Idaho History Aug 23, 2020

Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic

Part 19

Idaho Newspaper clippings December 13-19, 1918

1918 Influenza Rx

1918RxWhiskeyFritz-a
(click image for larger size)

“A prescription from December 1918, in [the] middle of Spanish Influenza pandemic. This doctor/drug store was in Malad, Idaho. But this was common across the U.S. at this time. Also, was a legal way to get alcohol during prohibition.”

courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection
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December 13

The Rathdrum Tribune., December 13, 1918, Page 1

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19181213RT2
Reopen In January
Rathdrum School Remain Closed All This Month

The Board of Education met last Tuesday evening and, after a good deal of refection, decided to postpone the re-opening of school until Jan. 6th. It was pointed out that in the majority of cases where the schools had re-opened, – they had again been closed and the epidemic condition became worse. Also, the consensus of opinion among parents seemed to be that there might be considerable risk in sending children to school when the epidemic in most places was more serious than at any time heretofore.

It is expected that, at the conference of superintendents to be held at Boise Dec. 27th and 28th, some action will be taken to bring about uniformity in regard to the work that is to be accomplished this year owning to the loss of time. Mr. Swenson will attend the conference.
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L. A. Kruger, who has served as marshal since Oct. 10, employed chiefly to enforce influenza regulations, was allowed $50 a month for the past two months and on motion he was continued on duty at $35 a month while the influenza ban remains on.
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Idaho State News Items.

Violators of quarantine regulations imposed by the Boise city board of health on influenza cases will hereafter be prosecuted to the full extent of the law.
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From Over The County

Post Falls

The town board adopted strict flu quarantine regulations.

John Arthur Chisholm, age 18, died Dec. 4, of influenza-pneumonia.

Harrison

Benjamin Beers, age 34, died of influenza at Medimonth Nov. 27.

Coeur D’Alene

Fritz Lille, age 37, succumbed to influenza Dec. 6.

There were 28 new cases of the ‘flu’ reported in Coeur d’Alene Tuesday.

With Judge Dietrich on the bench, federal court for this district opened Monday. …

source: The Rathdrum Tribune. (Rathdrum, Idaho), 13 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Rathdrum Tribune., December 13, 1918, Page 3

Personal Mention.

Frank Erickson, a woodsworker from Hauser lake, is ill at the county hospital, where he was received last Saturday.

Mrs. Margaret Scott has taken the principalship of the Spirit Lake school during the absence of Miss Dorothea Wenz for a few weeks.

A. Ulbright and son, Amel, were up from Hauser lake Saturday. Mr. Ulbright stated that his daughter, Mrs. Perry Krebs, and family in Spokane were ill with influenza.
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Local Paragraphs.

The churches and lodges are chaffing under the flu ban.

No new influenza cases have been reported in town since the 4th, but a number of cases are reported on the prairie, brought in from outside points.

source: The Rathdrum Tribune. (Rathdrum, Idaho), 13 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Oakley Herald. December 13, 1918, Page 1

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19181213OH2
Many New Cases of Influenza

Influenza broke out again at Oakley last Sunday. On Monday the public schools were closed indefinitely. Wednesday the city council passed an ordinance prohibiting all public assemblages, closing places of public amusement, and ordering all business places to close at 6 p.m.

Among those suffering from the disease are the Misses Fern, Wanda, and Olive Harper; Theo, and Ralph Whittle; Roy Price. Seven cases are reported at Marion in the Tollman family, and four in the Woodhouse family.

The home doctors are now ready to give the immunizing treatment against influenza.

[Note: In 1918 they did not yet know about the virus and the “immunizing treatment” was ineffective.]
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Ordinance Number 94
by W. T. Harper

An ordinance to provide against the spread of Spanish influenza, providing the time for the opening and closing of business houses, closing pool halls, picture shows, and other places of public assemblaces, making other regulations to prevent the spread of the above named infectious disease, providing a time when this ordinance shall take effect, and providing a punishment for violations hereof

Be It Ordained by the Chairman and Board of Trustees of the Village of Oakley, Idaho;

Whereas there are a number of cases of Spanish influenza among the residents of the Village of Oakley, Idaho; and,

Whereas it has been, and is deemed necessary, in order to prevent the further spread of the above named infectious disease, [shall?] certain regulations be adopted and enforced; and,

Whereas immediate action is required to protect the health of the people of the said Village against the spread of the said disease; now therefore

Be it ordained y the Chairman and Board of Trustees of the Village of Oakley, Idaho:

Section One. From and after the passage and taking effect of this ordinance the following regulations shall be observed and enforced within the limits of the Village of Oakely, Idaho:

First. All schools, meetings, and all other public assemblages are hereby prohibited.

Second. All pool and billiard halls, moving picture shows, theatres and all other places of public amusement are hereby closed and all operations shall be suspended.

Third. All stores and business establishments of all kinds shall be closed and all business suspended on and after 6 o’clock p.m. of each and every day, and shall remain closed until the following morning at 7 o’clock, provided that nothing herein shall prevent the filling of prescriptions at any time by drug stores of duly licensed physicians.

Section Two. Any person violating any of the terms or provisions of this ordinance, shall in conviction thereof, be fined in any sum not exceeding $100, together with costs of suit. And upon failure to pay such fine and costs, shall be imprisoned in the Village jail at hard labor until such fine and costs shall be paid, allowing $2 for every day so imprisoned.

Section Three. This ordinance shall be in force and effect from and after its passage, approval and the proclamation of the Chairman of the Board of Trustees there of duly issued, as provided by law.

Passed and approved this the 11th day of December, A. D. 1918.
W. C. Whittle, Chairman of the Board of Trustees
Attest:
C. G. Larson, Clerk.
State of Idaho County of Cassia
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In The Gem State

After having been wounded July 18, and being confined to the hospital for a long period, Sergt. Walter Steineck died in France November 13 of pneumonia contracted from Spanish influenza, according to news received last week at Boise by his mother.
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Locals and Personals.

Miss Reva Dummer, who is a trained nurse, left Tuesday for Pocatello.

Pratt Thurber is very ill at the University of Utah with influenza followed by pneumonia.
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Plans for Red Cross Roll-Call Week, Modified by Epidemic
Send in Money for your Dues

On account of the influenza epidemic, the committee will not make house-to-house canvass for members. Everyone is urged to send in his dollar for membership dues to the Red Cross Rooms or to Mrs. W. T. Jack.

source: The Oakley Herald. (Oakley, Idaho), 13 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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American Falls Press. December 13, 1918, Page 1

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Two Deaths From Influenza

Hayward Lee, son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles F. Lee, of Fairview, and W. A. Peterson, of Shoshone, died this week from influenza. Both had been despaired of for several days. Hayward Lee was 22 years of age, and lived with his parents north of town. The home of Mr. Peterson was in Shoshone, to which place his body was taken for interment. He was 19 years of age and employed here as a truck driver. Both young men were well known locally and their untimely end causes much sorrow.
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Land Sale January 16.

The sale of 12,000 acres of land in Power County has been reset for January 16. The sale was to have taken place December 5, but closing of the town by the health board made a postponement necessary. Whether the sale will come off on the new date will probably be determined by health conditions that prevail at that time. …
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To Instruct In Fighting “Flu”
Organize Work in Teaching American City and Communities

Four committees of the American Public Health association were chosen Monday in Chicago to organize the work of teaching cities and communities to prevent or control outbreaks of influenza. The nominating committee will announce the composition of these committees at the first general session of the forty-sixth annual meeting.

One committee will compile statistics on the recent influenza epidemic, another will devise and circulate the best known measures of prevention, another will handle measures of relief for convalescents, and the fourth will investigate vaccines and serum.

The membership of the four “influenza” committees of the American Public Health association are announce as follows:

Preventive measures – Surgeon General Rupert Blue, Washington, D. C., chairman; Drs. W. A. Evans, Chicago; Eugene R. Kelly, Boston, and M. S. Fraser, Winnipeg, Canada.

Relief measures – Dr. D. B. Armstrong, Farmington, Mass., chairman; Dr. W. C. Woodward, Boston; Miss Edna Foley, Chicago; Miss Eunice Dyke, Toronto, Canada.

Vaccines and serum – Dr. W. H. Park, New York, chairman; Dr. Geo. W. McCoy, Washington; Professor Henry Albert, University of Iowa; Dr. D. J. Davis, Chicago.

Influenza statistics – Drs. W. H. Davis, bureau of census, Washington; Frederick L. Hoffman, Newark, N. J.; J. T. Black, New London, Con.; Edwin F. Kopf, New York.

It will be the aim of these committees to bring out the fullest information concerning influenza and try to form a national program for fighting the return of the epidemic.

source: American Falls Press. (American Falls, Idaho), 13 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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American Falls Press. December 13, 1918, Page 3

19181213AFP2
Red Cross Fights Deadly Epidemic

Besides the special work conducted by hundreds of Red Cross Chapters throughout the country in checking the recent epidemic of Spanish Influenza, the organization through its headquarters at Washington is preparing to fight a repetition of the experience that was so disastrous this fall, educating the public thoroughly regarding the symptoms and proper care at the beginning of an attack. In addition to this, the American Red Cross is fighting tuberculosis. The recent appropriation to the National Tuberculosis Association will be used for educational as well as relief work throughout the country.

So much has been said about the aftermath of the epidemic that especial attention is being given to the work along this line. The weakness which follows influenza leaves the patient in a condition which makes him a good field for the germs of tuberculosis. A thorough physical examination, proper food and clothing, the use of mild preventives, will check the progress of the disease at once.

Tuberculosis, or consumption, as it is frequently called, is both preventable and curable, provided the treatment of the disease is begun before it is too far advanced. Medicine plays a comparatively small part. The frequently advertised “consumption cures” should be looked upon as poison. The only medicine which should be taken is a good tonic which will stimulate the appetite and build up the system generally. The main cure lies in proper food, sufficient rest, fresh air and sunlight and living, if possible, according to the plan prescribed by a good physician. This renews the patient’s vitality and soon kills the disease entirely.

For several years the National Tuberculosis Association has been financing its work by the sale of Red Cross seals at Christmas time. The seals sold for a penny each and by making a concerted effort enough money was usually raised to carry the work through the year. This year there will be no seals sold because the American Red Cross has made an appropriation for the anti-tuberculosis work, and those who formerly spent their time selling seals will join in the work for the Red Cross Christmas Roll Call during the week of December 16 to 23.

source: American Falls Press. (American Falls, Idaho), 13 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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American Falls Press. December 13, 1918, Page 4

Teachers’ Examination.

The regular teachers’ examination for all classes of certificates, which was postponed from November on account of influenza, will be held in the court room in the court house, on December 19, 20 and 21, 1918.

