Idaho History Aug 2, 2020

Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic

Part 16

Idaho Newspaper clippings December 2-5, 1918

Troy, Idaho 1918

1918Troy-a
L-R: Bob Bell, Sam Lewis, Bookie Nelson, Shorty Mikelbust, ?, Stuffy Harris (by gas barrel) Troy Garage. Troy, Idaho.

source: Idaho Cities & Towns Collection, Digital Initiatives, University of Idaho Library
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December 2

The Daily Star-Mirror., December 02, 1918, Page 1

19181202DSM1
Many New Influenza Cases At Kendrick

Kendrick. — The influenza in Kendrick continues to increase. There are now about 36 cases here. Mr. Newton of the Red Cross pharmacy and his assistants are down with the disease and Dr. Paul Rothwell, Kendrick’s only physician, was taken ill with the malady yesterday. The citizens succeeded in having Dr. Herrington, formerly of Gifford, come here for a few days. He arrived last evening and is attending to the cases as far as possible. With the exception of Mr. Hamilton, whose condition is considered dangerous, all the patients seem to be doing nicely.

It has been planned to reopen the schools and churches, but that step has now been indefinitely postponed pending an improvement in the situation.
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19181202DSM2
Moscow People Show Generosity
Respond Liberally to Appeal for Aid for a Sorely Afflicted Family

That Moscow has generous sympathy enough to go around was evidenced in gratifying measure by the immediate and great response to the appeal for the family so severely afflicted with influenza. The Star-Mirror had scarcely made its appearance on the streets on Saturday night before offers of clothes for children were made, and it is safe to predict that the baby and the two older boys will be well provided for the rest of the winter. All of the articles furnished will be extremely useful and are much appreciated. The public will be interested to know that the mother and baby are making satisfactory progress against the influenza, and that the father, who has been at death’s door for some days, is showing a decided improvement and gain. …
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Wife and Mother Called Home by Death

Mrs. Walter Overlander died last night at 11:20 at her home on South Washington, of influenza, followed by pneumonia. Mrs. Overlander had been ill about a week.

She was 41 years of age. She leaves her husband, a carpenter of Moscow, and five children …

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 02 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., December 02, 1918, Page 3

19181202DSM3
City News

Mrs. Elmer Desvoigne was called to Spokane Sunday on account of the sickness of her son Louie, who is ill with an attack of influenza.

The Ladies’ Aid society of the Methodist church will not meet as announced yesterday. The meeting has been indefinitely postponed.

Mrs. W. L. Rambo and daughter returned today from Lewiston. Miss Rambo is just recovering from a severe attack of influenza.

Colonel McIntire, son of Mr. and Mrs. A. B. McIntire, is sick with influenza.

Misses Shelona and Katherine Witter returned today to their school at the Holy Names academy, Spokane.

Chas. Burke and family are ill with influenza.

Mrs. George Savage is ill with influenza at her home on South Jefferson street.

The families of A. T. Myklebust and Tom Myklebust, who now live in Troy, are ill with influenza, but at last reports all were improving.

There will be no chamber of commerce luncheon tomorrow (Tuesday) owing to the prevalence of influenza in town. The chamber of commerce desires to do “its bit” in trying to eradicate the disease and will not hold a luncheon until it is believed all danger is past.
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Grace Ann Campbell Answers Summons
Daughter of Latah County’s Sheriff Was Influenza Victim Sunday

A death that will cause genuine sorrow in a wide circle was that of the daughter of Sheriff and Mrs. J. J. Campbell, which occurred Sunday. The daughter, a bright, intelligent and lovable girl of 16, who would have graduated from the Moscow high school next semester, was taken ill a week ago last Saturday with influenza, which quickly turned to pneumonia, and for several days there had been little hope of her recovery, although everything possible was done to save her. Kind friends assisted the afflicted family, five members of which were sick at one time. …
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Tuberculosis Campaign Is On
Red Cross Seals to Raise Monday to Fight the Great White Plague

In former years, the nation-wide campaign against the white plague, led by the national tuberculosis association, has been supported in the main by the sale of the little Red Cross Christmas seals, which any one who had even a penny to spare might buy.

The war has served to reveal to America more tellingly than ever before how enormously our tuberculosis problem is and how imperative is the continuance and extension of the campaign against tuberculosis, for tens of thousands of the nation’s young men have been rejected in the draft as unfit for military service on account of tuberculosis. …

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 02 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Moscow, Idaho 1918

1918Moscow1-a
No 14, Business block. Moscow, Idaho.

source: Idaho Cities & Towns Collection, Digital Initiatives, University of Idaho Library
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December 3

American Falls Press. December 03, 1918, Page 1

19181203AFP1
Forty Cases Of Flu Reported At Roy
Call For Nurses Could Not Be Met Because We Have None to Send.

Mrs. J. T. Fisher of Rockland, yesterday, telephoned to the Red Cross stating that there were forty cases of flu at Roy, and asked for nurses to assist in caring for the sick. She was regretfully informed that we had no nurses to send. The situation is better here, on the whole, than it has been for some weeks, but those who have been going out nursing, for the most part, have the flu cases in their own families and can not go.

No mention was made as to the seriousness of the cases at Roy, but lack of proper care can readily make mild cases into serious ones.

source: American Falls Press. (American Falls, Idaho), 03 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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American Falls Press. December 03, 1918, Page 3

19181203AFP2
People and Events.

Miss Florence Barber who was a flu victim, resumed her work in the county auditor’s office yesterday.

Mr. and Mrs. Andrew May were up from Rockland Saturday. All of Mr. May’s family were flu victims late in October, but all recovered and are now enjoying normal health.

Fred Durkee, who had been confined to his home for a week with the flu, was able to resume his regular work Saturday.

Dr. and Mrs. R. F. Noth returned from Salt Lake Saturday night, where they went for a short rest. Dr. Noth added to the pleasure of his vacation by having his tonsils removed.

Miss F. Nettie Rice, county treasurer, was in her office Monday, the first time for ten days. She is not strong yet, but is able to supervise the work, and to assist materially in getting things shaped for taxpaying time.
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Roy and Vicinity.

Lawrence Roy began carrying the mail last week. We are glad to see him back again.

