Idaho History July 12, 2020

Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic

Part 13

Idaho Newspaper clippings November 15-19, 1918

1918WearAMask-a
One Oregon newspaper clip reads: “We appeal to your civil patriotism to co-operate with us in our effort to stamp out the Spanish Influenza or “Flu” Plague in Portland by wearing a mask.” A newspaper clip from January 1919. University of Oregon

source: Katie Canales Jul 2, 2020, Business Insider
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Nov 15

The Rathdrum Tribune., November 15, 1918, Page 1

19181115TRT1-headline
Celebration In Rathdrum
Victorious End of the War Proclaimed
Awakened Holiday Spirit.

Rathdrum celebrated the end of the war Monday with manifestations of gladness that crystallized into an organized street parade and stated program of music and speeches, a bonfire and barbecue. From the time the joy bells announced the signing of the armistice that brought a cessation of hostilities, about 3:30 in the morning, until the barbecue was over and the bonfire had burned low, the holiday spirit pervaded the entire town and vicinity.

The ringing of the bells, honking of auto horns and firing of guns got out a large crowd before daylight, and sunrise found the town in gala attire with its flags and bunting displayed in profusion down both sides of the main street. Early in the day O. G. Farnsworth, chairman of the local advisory committee started arrangements for the evening celebration. Committees were appointed and speakers secured. Forty-two dollars were raised and a trip made to Spokane to purchase fireworks. Another committee was assigned the work of preparing the barbecue, and another to gather fuel for the bonfire at the school grounds and to install the necessary lights on the stairway and porches.

In the afternoon a large crowd assembled down town to receive and give vociferous welcome to some twenty-six auto loads of Coeur d’Alene citizens who came over to return the visit made to their town by people of Rathdrum and vicinity the evening of Nov. 7.

The evening parade consisted of a long line of autos appropriately decorated headed by four individuals on horseback, Miss Edna Layton, representing the Goddess of Liberty; Art Foster, soldier; Clark Hill, sailor, and Miss Stella Hurrell, Red Cross nurse. The line of the parade started at the bank corner, east to Idaho street, thence to Crenshaw’s addition, back to First street by Coeur d’Alene street and thence to the school grounds. The band played prior to the starting of the parade and also had a part in the program at the school grounds.

H. H. Mitchell had charge of the program in front of the high school building. Speakers were Frank A. Morris, County Sup’t R. C. Egbers, Professor W. E. Chandler [?], E. G. Greenup and M. B. Layton. The speaking was interspersed with selections by the Liberty chorus, the band, and the male quartet which consisted of Superintendent L. O. Swenson, L. J. Hartlerode, N. H. Taylor and O. G. Farnsworth.

Mr. Morris, In his address, referred to the event being celebrated, as the harbinger or forerunner of peace to be followed by a difficult period of reconstruction work. The peace treaty, he reminded the audience, has yet to be drawn up and signed. In the meantime hostilities have ceased and America is to be congratulated for having escaped the horrors visited by the Germans upon the unfortunate inhabitants of Belgium, France and other European countries.

Mr. Egbers referred briefly to the fact that since the American army stopped the Germans at Chateau Thierry last July the allies had been winning on all fronts.

Mr. Chandler made humorous references to the kaiser’s vaunted versatility and omniscience and the disaster to which his talents have brought him. He also spoke of this as the first great international or world holiday that the world has ever knows, that, will be celebrated by every liberty loving people henceforward.

Mr. Greenup also made a hit with the crowd by his witty remarks concerning the kaiser’s downfall and his flight to Holland in an effort to escape punishment for his crimes. He said the present peace marks a new phase in the world’s progress, the overthrow of autocracy and the ascendancy of government by the people.

Mr. Layton devoted his remarks chiefly in behalf of the united war work campaign, reminding his hearers that, although peace had come, the boys would be in Europe and in the camps for many months and would need the helpful work of these good agencies as much as ever.
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Idaho State News Items.

Boyd Kelly Frazier, the Jerome young man who died three days after he had returned home from the S. A. T. C. at Moscow suffering from lack of medical attention for a severe case of Spanish influenza, failed to report to officials at the university that he was sick, although he had every opportunity to receive medical attention, according to a letter written [by] Dr. E. A. Bryan, commissioner of education, by E. H. Lindley, president of the university, explaining the results of an investigation by two Jerome citizens, one of them the boy’s father.
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From Over The County

Harrison

Earl Wark returned from Camp Jefferson on account of the flu. He had lost twenty pounds.

Influenza caused one death at Medimont.
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Coeur D’Alene

Judge Alfred Budge canceled the session of the supreme court of Idaho which was to have been held in Coeur d’Alene beginning November 11.

The third member of the Knute Swanson family to succumb to influenza was Theodore, age 21, who died Nov. 9.

A forth member of the Knute Swanson family, Iona, age 12, died of influenza Sunday.

source: The Rathdrum Tribune. (Rathdrum, Idaho), 15 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Rathdrum Tribune., November 15, 1918, Page 3

Local Paragraphs.

Twenty-seven autos loads of Rathdrum people joined in the trip to Coeur d’Alene Thursday night of last week to celebrate. They were well received and the Liberty chorus made quit a hit.

The first of the week Rathdrum was free from influenza, but on Wednesday two new cases were reported, coming from other communities. Many cases are reported in Spokane, Spirit Lake and Coeur d’Alene.

The teachers of the Rathdrum schools were granted leave until after Thanksgiving and several of them have done to their homes. It is expected that school will be resumed about Dec. 1, if not sooner.

The abdication of the kaiser was celebrated in Rathdrum last Saturday afternoon and evening. The fallen potentate was hung in effigy by a hilarious crowd. Bells were rung and the Liberty chorus sang stirring selections on the street in various parts of town.

source: The Rathdrum Tribune. (Rathdrum, Idaho), 15 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Republican. November 15, 1918, Page 1

19181115TIR1-headline
Blackfoot Sure Did Celebrate
Announcement of War’s End Aroused Local People to Intense Activity on Monday.

There was shouting and singing and jubilant ringing in Blackfoot early Monday morning when word was received that the armistice had been signed, which meant that the world war was over. As soon as the glad tidings were received the bells of the city were set to ringing and loud, shrill whistles let open so that the early morning air was a confusion of joyful sound. At the early hour of 4:30 the city fire engine, loaded with men, wild with enthusiasm, all shouting, raced up and down the residential streets waking the slumbering townfolk. It reminded one somewhat of the famous midnight ride of Paul Revere on the eighteenth of April, 1775, only it was realized that it was world wide.

At early dawn many autos decorated in national colors and flags had fallen in line behind the fire engine and a parade formed. Business people tried to collect themselves sufficiently to take their respective places, but in most cases upon arriving at headquarters found doors locked and their managers decorating the buildings in flags and bunting – so business houses remained closed all day to more fully do justice to the occasion.

At 2 o’clock in the, afternoon a parade of some 250 citizens carrying flags, marched thru the business district, over to Judicial street and to the court house grounds, where they assembled to listen to addresses by the Rev,. Colver, Judge Anderson and J. T. Carruth. The festivities lasted until dark.

November 11 will go down thru the ages as perhaps the greatest day in history for this old world of ours, and it would seem fitting to always observe it as the real Thanksgiving day.
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Miss Dorothy Belville and her friends had a fine looking coyote in the celebration Monday. He was kept on a chain, and was as busy celebrating as anybody.
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War Summary

November 12

Greater portions of U. S. army to remain for the present overseas. Much naval work yet to be done. Will take over, and guard all of the enemy’s warships.

Calls to army are cancelled. All draft work cancelled. No more inductions, will return men who have been entrained, but not yet reached training camps. …

November 13

Teutons to surrender all divers. Starvation facing the German people.

… The danger of famine in Germany was the reason for early peace negotiations.

U. S. needs four billion dollars yearly to carry on the reconstruction work… AcAdoo taxes will be high for many years. More loans are also required to pay off the war debt.

November 14

… President promises Germany food aid. Everything possible will be done.

… U. S. forming plans for future of army.
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Died at Camp Lewis

Richard Phillips of Aberdeen died of influenza at Camp Lewis about three weeks ago, after a four days illness.

The body was sent to Aberdeen for burial.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 15 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Republican. November 15, 1918, Page 2

The influenza epidemic caused a ban to be put upon public gatherings of all kinds, hence the oratory of the different candidates was lost to the Idaho citizenry. But there was no lack of interest in the campaign. Being denied the privilege of addressing the voters of the state in person, many of the candidates resorted to newspaper publicity, and many columns of campaign arguments were published in the press of the state, to the gratification at least of the publisher. How the public appreciated the innovation is a question open to debate.

The prevalence of influenza was responsible for a much lighter vote than would have been cast had health conditions throughout the state been normal. Many did not vote because they were confined to their homes with the disease, while others doubtless did not go to the polls because they desired to avoid coming in contact with some who were probably afflicted with the disease.
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19181115TIR2
Moreland

Miss Revella Wray, the clerk at the Lindsay store, is staying at the home of Mrs. Blanche Wray, because her folks have the influenza.

Miss Blanche and Locloe Ribbins have been ill for a few days, it is reported that they have the flu.

Joice Hudson, the eight year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Hudson, died Saturday night. The little girl had the Spanish influenza.