The teachers’ institute which was also postponed, will not be held this year.

Harriet M. Wilson, County Superintendent.

source: American Falls Press. (American Falls, Idaho), 13 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Clear Creek School – 1918

SchoolClearCreekSchool1918PBC-a

Dist No 66, March 5, 1918
Clear Creek – T31N, R5E, S06

courtesy: ‎Penny Bennett Casey, Idaho County GenWeb
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Clearwater Republican. December 13, 1918, Page 1

19181213CR1

19181213CR2
Orofino Out of Danger From “Flu” Epidemic

At this writing there is little danger from the influenza epidemic in Orofino. The hospital was closed nearly a week ago and the rooms cleaned up and fumigated. The few isolated cases around town are all on the road to recovery and there is no danger from that source. There are two cases from the work train gang, but they have been kept under strict quarantine. A fresh outbreak of the contagion is hardly probable if people will take ordinary precaution in taking care of their health. Don’t get panicky and the “flu” will be like the kaiser, down and out.
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Charles McGee.

Charles McGee, whose home was near Orofino, died last week Saturday forenoon at the emergency hospital in Lewiston, of pneumonia which developed from an attack of influenza. He was taken ill while on a visit to Lewiston and had been working in the Craig mountain district. His wife was summoned from Orofino and his mother from Central ridge, but he passed away before their arrival. The deceased is survived by a wife and child and by his father and mother, Mr. and Mrs. James McGee of Central Ridge, and an uncle John McGee, manager of the Nezperce telephone company. Charles McGee was 32 years of age and had lived in this part of Idaho for about 20 years.
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Death of John Hanley.

John Hanley, foreman of the Fraser Lumber company and living at Fraser, died at the Orofino hospital last Sunday morning with influenza. He was not considered in a dangerous condition until shortly before his death, when he passed away suddenly with heart failure. Mr. Hanley was about 33 years of age. Mrs. Hanley came to Orofino the evening before his death. The remains were taken to Spokane for interment.
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Card of Thanks

The undersigned wish to thank the many friends of Harry L. White who so kindly assisted during his late illness and death at the influenza hospital.

Especial thanks are extended the Masons, Odd Fellows and Firemen for the beautiful floral offerings.

Mrs. Harry L. White and Children.
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Local News

Ryan Snyder of Weippe, is reported to be on the sick roll at Camp Lewis and in a dangerously low condition.

Influenza’s toll in deaths from Orofino has been five, Miss Hungerford and Mr. McGee, who died in Lewiston, and Andy Lee Williams, Harry White and John Hanley, who passed away at the Orofino hospital. The actual result in deaths has been barely five per cent of those in this vicinity who have been afflicted with the disease.
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Harry L. White

Brief mention was made last week of the death of Harry L. White on December 6th at the influenza hospital.

Harry White was born in California December 27, 1888, and was 30 years of age, and the family came to the Gilbert section when he was 12 years old. …
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The county commissioner have been in session all the week, an unusual amount of business having developed in the settlement of the influenza expenses.

The young people who have had the “flu” held a social gathering Wednesday evening, as a farewell for Mrs. Holden, the professional nurse who has returned to her home at Seattle.

source: Clearwater Republican. (Orofino, Idaho), 13 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Kendrick Gazette. December 13, 1918, Page 1

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Capital Correspondence

The Capital City has been moving slowly for the past six weeks owing to the strict quarantine on business of all kinds but the ban has been lifted and the holiday season promises to be one of unusual gaiety.
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Flu at Juliaetta

It is reported that there are over twenty cases of influenza at Juliaetta. A short time ago the town was entirely free from the epidemic but since the first of last week it has been gradually increasing. At this time there are no serious cases reported there.
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School Children Pick Beans
19181213KG2

source: The Kendrick Gazette. (Kendrick, Idaho), 13 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Kendrick Gazette. December 13, 1918, Page 2

Southwick Items

Another soldier, Arnold Cuddy, came home to spend Thanksgiving. Arnold has recovered nicely from his severe attack of pneumonia.

Walter Bateman and family have been sick with lagrippe. Two members of the family are suffering from pneumonia.

School closed last week on account of a false alarm of the flu, but has opened again.
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Is Flue [sic] Chiness [sic] Plague?

Captain James Joseph King of the United States Army Medical Corps advances a number of facts that tend to show that the influenza epidemic which has been raging with such dire results in this country, is a form of pneumonic plague that has been prevalent in China for several years past.

Dr. King believes that the plague was taken to France by Chinese coolies imported as laborers, whence it spread over Europe in modified form. The symptoms of the two diseases are similar, he says, and some of them have differed from those observed in previous epidemics. Both diseases seem to be due to groups of different germs, and some of these have been definitely found in both. Dr. King thinks the coolies had among them “carriers” of the plague bacillus, and that this assumed new virulence and different form when transplanted into virgin soil. We read in The Record: In the China epidemic there were few definite symptoms at the outset of the disease except the general malaise, prostration, loss of appetite, etc., soon to be followed by the pneumonic process and death. So it is in the present epidemic. There have been indefinite symptoms, great prostration rapidly followed by pneumonia and death in the most virulent forms. The outstanding features of the Chinese pneumonic plague were the high infectivity of it and the high mortality. So in this so-called influenza epidemic it is more contagious, is followed more frequently by pneumonia, and attended with much high mortality than in any previous influenza epidemic.”

source: The Kendrick Gazette. (Kendrick, Idaho), 13 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Kendrick Gazette. December 13, 1918, Page 8

Gleanings

Dr. Herrington was called to Moscow Tuesday on business. He returned Wednesday.

Elsie Thomas went to Juliaetta Thursday to care for the Jack Odem family during their siege of influenza.

There will be no school in Moscow before December 30, according to decision reached by the Moscow school board. If the influenza situation is favorable school will open there on that day.

Dr. Rothwell went to Lewiston the first of the week for a short vacation.

There were no new flu cases reported in Kendrick since last week until yesterday. The section foreman, Joe Scmarcia, several in the Ernest Clem family and two doubtful cases were reported Thursday morning. Those who were ill last week are all getting along very well except Buster Brown, who is having a severe time of it.

Sergeant Braden returned to his company at Camp Funston, Thursday. He came here on a ten-day furlough but shortly before the expiration of the furlough contracted the flu and had to have the time extended. He was here about three weeks in all.
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Leland Items

School moves on with no particular disturbance, abatement of interest on the part of those who are in attendance. But while quite a number are kept at home on account of the influenza scare, a goodly crowd of youngsters daily gather at various points about town and spend time in sports and other amusements. Of course there is no danger from the malady under these conditions.
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Big Bear Ridge

Miss Agnes Rognstad who is teaching at Garfield, is pending a number of days at the home of her brother here, before returning to her home in Clarkston, Wash. Her school being closed again owing to the influenza epidemic.

Gabriel Forest has been seriously ill at Camp Lewis with an attack of measles and pneumonia. He has been in the hospital for the past five weeks and is slowly recovering.

Services were held at the Lutheran church Sunday morning. There will be no Christmas program as previously planned. It was thought wise to use every precaution against spreading the flu.

source: The Kendrick Gazette. (Kendrick, Idaho), 13 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Recorder. December 13, 1918, Page 1

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19181213IR2
This Quarantine Still Holds Good

It seems the judicial interpretation of the quarantine laws and the interpretation put upon them by the resolute citizens of Challis people are in sharp conflict, Judge Cowen being on one side of the contention and the Challis people, who want to protect their citizens from the epidemic, being on the other. The judge called for the military arm of the state government to enforce his commands but the demand was irregular and the governor declined to act as requested. Thus is the court overruled and his acts made of no force or biding effects upon anybody concerned. The ruling of the state authorities is that a quarantine is a quarantine in spite of any court order, when the quarantine is invoked to save human life.

So we seem still to be guaranteed life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness by the governor of Idaho through the courts may say us nay.

It is pertinent to inquire at this time, “What’s the matter with Moses Alexander?” And the answer comes rolling down the Salmon river valley, “He’s all right.”

A phone message Sunday from a member of the Custer county council of defense affords the information that the Challis quarantine is still rigidly maintained. The decree of the local health board is enforced by strong public sentiment it seems and an armed force is back of that public sentiment. A report that an armed mob was on the road from Mackay caused the mobilization of the Challis reserve one day last week and the defense of Warm Spring pass, a modern Thermopolae, was decided upon. The Mackayites decided that discretion was the better part of valor and there has not been a case of flu infection or a death from violence to date.

source: The Idaho Recorder. (Salmon City, Idaho), 13 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Recorder. December 13, 1918, Page 6

Idaho State News

The Gooding schools will probably not be opened before December 9.

The Emmett schools, which reopened Monday of last week, were closed Tuesday by order of the board of health. Two or three cases of influenza developed among the high school students, and it was deemed wise to close until it could be known how far the infection had spread.

source: The Idaho Recorder. (Salmon City, Idaho), 13 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Recorder. December 13, 1918, Page 8

Pleasant Grove

The Geertson creek school will not reopen until after the Christmas holidays because of influenza still in the district. Miss Emerson, the teacher returned from Bannack, Montana, on Tuesday expecting to resume her teaching duties.

Mrs. Margaret Holbrook, mother of Harry Holbrook, came from Pocatello on Monday. She arrived too late for the funeral of her son because of a delay at Armstead. Mrs. W. P. Garner, mother of Mrs. Harry Holbrook, came at the same time intending to remain for a visit but was recalled to her Pocatello home by the serious illness of another daughter. Mrs. Margaret Holbrook returned on Thursday accompanied by Mrs. Harry Holbrook and six-year-old son, who intend making their home at the Gate City.
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Leadore

At an open air meeting held at Leadore last Friday afternoon it was decided to continue quarantine regulations, school excepted, until the New Year.

School was reopened Monday, the 9th. No visitors to be received and parents requested to be very careful and not send any pupil who is at all ill.

source: The Idaho Recorder. (Salmon City, Idaho), 13 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Montpelier Examiner. December 13, 1918, Page 4

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Health Conditions Continue To Improve

Another week has passed without a death from influenza in Montpelier, and the situation is daily improving. Several new cases in mild form have developed in the past week and there are still some eight or ten houses under quarantine, but City Health Officer Ashley believes that by the middle of next week there will not be a home in the city under quarantine.

If conditions continue to improve during the next four days, it is expected that the city health board will lift the ban against public gatherings by Thursday of next week, and the county health board will lift the ban against people from the county coming to Montpelier. However, it is not likely that the public schools will open until Monday, Dec. 30, and there will probably be no dances until about that time.