Will Young is again on the sick list and we hear he is suffering from bronchial pneumonia. He had the influenza a few weeks ago and has been busy doing his fall work since.

We are glad to hear that Mrs. J. D. Lower and Miss Hazen Lower are improving, having had such a long siege of the flu.

Mrs. Ed Sager returned from Burley last week, where she was called to the bedside of her daughter, Mrs. Glen Black, who was suffering from influenza and pneumonia. Mrs. Black is now convalescent.

H. B. Ellis is suffering from an attack of influenza.

Mr. and Mrs.. Walter Malcolm, who were called to Spokane a week or two ago to Mr. Malcolm’s mother’s bedside and also other members of the family who were ill with influenza, found all concerned improving when they reached there.

Van Hessner is ill with the flu.

Mrs. L. A. Commons and daughter, Mrs. Clark Carney of Burley, are visiting of the home of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Commons on the divide, being called there by the illness of Mrs. Commons, who was suffering from influenza.

Mrs. C. G. Sprig is seriously ill at her parent’s home in California with influenza.

source: American Falls Press. (American Falls, Idaho), 03 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Republican. December 03, 1918, Page 1

19181203IR1

Around the Court House

Judge Cowen postponed the call for a jury until the influenza situation is improved, unless a trial is demanded no jury will be called and the cases will be continued for the term.

The county commissioners and county health officer Dr. Hoover held a special meeting Saturday to consider some new regulations pertaining to the influenza situation.

The district court adjourned Saturday, on account of the influenza epidemic, and will continue the present term of court on December 23.
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H. B. Kinney Improving

Harry Kinney, who has been ill with the influenza for the past week, is now much improved. Mr. Kinney expects to be able to resume his duties at the store in a few days.
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Ill With Influenza

Aloys Spaunbeaur is very ill with the influenza at his home north east of Blackfoot. At last reports he was on the improve.

The other members of the family who have the same disease, are doing nicely.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 03 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Republican. December 03, 1918, Page 2

Springfield

The infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Thurston was seriously ill Sunday with pneumonia. Dr. Mitchell was called and arrived in time to bring the baby thru the crisis of the disease. The child is now improving.

Ralph Davis is recovering from the pneumonia. Mrs. Davis had a light attack of influenza.

Mr. Neely, who lives north of Springfield on a dry farm, died Monday with pneumonia. Mr. Neely worked in Springfield this summer and many friends and acquaintances were shocked to learn of his death.

Services are announced at the L. D. S. church for Sunday and school is to open on Monday.
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Aberdeen

Several families in the country around Aberdeen are slowly recovering from the flu.

Mr. and Mrs. P. A. Friesen were both taken to the hospital on account of the severe attack from the flu. The latter is reported as recovering. Mr. Friesen died in a few days and was buried last Saturday in the Mennonite cemetery.
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Sterling

Frank Gravatt is the latest one to come down with the flu, but is getting along nicely.

Everett Parsons is quite ill with pneumonia.
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Wicks

Mr. and Mrs. Aloys Spanbauer and son Paul are ill with influenza at the present writing.
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Idaho Budget

The schools of Ada county will open December 2 only in places where there is no influenza epidemic, is the statement made by Miss Peninah Newlin, county superintendent.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 03 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Republican. December 03, 1918, Page 3

19181203IR2
Says Masks Were Of Great Benefit

Provo, Nov. 27. — Mayor Le Roy Dixon received a telegram today from Mayor James Rolph, Jr., of San Francisco, which says:

“Universal wearing of masks almost wholly responsible for San Francisco beating the usual course on influenza by several weeks; prevented 1500 or more possible deaths and thousands of cases of influenza and pneumonia, with great reduction of consequent suffering.

“We used Leary vaccine as far as possible and this undoubtedly helped much. If you have epidemic, I strongly advise strict enforcement of universal masking. All our people did this gladly and are devoutly thankful for good results.”

Arrangements are being made by the city board of health to obtain a supply of vaccine for inoculation. The treatment will be given free of charge by the city physician, A. J. Stewart at his office from 12 to 1 and from 5:30 to 6:30 o’clock of each day beginning Friday to those who wish the service of the city physician.

Four new cases of influenza in two new families were reported today.
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Situation At Ogden Is Little Improved

Ogden, Nov. 27. — There was but little improvement in the influenza situation in Ogden today, according to the reports from the office of the city health board. Up to the twenty-four hours ended at 5 o’clock this afternoon, there were sixty-four new cases and nine deaths attributable to the influenza.

It was announced today that there will be no funerals tomorrow, as the gravediggers served notice upon the city officials that they would not work Thanksgiving. The employees said that for the past seven weeks they have been working every day, including Sundays and that they figure they are entitled to a day of rest. After the announcement was made, funerals set for tomorrow were postponed until Friday. Ten funerals were held today.

The merchant’s committee, which is working with the local board of health, held another session today and further outlined its campaign of action to bring about the stamping out of the epidemic. Special police have volunteered. Special police authorities and the officers were immediately detailed to begin the checking up of the situation. Dr. W. W. Harrison of the United States public health service was in conference with the health board most of today.

The health committee announced late this afternoon that the high school would be used at once as another emergency hospital. The cots will be received tomorrow, it is said, from the government hospital at Fort Douglas. Experienced nurses will be in charge of the hospital and will have the assistance of volunteer nurses.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 03 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Republican. December 03, 1918, Page 5

Mrs. Wesley Lantis Is Called to Rest

Mrs. Wesley Lantis, age twenty-eight, passed away at the home of her parents north of Blackfoot, Friday morning, after suffering for one week with influenza. She is survived by a husband, a baby boy, her parents Mr. and Mrs. R. Prouse, three brothers and three sister. …
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Obituary

Pearl Emma Rider, wife of Bishop Oscar L. Rider, died at the family residence November 27, 1918 at five a.m. of influenza. …

She leaves to mourn her loss besides her husband, five children, one boy and four girls, also her mother, two sisters, and two brothers, as well as a great many relatives thruout [sic] this section.
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Victim of Flu

Mrs. D. W. Miller, at the age of twenty-five years died at 4 o’clock Sunday afternoon, Nov. 24, from influenza-pneumonia, after a several days’ illness. She is survived by a husband and two children, Alta age six, and Tessie age eight. Also a father, three brothers and two sisters. …
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Regard Cold As Serious
Medical Authority Warns Against Contemptuous Attitude Too Often Taken by Those Afflicted.

