burn pile at the Transfer Station on the south end of the turn-around. Remember, keep the pile neat. Woody debris only, no nails, no cardboard and no furniture! The Boise NF will burn the pile in the fall when it is safe and doesn’t pollute our fine YP air.

YP Fire Commissioners:
Sue Holloway – District 1
Dan Stiff – District 2
Merrill Saleen – District 3
(TBA) – Fire Chief

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice

The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.” Click the link: to view 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation
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Biz Listings:

The Corner (208) 633-3325

Open 11am-8pm Closed Tuesdays
Calling ahead works best but not a huge deal. Groceries, Ice Cream, Beer and Soda. Our menu fluctuates but typically have Smoked Brisket, Tri Tip, Chicken, Burgers and Wings on hand.
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Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233

Open Daily 8am to 10pm. Outside Dining and Bar. Breakfast and Bar Food.

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Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377

Open.
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Yellow Pine General Store (208) 633-3300

The store is open now and will be open into October. Hours are 9 am to 6 pm Tuesday through Saturday. Closed Sunday and Monday.
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Murph’s RV Park & Mary’s Cabins (208) 633-6677

Cabins are not available in 2020. RV Spaces $25/night; $150/week; $300/month. Tent spaces $10/night. Shower house is closed for 2020.
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Knotty Kat Crochet Works – 208-502-0940
FB page link
open Tue – Sat, 9-5
Yellow Pine eggs $3/doz
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Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Tom & Sarah Lanham
156 Yellow Pine Ave, Yellow Pine Id 83677
website:
Facebook:
Starting June 2020 We will be doing trail rides out of Yellow Pine along with summer pack / camping trips to high mountain lakes in the area!

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
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Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430 open 830am-5pm Monday-Friday, closed weekends.
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Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

The Star-News

subscribe:
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine

Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, will service Yellow Pine

B&T Safety Solutions LLC
208-271-1600 Based out of Donnelly
Snow removal, cleaning chimneys and stoves, we do cabin staining/chinking as well
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (July 20) overnight low of 46 degrees, clear sky and light breeze this morning. A few early airplanes and light street traffic. Swallows working hard to feed their broods, a robin and a jay hopping around, a few finches and pine siskins visiting. Hot and sunny at lunch time. Hot and clear early afternoon, high of 90 degrees. First swallow chick left the nest. Still hot and clear early evening. Clear sky and cooling off slowly before dusk. Internet out around 9pm and off all night. Hungry skeeters swarming anything warm blooded. Clear at midnight.

Tuesday (July 21) overnight low of 47 degrees, clear sky this morning. Internet back on early this morning. Only a couple of loud airplanes and light street traffic, air quality improved. Robins and ground squirrels scampering about. Some of the swallow chicks have left the nests and hanging around on top of the bird houses begging as the parents swoop by. Two more swallow chicks have left the nest, the two smaller one are still in there. Clear and hot at lunch time. Jay and a few finches visiting. Clear and hot with slight breeze mid-afternoon, high of 93 degrees. Afternoon traffic and dust. Still pretty hot mid-evening and clear sky. Cooling of slowly before dusk, lots of skeeters out. Clear before midnight.

Wednesday (July 22) overnight low of 49 degrees, most of the sky covered in clouds this morning and calm. Nearly all of the swallow chicks in the neighborhood have fledged and are practicing flying around. Loud gunshot at 942am – sounded like it was on the west side of the golf course – followed by a few more shots spaced well apart. A few finches and pine siskins visiting. Cooler and cloudy at lunch time. Mail truck made it in on time. Loud single gunshot in the neighborhood at 233pm. Mild temperature and mostly cloudy mid-afternoon, high of 84 degrees. More than usual street traffic in the neighborhood for mid-week. A little bit cooler mid-evening, mostly cloudy and humidity is up a little. Cooling off slowly after sunset, overcast and calm before dusk. Getting blustery before 11pm, dry but smells like rain somewhere. Gusty breezes after midnight, no rain.

Thursday (July 23) overnight low of 55 degrees, overcast this morning. Loud gunshots on the golf course starting around 920am for 10-15 minutes. Lots of swallows swooping low, young birds are flying around too. Rain sprinkles on and off all morning and after lunch time. Mild temperatures, mostly cloudy and light breeze mid-afternoon, high of 78 degrees. A few cassin’s finches visiting. Warmer and partly cloudy mid-evening. A bit dusty with traffic this evening. Just before dusk it was mostly cloudy and cooling off. Lots of swallows on the power lines and more swooping around hunting. Blustery breezes ringing the chimes and mostly cloudy after dark. Calmer after midnight.

Friday (July 24) overnight low of 46 degrees, partly cloudy sky and light breeze this morning, 24 hour rain total = 0.04″. Lots of loud airplanes flying over the village, a street traffic kicking up dust. Swallows swooping and hunting, flicker whooping, red-breasted nuthatch, cassin’s finches and a few pine siskins visiting, jays and robins hopping around and a hummingbird visiting. Mostly cloudy and a little breezy at lunch time. Mostly cloudy, warm and getting quite blustery mid-afternoon, high of 86 degrees. Air traffic over the village during windy conditions. By early evening lighter variable breezes, still pretty warm and mostly cloudy. Cooling off and clear just before dusk. Looks like smoke along the river west of the golf course. A few stars out after midnight and smell of smoke.

Saturday (July 25) overnight low of 44 degrees, the sky was partly covered in high thin haze. Early air traffic (some extra loud) and a loud dirt bike in the neighborhood. Flicker whooping, swallows swooping, and a few finches visiting. Mostly clear, warm and a little breezy at lunch time. Increased traffic and dust. Clear, hot and breezy mid-afternoon, high of 87 degrees. Seeing more hummingbirds, also a red-breasted nuthatch stopped by for a snack. Clear sky early evening and still pretty warm. Evening street traffic. Cooling off slowly by dusk. Clear before midnight.

Sunday (July 26) overnight low of 42 degrees, clear sky this morning and light breeze. Early air traffic. Not as many swallows around. Clear, warm and breezy at lunch time. A few finches and hummingbirds visiting. Hot, clear and light breezes mid-afternoon, high of 93 degrees. Still hot mid-evening and clear sky. Traffic kicking up dust. Young Colombian ground squirrels out and about.
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RIP:

Barbara Jean Davis

Davis, Barbara Jean, 84, a resident of Boise [and Yellow Pine], passed away July 21, 2020 in Boise.

Arrangements are under the direction of Bowman Funeral Parlor of Garden City.

Published in Idaho Statesman on Jul. 22, 2020.
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Idaho News:

Idaho to remain in Stage 4 for another two weeks, Governor Little says

by Keith Ridler Associated Press Thursday, July 23rd 2020

Gov. Brad Little said Thursday that there are too many coronavirus infections, and Idaho will remain in the fourth and final stage of his plan to reopen during the pandemic for at least another two weeks.

The Republican governor also reemphasized his plan for state-local collaborations in dealing with the pandemic, allowing local leaders to determine restrictions as the state deals with a surge of infections. That means the state’s seven health districts and local officials will continue evaluating conditions in their areas and decide on restrictions with Little’s oversight.

Little said he was visiting four of the state’s health districts Thursday to help them make decisions that would also include information from the state epidemiologist and the director of the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare.

continued:
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563 new Idaho COVID-19 cases Saturday, 2 new deaths

July 25, 2020 Local News 8

Idaho officials reported 563 new COVID-19 cases and two new deaths on Saturday.

This brings the total confirmed and probable cases reported since March to 17,827.

There are a total of 16,735 confirmed cases and 1,092 probable cases in 41 of the 44 Idaho counties, according to numbers released from the local health districts and the state.

… Two new deaths were reported bringing the total recorded deaths to 146.

continued:
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Valley County sees first COVID-19 death

Number of cases in county stands at 73

By Tom Grote for The Star-News July 23, 2020

A McCall man has been identified as the first Valley County resident to die from COVID-19.

Elford M. Houseman, Jr., 85, of McCall, died July 15 at St. Luke’s Boise hospital due to complications of COVID-19 infection, Valley County Coroner Scott Carver said.

“No information is available where he may have contracted the virus, but he was transferred from St. Luke’s McCall to Boise after confirmation of infection, where he remained hospitalized until his death,” Carver said.

Houseman’s death comes as the number of confirmed COVID-19 cases in Valley County reached 73 on Wednesday, up from 61 cases a week ago.

St. Luke’s McCall reported 59 positive cases from testing done at the hospital, while Cascade Medical Center reported 14 positive cases.

Nearly all of the positive cases have been recorded since summer tourism traffic started in mid-June.

Central District Health reported 37 positive cases were confirmed to be Valley County residents as of Tuesday.

Some of those who tested positive at the two hospitals but did not declare Valley County their primary residence could still be in Valley County under quarantine, health officials have said.

Adams County had 15 confirmed cases among residents as of Tuesday, according to Southwest District Health.

source: © Copyright 2009-present Central Idaho Publishing Inc.
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Valley official learns of COVID-19 exposure during meeting

Hasbrouck did not contract virus from man he was care-giving

By Max Silverson for The Star-News July 23, 2020

Valley County commission Chair Elt Hasbrouck learned during a live-streamed public meeting that he had been exposed to someone with the COVID-19 virus

“Oh crap,” Hasbrouck said in the commissioners meeting on July 6 after finding out he had been exposed.

Hasbrouck was back at the county commissioners meeting on Monday following two weeks in quarantine without falling ill.

continued:
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2020 Valley County Fair to be limited to 4-H events only

Rodeo, open class exhibits canceled due to COVID-19

By Max Silverson for The Star-News July 23, 2020

The 2020 Valley County Fair will be devoted to 4-H youth activities only this year with all other events canceled, Valley County commissioners decided on Monday.

All public events of the fair, such as the Valley County Rodeo, food and entertainment vendors, live music and the Open Class competitions, were canceled due to worries over the COVID-19 virus.

“There’s just no way we can separate people,” Valley County Fair Board Chair Carl Barrett told commissioners. “If we did separate them, after a few beers from the beer garden, they’re going to blow that right out of the water anyhow.”

The fair, scheduled for Aug. 3-8 at the Valley County Fairgrounds in Cascade, will continue to feature 4-H projects, including large and small animal competitions.

… For more information, contact Alysson Statz, Valley 4-H Program Coordinator, at astatz@uidaho.edu, 208-315-3871 or 208-382-7190.

continued:
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Valley P&Z OKs central recycling depot

County to close centers in McCall, Cascade, Donnelly

By Max Silverson for The Star-News July 23, 2020

A centralized Valley County recycling facility on East Lake Fork Road was approved last week by the Valley County Planning and Zoning Commission.

With the new facility approved, the county will close unstaffed recycling depots in McCall, Donnelly and Cascade and centralize recycling at the newly approved staffed facility near the county road department offices and yard.

Construction of the new Lake Fork facility will begin as soon as possible, with an anticipated opening date of Oct. 1, said Valley County Treasurer Gabe Stayton, who oversees the county’s solid waste and recycling programs.

continued:
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McCall man runs 20 miles to heroically rescue missing hiker

“There was a little marshy lake, so she had water but no food for four plus days,” Jeremy Humphrey said. “So, it was time. It was getting serious.”

Gretchen Parsons July 20, 2020 KTVB

A McCall man made a brave and daring rescue in the Valley County wilderness.

Jeremy Humphrey is an avid ultra-marathon runner and can move quickly in rough terrain so he put his skills to the test to rescue a hiker who hadn’t been seen in nearly a week.

Valley County Search and Rescue says 43-year-old Laura set out to go hiking July 3 and hadn’t been seen since.

Her car was found at Peril Lake Trail Head in Valley County.

Humphrey said he was familiar with the area and felt called to help.

continued:
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Update: Hiker found in good shape

Original story…

Hiker, 73, goes missing in Idaho County

by CBS2 News Staff Wednesday, July 22nd 2020

A 73-year-old hiker has gone missing in Idaho County.

The Idaho County Sheriff’s Office says 73-year-old David Wolfe was hiking from the Campbell’s Ferry area on the Salmon River to the small community of Dixie where his pickup truck was parked near an airstrip.

Deputies say on July 19, he used a satellite phone to call a small back country plane company out of Cascade to ask how much it would cost to come and pick him up. It was then, police say, when Wolfe told the employee that he would figure something else out.

He hasn’t been seen or heard from since.

Deputies and search crews found his vehicle on Monday near the airstrip and continue to look for Wolfe, including Wednesday night.

source:
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Valley County Code

A friendly reminder about utility buildings (i.e. sheds)…these structures are NOT for human habitation or occupancy. Per code, utility buildings may not be used for any other purpose than storage.

Please review our requirements and contact the Valley County Building Department if you have any questions.

FB Link:
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Traffic back open after crash along Banks-Lowman Road

by Bryan Levin Thursday, July 23rd 2020 CBS2

Banks, Idaho (CBS2) — Both lanes of traffic are back open after a crash on the Banks-Lowman Road earlier Thursday.

Idaho State Police sent out an alert at 5:41 a.m. that it happened at milepost 3, just east of Banks. That’s all the information they’ve released so far.

source:
— —

Hwy 17 Thursday

There is a gravel truck turned over on Hwy 17 Banks to Lowman road at MM 2.5. Only one lane is open which will delay travel. Both lanes of traffic will likely be closed when the tow truck arrives to remove vehicle further delaying commuters.

(Boise County Emergency Management around 630am July 23 FB post)
— — — — — — — — — —

Idaho City man dies in motorcycle vs. vehicle crash north of Boise

The accident happened at about 9:45 a.m. Saturday at milepost 14.4 on Highway 21.

July 25, 2020 KTVB

Idaho State Police responded to a fatal motorcycle versus vehicle crash that happened on Highway 21, near the Hilltop Station, north of Boise.

… The crash blocked traffic off and on for about three hours.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Crews blast large boulders blocking US-95, hope to open highway on Monday

They are working to reopen a temporary road near the base of the slide that has been closed since July 10.

July 23, 2020 KTVB

Riggins, Idaho — Highway 95 could reopen as early as Monday, July 27, according to the Idaho Department of Transportation.

Crews were able to drill and blast some the biggest boulders on the highway during the past week. They are working to reopen a temporary road near the base of the slide that has been closed since July 10.

Some of the boulders measure 40 feet across. Crews were able to blow up large boulders on Thursday.

continued: with video of blasting
————————

Mining News:

Valley P&Z OKs Midas Gold facility

Critics say Warm Lake Road project premature

By Max Silverson for The Star-News July 23, 2020

A logistics facility on Warm Lake Road near Cascade for Midas Gold was approved on a split vote last week by the Valley County Planning and Zoning Commission.

The 3-1 approval saw commissioners Scott Freeman, Ray Cooper and Brian Benton voting in favor with commissioner Ed Allen voting against. Commission Chair Johanna Defoort did not participate in the hearing because she works for Midas Gold Idaho.

The application was presented by Midas Gold Idaho field operations manager Kyle Fend. It includes four buildings and outdoor parking areas on 25 acres of land on Warm Lake Road, about eight miles east of Cascade.

Allen questioned the timing of the application to the commission in advance of a formal decision by the Forest Service on the Stibnite Gold Project proposed by Midas Gold.

A draft study of the proposal is due out next month followed by public comment and final approval.

“Any time you’re looking at a project that far out, a lot of things are going to change,” Allen said. “Seems like maybe there’s the possibility of getting the cart before the horse on this one.”

He also wondered if the application was contrary to the Valley County comprehensive plan by approving a large industrial facility in such a rural and undeveloped part of the county.

“You’re proposing a fairly large deal in a fairly pristine part of the community which is a little bit of a rub with our visions in the comp plan.” Allen said.

Buildings at the facility would include an office and laboratory, warehouse, hazardous materials storage and a core sampling and storage building. Plans show 300 parking spaces in addition to a truck staging area and a “laydown” area for larger equipment.

Midas Gold plans to construct the facility over three years from 2021-2023.

The facility would be used as a staging area and parking facility for employees working at the mine who would be shuttled to the site by bus, Fend said.

Packages and other deliveries would be consolidated at the facility to decrease the number of trips into the mine, he said.

The application says that the facility would be in use Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. with occasional weekend use.

The facility would only store small quantities of hazardous material, comparable to a high school chemistry lab, Fend said.

Two people spoke in favor of the proposal and six people against during a public hearing on the proposal.

Arguments in support of the facility mentioned jobs, a central location for staging people and fewer trips on Warm Lake Road.

Arguments against approving the facility ranged from conflicts with the comprehensive plan, setting a precedent for industrial development in a secluded area, and a lack of details about water disposal systems, among other concerns.

“I feel that this facility is completely out of character of that corridor and it’s not compatible with the comp plan,” Jeff Abrams of McCall said. “The location of the proposal absolutely does not preserve the character of the area.”

Written comments received before the meeting tallied 21 in support and 36 in opposition.

“This facility will allow for many employees to park at the logistics facility and carpool, which will reduce the number of people traveling to the Stibnite site reducing traffic, which will promote safer roads,” David and Kacie Bracht of Cascade said in a written comment.

source: © Copyright 2009-present Central Idaho Publishing Inc.
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Letter to Share:

Hello Friends and Supporters,

I am reaching out for your help at an exciting time for the Stibnite Gold Project in Valley County. As you may know, this project is critical for Idaho and our nation and is unlike any mining project this nation has ever seen.

In just a few weeks, the draft Environmental Impact Statement will be released for the public review and comments. Before it is released, we want to make Idaho’s support loud and clear.

Yes, I will be asking you to write a letter of support for the project, but before then, can I count you in as a Proud Supporter?

Be a Proud Supporter.

Sign your name to a Proud Supporter ad which will print in local papers during the comment period and feature the thousands of people in our Support Stibnite Coalition and supporters from around Idaho. A copy of the ad is attached here.

Be a Proud Supporter, (link) You can also respond to this email and let me know you are happy to be a supporter and I will fill out the appropriate info for you.

Thank you all for hanging in there with us as we wait for the draft EIS to come out, I will be reaching out soon for the comment letters.

Hope you are all staying safe and healthy!

Belinda Provancher
provancher@midasgoldinc.com
Community Relations Manager
Midas Gold
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Idaho History:

‘Don’t be a Guberif’: 70 years ago, Idaho’s attention-grabbing wildfire prevention campaign was born

“It seemed to work because a lot of people would hear the name and go, ‘what is that?'”

Brian Holmes July 22, 2020 KTVB

guberif_postcard2-a

Idaho has certainly made some significant contributions to culture and innovation, from the Pulaski firefighting tool, the chairlift, and perhaps, television.

About 70 years ago, there was a probably less-popular Idaho creation that has been the cause of so many questions.

“50 years ago, I visited Idaho and noticed something printed on the road,” a viewer said. “‘Don’t be a Guberif’: what is that?”

Unless you’re a real old-time Idahoan, you may not know the answer.

continued:
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Public Lands:

Smokey Bear Stolen

20200717SmokeyGone-a

Smokey Bear’s carbon copy is missing! During the overnight hours of Monday July 13th thru 14th, the McCall Ranger District Smokey Bear signs were illegally removed, says LaDawn Saxton, Central Zone Fire Prevention Officer. The Smokey Bear signs are always posted next to the McCall Ranger District Fire Danger sign, located on the corner of E. Lake Street and Mission Street.

Smokey Bear is a national symbol of forest prevention and we are seeking the public’s help to get our Smokey’s returned to their rightful place! These two Smokey’s are 2D, made of plywood and are nearly life size. Anyone with information on these Smokey’s whereabouts is encouraged to contact the McCall Police Department at 208-634-7144.

We appreciate our local community’s support! Please remember, ONLY YOU can prevent wildfires and help bring Smokey home! Fire Danger today is Moderate.

(Payette NF FB page July 17)
— — — — — — — — — —

Plan for state lands around McCall due Dec. 15

Study prompted by Trident Holdings swap proposal

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News July 23, 2020

A long-term management plan for state lands around McCall is expected to be complete by Dec. 15, the State Board of Land Commissioners was told on Tuesday during its meeting in Boise.

An update on the plan is expected at the land board’s Sept. 15 meeting before a draft plan is presented at the Nov. 17 meeting, said Ryan Montoya, real estate services bureau chief for the Idaho Department of Lands.

… Trident’s proposal would give it about 25,000 acres of state land stretching from north of Payette Lake to south of McCall.

In return, the state would receive unspecified timberlands in northern Idaho that could yield the state about $2.9 annually in revenue and cost savings, according to an analysis commissioned by Trident.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Yurt builder seeks $2.5 million from state

Lease sought to build ‘glamping’ site on Payette L.

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News July 23, 2020

Two claims totaling about $2.5 million in damages have been filed against the State Board of Land Commissioners in response to its handling of state lands in the McCall area.

The claims were filed on May 11 and June 25 by Boise resident Bruce Smith, who sought to build a “glamping” business with yurts on 28 acres of state land fronting Payette Lake.

continued:
———————–

Fire Season:

Wildfire burning near Lucky Peak

by Brian Morrin Saturday, July 25th 2020 CBS2


BLM photo

The Boise District BLM is currently fighting a wildfire near Luck Peak Reservoir.

As of 10:24 p.m. Saturday, crews have stopped active spread of the fire and are working hot spots to reach full containment.

According to BLM, the fire burned an estimated 150 acres.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Multiple fires start in southeast Idaho

July 25, 2020 Local News 8

Lightning tracked over southeast Idaho Saturday afternoon and evening ignited multiple wildfires.

Fire crews responded quickly to the new starts.

continued: with location and more info
———————

Critter News:

Pet talk – Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Infections (MRSA and MRSP)

By Dr. Allani Delis July 24, 2020 IME

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus (MRS) infections are a growing problem in humans and animals. Methicillin is an antibiotic formerly used to treat staphylococcal infections. Most MRS organisms are resistant to all antibiotics in the penicillin and cephalosporin groups, and some are resistant to other antibiotics. A major concern with these infections is the development of strains that will be resistant to all known antibiotics. MRS infections may be localized, like wound infections, or become generalized.

MRS infections are caused by a variety of staphylococcal bacteria. Infections with Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Staphylococcus pseudointermedius (MRSP) are the most common causes in dogs and cats. These organisms may normally live on skin, in the nose, and in the gut of animals without causing any problems. When a wound occurs, a surgical procedure is performed, or skin is otherwise damaged, these bacteria may take advantage of the weak skin and cause an infection. Most Staphylococcus bacteria are susceptible to commonly used disinfectants (bleach) and hand soaps. Transmission is by direct contact with infected people, animals, or via contaminated objects.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

7 Yellowstone-area grizzly bear attacks this year

by Associated Press Friday, July 24th 2020

Wildlife officials have documented seven grizzly bear encounters resulting in injuries so far this year in the three-state greater Yellowstone region, an increase compared to the previous high mark of three injuries in the first half of 2007.

Interagency Grizzly Bear Study Team Supervisor Frank van Manen reported that there is usually a single interaction where a person is harmed in the first six months of any year, the Jackson Hole News & Guide reported.

Data from the team dating back to 1992 shows that 17% of injury-induced interactions occur in the first six months of the year compared to big game hunting seasons in September and October when there are more injuries to humans and bears.

continued:
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Moose wanders into Magic Valley field, close to I-84

Idaho Fish and Game darted the yearling moose and relocated it to habitat north of Carey.

July 21, 2020 KTVB


Credit: IDFG

The Idaho Department of Fish and Game continues to relocate young moose who have lost their way in the Magic Valley.

A yearling cow moose ended up in a field east of Paul, dangerously close to Interstate 84 on Monday evening.

Officials say moose and vehicles on I-84 are not a good mix since a collision at high speeds is dangerous for all involved. In the interest of public safety, the decision was made to anesthetize the moose and move it back to more typical moose habitat.

continued:
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Several hundred calves stolen from ranch in Cassia County

by CBS2 News Staff Wednesday, July 22nd 2020

Several hundred calves were stolen from a ranch in Cassia County according to the sheriff’s office.

The Cassia County Sheriff’s Office (CCSO) says it is currently investigating a report of stolen animals from the MGM Calf Ranch in Declo, Idaho.

The several hundred calves that were reported stolen could have been taken any time between January through July of 2020.

If you have any information on livestock theft, CCSO asks you call your local law enforcement agency or the CCSO dispatch center at 208-878-2251 extension 1.

continued:
———————-

Fish & Game News:

Don’t forget to buy 2020 controlled hunt tags by August 1

By Brian Pearson, Conservation Public Information Specialist
Tuesday, July 21, 2020

If you are a hunter who was successful in the 2020 controlled hunt drawing, don’t forget to purchase your controlled hunt tag by Aug. 1.

Successful applicants must purchase their controlled hunt tags by midnight MDT on Aug. 1 or their tags will be forfeited. All unclaimed tags, along with controlled hunt tags no one applied for, will be available in a second drawing, with the application period running from from Aug. 5 through Aug. 15. Successful applicants for the second drawing will be notified by Aug. 25.

After the second drawing, any leftover tags will be sold first-come, first-served beginning Aug. 26 at 10 a.m. Mountain Time.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Anglers’ help needed for second year of wild steelhead study

By Brian Pearson, Conservation Public Information Specialist
Monday, July 20, 2020


Ron Roberts

Anglers can report tagged steelhead they catch to Fish and Game, and some have a cash reward

Steelhead anglers are once again asked to watch for tagged steelhead they might catch during the 2020-21 steelhead fishing seasons, and report tagged fish if they catch one.

Idaho Fish and Game and the University of Idaho are moving into the second year of a research project to study how often anglers catch wild steelhead, and how well those fish survive after being released.

continued:
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More F&G News Releases

link:
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Crazy Critter Stuff:

‘We first saw this cougar 3 days ago. We have seen it every day since’

by News Staff Wednesday, July 22nd 2020


Jeremy Orcutt

Dunes City, Ore. – Imagine seeing a cougar on the other side of your sliding glass door, looking at you.

Then imagine it came back the next day.

And the next.

continued: w/photos and video
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Seasonal Humor:

1918Humor1G-a
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Idaho History July 26, 2020

Idaho 1918-1920 Influenza Pandemic

Part 15

Idaho Newspaper clippings November 26-30, 1918

Bonners Ferry’s First Hospital

1918BonnersFerryHospital-a
Located on the north side of the river, this was Martin Fry’s house and he gave it for use as the hospital.
Dr. Fry constructed his first hospital in 1918.

source: These early photos courtesy of and obtained from the Boundary County Free Museum, operated by the Boundary County Historical Society.
— — — — — — — — — —

Nov 26

American Falls Press. November 26, 1918, Page 1

19181126AFP1

19181126AFP2
Bad Flu Cases

As a rule the bad flu cases develop from mild ones, from lack of precautions. There have been many relapses following a too-early getting out of bed. The victims of an apparently mild form of the disease feel fine, and do not realize the risk they take by getting up and attempting to attend to business too soon. “Look out for people who get up on the third day,” said one of the local physicians. “They may need an undertaker soon afterward.”

Other severe cases result from the victim’s not giving up soon enough. They’re not sick, of course not; just have a little cold, which will soon pass away. Result, a severe case nearly always, and not infrequently ending in death.

The safe way is to go to bed when the first symptoms appear, and send for a doctor. It may be only a cold, but it is too serious a matter to take chances. Once in bed, stay there until the doctor says to get up. This is usually two days or more after the victim feels fit. Better to go to bed on a suspicion of being sick than to have a funeral. Most people who have the flu don’t think they have it until they are too sick to think at all. Safety first is the correct principle.
— —

Death of E. M. Evans.

Influenza claimed a victim in the person of E. M. Evans on Sunday morning at 7 o’clock. Mr. Evans fell a victim to what he believed to be his duty to employers, the making of a daily report, which he felt no one else could do. With this feeling he left his home the evening of the first day of his illness, and faithfully performed what was to be his last service to his employers. …

source: American Falls Press. (American Falls, Idaho), 26 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

American Falls Press. November 26, 1918, Page 3

19181126AFP3
Lid Kept On

The board of county commissioners met Saturday evening and decided to keep the lid on a few days more, on account of a number of influenza cases developing during the past few days. It is not believed the closed season will last much longer. The chairman of the board and the acting health officers can lift the ban whenever, in their judgement, the danger is over. …

Yesterday morning the board met and appointed Charles T. Cotant, County Attorney, and DeWitt Brown, a special deputy in the Auditor’s office. Auditor Bulfinch being away, and his deputy and clerk both flu victims, left no one in the auditor’s office to transact public business. …
— —

Arbon News.

Mrs. Bernie Burge has been quite ill the past week with pleurisy.

Mr. Fallon returned home from Pocatello Saturday and on Tuesday developed a case of influenza. He is not serious ill, having taken precaution in time by calling a physician and staying in bed.

Rennie and Joey Evans, two eldest boys of L. B. Evans are a little better, but it will be some time before they fully recover from their illness.

Newell Lishemann and Richard Bandy are out again after a long siege of pneumonia.

Mrs. John Lusk and daughter, Miss Anna, are visiting at the home of Mrs. Joe Evans. They came out from Malad last week, due to the serious influenza epidemic in that town.

Mr. and Mrs. John Bolingbrok went to Malad last Tuesday to attend the funeral of their niece, who died of pneumonia.

source: American Falls Press. (American Falls, Idaho), 26 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

American Falls Press. November 26, 1918, Page 4

19181126AFP4
People and Events

Mrs. H. R. Hager is a flu victim, taken ill Saturday.

Mrs. Arthur Davis is down with the flu, but is getting along nicely.

Marjorie Greene, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Chester Green, has a mild case of the flu.

John P. Voight, Mrs. Voight, and Sam Bob, are flu victims. Mrs. Alexander had a very light attack, but is up and able to take care of the others.

Miss F. Nettie Rice is still confined to her home, and probably will be for some days. Her temperature has ranged quite high, but she is improving.

Dr. and Mrs. R. F. Noth left yesterday for Salt Lake for several days’ stay. Dr. Noth has been having ear trouble following his influenza and will consult an ear specialist while there.

There are only three or four cases of flu at the hospital and all of them are up and about.

Mr. Wilcox, teller at the First National Bank, is able to sit up after a busy week with the flu. Mrs. Wilcox, who was visiting her parents at Wendell, when he was taken sick, is now a victim, but is getting along well.

source: American Falls Press. (American Falls, Idaho), 26 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

The Idaho Republican. November 26, 1918, Page 1

19181126TIR1
Quarantine Order

Whereas, the situation with regard to influenza is worse now than it has been at any time since the outbreak of the epidemic, and the conditions within the City of Blackfoot are reported by the physicians to be very serious,

Now therefore, by virtue of the authority in me vested by Secs. 2195 and 2196 of the Revised Codes of Idaho, it is hereby ordered:

1. That no theatre, moving picture house, dance hall, or other place of public entertainment or amusement shall be opened or allowed to run.

2. That no games of pool or billiards and no card playing shall be allowed in any of the pool halls of the city.

3. That no crowds shall be permitted to congregate anywhere within the city, either inside or out side, and any person or persons not having legitimate business in any store, restaurant, pool hall, or other place of business must be required by the proprietor or manager thereof to immediately vacate.

This order shall take effect at 12 o’clock noon, on Monday, November 25, 1918, and shall remain in full force and effect until further order of the Mayor or Council.

W. A Beakley, President of the Council of the City of Blackfoot.
— —

19181126TIR2
Custer County In An Uproar
Enforcement of Rules Regarding Quarantine Causes Some Excitement.

For a couple of weeks in the early part of November Custer county and the District Judge F. J. Cowen, have been carrying on a contention over the quarantine for influenza. The Custer county board of health quarantined a part of the upper end of Custer county including the town of Challis, and established a sentinel on the Willow creek summit, between Mackay and Challis to turn people back who came over the road intending to go into that part of the county that was quarantined. A party of Mackay hunters consisting of D. V. Archibold and others, desiring to hunt deer on the upper ridges of the Salmon river, ran the blockade in some way, but were taken into custody afterwards at Bay Horse or Custer and were detained.

Judge F. J. Cowen traveling from Blackfoot to Challis in company with T. R. Jones, Clay Vance and some attorney from Idaho Falls, disregarded the sentinel on Willow creek summit and went on towards Challis. It seems that the sentinel telephoned into Challis and a party of about one hundred citizens blocked the road below town and challenged the Judge’s party when they arrived there. They informed the Judge that the quarantine was no respector of persons and the fact that he was district judge did not constitute a passport to himself nor his associates and that they would have to insist upon his obeying the quarantine order the same as other people.

The quarantine was regularly and legally constituted and that meant no disrespect to the court or any of its officials, but they would resist any attempt to break the quarantine.

It was evening and it was 60 miles back to Mackay, and the citizens suggested that the Cowen party drive to the Challis hot springs and put up for the night and if they still wanted to remain in Custer county they would have the county council called into session to determine under what conditions persons could come into the county, who were possibly carriers of the disease. The Cowen party did not act upon the suggestion and returned to Mackay that might. Judge Cowen telephoned to the county clerk at Challis asking him to see if some changes could not he made in the quarantine regulations and at a meeting called for that purpose it was ordered that anyone desiring to come into the quarantined district could do so on the condition that they be isolated or held in quarantine until the danger of developing the disease in themselves had passed and when it was thus ascertained that they did not carry the disease they could thereafter mingle with the people of the district.

At some time during the proceedings, not clear to the writer, the judge ordered Sheriff W. J. Huntington and C. L. Courtney, chairman of the board of health, to release Archibold and his party from quarantine or from what ever charge they were being held upon for breaking quarantine. This the officials refused to do, whereupon Judge Cowen ordered them to appear before him for contempt of court. Judge Cowen then telephoned to the governor asking for troops to assist him in enforcing orders. The attorney general considered the matter and decided that the emergency was not sufficient to justify them sending in troops to quiet a disturbance when nothing of the kind existed. The only violation of laws that had occurred was that the Archibold party ran the blockade in the night, after being forbidden to pass that point and Judge Cowen and his associates passed that point, presumably resting their right upon the fact that Cowen was district judge.

It is said that in a telephone conversation between Judge Cowen and the county clerk, E. J. Michael, Judge Cowen, on being informed of the only conditions upon which he could enter the quarantined district, said that if the people of that country did not change their methods they would get into a worse condition than Spanish influenza could put them into. This so irritated and enraged the people at Challis that they called upon the governor for troops to maintain the quarantine, but this request was turned down on the ground that requests for troops must come from the court and no other officer could legally ask for troops. Of course the Challis people could not get such a request thru Judge Cowen to oppose his own desires and there the matter rested until R. S. Madden, private secretary to Governor Alexander, was dispatched Ito Custer county to straighten out the tangle.