People from some sections of the county are gradually beginning to come to town as they realize that there is now practically no danger of catching the flu. It is believed by the end of next week business in Montpelier will have resumed normal conditions.
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A letter received in Montpelier yesterday written by Rev. J. R. Browne, who owns a ranch just west of town and who visited here for several weeks last fall, says that the ban is on tight there and no likelihood of its being lifted before spring. He said the death rate from the Spanish influenza is shocking in his town, Otterville, Mo.

source: Montpelier Examiner. (Montpelier, Idaho), 13 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Montpelier Examiner. December 13, 1918, Page 5

Local News

The past few days have witnessed quite a large number of people coming to Montpelier from the country to do their trading. The flu situation is practically cleared up and there is no longer any danger to people coming here. Wednesday and yesterday the restaurants were taxed to their capacity to accommodate the large number of people coming to town, but all were taken care of.

The city hall, which was used as an emergency hospital during the flu epidemic, was thoroughly cleaned and fumigated last Saturday, and on Monday the City Clerk Barrett again established his offices there.

A son was born to Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Richards last Saturday. The mother was ill with the influenza at the time, but under the care of a competent nurse, she and the babe are getting along nicely.

Roy Stuart, who was called here by the death of his father three weeks ago and who was taken down with the flu, has fully recovered and returned home this morning.

Manager Norris reported for duty at the Three Rule store yesterday, the first time since the flu got the best of him. He did not, however, attempt to overdo his strength at waiting on customers, all of whom were glad to see his familiar face.

M. B. Cherry was an over Sunday visitor in Pocatello. He reports that the flu situation is slowly improving there. The death rate is decreasing but there are still a large number of cases in the city.

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Morgan, their son John and daughter Rose, came up from Cokeville last Tuesday and remained over night the guests of Mrs. Hannah Ansell. Mr. Morgan reports the condition in Cokeville as being most favorable, not a case of the flu now in the town.

The Afton schools reopened last Monday and as quickly closed again on Wednesday after 32 new cases of the flu had developed. This information was divulged by a resident of the place to Chief Rand Groo yesterday.

source: Montpelier Examiner. (Montpelier, Idaho), 13 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Republican. December 13, 1918, Page 1

19181213TIR1

Further Modification of Quarantine Proclamation

Whereas, on November 27, 1918, the president of the council of the City of Blackfoot, by virtue of authority vested in him by law, issued and caused to be published a general quarantine proclamation and promulgated rules to be observed in the City of Blackfoot and within a radius of five miles thereof for prevention of the spread of Spanish influenza, which rules on December 4 were modified by the mayor to the extent of no longer requiring the wearing of gauze masks, and

Whereas, conditions have improved to such an extent as to justify a further modification of said proclamation,

Now, therefore, it is hereby ordered: That on and after Monday, Dec. 16, 1918 it shall not be necessary to observe or comply with any of the rules or provisions in said proclamation contained, except those requiring absolute quarantine of places where influenza is known to exist, and as to such quarantine provisions the said proclamation shall be and remain in full force and effect until the further order of the mayor or council.

Dated at Blackfoot, December 12, 1918.
A. B. Stephens, Mayor.
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19181213TIR2Schools Will Open Monday, Dec. 16
Special Nurses at Each Building.
Arrangements for Exceptional Ventilation.

Professor Vincent announces that school will open Monday as the epidemic is sufficiently under control now to make the opening of school safe. Special nurses will be in service at each building and each student, including high school students, will be examined four times a day and any sign of any disease whatsoever will compel the student in particular to go home and remain until completely recovered.

The attendance will not be enforced at this time, but on the other hand will be entirely optional with the parents. Parents are urged to send the children properly clothed in warm protective clothing in order that rooms may be thoroly [sic] and properly ventilated at all times. Furnaces will be kept going at full blast all the time to insure comfort and that together with proper ventilation it is thought will guard and make safe the health of all children.
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Death of Russel Sewell

Russell Sewell departed this life on Wednesday morning at 1 o’clock, after a long battle with influenza. He was nearly recovered at one time, but unfortunately took a relapse and suffered long and hard. He had much to live for and he battled hard for life, but failed. He leaves a wife and family, friends and business that will miss him. Not many months ago he lost his father and mother only a few days apart, and recently a relative visited his home and while there died of influenza, so the hand of death has rested heavily on the Sewell home. …
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Improving

Mr. Frank Spanbauer, who has been very ill with influenza at his home east of town, is improving.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 13 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Republican. December 13, 1918, Page 2

Springfield

School opened last Monday, but the attendance was very light.

David Wiltamuth of Grandview died Wednesday afternoon, Dec. 4, of pneumonia following influenza. With his death this valley lost one of its most progressive farmers, an honest, straightforward businessman, and a friend of sterling worth. … The deceased is survived by his wife, two sons and a daughter. Mrs. Wiltamuth is ill with influenza at the present writing. …

Mrs. R. R. Davis is suffering from a relapse, after an attack of influenza.

Dallas Wells is reported ill with influenza.
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Rose

Miss Melba Norman, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Norman was on the sick list last week.

Mrs. H. A. Gardner has been ill for the past few days.
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Jameston

There were several loads of coal hauled to the school house last week.

It is thought that school will not start until after the holidays.

Mr. and Mrs. Jim Poulson are ill with the flu. At this writing their conditions is not serious.

Mrs. Leon Hampton of Shelley is very will with the influenza. She has three sisters and one brother in Jameston. …

Mrs. J. C. Bolander of Shelley was in Jameston Monday. Mrs. Bolander in nursing the influenza patients at the Hampton home.
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Kimball

Mrs. William Anthony has returned from Ririe, where she has been taking care of relatives, who have been suffering with influenza.

The Sanders family are suffering with the influenza at present.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 13 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Meridian Times., December 13, 1918, Page 1

19181213MT1

Editorial Mention.

The farm bureau meetings scheduled for Meridian and other parts of Ada county, have been postponed on account of the influenza.

Hon. Addison T. Smith, representative from Idaho, has introduced a bill in congress to grant to every honorably discharged soldier, sailor, and marine, the uniform he is wearing at the time of such discharge and to provide pay for ninety days after such discharge.

source: The Meridian Times. (Meridian, Idaho), 13 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Meridian Times., December 13, 1918, Page 2

19181213MT2
All Corners of the Earth
Complete History of the Past Week Told in Paragraphs – Prepared for the Busy Reader

Intermountain.

Extension of the influenza ban to forbid public dances, mass meetings, community singing, conventions and crowding in theatre lobbies was announced at Seattle by the city health officer. Theatres and churches will remain open.
— —

Domestic.

A wireless appeal for medical aid to check a serious epidemic of influenza in the Society Islands, situated in the South Pacific ocean approximately 3000 miles from San Francisco, has been received.

Because of the influenza epidemic, the annual convention of the Investment Bankers’ Association of America, scheduled to be held at St. Louis, has been transferred to Atlantic City, N. J., to be held December 9, 10 and 11, inclusive.

source: The Meridian Times. (Meridian, Idaho), 13 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Meridian Times., December 13, 1918, Page 7

Salt Lake Lifts Influenza Ban.

By unanimous action of the state and city health boards, at a joint meeting December 6, orders looking to the control of the Spanish influenza epidemic were modified to raise the ban against the opening of churches and places of amusement. The former were permitted to open Sunday December 8, for all regular religious and Sunday school sessions, and the latter may give performances beginning Monday, December 9. The order is operative in Salt Lake City only.

source: The Meridian Times. (Meridian, Idaho), 13 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Meridian Times., December 13, 1918, Page 8

Meridian News Notes

At a meeting of the Rural high school board it has been decided not to reopen the school at this place until Dec. 30th, when it is hoped all danger from the influenza will be over.

The churches opened Sunday with a fair attendance and Monday the grade school was started. About two-thirds the normal number of scholars were on hand. No bad effects have resulted from opening the schools.

The family of A. L. Nichols living southeast of town are ill with the influenza.

Alta Whiteley, the daughter of Amos Whiteley, is ill at her home with influenza.

Joe Curtis, who returned Monday from Camp Cole, Gettysburg, Pa., is ill at his home on Pine street, in Meridian, with Spanish influenza.

Clara and Edith Humphrey, daughters of Guy Humphrey, are quarantined at their home with diphtheria.

O. Singrey, who gave up his job at the Meridian water works pumping station one day this week and went home with the influenza, is much improved.

source: The Meridian Times. (Meridian, Idaho), 13 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

Battle Ridge School – 1918

SchoolBattleRidgeSchool1918PBC-a

Dist No 25, March 4, 1918
Battle Ridge – T31N, R4E, S02 – Southeast of Stites on ridge Northeast of Harpster

courtesy: ‎Penny Bennett Casey, Idaho County GenWeb
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The Daily Star-Mirror., December 13, 1918, Page 1

19181213DSM2

19181213DSM3
Moscow Citizens Given Warning
Practically a Quarantine Placed on Those Having Disease in Homes

There have been 10 new cases of influenza reported so far this week as compared with 11 last week, 26 the week before and 39 the previous week. The number of cases reported this week includes two just outside the city limits. None are reported in the university.

In order to prevent the spread of the disease again, Dr. Adair, city health officer, has made a ruling that persons who have influenza in their homes must not go out on the street or mingle with others and are not to get out until given a physician’s certificate. This is virtually a quarantine, but it leaves the matter largely to the honor of the persons affected. His order follows:

“In order to free the city of remaining influenza, all persons having influenza in the city will be from this date, required to have a permit from their attending physician, stating that he no longer recognizes any contagion or danger in the patient mingling with the public before the individual will be permitted to come up town and go into public places or private homes. Parties having no physician, yet having suspicious cases or the so-called severe cold, etc., in their homes, will be expected to co-operate and thus protect the public.

“The epidemic has not increased any this week, so far, there has been 10 cases reported. But we must not slacken our efforts to clear the city of what cases we have. I would especially call your attention to the article by Surgeon General blue in last night’s Star-Mirror in which he warns against the crowd and sneezing or coughing without the use of the handkerchief.”
— —

19181213DSM4
Influenza Ban Is Put On In Palouse
Neighboring Town Has Return of Disease With Several Recent Deaths

During the past week the influenza coupled with the pneumonia, which in so many cases follows in its wake, has taken a heavy toll in life in the Inland Empire. For the first time since the disease made its appearance last fall, it reached a point during the week in this community where it may be considered an epidemic, several dozen cases developing. So far, however, there have not been more than two deaths in the community which were directly traceable to influenza, speaking well for the care given the patients by the local physicians who are doing everything in their power to combat the disease, and for the nursing given in the individual cases, usually be members of the family, as it is impossible to secure trained nurses.