19181203IR3

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 03 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Republican. December 03, 1918, Page 8

Goshen

Maud Robenson is very ill with the influenza.

The Julius Monsen family have the flu.

Heber Killian is on the sick list.
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Thomas

William Wilkins is back finishing his cropping. He was called to Moscow on account of the death of Mrs. Wilkins, who died there from an attack of influenza contracted while nursing her son, Charles, who was in training there. The sympathy of the community goes out to Mr. Wilkins and the two children.

There are not new cases of influenza in Thomas at this writing.

The family of James Jackson are suffering with influenza.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 03 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Bonners Ferry Herald. December 03, 1918, Page 1

19181203BFH1

Public Schools Will Continue

Chairman Kent, of the board of trustees of Independent School District No. 4, called a special meeting of the board last evening to discuss the advisability of again closing the public schools until the Spanish influenza danger is entirely passed. The trustees considered a petition asking for the closing of the schools. This petition was signed by some 50 patrons of the school.

The school trustees decided that they would act on the advice of the city and county health officer, Dr. E. E. Fry, and keep the schools open. The teachers will be required to keep a careful watch of their pupils and no student with any symptoms of the influenza or whooping cough will be allowed to attend school.

It was decided that the district should arrange to have all the students who have not had the Spanish influenza, vaccinated at once if there is no objection on the part of the parents. Dr. Fry will begin giving the vaccine tomorrow.
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R. P. Foster Buried Friday
Died of Spanish Influenza on Saturday, November 23rd.

The funeral of Robert Phillips Foster, who died November 23, of pneumonia contracted following an attack of Spanish influenza, was held Friday afternoon at one o’clock at the Bonners Ferry cemetery. …

He is survived by his wife and four small children, his mother, Mrs. C. W. Shoop, of Spokane, and three brothers and one sister. He was sick for one week. …
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Miss Soderlund Passes Away
Sister of Mrs. Axel Johnson Is Victim of Spanish Influenza.

Miss Wilma Margaret Soderlund died Thursday at the home of her sister, Mrs. Axel Johnson, of pneumonia, contracted from the Spanish influenza. …

The deceased was sick nine days. She came here from Spokane to assist her sister, Mrs. Johnson, who had been ill. …
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Mrs. S. E. Henry returned home Sunday from Grafton, N. Dak., where she was called several weeks ago by the illness of her parents with the Spanish influenza. While at Grafton Mrs. Henry contracted the disease and for a time was quite seriously ill.

source: Bonners Ferry Herald. (Bonners Ferry, Idaho), 03 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Bonners Ferry Herald. December 03, 1918, Page 2

19181203BFH2
Idaho News Paragraphs
Recent Happenings in This State Given in Brief Items for Busy Readers

A number of new cases of influenza are reported in Moscow and vicinity and conditions are regarded as worse.

The “flu” ban is now all off at Wallace and dances are permitted and children allowed to attend picture shows.

Mrs. Mary Barnes, the new county school superintendent, announced that the annual teachers’ examination, that was postponed on account of the epidemic, will be held on December 19, 20 and 21, at Wallace.

“Most of the public schools in Nez Perce county outside of Lewiston resumed work Monday,” said County Superintendent Minnie Faust. “There are few cases of influenza in Nez Perce county outside of Lewiston and vicinity.”

Judge Steele of the district court postponed the term of course in Clearwater county until December 9 and in Latah county until December 15, with the understanding that if conditions do not improve furthers postponement may be expected.
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18 Die in Butte in Day.

Butte, Mont. — Deaths here of influenza in November totaled 325, there being 18 reported Saturday.
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Summary of the World’s Events

Deaths from influenza among Europeans and natives of South Africa are estimated at 60,000.

The grippe has again become prevalent in Vienna and at Budapest, with more fatalities than in the former epidemic, although the cases as yet are not so numerous.

source: Bonners Ferry Herald. (Bonners Ferry, Idaho), 03 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Bonners Ferry Herald. December 03, 1918, Page 4

Mrs. McCarthy Buried Saturday

Mrs. Maggie Sullivan McCarthy died Wednesday at her home near Copeland of pneumonia contracted from Spanish influenza. The funeral services were held Saturday afternoon at two o’clock and were conducted by Rev. G. H. Wilbur.

The deceased was sick about two weeks before she died. She had been working, with her husband, Frank McCarthy, at the ranch house of the Tormey Timber Company and came here about four months ago from Spokane. …
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Death at Klockmann

John Mulaney, and employee of the Idaho-Continental Mining Company, at Klockmann, died Sunday of pneumonia contracted from Spanish influenza. The body is being brought here today and funeral arrangement will be made as soon as communication can be had with relatives of the deceased.

The deceased had been sick several weeks before his death. He was a miner.
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Miss Edmire Boileau resumed her duties as day operator for the interstate Utilities Telephone company yesterday after having been sick for some time with the Spanish influenza. Mrs. Boileau was also very sick with the same malady. Miss Eve Boileau, a nurse at the Wallace city hospital, has been here taking care of her mother and sister.

source: Bonners Ferry Herald. (Bonners Ferry, Idaho), 03 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Bonners Ferry Herald. December 03, 1918, Page 7

19181203BFH3
Local News

Miss Alice Dunn, clerk at the local postoffice, has been sick for the past week with the Spanish influenza.

Bernard Nystrum arrived here Friday from Jefferson Barracks, Mo., where he had been in training as an auto truck driver. While at the barracks Nystrum underwent an operation for appendicitis and afterwards contracted the influenza. Upon his recovery he was discharged on account of physical disability.

Mrs. and Mrs. F. S. Sargent left Sunday for their home in Spokane after having visited here for several weeks at the home of their daughter, Mrs. H. J. McCoy. While here both Mr. and Mrs. Sargent contracted the Spanish influenza.

Miss Lillian O’Callaghan arrived here last week from Spokane and will stay here until the first of the year, visiting with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Charles O’Callaghan. Miss O’Callaghan is recuperating from an attack of Spanish influenza which she contacted several weeks ago. She has been taking a course in nursing at the Sacred Heart hospital in Spokane.