In the meantime the chairman of the state board of health was appealed to to establish marshall [sic] law In the district and he said that if marshall [sic] law was established for any purpose it would be to enforce the quarantine, which he found had been regularly and legally established. When Secretary Madden arrived he affected some compromise and at this writing we understand that the opposition both ways has been dropped.
— —

19181126TIR3
J. B. Hunter Talks

J. B. Hunter, one of the prominent men of Custer county, who lives on the Mackay side of the Willow creek summit, where the sentinel has been stationed to enforce the quarantine against travelers going into Round valley, was in Blackfoot Sunday morning, and talked of the quarantine troubles about as follows:

“The Custer county officials are carrying on a high handed procedure that is too rank to be tolerated. This is not the first thing they have done that is high handed, and it is time somebody was laying hold to teach them their limits.

D. V. Archibold and six other men planned to go out hunting in the wilds of Loon creek, far distant from anybody, and were ready to leave Mackay in the evening of a certain Saturday at 10 o’clock. They wanted to make a night drive and reach the upper course of Salmon river in the morning, going via the Antelope valley and over the cut-off to East Fork, down that stream to Salmon river and up Salmon via the Golden Sunbeams mines and over the summit of Loon creek. They would hardly get out of their cars in the trip, and would be back in the high mountains, where nobody lived.

“In passing thru via the Willow creek summit, the only person they would pass close to would be the sentinel stationed on the summit, there being nobody else within six miles. They could do no harm along the road, even if they had influenza, and there were only six cases at Mackay and all closely quarantined.

“When it was learned that they had passed thru the quarantined district or thru some of that sparsely settled country forming a corner of the quarantined district, Sheriff Huntington went out to the hunting grounds and arrested them and brought them down to civilization and to the town of Challis, and placed them in jail. If the officials wanted to keep out of the flu, they had a queer way of doing it, but into the jail the men went. No quarantine, no fumigation, no isolation, but just jammed into jail. I don’t know why they put them in jail, nor do I know why they let them out, after a day or two, but the officials did both.

“In the meantime Judge Cowen issued a habeas corpus order for their release, and tried to get in touch with them by telephone, but they tore out the telephone to keep him from talking to them. Then the judge started to go into Challis and some of the people, a minority, who endorsed the action of the officials, barricaded the road and stood guard to forcibly, if necessary, prevent the judge from coming into town.

“It is all very ridiculous, It is carrying out the letter of the law without using common sense with it. There is a contractor up there building a section of the new highway reaching down on both sides of the Willow creek summit, and he had gangs of men working on both sides. The sentinel enforcing the quarantine would not let the contractor go over the hill to look after the work on the other side. There was no flu in that country, they were all working out in the open, there was no possible chance to bunch up and give one another the disease, and yet the sentinel blindly and stupidly enforced the quarantine order not to allow travelers to pass.”
— —

Mrs. John Price Passes Away

Mrs. J. J. Quillin of this city received word of the death of her grandmother, Mrs. John Price of Kansas City, Mo., who passed away there Saturday morning at 11 o’clock after suffering with influenza.

Mrs. Price was a resident of Blackfoot some years ago and while here made many friends and acquaintances. Mr. Price died at Blackfoot about four years ago.
— —

Ill With Influenza.

Rev. J. F. Gresl is ill at him home with the influenza. He was taken ill Friday afternoon, but at last reports he was doing nicely.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 26 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Idaho Republican. November 26, 1918, Page 2

19181126TIR4

Springfield

Ralph Davis came down with the influenza Friday, which rapidly developed into pleurisy and pneumonia. Dr. McKinnon has charge of the case and Mrs. I. N. Noyer is assisting with the nursing.

The Frank Thurston family is ill with the influenza, but so far all cases are reported as being light.

Mrs. Sant Shelman is recovering after a severe attack of influenza. Mr. Shelman and Loren are also improving.

Mention should be made of the spirit of self sacrifice shown by Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Edwards and Mrs. Thomas Blackburn. Tho they have not had the influenza, they have been nursing several families ill with the disease. John Criddle has also been untiring in making numerous trips for nurses, and help for those suffering with influenza.
— —

Shelley

Word was recently received from Joseph Patterson, who is in France fighting, and has been there for over nine months, saying he had been another big drive. He said he had been fighting for ten days, during that time going thru all kinds of weather and driving the Hun back all the time. He became ill with the grippe and was sent to the hospital. Then, having recovered, he again became a sick fellow, having an attack of appendicitis. When last heard from he had been operated on and expected to be well enough to come home in a short time now that the war is over.

It is thot [sic] schools will open here Nov. 25.

Dr. Packard has been ill for some time with the influenza, but is getting along as well as could be expected when last reported.

The flu seems to be more serious in the surrounding country than in the immediate vicinity of Shelley.

Gould Porter is reported to be very ill with the influenza, other complications are said to have set in, and his condition is serious. Other members of the Porter family are also sick with the flu.
— —

School on Saturdays.

Many students have wondered whether there would be school on Saturday when the schools opened again. This is not known for certain, but as this plan was adopted for a time last year and did not work very well, it is thot [sic] that such a plan would not be advisable again this year, as there is generally a very poor attendance on Saturdays.
— —

Grandview

The influenza epidemic is rapidly growing more serious in Grandview.

Thomas Prudhomme died Monday morning from pneumonia, having been sick but a few days. His death is very sad, as it is but three and one-half months since the death of his wife. Five children are thus bereft of both parents. All the children are in Canada with relatives of Mr. Prudhomme’s. He had recently sold both his homestead and the irrigated land, and was almost ready to go to Butte for the winter. The remains will be laid away beside those of his wife in the Blackfoot cemetery. At the time of his death he was at the home of Wm. Hill, where he had been staying since the children left.

Wm. Hill is sick with the flu.

Ralph Davis is very sick with an attack of pleurisy and pneumonia.

Eva Johnson is another victim of the flu.

Mrs. I. N. Noyer is nursing at Ralph Davis’.

A. Y. Satterfield drove over from Pocatello Saturday to see the sick relatives. Several members of his father’s family are sick. Luther’s family are all sick, also Marvin Thompson.
— —

Sterling

Ralph Davis is very ill with pneumonia.

“Buster” Driscoll is very ill with the influenza.

The “Flu” situation here does not improve any. There are more cases this week than there has been before.

Mrs. W. R. Leach was on the sick list last week.

Five of the children of Mrs. Charles Parsons are ill with the “flu.”

Mrs. Partridge, proprietress of the Hotel Sterling, suddenly took very ill Tuesday morning, which is thot [sic] to be the influenza.
— —

Wicks

School was not re-opened here this week and it was thought best not to re-open the school until all danger from sickness was passed.
— —

Idaho Budget

Boise now has an ordinance which prohibits all immoral or dissolute persons attending places of public amusement.

Mrs. W. H. Jeffee died at Wallace of Spanish influenza, after the entire family, consisting of three children and her husband, had been stricken with the epidemic.

Warden Frank DeKay authorizes the statement that the yard used by the convicts who escaped was not Red Cross yard, but yard procured from the unraveling of sweaters belonging to convicts.

To recover time lost on account of the influenza closing order the Lewiston state normal will divide this school year into quarters of eight weeks each, instead of nine weeks, and will continue school work during the holidays, except on Christmas and New Year’s.
— —

Idaho Falls is Still in Grip of The “Flu”

Idaho Falls, Idaho, Nov. 21. – A meeting of the city council. with members of the school board, several physicians, the county commissioners and a number of citizens, was held at the city hall last evening, when it was decided to keep the schools and various public places closed until further notice.

The county commissioners will make an appropriation to be handled by the Red Cross committees for the relief of those who are in need of assistance.
— —

Death of Clarence Detrich at Idaho Falls

Lawrence Detrich, nephew of Frank Detrich, federal judge, died Thursday morning at Idaho Falls, following an attack of influenza.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 26 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Idaho Republican. November 26, 1918, Page 4

19181126TIR6

Influenza Warning

Influenza has taken a new start at Blackfoot, and people are warned against talking unnecessary rick. People who have it in their homes are instructed to take cards or pieces of paper on every door of the house bearing the word “Influenza,” so persons coming to the place will stay out.

Do not bunch up with other people in conversation. Stand at some distance. Do not let anybody talk to you at such close quarters that you have to take their breath. If you wear a mask, have it washed every day, or have several and change as often as they become odorous. A dirty mast is worse than none at all.

The influenza is among the Mexicans, and they do not understand about isolating themselves or taking any precautions. People are warned to stay away from them as much as they can. They are apt to assemble in stores and endanger other people, but physicians and interpreters have been unable to get them to comprehend as white people do.

Closing business houses will not stop influenza. Isolating others from coming into their atmosphere are the important things to do. Carry a mask and put it on if you enter a store where you think there may be danger.
— —

Death of Mrs. Fred W. Goff

Mrs. Fred W. Goff, age thirty-one years, died at her home Monday afternoon at 12:45, after suffering an illness of four days with influenza, which later developed into pneumonia.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 26 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Idaho Republican. November 26, 1918, Page 5

19181126TIR7
Local News

Guy Stevens is ill with the influenza.

Mrs. Fred Montgomery has been ill for the past week but is now able to be around again.

Mrs. George Locey, who has been ill for several weeks is improving.

Dr. Richards is able to be out and around again after suffering an attack of the flue.

Mrs. W. O. Bridges, who has been ill with the influenza is able to be out again.

Mr. Kirchner, who has been ill for the past few days is now somewhat improved.

Miss Affie Fisher, who has been suffering with the influenza, is now somewhat improved.
— —

19181126TIR8
— —

Marian Just Ill.

Miss Marian Just, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Just of Presto, is seriously ill. Miss Just has been in poor health for some time.

Mr. and Mrs. Just leave the first of the week for California where they will take her for her health.
— —

Death of Mrs. V. A. Bidinger.

Mrs. Bidinger, wife of V. A. Bidinger, died at five o’clock Sunday morning at their home west of the Sugar Factory, influenza being the cause.

The funeral will be conducted from the home on Tuesday afternoon at two o’clock. Rev. Father Fuchs of the Catholic church officiating.
— —

Ill With Influenza.

Harry Kinney, of the Kinney Mercantile company, is ill with the influenza. At last reports he was getting along nicely.

Mrs. Oscar L. Rider is very ill with the influenza.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 26 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Idaho Republican. November 26, 1918, Page 8

Sterling

All of the flu patients are recovering nicely except the Charlie Parons’ family, who are reported to be very ill.
— —

Ill With Influenza

Word has been received here that Harry Holden is very ill with the influenza at his home in Idaho Falls.

At last reports he was getting along as well as could be expected.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 26 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Bonners Ferry Herald. November 26, 1918, Page 1

19181126BFH1
Schools Start Again Monday
Closed For Six Weeks On Account Of Spanish Influenza Epidemic
Watch Contagious Diseases
Many Rural Schools Resumed Yesterday Morning

At a meeting of the school board of Independent School District No. 4, held last evening, it was decided that schools would open Monday of next week unless in the meantime the epidemic of Spanish influenza again becomes a menace.

The public schools of Bonners Ferry have been closed for over six weeks on account of the Spanish influenza epidemic.

Clerk Gleed, of the school board, advised the Herald last night that the teachers would keep a careful watch over all their pupils and none would be allowed to attend school who showed any symptoms of Spanish influenza or whooping cough. There are many cases of the whooping cough in the city. Children with whooping cough and bad colds will not be allowed to come to school.

The school time lost will be made up as follows: Two weeks will be made up on Saturdays (the first ten Saturdays) and the term has been extended one month which will make the closing date June 6th. There will be no holiday vacation except Christmas day and New Years day. This plan has been worked out to enable pupils to make up sufficient work to pass their grades. Otherwise a year’s work would be lost. Under these conditions the cooperation of all patrons is expected.

The schools of District No. 14 will also open next Monday and extra precautions will be taken by the teachers to detect signs of the influenza and whooping cough.

Many of the schools of the rural districts resumed yesterday. The schools which will not start until next Monday are those in the Hooker district, the Carlock district and at Copeland and Meadow Creek.

Dr. Fry, county health officer, feels confident that the influenza epidemic is well on the decline. But very few new cases have developed the past week. He states that is is probable that new cases will continue to develop for several weeks yet but ordinary precautions will prevent the spread of the disease.

In this county the percentage of deaths from influenza was very small in comparison with other districts where the disease was encountered in an equally virulent form.
— —

Postpone Lyceum Entertainment

On account of the Spanish influenza epidemic the first number of the Ellison-White Lyceum course which was scheduled here on November 27, has been canceled and another attraction will be secured at some future date to take the place of the November number. Supt. Kerr, of the Bonners Ferry schools, has taken charge of the lyceum course work and tickets will be sold by the high school students, as in previous years, for the season’s entertainment. The lyceum committee was fortunate this year in contracting for some very excellent entertainments.

source: Bonners Ferry Herald. (Bonners Ferry, Idaho), 26 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Bonners Ferry Herald. November 26, 1918, Page 3

19181126BFH2
Idaho News Paragraphs
Recent Happenings in This State Given in Brief Items for Busy Readers

The Lewiston city health board decided to keep schools, theaters and places of amusement closed all this week on account of the influenza epidemic.

Flu conditions at the University of Idaho are satisfactory. There have been no new cases in many days. The few girls who had influenza are recovering.

The schools of Moscow did not open Monday. The school board, after consultation with health officers, regarded it dangerous to open school with so many cases of influenza in town.
— —

American Causalities
19181126BFH3

source: Bonners Ferry Herald. (Bonners Ferry, Idaho), 26 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Bonners Ferry Herald. November 26, 1918, Page 4

19181126BFH4
Local News

J. R. Meeker was up and around last Thursday after having had a tussle with the “flu”.

Miss Dollie Bruce, who has been seriously ill with pneumonia for the past ten days, is still very sick. Her condition this morning was reported as “slightly better.”

J. Bert Cowen, cashier of the First State Bank, resumed his duties yesterday after having been a victim of the Spanish influenza for ten days.

H. S. Swenson returned Saturday from Grafton, N. Dak., where he was recently called by the serious illness of his parents with Spanish influenza. His sister, Mrs. S. E. Henry, accompanied him on the trips and while at Grafton both became sick with the influenza. Mrs. Henry was seriously ill but is now convalescing.
— —

R. P. Foster Pneumonia Victim

R. P. Foster, a well known resident of the Cow Creek district, died Saturday evening of pneumonia which was contracted from Spanish influenza. He was sick only a short time. …

The deceased is survived by his wife and four small children and his mother, Mrs. C. W. Shoop. …

source: Bonners Ferry Herald. (Bonners Ferry, Idaho), 26 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Bonners Ferry Herald. November 26, 1918, Page 7

19181126BFH5
Local Pick-ups

Mr. and Mrs. K. W. Smith, of Porthill, were in the city from Wednesday until Saturday. The whole family are just recovering from attacks of the Spanish influenza.

Mrs. A. A. McIntyre returned Wednesday from Portland, Oreg., where she was recently called by the serious illness of her daughter-in-law, Mrs. D’Arcy. Mrs. D’Arcy is now on the road to recovery.

Claude Hydorn received word last Monday of the death of his brother, Kenneth, at Warden, Wash., of Spanish Influenza. …

The public library which has been closed during the Spanish influenza epidemic, will reopen for the taking out of books, on Saturday, November 30th, hours as usual. Mesdames E. Wales and F. E. Murray will act as librarians during the remainder of the year, Mrs. Wales having charge on Saturdays and Mrs. Murry on Wednesdays.

Illness with the Spanish influenza will probably cause delay in the issuing of the county tax notices, of which there are about 2,000 to be prepared. County Treasurer James is working early and late on the books in the effort to make up the time he lost while sick with the influenza. Miss Freda Peterson is assisting him. Taxes are payable after the fourth Monday in November and prior to the first Monday in January.

source: Bonners Ferry Herald. (Bonners Ferry, Idaho), 26 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., November 26, 1918, Page 1

19181126DSM1
Eleven New Cases of “Flu” Puts Ban on Public Dances

There will be no reception to the S. A. T. C. men of the University of Idaho at the churches of Moscow Thursday evening. Dr. Adair, city health officer, thinks this is dangerous and has also put the ban on dances until the influenza situation improves. Dr. Adair in making the announcement said;

“There will be no interference with the union Thanksgiving services at the Methodist church, which is large and well ventilated, and the danger of such a meeting where the people are only assembled for a short time and are sitting still, would be very small. But receptions where large numbers are crowded into a closed room and every one is moving about and meeting every one else is vastly different. It is the same with dances. People get into one of the dance halls and every one is active and moving about and coming in close contact with each other and there is grave danger.

“People must not think that because the quarantine has been partly lifted that the danger is over. It is not. There were 11 new cases reported yesterday and several more new cases have been reported so far today. The situation is full of grave danger. We must be very careful. I do not want to be arbitrary, but lives are precious and we cannot afford to take chances for brief moments of pleasure. If we are careful for another week or two the danger will be much less.”
— —

University Will Have Movable Schools Again

Boise. – Plans for movable schools and farmers’ institutes this winter, which were upset by the influenza epidemic, are being resumed by the University of Idaho extension department. Arrangements for about 60 institutes and schools, 25 of them in north Idaho, are being tentatively made.

Because of general business conditions being upset as a result of the influenza, no definite dates can be announced for the institutes, but present plans are for holding them some time in January.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 26 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., November 26, 1918, Page 3

19181112DSM2
City News

Mrs. J. Jabbora of S. Almond, is very ill of pneumonia, following influenza.

Roy Haynes is ill at his home with an attack of influenza.

Miss Rilla Gehrett, general deliver clerk at the post office, is sick with influenza and Miss Margaret Fanning is serving in her place.

O. W. Beardsley was in Troy yesterday to visit W. M. Thompson, who is quite ill.

Mrs. Cuendet and two children have been sick with the influenza and reported by Dr. Herrington as improving very nicely.

Gus Paulson, of the Farmers’ store has received word that his nephew, Albert Westendahl, who is now at Camp Lewis, is severely ill with pneumonia. Albert’s parents live at Kendrick.

Mrs. A. N. Haynes went to Kamiah today, called by the serious sickness of her brother and his family with influenza. Mrs. Haynes has been nursing influenza cases in Moscow recently.
— —

District Court Postponed.

Judge Steele today postponed the term of the district court which was called for next Monday, December 2, has been postponed another week, and will convene on Monday, December 9, if conditions are favorable.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 26 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

1918Atlantic9

(Original Caption) 1918-Influenza Epidemic; court is held in open air in San Francisco. Bettmann / Bettmann Archive

source: Alan Taylor April 10, 2018 “30 Photos of the 1918 Flu Pandemic” The Atlantic
— — — — — — — — — —

Nov 27

The Daily Star-Mirror., November 27, 1918, Page 3

19181112DSM2
City News

Mrs. C. H. Snead went to Lewiston today on account of the serious illness of her little grand daughter.

Mrs. E. J. Smithson of Colfax has suffered a relapse and returned to the hospital in Colfax with pneumonia. She is now improving again. Her mother, Mrs. W. H. Connor of Moscow, is with her.

Sheriff J. J. Campbell and family, five in number, are sick with influenza. The daughter, Miss Grace, is seriously ill.
— —

University to Have But One Day’s Vacation

There will be classes at the University of Idaho Friday as usual. The war department is allowing but one day’s vacation and insists upon the usual work the day before and the day after Thanksgiving. Tomorrow will be a real holiday for every one and the university students are to have a royal time and a splendid feast, but the next day they will be expected to take up their work as usual. The war department is desirous of having much of the time lost through the influenza epidemic made up by working on days that would otherwise be devoted to vacation.
— —

Princeton Schools Opened Monday, November 25

Loyd Graves came home from the hospital at Bovill, where he was two weeks with the influenza, and visited Arveld and went back to camp Tuesday.

Mrs. Edgar Adair is on the sick list with lagrippe.

School opened Monday, the teachers, Miss Brown and Miss Ruth Phelps, returning Saturday.
— —

Cove Precinct Furnishes Many Interesting Items

The schools opened Monday morning after having been closed for five weeks on account of influenza.

Robert Mafors is convalescing after a severe attack of influenza at the I. W. Lazell home.
— —

Rambo Family has been Sorely Afflicted

Mr. and Mrs. W. L. Rambo, of Lewiston, whose son died a few days ago, have ha more than their share of trouble. Mrs. Rambo was stricken with a nervous collapse and two daughters who came home to assist in the care of their brother were both stricken with influenza, one being taken down within an hour after her brother passed away. Both are recovering, however and are now regarded as out of danger. The family wish to thank the people of Moscow and vicinity and the Cornwall Sunday school class for many kindnesses shown them during the sickness and funeral of their son and brother.
— —

19181127DSM1
President Makes Statement Concerning S. A. T. C.
Hopes to Be Able to Provide Discharge for Those Who Wish it.

The S. A. T. C. men here in training are anxious to learn when they will be discharged. Some of them will probably wish to continue their work here, others to begin regular academic work, and still others to return to their homes.

President Lindley says in regard to this: “We are daily expecting information concerning the future plans of the S. A. T. C. I sincerely trust we may be enabled to provide discharge for all men who wish to withdraw from the University, and on the other hand to admit from the cantonments and officers training camps all who wish to avail themselves of the advantage of the University.

“A very large number of men in the camps express the desire to have the same privilege as the S. A. T. C. for final discharge from the army.”

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 27 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

1918ShelbyNebraska-a
Men wearing surgical masks in Shelby, Nebraska, December 8, 1918. History Nebraska RG2017.PH

source: Madison County Sheriff
— — — — — — — — — —

Nov 28

The Grangeville Globe. November 28, 1918, Page 1

19181128GG1
Will Resume School Work Monday Dec. 2

Now that the last threat of the Spanish influenza has about died out the Grangeville schools will resume work Monday, December 2nd. Both pupils and teachers are anxious to begin work before it piles up any higher, and it is realized that it will be a difficult task to arrange a scheme for “making up” work that will not inconvenience some of the pupils.

The buildings have been heavily fumigated and the furnace will be kept hot for a few days before school opens in order that the dampness may be driven from the walls. Superintendent Case announces that every precaution will be taken to safeguard the health of the pupils.
— —

19181128GG2
No Live Stock Show This Season
Directors Decide Last Thursday; Influenza Situation Prohibits
For Human Welfare
Sales of Cattle Arranged, the Hereford Sale Set for Dec. 18 or 19

The executive committee of the Northwest Livestock association decided last Thursday evening to postpone this season’s exhibition until next year on account of the influenza epidemic that has been raging throughout the country. The state board of health has granted a permit to hold the show provided no indoor meetings were held. The county board of health, consisting of the county commissioners and county health officer, decided that the situation was too critical to permit raising the ban in Nez Perce county at this time.

The Lewiston Red Cross chapter and the Lewiston Commercial club had made a survey of the situation and reported that it is inadvisable to attempt holding the show or any public meetings at this time.

General regret was expressed that it was necessary to abandon holding the show inasmuch as it represents a great loss to stockmen throughout the country.

“Nevertheless,” said secretary O. P. Hendershot, “human welfare must be looked after at this time and we would not think of holding the show now that it appears clearly that it would jeopardize the health of the community and those in attendance.” …

source: The Grangeville Globe. (Grangeville, Idaho), 28 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

Lincoln County Times., November 28, 1918, Page 1

19181128LCT1
Schools to Remain Closed

Although the health officers will raise the quarantine for Jerome on December 1st, by order of the board of trustees the schools will remain closed until a later date.

Signed:
Board of Trustees,
Independent School Dist. No. 33.
— —

Quarantine To Be Lifted December 1

Unless indications point to the contrary the “flu” quarantine will be removed in Jerome at midnight, Sunday, December 1.

J. F. Schmershall, M.D., Health Officer.
— —

Rialto Theatre Announcement

The health authorities have decided to life the quarantine unless the situation changes for the worse, on Sunday, December st, at midnight. The Rialto theatre will therefore give the opening performance Monday evening, December 2nd.

The Rialto is unusually well ventilated. It will be kept scrupulously clean and disinfected regularly. The management feels that there is no occasion for the spread of the prevailing contagion in the theatre, provided the public co-operate in the use of a few common sense rules of cleanliness. You will be asked not to spit on the floor nor to sneeze or blow your nose except with the use of a handkerchief. Those not taking these precautions will be asked to leave the theatre.

Do not attend the show if you do not feel well, nor if any of the members of the family with who you are associated have the influenza.

L. M. Zug, Manager.

source: Lincoln County Times. (Jerome, Idaho), 28 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

Payette Enterprise., November 28, 1918, Page 1

19181128PE1
Personal and Local Mention

Miss May Genoway returned to her school near Weiser, last Saturday.

Miss Gladys Willcox went to Nampa Sunday to take up her school duties again.

Miss Marion Crawford was called back to Oakley, Idaho, Monday where she will resume her school duties Monday.

Mrs. Geo. Yager and daughters, Miss Lucy Yeager and Mrs. D. L. Martin, who have recently been down with the influenza, have recovered and are able to be out again.

W. D. Case returned from Twin Falls last Saturday evening where he was called on account of the serious illness of his brother who died before he arrived. Spanish influenza was the cause of his death.

Lee Brown is out again after a short siege of influenza.

Three of the M. Lauer family have been having quite a siege with the influenza, Mrs. Lauer, Faye and Ernest. All are reported better at this time.

During the period of the quarantine there was no place to go and some of the men stayed at home evenings and actually got acquainted with their wives.

source: Payette Enterprise. (Payette, Canyon Co., Idaho), 28 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

The Emmett Index. November 28, 1918, Page 1

19181128EI1
Schools Closed Again
Two Cases of Influenza Among Pupils the reason

After reopening the city schools Monday morning, two cases of influenza among the pupils – the two children of Conda Wilson – developed and it was deemed advisable, under instructions from Health Officer Cummings, to dismiss school Tuesday noon until Monday morning pending further developments.

Besides these two cases mentioned above, there are two other cases in the city. One of them is E. H. Pattison. On this account the churches have decided to call off the Thanksgiving services planned for today, which includes the community sing. This was decided upon Tuesday evening by the Ministerial Association. They would recommend that selections from the musical program sent out by the Women’s Council of Defense, and published in last week’s paper, be sung at 4 o’clock Thursday afternoon in the homes. They also recommend that the president’s and governor’s Thanksgiving proclamations be read, and that God be personally thanked for the blessings of the year.

source: The Emmett Index. (Emmett, Idaho), 28 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Emmett Index. November 28, 1918, Page 5

19181128EI2
Emmett News

Mrs. G. W. Maxfield is filling the vacancy occasioned by illness of Miss Wagner. Mrs. Maxfield is quite familiar with the work, having supplied in this grade last year, completing the year for Miss Ella Breshears, elected to the county superintendency.

Mrs. R. F. Cook received word this week that her son Henry was suffering from an attack of Flu at his home in Tular. His father went from Portland to be with him, but as Henry was reported doing very well, Mrs. Cooke remained here.

Word was received last week from Miss Agnes E. Wagner, teacher of Eighth grade in the city schools, that she would be unable to return to her duties for some time, being ill with the Spanish influenza, at her home in Elburton, Washington, where she had gone for her vacation. She is getting along nicely, however, and hopes to return ere long. Her two sisters also are afflicted with the disease.

Miss Vera Shaver returned to resume her school work.

Miss Leota Wilson was about to leave for her school at Wilson, when she received a long distance call informing her that the schools would not reopen until after January 1.

Mrs. Joel Brown has been confined to her home by illness several days.

Harry Shellworth of Boise was an Emmett visitor Sunday.
[See the Harry Shellworth Album by photographer Ansgar Johnson Sr. of Yellow Pine area in 1928 link]

source: The Emmett Index. (Emmett, Idaho), 28 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Emmett Index. November 28, 1918, Page 8

19181128EI3
News Of Gem County
By The Index’s Correspondents

South Slope
By Mrs. C. W. Cook

The Washington county schools did not open Monday as was expected. Mrs. Stinson who was to supply a vacancy there, and Miss Grace Cook received word in plenty of time so they did not go. The schools will open next week Monday.
— —

Haw Creek
By Mrs E. Tennyson.

Miss Marie Hanthorn came home Monday from Weiser to visit home folks till the ban from influenza is lifted and her school starts again.

Mrs. James Stippich left last Thursday for Weiser to reopen her school.

School opened Monday with a large attendance.
— —

Upper Mesa

A new bell has been placed at the schoolhouse and its pleasant tones called the scholars to school again Monday morning.

Farmer’s Union meetings will begins again Friday, Nov. 29.
— —

Letha

Mrs. Kiggins had word of the death of a cousin in Colorado from Spanish Influenza.
— —

Montour
By Mrs. R. E. Noland

School is again in session, after a month’s vacation.

Misses Edna and Minnie Wellman went to Emmett Sunday to resume their studies.

source: The Emmett Index. (Emmett, Idaho), 28 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

Idaho County Free Press. November 28, 1918, Page 1

19181128ICFP1
Family Dinners To Feature Day Of Thanks
No Public Services Held In Grangeville – Business Is Suspended
Plenty of Turkey for All
But Birds Are Not As Fat As Usual, Due to Fact That They Were Fed Little Grain.

Today, Thanksgiving day is to be generally observed in Grangeville by suspension of business. A number of family gatherings are to be held. No public Thanksgiving services are to take place.

Stores arranged to close at 10 a.m., while banks, county and federal offices were closed Wednesday night for the holiday.

Numerous hunting parties have gone to the woods in search of deer and elk. Since the open season on these animals closes Saturday, local hunters who have not shot the limit allowed by law are putting forth a final effort to bring in trophies.

For the Thanksgiving dinner, turkeys seem to be plentiful, while local markets have a bug supply of chickens. Geese and ducks are not overly abundant. Many of the turkeys, however, are not as fat as usual due, it is believed, to their not having been fed grain by farmers. With grain at high prices farmers were disposed to allow the turkeys to find their own feed, and few of the birds are plump.
— —

Woman Is Up For Insanity
Mrs. Henry Bray of Kooskia Adjudged of Unsound Mind.

Mrs. Henry Bray who resides on a ranch on the Middle Fork of the Clearwater, near Kooskia, was brought to Grangeville Saturday on an insanity charge. She was found to be of unsound mind, but because the hospital at Orofino has stopped receiving patients until the influenza epidemic is eradicated, it was deemed advisable to allow the woman to return to her home until such time as permanent disposition of the case can be made.

source: Idaho County Free Press. (Grangeville, Idaho Territory), 28 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Idaho County Free Press. November 28, 1918, Page 4

19181128ICFP2

Ferdinand

Schools were not opened here this week on account of several new cases of influenza.

Miss Lucile Adsley departed last Friday for Lewiston in response to a message stating that her mother was ill with influenza.

Miss Margaret Daniels is quite ill with influenza.

source: Idaho County Free Press. (Grangeville, Idaho Territory), 28 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Idaho County Free Press. November 28, 1918, Page 8

19181128ICFP3
One Death From Flu In Every 40 Cases
Statistics on Epidemic in Idaho Show Chances for Patient’s Recovery
Many Due To Carelessness
Mortality Rage From Epidemic Could Be Further Reduced If All Afflicted Took Precautions

[from an ‘ad’ for Osteopathic Physicians]

One persons in every forty who has been stricken with Spanish influenza in the state of Idaho has died, reports from all parts of the state, on file in the office of the state board of health at Boise reveal. In other words a patient who has Spanish influenza, the Idaho statistics show, had 1000 chances to recover to twenty-five that he will die.

Since October 8, when the first report was filed, 12,500 cases of influenza have been reported, of which 316 resulted fatally.

Taking 12 1/2 out of 1000 as a fair normal time yearly death rate, these figures, based on a little more than one month, show that during the presence of the epidemic the death rate in Idaho is doubled among persons who take ill with it.

Death can be given a poorer showing than even a 1-to-40 chance if persons who become ill with influenza take extra precautions at the outset to fight off the disease, it is said, as many of the fatalities in the health board’s report resulted beyond a doubt from the carelessness of the patient in failing to understand the seriousness of his case and take care of himself as instructed.

With respect to vaccination to prevent influenza, the Journal of the American Medical associations says: “Vaccination against epidemic influenza is in a wholly experimental stage.” …
— —

Personal

Carl Carlton, proprietor of the Smoke House, has recovered from an attack of influenza, and is again at work.

O. D. Hamlin, Cottonwood drayman, was in Grangeville Saturday. Mr. Hamlin and family had just recovered from [a] siege of Spanish influenza.
— —

Schools Will Open Monday

Pupils of the Grangeville public schools who have been sufferers from influenza need have no fear that the teachers will drive them hard into their studies immediately schools open, next Monday, for Superintendent Case has declared that the teachers will take cognizance of the fact that many who have suffered from the disease will not have entirely recovered their strength. Superintendent Case has issued the following statement on the opening of the schools:

“The Grangeville schools will be in session again on Monday, December 2. Mr. Markham gave the building such a strong dose of fumigation that it killed all of the flies and mice. The ‘flu’ bugs either died or quite the premises. The building will be regularly heated a few days in advance; so there will be no dampness.

“The pupils will be glad to get back into the harness because they feel that the six weeks of work which as been missed is not finished, but only postponed. If there are any students who have not recovered, however, they will not be expected to pull a full load for a few days.

“We are truly thankful that the epidemic did not afflict Grangeville as sorely as it did some communities. The school officials wished to be on the safe side; so they kept the schools closed as long as there was any danger. The pupils are well protected in that the school board can close school whenever any disease threatens the safety of the children.”

source: Idaho County Free Press. (Grangeville, Idaho Territory), 28 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

1918Atlantic2-a
Original caption from the National Archives: “February, 1919. U.S. Army at Archangel Front, Russia. Funeral of member of crew of U.S.S. Ascutney. Three members died in Archangel and many were sick with influenza.” National Archives

source: source: Alan Taylor April 10, 2018 “30 Photos of the 1918 Flu Pandemic” The Atlantic
— — — — — — — — — —

Nov 29

The Rathdrum Tribune., November 29, 1918, Page 1

19181129RT1
Idaho State News Items

Capt. F. A. McCall of the adjutant general’s staff advocates the erection of a monument to the Idaho men who bore the brunt of the war.

Idaho’s home guard companies may become the 3rd Idaho with the passage of a militia bill by the next legislature.

On account of the influenza epidemic the annual Northwest Livestock show at Lewiston has been postponed until next year.

Spanish influenza in the state of Idaho gives its victim a gamble with death on the basis of about 25 chances that the patient will die to 1000 chances that he will get well, a study of the epidemic reports filed at the office of the state board of health shows. In other words, one person in 40 who comes down with the malady has succumbed.

To recover time lost on account of the influenza closing order the Lewiston state normal will divide this school year into quarters of eight weeks each, instead of nine weeks, and will continue school work during the holidays, except on Christmas and New Year’s, the state board of education was notified last week.
— —

19181129RT2
From Over The County

Post Falls

The death of Dorothy Cunningham is the only one in Post Falls that has occurred during the six weeks’ siege of influenza.