At the meeting of the city council last Thursday night, sitting as a board of health, with Dr. W. S. Dartt, city health officer, present, it was decided by unanimous vote to put the ban on all public gatherings again. The churches, schools, theatres, etc., are therefore closed until such time as the officials may deem it safe to lift the ban.

That the disease may be communicable from one person to any number of others who may be in the same room, was proven beyond a doubt the latter part of last week when a dozen or more high school pupils took sick within 24 hours, some one of their number evidently having spread the disease at school either Thursday or Friday morning. All but two members of the sophomore class now have the disease, and all but one member of the high school glee club.

It is estimated now that there are 50 cases in the town, many of them, however, well on the way to recovery, while others have taken down within the past 24 hours. It is believed, however, that the disease has passed the peak here, and the physicians report that there are no serious cases. It is desired that every precaution be taken and it is believed that the people generally are closely following out the rules laid down at the beginning of the epidemic by the state board of health.

– Palouse Republic.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 13 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., December 13, 1918, Page 2

The university faculty acted wisely when it postponed the opening of the short courses one week in order that Moscow might be thoroughly cleansed of influenza. It will mean a larger attendance and with less danger. It is now the duty of Moscow citizens to “clean up” the town and have it free from the contageon [sic] by the time the short courses open and then invite the people of Idaho to attend. The university is doing its part. Lets us do ours.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 13 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., December 13, 1918, Page 3

Second Quarter Opens January 6
Class B Men Being Examined Preparatory to Discharge

The opening of the second quarter at the University of Idaho has been postponed from December 30 to January 6 in order that the town may be entirely rid of influenza when the quarter opens. The conditions here show such marked improvement that it is believed by waiting another week the town will be entirely free of the contageon [sic]. …
— —

19181202DSM3
City News

Mrs. Flora Harrison of Kendrick arrived in Moscow yesterday to be with her grand-daughter, Mrs. W. L. Clauson, who is very ill with influenza.
— —

Cornwall School is Open

School opened in the Cornwall district December 2nd, and though the attendance has been small, no new cases of influenza have developed.

Herbert Walker, son of John Walker, living east of Moscow, returned from Lewiston yesterday ill with influenza.

Sol Peiffer returned yesterday to Santes, Wash., where his daughter is ill with influenza.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 13 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., December 13, 1918, Page 4

Leopold Monick is Dead at Bovill
Man Who Forged Check on Father Pecoul is Victim of Pneumonia

Leopold Monick, who was under parole from the district court, died at Bovill Sunday of influenza followed by pneumonia. Charles Summerfield, deputy city marshal, went to Bovill to identify him at the request of the Moscow State bank. Mr. Summerfield returned to Moscow last night and says the dead man is Monick. …
— —

Genesee Couple Stricken On Trip
Husband Dies and Wife is Very Ill at Wallace – Funeral at Genesee

Wallace, Idaho. – Among strangers and very ill with influenza, Mr. and Mrs. Henry Morisch arrived in Wallace last Saturday and were taken to a local hospital for treatment. Yesterday the husband passed away and his wife is critically ill with pneumonia.

Mr. and Mrs. Morisch operated a ranch at Cameron, Idaho, and as far as could be learned were on their way to Spokane or Canada to visit relatives. When they reached Wallace they were too ill to continue their trip.

The mother of the deceased arrived yesterday from Spokane where she was visiting, her home being in Canada. Mr. Morisch will arrive today. Charles Spurbeck, and uncle of the sick woman, arrived in the city last night. They will remain in the city until Mrs. Morisch’s condition is more favorable. Later they will take the body of the deceased to Genesee, the former home of the couple, for burial. The deceased was 31 year of age.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 13 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

Shoshone Journal. December 13, 1918, Page 1

19181213SJ1

Dietrich.

Besslen schools closed again last Tuesday on account of the prevalence of the influenza.

Miss Myrtle Borden who has been suffering from a severe case of pneumonia in the hospital at Pocatello, is reported better this Thursday. For some days her recovery was considered very doubtful.

O. E. Borden has been in Pocatello thus far this week at the bedside of his daughter, Myrtle.

Several members of the Fred Rutherford family are suffering with the influenza.
— —

Wood River Center Grange.

School district No. 29 is still going and no new cases of the flu yet.

Clarence Butler has been on the sick list this week.

source: Shoshone Journal. (Shoshone, Idaho), 13 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Shoshone Journal. December 13, 1918, Page 7

Idaho State News

A. C. Lillard, city health officer of Nampa, reports no new influenza cases have developed and that within a few days from 20 to 25 cases now under quarantine would be released.

The formal opening of the Carnation Milk company’s condensery at Nampa, which was to be held during the middle of December, has been postponed indefinitely on account of the Spanish influenza epidemic.

source: Shoshone Journal. (Shoshone, Idaho), 13 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — —

Shoshone Journal. December 13, 1918, Page 8

Died of Influenza.

Anton M. Peterson died Wednesday at American Falls of influenza. He was the son of S. M. Peterson who resides on the Dill ranch, and was 19 years, 10 months and 9 days old at the time of his death. The remains were shipped to Shoshone and the funeral will take place Friday afternoon at the family home. Mr. Peterson was a young and of promising future and his untimely death will be mourned by a host of friends who held him in high esteem.
— —

Died of Influenza.

Fred Monson has been notified that Florence Jones, daughter of Mrs. Josie Monson Jones, is dead of influenza at the Seattle home of the Jones’. Also that Miss Laura Monson is dangerously ill with the disease.

source: Shoshone Journal. (Shoshone, Idaho), 13 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

Glenwood School – 1917

SchoolGlenwoodSchool1917PBC-a

Dist No 72, November 27, 1917
Glenwood/Morris – T34N, R5E, S33

courtesy: ‎Penny Bennett Casey, Idaho County GenWeb
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December 14

The Daily Star-Mirror., December 14, 1918, Page 1

19181214DSM1

School Children Buy Many Stamps
District No. 23 Claims Record For War Savings Stamp Purchases

School district No. 23, of Latah county, claims the championship for a school of that size (18 pupils) in war savings and thrift stamp purchases. Since school opened on October 1, these pupils have bought $157 worth of he stamps, notwithstanding the fact that the school was closed six weeks, having closed on account of influenza on October 21. …

Miss Brumm, the teacher, is encouraging the pupils in their war work and takes pride in their success. She came to Moscow when the school was closed by influenza and acted as a volunteer nurse for influenza patients here. She has had one year’s training in the east as a nurse and this came in good play. She nursed eight sick students at the home of Mr. and Mrs. F. L Moore and then went to the A. K. E. fraternity house where she with another girl, nursed 30 patients until she was taken down with the disease and narrowly escaped death. Her school opened again two weeks ago and there has been a full attendance since.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 14 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., December 14, 1918, Page 2

The influenza situation in Moscow certainly shows great improvement and with the more rigid regulations announced yesterday closely observed, it will be possible to have a town entirely free of the disease by Christmas. That will be the finest Christmas present Moscow could have.
— —

Flu Worse at Genesee.

It was learned by telephone this afternoon that Genesee has a new outbreak of influenza, a large number of new cases being reported there. It is thought Genesee can handle the situation without any outside help, but some alarm is felt and it is thought best to warn people of the new outbreak at that place.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 14 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., December 14, 1918, Page 3

19181202DSM3
City News

Mr. Bleeker of Spokane, general manager of the Washington Water Power company, died Monday of influenza. Mr. Bleeker often made trips to Moscow in the interests of the company.

Two quilts loaned to the Red Cross by some Moscow women during the influenza epidemic have lost their identification tags, and the owners can not be found. The quilts are now on the front porch at 115 Van Buren and anyone who cares to may see them there to find out where they belong.

Elmer Desvoigne returned yesterday from Spokane where he left Mr. and Mrs. Louie Desvoigne recovering nicely from the influenza.

Ross Reeder, son of Mr. and Mrs. R. R. Reeder, returned today from Seattle on a sick leave. Ross is with the merchant marines of the U. S. Shipping board and is just recovering from the influenza. His furlough is good until December 28.

Word has been received that Herbie Knox, of Princeton, died in France of influenza. His mother, Mrs. Jessie Knox, is a widow whose home is in Princeton.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 14 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The “New” Kooskia High School – 1918

SchoolKooskiaHighSchool1918PBC-a

Dist No 36, March 7, 1918

courtesy: ‎Penny Bennett Casey, Idaho County GenWeb
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December 16

The Daily Star-Mirror., December 16, 1918, Page 1

19181216DSM1

19181216DSM2
Fourteen Catch Influenza At Dance
City Health Officer Tells of Dangers From Christmas Festivities

Dr. W. A. Adair, city health officer, issues a warning against having parties and dances during the Christmas week and tells of an instance where every one of 14 attendants at a party in a neighboring town caught the influenza from one young man. Dr. Adair says no new cases have been reported to him by local doctors since last Friday. He has had no official notice of the disease being in the Hall and Moore homes as they had not been reported to him. Dr. Adair said:

“As the holiday season draws near with all its gaieties, I must ask the public to be very careful, not only for the sake of your own family gatherings but for others as well. I have been asked by a number already for the privilege of having a small party or dance and wish to submit the following for your consideration, which I obtained from a reliable citizen of one of our neighboring cities:

“‘A short time ago a young lady of our city gave a party to fourteen of her friends, and dancing and games were participated in. One of the young men was not feeling well and later proved to have been in the first stages of the influenza. In a short time every one of the fourteen guests came down with the disease.

“This we have as another example of how dangerous it is to assemble with indoor crowds, as there is nearly always a possibility of some one being present who thinks he has just a bad cold, but which may prove very serious to those exposed.”
— —

19181216DSM3
Heroic Women Are Volunteer Nurses
Many Women Neglecting Their Own Work to Care For Sick of Influenza

The present siege of influenza is bringing out many examples of sacrifice and real heroism. The shortage of nurses and help during sickness is being met in many cases by people who are giving their services gratis and who are leaving their own home duties to help where people are in distress from this dread disease. One Moscow woman with the assistance of her two daughters, has helped with the nursing in home after home. She has given her services and energies, to almost the point of exhaustion, but taking turns night after night of wearing watching and serving. And for all this they ask nothing but the privilege of serving suffering humanity.

Even the travelers are helping where the call is imperative.

Mrs. H. F. Preston, whose husband represents the Burnett Extract company, and who as a bride is making the trip of the Inland Empire with her husband, helped out the situation at Oakesdale. When they arrived nurses were badly needed but there were none to be had. Mrs. Preston offered her services and for two days and nights took care of a family of eight who were all down with influenza. She stayed until other help could be secured.