C. F. Wolfe was able to be up and around yesterday after having been sick for a week at the Bonners Ferry hospital with Spanish influenza.

source: Bonners Ferry Herald. (Bonners Ferry, Idaho), 03 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Bonners Ferry Herald. December 03, 1918, Page 10

Thanksgiving Day Program

Sickness, the fear of contracting the Spanish influenza and the cold weather prevented many from attending the open air Thanksgiving Day celebration Thursday morning on Main Street, never-the-less there were several hundred people on hand to enjoy a carefully arranged and well carried out program. …

source: Bonners Ferry Herald. (Bonners Ferry, Idaho), 03 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., December 03, 1918, Page 1

19181213DSM1

Mrs. Tony Grendahl Died This Afternoon

Mrs. Tony Grendahl died this morning at 10:45 of influenza at her home on South Washington street. …

She leaves her husband and two children, a son and a daughter, six and four years of age; also her aged father, A. A. Ere, of Moscow. She has three brothers living in Minnesota. …

Mr. Grendahl and little children have both suffered from an attack of influenza but are now slowly recovering.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 03 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., December 03, 1918, Page 3

19181202DSM3
City News

Dr. J. J. Herrington was called to Kendrick Saturday by Mayor Peterson to help take care of the influenza situation. Dr. Rothwell, the physician at Kendrick, is seriously ill. This is twice Dr. Herrinton has left his Moscow practice to assist in other places. He went to Nez Perce during their affliction and contracted influenza, but recovered and has gone again.

J. A. Sudderth of the postoffice has returned to work after a few days illness.

The body of Henry D. Lawrence, who died here on November 9, was shipped to Spooner, Wisconsin, for burial today. A son who came from Alberta to accompany the body, is confined to his bed with a severe attack of influenza.
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Potlatch Health Conditions Better
Great improvement in Influenza Situation

The influenza situation in Potlatch has shown a decided improvement with only one case reported in town, that of Mrs. Thompson, wife of Dr. J. W. Thompson. The highest number of cases in the city at any one time was 11, which have now all been released from quarantine. All precautions possible are being taken to prevent the spread of the disease and it is hoped in this way to keep the disease down to a minimum number.

Mr. A. L. Broughton, roadmaster for the W. I. & M. Railway company, is in the hospital at Palouse suffering from an attack of influenza.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 03 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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School, Harrisburg, Idaho 1918

1918Harrisburg
School. Harrisburg, Idaho.

source: Idaho Cities & Towns Collection, Digital Initiatives, University of Idaho Library
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December 4

The Daily Star-Mirror., December 04, 1918, Page 1

19181204DSM1
Spokane Hit Hard By The Influenza
Schools Closed and Children Forbidden to Attend Shows or Meetings

Spokane has a new and worse outbreak of influenza, believed to be a result of the three days’ peace celebration which brought thousands of visitors from all parts of the Inland Empire and brought Spokane people together in great crowds at entertainments, dances and celebrations. On Monday 603 new cases were reported and the total has reached more than 7,500 with more than 250 deaths.

Children under 12 years old are forbidden to attend picture shows or any other entertainment in Spokane and parents are requested to keep their children off the streets. The health officers are seriously considering putting a ban on all public meetings again, including church and shows. Dances will be forbidden.

The fruit convention which was to have been held in Spokane from December 10 to 13 has been indefinitely postponed and The Star-Mirror today received a request from President Lane, of the Spokane chamber of commerce, and several other influential citizens of Spokane, to publish the following notice:

“On account of the general influenza situation throughout the Northwest and upon the request and recommendation of Dr. J. B. Anderson, city health officer for Spokane, the joint convention of the Washington State Horticultural association, the Inland Empire Fruit Growers’ association and the Washington State Grade and Pack conference, which was scheduled to be held in Spokane, December 10-13, has been postponed for the present. As soon as the influenza situation clears itself, which it is hoped will be shortly after the first of the year, plans will be made for the convention on the same big scale as originally outlined and notice will be sent out well in advance.”
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Health Officer’s Report Today is Encouraging

Dr. W. A. Adair, city health officer, reports only 26 new cases in the week ending last Saturday, as compared with 39 the previous week, but one of the most encouraging features is that all of the new cases were very mild. True, there were three deaths from influenza, but these were cases that were taken ill before last week. There have been no new cases reported among Moscow people for two days, but two persons from other points in attendance at federal court were taken down with mild attacks of the disease. It is believed they were exposed at Cottonwood before coming here. Dr. Adair insists that there be no relaxation in observance of the quarantine regulations and that people use the utmost care to prevent any further spread of the disease. It is not yet known whether school can open next Monday, but it is hoped that it can be opened.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 04 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., December 04, 1918, Page 2

19181204DSM2

There is much encouragement in the report of City Health Officer Adair that there were only 26 new and very mild cases of influenza in Moscow last week, as compared with 39 the previous week, and there have been no new cases in two days. But that is not grounds for relaxing our vigilance. We must be more careful then ever and not be like Spokane and Walla Walla, which towns raised the quarantine and threw everything “wide open” only to have a second and worse epidemic which required “putting the lid on” tighter than ever. Lives are too precious to be gambled with in that fashion. Moscow must use the utmost care and vigilance to stamp out the disease which has already proved so costly.
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A Spokane physician blames the people of neighboring towns for the increased number of new influenza cases in that city. Six hundred new cases appeared in Spokane Sunday and Monday and the increase is blamed onto the peace celebration lasting three days of the previous week. It may be that the influx of people from surrounding towns helped to spread the disease, but our great fear is that the people who visited Spokane from here may have been exposed and bring the disease here in a new form. It is more likely that Spokane will spread the disease throughout the Inland Empire than that neighboring towns are carrying it to Spokane. That city has had more than 7,500 cases and 250 deaths since the epidemic first appeared in the Northwest.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 04 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., December 04, 1918, Page 3

19181202DSM3
City News

Mrs. Ward Gano returned last evening from Spokane. Her sister, Mrs. H. . Kressly, is ill in Spokane, probably with influenza.

Mrs. W. F. Morgareidge, chairman of the home department of the Historical club, announces that there will be no meeting of that department this week, on account of the influenza situation.