All the members of the John Hall family are ill with the influenza except one small boy.
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19181115TIR3
Sterling

The Holmquist family are down with the influenza.

Claude Parsons is confined to his bed with the influenza.

The Tanner family, who are ill with the flu, are improving.

Miss Adeline Nelson came home Saturday from Provo to stay until school reopens. She has been ill with influenza.
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19181115TIR4
Grandview

Luther Satterfield is the latest victim of the flu.

The Quigley family are reported a great deal better this week.

Joe Cosgrove returned from the hospital [in] Pocatello Saturday.
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19181115TIR5
Rose

Alma Jackman and family are going to move to their new home in Aberdeen as soon as they recover from the influenza.

Mrs. J. G. Waring had word that Willie Johnson has been quarantined on board a ship for five weeks, but thought the company would be able to sail soon.,

John Norman is slowly improving, after his second attack of the influenza.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 15 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Republican. November 15, 1918, Page 3

Wanted Contraband Booze

A body of three or four hundred men gathered at the court house Monday forenoon and asked to be given the contraband booze then in the custody of the sheriff.

The request was refused and they were told to have as good a time as they could, but not to bring any booze into play.
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Ill With Influenza

Miss Gertrude Kinney, who has been seriously ill with the influenza at her home in Pocatello is now much improved.

During Miss Kinney’s illness her sister Miss Whilden Kinney has charge of the Kinney Art Studio …. (page cut off)

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 15 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Republican. November 15, 1918, Page 5

Local News

Fisher Hearing Postponed

On account of the illness of the county stenographer Mrs. Maurine White, the Fisher preliminary examination was postponed until some time next week. Announcements will be made later.
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Infant Baby Dies

William, the seventeen months old baby of Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Quigley passed away Monday morning after a few days’ illness with pneumonia. …
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Stores No Longer Close at 6 O’clock

On account of the subsidence of the influenza epidemic locally, the ruling for stores closing at 6 o’clock was lifted today, Thursday.

This, however, does not apply to the state order pertaining to public gatherings, school and picture shows.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 15 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Republican. November 15, 1918, Page 8

Influenza Situation.

The influenza situation in Blackfoot is much improved, and there are only a very few cases.

However the disease is more prevalent in Shelly and Presto, than any other part of the county.

And with people still taking precautions it is though that the epidemic will soon be wiped out.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 15 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Oakley Herald. November 15, 1918, Page 1

19181115TOH1
In The Gem State

Ralph Gouchnour of Burley, son of D. M. Gouchour [sic?], a member of the vocational section, died at Moscow of typhoid pneumonia.

On account of there being no slackening of the influenza epidemic in the Pocatello district, it was decided to postpone the date of holding federal court there to November 18.

Owing to the influenza epidemic, and a drizzling snow during the entire day, less than 50 per cent of the vote was cast at the election at Idaho Falls. The new style of ballot also made it tedious in making the count.

The Caldwell general hospital closed last week for good. Those in charge of the hospital refused to say anything in regard to the closing, but it is known that it has had a stormy financial career because of the lack of cooperation it deserved.

The influenza epidemic has been making rapid strides in Idaho Falls and Bonneville county and stringent measures are being taken to overcome it. Every person has been ordered to wear a mask over the nose and mouth and all business houses, except drug stores and cafes, are closed at 6 p.m.
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Locals and Personals.

Benjamin Judd is ill this week.

Rosel Hale is back again on Route 1 after a brief illness.

Miss Violet Cummins, who is at Camp Lewis, has recovered from an attack of ‘flu’.

Leland Peterson has recovered from a severe attack of ‘flu’ and is ready to assume his duties on Route 2 again.
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Joseph H. Boren

The funeral of Joseph H. Boren who died last week from influenza, was held Friday. He was 52 years of age and was born in Provo, Utah.

His mother and six brothers attended funeral services. He is survived by his wife and six children: Mrs. Dell Chipman of Provo, Utah, Jesse, Wesley, Estella, Etta, and Addie Boren.
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Churchill

There are no new cases of ‘flu’ in Churchill.

Lloyd Oldham received word last week of the death of his brother with the ‘flu’.

Eugene Berrell who recently moved from Churchill to Burley is very ill with the ‘flu’.

source: The Oakley Herald. (Oakley, Idaho), 15 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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American Falls Press. November 15, 1918, Page 4

19181115AFP1
People and Events

Mrs. Sailing is reported to be ill with influenza.

Miss Walsh, who has been ill for the past two weeks with influenza, is able to be about once more.

Ernest Jones came up from Rockland yesterday. He is not strong yet, but his appetite indicates that he is making a good recovery.

The family of P. A. Friezen, who were reported ill with influenza last week, have been brought to the hospital here. They are reported to be quite sick.

Miss Hazel Lower of Roy is recovering from a siege of influenza and pneumonia. For a time the young lady was very ill and it was doubtful if she would recover.

The influenza epidemic appears to be checked in American Falls and the near vicinity. It is also reported to be less frequent in outlying parts of the county. However, the ban on public meetings and on schools has not been raised. The state board of health has decided to be slow about raising the ban, believing that a little caution is the better policy.

A. A. Friezen was in from cedar Creek settlement Wednesday and reports an experience that was common to many people in all parts of the county. Seven members of his family were down with influenza at the same time, leaving him the only one to be up. He had their care and the care of the family as well, as it was impossible to get anyone to assist at that time.

source: American Falls Press. (American Falls, Idaho), 15 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Recorder. November 15, 1918, Page 1

19181115IR1
One Quarantine Made Effective

A letter from Challis describes how the citizens of that locality determined to make an effective quarantine against influenza, as follows:

The court and the county board of health and council of defense have clashed in the Challis or Salmon river watershed section of Custer county over Spanish influenza quarantine. To prevent carriers taking the disease into the Challis section, all road and highways leading thereto were picketed. In the night, however, parties passed the pickets, and when discovered, were placed in quarantine. They applied to the courts for help, and Judge F. J. Cowen issued a writ for the release of the parties so detained and cited Sheriff Huntington and Dr. C L. Kirtley, chairman of the Custer county board of health, to appear before him at Arco on November 11, to show cause why they should not be punished for contempt of court for refusing to release them.

Resolution Explains Situation.

The Custer county council of defense met and passed the following resolution, which was forwarded to Governor Alexander, the state board of health, the state council of defense and Judge Cowen:

“Whereas, a dangerous and infectious disease known as the Spanish influenza has become epidemic through the United States, and has infected many places within the state of Idaho, and the affliction often causing death, and the Custer county board of health under the authority and rules and regulations of the state board of health, have quarantined the Salmon river watershed in Custer county against infected district, said Salmon river watershed being free from said epidemic by reason of such quarantine, and proper stations and guards having been placed on roads and ways of ingress to this section, and one of them being placed on the public road between Mackay and Challis at Willow creek summit, the Lost river and Salmon river divide, and

Run the Blockade.

“Whereas, persons from an affected district did willfully and unlawfully in the night time and after being instructed by Dr. C. L. Kirtley, chairman of the county board of health, not to do so, steal by such guard and quarantine station and expose people in this district to said disease, and under the direction of said board of health, such persons were arrested and detained under quarantine by W. K. Huntington, sheriff of Custer county, until time for the development of the disease and danger of the infection had passed, and

Court Steps In.

“Whereas, F. J. Cowen, judge of the Sixth judicial district court, did, on the fifth day of November, 1918, issue a writ directing the sheriff and health board to immediately release said persons so quarantined and also make an order appointing T. R. Jones to serve said writ and for Chase A. Clark to accompany him, both of said persons being from an infected district, armed with such order and writ, willfully passed said quarantine station and guard and came to Challis and served said papers, said judge directing that they be not interfered with in making such service; that said judge had issue an order directing W. K. Huntington, sheriff, and Dr. Cl. L. Kirtley, chairman of the Custer county board of health, to appear before him at Arco, Idaho on the 11th day of November and show cause why they should not be punished for contempt of court for refusing to release parties from quarantine; that we are reliably informed that said Judge F. J. Cowen has issued further orders to permit other persons from affected district to pass quarantine station and guard and thereby permitting them to expose persons in this district to infection, although said judge has been fully informed as to all conditions recited there in.

Uphold Officials.

Therefore, be it resolved that each and every act of W. J. Huntington, sheriff, and Dr. C. L. Kirtley, chairman of Custer county board of health, in enforcing said quarantine is hereby approved and they are assured of the united support of this council of defense and are directed and requested to instruct all quarantine guards to permit no one to pass such guards from infected districts unless they are supplied with order to do so from the state board of health or the Custer county board of health, and to disregard all orders coming from any other source; that said Judge F. J. Cowen is respectfully requested to issue no more orders or writ for persons to violate the quarantine regulations of the Custer county or state board of health; that Honorable M. Alexander, governor, the state council of defense, the state board of health, th Honorable F. J. Cowen, district judge, be appealed to and requested to give this council of defense and the Custer county board of health their support and co-operation in using all necessary force to maintain said quarantine; that a copy of this resolution be mailed to Honorable M. Alexander, governor, the state council of defense, the state board of health and Honorable F. J. Cowen, district judge, and that this resolution be signed by the chairman and secretary of this council and members.”
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19181115IR2
Posse Resists This Federal Agent

A secret service agent in soldier uniform was forcibly ejected from the Pahsimaroi valley by an angry bunch of citizens for running the quarantine blockade at the line between Custer and Lemhi counties last Sunday night.