Another traveling woman, on stepping from the train at Nezperce, was accosted with the inquiry, “Was she the nurse that was expected,” and on replying in the negative was informed that they did not know what was to be done for a family who were all sick with influenza, as all the well were helping, who were not too afraid of the disease. This woman replied that she would assist for the night at least, and immediately took charge, and stayed with the job until the expected nurse arrived.

So many real heroes are helping in these trying times. The world holds many hearts who are touched with the sufferings of others and are not too busy with their own plans to halt a bit and lend a hand.
— —

Uniontown Woman Died In Spokane
Wife of Banker Leaves Husband and Young Daughter – Influenza Victim

Mrs. Katherine Button, age 29, died at her home in Uniontown yesterday of pneumonia following the influenza. She was the wife of Charles A. Button, cashier of the Farmers State bank of that place, … She is survived by a husband, a daughter age 2, and her aunt, Mrs. Scott. …

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 16 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., December 16, 1918, Page 3

19181202DSM3
City News

Dr. Herrington returned Sunday from Kendrick.

Mrs. A. J. Gehrett went to Troy today, called by the illness of her grandchildren with influenza.

E. E. Crandall, traveling representative of the Pacific Telephone & Telegraph company, spent Sunday in Moscow. Mr. Crandall had spent two weeks at Walla Walla helping out there during the influenza epidemic when a great part of the office force of the telephone exchange was sick with the flu or quarantined.

Two small children of Sam Hall, of the post office force, Oliver and Woodrow Hal, are ill with influenza at the family home on Sixth street.

The children of Mr. and Mrs. Pren Moore have the influenza in a mild form.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 16 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Harpster School – 1918

schoolHarpsterSchool1918PBC-a

Dist No 37, April 17, 1918
Harpster – T31N, R4E, S33

courtesy: ‎Penny Bennett Casey, Idaho County GenWeb
— — — — — — — — — —

December 17

American Falls Press. December 17, 1918, Page 1

19181217AFP1

Influenza Condition Is Greatly Improved
Ban Removed From Business Houses Saturday and Picture Shows Permitted to Operate Under Restrictions – Few New Cases Develop.

The ten day closing ordinance expired by limitation Saturday night and restrictions on business houses were now renewed. The ban on picture shows was partially removed, but meetings are still under the ban. It is believed they may be removed so that churches may resume Sunday.

Picture shows are allowed to operate on condition that not to exceed half the seating capacity is utilized, and the audience kept scattered. The shows have been closed for about two months.

Flu conditions show a marked improvement, there being very few new cases, and fewer serious ones. All who have been seriously ill are improving. There are three new cases in the family of S. E. Kramlich, and one case in the Bauman family in American Falls.

In some country sections the scourge is quite prevalent. Raft River has one or more sick in about every home. Conditions at Roy are improving and at Aberdeen there is a marked improvement. It is hoped that the worst is over and that the ban will soon be entirely raised.

source: American Falls Press. (American Falls, Idaho), 17 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

American Falls Press. December 17, 1918, Page 4

People and Events.

Flu or no flu, the children are not going to be robbed of their Christmas joys. There are going to be Christmas programs and probably church Christmas trees. The home festivities will be as numerous as ever.

One of the children of Chris Barbre, of Igo, is quite ill. The other children are improving. They have influenza.

Mrs. C. W. Stier and children were taken to the hospital this morning. Mrs. Stier is possibly a flu victim, but it is too early to be sure. Mrs. Stier and children were to have taken the noon train today for the coast, but it was thought best by Dr. Noth to detrain them until it is certain whether flu will develop or not. Mr. Stier left with a car of immigrants’ goods several days ago.
— —

“Flu” Test Case Dismissed.

The test case brought by the city of Los Angeles against five admitted members of the Fifth Church of Christian Science, to determine the validity of an ordinance enacted during the influenza epidemic to prevent holding of church services or other gatherings was dismissed in the court on motion of the city, over the protest of the defendants.

source: American Falls Press. (American Falls, Idaho), 17 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Idaho Republican. December 17, 1918, Page 1

19181217TIR1

19181217TIR2Idaho Is Free From Increase Of Influenza
Recrudescence of Epidemic Which is Noticeable in Other Places, not Apparent in Gem State; Disease Mild in Boise

“Experiences in other states seem to indicate that we may expect a recrudescence of Spanish influenza in Idaho, but so far reports to this office fail to indicate any increase in the state,” Dr. E. T. Biwer, secretary of the state board of health, stated Thursday.

Nothing in the regulation reports filed weekly by country health officers with the state health board indicates that influenza has begun ravages among school children, as it has in many places, according to a statement issued Wednesday by Surgeon General Rupert Blue of the United States public health service.

There were twenty-nine new influenza cases reported in Boise on Thursday, twenty-eight on Wednesday, ten on Tuesday and thirty on Monday. All of these cases except four were those of city people, none being from the outside. Dr. I. P. Pond, city physician, says that these cases are in a light form and that few fatalities are now occurring because of the disease.”

“It is generally noted,” he says, “that the first outbreak of influenza is marked by its virulent form; the disease later lessening in malignancy.”

Ignore Anonymous Warnings

Anonymous letters or telephone communications to the city board of health will hereafter not be given any consideration, according to Deputy Health Officer L. P. Pfirman. “These rumors invariably prove groundless,” says Mr. Pfirman, “and the investigation of them has caused us considerable work. One communication sent to us Thursday was sent special delivery. It caused Dr. Pond a long journey to South Boise and much inconvenience only to find that the patient in question was troubled with pleurisy. The letter was unsigned.”

Lemhi county is free from new cases, and no deaths have resulted so far this week, according to the county health officer’s report. In Jefferson county 102 new cases have developed this week, and there has been one death, an increase over the previous report.

Boundary county which had about sixty cases in the last report, has twenty-new new ones this week. Nez Perce county, including the city of Lewiston where it was feared the disease was getting a new grip, reports only seventy-five new cases so far this week.

Someone who misunderstood a newspaper heading which read, “Influenza Takes New Lease,” started a rumor Thursday that the influenza has appeared in a new and more deadly form. By noon the report was being quite generally circulated that the influenza had appeared in combination with the black plague and that victims of this combination die within two hours after infection. The news item over which the heading appeared stated that the influenza epidemic had not ended, and that Surgeon General Blue warned the country to take every precaution to prevent its recrudescence.
— —

Ida Edwards Passes Away

Ida, the beloved daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Edwards of Springfield, departed this life at the home of her parents, Friday morning, Dec. 13, after suffering for five long days with influenza. All that loving hands could do was done to save the precious life, just entering into the beauty of womanhood, and with all the good things of life yet before her. …

The remains were laid to rest in the Springfield cemetery Sunday.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 17 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Idaho Republican. December 17, 1918, Page 2

Jameston

Roy Leavete is very ill with the influenza.

Members of the Elmer Collins family are all ill with the flu.
— —

Mrs. Leon Hampton Passes Away

Mrs. Leon Hampton passed away last Tuesday of pneumonia following an attack of influenza.

Mrs. Hampton was loved and honored by all how knew her. She was a true wife and a loving mother. She leaves a devoted husband, four daughters … and five sons, …

A son, Golden, age eighteen years died of the same disease Wednesday night. The community extends their deepest sympathy to the bereaved ones.
— —

Sad News From California

Relatives in Jameston received a telegram Thursday, Dec. 15 from California, saying that Mrs. John Clark has died from an attack of influenza. Her body will be sent here for burial.

Mrs. Clark has been in very ill health for some time, but was thought o be improving.

Mr. Clark and daughter Zella are also very ill. This is sad news for friends and relatives in Jameston and it is sincerely hoped that the other members of the family will soon recover. …
— —

Thomas

Fred Bell is confined to his bed with an attack of the flu. Albert Bell and son are reported to be recovering from a similar attack.
— —

Sterling

The flu situation here does not seem to improve any. All those who have it now are getting along nicely.

Mrs. Beulah Wells is convalescing from her recent attack of the flu.

George Andrews is clerking in the J. W. Sprague store this week during the illness of Miss Verbick.

Mr. and Mrs. Julius Tiechert are both ill with the flu. Mrs. Tiechert is quite ill. Miss Margaret Driscoll is also ill with the same disease.

The Pubmire family are just recovering from the flu. All of the family came down with it at once, and no one was able to go for a doctor. Living in rather remote place no one knew they had it until they were nearly well.

Dr. Lynn of Pocatello was here Saturday to see Dr. Mote, who is very low.

Mrs. W. A. Edwards is ill with the flu. Mrs. Edwards has been very courageous about nursing flu patients ever since the epidemic began, and now has the disease herself. All the community are hoping for her speedy recovery.

Dr. McKinnon was here Sunday vaccinating patients for the flu. *
[*Note: this vaccine was not helpful.]

Bill Verbick is ill with the flu.

Mr. and Mrs. H. N. Wells and two children are very ill with the influenza.

Frank Parr is able to be out again after an attack of the flu.

M. A. Driscoll is ill with the flu.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 17 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Idaho Republican. December 17, 1918, Page 7

The Maple Grove schools opened this week.

At a meeting of the grade school board of Meridian Wednesday evening it was decided to open the grade school Monday morning.

Miss Augusta Schoonover, a prominent young woman of Caldwell, died at her home Sunday morning of influenza.

Word has just been received at Caldwell that Chester Simmons, a former Caldwell boy, is critically ill in a New York hospital with influenza. Mr. Simmons is third-class electrical on the U. S. S. Iroquois, and was returning to his ship from a furlough in Caldwell when he was attacked by the disease.

A. C. Lillard, city health officer for Nampa, reports no new influenza cases have developed and that within a few days from 20 to 25 cases now under quarantine would be released.
— —

Inland Northwest

In order to protect the regular passengers and to give the best service to its employees and their families who may be ill with the influenza, the Oregon Short Line has run a special hospital car into Boise for the last seven weeks.

Acting on instructions from the city health department, Chief of Police Jere Murphy of Butte has notified the undertakers that further restrictions had been placed on funerals. Under the new ruling, funeral processions may be comprised of only four vehicles in addition to the hearse and the car for pallbearers.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 17 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., December 17, 1918, Page 3

19181202DSM3

City News

Miss Lillian Goodwin, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Goodwin, is very seriously ill at their home on Orchard avenue, with pneumonia following influenza.

Sol Peiffer returned today from Santes, Wash., where he left Mrs. Peiffer well, and his daughter, Mrs. Ingram, recovering from influenza.

Miss Lillian Warren has returned from her school near Genesee, the school being closed on account of influenza.

Mrs. J. G. Gibson returned last evening from Spokane, where she left her son and family on the road to recovery from influenza.