The family of Adrian Nelson have been afflicted with influenza, but they are now convalescent.
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Jury Thanks Judge Dietrich.

The members of the grand jury which turned in its report today to Judge Dietrich, of the federal court, also extended its thanks to Judge Dietrich for the courtesy he extended to the jury in permitting it to use the court room instead of the jury room for its deliberations. This made it much more pleasant and undoubtedly more safe for the jury during the time which there is so much fear of influenza contagion from crowding into a small room.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 04 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Grangeville, Idaho 1918

1918Grangeville1-a
Ed Vincent making a war talk for Red Cross Drive. Grangeville, Idaho.

source: Idaho Cities & Towns Collection, Digital Initiatives, University of Idaho Library
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December 5

The Grangeville Globe. December 05, 1918, Page 1

19181205GG1
Open Schools When Safety Of The Pupils Permit; Reopen Hospital
Did Not Open Last Monday Morning as Advertised; New Influenza Outbreak Afflicting Many Families; Few Cases Very Serious.

As was advertised in our last issue the local schools did not reconvene on Monday last on account of the new outbreak of the epidemic. Friday and Saturday a number of new cases were reported and in conferences held by members of the School Board, Superintendent Case, and Health Officer Dr. G. S. Stockton, it was deemed best for all concerned not to permit the schools to open at that time.

New cases were reported with such rapidity that the local hospital, which had been closed for some time for want of patronage, was placed in readiness for patients and on Monday and Tuesday seven sufferers were taken there for treatment. The only really serious case was that of Thomas Robie, who had been ill for several days, and who passed away at 9:15 yesterday morning, the first death from the epidemic in this section for some time and also the first to occur at the hospital.

The city council in regular session last Monday evening appointed a committee to make an investigation and order what measures they deemed necessary put in force. Mayor Edmundson voluntarily closed his picture show and after holding one service Sunday morning the local churches went out of business for the present so far as public meetings are concerned. Lodges have also ceased to convene. More “Move On” signs were printed and distributed by the Chief of Police, and orders from the committee of the city council to the pool hall proprietors not to permit people to congregate in their places of business were issued.

While the outbreak is considered serious, people are warned not to be afraid but careful. In another column of this issue of the Globe appears an article directed to influenza convalescents and issued by the United States Public Health Service. The article should be read by every one who has had the disease.

At a meeting of the local school board Wednesday night the following resolution was offered and unanimously adopted:

Resolved, That it is the sense of this meeting that the Grangeville public schools will be opened as soon as the safety of the pupils will permit. And be it further

Resolved, in order that the present influenza epidemic be cleared from the town, so that the inconvenience and expense of conducting the public schools be reduced, that the city officials acting in conjunction with the county health officer, be urgently requested to place such quarantine on all places of amusement or where people congregate, as will prohibit any persons from entering the same; and that no person be allowed to enter unnecessarily any place of business, or to linger in such place except to be served as a customer.
— —

Judge Scales Ill.

Judge W. N. Scales of the Tenth Judicial district went down to Lewiston last Sunday to be in readiness to open the regular fall term of the district court for Nez Perce county on Monday morning. Shortly after convening the judge made an order continuing the term to Jan. 6. He returned home Monday evening and has since been confined to his home with the influenza. As we go to press he is reported to be rapidly improving.
— —

Thomas Robie Dead.

Thomas Robie passed away at the local hospital this morning from pneumonia which followed a severe attack of influenza, at the age of 50 years. Mr. Robie was ill with the disease for a few days before he was taken to the hospital on Monday morning and very little hopes were entertained for his recovery at any stage of his illness. …

source: The Grangeville Globe. (Grangeville, Idaho), 05 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Grangeville Globe. December 05, 1918, Page 3

19181205GG2
Advice to “Flu” Convalescents
Spain and England Report Increase in Tuberculosis After Influenza Epidemic.
U.S. Public Health Service Warns Public Against Tuberculosis, One Million Cases Tuberculosis in United States – Each a source of Danger.
Influenza Convalescents Should Have Lungs Examined – Colds Which Hang On Often Beginning of Tuberculosis. No Cause for Alarm if Tuberculosis is Recognized Early – Patent Medicines No to Be Trusted.

19181205GG2a

Washington, D. C. (Special.) – According to a report made to the United States Public Health Service, the epidemic of influenza in Spain has already caused an increase in the prevalence and deaths from pulmonary tuberculosis. A similar association between influenza and tuberculosis was recently made by Sir Arthur Newsholme, the chief medical officer of the English public health service, in his analysis of the tuberculosis death rate in England.

In order that the people of the United States may profit by the experience of other countries Surgeon General Rupert Blue of the United States Public Health Service has just issued a warning emphasizing the need of special precautions at the present time. “Experience seems to indicate,” says the Surgeon General, “that persons whose resistance has been weakened by an attack of influenza are peculiarly susceptible to tuberculosis. With millions of its people recently affected with influenza this country now offers conditions favoring the spread of tuberculosis.”

One Million Consumptives in the United States.

“Then you consider this a serious menace?” [he] was asked. “In my opinion it is, though I hasten to add it is distinctly one against which the people can guard. So far as one can estimate there are about one million cases of tuberculosis in the United States. There is unfortunately no complete census available to show exactly the number of tuberculous persons in each state despite the fact that most of the states have made the disease reportable. In New York city, where reporting has been in force for many years, over 35,000 cases of tuberculosis are registered with the Department of Health. Those familiar with the situation believe that the addition of unrecognized and unreported cases would make the number nearer 50,000. The very careful health survey conducted during the past two years in Framingham Mass., revealed 200 cases of tuberculosis in a population of approximately 15,000. If these proportions hold true for the United States as a whole they would indicate that about one in every hundred persons is tuberculous. Each of these constitutes a source of danger to be guarded against.”

What to Do.

In his statement to the public Surgeon General Blue points out how those who have had influenza should protect themselves against tuberculosis. “Any who have recovered from influenza,” says the Surgeon General, “should have their lungs carefully examined by a competent physician. In fact, it is desirable to have several examinations made a month apart. Such examinations cannot be made through the clothing nor can they be carried out in two or three minutes. If the lungs are found to be free from tuberculosis every effort should be made to keep them so. This can be done by right living, good food and plenty of fresh air.”