This agent had run the blockade on the Willow creek summit between Mackay and Challis Sunday morning and was escorted back without legal proceeding. He associated himself with a cattle buyer and took the first branch road to the Pahsimaroi. As soon as the occurrence was reported to the citizens the exposed community assembled 50 strong and rounded up the intruding pair and afforded transportation and escorts to the county line. There a Custer county escort took the army officer and the cattle buyer and delivered them to the guards at the Double Spring pass.

That army officer stripped his soldier coat and challenged the crowd to battle, but he could find no vulnerable spot in the column of 50 that advanced to use force in the process of ejectcment. He cussed and pleaded tho, but he wet along just the same as a common man would go in response to unanimous sentiment. This army officer evidently had Uncle Sam behind him, but too far behind just then.
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19181115IR3
More Victims of Prevailing ‘Flu’

A. Roy Buchanan

A. Roy Buchanan died at the Tendoy home of his mother-in-law, Mrs. Margaret Kirkham, on Monday last, November 11, after a week’s illness from complications that usually follow influenza. From the beginning his case was considered a bad one. He was a giant in strength yet the disease quite mastered him within a short time, when one of his lungs became involved in pneumonia. …

William Humphreys

William Humphreys, known as “Smokey Bil, died in Salmon, at a city hotel, on Sunday. His case was another of the influenza attacks. In the community Mr. Humphreys was well known as a successful angler.

Mrs. Billy Withington

Mrs. Maggie Richardson Withington died at the Hamner hospital last Sunday morning. She was the wife of William Withington of Sandy creek. This entire family was stricken with attacks of influenza at the same time, Mr. Withington also having been extremely ill. He reached the home of Mr. and Mrs. L. C. Thirlkill in Salmon where he has received the all needed care and attention. … Their home is at the Harry Hover ranch, further up Sandy creek. This lady hovered between life and death for several days. All of the other Withington family except one who still remains at the hospital have been cared for in the homes of relatives.

Mrs. May Withington Hill died at the Hoover farm on Sandy creek early Wednesday morning from the influenza. She left a babe which was born in the midst of the young mother’s fatal illness. The child is living. The father and husband, Herbert Hill, was very sick and it seemed, hardly probable at one time that he would recover. Mrs. Hill was the daughter of Mrs. Withington who died at the Hanmer hospital last Sunday morning, and whose father is recovering from the same disease at the Salmon home of Mr. and Mrs. Thirlkill.

Harry Yost

Harry Yost died yesterday at the works of the Drilling Development company where he had been employed as foreman. His fellow workmen knew him as a man of fine character and among all who knew him he was highly esteemed. He had suffered from influenza twelve days. …

source: The Idaho Recorder. (Salmon City, Idaho), 15 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Recorder. November 15, 1918, Page 5

[top of page cut off]

Dr. and Mrs. W. B. Hart were called to Butte by the illness of their son, Frederick Shenon.

Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Smith and their children are all recovered from their attack of the epidemic, Mr. Smith being out and around this week.

The regular teachers’ examination has been indefinitely postponed y order of the state board of education, according to notice published by the county superintendent.

Mr. and Mrs. Homer Harris arrived on Sunday last by special stage from Armstead. They had visited Chicago, where Mr. Harris stayed, the epidemic raged with terror to the people until the fall rains came.

Joe Moodie has been home in Salmon from the sheep camp for two weeks nursing an attack of the prevailing malady from which he came off all right. Mr. Moodie is associated with L. T. Ramsey in business at Lemhi.

The G. H. Monk family expect to leave Salmon next week for California. Mrs. Whitcomb, who expected to go along, will defer her trip on account of the effects of an attack of influenza, from which, however, she is recovering.

Seth Ball, prominent rancher of the Lemhi valley, was in Salmon Wednesday for the first time in a month. He returned from the east last week. He was disabled for a little while with a tussle with the influenza while away from home but pulled out of the encounter without difficulty.

Decidedly better conditions prevail among the sick and afflicted from the visitation of influenza, as reported by Salmon physicians. The change seems to have started with a rainfall on Saturday night. Travelers say that wherever in the stricken localities there has been rain a falling off of the disease has been noticeable, particularly where a drought has prevailed. The ravages of the epidemic are reported exceedingly alarming, however, in Portland, where rains are frequent, possibly a daily occurrence in some seasons of the year.

Numbers of the afflicted people of Salmon will remember as long as they live little John Keyes, who, though not yet 12 years of age, has been the help of many a home besides that of his mother, where every member of the family but himself was on the sick list. John as been doing chores for everybody who needs his help – feeding chickens, emptying slops, starting fires, bringing water, washing dishes, chopping wood, cooking food and doing pretty good nursing besides. Talking about busy people that little fellow is one of them.
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[top of page cut off]

Dan Chase was able to be out of the house yesterday morning for the first time since his influenza attack.

Art Simrs, the divorced husband of Ethel Fowler, died at Stockton, Utah, last Friday of the flu.

Gert Goodell was taken sick with the flu at the pope-shenon mine Monday night and was brought to Salmon Tuesday.

Dr. C. F. Hanmer goes to Ft. Arden, Washington, next Tuesday, for training as an army surgeon. Mrs. Hanmer and their son Ferguson will accompany Dr. Hanmer as far as Butte, stopping enroute t Dillon to visit Mr. and Mrs. Harry Pierce, who have been ill in a Dillon hospital with influenza.

In the alarm over the ravages of the epidemic many erroneous reports were circulated. Two of these came from Idaho Falls according to Mrs. N. O. Ward in Salmon from her mother, Mrs. A. H. Boomer, in that city. The mother writes that neither Harry Holden nor Mrs. Milt Stover succumbed to the disease as reported but are now well on the road to recovery, the writing having met them both on the street.

source: The Idaho Recorder. (Salmon City, Idaho), 15 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Recorder. November 15, 1918, Page 6

19181115IR4
World News In Condensed Form

Since October 1 there have been 204,639 cases and 32,398 deaths from influenza and pneumonia, reports of the Pennsylvania state health department say.

Home products only on the Thanksgiving dinner table this year is the program of the food administration. Hotels, restaurants and other eating places have been asked to save transportation by using only food produced locally and the administration has issued an appeal to households to observe the same rules.

source: The Idaho Recorder. (Salmon City, Idaho), 15 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Recorder. November 15, 1918, Page 7

Around The Mines

Western oil fields have been hit hard by the prevailing disease. It is declared that the spread of the Spanish influenza among the workers caused many drilling operations to be suspended, and also handicapped the handling of the leases.

Most of the Alta mines have had a double handicap to contend with the past few weeks. Added to the frequent storms’ with their consequent muddy highways comes the inroad of the insidious little influenza germ. Already some of the husky miners have succumbed, and many others are down with the disease.
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Inland Northwest

Seattle’s stores may be closed in an effort to prevent the spread of Spanish influenza, City Health Commissioner J. S. McBride has announced.

Arrangements have been made whereby nutritious soup and other food will be taken to homes in Lewiston, Mont., where the influenza has made the preparation of good food for any patient difficult.

Druggists will be permitted under certain restrictions to refill prescriptions calling for morphine, codeine or heroin, written by registered practitioners for patients suffering from influenza and any pulmonary or bronchial afflictions, according to notice received at Helena.

source: The Idaho Recorder. (Salmon City, Idaho), 15 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Recorder. November 15, 1918, Page 8

19181115IR5
Leadore

Miss Irene Yearian, who is teaching in Albany, Oregon, and Will Yearian at Ft. Warden, Wash., are both recovering from an attack of influenza.

C. H. Benson, Lee Reamy, Harry Pierce and John Edwards, who have been delivering stock in the east returned to their homes in Leadore last week. All are well but precautions were taken for a few days that no influenza germs should be scattered.

Horace Ecker, who is quite well known here, has been transferred from Camp Dick, at Dallas, Texas, to the Flying Field near Lonoke, Arkansas. He has just recovered from a severe case of influenza.

Friends of the Carlson family will be glad to learn that the cases of influenza in that home are improving rapidly.
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19181115IR6
Leesburg

Miss Lewis, who came over from Salmon to visit at the Caples camp, is recovering from an attack of influenza. Miss Rovers is also a guest of Mrs. Caples.

The O’Conner family have all been ill with influenza but are now on the convalescent list.

Hilliard Grieber is also another influenza patient in this district sick with influenza. He is at the Italian mine.
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19181115IR7
Gilmore

We are still very fortunate, no case of influenza has put in an appearance. We have our masks ready, our signs out that we are in quarantine against the outside world and profoundly hope to come forth unscathed. We were all sorry to learn of the death of Mrs. Geo. Johnson at Salt Lake this past week. Mrs. Johnson spent the summer in Gilmore and had only recently gone to Salt Lake to live for the winter.

