Idaho History Aug 30, 2020

Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic

Part 20

Idaho Newspaper clippings December 20-25, 1918

Lewiston State Normal School, Rural Training School, Lapwai, Idaho 1914

SchoolRuralTrainingSchoolLapwai1914Fritz-a

courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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December 20

The Rathdrum Tribune., December 20, 1918, Page 1

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Idaho State News Items.

Commencing Dec. 13 influenza patients in Wallace are quarantined and their homes placarded, according to Dr. C. S. Stone, city health officer.
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From Over The County

Post Falls

The Stateline school is closed indefinitely on account of the flu. School is in progress at McGuire despite the flu.

The school board has employed an orchestra teacher at $20 a month.
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Harrison

Fritz Lilly, Mr. Herrick’s head carpenter, died of the influenza after a visit to his sister at Coeur d’Alene.

Postmaster J. E. Wood, his wife, and his assistant, Miss Goodwin, are all absent from duty at the same time on account of the flu.

It has been decided not to open school until after New Year’s.

General regret is expressed for the death of Prof. J. D. Baughman, who succumbed to influenza the first of last week.
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The schools closed Dec. 20 for the holidays.
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Coeur D’Alene

Dr. Alexander Barclay has been appointed executive head of the city health board, who with Mayor Potts and President Kercheval of the city council will enforce, through the police department, all influenza regulations and quarantines.

Sessions will be held by the state supreme court at Coeur d’Alene beginning December 27, it was announced Friday. Nov. 11 had been previously set for the north Idaho session, but the date was cancelled because of the influenza epidemic.
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Rathdrum Flu Ban Lifted.

The local flu ban is lifted again and churches, lodges and public meetings are permitted to resume. Chairman Berges had notices distributed on First street Tuesday suspending the operation of the ordinance.

The resolution, under the state law, requiring the quarantining and placarding of houses in which influenza cases may appear, is understood to still be in force.

There are no cases of influenza in Rathdrum at present, so far as known.

source: The Rathdrum Tribune. (Rathdrum, Idaho), 20 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Rathdrum Tribune., December 20, 1918, Page 2

Spokane seems to consider the lives of her people less important than the uninterrupted flow of business. Theaters, churches, and public gatherings are allowed to continue almost without restriction while the influenza death rate mounts to seventy-five a week. Under the present lax, half-way methods of control, Spokane is doing much to keep the epidemic alive in all the surrounding country.
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Church Announcements

M. E. Church

There will just be the morning preaching service at the Presbyterian church next Sunday at 11 o’clock. There will be no Sunday School or night service, but we expect to start in all services one week from Sunday.

Let’s all come to the morning service. All precautionary methods will be used, so feel free to come. Sunday School papers will be distributed at close of services.

J. G Carrick, Pastor
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Roman Catholic Church

Services Sunday morning, with confession at 8 o’clock and mass at 9.

source: The Rathdrum Tribune. (Rathdrum, Idaho), 20 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Rathdrum Tribune., December 20, 1918, Page 3

Personal Mention.

Miss Dorothea Wenz has resumed her duties as teacher at Spirit Lake.

Frank Stine, writing from Alhambra, Cal., says his and his family like their new home. However, he reports a great deal of influenza there at present.

Irvan Feely’s family had the misfortune to catch the influenza on the train while returning from Musselshell to reside again on their farm on Rathdrum prairie. Mrs. Chas. Feely was also reported ill with the disease the first of the week.

Mrs. Edgar Green, who died of influenza at St. Joe last week, was the only daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. I. Lagers of Colville, Wash., formerly of Rathdrum vicinity. Mr. Green is a brother of Charles and John Green, well known farmers of Rathdrum prairie.
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Local Paragraphs.

Announcement is made that the Rathdrum Public Library will be open Saturday afternoon and evening, providing there are no more influenza regulations to prevent.

A Community Sing is announced at the Presbyterian church Christmas Eve. An impromptu program will be given, with songs for young and old. A good time for all.

source: The Rathdrum Tribune. (Rathdrum, Idaho), 20 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Oakley Herald. December 20, 1918, Page 1

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“I’m Thru-Enza” Germ Makes Debut

With the cessation of hostilities the Red Cross is called upon to combat a new epidemic, originating this time within its own ranks. The affliction is known as “I’m thru-enza.”