Danger Signs.

The Surgeon General warned especially against certain danger signs, such as “decline” and “colds which hang on.”

These, he explained, were often the beginning of tuberculosis. “If you do not get well promptly, if your cold seems to hang on or your health and strength decline, remember that these are often the early signs of tuberculosis. Place yourself at once under the care of a competent physician. Tuberculosis is curable in the early stages.

Patent Medicines Dangerous in Tuberculosis.

“Above all do not trust in the misleading statements of unscrupulous patent medicine fakers. There is no specific medicine for the cure of tuberculosis. The money spent on such medicines is thrown away; it should be spent instead for good food and decent living.”

source: The Grangeville Globe. (Grangeville, Idaho), 05 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Grangeville Globe. December 05, 1918, Page 8

Rev. Father Phelan announces there will be no services at the Catholic church next Sunday.

Ralph Smith was out this week from his ranch on the South Fork of the Clearwater above the Fisher placers. Ralph states his section is prosperous and has escaped the influenza up to the present time.

Bert Miller was in from his ranch home near Winona Saturday. Mr. Miller’s family recently suffered a severe attack of influenza and lost one dear little girl. The other members of the family are as well as usual at this time.

Joe Yates and his manager, Jack Wilkes, are at present undergoing the trials of Spanish influenza, out at the ranch of the former, just west of town. Mr. Wilkes is a very sick man, but the condition of Mr. Yates has not been so critical.

Quite a number of flu patients have recovered sufficiently to return to their duties among them being Carl Carlton, L. M. Harris, C. A. Tollefson and wife and many others whose names we do not recall. There are also a large number suffering from the disease, but it would be impossible to mention them all.

source: The Grangeville Globe. (Grangeville, Idaho), 05 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Lincoln County Times., December 05, 1918, Page 1

19181205LCT1

Dead Minister’s Family Are Victims Of Epidemic
Wife and Five Children of Late Rev. D. L. Andrews Critically Ill – Remains Are Brought Home.

We clip the following from the Twin Falls News which speaks of the death of a former resident of Jerome. Mr. Andrews was a pastor of the Methodist church here a few years ago:

Rev. D. L. Andrews, who died on Sunday last at Castleford from pneumonia following influenza, had been a resident of the Minidoka project for several years. He homesteaded a farm on the west end when the project was in its infancy. He moved with his family to Castleford about a year ago. He was a Methodist minister and had filled the pulpit here as well as at Castleford.

Recently Mr. Andrews had rented a farm near here and Mrs. Andrews and their five children had moved up here a week before his death. All of the members of his family, as well as those of his brother, Kit Andrews, residing here, are suffering now from influenza.

The remains of Mr. Andrews were brought here Tuesday and short burial services at the cemetery were conducted by Rev. G. W. Barnes. Memorial services in honor of Mr. Andrews will be held as soon as the family has recovered.

source: Lincoln County Times. (Jerome, Idaho), 05 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Payette Enterprise., December 05, 1918, Page 1

19181205PE1
Personal and Local Mention

Earl Hurd is very sick with the Flu at the home of his parents.

Loren Arment who has been very ill is a little better at the present writing.

Marian Bowers whose wife died at Baker City with influenza, is visiting his mother.

Miss Lewis, daughter of Mrs. John Hill, is recovering from an attack of influenza.

H. B. Orcutt received word that his brother W. W. Orcutt who lived at Bend, Oregon, had recently died from influenza.

source: Payette Enterprise. (Payette, Canyon Co., Idaho), 05 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Payette Enterprise., December 05, 1918, Page 5

Fruitland Department
Mrs. R. G. Wilson

Lambert Young is ill with the Flu. Mr. and Mrs. M. M. Hurst have both been ill the past week with it, as have the J. Thode family.

School began Monday with 25 new pupils enrolled.

Misses Fern Linck and Jane Shamberger returned to Star Sunday to open their school Monday.

Mrs. Geo. Hooker left Monday evening for her sister’s home in Pasadena, Calif. Her sister, Mrs. Lucy Boyles’ son who was in the Navy, just died in Philadelphia with the influenza.

Mrs. Otto Swanson returned from Nampa. Mrs. Swanson’s son, Frank McGee, died in the eastern part of the state just lately with pneumonia, and her daughter, Mrs. Jack Corry, of Nampa, who was well known here, died with the Flu. The community sympathize with Mrs. Swanson in her bereavements.
— —

Sand Hollow

School was opened last Monday.

Mrs. S. A. Bena is again able to be out after having been sick for several days.
— —

Little Willow

How fortunate our little Valley ought to feel; so few flu cases and not one fatal one. Payette County is sure to be congratulated.

source: Payette Enterprise. (Payette, Canyon Co., Idaho), 05 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Emmett Index. December 05, 1918, Page 2

19181205EI1
Tales of Town

Now that the influenza scare is subsiding, we await the day when we can look up at the sun and take a good old heart searching, soul stirring sneeze without being looked upon with suspicion.

An Emmett man, feeling pains he thought were influenza symptoms, took what he thought was a pill from the kitchen table. Really, however, it was a button his wife had lost from her white spats. Nevertheless, the flu symptoms had all flown the next morning.

source: The Emmett Index. (Emmett, Idaho), 05 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Emmett Index. December 05, 1918, Page 5

19181205EI2
Emmett News

George Cruickshank, who is suffering from an attack of flu, is reported doing nicely. His sister, Miss Mary, has been away from home during the time of his illness, as a precautionary measure. She is a guest of Miss Ruth Manley.

Dave McGowan was called to Portland last week by the illness of his sister Mary. She is sick with the flu. She and Lillian Hall are rooming together. Miss Hall has just recovered from the disease.

Relatives here have received word that the family of Lynn Burton in Spokane are all having influenza. Mr. Burton’s father, W. L. Burton, who recently went to spend the winter there is taking care of the son and his wife, while the children are staying at the home of a neighbor. All are recovering nicely.
— —

East Emmett

Lillian Hall has recovered from the influenza and has returned to her work.
— —

Influenza Victim.