The Weirs, who went a couple of weeks ago to Idaho Falls to attend a funeral, are held there by the quarantine.

source: The Idaho Recorder. (Salmon City, Idaho), 15 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Kendrick Gazette. November 15, 1918, Page 2

19181115KG1
Idaho News Paragraphs
Recent Happenings in This State Given in Brief Items for Busy Readers

The epidemic of influenza is on the increase at Elk River.

If no further cases of influenza develop the Sandpoint schools may resume Nov. 18. The ban on picture houses and public gathering will probably be removed at the same time.

Miss Catherine Lansing, age 42, died recently at Lewiston from the “Flu.” Miss Lansing was among the most devoted of Red Cross workers, and for the last year had given practically off of her time to this work.

The influenza epidemic has run its course in Lewis county, no new cases having been reported for nearly two weeks. In all 23 deaths occurred in Lewis county from the epidemic, 15 being at Nez Perce and eight at Ilo-Vollmer.

One doctor in Kellogg reported 400 cases of Spanish influenza. In some families six and seven members are in bed from the disease – all regulations are closely followed, but it seems to be on the increase. Eight have died Friday and Saturday.

source: The Kendrick Gazette. (Kendrick, Idaho), 15 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Kendrick Gazette. November 15, 1918, Page 3

Leland Items

Leland people gathered on Monday evening in an impromptu manner, rang bells, fired guns, exploded dynamite, in fact they made use of anything that would make a noise to celebrate the canning of the Kaiser.

The Fred Wegner family, who have been quarantined with influenza are all well again.

Linden Items

Word was received that Mrs. Granvill Wall is recovering from the influenza and that Granvill just got out of the hospital in California.

source: The Kendrick Gazette. (Kendrick, Idaho), 15 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Kendrick Gazette. November 15, 1918, Page 8

Gleanings

Howard and Dick Fenton were taken suddenly ill with influenza last Saturday afternoon. A. E. Wilcox was away on a hunting trip at the time and had to be called home to take charge of the depot here. Until his arrival H. P Hull looked after the interests of the N. P. here. Howard and Dick are getting along very well and it is believed will soon be entirely recovered.

Mrs. J. B. Helpma arrived Wednesday from Northport, Wash. She came to take care of her daughter Helen, who is ill with influenza.

Mr. and Mrs. Howard Fentron and two children and Dick Fenton were taken ill with influenza the first of the week. All are getting along nicely except Howard who has a very severe attack. He has had a high fever for several days but it is hoped that his condition will improve very soon.

There are a number of cases of influenza in Kendrick this week but no serious cases except Howard Fenton, who has been very ill. An accurate list is rather hard to procure as there are a number of cases that have not developed decided symptoms. …
— —

Big Bear Ridge

A large number stopped their various kinds of work Monday to join in celebrating the long-to-be-remembered day of Peace, in Kendrick and Deary. The ring of church bells was heard far and near.

The A. W. Jones family have been on the sick list but are improving at this writing.
— —

Southwick Items

The sick people of this neighborhood are reported to be improving.

Edwin Wetmore and Marion McClelland are stationed at Mare Island, Cal. The boys say they have not caught the “flu” yet.
— —

Night Work Discontinued

Nineteen out of twenty night trips made by the doctor could be avoided if people show the proper consideration for his welfare. It is also a great advantage to the sick person to begin treatment before night comes on.

As a matter of personal protection, I have discontinued night work, excepting confinement cases.

— Dr. R. C. Faust.

source: The Kendrick Gazette. (Kendrick, Idaho), 15 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Montpelier Examiner. November 15, 1918, Page 5

19181115ME1
Local News

Dr. King is confined to his home with a mild attack of the influenza. Mrs. King also has it in mild form.

On November 1st Bear Lake county stood 23rd in the sale of war savings stamps. That is, 22 counties in the state had a better record than Bear Lake.

If any one thinks it an easy matter to get out a newspaper with the town quarantined “tighter than beeswax” we will gladly give them a chance to try it.

The body of John Olson who died in San Francisco last Saturday, was brought here for burial Monday. Death was caused from pneumonia. Deceased was a son of Mrs. B. Olson of this city. For some time past he had been employed as a brakeman on the Southern Pacific, and was a member of the B. of R. T. He was buried on his thirty-second birthday.

A daughter was born last Tuesday to Mr. and Mrs. N. A. Myers of this city. Mrs. Myers is ill with the influenza at the Montpelier hospital but she and the babe are getting along nicely.

source: Montpelier Examiner. (Montpelier, Idaho), 15 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Montpelier Examiner. November 15, 1918, Page 8

Fish Haven Notes.

Fish Haven, Nov. 13. – Funeral services were held at the Fish Haven cemetery on Nov. 7 for Henry Smith, who died at Aberdeen, on Oct. 31. Death was caused from diphtheria, following the influenza. The loving sympathy of the entire community goes out to the widowed mother in her terrible bereavement.

The news that “the war is over” was received here with cheers and rejoicing, firing of guns and driving decorated autos through the street with the boys and girls waiving hats and handkerchiefs. At night a great bonfire was built and the kaiser was burned in effigy at nearly every home as well as in public. A number of autos drove up from Paris, all decorated with flags and bunting. Loud cheers and greetings were exchanged with the people of Fish Haven and the visitors raced back as thought they were afraid they would not get a chance to fire a shot at the kaiser if they didn’t hurry. The frolic kept up until a late hour, when all retired with hearts filled with joy that the terrible was was over and suspense ended at last.

Mrs. L. S. Coley received word this morning that her daughter, Mrs. O. L. Schenck, who lives near Randolph, was very low with influenza and that other members of the family were also ill with it.

So far, there are no cases of the “flu” here, for which we are truly thankful.

source: Montpelier Examiner. (Montpelier, Idaho), 15 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Meridian Times., November 15, 1918, Page 1

19181115MT1

Editorial Mention.

According to reports from health officials the Spanish influenza is under control in Ada county. It is said that the quarantine will be lifted, if all things are favorable, in two weeks unless there is an increase of cases in the meantime. Crowds gathered to celebrate the end of the war and up to date there are no bad effects noted.

source: The Meridian Times. (Meridian, Idaho), 15 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Meridian Times., November 15, 1918, Page 8

Meridian News Notes

Mr. and Mrs. D. W. Holman have received word that their son William is recovering from an attack of the Spanish influenza at the Moscow state university.

Arthur Grrett [?] has received word from his sister Miss Vivian, who is teaching at the state agricultural college at Pullman, that she is just out of quarantine from the Spanish influenza.

Ward has been received from Miss Winnie Baird, who is teaching at Spokane Wash that she is recovering after two weeks illness with the Spanish influenza. She says there are many cases, some fatal, in Spokane, but that the situation looks better this week.

source: The Meridian Times. (Meridian, Idaho), 15 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Shoshone Journal. November 15, 1918, Page 1

19181115SJ1

O. H. Truman Victim of Influenza

O. A. Truman received the sad news a few days ago of the death of his twin brother, at Long Beach, Cal., Monday, November fourth. Mr. Truman left Shoshone but a few weeks ago. Recently he contracted influenza, which developed into pneumonia, which resulted in his death. The body was shipped for burial to Mr. Truman’s daughter at La Cross, Kansas, the old family home. …
— —

Wood River Center Grange

Will Ivie is very ill at the present writing.

The Fawn Mills’ are all ill with the influenza. They are getting along as fine as can be expected.
— —

Big Wood River News

Every one on Big Wood river rejoices because the war is ended.

Mrs. Burdett has been quite ill with the flu.

The family of A. M. Gomes have all recovered from the Flu.

Master Ward Mills is suffering with the Flu at present.
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Dietrich News

The force of Idaho Irrigation Company workmen engaged in concrete work were badly left out when the flu struck all the restaurant people and left the workmen short of provender. Some good Samaritans came to the rescue and are filling the place left vacant by Mr. and Mrs. Bailey in good shape.

Mr. and Mrs. Edwin R. Gage and two employees on the big Gage farm are sick with the prevailing epidemic, greatly to the interruption of much work now on hand there.

This week Dietrich has been receiving its share of influenza. So far the disease has been rather light in its form here. The big hotel is put to a good use after several years of rest, and is now doing good work as an improvised hospital. L. P. Mustard, James W. Patterson, R. J. Soper, Homer Turner, Mrs. Crist and Mary Crist are all well taken care of there. At the restaurant building J. A. Bailey, Mrs. Bailey, Mrs. Bailey’s sister and her father are sick with the disease. So far there have developed no cases of pneumonia, and all the sick people are said to be prospering. Dietrich is, however, exceeding slow on business and news just now.

source: Shoshone Journal. (Shoshone, Idaho), 15 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., November 15, 1918, Page 3

19181115DSM1
University Will Open Next Monday
Quarantine To Be Raise Tomorrow – No County Schools Next Week

Permission has been granted the University of Idaho to resume its work next Monday and, unless more cases of influenza develop in university circles the quarantine will be lifted tomorrow and school work will be resumed Monday. Students living in the dormitories and at the barracks will be permitted to attend classes. Students living outside of these will have to have certificates from the city or county health officers and Dr. E. H. Lindley, president of the university, has requested all Moscow students who live at home to see Dr. W. A. Adair, city health officer before Monday and secure certificates. He is anxious to have as nearly a full attendance as possible at the university classes Monday.

No new cases have developed in the university circles in two days and only two new cases had developed in the two preceding days, and the situation is regarded as very favorable for university people.