Where would Moscow have been during the influenza epidemic without the Red Cross. Think of what the Red Cross did for the civilian population; and JOIN.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 17 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

Bonners Ferry Herald. December 17, 1918, Page 5

19181217BFH1

Idaho Children’s Home at Lewiston, Idaho, Needs Help

An appeal for help has come to the people of Boundary county this week from the Idaho Home Finding and Aid Society of Lewiston. Many local people have given to this institution in years past and will probably continue to do so. This year the needs are more urgent than ever before and it is necessary that there be more gifts. All money may be left at the Herald office or may be given or sent to Mrs. F. R. Richardson. The list of donations from this county is headed with a $10.00 subscription of the Methodist Ladies’ Aid society. …

“War time has given us an unusually large number to be cared for; at the same time the cost of living has increased to an alarming degree.

“To add to our problems the Spanish influenza has visited us and seventeen of our family have been afflicted. We were in quarantine for three week. I was compelled to come in from soliciting and take care of the sick. As a result we had to borrow $200.00 to meet our immediate needs and we will have to borrow more in a few days unless this money comes from somewhere. …
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Spokane Girl Nurses Miners
Miss Zelma Neitzel Offered Services In Spanish Influenza Epidemic

Miss Zelma Neitzel passed through the city Saturday evening on her way from the Idaho-Continental mine at Klockmann, to Spokane where she will spend the Christmas holidays. She was accompanied here by her brother-in-law, A. Klockmann, president and general manager of the Idaho-Continental Mining company.

For several weeks past many of the employees of the Idaho-Continental company have been seriously ill with the Spanish influenza and at the time it was impossible to take the sick people to a hospital on account of a long overland trip in bad weather and it was almost impossible to secure proper medical aid and nursing for the men. In this dilemma Miss Neitzel stepped in and offered her services and for weeks waited patiently and most efficiently upon the sick men, under trying conditions. Before Miss Neitzel left for her home in Spokane the men at the Idaho-Continental company’s mine decided that they would do something to show their great appreciation of the services and self-sacrifice of Miss Neitzel and so they made up a purse, every man giving something of his own freewill, and presented her with $232.00 with which she is to buy some article which she will keep as a token of the esteem and regard felt for her by the men of the Idaho-Continental.
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Died In Spokane Wednesday
Miss Vivian Chisholm Is Victim of the Spanish Influenza.

Miss Vivian Chisholm, the 17 year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. D. H. Chisholm, died early Wednesday morning at the Deaconess hospital in Spokane, of pneumonia which had been contracted from Spanish influenza. The body was brought here Thursday and the funeral services were held the same afternoon, …

The deceased went to Spokane several months ago to take a course in nursing at the Deaconess hospital. About ten days prior to her death she became a victim of the Spanish influenza and this later developed into pneumonia. Her condition became so serious last Monday that her relatives were called to Spokane and all her family were with her in her last hours. …

source: Bonners Ferry Herald. (Bonners Ferry, Idaho), 17 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Bonners Ferry Herald. December 17, 1918, Page 6

Idaho News Paragraphs
Recent Happenings in This State Given in Brief Items for Busy Readers

Generally the influenza situation is better in Grangeville. No steps have been taken as yet to lift the ban.

Influenza has claimed another victim at Grangeville when Charles G. Nail, age 53, died. He leaves a widow and five children.

The body of Henry Moersch of Cameron, Idaho, who died at a hospital in Wallace of pneumonia following influenza, was sent to Genesee for burial.

William Brunn died of influenza at St. Joe Saturday 26 hours after the death of his wife. The four children are recovering from the same disease.

New Flue [sic] rules have been made at Coeur d’Alene city. The recently organized board of health demands quarantine of influenza patients, that there be no Christmas fetes and that stores and pool halls open, but no loitering permitted, also puts ban on card games.
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Noble Work in Montana.

Helena, Mont. – The federal bureau of child and animal protection has asked civilian relief committees of the Red Cross in Montana to report cases of children left orphans and homeless through the influenza epidemic, in order that the bureau may take due steps for their relief.

source: Bonners Ferry Herald. (Bonners Ferry, Idaho), 17 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Bonners Ferry Herald. December 17, 1918, Page 12

Local News

Mrs. H. A. Gale was called to Sandpoint last week to attend her friend Mrs. Flynn, who is ill with the Spanish influenza.

Mrs. Eli Miller left last week for her home at Troy after having been here for some time attending her sister, Mrs. L. C. Felch, who was ill with the Spanish influenza.

source: Bonners Ferry Herald. (Bonners Ferry, Idaho), 17 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Clearwater School – 1918

SchoolClearwaterSchool1918PBC-a

Dist No 16, February 25, 1918

courtesy: ‎Penny Bennett Casey, Idaho County GenWeb
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December 18

The Daily Star-Mirror., December 18, 1918, Page 3

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19181202DSM3
City News

Sam. Hall of the postoffice force, is confined to his home with an attack of influenza. Mrs. Hall and two of the children also have the disease.

J. A. Sudderth, deputy postmaster, who has been sick with the influenza, is better and spends part of each day at his desk in the postoffice, but is still quite weak. Mrs. Sudderth has about recovered.

Harry Thatcher, who had the influenza and recovered sufficiently to be out on the street, is again confined to his home with the disease.

Mrs. R. B. Knepper, county school superintendent, visited a rural school near Potlatch yesterday. She had to drive from Moscow to Palouse to catch the train for Potlatch.

Miss Mary Jensen returned yesterday from St. John, Wash., where she was been teaching when the schools were in session. Miss Jensen is just recovering from a severe attack of influenza.

Mrs. Anna Colby went to Palouse yesterday to assist in nursing.

Mrs. E. E. Ostroot and Mrs. Dorothy Dahl left yesterday for Coeur d’Alene where they were called by the death of the wife of Rev. P. J. Luvaas, who is their nephew. Mrs. Luvaas died of influenza.

Mrs. Victor Helson went last evening to Kendrick to nurse an influenza patient.
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Deary Has Had Hard Siege of Influenza

The flu epidemic which has been raging around Deary, Bovill and all the surrounding logging camps for several week, until physicians, nurses and other attendants have been taxed beyond their capacity to attend to the sick ones, is now showing a let-up. The new cases are not occurring as fast as the number of convalescing ones.

The Moscow Red Cross has sent a box of slippers, bath robes, masks, etc., to the Deary Red Cross, which is a kindness much appreciated by the latter.

The highest number of sick in one family around Deary has been ten, and this without any help for two days, when they were all sick.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 18 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Tahoe Ridge School – 1917

SchoolTahoeRidgeSchool1917PBC-a

Dist No 29, October 15, 1917
Tahoe/Tahoe Ridge – T32N, R5E, S18

courtesy: ‎Penny Bennett Casey, Idaho County GenWeb
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December 19

The Grangeville Globe. December 19, 1918, Page 1

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Mrs. Hollenbeak Buried.

Undertaker A. J. Maugg returned last Friday evening from Riggins where he was called the day before to direct the funeral of Mrs. Cleveland Hollenbeak of that place who had passed away Thursday from Influenza. Mrs. Hollenbeak was 28 years old and is survived by her husband and two small children.

Mrs. Maugg accompanied her husband on the trip which was made by auto.
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Judge Scales Recovered.

After being confined to his home for practically two weeks with influenza, Judge Wallace N. Scales was able to be down town Tuesday afternoon for the first time. The judge shows the effects of his enforced confinement and appeared slightly wobbly on his pedal extremities. The entire population was gratified to see him out, however.
— —

Mr. and Mrs. I. E. Zuver of the Silver Grill were exceedingly fortunate in rapidly recovering from attacks of the flu. Just at the time they took over the grill the first wave of the epidemic broke out and restrictions by the state and county health boards were placed on many lines of business. Traveling by the general public fell off and the dining room at the Imperial Hotel was closed by the management, and was closely followed by the suspension of the Grangeville Hotel, owing to a change in the ownership of the premises, which left the Silver Grill the only place where the inner man could be given attention. Different employees were then afflicted in rapid succession, and their good fortune lies in the fact that they were both able to be on the job and were willing to do all in their power for the public.

The Sasenbery clothing and furnishing store has enjoyed an unusual patronage this season until the last outbreak of the flu, which has caused a lull in trade.

The Central Garage, although nearly every member of the force has been afflicted with the influenza, is enjoying a nice Christmas patronage. The concrete, fire-proof establishment is attractive to autoists.
— —

J. A. Peterson, of the postoffice force resumed his duties Tuesday of this week after a serious time with the flu. Mrs. Peterson and the two little boys have also fully recovered.
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Passing of Chas. G. Hail.
Pneumonia Claimed Another Victim Last Saturday Morning.

Charles G. Nail, for the past 20 years a resident of this section, died at his home in the city Saturday morning from pneumonia following an attack of influenza, at the age of 53 years. Mr. Nail had been sick for about a week before his death. He is survived by his wife and five children, three sons and two daughters. …
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Obituary

Miss Lefa LaVilla Martin, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. A. O. Martin of Cottonwood, was born March 6, 1904, at Cottonwood, and died December 17, 1918, at the age of 14 years, 9 months and 18 days. After an illness of only 10 days with influenza, she passed to the great beyond. …

source: The Grangeville Globe. (Grangeville, Idaho), 19 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Grangeville Globe. December 19, 1918, Page 5

Probate Court Matters.
Some Business Being Transacted Regardless of Influenza Conditions.

Business in the probate court of Idaho county is being conducted almost “as usual” by Probate Judge Wilbur Campbell. The influenza situation is holding up some matters of considerable importance, among them being an insanity case. …

In the matter of the estate of Edward Henley, an insane man, letters of guardianship were petitioned for Monday by William Henley, a brother, for the purpose of making final proof on the former’s homestead. On account of the Northern Idaho sanitarium at Orofino not receiving patients during the epidemic, Edward Henley is being held in custody at the county jail. Attorney F. E. Fogg represented the petitioner. …

source: The Grangeville Globe. (Grangeville, Idaho), 19 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Grangeville Globe. December 19, 1918, Page 8

Geo. Wikoff who suffered a second attack of the flu, and was very ill, is now again recovering.

Miss Alice Erskine having closed her school, is home again for a time. She will probably resume teaching again elsewhere, when the school are reopened.

Mrs. Mat Geary and children are late victims of the flu. It is in a very mild form however, and it is expected that they will not suffer great inconvenience from it.

Chas. Jewell, who has been ill with the flu has sufficiently recovered to take the train out of here Tuesday morning leaving for Spokane, where he has been offered lucrative employment.

R. M. Hattabaugh was unable to leave his bed Tuesday morning, the popular affliction having attacked him. However, it is stated that his case is not a severe one. He is expected to be around again in the regulation period.