The McGuire school reopened Nov. 25.

The Post Falls school opened Monday, holding only afternoon sessions during this week.
— —

Spirit Lake

Dances are still prohibited on account of influenza.

S. A. Wylie became so ill with pneumonia that he had to go to a Spokane hospital.
— —

Coeur D’Alene

The influenza ban is to be lifted in Coeur d’Alene Dec. 1.

By direction of the state superintendent of public instruction, notice is given by County Sup’t R. C. Egbers that a teachers’ examination will be held Dec. 19, 20, and 21, at Coeur d’Alene.

On account of the time lost to the schools during quarantine, and the risk in assembling a large number of teachers at this time, the five county teachers’ joint institute for the counties of Benewah, Bonner, Boundary, Kootenai, and Shoshone, will not be held prior to September, 1919. This is in accordance with the recommendation of the state board of education, and agreement of the county superintendents of the five counties mentioned.

source: The Rathdrum Tribune. (Rathdrum, Idaho), 29 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Rathdrum Tribune., November 29, 1918, Page 3

19181129RT3
Personal Mention.

Dr. F. Wenz has been called to Coeur d’Alene several times recently to attend influenza cases.

Mrs. C. L. Powell is reported seriously ill and was taken to Spokane last Saturday for treatment.

C. G. Lancaster has received word of the death of two aunts whom he visited at Sharon, Penn., two years ago. Both died of influenza within one week.
— —

19181129RT4
Local Paragraphs

It was a white Thanksgiving

The lodges began holding meetings again this week.

Several new cases of influenza were reported in this vicinity yesterday. One family in town, that of J. D. Crabtree, is said to have the disease.

The Georgetown and Tautenhahn schools west of town reopened Monday, after being closed about six weeks on account of the influenza closing order.

source: The Rathdrum Tribune. (Rathdrum, Idaho), 29 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Oakley Herald. November 29, 1918, Page 1

19181129OH3
City Closed Against Outside World

No one is permitted to leave the precincts of Oakley, Basin, Boulder, Locust, Marion, Churchill, Hazel, Kenyon and Moulton without permits from the Board of Health. Anybody who enters these districts from outside, will be quarantined five days at their own expense.

The measures were passed at a meeting of the Board last Sat. night. While there are still several cases of influenza in Oakley, there are fewer here than elsewhere, and it is will for us to protect ourselves against the more thoroughly infected districts.

Violations of this order are to be punished by fine or imprisonment or both.

J. A. Martindale, deputy sheriff, has authority to issue special permits.
— —

19181129OH2
Public School to Open Monday

The local board of health has decided to open the public school next Monday,

All the Teachers are now in the city. Miss De Klotz has been here since the school was closed assisting in getting out the local paper. The Missis Berninger and Manley have been in Oakley most of the time. The Missis Crawford and Bates arrived this week. Miss Keetch was prevented by quarantine restrictions from visiting her home.
— —

19181129OH1
In The Gem State

The federal term of court to be held at Moscow this fall has again been postponed to November 30.

The regular fall meeting of the state board of education, which was postponed on account of the epidemic of Spanish influenza, has been set for December 5. At this meeting the biennial reports and the budgets of the various state educational institutions will be considered.
— —

Local and Personals.

Harvey Nelson of Boulder is recovering from a severe attack of influenza.

Mrs. Elmer Reed and baby of Boulder who have been ill with influenza are reported improving.

Dr. Lowe of Burley is slowly recovering from a severe attack of influenza followed by pneumonia.

source: The Oakley Herald. (Oakley, Idaho), 29 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Oakley Herald. November 29, 1918, Page 8

19181129OH4
Oakley Items.

B. T. Judd has sufficiently recovered from an attack of influenza to walk about the street.

Mrs. S. A. Pickett of Marion, who is visiting with Mrs. Walter Southworth, is recovering from an attack of lagrippe.

source: The Oakley Herald. (Oakley, Idaho), 29 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

American Falls Press. November 29, 1918, Page 4

19181129AFP1
People and Events.

Miss Florence Barber, who was among the flu casualties, is able to be up.

G. S. Wennstrom, assistant cashier of the First National, is able to be on duty again.

Mrs. Carl Dahlberg, who has been quite ill with the flu, is able to be up and around the house.

Warren Grothe, who had been a flu patient at the hospital, was able to be taken home Wednesday.

Miss F. Nettie Rice, who has been numbered with the flu victims for the past ten days, is able to be up again and will soon be in the treasurer’s office again.

The public library will open Saturday afternoon from 2 to 5 for the distribution of books only, and will be open every afternoon thereafter except Fridays. The reading room will remain closed for some time yet.

J. S. Abercrobie, who has been one of the dangerously sick influenza victims, is improving rapidly. He had a close call.

Arnold Wiertzba, the “Mickie” in the Press office, who has been absent from his post of duty on account of the flu, is getting along nicely.

Mrs. J. P Voight has developed a very serious type of influenza and her friends are alarmed about her condition. Mr. Voight is improving, and their son, Bob, has practically recovered.

The Bethany Deaconess Hospital has but two flu cases, the least number since the epidemic broke out. A Mr. Howland was taken there yesterday. Before going he was in the Corner Cigar Store, mingling with quite a crowd, and there may be a fresh crop develop.

Miss F. Nettie Rice, county treasurer, is able to sit up after a week’s vacation with the flu, but it will be several days before she is able to return to work. Mrs. G. M. Oliver is in charge of the work of making out and mailing tax statements, and [is] getting along splendidly.

County Auditor Bulfinch returned last night from the officers training camp at Louisville, Ky, Chicago and other small inland towns. He found his office occupied this morning by a couple of very ordinary looking clerks namely, DeWitt Brown and O. F. Crowley, who are substituting for the efficient help he left. Mrs. Hauscrildt, deputy auditor, and Miss Barber, recording clerk, have been having a flu vacation for the past week or more, and there is work piled up that will keep Mr. Bulfinch so busy for the next few days as to make him forget that he has had a nice fifteen-day vacation.

source: American Falls Press. (American Falls, Idaho), 29 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Recorder. November 29, 1918, Page 1

19181129IR1

Schools to Remain Closed

The school board met Tuesday night to consider the reopening of the city schools. Superintendent Rand was present to recommend that the city schools remain closed a while longer, for, he said, he had been around among the townspeople to ascertain that 75 per cent of them favored the closing. The board acted accordingly. …
— —

Echoes of the Epidemic

Salmon churches were reopened with services last Sunday. In the evening there was to be a show at the Grand but the proprietor was disappointed in the failure of the films to arrive, so the house was not opened till Monday evening.

The city board has decided to keep the schools closed till all danger of spreading the epidemic be over.

The pool halls and card games were started up again Monday evening and a dance was an attraction at the opera house on the night of Thanksgiving.
— —

Flu Hits Bohannon Bar

J. G. England was in Salmon on Monday from Bohannon Bar and reports many of the people down with the influenza. In his family his son Roy was taken sick on Sunday. Mrs. Orville Wright and baby have been ill; the entire Stills family of five were taken at nearly the same time; only one of the Bohannon family of eight is able to be about. Miss Snodgrass, Mrs. Edith Mackay and son were visitors at the Bonhannons when they became ill with this epidemic. Mrs. Louis Bancroft and daughter Fern developed symptoms of the disease Sunday.

source: The Idaho Recorder. (Salmon City, Idaho), 29 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Idaho Recorder. November 29, 1918, Page 2

19181129IR2
Idaho State News

The lid was shut down hard on Pocatello for ten days to kill influenza. Soda fountains were ordered closed, public funerals prohibited; many places of business classed as unnecessary were closed; all gatherings of more than ten people forbidden in public places, and private gatherings banned.

source: The Idaho Recorder. (Salmon City, Idaho), 29 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Idaho Recorder. November 29, 1918, Page 3

19181129IR3
Northwest Notes

During the entire epidemic of influenza in Oregon the cases have totaled 17,924, and the deaths have totaled 632.

The influenza quarantine in the state of Washington was lifted last week, subject to the approval of town and city authorities for their own districts.

Miss My Trumper, state superintendent of public instruction of Montana, has announced that all teachers’ examinations have been postponed until December 5, because of the influenza epidemic.

The influenza situation in Baker, Ore, was so much improved that the ban on public gathering was lifted Sunday. The churches and moving picture houses were permitted to reopen, and the city resumed its normal status.

Affairs have reached a hot point in Custer county, Idaho, where bitterness has developed anew between the residents of Mackay on the one side and residents of Challis on the other as the result of complications growing out of an attempt by Custer county health officials to enforce a quarantine blockade in the Challis section against travelers.

source: The Idaho Recorder. (Salmon City, Idaho), 29 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Idaho Recorder. November 29, 1918, Page 5

19181129IR4
Salmon Locals

The three children of the Alf Yearian family in Salmon are sufferers from influenza.

W. H. Shoup was able to be at the Pioneer store on Tuesday for the first time in two weeks, in which he was an influenza patient.

Charley Hardy, former teacher of the Forney school, who for the past year has been employed at the Ramsey munition plant in Montana, is just out of the Butte hospital from an attack of flue and a very serious attack it was too.

Mrs. James Mahaffey of Tendoy was brought to Salmon last Sunday in the hope that a change to a lower altitude might work benefit to her health. So it was proved, for her condition, which had been precarious from complications following an attack of influenza that had involved the heart, has steadily improved. Mrs. Mahaffey was brought to the home of her sister, Mrs. Dan O’Connell.

The public library reopens today so patrons may get books at Mrs. Murdoch’s millinery store where the books are now placed. Hours from 3 to 5 every Friday afternoon.

Leslie Redbetter, rancher up the Salmon river, is recovering from what was one of the worst cases of influenza yet reported in this city where the patient was brought for the care and attention he could not get at his bachelor home. L. D. England has had charge of the case.

Mrs. Charley Jones and Al Royce, well known residents of Gibbonsville, are suffering from influenza.

source: The Idaho Recorder. (Salmon City, Idaho), 29 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

Clearwater Republican. November 29, 1918, Page 1

19181129CR1

Local News.

The editor of the Republican, P. L. Orcutt, has been a pretty sick man this week and has been confined to his bed.

W. E. Stoddard came over from Gifford Saturday and took charge of the undertaking parlors during the absence of Arthur Shaw on account of sickness.

Mrs. Patrick Madden died in a hospital at Lewiston Monday evening with pneumonia. Mrs. Madden was the wife of Patrick Madden, of Madden brothers, the well known sheep men.

Thursday was a typical Thanksgiving day, with a light snow sifting down through the air, and it was so quiet that the best machine gun squad in the army had it been stationed in Orofino couldn’t have hit a human being.

The Misses Sweeney and Feeney, teachers in the Orofino schools, and who have been temporarily out of work while the schools are closed, have made themselves very useful, generously volunteering in nursing the sick, waiting on table, or otherwise performing any work that needs doing. And these ladies have thus far escaped the epidemic. It is possible that the best preventive is to forget it and keep busy.

Those in the hospital reported as having the pneumonia, following an attack of the influenza, are Messrs. Austin, Harry White and Alvin Small. Clarence LaForest is in the most serious condition with the influenza.

The Nez Perce Herald reported that the Misses Madge Miller and Nellie Ratcliffe went to Orofino Monday of last week in response to a call for help in nursing influenza patients in the hospital there.

Nearly every young man in this vicinity who come under the last war draft instead of getting into the war have been drafted into our hospital with the “flu,” and nearly all of them when they come out look as if they had been in the trenches for four years.
— —

When the “flu” tackled Sheriff Pete Shea “catch as catch can” about a week ago it grappled with a hard man to down. The genial sheriff had made up his mind to put up a fight, had himself inoculated with three shots of serum, but caught cold and went to bed. Then he was out again in again and able to tell a good story until the doctor caught him in circulation with a dangerously high temperature and took the law in his own hands and tucked him away in a bed at the hospital and told him to stay there and recuperate a few days, when he will be able to be on the job again. It was a sure bet from the first round that Sheriff Pete Shea would be too much for the “flu,” though the best men sometimes fall the hardest from an attack of the unknown “flu” bug.
— —

The Misses Mabel and Julia Brown are back in their positions at Hotel Orofino, after a ten days’ attack of the influenza. Mrs. Helgeson and Mrs. Brown are also on the road to recovery. Nels has been too busy thus far to fly off his job with the “flu.”
— —

Eureka Ridge.

Gladys King is getting over the “flu” in good shape.
— —

Deaths

Andy Lee Williams.

Andy Lee Williams, who recently came to Orofino from Yakima, Wash., died Sunday last, Nov. 24, at the Orofino hospital from the effects of the influenza. He had been a victim of the prevailing contagion and suffered a relapse after coming to Orofino.

Mr. Williams was 23 years of age, and was born in Crescent City, California. His father, Milton Lee Williams, resides at Yakima, as does also a sister, Mrs. P. W. Recherzhagen, who was here caring for him at the time of his death and is now in the hospital with an attack of the influenza. …

source: Clearwater Republican. (Orofino, Idaho), 29 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

The Kendrick Gazette. November 29, 1918, Page 1

19181129KG1

Kendrick Still Has Flu

There are now fifteen or more cases of the flu in Kendrick but none of them are serious at this time. Dr. Rothwell is working day and night to care for the flu cases and other sickness in this locality. There are a number of influenza cases in the vicinity of Kendrick so that the Doctor has his hands full these days.

Those to be added to last week’s influenza list are: Mr. and Mrs. Harry Stanton, Mrs. Herres and two children, Mrs. Harvey Roberts and daughter, Edith Ivy, Luther Hampton and two children, Earl Hampton, Charles Keeler, Mrs. Stuart Compton, the Leonard Sturdevant family, L. Stevens.
— —

Flu at Orofino

It was reported last week that there were about 50 cases of influenza in Orofino but none of them serious. Both the school and the Methodist church were fitted up as emergency hospitals. It is believed that the efficient manner in which the situation was handled there is responsible for the fact that no deaths occurred. It is reported that the number of cases if growing less there.
— —

School Probably Not Open

While no definite decision has been reached up to the time the Gazette went to press, it was felt by those in authority that school would not start Monday. No definite time has been set for re-opening school as the matter will depend entirely on how soon the influenza epidemic abates.

School has not been opened at Moscow, Lewiston, Troy and a number of the rural districts in the surrounding country where the influenza is still prevalent.
— —

Dr. Rothwell: “If people would go to bed and stay there, when they get the flu, there would be very little danger and they would have it much lighter. Keeping the system in good condition is the important thing.
— —

It is reported on good authority that Troy had nearly fifty cases of influenza the first of the week.
— —

Christopher Byrne Dead

Frank Byrne was called to Lewiston the first of the week on account of the critical condition of his father, who was very ill with influenza, which resulted in death Tuesday morning. …

source: The Kendrick Gazette. (Kendrick, Idaho), 29 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Kendrick Gazette. November 29, 1918, Page 2

19181129KG2

Southwick Items

School opened here Nov. 25th.

There was not a very large attendance at Frank Nixon’s sale on account of the flu.

Lee McFadden, of Cream ridge, has been very sick with influenza.

source: The Kendrick Gazette. (Kendrick, Idaho), 29 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

Montpelier Examiner. November 29, 1918, Page 4

19181129ME1
Star Valley To Be Stringently Isolated

In an effort to keep the influenza out of the valley in the future those in charge have decided to place the valley under strict quarantine, and have ordered locked gates placed at the three different entrances to the valley. A gate will be placed on the Crow Creek, Cokeville and Snake river roads, and the men hired to act as gatekeeper, who will be paid by the county. Those who must come to the valley must be placed under a quarantine for four days immediately after their arrival. The schools in the district will all commence next Monday morning and it is thought by taking these precautions, no new cases will develop in our midst.

– Star Valley Independent
— —

Frank Lindsay of Nounan a Victim of Influenza.

Frank Lindsay died at his home in Nounan last Wednesday morning. Death was caused from influenza, with which he had been ill for ten days. On Tuesday his condition was apparently much better and it was thought that he had passed the critical stage, but during the night he suddenly took a relapse and the end came at 9:40 Wednesday morning. …

source: Montpelier Examiner. (Montpelier, Idaho), 29 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Montpelier Examiner. November 29, 1918, Page 5

19181129ME2
Local News

Miss Anna Rhoner is convalescing from her recent illness with the influenza.

The last word received from Lloyd Lehrbas, who is ill with pneumonia at Ft. Bliss, what that he was getting along nicely.

Yesterday was the first Thanksgiving that has passed in Montpelier for many a year without a dance.

Charlie Kind and family of Cokeville, were over Sunday visitors in Montpelier. Charlie said the “flu” situation was rapidly clearing up at Cokeville.

Miss Marjorie Staley, we are glad to know, is about completely recovered from her recent severe illness caused by the influenza.

Carl Spongberg and family were released from quarantine this morning. All are feeling as well as could be expected after going through a siege of the “flu.”

Manager Norris of the Three Rule store was taken suddenly ill with an attack of the “flu” this week and is under quarantine at his home. His sister-in-law had just recovered from the epidemic when he came down with it. We are glad to report his favorable condition this morning and that he is rapidly recovering.

Aside from feasting on turkey and cranberry sauce in a quiet family way Thanksgiving Day in Montpelier was conspicuous for its unobservance.

Manager Brough has a thrilling picture on hand that he will put on the screen the night of the day the quarantine ban is raised. It goes without saying that a hungry people for a picture at the famous playhouse will give the opening show a capacity house.

Miss Gerturde Vibrans of Cokeville has proven that she does not know fatigue when an emergency exists. During the flu epidemic in Cokeville she stayed at the telephone switchboard for 18 hours each day without relief, the other operator, Miss Chelsea Kehoe, being required at home to assist in caring for her mother. – Kemmerer Republican.

Miss Annie Lauridsen, who had been rendering valuable services to the stricken people at the emergency hospital in the city hall for three or four week last past in the capacity of cook and nurse, became a victim of the influenza last Monday and is quarantine at her home. Louis Lauridsen, a brother, is also afflicted but both are progressing favorably, under the expert nursing of Mrs. Lauridsen and the medical care of Dr. Guyon.

We are pleased to be able to report that Miss Mable Foss, whose life was almost despaired of for several days last week, confined at the emergency hospital as she was with a most serious attack of influenza, is now on the rapid road to complete restoration of health.
— —

Influenza Situation is Greatly Improved

Although there is still a number of cases of influenza in the city, the situation is much improved over what it was a week ago. There is now only one patient at the city hall, and there are not more than two patients who were this morning considered by the doctors as being at all in serious conditions. There has not been a death since last Saturday.

Just when the quarantine will be raised against public gatherings and the opening of schools, we cannot say, but it will be done just as soon as the board of health feels that it can safely do so.

source: Montpelier Examiner. (Montpelier, Idaho), 29 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

The Idaho Republican. November 29, 1918, Page 1

19181129TIR1

Obituary

Mabel Phelps Goff was born June 7, 1889 at Morrison, Colo. …

She was married February 18, 1912 to Fredrick William Goff of Blackfoot, Idaho. The only child was born October 18, 1914. …

She was taken ill Thursday night, Nov. 21, with influenza, which rapidly developed into pneumonia and she passed away Monday morning, Nov. 25, at the family home on 386 South Shilling avenue. She was twenty-nine years of age. …
— —

Death of Percy H. Mathers at Mont Rose, Col.

At 1:30 Tuesday morning, Nov. 19, Percy H. Mathers, after a brave struggle for his life, battling against the ravages of pneumonia, breathed his last, the end coming quietly and peacefully at the Montrose hospital, where he had been receiving treatment since his return home on Saturday from Greybull, Wyo., where he went a fortnight ago to take charge of a store. He had just assumed his new duties when stricken with the fatal disease, and he immediately started home, his condition of course growing much worse as he pursued his journey alone.

When he reached the city Saturday he was in a very grave condition and it was feared then he could not survive. He was met at Cerro Summit by his brother-in-law, H. H. Heath, and on his arrival here was taken at once to the Montrose hospital. Everything that human hands and skill could do, was done for the sufferer, but all to no avail. and he passed to his reward shortly after midnight. …
— —

Death of Lars Peter Nelson

Lars Peter Nelson, age eighteen years, son of Mrs. L. P. Nelson, died Monday afternoon after suffering with influenza.

Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon, and interment was made in the Grove City cemetery.

He leaves a mother, two sisters and four brothers to mourn his loss.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 29 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Idaho Republican. November 29, 1918, Page 2

19181129TIR2

Goshen

O. F. Freeman is recovering from an attack of influenza.

The little daughter of T. O. Sissions is very low with pneumonia.
— —

Shelley

Many school teachers were anxious about their salaries as school has been closed for some time on account of the “flu,” but were greatly relieved when the school board issued their warrants last Friday.

Mrs. C. S. Forster received word from her daughter, Mrs. Gertrude Galloway, who was visiting here this summer, saying that she was in the hospital and seriously ill with the influenza. She also stated that she was operated upon on account of complications setting in after the influenza.a Her husband write later that she was resting easily after the operation.

Five Mexicans out at the Riverview ranch have become stricken with the influenza.

There are reported to be many cases of the influenza in Woodville and three persons are said to have died of it there.

School is now expected to start a week from Monday last.

Miss Edna Hammer of Woodville, who has been ill for quite some time with the influenza, is now out and around again.

Dr. Packard and young daughter, Afton, who have been ill for over a week with the “flu,” are recovering nicely at the present writing.

The influenza situation here has not improved to any great extent, if any, but business houses will open up here at night again as usual beginning Monday, and if the “flu” becomes worse they will have to be closed up again.

A number of the Eterick Miller family have the “flu,” but not serious enough to cause any alarm as yet.

Miss Louise Grosbeck is now ill with the flu, but her case is not serious.

The doctors here try to emphasize that there is no danger of death from the influenza if people will take care of themselves properly if they get the disease. There are enough instructions in the newspapers every day about how to take precautions against the flu, that people should be able to wipe out this disease if they heed to such instructions.
— —

Centerville

R. S. Kelley was quite sick on Saturday and Sunday, but is somewhat improved at this writing.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 29 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Idaho Republican. November 29, 1918, Page 4

Rose

C. A. Taylor and family have recovered, after a severe attack of the influenza. The baby, who had pneumonia is now out of danger.

William Bruce has recovered from an attack of influenza.
— —

Death of Mrs. Oscar Rider

Mrs. Oscar Rider died at her home Wednesday morning at 5 o’clock, after suffering an attack of influenza.

Deceased is survived by her husband and five children. The infant child, which was born to them last week is doing nicely. …
— —

Idaho Tech Students Will Receive Credit For Full Year’s Work

The Idaho Technical institute plans, in order to make up the time lost during the influenza epidemic, to shorten both semesters so that the burden will not fall upon the first alone. This means that the first semester examinations will occur during the latter part of February [or] the first of March and full semester credits will be given to all those completing required work.

Students should return to school immediately upon its opening, the date of which will be announced as soon as possible. If students do not return after Christmas holidays they will be entering the middle of the semester and would secure credit with difficulty. The intention of the institute faculty is to cut short all holidays and by making the work more intensive permit students to receive full credit for a full year’s work.

Students planning to enter for winter semester of night school should also enter at the earliest opportunity.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 29 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Idaho Republican. November 29, 1918, Page 5

Quarantine Proclamation

By virtue of the power and authority vested in me by sections 2195 and 2196 of Idaho revised codes and the ordinances of the City of Blackfoot, Idaho, I, W. A. Beakley, president of the council of the city of Blackfoot, do hereby announce the hereinafter named regulations to be observed within the City of Blackfoot, Idaho and also within a radius of fire (5) miles of the limits of said city.

That whereas, an epidemic is prevalent within the above named area of the disease known as Spanish influenza, and the citizens of the City of Blackfoot, have asked the undersigned to use the powers vested in him to assist in the prevention of the spread thereof:

Now therefore, the following rules are by this proclamation hereby promulgated:

Section 1. That is shall be unlawful to hold any public meetings, either churches, dances, motion picture, theatre and all pool halls shall be closed for business so far as pool or billiard or card games, and no more than four (4) people outside of the immediate family shall be permitted to attend any funeral, and all public meetings of any kind are prohibited, whether the same be indoors or outdoors, and the congregating of crowds on the streets, sidewalks or on the public roads within said area is hereby forbidden.

Sec. 2. All hotels and restaurants shall close at 9 o’clock p.m. and there shall be no chairs, benches or other places for people to sit or lounge in the lobby of any hotel, rooming house, or banks, and no rest rooms shall be maintained at any stores, banks or other places where the public are invited in the City of Blackfoot, except the ladies waiting room at the O. S. L. depot, and at that place the benches and other places, where the general public are invited to rest shall be so placed that they cannot be used by the general public, except in said ladies’ waiting room.

All stores shall close at 6 o’clock p.m., except drug stores for strictly prescription purposes only, and selling of only those drugs used in sickness.

All display lights and sign lights shall be turned off at closing time, that is at 6 o’clock pm. for all stores.

All stores are hereby required to make one free delivery per day to each family requiring the same within the limits of the City of Blackfoot and no merchant shall permit in his store at any one time more customers than he shall have clerks available ti immediately wait upon the aid customer and when the customer’s needs are taken care of, he should not be permitted to remain in the store.

All places where the people are known to have the above mentioned disease, shall be quarantined and the people in the place that has been quarantined shall be required to remain therein until the physician in charge, or if no physician be in charge, then the county physician shall discharge said family from the said quarantine.

All persons traveling the streets of the City of Blackfoot, Idaho, within the business districts, which for the purposes of this proclamation, shall be the same as the fire district of the City of Blackfoot, shall be and they are hereby required to wear masks.

Not more than six customers shall be permitted to be in any bank at any one time and all places for customers to rest shall be removed by said banks of the City of Blackfoot, which have been kept in the lobby.

Each case of Spanish influenza, known to any physician, shall be reported to the fire chief of the City of Blackfoot, Idaho, so that the hereinafter mentioned quarantine regulations may be carried out.

A quarantine card must be placed on the front and rear door of each house where the above named disease is known to exist, and it shall be unlawful for any person or persons to leave or enter said house, except the physician, nurse or other person delegated by the physician wile the quarantine id being maintained.

Any person violating any of the provisions of the above proclamation are hereby declared to be guilty of a misdemeanor and shall be punished by fine of note more than $100 or by imprisonment of not more than thirty days or by both such fine and imprisonment.

Dated November 27, 1918
W. A. Beakley, President of the Council of the city of Blackfoot, Idaho.
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Local News

Guy Stevens, who has been ill with the influenza, is much improved. Mrs. Stevens is also doing nicely.

Harry Holden of Idaho Falls, who has been very ill with the influenza, is much improved.
— —

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 29 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Republican. November 29, 1918, Page 8

Organize Burn Wood Campaign.

Washington. — State fuel administrators were asked Monday by the fuel administration to organize “burn wood” campaigns to further the use of wood for domestic fuel this winter, the idea being to save coal.
— —

Jameston

We are sorry to record the death of another of our young men, who died of the influenza. Joseph Poulsen, Sr., died Sunday night, Nov. 24. Funeral services have not as yet been made.
— —

Grandview

Frank Gravatte, who has been working at A. J. and Luther Satterfield’s, came down with the flu Saturday. He had gone to Sterling and came down while at home.

The Satterfield family are all improving rapidly, Luther is out doors again.

William Hill seems to be getting along nicely.

The Johnson Family are getting better.

The Davis family are also improving.

Evelyn Wiltamuth came down with the flu Saturday and Glenn on Sunday.

O. E. Rice was a business caller in Grandview Saturday. Mrs. Rice has been nursing her daughter’s family Mrs. L. A. Satterfield during their sickness.

Mrs. In. Noyer returned home Friday from Ralph Davis’, where she was nursing the sick. Vivian was sick when she came home, but has recovered.
— —

Upper Presto

The R. P. Hansen family, who have been ill with the flu, have all recovered.

The Robbinson family are all very ill with the flu, Mrs. Milton Andrus is nursing them.

George and Dan’s and Sam Davis’ families have the flu.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 29 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Meridian Times., November 29, 1918, Page 1

19181129MT1

Harry Howry Died of Spanish Influenza

The Times regrets to chronicle this week the passing of one of our best young men, Harry Howry, son of William Howry, who died Friday afternoon of influenza. He was 23 years of age, and was born in Missouri. …

His death, however, was more pathetic for the reason that his friends were denied attending a public funeral, as he deserved. Harry was a good boy, a loyal kind friend, who will be missed every day by those who would see his familiar face on the street. …
— —

Ralph Temple, Linotype Operator is Dead.

Ralph Temple, aged 26 years, died of influenza Friday night in a hospital at San Francisco. Word was received to this effect by friends in Boise the next day. His wife had started a few hours previous to this for his bedside, but reached there too late to see him alive. Mr. Temple enlisted in the navy in Boise in September and being a good machinist, was placed in the motor division, and was recently transferred to San Diego, and was en route to that city when stricken.

He is survived by his wife and baby daughter. …

source: The Meridian Times. (Meridian, Idaho), 29 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Meridian Times., November 29, 1918, Page 8

19181129MT2
Meridian News Notes

Lewis Heikes is a recent name on the list of flue [sic] sufferers.

Mr. and Mrs. Will Howry and family, who have been so ill with influenza, are much improved.

The oldest son of Charles Williamson is quarantined at his home with Spanish influenza.

All the public institutions will be open, beginning with this Sunday, the flu seemingly being on the wane. Church services will be held in Meridian Sunday and the schools will start Monday.

As we print this issue of the Times we learn of the death from influenza of Ruben Howry, son of Rolly Howry. He died at noon Thursday. He was married several months ago to the daughter of William Howry.

Advice was received here Friday morning of the death of Newton Elam, a former citizen of Meridian, which occurred at Caldwell from the Spanish influenza. The body was shipped to Meridian for interment and funeral services were held for the deceased from the local cemetery, Saturday. Rev. C. A. Quinn having charge of the services.
— —

Schools of Ada County Will Open Next Monday

The rural schools of Ada county will reopen Monday, Dec. 2d. This statement was authorized Wednesday by Dr. Calloway, county physician and secretary of the Ada county board of health. She has made an investigation of conditions in the county and finds but a few cases of influenza now exists and believes the epidemic has run its course. As secretary of the county board of health, empowered with full powers to act, she has given her permission to have the schools reopened.

source: The Meridian Times. (Meridian, Idaho), 29 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Shoshone Journal. November 29, 1918, Page 5

19181129SJ1
Local and Personal News

Schools Open Monday.

Walter White, who has been ill with the Flu, has recovered, but shows the effects of it by his reduced weight.

Mr. Gilbert J. White is quite ill with the influenza. He was taken with it Wednesday.

Edward Chrisman is a victim of the Flu this week.

Miss Tress McMahon is back from Richfield for the opening of school Monday.

The school Board held a meeting Tuesday evening at which it was decided to open schools Monday, Dec. 2.

Miss Stella McFall is rapidly recovering from an attack of the Flu.

The Charles Burgess family is suffering a severe attack of the Flu.

source: Shoshone Journal. (Shoshone, Idaho), 29 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., November 29, 1918, Page 1

19181129DSM1

19181129DSMNoSchool
No School Next Monday.

There will be no school in Moscow next Monday. L. F. Parsons, of the school board announced this afternoon that school will not open next Monday as had been planned. Mr. Parsons could give no definite idea as to when it will open, but said that the health officers and other physicians deemed it unsafe and unwise to open schools in Moscow next Monday. This will be a severe disappointment to many teachers, pupils and parents, but it is believed that there is danger of loss of life if school should be opened while there is as much influenza in Moscow as at present. Lewiston has been hit hard and the situation there shows little improvement. Walla Walla lifted the quarantine, started school and opened all amusements and had to close them again. It is hoped to avoid such an experience here by not permitting school to open Monday.
— —

Florence O’Donnell Called By Death
Daughter of Well Known Family Near Moscow Gives Her Life For Others

Another act of real heroism equal to any shown on the battle field was recorded when Miss Florence O’Donnell, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George O’Donnell, one of the best known families of this section, living just across the line in Washington,m gave her life while nursing others through the influenza epidemic at Lewiston. The young lady gave up all that appeals to most women to become a Sister of Charity and was engaged in nursing at St. Joseph’s hospital, Lewiston, when stricken with the disease through which she had nursed many others to health. The Lewiston Tribune contains the following account of her sickness and death with the tribute of the Rev. Father Vincent Chiappa, which follows:

There were two deaths in Lewiston yesterday due to influenza, while new cases reported numbered 19. One of the dead is Sister Clement of St. Joseph’s hospital, the second sister of that institution claimed by the epidemic, Sister Evangelista having succumbed to the malady a few weeks ago. The second death yesterday was that of an infant girl, Neva Snead.

Dr. Bruce, in announcing the list of new cases yesterday as reported to her, brought out the fact that so far in November 386 cases have been reported to her office. The number reported in October was 150, making the grand total, 536. …
— —

Another Student Is Called Home
Ewing Albertson, of Albion, Idaho, Died Last Night After Long Illness

Another S. A. T. C. boy is dead from influenza followed by double pneumonia. The victim is Ewing Albertson, of Albion, Idaho. He was a member of the S. A. T. C., and had been ill for some time. The body will probably be sent to Albion for burial.

Only one new case of influenza is reported among the S. A. T. C. men of the University of Idaho and no new cases among other students. The quarantine against some of the girls who had been exposed, has been raised. The few cases of girls students who had the disease n a light form have all recovered and the girls have been released as cured. These were quarantined in the Aldrich house which has been thoroughly fumigated and renovated and it is believed the disease is stamped out in the university.

A few new cases are reported in town and country districts and there are several cases that are causing uneasiness, but general conditions are much better.
— —

Fenton Family Is Sorely Afflicted
Howard Fenton Dead, Wife and Child Ill, Funeral Waits Their Recovery

Elmer Grice of Portland was called to Kendrick by the illness of his little granddaughter, Eula Lee Fenton, who has had the influenza. She is the daughter of the late Howard Fenton who died recently at Kendrick. She is improving now and is regarded as out of danger.

Mr. Fenton returned to Portland yesterday morning with the body of his son, Howard, which has been at the Grice undertaking parlors since Friday of last week. The body will be kept at the Grice undertaking parlors in Portland until Mrs. Fenton and the children are able to go to Portland with Mrs. Fenton’s mother, who is with the family at Kendrick.

Mrs. Fenton is improving slowly and is able to sit up, but her condition is really pitiable. She and her husband were sick at the same time and she was not able to be with him during his last illness.