Conditions are not so good in town. It is believed that the disease was spread in Moscow as a result of the victory celebration Monday. The people gathered on the streets in large crowds, regardless of influenza, and it was predicted that many new cases would result.

Dr. W. A. Adair, city health officer, says “More new cases have developed in Moscow in the past 24 hours than in several days prior to that time. People are clamoring to have the schools opened but I think it is dangerous. I know of influenza developing in the homes of four families in Moscow who have a number of children who would have been in school had school been open and this would have given the spread of the disease a new start. There are many new cases among children in town and I think it would be dangerous to open the schools in Moscow before a week from next Monday.”
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19181112DSM2

City News

Mrs. Emma Peterka of Republic, arrived this morning to visit her son, Frank Peterka of the S. A. T. C., who is ill of influenza. Mrs. Peterka is a sister of O. H. Swartz of this city.

Dr. McBryde has been quite ill this week.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 15 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., November 15, 1918, Page 4

19181115DSM2-headline
Armed Mob Holds Up District Judge
Refused to Permit Judge to Enter County to Hold Term of Court

Boise, Idaho, Nov. 14. – Judge J. F. Cowen of the Custer county district court today telegraphed to the governor an appeal for state troops to help him force his way into Custer county, which is closed by a quarantine regulation designed to debar Spanish influenza.

Citizens of the Challis section of the county have barricaded all highways and are on guard with shotguns and rifles. The attorney general has held that the quarantine is legal, and that court dates are not of sufficient importance to justify calling state troops to aid the judges and court attaches to enter the county. The court is seeking to serve removal papers of the sheriff for failure to enforce what he claims are the civil laws.

Judge Cowen asserts that the citizens are thwarting law enforcement and bloodshed was feared.
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Prepare to Reopen the University

Capt. Luther B. Felker, university commandant, issued orders today that since the danger from influenza is decreasing, strict military discipline would be put into effect.

All men will be required to report to formation unless they have a written permit from the surgeon general. Any indisposition is to be reported to medical authorities at once.

The influenza situation continues to improve. Capt. Felker expects to lift the quarantine Saturday. This will apply only to the university. Moscow’s quarantine will not be lifted until ordered by the state board of health.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 15 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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1918ManInMask-a
A man wearing a mask in 1918. Western Neighborhoods Project OpenSFHistory.org

source: Katie Canales Jul 2, 2020, Business Insider
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Nov 16

The Daily Star-Mirror., November 16, 1918, Page 1

19181116DSM1
Another Death From Influenza
Young Soldier Lays Down Life This Morning After a Brave Struggle

Frank J. Paterka, of Spokane, a member of class A, of the S. A. T. C., at the University of Idaho, died this morning of pneumonia, following influenza. He had been in a critical condition for several days. His mother, Mrs. I. J. Paterka, was with him when the end came. He will be buried at Moscow tomorrow afternoon. …

Word reached here today that Howard Fenton, of Kendrick, died there last night of pneumonia, making the first death in Kendrick as a result of the “flu.” He was well known here, his wife, formerly Miss Mabel Grice, having lived in Moscow several years.

There has been a new outbreak of influenza in town, believed to be a result of people massing together the day of the celebration, last Monday. More new cases have been reported in town during the past 48 hours than in the previous week. There are several quite serious cases in town.

The first girls to develop the disease in the university, were quarantined in the Aldrich house today. Three girls, who show symptoms of the disease in a very mild form were taken from their boarding houses, where they have been quarantined and placed in the Aldrich house.

They are Manilla Reed, and Marie Freehafer, of Boise, and Ernestine Rose, of Salmon, Idaho.

The quarantine at the university was raised at noon today and more than 1000 young men and women who have been in quarantine were released. The men will be permitted to come down town but will not be permitted to loaf in pool rooms or any place where a crowd is likely to gather. All of the S. A. T. C. men and many girls were out to see the foot ball game this afternoon and enjoyed it immensely.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 16 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., November 16, 1918, Page 2

Peter Swenson, Farmer of Near Deary is Dead

Peter Swenson, a farmer living on Little Bear ridge, died Wednesday from influenza. His wife and daughter, Miss Mable, had just returned last Tuesday from a visit at Spirit Lake. It is thought she brought the disease home with her. Three other children are in bed with the flu.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 16 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., November 16, 1918, Page 3

19181112DSM2
City News

Miss La Vern Savage returned home yesterday from Pullman suffering from an attack of influenza.

Miss Sabra Hardy, a Red Cross nurse, died in France, Nov. 4, of influenza. Her father, Rev. Hardy, was for several years pastor of the Baptist church at Moscow.

The Aldrich house, near the university, is being used as a hospital for the girls of the university.

Miss Helen Long left this morning for Spokane to assist in the care of her sister, Mrs. John Drury, and family, who are ill of influenza.

Miss Pearl Heise arrived today from Colfax to assist in nursing at the Inland Hospital.

Otis Smith is sick of influenza at his home in southeast Moscow.

Mrs. D. M. Scott has gone to the Armstrong home east of Moscow to relieve Miss Suma Hall, who has been nursing the family during a siege of influenza.

Isaac Spitler, age 18 years of age, son of O. M. Spitler, who lives near Cornwall, died at Lewiston yesterday of pneumonia. The body was brought to Moscow today for burial.

Mr. and Mrs. R. G. Wood of South Almond street are just recovering from attacks of influenza.

The family of J. Jabora are ill with influenza.

Miss A. H. Lampert, one of the nurses from Potlatch, is sick of influenza at the Idaho hotel.

Lloyd Bassett, who has just recovered from the influenza, went to Canada yesterday on account of the illness of his father.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 16 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., November 16, 1918, Page 4

19181116DSM2
Influenza Calls For More Nurses
Situation in Moscow Worse Than Several Days Ago – Nurses Are Needed

Can you nurse? Will you nurse? That is the question which every conscientious woman in Moscow is invited to ask herself at once. Will it be possible for you to devote the next few days or even a part of them to the task of nursing some new cases of influenza? If you can make a favorable answer to this urgent appeal for volunteer nurses, notify Mrs. E. T. Baker, Telephone 243, at once. You are needed. And you are badly needed. Unless some help is forthcoming immediately there is grave danger that the influenza situation will again be a serious menace to the health of the community.

To those in charge of the nursing problem for the civilian population, it does not appear that the disease has by any means been stamped out. There are a number of families where deaths will surely occur unless nurses can be furnished. In one family eight are down with the disease. If these patients have to get up to wait on themselves or on other members of the family, cases which are now mild will surely be changed into dangerous ones.

Mrs. William Hunter, who has been working tirelessly for the past few days to obtain nurses for influenza cases, stated last night that she was at the end of her resources and had not been able to find volunteers who would help out the families now so much in need of assistance. “If we can get this help and get it right away,” said Mrs. Hunter, “we can reasonably hope to save the lives of all the patients. But if they do not expect anything else than fatalities. The crisis so far as the nursing problem is concerned has not passed in Moscow, and if any woman can respond to this appeal to meet a public necessity, she will earn the gratitude of the people at large as well as of the Red Cross and the particular families who are down with the disease.” It is not necessary that the women have a nurse provided, we can hardly who respond should be trained nurses, with diplomas. Any practical woman who has any skill at all at the bedside will he very welcome in the ranks of the volunteer nurses.

Having done her part so nobly for the past few weeks, Moscow, it would seem to those in charge, should not fall down now and neglect to do her full share of merciful work for the benefit of those recently stricken.

It is hoped that as soon as this notice is read tonight a number of women will offer themselves as nurses to meet the impending crisis.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 16 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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1918WomanInMask-a
Photo contributed by the Indiana Historical Society, P0173
An unidentified woman wears a face mask during the 1918 flu epidemic.

source: What Indianapolis was like during the 1918 pandemic April 8, 2020 – by Noah Crenshaw
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Nov 18

The Daily Star-Mirror., November 18, 1918, Page 1

19181118DSM1
University Exonerated for Death of Boyd Frazer

Shortly after school opened at the University of Idaho, Boyd Frazer of Jerome, who had applied for entrance into the S. A. T. C., was discharged owing to a minor physical disability, he being unable to pass the physical examination. He returned to his home at Jerome, Idaho and soon after died. It was thought at the home of the young man that he had been released from the university and sent home while sick. Much indignation was expressed there and there was much talk and ill feeling. When Dr. Lindley, president of the University of Idaho, learned of this he requested that a committee be sent from Jerome to investigate the matter.

A. C. Alexander, publisher of the Lincoln County Times, of Jerome, and R. S. Frazer, father of the young man, came to Moscow to make an investigation. On the train they met F. A. David, who was returning from southern Idaho, and he accompanied them to Moscow and assisted them in getting at the facts. They made a thorough investigation, going into every detail of the matter, visiting every place information might be obtained, and were fully convinced that no blame attached to any one. While in Moscow Mrs. Alexander called at the office of The Star-Mirror and wrote a statement showing that the investigation had proved that no fault could be attached to any one here. Upon his return home he published in his own paper, the Lincoln County Times, the following report, which completely exonerates every one in Moscow with any responsibility for the death of the young man. …
— —

University of Idaho is Again Holding Classes

The University of Idaho opened today in a limited way, after being closed three weeks by the influenza quarantine. All S. A. T. C. classes and work has been renewed, but the classes for girls were not resumed owing to the fact that there are a few very mild cases of influenza among the girls students. These are being carefully watched and guarded. If no new cases develop the girls’ classes will be resumed within a few days. Individual instruction in music has never been stopped at the university as the girls were taught individually and not in classes.