With very few exceptions all the flu patients that were considered seriously ill a short time ago are rapidly breaking out of confinement. Chas. Kunze is doing very nicely as are a number of others. There are only two patients in the local hospital.

Frank Gillett is about again after a serious time with the flu. Frank looks some the worse for the wear, but says he feels good, only his legs become a little unruly when ascending or descending stairs, almost refusing to use the brake on the down grade.

Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Cone have broken away from the clutches of the flu and Charlie has been seen on the streets for a day or two. Rural carrier Early Whetstine was discharged from the hospital this week and will soon resume his labors, and Clyde Price is also about to be around again.

S. W. Hunter came in on last evening’s Salmon river stage from the home of Ralph Russell who lives up the river above White Bird, where he has been for the past week installing a gas lighting system. He did not finish the work entirely on account of the family being afflicted with the influenza.

Mrs. Joe Sorrow returned early this week from Portland where she was called by the illness of her son William. After seeing to the fact that he had every care she returned to find her son Joe and little daughter had been taken with the disease last Sunday. They were all getting along well at this time.

A. R. Harlan returned from Portland late last week where he has been for six weeks attending his two sons, Ray and Paul, who were stricken with the pneumonia, following influenza. The boys have recovered but are very weak, being able at the time of Mr. Harlan’s return, barely able to walk out a short distance with the aid of a cane.

County Attorney elect, B. Auger, arranged his personal affairs about the city late last week and immediately engaged a private room at the local hospital, for the purpose of combating an attack of the influenza that he felt was rapidly approaching. While Mr. Auger is quite ill his condition is not considered alarming. By taking the case in time Mr. Auger feels that his confinement will be of short duration.

Fred Lyda, of the Central Garage, was on the street today, his first appearance since being attacked by the flu. He is feeling pretty good and will soon have forgotten all about the event.

source: The Grangeville Globe. (Grangeville, Idaho), 19 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Lincoln County Times., December 19, 1918, Page 2

19181219LCT1

Hawaii Escapes Ravages of ‘Flu.’

Honolulu, T. H. – (By mail) – Hawaii thus far has entirely escaped the Spanish influenza, which has been epidemic over most of the world. With reports of the ravages of the disease reaching here from both sides of the Pacific, the states and Japan and Siberia, every precaution was taken to keep it out of the islands. A number of trans-Pacific liners with the influenza on board were held in close quarantine while in port, although a few critical cases were taken to local hospitals and a large number of the crew of a Japanese liner were treated here until they recovered.

An epidemic was particularly dreaded here because of the high mortality it undoubtedly would have caused among the native Hawaiians, who are peculiarly susceptible to influenza and related diseases.

source: Lincoln County Times. (Jerome, Idaho), 19 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Emmett Index. December 19, 1918, Christmas Edition, Page 3

19181219EI1

Letters To Santa Claus
Pupils of Lincoln School Tell of Their Christmas Desires.

Second and Third Grades.

Dear Santa Clause: I would like you to visit the French, Belgium and English children. Say, don’t you forget me. I have been a good boy. But when you come wake me up and I will see my things. I want a twenty-two, and a steam engine, and I want a wagon, some Billy goats and some harness. But were you killed? My papa said you were killed, so you wouldn’t come to see me. – Joe Tyler.

Dear Santa Claus: I hope you didn’t get killed in the war. I want a tractor. I want a pair of boxing gloves. I want a goat and want a football. – James Wills.

Dear Santa Claus: I wish you would visit me. I wish you would think of the French, Belgium and English children. I wish you would bring me a box of B B.s and I wish you would bring me a thrift stamp. That will be all this year. – Johnnie Danielson.

Dear Santa Claus: I would like a pair of ice skates and an air gun. I didn’t want you to get killed in the war, because some of the children said you were. – Dell Carpenter.
— —

County School Enrollment.

Gem County schools have a total enrollment of 1984 pupils. Of these 1114 are in the Emmett district.

source: The Emmett Index. (Emmett, Idaho), 19 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Emmett Index. December 19, 1918, Christmas Edition, Page 10

Emmett News

Mrs. Frank Knox, who has been ill with Spanish influenza, is reported as greatly improved, and the quarantine has been raised. Chris Peterson has been in charge of affairs at the hotel during the absence of Mr. Knox, who remained at home during her illness.

During the past year only three deaths from pneumonia occurred in Gem County, according to C. D. Bucknum. This is a very low average and emphasizes the healthfulness of this section.

A letter from Henry Thompson at Umatilla, Ore., states that the entire family is sick with the flu.

source: The Emmett Index. (Emmett, Idaho), 19 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Emmett Index. December 19, 1918, Christmas Edition, Page 12

Letha

Ed Bott was on the sick list last week with a case of what appeared to [be] a case of flu. He has recovered.

Mrs. John Wilton has been a sufferer with the flu this week. she is at present much improved though weak. Her son Will was taken ill first but the attending physician did not call his a case of flu, he has recovered.

The School Trustees held the regular December meeting Monday. It was decided to bring the question of a change in the site for schoolhouse to a vote of the district, Jan. 11, to get the will of the people on it.
— —

Ola

Mrs. Foster is on the sick list this week.

It is reported that Walter Blessinger and his wife both have the Flu. They are being nursed by Mrs. Blessinger’s mother, Mrs. Hoyt.

Mr. and Mrs. Fred Allen are on the sick list this week.

Church services have been discontinued until after New Year’s on account of the Flu.
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Bramwell
By E. F. Wells.

School was resumed again Monday after an enforced vacation of eight weeks.
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South Slope
By Mrs. C. W. Cook

Harry and Lewis Harvey are home from the Canyon canal work, and both are ill with either flu or the grip, which has not been determined yet. In either case, the quick application of treatment always brings good results, and it is hoped the flu will not invade South Slope.
— —

Central Mesa
Regina Conrad

Mrs. Bayston was on the sick list Monday and was unable to teach school.

Leon Aston also has the influenza.

source: The Emmett Index. (Emmett, Idaho), 19 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Idaho County Free Press. December 19, 1918, Page 1

19181219ICFP1

19181219ICFP2
Five Deaths In Week Due To Influenza
Three Succumb at Cottonwood, One in Grangeville, One Winona
Charles G. Nail Summoned
Jesse McKinley, Fred Rustemeyer, Lefa L. Martin and Helmuth Lage Are Dead.

Five deaths from influenza-pneumonia is the week’s toll in Idaho county. The dead are:

Charles G. Nail, Grangeville.
Jesse M. M’Kinley, Cottonwood.
Fred Rustemeyer, Cottonwood.
Lefa L. Martin, Cottonwood.
Helmuth Lage, Winona.

Cottonwood has been hardest hit by the plague, three deaths having occurred there, and some serious cases are said to still exist.

In Grangeville, where one death has occurred, few new cases have been reported during the week.

Patients in Whitebird and other parts of the Salmon river country are convalescent.

The Winona country has been seriously affected by the malady. Many cases are reported from there. …
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Odd Fellows’ Meet Postponed
Grand Lodge Will Not Be Held Until January.

Meeting of the grand lodge of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, scheduled to meet in October and postponed at that time to December because of the prevalence of influenza, has again been postponed to some time in January according to word from Boise. The exact date will be set by the grand master. The grand encampment and the Rebekah state assembly will be held at the same time.

source: Idaho County Free Press. (Grangeville, Idaho Territory), 19 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Idaho County Free Press. December 19, 1918, Page 2

Many More Send Yule Letters To Santa

Has Had The Influenza.

Grangeville, Idaho. Dec. 10, 1918.

Dear Santa Claus:

Bring me a sled and a bag of marbles and a top that you can spin with a string and some candy, a pair of skates. I do not want much. I am 8 years old and had the flu. You want to be awfully careful when you come in.

Your friend, Betty Jane Yates.
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Lives On Whitebird Hill

Grangeville, Ida. Dec. 15, 1918

Dear Santa:

I am 7 years old and am writing this letter all by myself. I live on top of Whitebird hill. I am so glad you haven’t got the influenza and are able to visit all of us little girls and boys this year again. We are all awfully glad to have you come but Santa, please don’t forget the poor little girls and boys in France and Belgium. This is my list I want you to bring me for Christmas. A little piano, a doll buggy for my big dolls, a little tin wash tub and a wash boiler and a wash board to wash my dollies clothes with.

Please Santa, don’t forget to stop at our house. I will have some nice grain hay for your reindeers to eat, and Santa be sure to come down the kitchen stove pipe ’cause the other pipe is too small for you to come down. I will have the pipe all clean and nice.

With lots of love and a Merry Christmas to you.

Hazel Buffilam.
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Wants a Wrist Watch.

Grangeville, Ida.

Dear Santa:

I do not want very much as some other boys and girls. All I want is a wrist watch and some candy. I think I would like a top too. I hope you do not get the influenza. It would be an awful thing for some boys and girls need you very bad. I think I will close. Hoping you a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year.

Jessie Yates.
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Wants Camping Ax.

Grangeville, Idaho. Dec. 15, 1918.

Dear Santa:

I hope that you haven’t had the flu yet. I heard that some of your workers have gone to war, so I don’t want much this year. I want a camping ax and a wrist watch and lots of nuts and mixed candy. Your friend,

Albert A. Turner.
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Haven’t The Flu At Fenn.

Fenn, Ida. Dec 13, 1918.

Dear Santa Claus:

I saw your ad in the Free Press for letters from the little boys and girls. Well Santa I would like a nice big Teddy Bear. As I have a doll and buggy I would like a Teddy Bear and some candy and nuts.

From your little friend, Annie Zehner.

P. S. Santa I live in Fenn and we haven’t got the flu.
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Papa Has The Flu.

Whitebird, Ida.

Dear Santa Claus:

I am 8 years old. I have gone to school for two years. My teacher’s name is Miss Fry. I am not going to school now as my papa has the flu. I want you to bring me a train and a bee-bee gun. My little sister wants a doll.

I will close. Hoping we have lots of snow by Christmas.

Alvin Kenney.
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Santa To Remember Homeless

Grangeville, Idaho.

Dear Santa Claus:

I want a nice doll and some candy and nuts. If you have lots of toys and candy send them to Europe to the homeless children.

With love, Minnie Stanberry.
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Writes From Nezperce.

Nezperce, Ida. Dec. 17, 1918.

Dear Santa Claus:

How are you? I want a toy tool chest if you have any to spare. I have been a good boy. I don’t want much. Let the poor French and Belgian children have it. I want a little candy. I am 8 years old and I am in the third grade.

Yours truly, Hayden Samuel Gordon.
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Dolly and Cradle.

Grangeville, Ida. Dec. 18, 1918.