The death of Mr. Fenton is particularly sad. The young couple were married three years ago last Friday and started on their honeymoon from here. Mrs. Fenton was Miss Mabel Grice and was well known in Moscow. She has been a teacher in Latah county prior to her marriage.
— —

Court Adjourned Again.

Judge Edgar C. Steele today adjourned court in Clearwater county of which Orofino is county seat, until December 9. This is due to the influenza situation in Clearwater country. The Latah county term of court which had been adjourned until December 9, has again been postponed until Monday, December 16.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 29 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., November 29, 1918, Page 2

19181129DSM2

There is just as much real heroism shown by the devoted nurses who have cared for the sick during the influenza epidemic, facing death every day, as any of the nurses or the soldiers at the battle front. Scarcely a day passes without an account appearing in the daily press of some nurse laying down her life while caring for others. Two Sisters of Charity at Lewiston, have given their lives “that others might live” within the past few days. Miss Packenham, a veteran nurse of Pullman, who worked day and night through the thick of the epidemic there, nursed influenza cases up until two days before her own death. Surely these women deserve a monument and to have their names inscribed upon the roll of honor just as much as those who died in battle.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 29 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., November 29, 1918, Page 3

19181112DSM2
City News

The family of Jim Clifford on South Main, are ill with influenza.

Mrs. F. K. Moore left several gallons of fruit butter and pickles at the Inland hospital for the boys of the S. A. T. C.

Miss Mary Kinser, who has been very ill with influenza, has recovered sufficiently to return to her home in Lewiston today. Her mother, Mrs. E. R. Kinser, who has been in Moscow for two weeks, also returned to Lewiston.

The little daughter of Theo. Snead was buried at Garfield, Thursday. She died of influenza at Lewiston.
— —

19181129DSM-Ad

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 29 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

1918NewYorkConductors-a
1918 Train conductors in New York, like many residents at the time, wore masks for protection against influenza.Credit…National Archives

source: NY Times
— — — — — — — — — —

Nov 30

The Daily Star-Mirror., November 30, 1918, Page 1

19181130DSM1
Advises Keeping Children At Home
Dr. Adair Asks Parents to Keep Children From All Public Meetings

Permission was today granted the churches of Moscow to hold Sunday school for adults but not for children tomorrow. The regular church services will be held. Dr. Adair, city health officer, has issued an appeal to parents to keep school children, who are not permitted to attend public or Sunday school from all gatherings, including picture shows. He says there are many new cases, including four families with children of school age in Moscow, who have developed the disease in the past few days.

The disease is spreading through the country districts but in mild form. A farmer near Viola, who has a family of 11, came to town one day this week with two of his children and now five members of the family have the disease. Dr. Adair says that taken as a whole conditions show gratifying improvement in Moscow and vicinity and that with care being used next week he believes that the ban can be lifted by a week from Monday. There is one new case reported in university circles.
— —

Sunday School for Adults

The health officers have consented to the churches holding Sunday school for adults tomorrow but not for children. The Sunday school services for grown people will be held at the regular hours in all of the churches. The influenza situation is believed to be improving but much care is needed to prevent a recurrence of the disease, which has broken out in bad form in many towns where the quarantine was lifted and all restrictions were suspended for a time. In these places it has been found necessary to again enforce a rigid quarantine.
— —

19181130DSM2
Influenza Victims In Moscow Helped
Associated Charities Assisted Severn Families on Thanksgiving Day

Although the associated charities has not asked the public for money for more than two years and has, consequently a very much depleted treasury, it nevertheless used what it had on Thanksgiving to cheer and brighten the lot of seven families whom the influenza has rendered almost desperate. Where the people were too ill to eat substantial food, custards, soups and milk were sent. Bread, butter, fresh fruit, cooked meats and some dainties were sent where the physician in charge signified a desire to have them sent. One basket was sent nine miles into the country to a deeply afflicted family, and the basket was conveyed by a kind hearted Moscow citizen, who undertook the long cold drive in his buggy in the snow storm on Thanksgiving morning.

With each box was enclosed a little Thanksgiving card for the family and enough paper napkins in holiday designs to go around.
— —

Flu is Bad at Troy.

Word comes from Troy that the influenza epidemic is very bad there and that there are about 50 cases in the town and nearby country. It is said that the people have been lulled into a false sense of security by the belief that injections of the anti-influenza serum will make them immune to the contagion. It had been reported that all of the soldiers here were forced to take the serum injections and the people of Troy are said to have rushed for this preventative and many have been deeply disjointed to discover that they took the disease after having the treatment to prevent it.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 30 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., November 30, 1918, Page 3

19181112DSM2
City News

Mrs. Martha Shea and her two daughters, Idaho and Doris, are just recovering from the influenza.

Mrs. H. D. Martin received word by telegram today that her brother’s wife, Mrs. L. E. Foglesong, of Des Moines, Iowa, passed away this morning as the result of pneumonia following influenza.

There are several people who have not yet returned books which were out during quarantine. Any which are not in my next Monday will have to be paid for according to the usual fine rate dating from Monday, December 2.

Mr. and Mrs. Chas. H. Albertson of Albion, Idaho, have been in Moscow several days, called by the illness and death of their son, Ewing Albertson. They will return to their home tomorrow.

N. E. Campbell came home today from Jefferson barracks. Mr. Campbell had a severe attack of influenza and has been out of the hospital only two weeks. He is honorable discharged from the army.

Mrs. Elizabeth Yandel has been ill with influenza at the home of Rev. Goss, but is now improving.

Dr. Stevenson was called to Troy yesterday to attend a family in which seven members had the influenza. Dr. Stevenson tried hard to secure a nurse for this family today but was unable to do so.

Five of Mr. Geo. Chaney’s family at Viola are down with influenza. All other cases reported almost well.

The family of Tony Grendahl have been ill from attacks of the influenza. Mrs. Grendahl is quite sick.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 30 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Back to Table of Contents
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 1)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 2)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 3)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 4)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 5)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 6)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 7)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 8)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 9)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 10)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 11)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 12)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 13)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 14)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 15)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 16)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 17)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 18)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 19)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 20)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 21)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 22)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 23)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 24)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 25)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 26)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 27)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 28)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 29)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 30)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 31)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 32)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 33)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 34)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 35)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 36)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 37)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 38)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 39)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 40)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 41)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 42)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 43)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 44)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 45)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 46)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 47)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 48)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 49)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 50)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 51)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 52)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 53)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 54)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 55)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 56)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 57)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 58)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 59)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 60)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 61)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 62)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 63)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 64)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 65)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 66)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 67)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 68)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 69)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 70)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 71)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 72)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 73)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 74)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 75)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 76)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 77)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 78)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 79)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 80)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 81)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 82)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 83)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 84)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 85)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 86)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 87)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 88)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 89)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 90)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 91)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 92)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 93)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 94)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 95)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 96)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 97)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 98)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 99)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 100)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 101)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 102)

page updated September 5, 2022

Road Reports July 26, 2020

Please share road reports. Conditions can change quickly any time of year. Some high elevation roads still have snow. Be prepared for rocks and trees in the road and remember there is no cell phone service.

Highway 95: Closed
US 95 in both directions: Road closed.
July 24 ITD update:

Over the last week crews were able to drill and blast some of the biggest boulders that have kept the temporary road around the base of the slide on US-95 south of Riggins closed since July 10. With these boulders now much smaller, the route may reopen as early as Monday, July 27.
“Now that the boulders are of manageable size, we will focus on clearing the detour around the base of the slide while continuing to monitor the stability of the slope,” Operations Engineer Jared Hopkins said. “We are still determining what the highway will look like when it reopens, but drivers should be prepared for flaggers and reduced lanes and hours.”
The final repairs to mitigate the slope failure are scheduled to be awarded on July 30. Once awarded, the contractor will be asked to mobilize within 48 hours.
Old Pollock Road will continue to be monitored and maintained for possible use as a detour in the future.
continued:
ITD (link)
Old Pollock Road will continue to serve as a detour around the slide during daytime hours – 6 am – 8 pm PDT (7 am – 9 pm MDT). The detour will remain closed at night in order for crews to perform maintenance operations on the roadway, which typically does not see this amount of traffic.
French Creek Road is not an official, nor a recommended detour for Highway 95.

Yellow Pine: Local streets are dry and dusty except where people paid for dust abatement. Deer, dogs and kids are wandering around. Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN. Report that a dog was hit injured on Main street in June.
link: Local Forecast
Yellow Pine Webcam: (check date on image)

Warm Lake Highway: No problems reported.
link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

Highway 55 Webcams Link:
Note: Bridge construction at Horseshoe Bend.

South Fork Road: Closed 7am to 4pm daily with no closures on weekends.
The closure sites will change on a weekly basis, and will not always be adjacent to the last closure site. Refer to the current weekly newsletter or the project website to determine the closure point and access for each week. South Fork Road Project page (link)
Update July 20: Closure is again at mile post 16 (same locations as the past two weeks) for July 20 – 24. Access to Mile Post 16 Hot Springs is from the south/Warm Lake Road.
Recent report that the road is really rough for cars in the construction zones on weekends.
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Saturday (July 19) mail truck driver (Kaleb) reports the road is getting rough in some spots but overall pretty good.

Johnson Creek Road: Open.
Wednesday (July 22) mail truck driver (Kaleb) reports the county had graded from Warm Lake road to the Johnson creek airstrip but is is already starting to get rough.
link: Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam
link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
Note: The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Opened by the county June 24th.
Last reported to be really rough on the McCall side.
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Open and rough.
Summit was reported snow free on Sunday June 28.
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcam: (check date on image)

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Semi-open to the adventurous ATV riders. Travel at your own risk.
Old report June 26: “Lots of rocks and trees. One little patch of snow 20 ft long. But otherwise Thunder Mountain is open for 4×4 vehicles … we cut over 30 trees. The other guy with me didn’t cut them full width for a car, just for his ATV. So any trees I didn’t cut will need to be trimmed to get full size vehicles through.” – SA

photo and report courtesy SA
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Cinnabar: Report received July 11: “UTV group made it into Cinnabar [via the upper road] about two days ago. Lots of snow drifts. Rough going. But they cut the trees out of the road.” -SA

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Old reports of OHVs making it over. Travel at your own risk.
Smith Creek Trees down from Avalanche

Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Warrens Wagon Road: Construction update: The road is CLOSED from 8am-Noon and 1pm-5pm Monday-Friday. The road is OPEN with a PILOT CAR from Noon-1pm and after 5pm Monday-Friday. The road is OPEN without a pilot car on Saturday and Sunday.
Update June 4: be aware that the Long Gulch Culvert Installation Project along Warren Wagon Road from Chinook Campground to Steamboat Summit will begin on June 15 and end in mid-July. The project involves the installation of numerous cross drain culverts. Delays of under 1 hour can be expected. This area of Warren Wagon is between Secesh Meadows and Warren.

Deadwood Summit: Open, travel with caution.
Scott Mountain is also open.
Note: The approx elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′
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Weather Reports July 19-25, 2020

July 19 Weather:

At 9am it was 56 degrees and clear. At 1pm sunny and breezy. At 245pm it was 86 degrees, clear and variable breezes. At 6pm it was 86 degrees, mostly clear (streaks of high thin haze) and light breezes. At 9pm it was 74 degrees. Some hazy cloud at midnight.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time July 20, 2020 at 09:00AM
Clear, light breeze
Max temperature 88 degrees F
Min temperature 46 degrees F
At observation 57 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
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July 20 Weather:

At 9am it was 57 degrees, clear sky and light breeze. It was 81 degrees at noon. At 2pm it was 86 degrees and clear. At 630pm it was 86 degrees and clear. At 930pm it was 66 degrees and clear. It was clear at midnight.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time July 21, 2020 at 09:00AM
Clear
Max temperature 90 degrees F
Min temperature 47 degrees F
At observation 57 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
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July 21 Weather:

At 9am it was 57 degrees and clear. At 1pm it was clear and hot, slight breeze. At 3pm it was 91 degrees, clear sky and slight breeze. At 630pm it was 90 degrees and clear. At 9pm it was 70 degrees, clear and calm. Looked clear at 11pm.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time July 22, 2020 at 09:00AM
Mostly cloudy
Max temperature 93 degrees F
Min temperature 49 degrees F
At observation 59 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

July 22 Weather:

At 9am it was 59 degrees and mostly cloudy. At 1230pm it was 74 degrees and mostly cloudy (darker and thicker.) At 330pm it was 80 degrees, mostly (dark) cloudy and very light breeze. At 6pm it was 78 degrees, mostly cloudy, still and humidity is up. At 9pm it was 69 degrees, overcast and calm, a little muggy. At 11pm gusty breezes ringing the chimes, dry but smells like rain. Blustery at 2am, no rain yet.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time July 23, 2020 at 09:00AM
Overcast
Max temperature 84 degrees F
Min temperature 55 degrees F
At observation 62 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
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July 23 Weather:

At 9am it was 62 degrees and overcast. Sprinkling lightly 948am to 1008am. Sprinkling at 1027am, lasted less than 30 minutes. Light sprinkles again at 1115am for about 20 minutes. Short sprinkles at 1144am. Another short sprinkle at 1230pm. No rain after 1pm. At 4pm it was 74 degrees, mostly cloudy and light breeze. At 630pm it was 77 degrees and partly cloudy. At 9pm it was 66 degrees and mostly cloudy. At 1045pm it appeared mostly cloudy and flag flapping gusty breezes. Bigger wind gusts at 11pm. At 1230am it sounded calm. At 2am it was calm and cloudy.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time July 24, 2020 at 09:00AM
Partly cloudy, light breeze
Max temperature 78 degrees F
Min temperature 46 degrees F
At observation 57 degrees F
Precipitation 0.04 inch
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July 24 Weather:

At 9am it was 57 degrees, partly cloudy and light breeze. Mostly cloudy by noon and a little breezy. At 3pm it was 80 degrees, mostly cloudy and blustery – gusty breezes. At 6pm it was 81 degrees, mostly cloudy and breezy. At 920pm it was 64 degrees, clear and light breeze. Looked like some high haze (smoke?) after midnight.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time July 25, 2020 at 09:00AM
Partly high thin clouds
Max temperature 86 degrees F
Min temperature 44 degrees F
At observation 55 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
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July 25 Weather:

At 9am it was 55 degrees, partly high thin clouds. At 1pm it was mostly clear and a little breezy. At 3pm it was 86 degrees. At 6pm it was 84 degrees, clear sky and light breeze. At 9pm it was 66 degrees and clear. Clear at 11pm.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time July 26, 2020 at 09:00AM
Clear, light breeze
Max temperature 87 degrees F
Min temperature 42 degrees F
At observation 52 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
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Road Reports July 22, 2020

Please share road reports. Conditions can change quickly any time of year. Some high elevation roads still have snow. Be prepared for rocks and trees in the road and remember there is no cell phone service.

Highway 95: Closed

(photo courtesy Mustang Towing)
US 95 in both directions: Road closed.
July 17 ITD update:
On Monday crews are expected to start removing rocks at the base of the slide on US-95 south of Riggins. The temporary road built around the base has been blocked by massive boulders since the slope failed for a second time last week but may be open in time for next weekend.
“Our entire timeline is dependent on survey results,” Operations Engineer Jared Hopkins said. “If we observe movement, that will limit our ability to have crews working underneath the slope and delay the eventual reopening of the temporary road.”
No significant movement has been detected since late last week, allowing scalers to finish dislodging loose material on the rock face this week.
Removing debris and rebuilding the rock berm to shield the temporary road is planned to take at least all week.
“Some of these boulders are 40 feet wide,” Hopkins said. “We’ll need to drill and blast them into small enough pieces to be removed.”
continued:
ITD (link)
Old Pollock Road will continue to serve as a detour around the slide during daytime hours – 6 am – 8 pm PDT (7 am – 9 pm MDT). The detour will remain closed at night in order for crews to perform maintenance operations on the roadway, which typically does not see this amount of traffic.
French Creek Road is not an official, nor a recommended detour for Highway 95.

Yellow Pine: Local streets are dry and dusty except where people paid for dust abatement. Deer, dogs and kids are wandering around. Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN. Report that a dog was hit injured on Main street in June.
link: Local Forecast
Yellow Pine Webcam: (check date on image)

Warm Lake Highway: No problems reported.
link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

Highway 55 Webcams Link:
Note: Bridge construction at Horseshoe Bend.

South Fork Road: Closed 7am to 4pm daily with no closures on weekends.
The closure sites will change on a weekly basis, and will not always be adjacent to the last closure site. Refer to the current weekly newsletter or the project website to determine the closure point and access for each week. South Fork Road Project page (link)
Update July 20: Closure is again at mile post 16 (same locations as the past two weeks) for July 20 – 24. Access to Mile Post 16 Hot Springs is from the south/Warm Lake Road.
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Saturday (July 19) mail truck driver (Kaleb) reports the road is getting rough in some spots but overall pretty good.

Johnson Creek Road: Open.
Wednesday (July 22) mail truck driver (Kaleb) reports the county had graded from Warm Lake road to at least Wapiti Meadow Ranch – but it is already starting to get rough.
link: Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam
link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
Note: The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Opened by the county June 24th. Last reported to be really rough on the McCall side.
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Open and rough.
Summit was reported snow free on Sunday June 28.
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcam: (check date on image)

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Semi-open to the adventurous ATV riders. Travel at your own risk.
Old report June 26: “Lots of rocks and trees. One little patch of snow 20 ft long. But otherwise Thunder Mountain is open for 4×4 vehicles … we cut over 30 trees. The other guy with me didn’t cut them full width for a car, just for his ATV. So any trees I didn’t cut will need to be trimmed to get full size vehicles through.” – SA

photo and report courtesy SA
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Cinnabar: Report received July 11: “UTV group made it into Cinnabar [via the upper road] about two days ago. Lots of snow drifts. Rough going. But they cut the trees out of the road.” -SA

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Reports of OHVs making it over. Travel at your own risk.
Smith Creek Trees down from Avalanche

Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Warrens Wagon Road: Construction update: The road is CLOSED from 8am-Noon and 1pm-5pm Monday-Friday. The road is OPEN with a PILOT CAR from Noon-1pm and after 5pm Monday-Friday. The road is OPEN without a pilot car on Saturday and Sunday.
Update June 4: be aware that the Long Gulch Culvert Installation Project along Warren Wagon Road from Chinook Campground to Steamboat Summit will begin on June 15 and end in mid-July. The project involves the installation of numerous cross drain culverts. Delays of under 1 hour can be expected. This area of Warren Wagon is between Secesh Meadows and Warren.

Deadwood Summit: Open, travel with caution.
Scott Mountain is also open.
Note: The approx elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′
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July 19, 2020 The Yellow Pine Times

July 19, 2020 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Reminder: We are still under a boil water order until further notice.

Community Calendar:

April 17 – Boil water order issued
May 15 – Firewood Season starts
June 16 – Hard closure of South Fork Road (weekdays)
2020 Harmonica Festival Canceled
Aug 8 – VYPA meeting at 2pm
Sept 12 – VYPA meeting at 2pm
(details below)
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From Valley County

We need Your Help to protect the place and the people we all Love.
link:
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Valley County Covid-19 Response Page
link:
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Valley County Emergency Operations Center
link:
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Rebound – Idaho Governor’s phasing program
link:
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COVID 19: Recommendations and Resources for Safe Business Practices
link: (lots of info for businesses)
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Local Events:

2020 Festival is Cancelled

We have come to the decision that the 2020 Festival will be cancelled. We look forward to celebrating the 32nd year of the Festival August 5, 6, & 7, 2021.

Our decision was not made lightly. We had to consider the current situation we are in and examine the outlook for the coming months. This is the necessary and right decision for the safety of our community and all participants.

We all look forward to one big reunion with all of you in August 2021.
– DF
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Village News:

Food Bank Friday

On Friday, July 17, the mail truck brought in Grasmick food boxes for the locals. Fresh fruit and veggies, butter, milk and cheese, cooked shredded chicken thighs and cute little hams.
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Yellow Pine Mosquito

A reader shared a picture showing the size of “mosquitoes” around town this summer. “They seem to be a little bigger…”

20200719YPSkeeter-a
– Doug C
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Community Yard Sale

$1024 raised for the Community Hall maintenance.
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Boil Water Order issued

Update July 5: the boil order is in effect do to extremely high use due to leaks.

Update June 12: The boil order is still on. We still are experiencing excessive water use because of leaks. Not sure when this will be lifted. We are applying for grants to repair the system.

Update June 2: The water plant is experiencing high water in Boulder Creek which brings more debris into the sand filter.

The high demand caused by leaks in the system plugs the sand filters prematurely. We will be on a boil order until further notice.

As of April 17th 2020, Yellow Pine is under another “Boil Order”

Minutes from July 5, 2020 Meeting

Yellow Pine Water Users Association Annual Shareholders Meeting 7/05/2020

Directors in Attendance:

Steve Holloway, Willie Sullivan, Stu Edwards, Dawn Brown

Steve called the meeting to order and gave a brief description of the agenda.

Willie gave the Treasurers Report. Current balance is $37,699.08. There are 14 accounts in arrears with 4 accounts seriously delinquent. Recommends following with legal action i.e. liens, water shut off, etc. Willie handed out a 3 year financial statement for the department showing 2017, 2018 and 2019 income and expenses.

Steve asked if anyone had questions.

Question from attendee: Should delinquent accounts be shut off first and then file liens? Steve indicated that we are looking at all options.

Question from attendee: They asked 3 years ago to have water line repaired to their place and not done yet so they haven’t paid yet. Willie indicated they tried to repair but gate was not open. Steve and Willie agreed that they would schedule repair with the user and coordinate access.

Steve indicated that we are still under a boil order.

Warren (Operator) gave an update as to status of plant. Indicated that as our plant is a surface water plant, has to be monitored every day and we report monthly to DEQ. He also indicated that the boil order is in effect do to extremely high use. He indicated that leaks in the lines are the reason for the high usage. Hard to detect where leaks are as our soil type does not allow leaks to surface and be seen. We also sustained damage from the recent earthquake to the plant. There are big cracks in the cement building 1/8” to 3/16” in very important part of structure. He indicated that it is still functioning properly and there is no danger now. He indicated he has spoken with Mtn Water Works and they are working on improvements and finding grant money and low interest loans. He said Nikki (employee) works every day to maintain adequate chlorine levels. Warren checks several locations when he is in town. Warren asked for questions.

Question from attendee: If you drill your own well do you still have to pay?

Warren: No, there are no restrictions from YPWUA but DEQ restrictions apply.

Question from attendee: Visitors have access to water and might not know about boil order. Should we put up signs at public access points?

Warren: DEQ requires that we make that information available to all. Steve and Willie indicated they would put up signs.

Nikki asked Warren to explain gravity feed water system. Warren gave brief description and indicated it could create air pockets. Nikki indicated that at high usage people on the upper end of the system sometimes have no water.

Warren said we need a new master plan to control leaks, take care of repairs, etc. He indicated we need a new tank but probably won’t be up and running until next year.

Steve said we are working on grants with Mtn Water Works and are hoping to get 1.25 million in grants to make all necessary repairs and get new tank up and running.

Willie indicated that they have a person assigned to our department helping to make sure we are doing everything we can. There is also a plan to repair line coming in to town. He said a 20’ section of pipe by the apple orchard was replaced. Said there were approximately 12 leaks in that 20’ section. Said pipes were not installed correctly originally so now seeing problems.

Steve spoke about rate increases. Said there will be no rate increases in the coming year as they would not be nearly enough to make a difference in repairs. He asked that if you do lawn watering please do not water after 2 pm and try to use the even and odd day schedule.

There are two officers up for election this year. Last year, Stu and Dawn were reelected. This year Steve and Willie are up for reelection.

Attendees nominated both for reelection and both were reelected.

Question from attendee: Is there an estimate from engineer on total cost of all repairs?

Willie: Not yet but it is being worked on.

Meeting adjourned.
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2020 Census

The 2020 Census Impacts All Valley County Residents

Inching closer. Each of our communities and Valley County as a whole have increased our response rate by a few percentage points over the last few weeks – but we still have a lot of room to grow! We are still ranked #42 of 44 counties in Idaho for our Census response rate. Let’s get that number up! Responding to the Census takes less than 10 minutes and mean $1,483 per person in federal funding for Valley County.

It is recommended that we all fill out the census online.

If you spend 50% of your time in Valley County, you can consider it your home per the Census. Where you register with the Census is confidential and never linked to other governmental requirements such as property taxes or mailing address. The deadline for the 2020 Census has been extended until October 31st. They will probably not be sending census takers up to Yellow Pine.

Link: to online census

You do not need an ID number. Go to the link. Click on “start questionnaire”. Then on the next page scroll down to “If you do not have a Census ID, click here” – when you click on that line it will start the census. (see below)

2020Census-a
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Critters

Tick’s are still very plentiful in early July.

Mosquitoes and no-see-ums are hungry.

Bears are out of hibernation, protect your trash and pet food.

Watch out for aggressive mother does and cows, they will stomp your dogs – and you too.
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Road News

Link: to current road reports.
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Forest Info

All campgrounds and restroom facilities in the South Fork Corridor, Lick Creek/Secesh Corridor and along the East Fork South Fork Salmon River are open. -Krassel RD
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Yellow Pine US Mail

The 6-day a week mail delivery started June 1st. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 55 cents. Support our local post office and purchase your holiday stamps here.
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Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

Yellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is located approximately 3 miles south on Johnson Creek Road.

The TRANSFER STATION is for household trash and yard waste:
* Household trash must be put inside (and fit) the dumpster;
* Yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, etc.) goes in the burn pile on the south end of the turn-around;
* Cardboard boxes should be flattened before putting the in the dumpster,

The DUMPSTERS are NOT for:
* Furniture (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station).

The BURN PILE is NOT for:
* Cardboard boxes (flatten and put in dumpster);
* Furniture and appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Drywall and building material (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wire or fencing (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Foam Rubber (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wood with metal (like nails) attached (take to Donnelly Transfer Station.)

When closing the DOORS on the front of the dumpsters:
* Make sure the “U” brackets at the top and bottom of the door are engaged;
* The retaining bar at the middle of the door is slid into the pipe;
* And the “L” bars at the bottom of the doors dropped into place.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: 208/634-7176
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Local Groups

YPWUA News:

The annual Water meeting for 2020 was held July 5th at the Community Hall 2pm.
link: minutes 20200705YPWUA.docx

New Boil Water Order issued April 17, 2020. This could last until runoff is over.

Boil Water Advisory Notice

Boil Your Water Before Using

Bring tap water to a rolling boil, boil for one minute, and cool before using or use bottled water. Boiled or bottled water should be used for drinking, making ice, washing dishes, brushing teeth, and preparing food until further notice.

This Boil Water Advisory Notice applies to The Yellow Pine Water System

The system is being monitored and checked daily for compliance. .

You will be informed when you no longer need to boil your water.

Please share this information with other people who drink this water, especially anyone who may not get this notice directly (for example, people in apartments, nursing homes, schools, and businesses).

You can do this by posting this notice in a public place or distributing copies by hand or mail.

State Water System ID#: 4430059 Date distributed: 3-22-2020

Notice of Intent to File an Application with USDA, Rural Development

The Yellow Pine Water Users Association, Yellow Pine, Idaho intends to file an Application with USDA, Rural Development to obtain a drinking water system facility Emergency Community Water Assistance Grant (ECWAG). Emergency Community Water Assistance Grant (ECWAG).

If any additional information is needed, please contact:
Willie Sullivan
Treasurer
ypwater @ gmail.com

Distributed to Yellow Pine Water Users Association customers via Yellow Pine Times on June 12, 2020.

The 2019 Yellow Pine Water Users Shareholders meeting was Sunday July 7, 2019.
link: 20190707YPWUAminutes
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VYPA News:

2020 Festival has been canceled.

The Community Yard Sale raised $1024 for the Community Hall maintenance.

Next VYPA meeting: August 8 at 2pm

Minutes from July 11, 2020 VYPA meeting
link:

Minutes from June 13, 2020 VYPA meeting
link:

July 1 – Post Harmonica Meeting 2pm Community Hall
Note: at each meeting we simply add to info on the topic. That way, info from all meetings is included in a single document.
Link to notes:

Heat was installed in the community hall on April 30th.

VYPA meeting schedule for 2020 – June 13, 2pm; July 11, 2pm; August 8, 2pm; September 12, 2pm.
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YPFD News:

There was a YP Fire Commissioner meeting on June 27, 2020 at 10am at the Fire Station.
Link: 20200627 Fire Dept minutes June 27_final.docx

YPFD COVID19 Policy

link: YPFD Covid 19 SOP.docx

link: Covid-19 EMS.pdf (May 23)

May 10th Burn Permits – contact the YPFD

Pile burning: Dress appropriately, have enough help on hand (people, water and tools) and make a firebreak before you start. Call your local fire protection district chief to let them know you’ll be conducting a debris burn. This saves them from sending emergency responders to your property if they are not needed. Do NOT burn on breezy afternoons.

Better yet, “Bring It, Don’t Burn It”, you can take your yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, etc.) to the burn pile at the Transfer Station on the south end of the turn-around. Remember, keep the pile neat. Woody debris only, no nails, no cardboard and no furniture! The Boise NF will burn the pile in the fall when it is safe and doesn’t pollute our fine YP air.

YP Fire Commissioners:
Sue Holloway – District 1
Dan Stiff – District 2
Merrill Saleen – District 3
(TBA) – Fire Chief

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice

The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.” Click the link: to view 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation
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Biz Listings:

The Corner (208) 633-3325

Open 11am-8pm Closed Tuesdays
Calling ahead works best but not a huge deal. Groceries, Ice Cream, Beer and Soda. Our menu fluctuates but typically have Smoked Brisket, Tri Tip, Chicken, Burgers and Wings on hand.
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Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233

Open Daily 8am to 10pm. Outside Dining and Bar. Breakfast and Bar Food.

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Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377

Open.
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Yellow Pine General Store (208) 633-3300

The store is open now and will be open into October. Hours are 9 am to 6 pm Tuesday through Saturday. Closed Sunday and Monday.
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Murph’s RV Park & Mary’s Cabins (208) 633-6677

Cabins are not available in 2020. RV Spaces $25/night; $150/week; $300/month. Tent spaces $10/night. Shower house is closed for 2020.
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Knotty Kat Crochet Works – 208-502-0940
FB page link
open Tue – Sat, 9-5
Yellow Pine eggs $3/doz
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Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Tom & Sarah Lanham
156 Yellow Pine Ave, Yellow Pine Id 83677
website:
Facebook:
Starting June 2020 We will be doing trail rides out of Yellow Pine along with summer pack / camping trips to high mountain lakes in the area!

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
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Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430 open 830am-5pm Monday-Friday, closed weekends.
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Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

The Star-News

subscribe:
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine

Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, will service Yellow Pine

B&T Safety Solutions LLC
208-271-1600 Based out of Donnelly
Snow removal, cleaning chimneys and stoves, we do cabin staining/chinking as well
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (July 13) overnight low of 44 degrees, mostly cloudy/hazy sky this morning and light breeze. Early air traffic. A few finches and pine siskins visiting. The swallows are swooping around for bugs (the early hatched chicks have their eyes open.) Mostly cloudy and light breezes at lunch time. Colombian ground squirrels running about. Mostly cloudy and light breezes mid-afternoon, high of 80 degrees. Lots of motorcycles and OHVs going up and down main street. Mostly clear to partly cloudy and light breezes mid-evening, pleasant temperature. Female hairy woodpecker and a chipmunk visiting, a lone robin calling. Mostly clear before dusk with occasional gusty breezes, mosquitoes and gnats about, swallows busy hunting and the robin is still cheerfully chirping. Looked clear at midnight.

Tuesday (July 14) overnight low of 37 degrees, clear sky and breezy this morning. Early air traffic. Swallows swooping around, a northern flicker whooping and a few finches and jays calling. Sunny and clear at lunch time. Ground squirrels out running amuck. Clear, warm and breezy mid-afternoon, high of 81 degrees. Jays active and sounding off this afternoon. A smudge of haze in a clear sky, warm and light breezes mid-evening. Cooling off and a streak of haze in the sky before dusk. Lots of stars out before midnight.

Wednesday (July 15) overnight low of 38 degrees, clear sky and light breeze this morning. Early (loud) air traffic. Robins hopping about, steller jay visiting and swallows hunting bugs. Shooting started at 1135am, lasted less than an hour. Mail truck made it in early, Robert came out of retirement to drive for a couple days. Clear, warm and slight breeze at lunch time. Some of the swallow chicks are big enough to climb up on the backs of their hatch-mates to peer out the door hole of the bird house, all have their eyes open. Clear, warm and occasional gusty breeze mid-afternoon, high of 86 degrees. Still pretty warm mid-evening, clear sky and light breezes. Partly hazy sky, cooling off and slight breeze before dusk. Robins calling and swallows hunting. Lots of stars out before midnight.

Thursday (July 16) overnight low of 42 degrees, clear sky this morning. Early air traffic, one very loud. Swallows hunting bugs and robins chirping. Clear and warm at lunch time. A lone jay making all sorts of funny sounds, quite a vocabulary. Getting hot under clear skies early afternoon, light and variable breezes, high of 90 degrees. Increasing traffic (and dust.) A few finches visiting. Still pretty warm mid-evening, clear and light breeze. A few pine siskins visiting. Slowly cooling off a little before dusk, clear and calm. Swarms of mosquitoes out, robins calling and swallow flying high to hunt. Clear and lots of stars out before midnight.

Friday (July 17) overnight low of 47 degrees, clear sky and warming up fast this morning. Early air traffic. Hairy woodpecker, jay and a few finches visiting, flicker calling to the south, and robins hopping about. Clouds coming in and gusty breezes after lunch time. Increasing traffic (and dust.) Getting pretty warm by mid-afternoon, mostly cloudy and gusty breezes, high of 88 degrees. Increased OHV traffic on main street. Still pretty warm mid-evening, mostly cloudy (a bit muggy) and variable breezes. OHV sightseers going around and around raising dust in the neighborhood. Cooling off very slowly after sundown, mostly cloudy and warm before dusk. Clear sky at midnight.

Saturday (July 18) overnight low of 46 degrees, clear sky this morning. Early air and street traffic (dusty.) A few finches, pine siskins and a vocal jay visiting, swallows hunting (the babies in the nest have been practicing flapping their growing wings.) Clear and hot after lunch time. Increasing street traffic (and dust.) Hot sun and a little breeze mid-afternoon, high of 88 degrees. More people and traffic than usual for a weekend (and dust.) Pretty warm mid-evening, clear sky and slight breeze. Slowly cooling off right before dusk, clear sky and not the best air quality. Clear at midnight.