There have been no new cases of influenza reported among S. A. T. C. men for several days and the situation in the university is regarded as very good. The men came down town Saturday evening for the first time since the quarantine was ordered, but they were given rigid instructions not to congregate in large numbers in store or other places. The privilege of coming down town will not be granted to the men from now on until the quarantine is raised.

President Lindley insists upon a rigid observance of this rule for several reasons, the chief being that he does not want to add anything to the situation in town, which is not as good as it should be. There are many new, although mild, cases in town. The students will not be permitted to mingle with the towns people. …

The siege has been a long and hard one and everyone is worn out. President Lindley is especially anxious to prevent any further spread of the disease in town, owing to the marked shortage of nurses. Many nurses who volunteered to take care of the sick when the epidemic was at its worst, have been taken down with the disease or are so worn out with continued work that they could not stand another siege. Appeals for nurses have been sent out every where, but none can be had. Every community is short of nurses and appeals continue to come to Moscow from other places, but Moscow has not enough nurses to care for her own sick if there should be any increase.

Schools will open in Latah county next Monday. Mrs. R. B. Knepper, county school superintendent, today received a telegram from the state board of health notifying her that the quarantine will be raised next Sunday, November 24, in Idaho, and that schools may open on Monday, November 25. Should local conditions be such that it is thought not advisable for the opening of schools at that time, the situation will be handled by the county or city health officers. Moscow churches are expected to hold services next Sunday.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 18 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., November 18, 1918, Page 2

Carey Smith Comes Home.

Carey Smith, who is attending the naval unit of the Washington State university at Seattle, came home Saturday evening to spend a week’s furlough with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. P. L. Smith. Carey and Orval Garrison, who is in the same school from Moscow, have just recovered from attacks of influenza. In the entire school of several thousand men there was a small percentage of deaths from influenza.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 18 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., November 18, 1918, Page 3

19181112DSM2
City News

Mrs. Howard Frazee and daughter, Maxine and Kathleen, arrived Sunday from Spokane to visit Mr. and Mrs. A. A. Frazee. Mrs. Frazee is just recovering from quite a severe attack of influenza.

Mrs. Worth Rogers, who lives east of Moscow, is sick with influenza.

Mrs. Andrew Hagan went to Spokane Sunday to visit her parents, Mr. and Mrs. M. E. Urton, who are just recovering from the influenza.
— —

Miss Genevieve Davis Dead.

Word has come to Moscow that Miss Genevieve Davis died at Pocatello, Nov. 14 with influenza. Miss Davis was a former student of the university and a sister of J. D. Davis and Ellsworth Davis, who are well known in Moscow. Mrs. J. D. Davis is now in Moscow visiting her parents, Mr. and Mrs. C. H. Bratton. She was teaching school at Pocatello.
— —

Women Work at Bremerton.

Frank Burch returned Saturday from Bremerton. Mr. Burch says Bremerton is a busy place. In the Puget Sound shipyards, where he was employed, there were 6300 persons on the payroll and 1000 of these were women. The women drove trucks, drove cranes, were machinists’ helpers, besides being employed in office work.

The influenza at Bremerton has been quite serious, the fatalities being largely among the sailors.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 18 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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1918FamilyMasks
A family in Dublin, Calif. wears masks during the novel influenza pandemic that ranged from 1918 to 1920 (Courtesy City of Dublin, Calif.)
(click image for larger size)

source: COVID-19 mask recommendations echo 1918 orders, By K. Cathey, Lodi News Apr 14, 2020
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Nov 19

American Falls Press. November 19, 1918, Page 1

19181119AFP1Flu Is Increasing.
Relaxing of Precautions Results in Unexpected Spread of Epidemic – Help Needed to Care for Sick.

There has been a material increase in the number of flue cases within the past four days. Among them are the family of A. O. Garten, eight members; children of Mr. and Mrs. Adolf Claassen, S. L. Upham, Mrs. C. W. Dahlberg, J. S. Abercrombie, Mr. Wilcox and G. S., Wennstrom at the First National Bank, Pat Field, Mrs. A. H. Barton, the Kennedy family, Waren Grothe, and Mrs. Soell.

There are said to be a number of others, who are caring for themselves and have not reported. The Red Cross is seeking aid in the care of some of the sick. Anyone willing to nurse the sick, to go in and straighten up the homes, or to prepare food, are requested to phone Miss Florence Barber at the county offices during the day or at 115J evenings.
— —

The influenza epidemic has been checked in army camps.
— —

19181119AFP2
Pleasant Valley.

Andrew Neu has been on the sick list for several weeks and is improving very slowly.

Some of our patriotic farmers are selling their wheat and buying barley to feed their stock, thus going to lots of trouble to save wheat for human consumption.

After a serious work of nursing in Rockland, Grandpa Hetch has returned safely and is ready to take up his duties in the Pleasant Valley school house.

Misses Sophia and Emelia Radke have been looking after the farm of their mother while she was nursing her son Emanuel in the hospital, who has been very sick. Much to the joy of his friends, he passed through the danger zone and arrived home Saturday last.

Influenza has almost left the valley. The worst cases were at the homes of Robert Radke, Jacob Neu, John Tiede, Mrs. M. Radke, Louie Adolf and Emmanuel Radke.

Dan Rast is enjoying health again after a week of illness,
— —

19181119AFP3
Arbon News.

Fred Richards is quite ill with the influenza at the home of E. H. Davis.

The two oldest boys of L. B. Evans are very ill with pneumonia following influenza. All of the family had the flu but are getting along fine.

Bert Noble, the 11-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. John Noble, died at the family home of pneumonia due to influenza, after a few days’ illness. Interment at the Pauline cemetery. This is the third child in the Noble family to die in a little less than two years.

John Bowen is ill at Malad with influenza. He was returning home from his daughter’s funeral when taken ill.

Mrs. Albert Poppie is sick with influenza.

Mrs. Heber Woods is still very ill.

source: American Falls Press. (American Falls, Idaho), 19 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

American Falls Press. November 19, 1918, Page 4

People and Events.

Mrs. A. H. Barton is confined to her home by an attack of influenza.

Mrs. C. W. Dahlberg has been quite ill with influenza but is improving.

G. A. Brahmstadt was here from Arbon Monday. He reports the flu situation there somewhat better.

The families of D. J. Wiens and Peter Boldt of Pleasant Valley, have been victims of the flu epidemic.

Emanuel Radke left the Bethany Deaconess Hospital last Saturday, fully recovered from an attack of influenza.

Warren Grothe, Jesse Smith, Mrs. P. A. Friesen, Miss Ida Tracy and Mrs. Butler of Arbon valley, are influenza patients at the hospital.

The family of Charles Johnson have recovered from the flu with the exception of Mrs. Johnson, whose lungs are affected. She has been ill for three weeks.

There seem to be quite a number of new influenza cases this week, and there is a prospect that the opening of schools and churches will be delayed a little while.

Reports from Pocatello yesterday were that there were 1500 cases of influenza. Furniture has been removed from hotel lobbies so that people are not encouraged to congregate and loaf.

Herman Barnard, 11 years old, who has been at Bethany Deaconess Hospital nearly seven weeks suffering from typhoid fever, has so far recovered that he will be able to return home this week.

People who have dishes which they do not know where to return, are requested to leave them at the Red Cross rooms. During the recent epidemic many dishes were sent to the homes of the sick, and in many cases the recipients do not know where they came from.

Mr. and Mrs. Carl Rudeen were in town from their Sunbeam ranch Monday. Mr. Rudeen stated that the flu epidemic out his way had come to an end. Nearly all his neighbors, as well as his household, were afflicted with the disease. …

Peter A. Friesen, a resident of the Cedar Creek locality, in Bingham county, died at Bethany Deaconess Hospital last Friday of influenza. He had been an inmate of the hospital for five days. He and Mrs. Friesen and their little child all had fallen victims to the disease. When they were visited by neighbors Mr. Friesen was in a delirious state and as quickly as it was possible, the family were removed to the hospital. Attention was attracted to the Friesen home by a message over the phone from Mr. Friesen. The party to whom he phoned noted an unnatural tone of voice and queer expressions, and feared there was something wrong. A telephone call was sent to Dr. MacKinnon at Aberdeen, and word soon was received that the fears were justified. For a time the life of Mrs. Friesen was despaired of but she is now out of danger. Mr. Friesen is survived by his wife and child and his parents, Mr. and Mrs. A. A. Friesen, who reside in the same locality. The family of A. A. Friesen were all down at the same time. Funeral services were held at the place of interment, the Mennonite cemetery west of Aberdeen.

source: American Falls Press. (American Falls, Idaho), 19 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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American Falls Press. November 19, 1918, Page 2

1918119AFPcartoon

source: American Falls Press. (American Falls, Idaho), 19 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Republican. November 19, 1918, Page 2

19181119TIR1
Upper Presto

The Howel boy was taken ill with influenza at Brush Creek, and was brought to Basalt for treatment.