Dear Santa Claus:

I am so glad you have not had the influenza. I thought you wouldn’t be here this year on account of the war. I have already received two presents – pair of slippers and a wagon, so you will not have to bring me those, Santa Claus. But what I would like to have a doll cradle and a bed for my dolly, and I would like a baby doll with a long dress just like a real baby. I would like to have one or two books. I shall have the chimney good and clean and will have my stocking near the big heating stove.

Wishing you a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year. From Dorothy G. Stockton.
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Mama Has The Flu.

Dear Santa:

I want a big doll and a sweater for my mama. She has the flu.

Dorothy Dale Brock.

source: Idaho County Free Press. (Grangeville, Idaho Territory), 19 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Idaho County Free Press. December 19, 1918, Page 4

Ferdinand

Mrs. Cole of Nezperce visited her sister, Miss Borghill Huff who has been very ill with influenza.

Mr. McMurray and children are victims of the influenza this week.

Mrs. G. H. Hammer and children are ill with the influenza.

source: Idaho County Free Press. (Grangeville, Idaho Territory), 19 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Idaho County Free Press. December 19, 1918, Page 5

Whitebird

Mrs. Alice Reeves, who had been up the river nursing relatives who had influenza, returned home Monday.

Dick Wyatt, who has been nursing Mr. Berry, returned from Lewiston Tuesday. Mr. Wyatt reports that Mr. Berry has left the hospital and is getting along nicely.

Influenza patients are all on the mend. There are not new cases at present.

(From Last Week)

Al McGie of Asaka, Ida., who is here helping with the construction of the bridge across Salmon river, was taken to Grangeville Wednesday to the hospital. He is afflicted with influenza.
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Clearwater

(From Last Week.)

Schools opened Monday after several weeks’ vacation.

source: Idaho County Free Press. (Grangeville, Idaho Territory), 19 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Idaho County Free Press. December 19, 1918, Page 8

Personal

J. A. Peterson has recovered from Spanish influenza, and is again at his duties in the local postoffice.

A. R. Wiley, who has been ill with Spanish influenza, has suffered a relapse, and again is confined to his bed.

Henry Telcher, county clerk, auditor and recorder, is confined to his home by illness.

William C. Graham, bookkeeper for the Bank of Camas Prairie, has been ill with Spanish influenza since last Friday. Roy Nail has recovered from the influenza. He was down town Monday for the first time since stricken with the disease.

Charles Dunham was in Grangeville the latter part of last week on his way to Whitebird from Lewiston, where he had been with his family. Mrs. Dunham and the children have been ill with influenza.

L. W. Price, Boles stockman, has been in Grangeville. Mr. Price and family have almost recovered from influenza. Mr. Price will take his livestock from Boles to Lapwai for the winter as soon as the condition of health permits.

source: Idaho County Free Press. (Grangeville, Idaho Territory), 19 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Nezperce Herald., December 19, 1918, Page 1

19181219NH1

The Flu Here and Hereabouts.

A local physician reports several mild cases of influenza in the vicinity of Nezperce and one in town, but states none of them show serious symptoms. In fact, the situation seems to be kept well in hand here and with continued attention by each individual to his own welfare along higenic [sic] lines more than an occasional sporadic appearance of the pest in milder form is not likely.

Two serious cases were reported at Kamiah this week, in the persons of Mr. and Mrs. Metcalf, son-in-law and daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Dissmore of that city. The sad news came through yesterday that Mr. Metcalf had succumbed to the malady and his wife was quite low. These people had recently arrived from their home in South Dakota for a visit with Mrs. Metcalf’s home folks in Kamiah, and on arriving there found the Dissmore family suffering from an attack of the disease. Another shock to Kamiah this week was the death at Lewiston last Sunday night of Delbert Rosengrants, 16-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. D. L. Rosengrants, well known Kamiah citizens who are spending the winter at Lewiston. The young man had been ill of influenza for about a week and his death occurred at the Lewiston emergency hospital. The funeral was conducted and interment made in Lewiston at 2 p.m. Tuesday.

Later – A phone message received this morning from Kamiah brought the sad intelligence that Mrs. Metcalf had passed away early this morning and the funeral will be conducted from the W. A. Dissmore home at 3 o’clock this afternoon. …

Cottonwood is just now the most severe sufferer of any prairie community from the epidemic. Three deaths have occurred there since last Friday. … Eleven new cases have been reported there the past three days, … It has been decided to quarantine all houses in that city where any of the family are afflicted with the ailment.

source: The Nezperce Herald. (Nezperce, Idaho), 19 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Nezperce Herald., December 19, 1918, Page 7

Local and Personal News Notes

Brakeman Clarke of the N. & I. has returned to his work after an attack of influenza.

Mrs. Edwards, who has rendered this community much assistance in the nursing line the past several weeks, went to Lewiston yesterday morning.

source: The Nezperce Herald. (Nezperce, Idaho), 19 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., December 19, 1918, Page 1

19181219DSM1

19181219DSM2
Flu Situation Is Very Much Better
Only Eight New Cases In One Week – Dr. Adair Gives More Instructions

Only eight new cases of influenza have been reported in Moscow to city Health Officer Dr. W. A. Adair in the week ending last night and these cases are all in two families. The families are Pren Moore, head of the poultry department at the University of Idaho and of Samuel J. Hall, a clerk in the postoffice, each have four cases. All of the cases are mild. Dr. Adair visited them yesterday evening and gave instructions as to maintaining the quarantine. Dr. Adair said:

“The situation is encouraging. The epidemic is waning and if we just observe all of the regulations we will soon have the town cleared up. I want to insist that any one having the disease in their families either remain at their homes or away from them or change clothes before going down town from their home. I also want to notify the lodges that large assemblages in lodge rooms cannot be permitted now. Banquets and big crowds in the lodge halls will not be allowed for some time yet. If we are patient and use good judgement for two weeks the town will be free of the disease.”

Dr. Adair says he is anxious to have the city clean of influenza before the opening of the second quarter of the university. He hopes to have the town free of the disease by the time school opens again and that Moscow will not be like Pullman, Spokane and many other places where they raised the quarantine and opened the schools only to have to close them again. In this connection Dr. Adair said:

“I want to thank President Lindley, Dr. Kotalik, Captain Felker and every member of the university faculty for the splendid assistance and cooperation they gave during the epidemic. They helped Moscow and it is our duty to have the town cleaned up before the second quarter and the short courses open on January 6. If all will cooperate we can do this very nicely.”
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When the influenza struck Moscow, everybody was very glad to have the Red Cross step in and furnish masks, pneumonia jackets, nurses, bedding, doctors, food and many other necessities. And foot the bill, too.
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Teachers Examination Today.

The Latah county teachers examination which has been postponed several times on account of influenza is being held today in the district court room of the court house. The attendance is light owing to influenza. One teacher who had planned to take the examination is very sick with the influenza and another is nursing a family of five who are the disease. The examination will continue until Saturday evening.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 19 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., December 19, 1918, Page 2

Influenza Notice.

Dr. W. A. Adair, city health officer, wishes to again call attention to the regulations which forbid any one with influenza in their homes from going about town without a certificate from the attending physician. Rigid quarantine regulations will be enforced against any one known to be endangering others by visiting stores or other places of business or amusement while caring for sick of influenza.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 19 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., December 19, 1918, Page 5

19181202DSM3
City News

Miss Charlotte Lewis returned yesterday from Lewiston, the Red Cross emergency hospital being discontinued, where Miss Lewis has been in charge of the dietetic kitchen. The influenza situation in Lewiston is much improved.

Adam Schaffer was a passenger to Lewiston today, called by the illness of his wife.

It was Mrs. Victor Peterson, who went as a nurse to Kendrick, instead of Mrs. Victor Nelson.
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When the influenza struck the S. A. T. C. and a small sized panic ensued, what would have become of those sick boys if the Red Cross had not stepped in and taken things in hand?

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 19 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., December 19, 1918, Page 6

19181219DSM3
Baptist People Pass Resolutions
Ask That Influenza Regulations Be Observed and Offer Assistance

To the health officer of the city of Moscow:

Whereas we, together with the greater portion of our country, have been suffering a scourge of Spanish influenza with which the medical fraternity have sought to cope and the people in general have manifested a hearty spirit of cooperation; and

Whereas the churches and others were under the closing ban most of the month of October and continuously until about two weeks ago, and now, while open, are but poorly attended as the grim monster stalks on. Our schools are closed, children in idleness at home, many of whom are under less effective sanitation than in Sunday School and day school, offering a culture medium for other evils. There appear in our daily press from time to time piecemeal restrictions which has the effect of depleting attendance and destroying our efforts, while the malady is not stamped out.

Whereas the Sunday school and the church are conscious that in the abatement of their efforts the soul welfare of the people is neglected and perhaps many are being lost to lives of usefulness. Therefore be it

Resolved, That we the First Baptist Church and Sunday School of this city do hereby put ourselves on record in this way as being deeply grateful to the medical authorities and the professor for all their efforts and labors and hereby pledge ourselves to continue to cooperate with them in every way possible. That we deeply appreciate the impossible tasks that have been placed upon them and stand amazed that they are able to continue so faithfully at their tasks.

Resolved, That we stand now as ever void of the spirit of thoughtless criticism. That we would not break down the quarantine. We desire that it be make really effective and effectual.

Resolved therefore that a quarantine be placed upon each case or cases of the Spanish influenza. That if it be in a home that that particular home and all its members be quarantined. That cards be placed upon the houses and such other measure used as shall make it reasonably certain the unmates [sic] do not come in contact with others. We are informed by the medical profession that this is a droplet contagion. We are assured that if each case can be successfully segregated we can stamp it out in a relatively brief time. Therefore

Resolved, That we, a corporation, suffering untold loss in our ministry of helpfulness, do hereby beseech, beg, urge, and humbly and kindly petition the powers that be, politically, that such a quarantine be placed upon the individual cases. If this is not possible because of absence of law justifying the medical authority that this fact be revealed to the people to the end that we may seek to create public opinion to meet this exigency in a time of dire need. We hereby pledge our most earnest and conscientious support. Ought we not to seek to do so in the briefest time and with the least possible loss of life that which up to this time we have in part at least failed to do and yet at so great expense?

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 19 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Photos from ‎Penny Bennett Casey, Idaho County GenWeb
link:

List of Pioneer Schools in Idaho County, Idaho
©Idaho County IDGenWeb Project 1997- Present- Keeping Genealogy Free
link:
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Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 1)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 2)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 3)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 4)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 5)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 6)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 7)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 8)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 9)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 10)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 11)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 12)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 13)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 14)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 15)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 16)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 17)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 18)