Sunday (July 19) overnight low of 44 degrees, clear sky this morning and warming up quickly. A few early airplanes, street traffic kicking up dust and making the air quality rather poor. A few cassin’s finches and pine siskins visiting, a talkative jay stopped by, and adult swallows hunting hard to feed their growing broods. Really loud airplane at 1041am. Visitor’s dogs running loose in the neighborhood. Heavy equipment (backup beepers) working in the neighborhood most of the day. Sunny, warm and breezy after lunch time. Ground squirrels running about. Hot, breezy and clear sky mid-afternoon, high of 88 degrees. Still pretty warm mid-evening, mostly clear sky and light breezes.
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RIP:

Norma Jean Auth

1928 – 2020

RIPNormaJeanAuth1928-2020-aThoughtful, generous, and kind are words people would use to describe Norma Jean Auth, who passed away, peacefully, on July 9, 2020. Norma was born on June 11, 1928, in Normal, Illinois, the middle daughter of Frances Pauline and Lyle Hill. An enthusiastic student, she loved school, was an excellent student, and took pride in her work on the school newspaper. On July 15, 1950, she married Robert Auth, and in 1959, they moved to Boise where Robert worked for the Boise School District. They divorced in 1976.

Norma spent her working life, in Boise, as an administrative assistant, at the Idaho Department of Employment. The years following her retirement were especially golden ones for Norma. She enjoyed spending winters in Hawaii, traveling abroad, and around the United States. Norma was an enthusiastic and fun travel companion, and many of her adventures included her family. She enjoyed numerous cruises and was up for anything, as long as family was there too. Two of her favorite vacation places were the Oregon Coast and Jackson Lake Lodge. A family trip to Jackson Hole, on her 80th birthday, found her hiking in the Tetons. She spent many enjoyable visits in Yellow Pine, Idaho, where her daughters and sons-in-law own cabins. She was a trooper, in her 80’s, stacking wood, raking pine needles, ATV riding, and joining in all the mountain activities her family loves. A BSU fan, she enjoyed many campfires, listening to games, with immediate family and friends, including her special nephew, Marc Auth, his partner, Kathi
Denton, and son-in-law John’s mother, Marge Schreiner. She loved animals and delighted in watching all creatures, great and small: whales, bears, deer, hummingbirds, and chipmunks, she enjoyed them all.

For the three years, prior to her passing and as her health began to fail, she resided at Plantation Place, where, once again, she joined in all activities, making sandwiches for City Lights, enjoying concerts, playing games, and becoming a part of Plantation Place’s very special family.

Norma was preceded in death by her parents and her brother, Dr. Ken Hill of Boise. She is survived by her sister, Joan Davis of Boise, her daughters, Chris Niebrand (Gary), Connie Auth (Leighanne Ridge), Cindy Schreiner (John) and her grandchildren, Lindsay Agalsoff of Auburn, California, Nick Schreiner of Weiser, and Bailey Eckert of Portland, Oregon. She is also survived by her sister’s daughter, Diane Fullmer, as well as other nieces, nephews, and great-grandchildren.

The family wishes to thank Bowman Funeral Directors and the family and staff at Plantation Place for their extraordinary love and care. At Norma’s request, a family celebration of life will take place at a later date.

source: (and to leave condolences)
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Idaho News:

Valley County hits 61 COVID-19 cases

Less than half declare themselves as county residents

By Tom Grote for The Star-News July 16, 2020

A total of 61 cases of the COVID-19 virus have been confirmed in Valley County as of this week, according to health officials.

St. Luke’s McCall reported 53 positive cases from 992 tests conducted since the start of the pandemic, up from 32 positive cases a week ago. All but two of the positive cases were reported since June 11.

Cascade Medical Center reported eight positive results from 143 tests, up from five last week. All eight were reported within the past three weeks.

Central District Health reported 26 cases among those who reported Valley County as their primary residents, up from 22 a week ago.

Some of those who tested positive at St. Luke’s McCall but did not declare Valley County their primary residence could still be in Valley County under quarantine, health officials said.

Adams County had 12 positive cases of COVID-19 as of Tuesday, according to Southwest District Health.

An employee of the City of McCall tested positive for the COVID-19, a statement from the city said.

The employee had no contact with the public during their work, and close contact with co-workers was minimal, the statement said.

The employee was adhering to the city’s COVID-19 protection guidelines including mask-wearing, physical distancing, frequent hand hygiene, and staying home when symptoms became apparent, the city said.

The city’s human resources department conducted a contact tracing interview with the employee, after which three other employees were found as having close contact with the infected employee.

Those employees will remain in quarantine, their offices have been sanitized for safety and the sick employee’s workplace has been closed until further notice, the statement said.

The name of the employees and the departments where they work were not disclosed.

“Our city staff is on high alert to keep each other safe and our public safe,” City Manager Anette Spickard said.

source: © Copyright 2009-present Central Idaho Publishing Inc.
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Valley County Mask-Up

On Monday, the Valley County Board of Commissioners passed Resolution 2020-14 which encourages every person to wear a face covering in public spaces including businesses and other establishments where people assemble and interact and any place social distancing of at least 6 feet cannot be met.

This Resolution is in place until July 31, 2020.

Read the full resolution here: (link)
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Valley County avoids mask mandate, encourages wearing them

By Max Silverson for The Star-News July 16, 2020

Valley County commissioners on Monday encouraged people to wear face masks in public places to prevent the spread of COVID-19.

The resolution applies to all areas in Valley County but does not include any punishment for failing to wear a mask.

Commissioners softened the resolution’s initial language from every person is “expected” to wear a mask, to “encouraged,” before a unanimous 3-0 vote to adopt the resolution.

“Every person is encouraged to wear a face covering that completely covers the person’s nose and mouth when the person is in a public place and others are present,” the resolution said.

Valley County defined a public place as “any place, indoor or outdoor, that is open to the public and includes, but is not limited to, businesses or other establishments where people assemble and interact, or members of the general public may enter and where social distancing of at least six feet cannot be met.”

source:
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Cascade City Council debates mandate on face masks

By Max Silverson for The Star-News July 16, 2020

The Cascade City Council on Monday considered, but did not take a vote, on a resolution that would mandate masks be required to combat COVID-19.

Council members were divided on whether a mask order was necessary, and could not decide if the order should apply to only businesses, indoor spaces or all areas within the city, including outdoors.

Council members were more agreeable to a resolution that recommended masks but did not mandate them.

continued:
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Watkins Pharmacy – Cascade

Watkins Pharmacy is set to reopen on Monday 7-13-2020 for both the front end of the store and the pharmacy. Store hours will remain 7am-6pm Monday through Saturday and 8am-4pm on Sunday. The pharmacy hours have changed to 10am-3pm Monday through Friday and closed on Saturday and Sunday for the next two weeks. We have undergone testing of all remaining staff and are happy to report all negative tests. We have cleaned the store and implemented policies and procedures to reduce potential transmission and increase the safety of staff and customers.

Safety is important during these times. Let us all keep in mind that we are still in the middle of a pandemic, and rates for community transmission are still high. To that end, it is strongly encouraged that all patrons maintain a social distance of 6 feet to the best of their ability as this is one of the most effective ways to reduce community transmission. It is also strongly encouraged to wear a mask while visiting the facility. Together, these steps will help prevent community spread and will help keep us and you safe. We look forward to once again opening our doors and serving our wonderful community. With all of ours and your continued efforts, we hope to keep us all in Valley County safe and working. Thank you all, and we hope to see you soon!

(via FB 7/13)
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Historic Roseberry cancels ice cream social, pioneer picnic

The Star-News July 16, 2020

The annual Old Fashioned Ice Cream Social and Long Valley Pioneer Picnic have been canceled by the sponsoring Long Valley County Preservation Society due to worries over the COVID-19 pandemic.

The decision to cancel the events was made “sadly and after much discussion” by the society board “due to COVID-19 and public safety,” a statement said.

The ice cream social had been scheduled for Sept. 5 at the Historic Roseberry townsite located one mile east of Donnelly.

… The Long Valley Pioneer Picnic had been scheduled to celebrate its 100th year on Aug. 16 at The Barn at Roseberry.

continued:
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Fosdick Benefit cancels dinner, but Aug. 2 golf tourney will go on

The Star-News July 16, 2020

The Fosdick Benefit has canceled its dinner and auction due to COVID-19 worries but will tee up for the 35th annual Golf Tournament on Sunday, Aug. 2, at MeadowCreek Golf Resort.

The barbecue dinner and auction, which were scheduled for Saturday, Aug. 1, were canceled due to the increase in community COVID-19 cases, a statement from organizers said.

Masks, gloves, sanitizer and temperature checks will be available at the golf tournament for the health and safety of guests and volunteers.

continued:
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Valley County Fair & ICA Rodeo – Cancelled

4H events will take place, for more information contact Alysson Statz, 4H Program Coordinator, astatz@uidaho.edu, or (208)382-7190.

Jr Rodeo will take place, for more information contact Toby Olson, (208) 634-9229.

(their FB page July 18)
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Eastern Idaho State Fair adjusts 2020 plans

Cancels majority of activities and entertainment

July 17, 2020 Local News 8

The Eastern Idaho State Fair has canceled the majority of activities and entertainment that would have made up this year’s fair.

The Fair said public safety was its number one concern and felt it could not meet the narrow requirements outlined by public health officials.

The annual 4H Livestock Competition and Sale and two nights of the Gem State Classic Pro Rodeo will continue with reduced venue capacity.

continued:
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Chubbuck Days Festival canceled

July 17, 2020 Local News 8

The recent spike in coronavirus cases in our area is causing Chubbuck to make some tough decisions.

The summer celebration Chubbuck Days Festival and Parade is canceled.

continued:
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Central District Health issues mandatory mask order for all of Ada County

by CBS2 News Staff Tuesday, July 14th 2020

Boise, Idaho (CBS2) — Central District Health voted Tuesday to issue a mandatory mask order for all of Ada County.

The health order has been issued as “effective immediately.”

The meeting ran long as different members discussed their views on the issue of stopping the spread of coronavirus.

They came to the conclusion that something had to be done to help Idaho’s hot spot: Ada County. The county currently has 4,541 cases out of the state’s 11,718.

continued:
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571 new Idaho COVID-19 cases Sunday

July 19, 2020 Local News 8

Idaho officials reported 571 new COVID-19 cases on Sunday.

This brings the total confirmed and probable cases reported since March to 14,873.

There are a total of 13,979 confirmed cases and 894 probable cases in 42 of the 44 Idaho counties, according to numbers released from the local health districts and the state. See the chart below.

continued:
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Highway 95: Closed


(photo courtesy Mustang Towing)

Warning: Do not use French Creek road for a detour.
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Highway 95 to remain closed indefinitely after rockslide

By Katie Kloppenburg July 14, 2020 KIVI


ITD photo

Riggins, Idaho — The Idaho Transportation Department (ITD) announced Tuesday morning they will continue to monitor the rockslide at US-95 south of Riggins to see if the area is stable enough for crews to begin rock removal. The rockslide happened on July 3.

“The additional rock fall that occurred last Thursday invalidated the survey points we were monitoring,” ITD Operations Engineer Jared Hopkins said. “We have to once again establish a baseline and carefully monitor the slope over a number of days to ensure that no significant movement is continuing to occur that would cause concern.”

A scaling crew was at the slide Monday to evaluate damage from the recent rock fall. The crew also assessed how the area can be best secured so crews can begin removing fallen rock off the highway.

continued:
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Smash Hit: Giant bolder lands on U.S. 95, crushes the competition

Shipping container barriers placed to block debris smashed, no estimate when highway will be cleared

By Max Silverson for The Star-News July 16, 2020

Another massive rockslide onto U.S. 95 south of Riggins last week crushed any hopes of the highway reopening soon, Idaho Transportation Department officials said.

The side area six miles south of Riggins will stay closed until crews can determine if the slope is stable and crews are safely able to enter the area and remove fallen rock, said an ITD statement.

The massive rockslide on the highway on July 3 severed Idaho’s main north-south highway.

A temporary bypass was opened on July 8 but had to be closed the next day when a rock slope overhanging the highway was found to be unstable.

Shortly after the closure, a new slide came down, crushing shipping container barricades that had been set up and blocking a temporary roadway around the rockfall.

One of the newly fallen rocks is 40 feet wide and will need to be broken apart before cleanup can begin.

continued:
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Rock removal to start Monday to reopen US-95 at the slide south of Riggins

July 17, 2020 by Megan Sausser ITD

On Monday crews are expected to start removing rocks at the base of the slide on US-95 south of Riggins. The temporary road built around the base has been blocked by massive boulders since the slope failed for a second time last week but may be open in time for next weekend.

“Our entire timeline is dependent on survey results,” Operations Engineer Jared Hopkins said. “If we observe movement, that will limit our ability to have crews working underneath the slope and delay the eventual reopening of the temporary road.”

No significant movement has been detected since late last week, allowing scalers to finish dislodging loose material on the rock face this week.

Removing debris and rebuilding the rock berm to shield the temporary road is planned to take at least all week.

“Some of these boulders are 40 feet wide,” Hopkins said. “We’ll need to drill and blast them into small enough pieces to be removed.”

continued:
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Health & Safety:

Knowing the early signs of heat stroke can mean the difference between life and death

by Natalie Hurst Friday, July 17th 2020 CBS2

Get ready for a heat wave next week – after a relatively mild start to July.

As you know, Idahoans love to be in the outdoors – whether we’re floating the river or just enjoying the city parks.

But mid summer’s heat and sun exposure can be dangerous, especially this time of year.

continued:
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Public Lands:

McCall council raps state land board proposal

Trident Holdings plan called ‘hornet’s nest’

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News July 16, 2020

The Boise man that wants to trade timberlands in northern Idaho for 28,000 acres of land around McCall received a frosty reception from the McCall City Council last Thursday.

Council members grilled Alec Williams of Trident Holdings for about 45 minutes after he presented his proposal to the council and an audience of about 120 people viewing the virtual meeting.

Williams tailored the presentation for city officials by emphasizing the control that the city and Valley County would gain by having 28,000 acres of land in the area subject to their zoning laws instead of the state’s whims.

Council member Mike Maciaszek thanked Williams for “kicking the hornet’s nest” and “galvanizing our community into action” to preserve open space around Payette Lake.

continued:
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McCall land swap?

By Steve Liebenthal Jul 15, 2020 KIVI

Jeff Mousseau is an Idaho outdoorsman and an Idaho native who chose McCall as the place to buy a second house. A major part of that decision was the city’s proximity to public land.

“From huckleberry picking, to fishing, to hunting, to hiking, to snowmobiling, There’s basically every outdoor recreation opportunity in those lands that you can think of,” said Mousseau.

But now a company called Trident Holdings LLC wants to take over 28 thousand acres currently held by the Idaho Land Board. Prime real estate that surrounds Payette Lake, Little Payette Lake, and prime fish and wildlife habitat to the south.

That puts fear in the heart of Mousseau and other outdoor enthusiasts who have seen public land go private, then end up in the hands of those who are unwilling to allow access.

continued:
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Letters to Share:

Feeding Pheasants

Hi all, here’s to all the folks that are raising pheasant chicks and other gamebirds from The Gamebird Foundation. If you would like to get started for next year, now is the time. All of the 10,000 chicks we have been raising are in the brooders and soft release pens now, to be released into the wild habitat at 10 weeks old. We have been doing this for a number of years and this is some of the things we have found about the kind of feed, the amount of protein, the medication and clean fresh water that it takes to make healthy birds. If you have any questions or need more help feel free to call.

“The Pheasant Guy”
Jim Hagedorn
208-883-3423
Jhag1008@gmail.com
The Gamebird Foundation
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Feeding Pheasants

The Gamebird Foundation and Little Canyon Shooting Sports, where we have our baby pheasant chick feed made, we take our protein content very seriously. After years of study, work and hands –on research it has shown us the optimum diet for raising healthy gamebirds when they are farm raised is the protein content and fresh, clean water.

In the wild, pheasants eat grain, insects, worms, and anything they can peck at- even if it is not good for them. Our pheasants are fed, a balanced diet with set protein contents tailored for their age. Because we buy in bulk, from Little Canyon, they have the feed mixed to contain the correct protein; medication and mineral content Check the ingredients on commercially purchased game bird feed and try to duplicate the following recommendations for results.

Up to three weeks of age use pre-starter feed with 30% protein; from 3 weeks to seven weeks use starter feed with 25% protein; from seven to 14 weeks use grower feed with 20% protein content and beyond the 14 weeks use maintenance food with 12 % protein or better protein content. If you cannot find gamebird feed in your area, turkey feed-not chicken feed-is the next best for keeping the pheasants on a healthy diet if you are going to keep them past the 10-12 week old stage.

For partridge, we have found the best results with 28-30% protein gamebird prestart from up to age nine weeks and then 24% protein game bird grower. Remember, wild bird feed does not have medication in it. Unless you want your birds to become infected with Coccidiosis and other infections you will have to add Amprolium to your water. Our feed we make and use has the medication and minerals already added.

Feeding pheasants is a science. Make sure you are offering your birds the correct protein percentage that will help you raise the highest quality pheasants. Shop around to find feed with the correct protein content and Remember an Abundant Supply of Fresh Water is a Very Important Component of Any Gamebird Diet. If you would like more information on feed consulting, please visit jhag1008@gmail.com or call Jim Hagedorn 208-883-3423.
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First load of load Red Leg Partridges

Good morning all, this is some of the first Red Leg Partridge. We , The Gamebird Foundation with the help of Little Canyon and Andy Harriston hatched and received our first batch of chicks. We received 300 + eggs and had a hatch of 254 live chicks. 83% hatch, very good. We have these chicks divided into 3 groups in brooders and we will raise them until they are 12 to 16 weeks before we release them.

2020GamebirdFoundationRedLegPartridge-a

Sportsman can thank, with the help of some generous donors to the Foundation, The Gamebird Foundation was able to purchase the eggs and now we will continue to raise them. This is only the beginning. With your help we will continue to bring wild upland birds to North Idaho. Pheasants, chukar, partridge, grouse, whatever we can do. Now is the time to pony up. We need your donations, $5.00 whatever. $20.00 buys a 50 LB. bag of chick starter. The family’s and folks raising birds to release into the wild, with the help of the Foundation have went through about 7 tons of chick starter. That is almost 300 bags. If we had more funds we could have raised another 4,000. As it is we had to stop at 8,500. Next year we hope to be able to raise double of this year, 16,000. With your help and donations we can do it.

Ask Bob Carson how great is to look out across his alfalfa field and for the first time in years, be able to see real live pheasants. Ask Joel Warner how great to look out in a field at his place this spring and see 15-16 hen pheasants with a rooster. We have many stories like this. We could almost start writing a book. Come Join us. If you can’t raise them please help with a small or large donation. The Gamebird Foundation, PO Box 100, Viola Idaho 83872

“The Pheasant Guy”
Jim Hagedorn
Executive Director
The Gamebird Foundation
208-883-3423
Jhag1008@gmail.com
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Critter News:

Tick Bite Paralysis in Dogs

PetMD Editorial Oct 05, 2010

Ticks act as carriers of various diseases in animals, including in dogs. Tick paralysis, or tick-bite paralysis, is caused by a potent toxin that is released through the saliva of certain species of female tick and which is injected into the blood of the dog as the tick infests the skin of the dog. The toxin directly affects the nervous system, leading to a group of nervous symptoms in the affected animal.

The toxins released by ticks cause lower motor neuron paralysis, which is defined as a loss of voluntary movement and which is caused by a disease of the nerves that connect the spinal cord and muscles. With lower motor neuron paralysis the muscles stay in an apparent state of relaxation.

An infestation of ticks is not necessary for a diseased state to occur. While multiple ticks are usually present on a dog that is showing symptoms of tick paralysis, tick-bite paralysis can take place after being bitten by only one tick. Conversely, not all animals, infested or not, will develop tick paralysis.

Symptoms usually begin to appear around 6-9 days after a tick has attached to the skin of the dog.

continued:
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Hummingbird Nectar Recipe

1. Combine 1:4 ratio of plain white table sugar to boiled water.
2. Allow the sugar to dissolve. Do NOT use red food coloring!
3. Cool and fill feeders. Store remaining nectar in the fridge for up to 2 weeks.

Your feeder should be emptied and cleaned twice per week in hot weather; cooler weather, once per week.
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West Nile virus found in Canyon County mosquitoes

by CBS2 News Staff Wednesday, July 15th 2020

West Nile virus was found in mosquitoes Tuesday in Canyon County.

According to the Southwest District Health, the mosquitoes were found northeast of Caldwell. The area has been treated for both larval and adult stage mosquitoes.

The Canyon County Mosquito Abatement District says it will step up surveillance and control measures to decrease any public threat.

continued:
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Fish & Game News:

Idaho Fish and Game Commission to meet July 22-23 in Idaho Falls

By Brian Pearson, Conservation Public Information Specialist
Friday, July 17, 2020

People who attend in-person meeting asked to observe social distancing, encouraged to wear masks

The Fish and Game Commission will meet in person in Idaho Falls on July 22-23, with the public hearing starting at 7 p.m. Wednesday, July 22, in the Grand Teton Event Center, 3910 South Yellowstone Highway. People can address the Commission about agenda items or any matters related to Fish and Game.

The business meeting will resume at the same location at 8 a.m. on Thursday, July 23. Public comments will not be taken during this portion of the meeting.

continued:
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Upper Salmon River closes for Chinook fishing effective immediately

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Supervisor
Wednesday, July 15, 2020

Fall Chinook season will be considered by the Commission at its July 22-23 meeting

Idaho Fish and Game has closed salmon fishing effectively immediately on the Upper Salmon River to protect wild Chinook salmon. Effects on wild Chinook salmon from catch-and-release impacts of non-tribal fisheries and direct harvest by tribal fisheries have met the allowable take approved through Endangered Species Act authorizations.

Chinook fishing is closed from the South Butte boat ramp upstream to the posted boundary about 100 yards below the Sawtooth Hatchery.

Officials from the tribes involved in the Upper Salmon River fishery have also said they intend to close tribal fishing in the area.

continued:
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Summer Edition of Windows to Wildlife

The summer edition of Windows to Wildlife

* Idaho’s Own Tiger King – Tiger Beetles
* Artificial Nesting Platforms for Common Loons
* Species of Greatest Conservation Need: Hoary Marmot

link:

Deniz Aygen
Watchable Wildlife Biologist
Idaho Department of Fish and Game
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More F&G News Releases

link:
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Crazy Critter Stuff:

Woman injured after colliding with bear while running on Montana trail

by KECI Staff Monday, July 13th 2020

Missoula, Mont. (KECI) — A woman sustained minor injuries Saturday morning when she collided with a young grizzly bear on Huckleberry Lookout Trail at Glacier Nation Park in Montana.

The collision occurred four miles down Huckleberry Lookout Trail. The woman was the lead runner, with two people in the group when she collided with the bear, park authorities said in a press release. The woman and the bear tumbled off the trail together, and once they separated, the bear reportedly ran off.

… The park sent out the following information in a press release Saturday about bears in the park:

“Visitors to Glacier National Park are reminded that the park is home to black and grizzly bears. Trail running in grizzly habitat is dangerous because runners traveling quickly and quietly through bear habitat have a higher risk of surprising grizzly bears at close range. Glacier National Park discourages trail running in order to protect the public and the bears.

continued:
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Seasonal Humor:

CovidCatWearMask-a

RedneckDoorbell-a
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Idaho History July 19, 2020

Idaho 1918-1920 Influenza Pandemic

Part 14

Idaho Newspaper clippings November 20-25, 1918

1892ChallisJail-a
Challis jail. Challis, Idaho. 1892
Johnnie Boyd in doorway, earl Dodge with pick, Joe Paul at corner, Arthur Fox, Donnie Rowels with pipe and Ralph Beardsley

courtesy Challis Public Library
source: Photo Group 5 | University of Idaho Library Special Collections & Archives 5-104-2c
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Nov 20

The Challis Messenger., November 20, 1918, Page 1

1918112CM1
Quarantine Regulations

County Board of Health, Custer County, Idaho, Nov., 16, 1918.

General Order No. 1.

To the Public Generally:

Whereas, and epidemic is sweeping through the nation, known as the “Spanish Influenza”, and said disease is both infectious and contagious and is hereby declared to be infectious and contagious, and

Whereas, said “Spanish Influenza’ has made its appearance in certain portions of Custer County, Idaho, and is exacting heavy toll of life within the Nation and in said portions of Custer County and is becoming alarming in its malignancy and the public health demands that prompt and efficient measures be taken to stamp out said disease and protect portions of Custer County not yet infected:

1st. Now therefore, it is ordered and directed and the undersigned Board of Health of Custer County, Idaho does hereby order and direct that all territory lying within the following boundaries to wit: All the Salmon River watershed in Custer County from the mouth of Yankee Fork on the Salmon River and extending down said Salmon River to the boundary of Lemhi County, Idaho; shall and the same is hereby declared to be a quarantine District for the purpose of preventing the introduction of the dangerous, contagious or infectious disease, to-wit, Spanish Influenza, within the said quarantine district. Said Quarantine District and this Order creating the same shall remain in full force and virtue until the further order of this Board of Health of said Custer County, Idaho.

2nd. All persons are prohibited from entering said district without a permit from the Chairman of the County Board of Health.

3rd. The Chairman of said County Board of Health is hereby authorized and empowered to appoint as many Quarantine Guards and to create as many Quarantine Districts as may be necessary to enforce these rules and regulations.

4th. The Chairman of the County Board of Health of Custer County, Idaho, shall cause to be printed suitable permits and quarantine cards in harmony with law and these regulations and place a sufficient number of said permits and quarantine cards at each quarantine station with the Quarantine Guards stationed there to meet all such necessary demands. It is hereby and herein further ordered and directed that the Chairman of said County Board of Health shall provide all Quarantine Guards at each Quarantine Station with “Yellow Flags” of suitable size to be used by said Quarantine Guards in placing or causing same to be placed on the vehicle in which said person or persons are traveling.

5th. All persons coming into said district and desiring to remain therein shall be quarantined for a period of four days, at the home of such person or person, in case they have a home in said District, and if not, then in some suitable place prepared and designated by the Chairman of said County Board of Health.

6th. All persons having business to transact in said district may enter said district and attend to such business, and depart again from said district; but all homes or other places to which such persons are allowed to stop and enter must be quarantined for a period of four days; such person or persons so entering under the provisios of this section shall stop at the first quarantine station on the road in, that such person or persons enter said quarantine district, and procure a written permit therefore; said permit shall direct such person or persons to travel the most direct public highway to and from his, her, or their homes or place where they seek to go, without stopping; and that such home, or place where such person or persons shall go or stop, shall be quarantined by the placing of a proper quarantine card up in a conspicuous place on said residence or place where such person or persons shall go or stop as aforesaid; said quarantine card shall be supplied such person or persons by said Quarantine Guard, such quarantine to be and remain in full force and effect for a period of four days from and after such person or persons shall so enter as aforesaid; and in the event any such person or persons or others in said home shall become afflicted with said disease, then and in such case, said quarantine of said home or place shall be and remain in full force and virtue until ordered discontinued by said Chairman of said County Board of Health. It is further hereby and herein provided that all persons entering said Quarantine District as aforesaid, shall place in a conspicuous place on the vehicle in which they travel a “Yellow Flag” and keep said flag thereon for a period of four days provided they remain in said Quarantine District for such period of time; said flag to be supplied by the Quarantine Guard.

7th. All persons desiring continuous passage through said District shall be granted such privilege but such person or persons shall first procure from such Quarantine Guard a permit and flag therefore, and all homes and other places in which they may be permitted to stop and enter shall be quarantined for a period of four days, as provided in rule Sixth hereof.

8th. The Chairman of the County Board of Health is hereby empowered and directed to cause to be printed larger quarantine cards to be posted up in a conspicuous place at each quarantine station so created as aforesaid, which quarantine card shall correctly describe the boundaries of the Quarantine District hereby created.

9th. Every person or persons, company or corporation violating any of the provisions of this order will be prosecuted as in such case made and provided.

An emergency existing therefor, and this order having been submitted to and approved by the State Board of Health on the 16th day of November, 1918, the same shall be and is in full force and effect from the date hereof.

Penalty for violation of this order is $50.00 fine or imprisonment in the County jail for ninety days or by both such fine and imprisonment.

Custer County Board of Health,
By C. L. Kirtley, Chairman,
By W. T. Oster
By C. V. Hansen.

The Above and foregoing rules and regulations, within and for Custer County, State of Idaho, are hereby approved this 16th day of November, A. D. 1918.
State Board of Health
By R. S. Madden.
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1918112CM2
Let Reason Rule!

It is high time for all people to call a halt in the quarantine conflict between Mackay and Challis. Let reason rule and peace prevail.

If mistakes have been made on either side it is a far greater mistake to recriminate and keep it up to the killing point.

The people of this section established a quarantine in self defense. Thereupon some Mackay sportsmen, in the sheltering darkness of the night, with full knowledge of the quarantine ran boldly into it and got “bumped”, or at least got quite a little dent in their dignity. They then claimed they “didn’t know it was loaded” and have, ever since, been calling upon the courts, authorities and upon the public to take up their little personal grievance – even though it case grim war and carnage.

They have pestered the public and the press until even the editor of the Mackay Miner has gone into spasms of bucolic wrath and has “got to fightin’ wind mills and ‘sees’ things at night.'”

If these sportsmen are really good sports they will now keep still, at least until the public crisis is past. If they don’t, they should, and no doubt will, be severely “sat upon” in their own “hum; town”. The majority of the people are not crazy – no, not even in Mackay.
— —

1918112CM3
The Battle of the Flu

Note: This heroic ballad may be sung to the tune of an Irish “Come All Yez.”

On the fourteenth of November
In the year nineteen-eighteen;
It was then there was enacted
That most memorable scene –
When a hundred men from Challis town
All gallant, brave and true,
Along the highway hurried down
To the Battle of The “Flu”.
Marching along one hundred strong,
A brave and gallant crew,
With blood in their eye – to do or die,
At the Battle of The “Flu”.

The forces of the enemy
Were counted by the score,
Advancing at a distance of
Some sixty miles or more;
Coming nearer, ever nearer
Through all that dreadful day.
But the closest that they ever got:
Was sixty miles away!
And rumor after rumor
Of their coming grew and grew
Until some other rumor proved
That rumor was not true.

We heard that they were coming,
By auto and by Ford,
With all the guns and bootleg
That they could crowd aboard,
That they were mad as blazes
And had vowed that they would shoot
As the quickest way to settle
The question in dispute.
And many a hero trembled
And shivered in his shoes
As he vividly remembered
The dreadful Mackay booze.

They swore that it was “pizen”
And would kill at ninety yards
And so the captain shouted
To double up the guards.
“There is an auto coming.”
An excited lookout roared,
But when at last the thing approached
It proved to be a Ford!
The captain then commanded:
“Right about and shoulder arms”
And he gave a solemn warning
To beware of false alarms.

Oh, there were generals by the slue,
And the colonels they were many;
Of captains there were quite a few
But the privates were “not any”.
And there were deeds of daring
Performed upon that day –
Yes, even though the enemy
Was sixty miles away.
Once when the day was darkest
Up spoke a tall, mule-skinner
Saying: “Fellers I’m not afraid to die,
But I hate to miss my dinner.”

But though nobody died they say,
Or at least no one was buried,
The devil himself might be to pay
If Mackay had not tarried.
They said that they were coming,
And that hell would be to pay.
But there were spies who kept them wise
And so they stayed away.
But, we are peace-loving people
And the world is now at peace;
Was Mackay right to force this fight?
Yes, in a – pig’s valise.

Ed. Note: It would seem that Clarence E. Eddy, the Poet-Prospector, who is the author of the above, must have been present at the “Battle of the Flu”. It requires a great poet to give real prominence to great events and affairs. Even hell would never have been so prominent had it not been for the poet Dante.

source: The Challis Messenger. (Challis, Idaho), 20 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Challis Messenger., November 20, 1918, Page 5

1918112CM4Uncle Sam’s Advice on Flu
U. S. Public Health Service Issues Official Health Bulletin on Influenza.
Latest Word on Subject.
Epidemic Probably Not Spanish In Origin – Germ Still Unknown – People Should Guard Against “Droplet Infection” – Surgeon General Blue Makes Authoritative Statement.

Washington, D. C. — (Special.) — Although King Alfonso of Spain was one of the victims of the influenza epidemic in 1893 and again this summer, Spanish authorities repudiate any claim to influenza as a “Spanish” disease. If the people of this country do not take care the epidemic will become so widespread throughout the United States that soon we shall hear the disease called “American” influenza.

In response to a request for definite information concerning Spanish influenza, Surgeon General Rupert Blue of the U. S. Public Health Service has authorized the following official interview:

What Is Spanish Influenza? is It something new? Does it come from Spain?

“The disease now occurring in this country and called ‘Spanish influenza’ resembles a very contagious kind, of ‘cold,’ accompanied by fever, pains in the head, eyes, ears, back or other parts of the body and a feeling of severe sickness. In most of the cases the symptoms disappear after three or four days, the patient then rapidly recovering. Some of the patients, however, develop pneumonia, or inflammation of the ear or meningitis, and many of these complicated cases die. Whether this so-called ‘Spanish’ influenza is identical with the epidemics of influenza of earlier years is not yet known.

“Epidemics of influenza have visited this country since 1647. It is interesting to know that this first epidemic was brought here from Valencia, Spain. Since that time there have been numerous epidemics of the disease. In 1889 and 1890 an epidemic of influenza, starting somewhere in the Orient, spread first to Russia and thence over practically the entire civilized world. Three years later there was another flare-up of the disease. Both times the epidemic spread widely over the United States.

“Although the present epidemic is called `Spanish influenza,’ there is no reason to believe that It originated in Spain. Some writers who have studied the question believe that the epidemic came from the Orient and they call attention to the fact that the Germans mention the disease as occurring along the eastern front in the summer and fall of 1917.”

How can “Spanish Influenza” be recognized?

“There is as yet no certain way in which a single case of ‘Spanish influenza’ can be recognized. On the other hand, recognition is easy where there is a group of cases. In contrast to the outbreaks of ordinary coughs and colds, which usually occur in the cold months, epidemics of influenza may occur at any season of the year. Thus the present epidemic raged most intensely in Europe in May, June and July. Moreover, in the case of ordinary colds, the general symptoms (fever, pain, depression) are by no means as severe or as sudden in their onset as they are in influenza. Finally, ordinary colds do not spread through the community so rapidly or so extensively as does influenza.

“In most cases a person taken sick with influenza feels sick rather suddenly. He feels weak, has pains in the eyes, ears, head or back, and may be sore all over. Many patients feel dizzy, some vomit. Most of the patients complain of feeling chilly, and with this comes a fever in which the temperature rises to 100 to 104. In most cases the pulse remains relatively slow.