The initial symptom is a sense of lassitude – a feeling of “What’s the use? It’s all over. Why should I work?” Steps are being taken to isolate the germ – also those who are carrying it.

The epidemic is not wide-spread; nevertheless an effort is being made to stem its advance.

“Cold feet” is a marked symptom.

Another indication of the presence of the germ is forgetfulness (that the boys are still over there.)

The victim, as a rule, cannot concentrate the mind (on the knitting.)

The sight becomes impaired (can’t see to sew.)

The ears become affected (can’t hear the appeals of hundreds of thousands of refugees who must be clothed, fed and housed.)

Heart doesn’t beat as it used to, and in advanced stage that organ apparently turns to stone.

A vaccine consisting of equal parts of tincture of I won’t quit and Red Cross spirits, a dash of patriotism and a peck of pep is effective.

The people of Oakley are asked to co-operate in destroying the “I’m-Thru-enza” germ.

Read the Red Cross appeals in the space generously contributed by the business men of Oakley – then act.

Let’s make it unanimous.
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Boulder

Mrs. H. P. Nelson and son, Lloyd, have been visiting friends and relatives at Hayburn, and report that the flu situation is very much improved.
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School Notes.

Assignment of 8th grade work.

Arithmetic, to page 186. Ask your parents for suggestions on Taxes and Insurance, work problems.

Reading, memorize “June” page 93, Stevenson’s selection page 103, “Ill fares the land,” study to page 116. Study spelling to lesson 50.

History to page 379, geography to Africa, page 373, using outline I have given you.

If you do not have your books, I will get them for you upon request.

Examinations will be given when school opens and your present work will help to determine your general average.

L. J Robinson, Jr.m Prin.
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Locals and Personals.

J. B. Randall has been ill this week.

The Burley Sugar Factory is now running full blast. Many beets are being shipped in from Utah points. The flu epidemic has prevented many of the Utah factories from operating this season.

Mrs. Earl Card, who moved from Oakley to Nampa several years ago, died at Nampa this week from influenza. The burial was held at Oakley Tuesday. Mr. Card has been in military service in France, but is expected back soon.

Miss Opal Thomas, daughter of J. H. Thomas of Basin is ill with influenza.

During the quarantine, the Academy is carrying on part of its work by means of correspondence.
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Idaho Budget

All but eight of the 56 Ada county schools have been reopened after having closed down on account of influenza. Eighteen more opened Monday. Only one-third of the students attended the first sessions of the Eagle school Monday, the county superintendent’s office was informed. Attendance in most of the schools, however, is above normal.

Doctors report that there are no cases of Spanish influenza in Meridian. The last quarantine sign was removed Thursday morning. Churches and pictures shows were given permission to open the first week, but decided to remain closed voluntarily.

Passengers traveling in Idaho on the Oregon Short Line have been well protected during the epidemic of influenza, which is still prevalent in many parts of the state. The Short Line has operated a fully equipped hospital car over its lines on the west end as far as Boise. The car at first was in charge of two professional nurses, and the company’s physicians at the various stations along the line are subject to call to board the car at any time it passes their station. Since the epidemic eased up, there has been no necessity for two nurses, and at present one nurse is in charge. A regular day coach is used, the seats having been partially removed and replaced with beds. The car has handled about sixty cases of influenza without one loss on board.

“The closing of the war will add to the teacher supply,” says Miss Ethel E. Redfield, superintendent of public instruction, in a letter to the county superintendents. “County superintendents will have many applications, so let us work harder than ever for higher and better professional standards.” Miss Redfield called particular attention to the fact that now it would be possible to have only certificated teachers in Idaho schools.
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Ordinance Number 94
by W. T. Harper

An ordinance to provide against the spread of Spanish influenza, providing the time for the opening and closing of business houses, closing pool halls, picture shows, and other places of public assemblaces, making other regulations to prevent the spread of the above named infectious disease, providing a time when this ordinance shall take effect, and providing a punishment for violations hereof

Be It Ordained by the Chairman and Board of Trustees of the Village of Oakley, Idaho;