Everything was closed yesterday and everyone took the advantage of celebrating the good news, of the war being over.

The Tolmie family report that Mrs. Hans Hansen and John Vasatkia are getting along nicely, after having the flu.

The two children of R. P. Hansen, Alta and Ammos, have the flu.
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19181119TIR2
Grandview

Marvin Thompson came down with the flu Monday morning.

Miss Hazel Quigley came home from the Crystal Springs ranch Monday. The family have all recovered from the flu.
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19181119TIR3
Sterling

Luther Satterfield and all of the family are confined to their beds with the influenza.

Mrs. Morrison is quite ill with the influenza.

The Smith and Cornforth families are victims of the “flu” at present.

The news of Germany’s downfall was joyfully, and enthusiastically received here Monday morning, and there was much cheer and as much celebrating as could be carried out on account of the “flu.” Everyone that could went to Blackfoot to join in the fun, while those at home celebrated a more sound thanksgiving. Far into the night blasts could be heard thundering and crashing off like the cannon shots fired at sunrise on Independence Day. It was indeed a happy day.

The Larkin Club meeting was indefinitely postponed on account of the influenza epidemic.

Miss Hazel Quigley returned home Sunday from the Crystal Springs ranch, where she has been for some time. She is just convalescing from a severe attack of influenza and pneumonia.

The Holmquest family are recovering nicely from their attack of the “flu.”
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19181119TIR4
Shelley

Shelly People Celebrate.

Everybody here was hilariously happy when news was received last Monday morning that the war was over All sort of effigies of the Kaiser were displayed, he was hanged, drug over the streets, etc. Firewater seemed to be in abundance and the majority of people who were celebrating seem to have had a taste of it. Whistles blew repeatedly here for several hours. All stores and business houses were ordered closed by the mayor. Te sugar factory closed down for the day to let its employees celebrate the most important day in all history. Cars rambled thru town all day with joy-mad occupants, yelling at the top of their voices. Extremely loud blasts were heard here all day Monday and far into the night. Many people here attended the celebrations both at Idaho Falls and Blackfoot. Last Monday could be said to be the liveliest day that Shelley has seen in years.

Many of our boys who were called by the local draft board were notified that their calls had been cancelled.

Mrs. R. B. Waller is reported ill with the flu, her condition being reported as not serious.

Two of H. L. Malcom’s girls who have the influenza are recovering nicely at the present time.

The influenza is reported to be slowly subsiding in Shelley, few people are now wearing masks as it is thot [sic] that they are of no particular advantage in avoiding the flu.

Farmers should be reminded that all stores here close at 6 o’clock for the present time.

It is not definitely known yet when the schools will be re-opened here.

So completely did some of the people here celebrate last Monday, that they have hardly gotten over their celebration yet.

Now that this great war is over, the Shelley people should receive their boys when they come with the greatest of enthusiasm and with the greatest of honor. It is reported that up to present date there has not been a Shelley boy killed in battle in France. Several of our boys have been wounded in action, but not seriously. Two Shelley boys who were wounded in the big spring drive were Joseph Patterson and Earl Schureman, the latter is reported on his way to Shelley. Two Shelley boys died of the influenza in training camps; they were Barney Johnson and Piercel Humphreys.

May all our boys who are in France come safely home.

Continue to buy War Savings Stamps for the money is needed for our boys over there.

Give with a whole heart to the Y. M. C. A. and the Red Cross.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 19 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Republican. November 19, 1918, Page 3

Families Ill With Influenza Now Recovering

The influenza seems to affect certain localities more seriously than others.

In Moreland the disease was more prevalent, but the afflicted families are now out of danger and on the high road to recovery. Some of the families are the following: Brig Robinson, O. C. Johnson, Hyrum Grimmit Jr., J. H. Hall and A. J. Akers.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 19 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Republican. November 19, 1918, Page 5

Influenza Ban Lifted in the State of Idaho

The influenza ban will be lifted in the state of Idaho, Sunday, Nov. 24.

On that date all public assemblages such as churches, picture shows, schools, etc. will be opened.

School will start Monday, Nov. 25.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 19 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Republican. November 19, 1918, Page 7

Idaho Budget

The University of Idaho, at Moscow, celebrated the peace rumors Thursday by a military parade, in which all the members of both sections of the S. A. T. C. participated and by the firing of military salutes just outside of town.

The validity of the state and county boards of health closing order during the present influenza epidemic as against business colleges, is questioned in a suite filed by M. S. Hoover, proprietor of the Gregg Business college, Twin Falls.

While participating in the celebrations taking place over the ending of the world war, Mrs. J. O. Marquess was thrown from an automobile driven by C. Smith and instantly killed on the road between Meridian and Nampa, about four miles from Nampa.

Indiscreet peace celebrations caused raids on two stills in Latah county. One of them was in the basement of a building in the center of Moscow business district, the other in the timber between Troy and Avon. Steve Weller and Charles Thrys were arrested.

Judge J. F. Cowen of the Custer country district court telegraphed to the governor an appeal for state troops to help him force his way into Custer county, which was closed by a quarantine regulation designed to debar Spanish influenza. The attorney general held that the quarantine was legal and that court dates are not of sufficient importance to justify calling state troops to aid the judge and court attaches to enter the county.

Health conditions are not such yet as to justify and relaxing of precautions against the epidemic of Spanish influenza, and reports being circulated in some parts of the state that the order against holding of public meetings is soon to be lifted are false.

The influenza situation in Pocatello reached a point where Mayor A. B. Bear asked the citizens to subscribe to a $5000 fund to be used in caring for the numerous victims who are suffering with the disease. The money will be disbursed by the civilian relief committee.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 19 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Republican. November 19, 1918, Page 8

Olive Evans Passes Away.

Miss Olive Evans died at Kellogg, Idaho, Thursday, after suffering an attack of the influenza.

Miss Evans was an employee of the Mountain States Telephone Co. here about three years ago. She was working for the same company up to the time of her death.

The remains were shipped to Moore for burial.
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19181119TIR5
Taber

A dozen cases of flue are reported in Taber.

Dr. Patrie was called to Taber Monday to attend Miss Mary King, who is very ill with pneumonia.

Taber people celebrated until a late hour Monday over the glad tidings of the war.

Herman Stuffins and family and the Delzer family are quite sick with the flu.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 19 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Bonners Ferry Herald. November 19, 1918, Page 1

19181119BFH1
Ban In Idaho Will be Raised
State Board of Health Will Lift Influenza Ban on November 24
May Continue Longer Here
Local Schools Will Probably Not Open Until December 2nd

The Spanish influenza ban which has been in force and effect in Idaho since Oct. 10 for public gatherings and Oct. 21 for the public schools, will be lifted on Sunday. Nov. 24. A decision to this effect was reached by the state board of health Thursday and the order so directing was issued to all the county health officials of the state by Dr. Biwer, secretary of the board.

After reviewing the returns from the various counties on the spread of the disease as they came in Thursday the board came to the conclusion that it would be safe to set a date when the influenza ban could be lifted. This was accordingly authorized. The officials are convinced that the epidemic is on the wane and that while it is severe in some spots in a majority of the sections of the state hardest hit, the serious stage of the epidemic has been passed.

In the event the epidemic should take a sudden change for the worse and should spread, Dr. Biwer states it will become necessary to suspend the date set for lifting the ban, but he does not believe that such a situation is likely to occur.

The order of the state board of health in regard to lifting the Spanish influenza ban gives the county health officer full authority to maintain the ban in localities where in his opinion there is danger of the disease spreading. In this county the Spanish influenza epidemic has abated somewhat but is yet serious and it is a question whether or not Health Officer Dr. Fry will raise the ban and permit the schools to open on Monday, November 25th. Many members of the school board of Independent School District No. 4 do not think it advisable to try to open the schools of the city until Monday, December 2. The long, enforced vacation will mean that school will continue later this coming spring. There will be no Christmas or New Year holidays and it is probable that the teacher’s institute week will be done away with.

Following is the order of the state board of health lifting the Spanish influenza ban in the state:

“You are hereby advised that all restrictions of the state board of health for the control of the epidemic of influenza, are to be removed at 1 a. m., Sunday, November 24, insofar as is safe within your jurisdiction.

“Reports received by this office indicate that for the state as a whole, the incidence of influenza is rapidly diminishing, which explains the foregoing order.

“While sporadic cases will doubtless develop for a considerable period, and while in some isolated sections influenza may still attain epidemic proportions, we believe that the present stringent requirements may be done away with.

“You are directed, however, to use all care in handling the situation within your jurisdiction and if in the judgment of the local board of health the time Is not ripe for removal of restrictions, you are authorized to maintain them for the present.

“I wish to thank you, and through you, the public generally, for the splendid cooperation which has been given the state board of health during this abnormal situation.”

During the past week there have been many new cases of the Spanish influenza develop and there have been two deaths resulting from the disease.

In various parts of the county there are those whose condition is serious. Most of the influenza cases are convalescing nicely.

The percentage of new cases of the influenza in the county this week is considerably less than for the past four weeks.