“In appearance one is struck by the fact that the patient looks sick. His eyes and the inner side of his eyelids may be slightly ‘bloodshot,’ or `congested,’ as the doctors say. There may be running from the nose, or there may be some cough. These signs of a cold may not be marked; nevertheless the patient looks and feels very sick.

“In addition to the appearance and the symptoms as already described, examination of the patient’s blood may aid the physician in recognizing ‘Spanish influenza,’ for It has been found that in this disease the number of white corpuscles shows little or no increase above the normal. It is possible that the laboratory investigations now being made through the National Research Council and the United States Hygienic Laboratory will furnish a more certain way In which individual cases of this disease can he recognized.”

What Is the course of the disease? Do people die of it?

“Ordinarily, the fever lasts from three to four days and the patient recovers. But while the proportion of deaths in the present epidemic has generally been low, in some places the outbreak has been severe and deaths have been numerous. When death occurs it is usually the result of a complication.”

What causes the disease and how is It spread?

“Bacteriologists who have studied Influenza epidemics in the past have found in many of the cases a very small rod-shaped germ called, after its discoverer, Pfeiffer’s bacillus. In other cases of apparently the same kind of disease there were found pneumococci, the germs of lobar pneumonia. Still others have been caused by streptococci, and by others germs with long names.

“No matter what particular kind of germ causes the epidemic, It is now believed that influenza is always spread from person to person, the germs being carried with the air along with the very small droplets of mucus, expelled by coughing or sneezing, forceful talking, and the like by one who already has the germs of the disease. They may also be carried about in the air in the form of dust coming from dried mucus, from coughing and sneezing, or from careless people who spit on the floor and on the sidewalk. As in most other catching diseases, a person who has only a mild attack of the disease himself may give a very, severe attack to others.”

What should be done by those who catch the disease?

“It Is very important that every person who becomes sick with influenza should go home at once and go to bed. This will help keep away dangerous complications and will, at the same time, keep the patient from scattering the disease far and wide. It is highly desirable that no one be allowed to sleep in the same room with the patient. In fact, no one but the nurse should be allowed in the room.

“If there is cough and sputum or running of the eyes and nose, care should be taken that all such discharges are collected on bits of gauze or rag or paper napkins and burned. If the patient complains of fever and headache, he should be given water to drink, a cold compress to the forehead and a light sponge. Only such medicine should be given as is prescribed by the doctor. It is foolish to ask the druggist to prescribe and may be dangerous to take the so-called ‘safe, sure and harmless’ remedies advertised by patent medicine manufacturers.

“If the patient is so situated that he can be attended only by some one who must also look after others in the family, it is advisable that such attendant wear a wrapper, apron or gown over the ordinary house clothes while in the sick room and slip this off when leaving to look after the others.

“Nurses and attendants will do well to guard against breathing in dangerous disease germs by wearing a simple fold of gauze or mask while near the patient.”

Will a person who has had Influenza before catch the disease again?

“It is well known that an attack of measles or scarlet fever or smallpox usually protects a person against another attack of the same disease. This appears not to be true of ‘Spanish influenza.’ According to newspaper reports the King of Spain suffered an attack of influenza during the epidemic thirty years ago, and was again stricken during the recent outbreak in Spain.”

How can one guard against Influenza?

“In guarding against disease of all kinds, it is important that the body be kept strong and able to fight off disease germs. This can be done by having a proper proportion of work, play and rest, by keeping the body well clothed, and by eating sufficient wholesome and properly selected food. In connection with diet, it is well to remember that milk is one of the best all-around foods obtainable for adults as well as children. So far as a disease like influenza is concerned, health authorities everywhere recognize the very close relation between its spread and overcrowded homes. While it is not always possible, especially in times like the present, to avoid such overcrowding, people should consider the health danger and make every effort to reduce the home overcrowding to a minimum. The value of fresh air through open windows cannot be over emphasized.

“When crowding is unavoidable, as in street cars, care should be taken to keep the face so turned as not to inhale directly the air breathed out by another person.

“It is especially important to beware of the person who coughs or sneezes without covering his mouth and nose. It also follows that one should keep out of crowds and stuffy places as much as possible, keep homes, offices and workshops well aired, spend some time out of doors each day, walk to work if at all practicable — in short, make every possible effort to breathe as much pure air as possible.

“In all health matters follow the advice of your doctor and obey the regulations of your local and state health officers.”

“Cover up each cough and sneeze, If you don’t you’ll spread disease.”

source: The Challis Messenger. (Challis, Idaho), 20 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., November 20, 1918, Page 1

19181120DSM1
Influenza Ban Is Officially Lifted
State Health Officer Thanks County Boards For Efficient Action

Boise. — Orders have been issued by the state board of health to life the Spanish influenza ban which has been in effect in this state for a month as a precautionary measure against the spread of the epidemic, on November 24. Like many other states, Idaho decided to close down churches, public schools, theaters and all public meeting places in order to guard against the spread of the disease. The order lifting the ban, as issued by Dr. E. T. Biwer, secretary and executive officer of the state board of health, to the chairmen of all county health boards, is as follows:

“You are advised that all restrictions of the state board of health for the control of the epidemic of influenza are to be removed at 1 a.m. Sunday morning, November 24, insofar as is safe within your jurisdiction.

“Reports received by this office indicate that for the state as a whole, the incidence of influenza is rapidly diminishing, which explains the above order.

“While sporadic cases will doubtless develop for a considerable period,, and while in some isolated sections, influenza may still attain epidemic proportions, we believe that the present stringent requirements may be done away with.

“You are directed, however, to use all care in handling the situation within your jurisdiction and if in the judgment of the local board of health, the time is not ripe for removal of restrictions, you are authorized to maintain them for the present.

“I wish to thank you, and, through you, the public generally for the splendid co-operation that has been shown the state board of health during this abnormal situation.”
— —

19181120DSM2
Normal Conditions Expected Soon
But Some Schools May Not Open Next Monday Because of Influenza

School may not open in all districts in Latah county next Monday, although the state quarantine will be lifted Sunday. Influenza has just made its appearance in some of the district which has not had the disease at all until three days ago reports seven new cases and the directors asked Mrs. R. B. Knepper, county school superintendent, what they should do about opening school. She instructed the directors to use their own judgment about it and if they deem it unsafe to open school Monday they may keep the school closed until such time as it is thought safe to reopen it.

School will open in Moscow and in nearly every district in the county Monday. Churches will hold services Sunday for the first time in several weeks. The motion pictures are arranging to reopen Monday evening and the chamber of commerce will give its regular weekly luncheon at noon on Tuesday. Lodges, which have held no meetings since the quarantine went into effect, will resume regular meetings next week and conditions are expected to become normal before the end of the week.

Many students of the University of Idaho, who have been out since the quarantine started, secured health certificates from Dr. W. A. Adair, city health officer, last night and were permitted to enter classes this morning. No new cases of influenza are reported in town today.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 20 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., November 20, 1918, Page 3

19181112DSM2
City News

The family of Frank Burch are ill of influenza, but all are gradually improving.

Mrs. E. J. Smithson, who has been ill of influenza in a hospital in Colfax for two weeks, is slowly improving.

Miss Anna Young, a teacher in the Moscow schools, is ill of influenza.
— —

Card of Thanks.

To our neighbors and friends who in so many ways assisted us by kindly deeds, and to those who offered assistance during the sickness of our family with influenza, we beg all to accept in this manner our appreciation and heart felt thanks.

– Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Settle and Family.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 20 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., November 20, 1918, Page 4

Mrs. Mary H. Cross of Dennison, Wash., who has been nursing at the homes of C. W. Walton and George Keiber, left last evening for Kendrick to assist Mrs. H. J. Fenton, whose two children are ill with influenza.
— —

The funeral of Lee Lester Schell was held at Freese church Nov. 12, the body having been shipped from Sedro Wooley, Washington, where he died of influenza November 7. …

Everybody is rejoicing at the prospect of getting to go somewhere now that the “flu” has flew over. It is hoped to open Sunday school and school this week.

Only two cases resembling the “flu” have been reported out this way, and those only light.

Roswell Strong, carrier on route three, has been confined to his home for a week or two with the “flu.” Walter Hislig has been carrying the mail.

Mrs. Mary Mewhinney has spent the month’s enforced idleness with home folks. She hopes to resume her school duties at Viola next week.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 20 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

19181111MoscowArmistice-a
(click image for larger size)
Celebrating the signing of Armistice-Nov. 11, 1918.

source: contributed by Patty Theurer for Latah County ID USGenWeb Archives
— — — — — — — — — —

Nov 21

The Wallace Miner. November 21, 1918, Page 1

19181121WM1
Success.
Company Employing 60 Men – Extracting Ore on Three Levels.

In common with other mines of the district, the Success Mining company has had difficulty in maintaining its output on account of the prevalence of influenza. However, the mill has been kept running one shift as usual and conditions are now much improved. The company has 60 men on the payroll. A good shoot of ore has been developed on the 700 level, and on the 1400, 1500 and 1600 levels the showings of ore are highly satisfactory. Concentrates are now delivered from the mill to the railroad, about half a mile, by motor truck, and the company has sold the teams formerly used for this purpose.

source: The Wallace Miner. (Wallace, Idaho), 21 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

Lincoln County Times., November 21, 1918, Page 3

19181121LCT1
Newspaper Aid Appreciated

Lincoln County Times, Jerome, Idaho.

Dear Mr. Editor: As the United War Work Campaign draws to a close I have been asked by Mr. Lyman L. Pierce, western department campaign director, to express to you his appreciation of the valuable assistance your newspaper has rendered.

Never before in the history of this country has a drive for funds been so dependent upon the newspapers for success. With the speaking program virtually eliminated because of influenza conditions, with schools in most sections closed, with public gatherings forbidden, the only method of getting our message to the people has been through the newspapers.

We feel that we owe the loyal, patriotic, unselfish newspapers of the west our gratitude and thanks, and in behalf of Mr. Pierce, and the members of the executive committee in the western department, I want to express to you our deep appreciation for all you have done to make this campaign a success. I am,
Very sincerely yours, F. F. RUNYON, Director of Publicity, United War Work Campaign, Western Department.

source: Lincoln County Times. (Jerome, Idaho), 21 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Lincoln County Times., November 21, 1918, Page 4

19181121LCT2
Appleton

C. H. Humphrey is able to attend to business again after his siege of the”flu.” L. C. Humphrey is improving slowly.

Mr. and Mrs. Fred DeBoard, Mrs. Lester DeBoard and Miss Winnie DeBoard are Appleton’s latest victims of the “flu.” Quarantine was placed there Sunday.
— —

19181121LCT3
Barrymore

Miss Lena Witt and her friend, Ruth Stoddard, of Sterline, Illinois, who have been here the past few weeks, expect to return Monday to their school duties at the Technical Institute at Pocatello, as the quarantine for influenza has been lifted from that place.

Robert Lind has so sufficiently recovered from his recent attack of influenza as to be able to be about.

Mrs. R. J. Wimmer received the sad intelligence of the death of her two sisters, who reside in Salt Lake, Utah. Both deaths occurred within a period of four days from Spanish influenza.

C. C. McCorkle, who was called to Vallejo, California, last week on account of the serious illness of his son, Samuel, returned home Tuesday, reporting the patient some better and had hopes of a permanent recovery. Samuel has been suffering from pneumonia, following the Spanish influenza. The latest telegram received this week stated that the patient had been operated on for the fourth time for emptmia, with conditions satisfactory.
— —

19181121LCT4
Grandview

The community was greatly shocked to learn of the death of Mrs. E. V. Cooke, which occurred Friday at the Twin Falls hospital.

Mr. Sam Hills is out again after a siege with the influenza.

source: Lincoln County Times. (Jerome, Idaho), 21 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Lincoln County Times., November 21, 1918, Page 5

Death of A. W. Arps

On last Sunday morning at the temporary hospital established in the Eagles’ Hall occurred the death of W. W. Arps from pneumonia following an attack of influenza.

Mrs. Arps who has had living quarters near his tin shop was sick for several days before medical aid was called in and when the doctor was called he was found in a serious condition and immediately removed to the hospital where everything possible was done to save his life but without success. …

Miss Johanna Arps and Mr. and Mrs. Dee Minor of Sterling, Colo., were present at the funeral. The son Adrian was unable to attend being confined to his home with a severe case of influenza.
— —

Death of Glenn E. Massey

On last Saturday morning at his home north of Jerome occurred the death of Glenn E. Massey, eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Massey and in this death the dread disease influenza has taken from our midst one of our most progressive young ranchers.

Mr. Massy was taken sick some two weeks ago and although he made a most plucky fight he was unable to withstand the ravages of the disease and passed to the great Beyond as above noted. …
— —

High School Notes

Many of the students when interviewed declared they are really anxious for school to begin.

When the schools open again there will be little excuse for parents keeping any boy out of school “for work.”

The Jerome high school body is composed of some of the best boys and girls in the world. Now if only this bunch of find folks will settle down when school begins and really work in co-operation with the teachers and parents the effects of our enforced vacation may yet be made up this term, perhaps.

Frequent absence, tardiness and idleness have been our three besetting sins. Parents can help in these matters largely if they will and as so many do.

October 1 the students of the high school held $5362 worth of War Saving stamps and Liberty bonds. This is an average of almost $50 each. A few do not have any.

Reports from 1150 counties in forty-seven states of the United States shows that the schools are 50,000 short. 500,000 school children are without teachers. In Idaho there is a shortage of about 50 teachers. Jerome has been one teacher short, until recently.

It is expected that there will be a more complete supervision of play on the school grounds. It is on the play ground that students learn to give and take, and it is there that they get needed fresh air and exercise.

We have found that a few outsiders know what a large high school Jerome has. The total enrollment in the high school which closed October 9 was 111, 19 seniors, 20 juniors, 30 sophomores and 42 freshmen. Of these 45 are boys and 64 girls. The average daily attendance of the 111 enrolled has been about 95.

source: Lincoln County Times. (Jerome, Idaho), 21 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Lincoln County Times., November 21, 1918, Page 7

Influenza More Deadly Than War.

Washington. – The recent epidemic of influenza in the United States caused more deaths than occurred among the American expeditionary forces from all causes from the time the first unit landed in France until hostilities ceased.

source: Lincoln County Times. (Jerome, Idaho), 21 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

Payette Enterprise., November 21, 1918, Page 1

19181121PE1
Personal and Local Mention

W. D. Case left Tuesday evening for Twin Falls in response to a message announcing the serious illness of a brother who is living at that place.

The influenza seems to about had its run in this community and we can consider ourselves very fortunate. Not a single death in Payette from the disease. The quarantine will be lifted Sunday morning when all social and business functions will be resumed without any interference. Schools will open again on Monday morning and unless a new outbreak of the disease occurs we can all go about our daily work feeling much relieved.

Dr. J. C. Woodward went to Nyssa Wednesday to attend several cases of influenza.

Miss Grace Prindle who has been quite bad with the Flu, is now on the road to recovery.

Miss Elsie Blomstrom, a volunteer nurse for the influenza cases, who has been seriously ill with the disease, is now improving.

The County Bards of Health announces that all closing restrictions have been lifted and that all stores will remain open on Saturday night until nine o’clock. So far the closing on other evenings at 5 o’clock will be continued for a time at least.
— —

The C. F. Wayne family are still in quarantine, but are not seriously ill.

J. J. Pine is recovering from a severe attack of erysipelas – not influenza.

The T. F. Newberry family of Willow Creek, five in number, are all down with the influenza.

source: Payette Enterprise. (Payette, Canyon Co., Idaho), 21 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Payette Enterprise., November 21, 1918, Page 5

19181121PE2
Fruitland Department
Mrs. R. G. Wilson

“As ‘Twas Told To Me”.
Personal Notes

Mary Pritzl came home from Ontario Hospital Saturday. She hopes to be well enough to return to help in the hospital next week.

Miss Bertha Blind came home from eastern Idaho because of her mother’s illness. Mrs. Blind is much improved.

Mrs. O. B. Cain is on the sick list.

A letter from Harold Vestal says after being in the hospital over a week with the “Flu” he is now able to be about again.

Mrs. C. I. Tussing received word last week that her cousin, Miss Enid McKern of Mt. Vernon, Ore., had died of influenza which developed into pneumonia. Miss McKern, with her sister, spent last fall and part of the winter at the Tussing home helping in the fruit, and while here made many friends. She was taking nurse training work in the Baker hospital when taken sick.
— —

19181121PE3
North Payette

Osee and Ruth Jackson are recovering from a light attack of la grip.

M. A. Burt and family have been quarantined for the influenza. All are recovering and will be able to be out next week.

If no more cases of influenza develop school will begin in Dist. No. 1 on Monday, Nov. 25th.

source: Payette Enterprise. (Payette, Canyon Co., Idaho), 21 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

The Emmett Index. November 21, 1918, Page 1

19181121EI2
The Flu Quarantine Is Lifted
Public Gatherings Permitted – Schools, Churches, Etc., Open Sunday.

The restrictions against the holding of public gatherings on account of the influenza epidemic will be revoked Sunday, and churches and theatres will be permitted to open on that day. The order also covers pool halls, and the amusements furnished by those places will be resumed Monday.

Schools Open Monday.

The schools throughout the state will open Monday. Teachers and pupils are returning to take up their interrupted work. While no definite plans have been formulated as to the method to be adopted for making up the time lost, it is quite certain that no vacation will be given at Christmas time, excepting Christmas day. the suggestion is made that the hours of each day’s session be lengthened, and some suggest that an extra session on Saturday might be advisable. This, however it is said, would work somewhat of a hardship with students who are holding positions outside of school hours, thereby assisting in their maintenance at school. Some plan will no doubt be decided upon very soon. It is suggested that parents watch the health of the child very closely and keep any child from school who has grip symptoms, thereby preventing the possible spread of any contagious disease.
— —

Present indications are that local draft boards will be out of a job by January first. This will be no source of regret to anyone concerned.
— —

19181121EI1
Lecture Course Next Week

The influenza quarantine prevented the appearance of the American Girls Trio, the second number in the Lecture Course, in October. As the ban will be lifted Sunday, the postponed number will be given Monday night in the Liberty Theatre. In this company are three talented young women – wonderfully versatile and typically American. Misses Grace and Virgie Byatt and Vera Miller are from the same western city and for several seasons have toured under Redpath management. The diversified program which they present includes saxophone and banjo trios, vocal numbers, solos on a variety of instruments, readings and character songs in costume. It is an entertainment that will please everyone.

source: The Emmett Index. (Emmett, Idaho), 21 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Emmett Index. November 21, 1918, Page 2

19181121EIFlag
— —

The man of the house was reading aloud to the family. “To escape the influenza,” he read, “keep a clean mouth, clean hands, a clean skin and wear clean clothes.” There was silence for a moment and then up spoke the tousle haired 10-year-old: “Gee whilikins, it sure will get me. The only time I’ve got any chance at all is on Saturday night.”

source: The Emmett Index. (Emmett, Idaho), 21 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Emmett Index. November 21, 1918, Page 8

19181121EI3
News Of Gem County
By The Index’s Correspondent

Letha

School will begin on Monday, Nov. 25, as the State Board of Health have released their order for quarantine.

A late report says that Mrs. Ralph Vanderdassen is much improved and the chances are good for her recovery.

There will be church and Sunday school at the Baptist church at the usual hour Sunday.

It is said that the Tom Clark family are afflicted with smallpox, all but a couple of them being down.
— —

Haw Creek.
By Mrs. E. Tennyson.

Mrs. Matt Bilbirey has received word that her daughter, Mrs. Floyd Fowler of Burley was quite sick with Spanish influenza.
— —

Bramwell
By E. F. Wells.

School will start again Monday, and we believe the kiddies, as well as the teacher, will be glad to resume their work again after five weeks of enforced vacation.

The Tom Clark family seem to be having more than their share of sickness. After all having a round with the influenza they are now all sick with the smallpox. They say they do not know where they contracted the disease. Dr. Cummings is attending them and reports them as getting along nicely.
— —

South Slope
By Mrs. C. W. Cook

Mrs. B. S. Wright has been quite ill this week but is improving now.

Miss Grace Cook returned to her school duties near Weiser on Wednesday.

Mrs. Ray Stinson received a request from the school in which Miss Grace Cook is employed, to act as substitute for Professor Beckwith who was called to Iowa Saturday by illness in his family who are there on a visit. Mrs. Stinson made hasty preparations and departed to accept the work.
— —

Central Mesa
Regina Conrad

Mrs. B. L. Limbaugh was on the sick list several days last week.

Sunday school next Sunday at 2 p.m. Preaching at 3 by Rev. Lanmann. Everybody is cordially invited.
— —

Hanna
By Mrs. J. I. Guthrie

School will reopen in District 4 on Monday, Nov. 25. The school board released Miss Norwood from her contract as teacher in order that she might accept an important position in the Bank of Emmett. Her place has been filled by Mrs. Clair Shane, who is not a stranger in this district, having taught here a few years ago.

source: The Emmett Index. (Emmett, Idaho), 21 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Idaho County Free Press. November 21, 1918, Page 1

19181121ICFP1
Raise Influenza Quarantine on Sunday
Public and Private Schools of State Will Resume Next Monday
Local Officials May Act
In Sections of Idaho Where Epidemic Is Not Schecked, Closing Order May Be Continued.
Lift Quarantine.

The quarantine to prevent spread of influenza will be lifted in Idaho county Sunday, in accordance with the ruling by the state board of health.

Dr. G. S. Stockton, county health officer, today issued the following statement:

“The intensity of the influenza epidemic has subsided sufficiently that ordinary business can be resumed.”

Public schools throughout the county except in Grangeville, will resume Monday, according to information available today from the office for the county superintendent of schools. The Grangeville schools will open on Monday, December 2. The delay in opening the schools here is due to the fact that many of the pupils have suffered from influenza and have not entirely recovered their strength. Inasmuch as the Thanksgiving holiday comes next week, only four days would be available for school.

The state-wide closing order, which has been in effect in Idaho for more than a month, to prevent spread of Spanish influenza, will be lifted next Sunday, according to information obtained from the state board of health.

Churches and theaters will resume on Sunday, while public schools will open on Monday. The order lifting the ban was issued on the strength of reports that the epidemic is on the wane.

In localities where local conditions preclude the permitting of public assemblages, local health officials are authorized by the state board of health to continue the quarantine locally.

Public assemblages have been prohibited in the state since October 10, and public and private schools have been closed since October 21.
— —

Influenza Takes Oscar Roos
Former Station Agent at Fenn Dies in Lewiston, Ida.

Oscar Roos, former agent for the Camas Prairie railroad at Fenn, died on November 12 from pneumonia, following Spanish influenza. Death occurred in the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Roos, in Lewiston.

Mr. Roos, who was 27 years of age, is survived by his widow, his parents and several brothers and sisters. M. A. Roos, postmaster at Whitebird, is one of his brothers.

Mr. Roos has been in the employ of the Camas Prairie railroad for four years. He left Fenn last summer to accept a position in the offices of the company at Lewiston.

The funeral was held on October 14 in Lewiston.

source: Idaho County Free Press. (Grangeville, Idaho Territory), 21 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Idaho County Free Press. November 21, 1918, Page 3

Toll of Influenza

Though complete figures on influenza mortality to date are not available, enough data on the toll of the disease in the United States has been complied as to give grim evidence of the terrible inroad [it] has made on the civilian and military populations of the United States proper.

Even in our community, where numerous deaths have occurred, and where for a time from one to two funeral processions were witnessed every day, the loss has been appalling. When one considered that the death rate from influenza in eastern cities has reached as high as 7.4 per thousand, and that in forty-six cities reporting on influenza mortality, with a population of 23,000,000, a total of 82,306 deaths has occurred, he can acquire some conception of the enormity of losses throughout the country.

The census bureau is sponsor for the statement that deaths from influenza in the United States have exceeded all deaths among the American Expeditionary forces in France. It is estimated that total casualties among the American troops is 100,000, which includes dead, wounded and missing. Of this number from 40 to 45 percent will cover the dead, thus placing the highest possible number of dead, when all casualties are reported, at 50,000.

With less than one-fourth of the country reporting on influenza deaths, it already can be truthfully said, so far as the American nation is concerned, that disease is more deadly than war.
— —

A moonshine still was discovered in the basement of a building in the business section of Moscow, following the peace celebration last week. Which illustrated that elimination of war worries doesn’t terminate all worries – for some persons.
— —

Since peace has been restored, the election is over and the influenza has been subdued, conditions should rapidly assume the normal.

source: Idaho County Free Press. (Grangeville, Idaho Territory), 21 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Idaho County Free Press. November 21, 1918, Page 5

19181121ICFP2
Whitebird

Mr. and Mrs. E. C. Smith returned home from Pasco, Wn., Saturday. Mrs. Smith had been in a hospital. She was suffering from influenza.

While in Lewiston E. C. Smith visited Mr. Berry at the White hospital. Mr. Berry is getting along nicely and hoped to be up soon. Dick Wyatt is nursing him.

source: Idaho County Free Press. (Grangeville, Idaho Territory), 21 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Idaho County Free Press. November 21, 1918, Page 8

19181121ICFP3
Local News in Brief

Taylor Recovering – H. Taylor is recovering from an attack of Spanish influenza. The disease was in a mild form.

Services at Whitebird – Father Phelan will hold services in Whitebird on net Sunday, November 24th, at 10:30 and on Monday at 8:30.

No Services – The Federated church will not hold services Sunday as it has been considered wiser to delay another week. J. J. Wood, pastor.

Bayless Has Flu – T. A. Bayless, local manager for the Grangeville Light & Power Co, was a victim of Spanish influenza, but now is well on the way to recovery.

Bowling Alleys to Open – The Bradbury bowling alleys will be opened Monday night, under the management of Ed Schmadeka. Bowling has in the past proven a popular diversion for Grangeville men and it is believed much interest will be manifested in contests to be staged with the opening of the alleys.

Pleased with Military – Jacob and Emery Briscoe, who are members of the S. A. T. C. at Moscow, write home that they are well pleased with military life. Emery, however, lost three weeks’ training by reason of having been ill with Spanish influenza, and he says he must hustle to keep up with the boys who were not ill.

At the Christian Church – Regular services will be resumed at the Christian church next Sunday. …
— —

Personal

Probate Judge Wilbur Campbell was stricken on Sunday with Spanish influenza. The disease is said to be in a mild form. Cases set for hearing in the probate court this week were necessarily postponed because of illness of the judge.

Deputy Sheriff John Powell returned to his work late last week, after having been confined for some time to his home by a severe attack of Spanish influenza. For a time but little hope was entertained for his recovery, but Deputy Powell fought the disease with fortitude and recovered.

J. A. Stewart, who resides on a ranch on the South Fork near the power plant, was a pleasant caller at the Free Press office Monday. Mr. Stewart had just recovered from an attack of Spanish influenza, which caused him to be confined to the Grangeville hospital for two weeks.

Mr. and Mrs. L. W. Zehner of Fenn were in Grangeville Saturday, and were pleasant callers at the Free Press office. They have been obliged to close their hotel at Fenn, because of lack of business, but hope to b able to reopen it [at] an early date. During the period the hotel is closed, they are caring for the traveling public in their home.

source: Idaho County Free Press. (Grangeville, Idaho Territory), 21 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., November 21, 1918, Page 1

19181121DSM1
The Influenza Becomes Scattered
New Cases Developing In Widely Scattered Sections of Town and County

There are a number of new cases of influenza in Moscow and surrounding country that have developed within the past few days. The disease seems to be getting scattered over a wider territory and invading the farming districts where it had not been before. Dr. Stevenson reports three new cases today in widely scattered sections and says he expects many new cases to develop in rural districts and sections where it has not appeared before. He cautions the people to be very careful and to report all suspicious symptoms as soon as they appear in order to prevent the disease getting established among the school children. Dr. Stevenson says one of the teachers in the Moscow schools is quite sick with the disease and will not be able to teach when school opens next Monday.

That the disease is getting well scattered in the country districts is shown by reports from various sections. It was announced that schools in Latah county would be open next Monday. early this morning the clerk of a rural school district called Mrs. R. B. Knepper, county school superintendent, by telephone and asked if it is compulsory to open schools Monday. He reported a number of cases of influenza among school children of the district. He was told that it is the duty of the school board to keep the schools closed as long as there is thought to be any danger.

The general situation, however, shows much improvement and conditions are becoming normal again. All new cases reported recently are of a very mild type and every day more convalescents are being released. There are fewer cases in the hospitals than at any time since the first week the epidemic struck Moscow.
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19181121DSM2
Investigation at W. S. C. Awakens Much Interest

PULLMAN, Wash., Nov. 20. — Roger S. Sanborn of Spokane today detailed to the board of regents of Washington State college and Governor Ernest Lister the circumstances regarding the death of his son, a member of the student army training corps, during the recent epidemic of Spanish influenza. He came at the request of the governor, who is taking up with the board Mr. Sanborn’s published charges that neglect and dereliction of duty by those in charge were responsible for the death of his boy.

The board is in regular session and has heard a score of other witnesses and persons connected with the handling of the epidemic situation, and will continue its hearing tomorrow. The purpose of the investigation is that a complete statement may be made of the full extent of the dilemma here, its causes, why it spread, its extent, the measures adopted to combat it and criticism or prosecution, if it is determined that any is desired by those in authority.

Sanborn Repeats Charges.

Mr. Sanborn repeated the experiences he encountered in the attempt to visit his son, that he believed the authorities were gambling with the lives of the young people, both boys and girls, and that the arrangements, especially the transfer of sick boys from one place to another was detrimental in the treatment of their cases.

Mr. Sanborn took the viewpoint that he was not appearing as a witness at an investigation; that if negligence existed the board of regents was equally culpable with the military and school authorities and that he favored a thorough probe of the entire matter, if it was to be taken up at all.

With Mr. Sanborn’s statement as a basis, the board of regents is asking statements of more than 50 physicians, clergymen, nurses, hospital heads and has invited any person who believes he or she is able to add any light in regard to the situation, to appear.

Will Publish Findings.

The hoard is meeting behind closed doors with the intention of making its findings public later. Physicians were present from nearby towns today. These were men who had been called in during the height of the epidemic, and they told of the emergency and what measures were taken. Their testimony taken separately tends to confirm that of the authorities who decided to place sick men in the churches. These buildings, they say, were of recent construction. were well heated, airy and made it possible for one nurse to attend to several sufferers. Placing the men in the large auditoriums has resulted in much complaint.

Despite this pitiful situation the physicians maintain that it was the best thing to be done, as there were insufficient nurses for those suffering and as every city in this region was also in the throes of the epidemic, more were not procurable. In this connection, it was stated that E. T. Coman, president of the board, made a thorough canvass of Spokane daily in attempts to secure additional aid. This, in answer to Mr. Sanborn’s charge that Mr. Coman paid no attention to the difficulties being encountered here.

New Arrivals Spread Epidemic.

It was brought out that the epidemic had made slight headway here up to October 15, on which date 600 new members of the S. A. T. C. arrived from points all over the state. In addition 150 other S. A. T. C. men, who were to have been transferred, were held unexpectedly to the college and military authorities. Within a few days after the arrival of these men the epidemic was raging. Ten days thereafter it reached its crest, with nearly 400 cases.

Every available facility, so far as the citizens here are able to determine, was brought into play. Men and women left their homes and worked night and day, the witnesses told the regents, in their efforts to alleviate the suffering. A strong guard was placed about the campus and the temporary hospitals, as discipline must be maintained. The physical work of caring for so many was enormous. They must be fed and given the best attention possible. Of the 850 cases recorded during the crisis 41 died.

Limit to Nursing Resources.

To provide the utmost care with the nursing forces available was the question which confronted the officials. To this end it was found expedient to move some of the sufferers more frequently than was perhaps good for them, and the parents of these men having heard of conditions were much distraught. In answer to the charge that the girls’ dormitory, Stevens’ hall, should have been vacated by the young women, the regents were informed that it was believed no good could have been accomplished. The hall is four stories high, with the kitchen in the basement, and it has no elevator. Its capacity is 80, and the physicians agreed that less than half that number of sick could have been properly cared for there.

The physicians also advised against permitting the young women to attempt entrance at that time in face of the danger. On the other hand, it was stated that many of the young women students living there had come to college with barely sufficient funds for the year, that if ordered to get out they would have faced a serious predicament. As it. was the young women devoted their entire time to the work so necessary. They turned out hundreds of sheets, icebags, masks and other equipment most needed.

The regents heard hundreds of instances of personal sacrifice by the people of Pullman and nearby towns. When the force of professional women without children were accepted. Many parents who came to look after their own sons remained to join the nursing force. The regents were presented with a number of letters from parents whose sons died. In them every expression of appreciation for the care given the young men is contained.

Colonel W. T. May, commandant of the S. A. T. C.. and the highest military authority here. declined an invitation to appear, stating that he had nothing further to say than what he had stated at a meeting in Spokane with President Holland, Mr. Coman and Dean Kimbrough. He declared that if charges were filed with the war department, that department would make investigations and would call on military officials for statements. It was pointed out by members of the board that the military officials, through the government’s contract with the state, were in complete control of the members of the S. A. T. C., and that this control included medical arrangements, but that in any unanticipated situation as at other times, the college authorities stood ready to meet all demands made upon them.

Critics Failed to Appear.

Mrs. A. P. Johnson of Garfield, whose activity appears to have been especially irritating to citizens here, did not respond to an invitation to appear. Dr. C. S. Kalb of Spokane likewise failed to accept the regents’ invitation. The expenses of those asked to testify is borne by the state. Dr. Kalb was among the physicians who attended Mr. Sanborn’s son.
— —

Parents Warned to Watch Their Children

Owing to the fact that there are still a few cases of influenza in town, it will be necessary to exercise a good deal of caution in the children returning to school. Anyone having sickness in the family must not allow their children to return to school until they have secured a certificate from the physician stating that the influenza is not the case of their sickness. This applies also to those who think they have only bad colds, as these so-called colds are often a mild form of the influenza, or later develop into it. These precautions must be taken for the protection of the schools.

Dr. W. A. Adair, City Health Officer
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Volunteer Nurse Takes Influenza But Recovers

Miss A. H. Lampert, stenographer for the Potlatch Lumber company at Potlatch, and a very competent newspaper correspondent for several newspapers, volunteered to nurse the sick at Moscow during the height of the influenza epidemic and did some valuable work. She was taken ill with the disease and was confined to her bed at the Idaho hotel for more than a week, but today was able to be out on the street and will return to Potlatch tomorrow.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 21 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., November 21, 1918, Page 2

Newsy Notes From Moscow Mountain Neighborhood

H. D. Hadden and two children are sick of influenza, but they are getting along well.

The family of J. W. Leith are ill of influenza.