Whereas there are a number of cases of Spanish influenza among the residents of the Village of Oakley, Idaho; and,

Whereas it has been, and is deemed necessary, in order to prevent the further spread of the above named infectious disease, [shall?] certain regulations be adopted and enforced; and,

Whereas immediate action is required to protect the health of the people of the said Village against the spread of the said disease; now therefore

Be it ordained y the Chairman and Board of Trustees of the Village of Oakley, Idaho:

Section One. From and after the passage and taking effect of this ordinance the following regulations shall be observed and enforced within the limits of the Village of Oakely, Idaho:

First. All schools, meetings, and all other public assemblages are hereby prohibited.

Second. All pool and billiard halls, moving picture shows, theatres and all other places of public amusement are hereby closed and all operations shall be suspended.

Third. All stores and business establishments of all kinds shall be closed and all business suspended on and after 6 o’clock p.m. of each and every day, and shall remain closed until the following morning at 7 o’clock, provided that nothing herein shall prevent the filling of prescriptions at any time by drug stores of duly licensed physicians.

Section Two. Any person violating any of the terms or provisions of this ordinance, shall in conviction thereof, be fined in any sum not exceeding $100, together with costs of suit. And upon failure to pay such fine and costs, shall be imprisoned in the Village jail at hard labor until such fine and costs shall be paid, allowing $2 for every day so imprisoned.

Section Three. This ordinance shall be in force and effect from and after its passage, approval and the proclamation of the Chairman of the Board of Trustees there of duly issued, as provided by law.

Passed and approved this the 11th day of December, A. D. 1918.
W. C. Whittle, Chairman of the Board of Trustees
Attest:
C. G. Larson, Clerk.
State of Idaho County of Cassia

source: The Oakley Herald. (Oakley, Idaho), 20 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Clearwater Republican. December 20, 1918, Page 1

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Local News.

The Christian church Sunday school will be held next Sunday at the church at the usual hour.

P. L. Orcutt, who has been on the sick list for the past four weeks, came in from the ranch today.

County School Superintendent E. Cecil Parker has been busy this week holding the teachers examination. The attendance was small, only six of seven being present, a few being excused on account of fear of influenza.

Manager Miller opened the Rex theatre Friday evening for the first time in several weeks. Movie patrons will now have an opportunity to pass the long winter evenings attending these popular entertainments.

source: Clearwater Republican. (Orofino, Idaho), 20 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Clearwater Republican. December 20, 1918, Page 3

That Flu Stuff.

If you have a tummy-ache,
It’s the Flu!
If you’re weary when you wake,
It’s the Flu!
Is your memory off the track?
Is your liver out of whack?
Are there pimples on your back?
It’s the Flu!

Are there spots before your eyes?
It’s the Flu!
Are you fatter than some guys?
It’s the Flu!
Do your teeth hurt when you bite?
Do you ever have a fright?
Do you want to sleep at night?
It’s the Flu!

Are you thirsty when you eat?
It’s the Flu!
Are you shaky on your feet?
It’s the Flu!
If you feel a little ill,
Send right off for Dr. Pill,
He will say, despite his skill:
“It’s the Flu!”

He won’t wait to diagnose,
It’s the Flu!
Hasn’t time to change his clothes,
It’s the Flu!
For two weeks he’s had no rest,
Had no time to make a test,
So he’ll class you with the rest –
You had the Flu!

– Cincinnati Enquirer

source: Clearwater Republican. (Orofino, Idaho), 20 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Kendrick Gazette. December 20, 1918, Page 1

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Death of Ruth Seals

Miss Ruth Seals died at the White hospital at Lewiston at five o’clock Wednesday morning. A severe attack of influenza followed by a relapse, developed into pneumonia which caused her death. She was learning nursing at the hospital before she was taken ill.

Miss Seals was a niece of Mrs. Joday Long and a sister of May Seals. She was greatly interested in her work at the hospital and was making splendid progress. Over exertion in caring for other patients before she had fully recovered her strength was said to be the cause of her death.