Tuesday afternoon, J. S. Pratt received a message to go to Nampa at once to attend his son John who was dangerously ill with Spanish Influenza. Mr. Pratt went, but ere he reached his son’s bedside, the disease had done its work. The body was brought to Emmett Wednesday, and Mr. Bucknum conveyed it on Thursday to Sweet the former home of the Pratts. Wednesday night another son in Nampa succumbed to the dread disease and interment was made there. It is reported that others of the family in Emmett are suffering from the same illness. The sympathy of the entire community is with the family in their deep trouble.

source: The Emmett Index. (Emmett, Idaho), 05 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Emmett Index. December 05, 1918, Page 7

19181205EI3
News Of Gem County
By The Index’s Correspondents

Letha

There is a case of influenza at Mr. Potters, who lives on the Rickett place near Falk. They are under quarantine.

There will be a meeting of the W. C. T. U. and Red Cross Thursday, Dec. 12, at the church. Let us get together and transact business and plan for future work, now that the epidemic has subsided.
— —

Bramwell
By E. F. Wells

School in this district will start Monday and it is desired that every pupil be in attendance unless there is sickness in the family.

Mrs. Purl Storey, who has been quite ill is much better and able to sit up a little at home.
— —

Hanna
By Mrs. J. I. Guthrie

Miss Josephine Wayman, who has spent a couple of weeks at her home, left Sunday, to resume her school work at Big Timber, Mont. After she was on her way a telegram came saying that the schools would not open.
— —

Central Mesa
Regina Conrad

Sunday school next Sunday at 1 p.m. Everybody welcome.
— —

Letter to My Pupils

My Dear Little People: Every day I keep hooping to see you, everyone of your back in school again, for your desks are very lonely without you, and I feel so myself. But when we pass the flags for our singing, we lay one on every desk, so I want you who are at home to know that we think of you, and if any of you are sick, hurry and get well and come back to good hard work, for we have much of it to do, and many children are here every day and working hard, and we are also sewing many different kinds of pretty cards. Next Friday afternoon, Dec. 6, is our Feast Day. We have lots of goodies on hand and 25 little folks who have not missed school or been tardy. So you hurry up as soon as you can, for I hope you are too smart for the old Flu to catch you, and I’m hungry to shake hands with all my flock in our old-time, many-time fashion.

Ever true, Your Teacher, Jean L. Shanklin.
— —

Teachers’ Examinations.

The regular teachers’ examination for all grades of certificates, including both state and county, will be held at the Court House in Emmett, Thursday, Friday, and Saturday, December 19, 20 and 21, 1918.

Ella E. Breshears, County Superintendent.

source: The Emmett Index. (Emmett, Idaho), 05 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Idaho County Free Press. December 05, 1918, Page 1

19181205ICFP1
Influenza Breaks Out Worse Than Before
Epidemic Spreads Over Town and Country – One Death in Grangeville
Cottonwood Also is Hit
Red Cross Appeals for Many More Volunteer Nurses to Care For Ever Increasing Cases.

The epidemic of Spanish influenza has again broken out in Grangeville and vicinity. The number of cases is said to be greater than when the epidemic first occurred. Physicians estimate that seventy-five cases are prevalent in the community at the present time.

One death has occurred, that of Thomas J. Roby, who died this morning. Other patients, who were pronounced in a critical condition, are said to be somewhat improved.

The Red Cross has issued an appeal for nurses. A number of person who had been nursing patients have themselves become afflicted with the disease.

Schools Still Are Closed.

The public schools remain closed, and measures are being taken to prevent further spread of the disease.

The Lyric theater was closed voluntarily by Manager Edmundston on Sunday night.

Church services were held Sunday morning, but were dispensed with Sunday evening.

Cottonwood has many cases of influenza. One death has occurred there.

The Grangeville city council, at its session Monday night, adopted a resolution that the mayor be empowered to name a committee of three members of the council to meet with Dr. G. S. Stockton, county physician with power to enter into quarantine regulations as may be agreed upon by the committee and the county health officer. Mayor Edmundson appointed a committee consisting of Councilmen Smith, Hattabaugh and Riuteel.

Resolution by School Board.

At a meeting the school board, Wednesday, the following resolution was adopted:

“Resolved, that it is the sense of this meeting that the Grangeville public schools will be opened as soon as the safety of the pupils will permit.

“And be it further resolved, in order that the present epidemic of influenza be cleared from the town, so that the inconvenience and expense of conducting the public schools be reduced, that the city officials, acting in conjunction with the county health officer, be urgently requested, to place such a quarantine on all places of amusement, or places where people congregate, as will prohibit any person from entering the same; and that no person be allowed to enter unnecessarily and place of business, or to linger in such place except to be served as a customer.” ….
— —

No Catholic Services.

There will be no services in the Catholic church on Sunday owing to the prevalence of influenza.
— —

Thomas J. Roby Is Dead
Well-Known Pioneer Succumbs to Influenza-pneumonia.

Thomas Jackson Roby, a pioneer of Idaho county, died this morning at 9:20 in the Grangeville hospital from pneumonia, following Spanish influenza. Mr. Roby had been ill since Tuesday of last week. He was 50 years old, and had resided in Idaho county since 1876. …
— —

Flu Kills Cottonwood Man
George Groshoff, Aged 24, Succumbs to Disease.

A victim of pneumonia, which followed Spanish influenza, George Groshoff, 24 years of age, died Sunday afternoon in Cottonwood, after an illness of ten days. Death occurred in the Cottonwood hotel, where Mrs. Groshoff had been staying. …
— —

Dr. Scallon Back to Work.

Dr. P. J. Scallon is again able to care for his patients, after an attack of influenza and illness resulting from an abscess in his ear.

source: Idaho County Free Press. (Grangeville, Idaho Territory), 05 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., December 05, 1918, Page 1

19181205DSM1

1,000 Cases Of Flu And Ten Deaths At Walla Walla

Walla Walla, Wash., Dec. 4. — (Special.) — There have been 10 deaths from the influenza here the last two days and over 1,000 cases reported. An emergency hospital which opened yesterday is rapidly filling up with patients. The situation has not grown better in the last few days, in the opinion of the health authorities, and there is no prospect of opening the town for some time yet.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 05 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., December 05, 1918, Page 3

19181202DSM3
City News

Mrs. Audrey Herington has returned to her position with the Washington Water Power company after a siege of the influenza.