The family of T. Armstrong are improving from their illness of influenza.

Mrs. Clinton Havens is ill of a light case of influenza.

The country schools will open Monday except in those districts where there are too many influenza cases.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 21 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., November 21, 1918, Page 3

19181112DSM2
City News

Mrs. George O’Donnell returned yesterday from visiting her daughter Florence (Sister Clement), who is ill with influenza, but is now improving.

The children of James Canham are ill with influenza.

Miss Irene Beardsley is recovering from a severe attack of pleurisy.

Mrs. Ricketts of Pullman, father of Isaac Ricketts, is quite ill with pneumonia at the home of Mrs. O. W. Beardsley.

Mrs. W. S. Cady delivered six pints of fine jelly for the soldiers at the Inland hospital.
— —

Not Guilty.

Old man “flu” never got into action at the Kenworthy. A germ never did and never can live in the Kenworthy. Why? Easy! The theater is always kept well ventilated – not by any fancy method, but by the open door and window process.

That’s nature’s own way of sanitation and prevention. You can’t beat it. Doctors will tell you the same thing.

What do we mean by the open-window way? Simply the old-fashioned way, the same as you would do to get proper air in your own home.

Open the window and allow the good Idaho air to come right in. But with the theater we have an advantage over the home as there are air vents in the ceiling over the auditorium and stage to carry off the ad air and sent it out where it can do no damage. Nearly everyone in Moscow has noticed the doors of the Kenworthy open wide during the day. That is done to grab all the air that is possible and keep the house fresh at all times. During the enforced vacation the house has been thoroughly scrubbed, fumigated and cleaned, and if any old germ came pes?ing around he would die of a broken heart. Next Monday Moscow will resume business life as of old and the Kenworthy will open again and you can rest assured that the health and comfort of the patrons is the most important thing at all times.
— —

Red Cross Wants All Bills Rendered Promptly

The Red Cross requests that all bills for material, services or other expense incurred during influenza epidemic be mailed to the secretary not later than Saturday, Nov. 23.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 21 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., November 21, 1918, Page 4

William Rivers is Home on a Furlough

Wm. Rivers, who is home on a three weeks’ furlough from his post in the shipping board service, says he does not know when the boys will be mustered out. He made a trip to Honolulu with the S. S. Mazama, having a crew of 47 men, capable of carrying a cargo of 30,000 tons. They carried provisions for the civilians and soldiers on the island. The influenza has been a severe epidemic on some ships, but not on the Mazama, where there were but three light cases. There are very few cases on the Hawaiian island among the civilians, for the sailors are carefully quarantined.
— —

Idaho Home Guards to be State Militia

Boise. – Idaho’s home guard companies may become the 34rd Idaho with the passage of a militia bill by the next legislature.

The state laws provide for a militia, but the state’s military organization was lost when the 2nd Idaho was federalized in August, 1917. Guard companies organized this year over the state under the home guard act will probably become companies in the new state regiment.

Officer for the new regiment will be selected by the companies, and staff officers will be selected by the company officers. Funds for maintenance of the state militia are included in the adjutant general’s biennial appropriation.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 21 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Nezperce Herald., November 21, 1918, Page 2

19181121NH2
Steele News.

Ed Choke, of Tekan, is seriously ill of the influenza at the home of his brother-in-law, Everett Horn.

Mrs. John Warlick is recovering from a severe attack of the flu.

source: The Nezperce Herald. (Nezperce, Idaho), 21 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Nezperce Herald., November 21, 1918, Page 7

19181121NH1
Local and Personal News Notes

Yes, the picture show will open Sunday.

A. W. Dant went to Lewiston Saturday to spend a few days recuperating from a recent attack of the flu.

Miss Esther Smith went to Lewiston Tuesday to assist in nursing the influenza patients during the epidemic there.

A. J. Sweeney and J. G. Adams went to Orofino Monday to assist in taking care of the influenza patients at the hospital there. Mr. Sweeney returned Tuesday, and brought the word that Orofino had her epidemic pretty well in hand; there being about 30 cases in the hospital, but all except one had escaped dangerous complications.
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19181121NHadBank

source: The Nezperce Herald. (Nezperce, Idaho), 21 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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1920sJeromeFritz-a
(click image for larger size)
Main Street, Jerome, Idaho [1920s]

source: the Mike Fritz Collection.
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Nov 22

The Rathdrum Tribune., November 22, 1918, Page 1

19181122RT1
Flu Ban Is Lifted
Subject to Local Conditions Throughout the State.

Boise, Idaho. – Churches and theatres of the state will again be filled Sunday, November 24, and public schools will resume their schedules the following Monday.

Orders to lift all restrictions imposed because of the epidemic of Spanish influenza were issued Thursday afternoon to county health officials by the state board of health, on the strength of reports indicating that the epidemic is rapidly diminishing.

One o’clock Sunday morning, November 24, is the time set for the removal of the restrictions. The only contingency that might cause restrictions to be continued is that local conditions might not justify a relaxation of precautions. In such cases local health officials are authorized to maintain the quarantine until improvement results. …

“It goes without saying that we expect rigid observance until the restrictions are removed,” said Dr. E. T. Biwer, secretary of the state board of health, Thursday. …
— —

19181122RT2
From Over The County

Post Falls

Charles Eggers, aged 21, died of influenza-pneumonia at Spirit Lake Nov. 7 and was buried in Pleasant View cemetery.

Harrison

Numerous cases and a few deaths from influenza are reported in this part of the county.

Coeur d’Alene

The city health officer reported the influenza situation much improved Monday.

The funeral of Dr. Alexander Cairns who succumbed to pneumonia Nov. 15, was held from the Mooney undertaking parlors Sunday at 2:30 p.m. His death is directly attributable to his zealous attention to duty during the epidemic of pneumonia and influenza in this section. Dr. Cairns made daily trips to Spirit Lake, where he had 30 patients, and this added to the attention he gave his practice in this city kept him up night and day.

Sudden change of weather and overzealous celebration of the end of the war is given by physicians as the cause of the alarming increase of influenza, la grippe and pneumonia cases here last week. One Physician reported 24 new cases to City health officer Evans Nov. 15, and it was conservatively estimated that no less than 60 cases had developed in the previous 48 hours.

source: The Rathdrum Tribune. (Rathdrum, Idaho), 22 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Rathdrum Tribune., November 22, 1918, Page 3

19181122RT3
Local Paragraphs.

School reopens Dec. 2.

Next Thursday is Thanksgiving day.

The churches resume holding services Sunday.

County Sup’t R. C. Egbers announces that schools of the county may reopen after this week at the discretion of the boards, the influenza ban being lifted. This means that schools can legally open next Monday if it is desired.

No board meetings had been held for more than a month, due largely to the influenza closing order, but the school board met Tuesday and the village trustees expect to meet next Monday evening. The local advisory committee has continued to meet from time to time as its duties required.
— —

Schools to Open December 2.

At a meeting of the board of education held last Tuesday evening it was decided to re-open the schools Monday, Dec. 2nd. Under tentative plans for making up the time lost, outlined by Supt. Swenson, there will be an actual loss of only eight teaching days. There will be no vacation during the holidays except Christmas day and New Year’s day. The usual teachers’ institute of one week will be eliminated this year, and the school year may be lengthened in the spring.

Owing to the fact that no vacation will be had during Christmas, the board felt that the teachers should be permitted to spend Thanksgiving at home, even tho the epidemic situation might warrant the opening of school next Monday. Also, it was feared that many parents would not send their children until after Thanksgiving, – especially those from outside the district of whom there are many.

It is urged very emphatically that pupils begin promptly with the re-opening of school, and that they be in regular attendance the entire school year. Harder work than under usual conditions must naturally be exacted if the year’s work is to be satisfactorily finished.

source: The Rathdrum Tribune. (Rathdrum, Idaho), 22 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Oakley Herald. November 22, 1918, Page 1

19181122OH1
Influenza Ban To Be Lifted

Orders have been issued by the state board of health to life the Spanish influenza ban on Nov. 24. This does not indicate that the quarantine will be discontinued in every section of the state at the same time. Local health boards are authorized to maintain restrictions as long as conditions may require.

The Cassia Stake Academy will open Monday for local students, but not for those from sections where the disease is still raging.

The local board has decided not to open the public school next Monday. It may open a week from then.
— —

19181122OH2
Influenza Situation Still Serious

There are still a number of cases of influenza, although it is not spreading as fast as formerly. The situation at Burley is better than last week, but still very bad. At Rupert conditions are so serious that no one is permitted to leave the town.

There are twelve cases at Golden Valley in one family.

This epidemic in the United States has taken more lives than we lost in this Great War.

Quarantine regulations should be strictly adhered to till the disease is under control.
— —

Locals and Personals.

Charles Dayley has been sick since Sunday.

B. T. Judd who has been ill for over a week is now rapidly improving.

Leonard Price was brought home from Paul Saturday with the influenza.

Up to this time the influenza epidemic has not reached the Moulton section.

Eugene Burrell, who formerly operated a ranch at Warm Cree, died from influenza at Burley last week.

Jake Levin, a brother of Morris Levin’s, died last week at Burley from influenza, and was buried at Salt Lake City.

Dr. O. C. Engebretson returned Sunday from Burley where he had been called by the illness of his partner, Dr. W. R. Jones.

source: The Oakley Herald. (Oakley, Idaho), 22 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Oakley Herald. November 22, 1918, Page 8

Idaho Budget

The validity of the state and county boards of health closing order during the present influenza epidemic as against business colleges, is questioned in a suit filed by M. S. Hoover, proprietor of the Gregg Business college, Twin Falls.

Judge J. F. Cowen of the Custer county district court telegraphed to the governor an appeal for state troops to help him force his way into Custer county, which was closed by a quarantine regulation designed to debar Spanish influenza. The attorney general held that the quarantine was legal and that court dates were not of sufficient importance to justify calling state troops to aid the judge and court attaches to enter the county.

Health conditions are nut such yet as to justify any relaxing of precautions against the epidemic of Spanish influenza, and reports being circulated in some parts of the state that the order against holding of public meetings is soon to be lifted are false.

The influenza situation in Pocatello reached a point where Mayor A. B. Bear asked the citizens to subscribe to a $5000 fund to be used in caring for the numerous victims who are suffering with the disease. The money will be disbursed by the civilian relief committee.

source: The Oakley Herald. (Oakley, Idaho), 22 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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American Falls Press. November 22, 1918, Page 1

19181122AFP1

The ban on public meetings in Power county will not be lifted the 24th. The number of influenza cases that have developed during the week have created a sentiment against a too hasty action, and reconciled citizens to a continuation of the band. It is said that fifty cases have developed during the past five days, the majority of them being in American Falls. Fifteen cases were reported in one day. This is the high mark of the week, and by continuing the ban it is hoped to make it the high mark for future weeks and months. One and possibly two cases have developed in the county offices this week, and many may have been exposed, as there are many daily caller. While all are anxious to have the ban lifted as soon as it can be done with safety, all are in favor of going slowly in this direction.

source: American Falls Press. (American Falls, Idaho), 22 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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American Falls Press. November 22, 1918, Page 4

19181122AFP2
People and Events.

Mrs. S. H. McCullough is indisposed and was forced to take to her ed yesterday afternoon.

Nest Thursday is Thanksgiving. If the flu will let up a little, and the boys begin to come home, there will be little more left to want.

Miss F. Nettie Rice is at home, a probably victim of influenza. Just at this time, when the treasurer’s office is working to the limit to get ready for the taxpaying period, it is very inconvenient to be sick, but the flu is no discriminator

Dr. Noth walked up town Wednesday, the first time he has been out for several weeks.

G. S. Wennstrom was down town yesterday. He has been a flu victim for the past week.

James Hauschildt, the 4-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Hauschildt, was taken with influenza yesterday. This makes the whole family victims of the disease.

Harry Stearman, who has been assisting in caring for J. S. Abercrombie, is reported to have come down with influenza yesterday afternoon, necessitating the securing of other help. Mr. Abercrombie is still very sick, but is reported to be holding his own.

Mrs. Henry Fedler and Miss Mary Fedler of Pleasant Valley were in American Falls yesterday. They are glad to say that their household had so far been fortunate enough to be free from any cases of influenza. Some of their relatives, whoever, were not so fortunate.

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Hauschildt are both confined to their home with influenza, which they contracted in looking after neighbors who were afflicted. They are both quite sick, but are making satisfactory progress. They came down Wednesday morning. Mrs. A. F. Hughes is taking care of them.

J. L. McKown spent yesterday in the vicinity of Aberdeen, and reports that the flue is all too prevalent there to suit either visitors or residents. He found many families with one or more members down with the disease. Mr. McKown returned from Twin Falls but a few days ago and says there was a wave of new cases following the peace celebrations, but that conditions there are not so unsatisfactory as here.

source: American Falls Press. (American Falls, Idaho), 22 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

The Idaho Recorder. November 22, 1918, Page 5

19181122TIR1
Salmon Locals

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Sherwood and their little child were all seriously ill from their attack of the flu, but are now happily out again.

Rumors are persistent that Judge Cowen intends to resign early in the coming year to devote his attention to the care of his fine farm near Blackfoot.

The Grand Theatre will reopen Sunday, November 24, with a good program and the house well heated and ventilated for the comfort of the patrons.

W. B. Horn and W. H. Shoup were both kept at home this week by slight attacks of flu.

George W. Cronkrite, probate judge-elect, left this week for his old home at Cave-In-Rock, Illinois, where he will spend the Thanksgiving and Christmas holidays. This will be his first visit home in twenty years and he will see a brother and sister who still live there. A nephew from the same place was in training at Camp Custer not long ago when he contracted fatal influenza. Judge Cronkrite had arranged to leave sooner for this visit but was detained by the demands of friends of his on Sandy creek who were suffering from the same disease but now all have recovered. The remarkable fact is reported by him that all but half a dozen of the 40 voters in that school district were kept from casting their ballots by the epidemic and that furthermore of those kept at home all were expected to vote one way.

Mrs. Gilbreath and Mrs Mathewson are both convalescent from severe flu attacks. Mrs. Gilbreath is the wife of the new country treasurer, Earl R. Gilbreath, and Mrs. Mathewson the wife of C. G. Mathewson.
— —

Notice

The order heretofore made, prohibiting all indoor meetings, gathering or congregations of persons, on account of the prevalence of the Spanish Influenza, is hereby rescinded, and such meetings shall be permissible after 1 o’clock a.m. Sunday, November 24th, 1918, but not before said time.

L. E. Glennon, Mayor.

source: The Idaho Recorder. (Salmon City, Idaho), 22 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Idaho Recorder. November 22, 1918, Page 8

[top of page cut off]

… Challis Mail

The salmon river road is blocked against vehicles beyond Pahsimaroi towards Challis. Two of three cars have managed to get through to May and beyond but the citizens of May are supposed to regard their presence as a menace, where so far there have been no appearance of flu.

The worst privation connected with this quarantine regulation has been the lack of mail facilities along the salmon river. The Pahsimaroi valley has been served in part from the other end of the route and so have other interior localities to some extent, but the star route from Salmon to May and Challis has been out of business for nearly a month. At the stage office of O’Connel & Bellamy yesterday it was said that they had no information as to the further duration of the regulations now in force against all comers from the outside. Mails have been dispatched regularly from Salmon to all the interior post offices except those on the Challis route.
— —

County Superintendent Anna C. Barron has mailed out notices to the various school districts, as follows:

To the Trustees of Lemhi County:

This is to give formal notice that the sate board of health has announced that the closing order will be lifted November 24th; that means our schools will open November 25th. Of course if local conditions do not justify a relaxation of precautions, local health officials will issue the necessary orders.

Yours very truly, Anna C. Barron, County Superintendent.
— —

Leadore

Corlis Morphy, who a short time ago went to Missoula, Mont., where he enlisted with the marines, is in St. Patrick’s hospital in that city ill with influenza.

Mrs. and Mrs. Leon Sells are living in Leadore temporarily while Mr. Sells is acting health officer.

Dr. and Mrs. Hart have gone to Missoula, Mont., where Mrs. Hart’s son, Phil Shenon, is ill with influenza. Word has been received that Mr. Shenon is better.

Kenneth Shenon has charge of the Hart Pharmacy during Dr. Hart’s absence.

The Vezina and Carlson families have been released from quarantine. We are glad to note that all have recovered.

Leadore is still under quarantine and there have been no cases of influenza in town.

The school authorities have received permission to begin school next Monday, November 25, but the local health boars as well as portions of school do not want school to start for a couple of weeks yet.

source: The Idaho Recorder. (Salmon City, Idaho), 22 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

Clearwater Republican. November 22, 1918, Page 1

19181122CR1
Over 50 Cases of Influenza In Orofino and No Deaths

While Orofino has for the last ten days been sorely afflicted with an epidemic of influenza, over fifty cases having developed, the community has been very fortunate in that there has not been a death up to this date. In a measure this can be accounted for by prompt medical attention and good nursing. Ample precautions had been taken and the school house had been put in readiness to comfortably receive patients needing hospital attention. After there were no more accommodations at the school house the Methodist church was utilized for hospital purposes. At this writing all the patients are reported as not dangerously ill, and a few have been discharged.
— —

A. J. Sweeney, a druggist from Nezperce, came to Orofino and assisted in the care of the patients at the influenza hospital Monday night. Other Nezperce citizens have kindly reciprocated in assisting Orofino since the outbreak of the malady in this section.

Mr. and Mrs. Homer Cohun and little son have been influenza patients at the hospital. One day some one had generously supplied the hospital with chicken broth, and a nurse asked the youngster if he would like some chicken soup. The little fellow replied: “No, but I will take a leg.”

Miss Nellie Roberts returned from Lewiston Saturday and has been assisting at the hospital.
— —

Thanksgiving Day.

The influenza ban prohibits public meetings. Be sure and remember the day at home with earnest thanksgiving to Almighty God for peace, prosperity and the multiplied blessings we enjoy.

F. L. Moore, Pastor.

source: Clearwater Republican. (Orofino, Idaho), 22 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

The Kendrick Gazette. November 22, 1918, Page 1

19181122KG1
For Children’s Home

John Howland, district superintendent of the Children’s Home Finding and Aid Society of Idaho, was in Kendrick Tuesday. He stated that gifts of potatoes, beans and vegetables would be greatly appreciated if sent to the Children’s Home at Lewiston. The children there need 30 sacks of either red or white beans and any wholesome food that could be brought in from the farm.

There are more children there than usual on account of the orphans left in the wake of the influenza epidemic. There were seventeen cases of flu in the Children’s Home but no deaths.
— —

Stores Closed Thanksgiving

The business men of Kendrick have agreed to close their stores all day Thursday, Nov. 28, and will observe Thanksgiving day in a fitting manner. They have expressed the sentiment that never before in the history of the world have the people had greater cause to be thankful than on this Thanksgiving day.
— —

Latah Schools Open Monday

The state board of health has sent out instructions to the effect that the quarantine will be lifted in Idaho, Sunday, Nov. 24, and that schools maybe opened Monday. However it is optionary with the local and county health officers to decide whether the influenza epidemic has been sufficiently checked to warrant the opening of schools in the county. It is said that the Moscow churches will hold services next Sunday.
— —

School Not Open Here

At a meeting of the Kendrick school board Wednesday night it was decided to keep the school closed another week in order to play safe with the flu. Dr. Rothwell, local health officer, and prof. White met with the board and the decision was unanimous that the conditions here, while greatly improved, would hardly warrant opening the school for another week.
— —

Death of Howard Fenton

The death of Howard Fenton last Saturday morning, cast a cloud over the entire community. After an illness of one week from a very severe attack of influenza which later developed into pneumonia, he passed away at 2 o’clock Saturday morning. …

It was believed for a time that Mr. Fenton’s splendid physique would conquer the disease, but his death lends weight to the statement that the finest physically constituted men and women often prove unable to withstand the ravage of influenza. He was twenty-six years old and in perfect health when he was stricken with the disease. …

More sympathy than can be expressed in words is felt for the wife and two little children, who were also ill with influenza at the time death came into their family. Mrs. Fenton’s mother, Mrs. G. E. Grice, arrived from Portland Saturday to care for her daughter and the two children, who are recovering nicely. …
— —

19181122KG2
Big Bear Ridge

The J. J. Slind family and Mrs. Halvor Lien are recovering from an attack of influenza.

Big Bear ridge has won the honor flag for the Fourth Liberty Loan. Owing to the Spanish Influenza epidemic no celebration can be held at present.
— —

Sergeant Braden of Camp Funston, Texas arrived in Kendrick Tuesday night. He secured a furlough to visit his wife here and upon his arrival he found her ill with influenza. Sergeant Braden was at the front in France and was in actual trench warfare on the firing line. He has been engaged in training troops at Camp Funston since his return to America a few months ago.

source: The Kendrick Gazette. (Kendrick, Idaho), 22 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Kendrick Gazette. November 22, 1918, Page 2

19181122KG3
Idaho News Paragraphs
Recent Happenings in This State Given in Brief Items for Busy Readers.

There has been a new outbreak of influenza at Moscow.

Howard J. Fenton died recently at Kendrick of pneumonia following an attack of influenza.

Per Svenson, early settler, recently died at his farm home two miles south of Deary from influenza.

The funeral of Dr. Alexander Carins, who succumbed to pneumonia, was held at Coeur d’Alene Sunday.

Judge Wallace N. Scales announces that the fall term of the district court will be postponed until Monday, December 2, at Lewiston, because of the influenza.

source: The Kendrick Gazette. (Kendrick, Idaho), 22 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Kendrick Gazette. November 22, 1918, Page 8

19181122KG4
Gleanings

Mrs. G. E. Grice arrived Saturday morning from Portland to assist in caring for her daughter, Mrs. Howard Fenton and Mrs. Fenton’s two children who are recovering from influenza.

At a special meeting of the Village Board last Saturday night a quarantine regulation was passed effecting the epidemic of Spanish Influenza. All persons afflicted with the disease are required to remain on their own premises until they have been released by their physician.

At a meeting of the Kendrick school board last week it was decided that in case the influenza epidemic increased here to any great extent, the school house could be used for an emergency hospital. It is favorably located and is the only steam heated building in town. The action by the board was simply to prepare for an emergency that possibly might arise.

W. B. Long has been substituting on rural route No. 1, on account of the illness of J. I. Mitcham. Mr. Mitcham contracted influenza last week, but reports are to the effect that he is getting along nicely.

Miss Manila Hanson is working at the local depot, substituting for Miss Helen Helpman, who is now recovering from influenza.

There will be no church services in Kendrick Sunday. Both churches agreed to postpone church meeting for a least another week.

C. F. Byrne was called to Lewiston Tuesday on account of the serious illness of his father, Chris Byrne, who was stricken with influenza.

The Wm. J. Roberg family are all ill with influenza.

A. D. Ozmun is ill with influenza but is reported to be convalescing.

Henry Hill was able to be out again this week after a siege of the flu. All of his family have had the disease but are getting over it as well as could be expected. The youngest member of the family was very seriously ill for a time but the last re port was to the effect that the child would recover.
— —

Flu Situation Improving

The influenza situation seems to be improving in Kendrick this week. Dr. Rothwell says that no new cases have developed in town this week, although there are a number in the immediate vicinity. Quite a large number of the people are being vaccinated as it is said good results have been noted from vaccination in other places. Dr. Rothwell has had considerable difficulty in obtaining the serum as the demand is very great for it. He obtained a supply a short time ago from Spokane to use in an emergency.

source: The Kendrick Gazette. (Kendrick, Idaho), 22 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

Montpelier Examiner. November 22, 1918, Page 1

19181122ME1

Influenza Fatal To Mrs. Font Bucher

The angel of Death has darkened a number of homes in Montpelier during the past month but in none of these homes will the loss of a member of the family probably be so keenly felt as it will in the home of Font Bucher, where the wife and mother was taken last Tuesday evening at 5 o’clock. Mrs. Bucher’s death was caused from influenza, following child birth. With two of the children down with the influenza, Mrs. Bucher was taken to the city hall the first of this month. On Oct. 5th she gave birth to a daughter, and for several days thereafter her condition was normal, but the peculiar malady suddenly developed in violent form and although she made a brave fight and had the best of care, the end came Tuesday evening. …

Besides her parents, she is survived by four brothers, her husband and five children, the eldest 12 years of age the the youngest a babe of two weeks. …
— —

“Dick” Barrett Succumbs to Pneumonia at Ft. Worth

Another one of Montpelier’s well known young men has fallen a victim to pneumonia, following the influenza, in the person of Richard Barrett, who died Wednesday night at Fort Worth, Texas. The first information that he was ill was received by his father, Thos. Barrett, Tuesday afternoon in a telegram which stated that “Dick” as he was familiarly called, was seriously ill with pneumonia. Another message was received Wednesday saying that his condition was critical, and his brother, Hohn, left for Fort Worth that evening on No. 18 Another message was received at 8:15 yesterday morning saying that Dick was dead. The news of his seriousness illness came as a great surprise to his parents as they received a letter from him last Sunday, written Nov. 14, in which he stated that he was well and getting along fine, so it is evident that when attacked by the influenza, pneumonia quickly developed.

Dick was 24 years of age …
— —

Wm. Sleight of Ovid Victim of Influenza.

William Sleight of Ovid, died of influenza in this city on Saturday, Oct. 16. Deceased was a native of Bear Lake county and was 42 years of age. He is survived by a bride of two months and two children by a former marriage. …

source: Montpelier Examiner. (Montpelier, Idaho), 22 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Montpelier Examiner. November 22, 1918, Page 5

19181122ME2
Local News

Bob Gordon was in from Georgetown Tuesday. He had just recovered from a light attack of the “flu.”

A telegram was received Wednesday evening from Dallas, Texas, stating that Lloyd Lehrbas was ill with pneumonia. Another message was received yesterday afternoon staying that his condition was much improved.

Mark Napper, a former Short Line brakeman and well known in Montpelier, died of influenza at Malad on Oct. 15. He had recently quit railroading and engaged in the drug business at Malad.

We are glad to know that Mrs. McClave, who has been with her son in Wyoming for the past two or three months, is in fairly good health and is only awaiting the raising of the quarantine here to return home.

Mrs. S. C. Everingham and little son arrived Tuesday from Hammonton, N. J., for an extended visit at the home of her mother, Mrs. McIntosh. She reports that the influenza had subsided there, but it was fierce while it lasted.

Tennyson Bates, nephew of Clarance Anderson, died of influenza at the Mare Island, Cal., hospital on Nov. 14. He enlisted in the marine corps early in October and had been at Mare Island only two weeks. He was 20 years old.

Should health conditions permit, Thanksgiving service will be held in the Methodist church Thursday morning, Nov. 28 at 11 o’clock. The services will be undenominational and everybody is cordially invited to attend as a religious and patriotic duty.

Austin Herrick, a son of the late “Dad” Herrick, died at La Grande, Ore., on Nov. 15 of influenza. Deceased was a former resident of this city. The body was brought here for burial, arriving last Saturday night.

Last Sunday W. K. Martin received a telegram from the war department conveying the sad news of the death of his only son, Donald, who was in France. Death was caused from bronchial pneumonia. He was in the infantry and went overseas last August. He spent sometime with his father here two years ago.

Miss Mabel Foss was taken to the city hall emergency hospital Sunday afternoon with an aggravated case of influenza and up to yesterday she was apparently rapidly recovering, when a change for the worse came and her condition this morning is said to be critical. We hope for her speedy recovery. All other patients at the city hall are holding their own at this writing.

E. L. McClave things the ban the Paris officials have put against Montpelier is at least stringent, if not extreme. He went to the county seat Wednesday on a business of considerable importance and was notified by the city marshal that no Montpelier people need apply, whether on business matters or otherwise owing to the ridiculous reports of the prevalence of influenza here. Paris has had but a single case of the “flu” so far, and from her stringent quarantine against Montpelier does not care to have the epidemic in her midst.
— —

19181122ME3
Situation Improving.
“Flu” Abating and Quarantine Will Be Raised In a Few Days

The influenza situation in Montpelier is much better than it was a week ago. The doctors this morning report that there are fewer cases in the city than there have been at any time in the past three weeks.

The county and city boards of health are scheduled to hold a joint meeting this afternoon to fix the date for lifting the quarantine and for the opening of schools and public gatherings. Dr. Ashley, chairman of the city board of health, is in favor of raising the ban next Monday, and it is likely the health board will fix that date at their meeting this afternoon.

At any rate, the situation is so improved that the people from the county need no longer have any fear of coming to Montpelier to do their trading.

While Montpelier has been hit pretty hard, at no time has the condition here been as bad as it has in many other towns in the state.

A majority of the deaths that have occurred can be positively attributed to the fact that the victims did not take the necessary precaution when at first attacked. They continued to be about and expose themselves until the disease had secured such a strong hold on them that medicine and care was of no avail.

It is likely that a case of the “flu” will show up now and then for the next month, but with the precaution that will continue to be taken by the health boar, there is absolutely no danger of the situation again becoming serious.

It is a great relief to the doctors, nurses and the public in general to know that the scourge is practically over.
— —

The Doctors Lynn Remove to Pocatello

Drs. I. W. and J. H. Lynn have removed to Pocatello, where they will engage in the practice of medicine and surgery. Dr. I. W. has been in Pocatello for the past months and J. H. joined him there this week. During the three years they were located in Montpelier they built up quite an extensive practice, and their decision to give up this field was a surprise to their friends.
— —

Rev. Martin Arrives.

Rev. J. G. A. Martin arrived in the city last Friday to enter upon his pastorate for the ensuing year of the Methodist church and was served by the regulation quarantine which kept him in seclusion until Wednesday, when he was permitted his freedom. …

source: Montpelier Examiner. (Montpelier, Idaho), 22 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

The Idaho Republican. November 22, 1918, Page 1

19181122TOR1

Notice

Because of the evidence of the continuing presence of influenza and diphtheria in our community the Baptist and Methodist churches will have no services next Sunday. The opening service if the epidemics are sufficiently abated, will probably be a union Thanksgiving service on Sunday morning, Dec. 1.
— —

Lutheran Church

Altho the quarantine has been lifted we will not hold any services next Sunday as the health conditions are not as good as we would wish for. But next Thursday, Thanksgiving day, we will hold a Thanksgiving service in our church at 10:30 a.m.

We want them to come together and give thanks for the manifold blessings bestowed upon us.
— —

Former Blackfoot Resident Passes Away

Mrs. Otto Heller died at her home in Goden Monday of pneumonia following an attack of influenza.

Mrs. Heller is a cousin of Mrs. Charles E. Harris and a former resident of this city.
— —

Notice.

Owing to the present conditions that exist, the schools will not open until Monday, December 2.

A school board meeting was held Thursday morning, and the date of opening was postponed from Monday, November 25, to December 2.
— —

19181122TOR2
Local News

W. O. Bridges is ill with the influenza at preset.

J. T. Wright, who has been guarding the Snake river railroad bridge west of town during the way, went to Pocatello Thursday looking for a new job, the guards having been taken off.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 22 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Idaho Republican. November 22, 1918, Page 3

19181122TOR3
The Flu

When your back is broke and your eyes are blured,
And your shin bones knock and your tongue is furred,
And your tonsils squeak and your hair gets dry,
And your dogdone sure that you’re going to die,
But you’re skeered you won’t and afraid you will.
Just drag to bed and have your chill,
And pray the Lord to see you thru,
For you’ve got the flu, boy, You’ve got the flu.

When your toes curl up and your belt goes flat,
And your twice as mean as a Thomas cat,
And life is a long and dismal cruse,
And you’r food all taste like a hard boiled hearse;
When your lattice aches and your head’s a-buzz,
And nothing is as it ever was,
Here are my sad regrets to you –
You’ve got the flu, boy, You’ve got the flu.

What is it like, this Spanish flu?
Ask me brother, for I’ve been through.
It is by Misery out of Despair;
It pulls your teeth and curls your hair;
It thins your blood and brays your bones,
And fills your craw with moans and groans.
And sometimes maybe, you get well.
Some call it Flu – I call it Hell!
— —

Here From Salt Lake

Miss Laverne Marshall arrived in Blackfoot Tuesday morning from Salt Lake.

Miss Marshall was called home to nurse her sister Mrs. Barton Lowder, who is ill with the influenza.

She will also spend a few days visiting her parents Mr. and Mrs. George T. Marshall.

Recovering from the Flu

Miss Affie Fisher, who has been seriously ill with the influenza for the past few weeks is now somewhat improved.

Recovered from the Flu

Clifford Royce has been in Pocatello for two weeks suffering from a severe attack of the influenza, but is now on the high road to recovery.

His father W. B. Royce has been in Pocatello looking after him. They both returned home Sunday.

George Marshall Returns Home

George Marshall returned to his home in Blackfoot Sunday evening after spending some time in Florida on a mission.

He has had the influenza and will remain at home until he recovers.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 22 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Meridian Times., November 22, 1918, Page 2

19181122MT1
In The Gem State

The quarantine on the University of Idaho will not be lifted until every case of influenza has been stamped out according to Capt. Luther B. Felker, commandant of the university troops.

Under regulations adopted by the Twin Falls county board of health, as a precaution against the spread of the influenza epidemic, all buildings housing influenza hereafter will be placarded and all influenza cases will be quarantined.

The closing order of the state board of health, which closed schools, churches, theatres and places of public gathering because of the influenza epidemic, will be lifted Sunday, November 24. Churches and theatres have been closed since October 10, and schools since October 21.

source: The Meridian Times. (Meridian, Idaho), 22 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Meridian Times., November 22, 1918, Page 3

19181122MT2
News Of A Week In Condensed Form
Record of the Important Events Told in Briefest Manner Possible.
Happenings That Are Making History – Information Gathered from All Quarters of the Globe and Given in a Few Lines.

Intermountain.

Influenza epidemic conditions remain unchanged in Utah, as far as the spread of the disease and the setting of a definite date for the opening of places of public assemblage are concerned.

Cables received at Seattle said thirty-four white residents and 150 Eskimos of Nome, Alaska, have died as a result of the influenza. Nome’s mayor said that the epidemic was on the decline.

Domestic.

When the city council of Long Beach, Cal., attempted to make kissing in public a misdemeanor it acted arbitrarily and in violation of the constitution, according to a decision rendered by Superior Judge Frank R. Willis.

source: The Meridian Times. (Meridian, Idaho), 22 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Meridian Times., November 22, 1918, Page 8

19181122MT3
Meridian News Notes

No services at the M. E. church this Sunday. The pastor will be in the church however, to give out literature.

Mrs. Mary French as received word that her daughters Janie and Mildred, who are at Spokane, have been been ill with the influenza but are better.