Mrs. E. Boileau and Miss Edmire Boileau are, confined to their beds with Spanish influenza. Miss Eva Boileau, nurse at the Wallace city hospital, is expected here today to take care of the sick folks.

Miss Dollie Bruce is seriously ill with the influenza. Other members of the Bruce family who have been sick with the disease, are recovering.
— —

Virginia Worley Passes Away
Died Monday Morning of Pneumonia Following Spanish Influenza

Virginia Worley, the eldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. D. B. Worley, residents of the Cow creek district, died Monday morning of pneumonia contracted following an attack of the Spanish influenza, at the home of Mr. and Mrs. M. McNichols. Funeral services where held at the cemetery this afternoon at 2:30 o’clock, Rev. G. H. Wilbur conducting the services. The funeral was attended by a large company of the friends of the deceased and her family and many beautiful floral tributes were banked on the grave of the deceased. …

She is survived by her father and mothers and four brothers and two sisters. She is a niece of Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Worley. …
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19181119BFH2
War Work Campaign Moves Slowly in Boundary

According to all reports now in the hands of T. S. Kerr, secretary and treasurer of the United War Work campaign, less than $1,000 of Boundary county’s quota of $2,700 has been subscribed. About $600 has been subscribed in Bonners Ferry but not more than half the population of the town has been solicited. But few of the country districts have made reports to-date. Most of the camps of the county have been visited by Chairman Kent and his committee of solicitors and the men have, in most cases, given freely.

Most of the counties of Idaho have more than raised their quotas and they did this early last week. Some counties, like Boundary, are way behind in their subscriptions. In this county the campaign for United War Work funds has been seriously hampered on account of so many being ill with Spanish influenza. It has not been possible for the workers to solicit in many homes and half or more of the workers themselves have been sick. …
— —

Little McNichols Baby Dies
Kathleen, Three Years Old, Died This Morning of Influenza

Kathleen Marie, the three year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. M. McNichols, died this morning of Spanish influenza and whooping cough with which she had been sick for about a week. The funeral will be held at the cemetery tomorrow at noon and Rev. Fr. Kelly will conduct the services.

The deceased was three years and three days old. She is survived by her parents and two brothers. …

Both Mr. and Mrs. McNichols have been very sick with the influenza for several days and both their boys are sick with the disease and have the whooping cough besides. Both Mr. and Mrs. McNichols are convalescing. Mrs. G. A. Elliott, of Coeur d’Alene, a sister of Mrs. McNichols, arrived here last night and is taking care of the sick folks. She has been taking care of her son Robert, for several weeks in his sickness with influenza and pneumonia.

source: Bonners Ferry Herald. (Bonners Ferry, Idaho), 19 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Bonners Ferry Herald. November 19, 1918, Page 3

19181119BFH3
Idaho News Paragraphs
Recent Happenings in This State Given in Brief Items for Busy Readers.

There has been a new outbreak of influenza at Moscow.

Howard J. Fenton died recently at Kendrick of pneumonia following an attack of influenza.

Per Svenson, early settler, recently died at his farm home two miles south of Deary from influenza.

The funeral of Dr. Alexander Cairns, who succumbed to pneumonia, was held at Coeur d’Alene Sunday.

Judge Wallace N. Scales announces that the fall term of the district court will be postponed until Monday, December, because of the influenza epidemic.

Fred George, alias Gruber, and harry Hinton, escaped from the Idaho penitentiary at Boise Sunday morning by scaling a 20-foot wall with the aid of a 24-foot rope braided from yearn furnished the inmates by the Red Cross for knitting sweaters for soldiers. George is under a life sentence for murder, and Hinton a five to 15-year sentence for robbery. They have not been captured.

source: Bonners Ferry Herald. (Bonners Ferry, Idaho), 19 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Bonners Ferry Herald. November 19, 1918, Page 4

19181119BFH4
Local News

Pend d Oreille Review, Sandpoint, Idaho – Mrs. Cleam Gorsline and babies are at the home of Mr. and Mrs. W. F. Whitaker, parents of Mrs. Gorsline. They came down from Porthill the first of the week, accompanied by Mrs. Whitaker who had been at Porthill nursing the Gorsline family through a siege of influenza.

S. E. Henry received a telegram on Sunday telling of the serious illness of his wife at Grafton, N. Dak., with Spanish influenza. Mrs. Henry was called to Grafton a couple of weeks ago by the serious illness of her parents. She was accompanied by her brother H. S. Swanson and he has also contracted the influenza.

source: Bonners Ferry Herald. (Bonners Ferry, Idaho), 19 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Bonners Ferry Herald. November 19, 1918, Page 5

19181119BFH5
Local Pick-ups

Mrs. F. E. Murray was called to Spokane Thursday by the serious illness of her sister.

Frank Ferraro, who has been sick for several weeks with the Spanish influenza, is back at work in his barber shop, the Pastimes.

Stookey’s Furniture Store was closed several days last week and this on account of the illness of the proprietor with Spanish influenza.

The First National Bank was doing routine business Saturday after having been partially closed up for several days on account of the officers and employees having the Spanish influenza.

Mrs. Dell Collins was arrested Sunday by Town Marshall Knight on the charge of being drunk and disorderly. The defendant plead guilty yesterday morning before Justice of the Peace King and was fined $25 and costs and was given a suspended jail sentence of 60 days.

The home of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Gleed has been a regular Spanish influenza hospital for some time, Mr. Gleed, Miss Laiurel Gleed, Miss Ruth Lozier and Miss Kevill, all being sick with the disease at the same time. All the influenza patients are now able to be up and around again.

source: Bonners Ferry Herald. (Bonners Ferry, Idaho), 19 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., November 19, 1918, Page 1

19181119DSM1
Idaho To Raise Quarantine Sunday Morning, Nov. 24

We can all go to church next Sunday. The announcement comes from Boise that the quarantine in this state will be raised Sunday morning. The state board of health, which declared the quarantine, makes this statement, which leaves no doubt of its authenticity. It is planned to hold regular services in all churches next Sunday at the usual hours.

Schools will open at 9 o’clock Monday morning. Every school in Latah county will be opened at that hour, unless a district develops influenza to such an extent that it is deemed unsafe. The county health officer will have authority to close the school if he deems it unwise to permit the holding of school in that district.

We can all go to the “movies” Monday night. There will probably be a rush to these on that date, for the people have been so long without this form of popular amusement that they will relish a good, clean show once more.

But we are cautioned against being careless when the quarantine is raised. The danger will not be over. Raising the quarantine does not kill germs of the disease that may be lurking, nor prevent contagion under favorable conditions. Physicians predict that we will have influenza for weeks to come and urge that the utmost care and diligence be used to prevent another outbreak of the epidemic here. They say that it is likely that persons living in the country, who have not been exposed may become exposed and contract the disease and others may have opportunity to spread it. It is urged that upon the first symptoms of the disease appearing the person afflicted retire from association with the public and that voluntary quarantine be established in every home where the disease appears. It is especially urged that children who may develop symptoms of the disease be kept out of school until it is ascertained whether they really have the influenza or merely a cold, as the early symptoms of both are quite similar.

We are prone to look upon the war as horrible and the long death list as terrible and shocking, yet we are told by the authorities that twice as many persons have died in the United States from influenza since it made its first appearance about two weeks ago, as have been killed in the American army since it began fighting Germany. This has been the worst scourge the United States has ever had and has resulted in a greater number of fatalities.
— —

19181119DSM2
All Classes At University Will Be Resumed Tomorrow

No new cases of influenza among either the S. A. T. C. men or the girls of the University of Idaho have developed. If Dr. W. A. Adair, city health officer, reports favorably all classes at the university will be resumed tomorrow.

Dr. E. H. Lindley, president, will require that all students living in Moscow, who have not been under quarantine at the university, will be required to bring certificates from the city or county health officer dated not earlier than today. The situation is very encouraging, but the greatest care will be used to prevent any spread of the contagion, either in the university circles or in town. The university people have asked to be permitted to co-operate with the town people in fighting the disease in town, as the town people did with them when the disease was so bad among university students.

Dr. W. A. Adair, city health officer, has consented to the opening of the university for all classes tomorrow, and will grant certificates to all students living in Moscow who are entitled to them. Without these certificates they will not be admitted to classes. Certificates dated prior to today will not admit them.

Dr. Adair will be in his office after 7 o’clock tonight and will examine all applicants and grant them certificates so they can enter school at the university tomorrow. He requests that all desiring certificates call this evening, if possible, as he will be waiting for them at his office tonight.

Dr. Adair says the situation in Moscow shows much improvement. Only two mild cases have been reported since last Friday and he thinks that with care and diligence the situation will soon be, under complete control.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 19 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., November 19, 1918, Page 3

19181112DSM2
City News

Russel Knapp has been on the sick list for a few days, but is improving.

J. W. Wilson is on the sick list with a slight attack of influenza.

Mrs. Audrey Herington, cashier of the Washington Water Power company, is ill of influenza.

Mrs. and Mrs. Chas. Rosnagle, who have been six weeks in Elk City visiting their daughter, Mrs. Otto Giles, came home today. Otto Giles is well again after an attack of influenza.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 19 Nov. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 1)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 2)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 3)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 4)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 5)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 6)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 7)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 8)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 9)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 10)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 11)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 12)