The two children of C. C. Hunter are quite ill with influenza.

Miss Rilla Gehrett has returned to her place in the postoffice after an illness of influenza.
— —

19181205DSM2
Spokane Clamps Lid Down Tight
Forbids Dancing, Conventions and Public Gatherings While Flu is Bad

With a new outbreak of influenza worse than at any time since the epidemic began several weeks ago, Spokane has again clamped down the lid which was lifted in order to hold the big three days’ peace celebration of Thursday, Friday and Saturday, last week. With new cases developing at the rate of 300 per day and many deaths occurring, the metropolis of the Inland Empire has been forced to cancel invitations to Inland Empire towns to send delegates to the fruit convention and the Farmers’ Union convention, both of which were to have started next Tuesday. The rigid rules now being enforced in Spokane are just what the Moscow health officers have been trying to avoid in Moscow by asking the co-operation of the people in enforcing a voluntary quarantine here.

The following report published in last night’s Spokane Chronicle shows the seriousness of conditions there and what steps are being taken to prevent a spread of the disease. The Chronicle says:

“In an order issued this morning by Health Officer J. B. Anderson and taking effect immediately, and indefinite quarantine is placed on public dances, on account of the influenza situation.

“Included in the ban order are all mass assemblages, community singing, conventions, where delegates come from outside the city and crowding in the lobbies of the theaters.

“The order also calls upon parents to keep all children of school age at home, away from theaters and off the streets.

Hope to Curb Epidemic.

“The quarantine order was issued after a consultation among Dr. Anderson, Commissioner Charles Fleming and other members of the board of health. They hope that by the provisions of the order the influenza epidemic can be greatly abated, the public protected from the disease and at the same time business not interfered with.

Cut Down Classes.

“‘The ban on dancing includes only public dances in halls and restaurants where the crowding of people is great and dangerous,’ said Dr. Anderson. ‘I do not wish to interfere with dancing schools where instruction is given by teachers, but the limit must be six couples at a time at such a school.

“All children of school age are barred from theaters, must keep off the streets and remain at home. Parents are cautioned to make children observe the provisions of this order, the health department believing that parents should have better control over the children than the health department can be expected to.

“Theater managers are prohibited from selling a ticket to any person when there is not a seat in the theater for that person. This order means just what it says, and must be strictly obeyed.

“No persons will be allowed to stand or crowd in the lobby of any motion picture, vaudeville or other theater. There shall be no such things as ‘standing room only.’

“All community sings, mass meetings, conventions where delegates from outside the city and large assemblages are prohibited. We want no outsiders to bring the disease into the city.

“Lodges and society meetings and the luncheons of the different civic and social organizations do not come within the provisions of the order. Neither has the ban been placed on private or denominational schools.”

New Cases Are 134.

“With 134 cases of influenza and four cases of pneumonia reported at the health office at noon, the situation is considered much improved. Of the 134 cases reported 43 were reported by a physician through the mail, the letter being dated December 2 and the report covering a period of several days. Another physician reported 21 cases for an entire week, his report being also added to today’s total. The total for the epidemic now stands at 5,864 cases of influenza 621 cases of pneumonia and 226 deaths.

“‘The public can be assured that the health officer will think of only the greatest good to the greatest number in any action taken,’ said Dr. Anderson. ‘This thought has governed my actions in the past and will continue to do so in the future.’

“The situation is serious but no further ban will be ordered unless, in the opinion of the health officer and the board of health, such a ban is absolutely necessary, and then only as a last resort.

“Individual common sense and care will do more to abate the ‘flu’ than any other agency. This I have stated many times, and it is as true now as it ever was. If each person will take care of his or her own health and, if afflicted with the influenza, use the treatment and precautions that have been many times published, there will be an astonishing falling off in the epidemic.

Need Mattresses.

“Single mattresses are needed at the influenza hospital, according to Dr. Anderson, and are wanted at once. All persons who have mattresses of that type and can donate their use are requested to let the health department know. An oxygen breathing apparatus with a supply of oxygen has been installed at the hospital for use when necessary.”

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 05 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Nezperce Herald., December 05, 1918, Page 1

19181205NH1
Be Careful and Don’t Get Frightened.

The influenza in Nezperce is well in hand. There are at present three cases in town under care of the doctors. They are J. P. Sorenson, the daughter of Mrs. and Mrs. Clay Smith and Miss Alta Oswald, the latter at the home of Mrs. Dr. Gordon. To-day’s report on these is that they are getting along finely. The Misses Sullivan and Sorenson, who returned from school last week suffering from slight attacks, are all recovered.

Dr. Taylor reports fourteen members of the Wright family, on the Ivan Jorgens place a mile southeast of town, as ill from the malady, but none serious. A few other cases, not considered serious, are reported unofficially from the Robt. Near neighborhood north east of town.

These are the facts of the flu situation locally to-day.

Dr. Taylor, county health officer, and the local authorities yesterday ordered the opera house and picture show closed here simply as a precautionary measure and with no further development of the malady than at present, these will be permitted to open soon. No ban has been placed on the schools, churches and lodges and similar essential public gathering places.

General business is good in Nezperce and everything aside from the two mentioned closings is going right along as usual.

source: The Nezperce Herald. (Nezperce, Idaho), 05 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Nezperce Herald., December 05, 1918, Page 4

E. C. Eckersley Influenza Victim.

E. C. Eckersley, druggist, and promising citizen of Winchester for eight years being a member of the council and active in public affairs, died at 1 o’clock, Saturday afternoon, a victim of influenza. He was taken ill a week ago and on Tuesday last – pneumonia developed. …

Mr. Eckersley is survived by his wife and two children, Mrs. Eckersley being a teacher in the public schools. His death is the first to occur from influenza in Winchester and at this time there are only a few mild cases in town.

source: The Nezperce Herald. (Nezperce, Idaho), 05 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Bridge on Potlatch Creek 1918

1918PotlatchCreek-a
Two women with two little girls stand on the bridge on Pioneer road at Potlatch Creek.

source: Idaho Cities & Towns Collection, Digital Initiatives, University of Idaho Library
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Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 1)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 2)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 3)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 4)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 5)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 6)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 7)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 8)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 9)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 10)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 11)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 12)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 13)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 14)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 15)