Those who are reported ill with what is classed as influenza include Mrs. Alice Frazier, Mr. And Mrs. Wm. Howry and two children, Mr. and Mrs. Roy Howry, and Mr. and Mrs. Rubin Howry. Also the baby daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Lee Barber.
— —

Public Places Will Not Open As Was Announced

Twenty cases of Spanish influenza are reported in Meridian, so public places will not be opened Sunday, Nov. 25th. Mayor S. H. Griffiths says it is not thought advisable to life the ban on public meetings. Schools will not open Monday but at a later date.
— —

Death This Week Of Samuel Williamson.

Samuel Williamson, one of the best known citizens of Meridian, died at 11:30 Saturday night, of pneumonia, aged 44 years, 8 months and 4 days. …

About two weeks ago he was stricken with Spanish influenza, which soon developed into pneumonia. All that medical skill and kind nursing was done to keep him here, but to no avail the call of the Reaper was heard and he answered. …

The funeral took place last Sunday afternoon. Rev. C. A. Quinn and H. B. Powers conducting. The remains were laid at rest in the I. O. O. F. cemetery.

source: The Meridian Times. (Meridian, Idaho), 22 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

The Idaho Republican. November 22, 1918, Page 2

19181122IR1
Rose

Miss Helen Gardner, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Albert Gardner, has recovered, after a two weeks’ illness.

Ellis Jackman, a son of Mr. and Mrs. S. M. Jackman has recovered from an attack of the flu.
— —

19181122IR2
Kimball

The infant son of Mrs. L. Quigley passed away last week, after a short illness of influenza. The community extend their sympathy to the bereaved mother.

Mrs. L. B. Heaton and Mrs. William Anthony are up at Ririe, caring for relatives, who are suffering from the influenza.

There are still two families in the neighborhood, who have the influenza. The Dail family and the Milburn family have it, but at last reports they were doing nicely.
— —

19181122IR3
Jameston

We are grieved to hear of the death of Mrs. Nita Lords from an attack of the influenza. She was a sister of Mrs. Dean Farrer of Jamestown [sic] and was very favorably known here. She leaves a husband and two small children, besides her mother, one brother and six sisters to mourn her loss.

J. C. Bolader has bee suffering for some time with the influenza, but is now much improved.

No new cases of influenza have been reported for several days, and it is hoped this dreadful disease is on the decline.
— —

19181122IR4
Grandview

Luther Satterfield and family are all sick with the influenza.

Ed Young went to Aberdeen the first of the week to help nurse the sick.
— —

19181122IR5
Sterling

Some of the children of Mrs. Charles Parsons are reported to have the influenza.

Lewis Teichert is just recovering from an attack of the grip.

The Heida family are just recovering from an attack of the influenza.
— —

19181122IR6
Springfield

Mr. and Mrs. L. Shelman are reported to be ill with the influenza. Mrs. Shelman helped at the Paul home when they were ill and probably contracted the disease there. All others ill with influenza are much improved.

Mrs. W. W. Stephens received the sad news last week, of the death of two nieces in St. Anthony from influenza.

Mrs. W. E. Wells has been quite ill, but is much improved at this writing.

The election at Springfield was very quiet due to bad weather and the influenza. From a registration of 157 only seventy-four votes were cast. The Republicans carried the precinct.
— —

19181122IR7
Shelley

We have been very fortunate in missing the flu, until the present time. There are now four cases, Bert Davis and his family, James Anderson and family, rs. H. A. Nelson and daughter and T. O. Sessions and wife.
— —

19181122IR8
McDonaldville

Mrs. H. M. Gray received word Wednesday of the death of her sister, who died from Spanish influenza at Kello, Idaho. Her body will be brought to Moore for burial.

The people who have been suffering with the Spanish influenza are rapidly recovering.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 22 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Idaho Republican. November 22, 1918, Page 5

19181122IR9
Local News

Mrs. Clifford, who has been ill with influenza, is able to be out and around again.

Miss Ethel Thompson is slowly recovering from a severe attack of the flu.

Mrs. Roy Longley and two children are recovering from an attack of the flu.

John Chapman, who has been ill with influenza is somewhat improved at this writing.

Mrs. H. C. Bond is here from Mackay at the home of her daughter, Mr. and Mrs. Roy Longly. Mrs. Longly and two children are ill. Mrs. Bond will remain here until they have fully recovered.

Mrs. William Bridges is recovering from an attack of the flu.

Ben Lyons, who has been seriously ill with influenza, is able to be out again.
— —

19181122IR10
Moreland

Mr. and Mrs. Morrel have the influenza.

There are not many cases here at present.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 22 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Idaho Republican. November 22, 1918, Page 8

19181122IR11
History of the Past Week
The News Happenings of Seven Days Paragraphed

Intermountain

Influenza epidemic conditions remain unchanged in Utah, as far as the spread of the disease and the setting of a definite date for the opening of places of public assemblage are concerned.

All shipments of troops from Camp Lewis, Wash., have been suspended by orders received there from Washington. Several hundred men of the One Hundred Sixty-sixth depot brigade, who have been assigned to other posts, but were held because of the influenza quarantine are affected.

Domestic

The recent epidemic of influenza in the United States caused more deaths than occurred among the American expeditionary forces from all causes from the time the first unit landed in France until hostilities ceased.

The victory celebration killed the Spanish influenza. That is the opinion of high medical authorities in Washington. It is admitted that suggestion may have had something to do with it, but it is contended that physiological rather than psychological reasons should receive the credit for rendering the disease germs innocuous.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 22 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Shoshone Journal. November 22, 1918, Page 1

19181122SJ1
Wood River Center Grange.

The Ivies are just recovering from a severe case of the Flu.

Charles and Florence Butler went down to Gooding Sunday and brought Mr. Ivie back up to take care of the place while his family is ill with the influenza.
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19181122SJ2
Unfortunate Accident.

Misses Lulu and Elizabeth Lewis, both trained nurses, recently decided to lease the old Shoshone Hotel and turn it into a hospital. They had the building cleaned and some of the rooms re–papered and expected to move in the latter part of the week. Wednesday about eleven-thirty Miss Lulu started to build a fire with coal oil; the oil exploded, wrecking the stove, and setting the building afire. The burning oil was thrown over Miss Lewis, causing painful blister on her hands and feet.

The building is badly damaged. The friends of the Misses Lewis will regret that a worthy enterprise should have ended so disastrously, but are glad that Miss Lulu escaped with her life.
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The Baugh Opens Monday

Lovers of the picture show will be pleased to know that the quarantine has been lifted and the Baugh will again begin entertaining its patrons, Monday night with one of its standard films.
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19181122SJ3
School Will Open Monday.

The Shoshone Public Schools will resume their regular schedule Monday, November 25th, and it is our desire that all schoolchildren in the city be ready to begin their work promptly.

It will be necessary for the parents, children and teachers to put forth a greater effort towards regular attendance, with concentrated work and study to make up for the amount of time lost during the enforced vacation.

A number of plans are offered whereby we may make up the time lost during the last five weeks. After a very careful consideration of each it has been decided to adopt the six day week for the two high schools. We believe this plan to be superior to the suggestion of longer days, or of night schools. In fact, this plan has been used by the Department of Education at Washington, for several years past. We realize that there will be some objections to this plan, but at the same time we feel that it is the more desirable to the greater number of people, both students and parents.

I am sure that no one would suggest that we allow the children to make it up. It also puts the question of education on a more business basis. In the past the child has had more daylight hours out of school than he has had in school.

In order to avoid any possible defects from overwork the students will be given systematic physical drill every day of the week, which will do much to relieve the mental fatigue and give them “pep” for their classwork. There is no doubt that the physical development is essential to the sound mental development.

The exact plan to be followed in the grades will be worked out at the teacher’s conference the latter part of this week.

The work in music will go on just as before the vacation. This work has been put under the direction of a very able teacher, a graduate of the New York Musical Institute and Cornell University, and one that comes to us very highly recommended after several years experience.

J. E. Wesson, Supt.

source: Shoshone Journal. (Shoshone, Idaho), 22 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., November 22, 1918, Page 1

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Lewiston Will Not Hold Stock Show
Great Annual Event Will Be Postponed Until Next Fall Due To The Flu

There will be no exhibition of the Northwest Livestock association of the states of Montana, Idaho, Washington and Oregon at Lewiston this year. For the first time in many years the show will not be held. After being postponed once because of the influenza situation, and the opening day fixed for Thanksgiving day, November 28, the directors have again decided that is is unsafe to hold it and there will be no show this year. It had to be held on the dates last fixed, or it could not be held this year, as its dates must conform with other Pacific coast livestock shows.

This will be a great disappointment to many, for the annual livestock show has become a feature of the northwest. It has drawn stockmen not only from the four states forming the association, but from all over the United States and western Canada. Efforts are being made to arrange for the big sale of purebred stock at a later date, but nothing definite has been done in this line. It may be that newspaper advertising will be used to sell the stock instead of the auction sale method.

Lewiston is in the midst of a bad influenza situation. The conditions there are said to be worse now than at any time since the “flu” first made its appearance there. The directors of the Northwest Livestock association met at Lewiston yesterday and after careful consideration voted to abandon the show for this year, regarding the protection of the lives of the people of far greater value than the big stock show.
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Parents Warned to Watch Their Children

Owing to the fact that there are still a few cases of influenza in town, it will be necessary to exercise a good deal of caution in the children returning to school. Anyone having sickness in the family must not allow their children to return to school until they have secured a certificate from the physician stating that the influenza is not the case of their sickness. This applies also to those who think they have only bad colds, as these so-called colds are oftentimes a mild form of the influenza, or later develop into it. These precautions must be taken for the protection of the schools.

Dr. W. A. Adair, City Health Officer
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Parents of sick Soldiers Pleased With Son’s Treatment

“Too much cannot be said in praise of the splendid care that has been given the sick members of the S. A. T. C. at Moscow. From President Lindley down to the assistants in the hospitals every one has done everything possible and the boys have had as good care as could be given them anywhere.” This is the statement given by Mr. and Mrs. N. H. Smith, of Addie, Boundary county, Idaho, today, and which they wished to be published in Moscow and Spokane papers. Mrs. Smith continued:

“So many boys are here, away from their homes and parents and the parents are, no doubt anxious about them. We want to tell them that their sons are having every care and attention that can be given. Our boy was very, very sick. We were notified and came here to take personal charge of him, but we found he was receiving everything that could be secured. We were permitted to see him every day and President Lindley and the officers tried very hard to secure a special nurse for him. We offered to pay for this but they would not let us. Mrs. Mark P. Miller came down and nursed him for three days and nights and was a wonderful help. It was impossible to get a regular nurse, but Mrs. Miller volunteered her services. Every one we have met in Moscow seems to be helping the boys and taking a deep personal interest in them. It is simply beautiful and it will be a greet comfort to the parents of boys in the S. A. T. C. to know that their sons are getting such excellent care.”

Mrs. Miller, whom Mrs. Smith mentioned, is the wife of one of Moscow’s wealthiest citizens and has a family of her own, including a small baby, but she gave up her own work and nursed the young man through the crisis of his illness.

The young man is Giles Purdy Smith, formerly of Spokane, where he was floor manager of the Stillwell theatres before coming here. He had applied for entrance in the University of Idaho to take up agricultural work prior to the formation of the Students Army Training Corps, but entered that when it was formed. He was taken ill with influenza and his has been one of the serious cases. Like all of the others he has had the best of care and, having a strong constitution, has “pulled through” and is now regarded as out of danger, although still confined to his bed.

Mr. Smith returned to his home at Addie today but Mrs. Smith will re-main in Moscow until her son fully recovers. Both Mr. and Mrs. Smith said they are unable to tell their full appreciation of the splendid care the boys are getting and the general kindness of the university and army people as well as the citizens of Moscow. They have been here long enough to get pretty well acquainted with conditions and to see the “team work” that is being done by the army officers, the university people and the people of Moscow.

The people of Moscow and neighboring towns and the country people have responded liberally to every call for help for the sick men in the S. A. T. C. The Star-Mirror started to raise a fund to buy delicacies for the sick and convalescent soldiers and asked for voluntary contributions. As a result of this work $138.80 in cash was turned over to Lieutenant Cook for the mess fund. A call was sent out for canned and fresh fruits, jellies etc. People responded with more than 1,000 quarts of fruits, boxes, sacks and barrels of apples, pears and other fruits, and dozens of nicely dressed chickens were sent to this office to be delivered to the hospitals. Every day a truck comes from the barracks to get the fruit and other delicacies sent in by people from Moscow, Genesee, Potlatch, Deary and country districts and delivered it to the places where most needed.

Now all of the cases (less than a dozen) in the S. A. T. C. are confined in one hospital, the Inland, which is devoted exclusively to the care of the sick among the 800 S. A. T. C. men.
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Lawrence Rambo Died at Lewiston Wednesday

Lawrence Rambo, son of Mr. and Mrs. W. L. Rambo, of Moscow, died at Lewiston, Nov. 20 of pneumonia following influenza. Lawrence had gone to Lewiston to visit his sister, Mrs. Gilmour, and was immediately taken sick. Lawrence was born seven miles south of Moscow and was 16 years of age. He leaves two brothers, Cecil and Ralph, and three sisters, Misses Iva and Blanch and Mrs. Edna Gilmour of Lewiston. The funeral occurred this afternoon at 2 o’clock at Moscow.

Mrs. Rambo and daughters were unable to attend the funeral, being ill in Lewiston with severe colds.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 22 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., November 22, 1918, Page 2

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The investigation at Pullman is unfortunate. Pullman and Washington State college had a hard scourge of the influenza and there were many deaths (more than 50), and it is not surprising that relatives of those who died should feel resentful. But it seems the wrong tactics were used by the college authorities and the people of Pullman. They did not co-operate with the bereaved relatives in trying to get at the facts, but began at once to try to discredit the man who made the charges and to try to disprove his statements. How much better it would have been for Pullman had Professor Sanborn, who makes such serious charges against the institution and the management of the influenza quarantine and the care of the sick, been given the assistance, the kind treatment and the courtesy that was given Mr. Fraser, of Jerome, Idaho, whose son died after leaving the University of Idaho, and who felt probably as badly and as deeply resentful as Professor Sanborn until he learned the true conditions. Today Mr. Fraser is a warm friend and supporter instead of an enemy of the school.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 22 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., November 22, 1918, Page 3

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City News

Miss Nellie Tomer is ill with the influenza at her home in southeast Moscow.

Born. – To Mr. and Mrs. Pete McDownald, a son, last evening at the Pleasant Home. Mr. McDownald is ill with influenza.

The family of Conrad Peterson are ill with influenza.
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Will School Open Monday to be Decided

As the Star-Mirror goes to press the local school board is in session considering the question as to whether school will open Monday or the quarantine be continued. The city and county health officers have been called in for consultation. The board has not yet reached a decision, but its decision will be published in Saturday’s Star-Mirror.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 22 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., November 22, 1918, Page 4

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source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 22 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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1907MontpelierFritz-a
Chapman’s Grocery, Montpelier, Idaho ca. 1907

source: The Mike Fritz Collection.
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Nov 23

The Daily Star-Mirror., November 23, 1918, Page 1

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Moscow Schools Will Not Be opened Next Monday

The schools of Moscow will not open next Monday. This was decided by the school board after consultation with city and county health officers at a special meeting held last night. It was regarded as dangerous to open school in Moscow now with so many cases of influenza in town. Dr. W. A. Adair reported 32 homes in this school district in which there is influenza and believes that if children from these homes enter the school there is danger of a spread of the contagion. L. F. Parsons, of the school board, made this statement:

“At a special meeting of the school board held yesterday evening the board decided to keep the schools of Moscow closed for another week, irrespective of the fact that the state board of health has raised the quarantine. Before making this decision the boards called in for consultation County Health Officer Dr. Rae and City Health Officer Dr. Adair. A canvass of the number of infected homes was obtained from the several physicians of Moscow. There were found to be 32 infected homes each of which had one or more cases.

“After a careful consideration of the matter is was decided by the board that it would be more desirable to lose one week of school than to unnecessarily expose the children of the district with the possibility of loss of life. It was understood by the board that the churches and theatres would open the first of the week and it was deemed desirable to wait and note the effect on the spread of the disease. If conditions remain favorable the schools will open Monday, December 2.

“The teachers of the district have been requested to remain in the city and refrain as far as possible from exposing themselves to the disease with the hope that the whole corps may be at hand for service on December 2nd and the school work proceed with as great speed and as little friction as possible.”

The churches of Moscow will hold services at the usual hours tomorrow and the theatres will open Monday evening. Both are preparing special programs for the opening occasion. The churches have been closed for six weeks and there have been no public meetings of any kind in Moscow in that time. Dr. W. A. Adair, city health officer, who has consented to the opening of churches and theatres makes the following announcement:

“Every one who has any symptoms of disease, even a slight cold, will be required to remain away from the theatres and churches. Coughing in these public places will cause uneasiness if it is not actually dangerous. No one with a cough should be admitted to any of them. Persons who have recently recovered from influenza should remain away from these places for several days, at least. Unless the greatest care is exercised there will be grave danger of a spread of the disease and all public meetings will again be forbidden for an indefinite period. It will be well for managers of theatres to refuse to admit any one with a cough. If great care is used in the next week the danger will be greatly lessened and every one should cooperate to prevent another epidemic here.”

The chamber of commerce will hold its regular weekly noon day luncheon at its room over the Orpheum theatre next Tuesday. Secret societies will hold their usual meetings next week and, aside from schools, the conditions in Moscow will again be normal.

Conditions at the University of Idaho are very satisfactory. There have been no new cases in many days. The few girls who had slight attacks of influenza are recovering and it is hoped that next Monday the quarantine can be lifted and the S. A. T. C. men and others students will again be permitted to come down town, attend church and theatres and make up, in a measure, for the loss of entertainment during the past six weeks. It is understood that the 300 men in the vocational training corps will leave here on December 15 to make room for 300 others, but where the latter will come from is not yet known.
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19181123DSM2
No Sunday School Tomorrow

Dr. W. A. Adair, city health officer, has announced there will be no Sunday school in Moscow tomorrow. Dr. Adair said: “If it is unsafe to have public school next week it will be unsafe to have Sunday school tomorrow. The little folks will flock to Sunday school and this will be just as bad as public school. They may hold church services if they wish, but there shall be no Sunday school.

“The situation is worse today. There are a number of new cases. A woman arrived here Tuesday from Kansas with her two children to visit relatives. Today she and her two children and her sister, whom she is visiting are down with the disease. A woman who had not been away from her home since the epidemic began in Moscow, was taken down with the disease last night. There are several other new cases. It would be very dangerous to have Sunday school tomorrow.”
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All books which have been out of the Public Library during the influenza quarantine must be returned immediately. Every book must be in before Thanksgiving.
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Spokane Will Have Big Peace Celebration

Spokane, Nov. 23. – Spokane and the Inland Empire will celebrate the war victory won by the allies and the advent of peace with a monster victory fete for three days beginning Thanksgiving day, November 28. Governor Ernest Lister of Washington will be here to participate in the program, and invitations have been sent to Governor Sam B. Stewart of Montana, Governor Moses Alexander of Idaho and Governor James Withycombe of Oregon. Several high military officials are also expected to attend. Among the features will be the presence of the marine band from the Mare Island navy yard.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 23 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., November 23, 1918, Page 3

19181112DSM2
City News

Miss Eva Leitch was nursing at the Hadden home during her vacation from teaching school.

Mrs. S. L. Willis, who went to Moorhead, Minn., about a week ago to see her mothers, has had an attack of influenza and pneumonia, but is now improving. Her mother is still seriously ill.

Miss Elsie Nelson, high school teacher at Winchester, Idaho, left for her place of work today.

Miss Evelyn Tesch, who has been visiting her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Fred Tesch, went to Kendrick today to go to her school on Bear ridge.

Miss Nora Yarborough went to school near Stites today.

Miss Ethel Shoemaker, who has been visiting Mrs. S. A. Neely, when to her school at Grangeville.

Miss Dorothy Cole, who has been visiting her sister, Mrs. Tolbert Gebett, left for Troy today to begin her school.

Miss Theodora Smith went to her school today near Deary.

Miss Eva Leitch left this morning for Black Lake, in northern Idaho, where she is teaching.

Miss Kathryn Semler of Colton went to Downs, Wash., today to take up her work of teaching.

Miss Mae Pattison of Spokane has returned to her work of teaching in the Moscow public schools.

Miss Viola McCartor and Miss Pearl Baxter went to Potlatch yesterday to take up their school work of teaching.

Judge Edgar C. Steele left this morning for Orofino to hold court, but on account of the epidemic conditions court may be postponed and only the jury called together at this time. Mrs. Steele accompanied him as far as Lewiston, where she will remain a few days.

Melvin Ricketts and Miss Myrtle Ricketts of Spokane are in Moscow to be with their father who is ill with pneumonia.

Mrs. Andrew Hagan returned Thursday from Spokane, where she left her parents, Mr. and Mrs. M. E. Urton, recovered from influenza.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 23 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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(click image for larger size)
Victims of the Spanish flu at a barracks hospital on the campus of Colorado Agricultural College, Fort Collins, Colorado, 1918.

source: American Unofficial Collection of World War I Photographs/PhotoQuest/Getty Images History.com
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Nov 25

The Daily Star-Mirror., November 25, 1918, Page 1

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Schools In Latah County Are Open
Only Six Out of 97 Districts Fail to Open Their Schools Today

The lifting of the state quarantine in Idaho yesterday resulted in the opening today of 91 out of the 97 schools in Latah county. Moscow, Kendrick, Troy and three other districts, where the influenza situation is not satisfactory, failed to reopen their schools today, but the others opened and will continue to hold school unless the influenza should grow worse.

Troy and Kendrick are in the midst of a bad epidemic. Both of these places escaped the disease for several weeks after it had made its appearance in Moscow and other places, but last week both towns were hit hard and the disease is so thoroughly scattered through the towns that is is thought best to not hold school until conditions get better. It is hoped that school can be opened at all of the places mentioned next week.

The health officers will watch closely the result of lifting the ban on motion picture shows, dances and churches. Services were held in practically all of the churches of Latah county yesterday and there is no doubt the shows will be well attended. If no serious results are noticed from these it is likely that Sunday schools will be permitted next Sunday and the public schools will open Monday.

So far as can be seen there have been no new cases in Moscow as a result of reopening the University of Idaho last Monday and conditions there have been gradually growing better.
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19181125DSM1
Moscow Churches Held Services
Attendance Light Owing to Fear of Influenza and Misunderstood Orders

All Moscow churches held services Sunday but the attendance was below normal. This was due to two causes, the fear of influenza and the conflict of orders. The order published in Saturday evening’s Star-Mirror that there would be no Sunday school kept many away from church as they believed there would be no church services. The lateness of the announcement caused much conflict and confusion. Many who did not get the notice sent their children to Sunday school, where the little folks were disappointed when they had to return home and reported to their parents that there would be no services.

All of the churches held special services, the first in six weeks and it seemed good to the members to get together again for Sunday worship. There was a special air of thankfulness prevalent in all churches, due to the momentous events that have transpired since the last public services were held in Moscow. The raising of the quarantine and the closing of the world war gave double cause for thankfulness.

The Protestant churches of Moscow will unite in a union service next Thursday (Thanksgiving day) at 10:30 in the Methodist church. Rev. Wayne S. Snoddy, pastor of the Presbyterian church, will deliver the sermon. It is hoped to have a large attendance in order that the people of Moscow may join in the greatest thanksgiving day the world has known. The services will be especially interesting and impressive.
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University Students Have One Day Vacation

The only vacation for Thanksgiving week at the University of Idaho will be next Thursday, November 28, Thanksgiving day. Owing to so much time having been lost on account of the influenza it has been decided by the board of education that one day is all the vacation that can be allowed.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 25 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., November 25, 1918, Page 2

19181125DSM3
Let Us Have Patience

There is much merit in the communication by the Rev. J. Quincy Biggs, of the Christian church, published elsewhere in this issue in regard to the lateness of the announcement that there would be no Sunday school in Moscow yesterday. The ministers naturally feel aggrieved and, as the Rev. Mr. Biggs says that they “did not get a square deal.”

But we must have patience. The health officers are very busy. They are working day and night trying to save the lives of those who are afflicted. Every doctor in Moscow has worked unceasingly in caring for the many cases of influenza. They have had little rest and little time to prepare notices to the public.

The patrons of the public schools can have the same complaint that the ministers have in regard to the Sunday school. The notice that there would be no school in Moscow this week should have been published Friday instead of Saturday, but The Star-Mirror could not wait with its Friday evening issue for the school board and health officers to decide the question for they were still undecided when the paper went to press. As a consequence those living on rural routes did not learn until Monday that there would be no school Monday. We requested that the statement be given out Friday evening, but the board could not get all of its members and the health officers who were looking after their many cases of illness, together in time for Friday’s paper.

These things are annoying and, at first glance, seem unnecessary. But, before we condemn, let us think of the vast load the health officers, the school board and others are carrying. The school board is composed of men of business and this work is only a “side issue” and is apt to be overlooked. It would have been better had the notices that there would be no public or Sunday schools been published not later than Friday, but no one is really to blame and we believe that all have done their duty as they saw it and that any mistakes have been because of those making them having too much to do.

Let us be patient and also be thankful that Moscow has escaped with as light of loss of life and as little suffering and inconvenience as she has.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 25 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., November 25, 1918, Page 3

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City News

The Catholic Ladies are postponing their annual Thanksgiving dance on account of the influenza. The date on which it will be given will be announced later.

Misses Edith and Mary Olson returned to Troy today, having come to Moscow to resume their school work, but found the schools closed.

The Cornwall schools did not open today on account of the influenza. Lockard and Gustafsin Hennen are just recovering from an attack of influenza.

Miss Fay Sandall, a teacher in the Moscow schools, is ill of influenza at Spokane and not able yet to return to Moscow.

Judge E. C. Steele returned to Moscow this morning. Judge Steele started to Orofino to hold court this week but learning that the influenza was so bad at Orofino he stopped at Lewiston and ordered a postponement of the Clearwater county term of court for one week.

Frank Potter, linotype operator in The Star-Mirror office was called to Spokane yesterday by the very serious illness of his brother and the latter’s wife and family, all of whom have the influenza. During his absence C. H. Van Meter takes his place in the composing room of the The Star-Mirror.
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source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 25 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Back to Table of Contents
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 1)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 2)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 3)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 4)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 5)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 6)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 7)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 8)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 9)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 10)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 11)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 12)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 13)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 14)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 15)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 16)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 17)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 18)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 19)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 20)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 21)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 22)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 23)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 24)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 25)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 26)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 27)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 28)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 29)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 30)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 31)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 32)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 33)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 34)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 35)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 36)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 37)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 38)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 39)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 40)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 41)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 42)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 43)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 44)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 45)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 46)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 47)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 48)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 49)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 50)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 51)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 52)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 53)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 54)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 55)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 56)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 57)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 58)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 59)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 60)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 61)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 62)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 63)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 64)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 65)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 66)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 67)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 68)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 69)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 70)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 71)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 72)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 73)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 74)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 75)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 76)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 77)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 78)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 79)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 80)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 81)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 82)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 83)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 84)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 85)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 86)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 87)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 88)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 89)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 90)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 91)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 92)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 93)
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Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 95)
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Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 97)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 98)
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Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 100)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 101)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 102)

Road Reports July 19, 2020

Please share road reports. Conditions can change quickly any time of year. Some high elevation roads still have snow. Be prepared for rocks and trees in the road and remember there is no cell phone service.

Highway 95: Closed

(photo courtesy Mustang Towing)
US 95 in both directions: Road closed.
July 17 ITD update:
On Monday crews are expected to start removing rocks at the base of the slide on US-95 south of Riggins. The temporary road built around the base has been blocked by massive boulders since the slope failed for a second time last week but may be open in time for next weekend.
“Our entire timeline is dependent on survey results,” Operations Engineer Jared Hopkins said. “If we observe movement, that will limit our ability to have crews working underneath the slope and delay the eventual reopening of the temporary road.”
No significant movement has been detected since late last week, allowing scalers to finish dislodging loose material on the rock face this week.
Removing debris and rebuilding the rock berm to shield the temporary road is planned to take at least all week.
“Some of these boulders are 40 feet wide,” Hopkins said. “We’ll need to drill and blast them into small enough pieces to be removed.”
continued:
ITD (link)
Old Pollock Road will continue to serve as a detour around the slide during daytime hours – 6 am – 8 pm PDT (7 am – 9 pm MDT). The detour will remain closed at night in order for crews to perform maintenance operations on the roadway, which typically does not see this amount of traffic.
French Creek Road is not an official, nor a recommended detour for Highway 95.

Yellow Pine: Local streets are dry and dusty except where people paid for dust abatement. Deer, dogs and kids are wandering around. Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN. Report that a dog was hit injured on Main street in June.
link: Local Forecast
Yellow Pine Webcam: (check date on image)

Warm Lake Highway: No problems reported.
link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

Highway 55 Webcams Link:
Note: Bridge construction at Horseshoe Bend.

South Fork Road: Closed 7am to 4pm daily with no closures on weekends.
The closure sites will change on a weekly basis, and will not always be adjacent to the last closure site. Refer to the current weekly newsletter or the project website to determine the closure point and access for each week. South Fork Road Project page (link)
Update July 13: This week’s road closure is at mile post 16. Access to Mile Post 16 Hot Springs is from the south/Warm Lake Road.
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Saturday (July 4) mail truck driver reports the road is getting rough in some spots.

Johnson Creek Road: Open.
Wednesday (July 15) mail truck driver (Robert) reports the county has graded from Warm Lake road to the Johnson creek airstrip.
link: Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam
link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
Note: The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Opened by the county June 24th. Last reported to be really rough on the McCall side. May have been graded on the McCall side since then?
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Open and rough.
Summit was reported snow free on Sunday June 28.
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcam: (check date on image)

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Semi-open to the adventurous ATV riders. Travel at your own risk.
Old report June 26: “Lots of rocks and trees. One little patch of snow 20 ft long. But otherwise Thunder Mountain is open for 4×4 vehicles … we cut over 30 trees. The other guy with me didn’t cut them full width for a car, just for his ATV. So any trees I didn’t cut will need to be trimmed to get full size vehicles through.” – SA

photo and report courtesy SA

Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Cinnabar: Report received July 11: “UTV group made it into Cinnabar [via the upper road] about two days ago. Lots of snow drifts. Rough going. But they cut the trees out of the road.” -SA

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Report July 13: “UTVs reported busting through snowdrifts and making it over the top of Elk Summit from the Big Creek side. Large drifts but passable for skilled drivers.” SA
Smith Creek Trees down from Avalanche

Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Warrens Wagon Road: Construction update: The road is CLOSED from 8am-Noon and 1pm-5pm Monday-Friday. The road is OPEN with a PILOT CAR from Noon-1pm and after 5pm Monday-Friday. The road is OPEN without a pilot car on Saturday and Sunday.
Update June 4: be aware that the Long Gulch Culvert Installation Project along Warren Wagon Road from Chinook Campground to Steamboat Summit will begin on June 15 and end in mid-July. The project involves the installation of numerous cross drain culverts. Delays of under 1 hour can be expected. This area of Warren Wagon is between Secesh Meadows and Warren.

Deadwood Summit: Open, travel with caution.
Scott Mountain is also open.
Note: The approx elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′
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Weather Reports July 12-18, 2020

July 12 Weather:

At 9am it was 59 degrees, clear sky and light breeze. Mostly hazy and a little breezy at noon. At 330pm it was 80 degrees, mostly cloudy (dark) and lighter breezes, feels a bit muggy. At 6pm it was 73 degrees, overcast and light breezes. At 9pm it was 64 degrees, overcast and slight breeze.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time July 13, 2020 at 09:00AM
Mostly cloudy, light breeze
Max temperature 83 degrees F
Min temperature 44 degrees F
At observation 54 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

July 13 Weather:

At 9am it was 54 degrees, mostly cloudy and light breeze. Cloudy and light breezes at 1pm. At 3pm it was 75 degrees, mostly cloudy and light breezes. At 630pm it was 75 degrees, mostly clear to partly cloudy and light breeze. At 9pm it was 63 degrees, mostly clear and occasional gusty breezes. Looked clear at midnight.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time July 14, 2020 at 09:00AM
Clear, breezy
Max temperature 80 degrees F
Min temperature 37 degrees F
At observation 50 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

July 14 Weather:

At 9am it was 50 degrees, clear and breezy. Sunny, clear and a bit breezy at 1pm. At 330pm it was 80 degrees, clear and breezy. At 630pm it was 78 degrees, clear and light breeze. At 930pm it ws 63 degrees and mostly clear, a thin streak of haze. Lots of stars at 11pm.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time July 15, 2020 at 09:00AM
Clear, light breeze
Max temperature 81 degrees F
Min temperature 38 degrees F
At observation 51 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

July 15 Weather:

At 9am it was 51 degrees, clear and light breeze. at 1150am it was 72 degrees, clear and slight breeze. At 245pm it was 83 degrees, clear and occasional gusty breezes. At 630pm it was 83 degrees, clear and light breezes. At 9pm it was 66 degrees, slight breeze and partly hazy. Lots of stars at midnight.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time July 16, 2020 at 09:00AM
Clear
Max temperature 86 degrees F
Min temperature 42 degrees F
At observation 56 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

July 16 Weather:

At 9am it was 56 degrees and clear. At 2pm it was 86 degrees, clear and light variable breezes. At 630pm it was 86 degrees, clear and light breeze. At 9pm it was 70 degrees, clear and calm. Clear at midnight.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time July 17, 2020 at 09:00AM
Clear
Max temperature 90 degrees F
Min temperature 47 degrees F
At observation 60 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

July 17 Weather:

At 9am it was 60 degrees and clear. At 1pm it was 83 degrees, partly cloudy and gusty breezes. At 230pm it was 86 degrees, mostly cloudy and gusty breezes. At 6pm it was 84 degrees, mostly cloudy (a little muggy) and variable breezes. At 9pm it was 75 degrees and mostly cloudy. Clear sky at midnight.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time July 18, 2020 at 09:00AM
Clear
Max temperature 88 degrees F
Min temperature 46 degrees F
At observation 55 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

July 18 Weather:

At 9am it was 55 degrees and clear. Clear, hot and a little breezy at 1pm. At 3pm it was 83 degrees, clear and breezy. At 6pm it was 84 degrees, clear sky and light breeze. At 9pm it was 70 degrees and clear. At midnight clear.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time July 19, 2020 at 09:00AM
Clear
Max temperature 87 degrees F
Min temperature 44 degrees F
At observation 56 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
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