The funeral was held at Asotin. Mr. and Mrs. Joday Long attended from here.
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Big Bear Ridge

Mrs. Robert Clemenhagen received word that her husband was in a hospital in Virginia, with the measles, having recently recovered from an attack of influenza.
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Not Much Flu Here

No new cases of flu have been reported in Kendrick since early last week and nearly all those who have been ill with the disease have recovered and are able to be out of doors. If no new cases develop by the end of this week there will be no flu in Kendrick.

source: The Kendrick Gazette. (Kendrick, Idaho), 20 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Kendrick Gazette. December 20, 1918, Page 6

Idaho News Paragraphs
Recent Happenings in This State Given in Brief Items for Busy Readers

Generally the influenza situation is better in Grangeville. No steps have been taken as yet to lift the ban.

New flu rules have been made at Coeur d’Alene city. The recently organized board of health demands quarantine of influenza patients, that there be no Christmas fetes and that stores and pool halls open, but no loitering permitted, also puts ban on card games.

source: The Kendrick Gazette. (Kendrick, Idaho), 20 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Kendrick Gazette. December 20, 1918, Page 8

Gleanings

Mr. and Mrs. A. C. White and Roger are ill at their home in Spokane with influenza. Last reports were to the effect that they were getting along nicely. Miss Vivian recovered from a siege of the flu shortly before Thanksgiving.

Dr. Herrington spent Sunday in Moscow, returning to his practice here Sunday night. As soon as Dr. Rothwell is able to resume his duties here, Dr. Herrington will return to Moscow, where he is permanently located.

The Potlatch Electric Company is wiring the school house throughout.

source: The Kendrick Gazette. (Kendrick, Idaho), 20 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Recorder. December 20, 1918, Page 1

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The Grand Theatre has been notified again to close.
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School Girl Dies

Mattie LaRouche died Sunday night last at Tacoma, Washington, where she was attending school. Her mother, Mrs. J. W. Jones, was called there the day before. Mattie was a school girl in this city last year and was a brilliant student. She was, it is stated, a victim of influenza.
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Salmon Locals

Little Johnny Keyes, the twelve-year-old stand-by for many a sick family in Salmon when it came to attending to their chores, is reported himself down with the flu. Three members of the family of Jack G[?] including his wife, are also suffering from the same malady. These people are all numbered among those who have freely helped others in their affliction.

source: The Idaho Recorder. (Salmon City, Idaho), 20 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Recorder. December 20, 1918, Page 2

19181220IR2Influenza Epidemic Is Not Over Says Gen. Blue
Surgeon General Advises Closing of Schools at First Sign of Reappearance of Disease

Washington, Dec. 12. – Warning to the country that the influenza epidemic is by no means ended and that all possible precautions against the disease should be taken, was issued yesterday by Surgeon General Blue of the public health service.

Reports received by the service show a recrudescence of the disease practically from one end of the country to another, and in his statement Dr. Blue advised the closing of the public schools on the first sign of the reappearance of the epidemic. He said the disease apparently now tended to occur more frequently among school children.

“Our main reliance,” Dr. Blue said, “must still be the observance of precautions by the individual person. He should cover up his coughs and sneezes and insist that others do the same.”

source: The Idaho Recorder. (Salmon City, Idaho), 20 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Recorder. December 20, 1918, Page 5

Salmon Locals

Out of abundant caution against the spread of the epidemic again the city schools were ordered closed till after the holidays.

Mr. and Mrs. E. B. Mitchell and Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Yearian were Salmon visitors from Lemhi on Monday. The Yearians will postpone their California trip because of the flu situation in San Francisco.

One of the Salmon lawyers having business at Challis for the court beginning there this week, went on into the forbidden quarantine precints [sic] after being fully informed that he must submit to a four-day sequestration. Even the same conditions were imposed upon Judge Terry, who has the judicial business in hand, and all the other visiting officers of the court. Mayor Glennon went as far toward Challis as May on Sunday but turned back there.

Owning to illness in the rector’s family there will be no Sunday service in the Episcopal church.

Paul McPherson arrived from Camp Fremont on Saturday last, with an honorable discharge from the army. He entered at once upon the management of the McPherson store in the absence of his father, J. M. McPherson, who was attacked by the influenza the same day. The father has been quite ill this week.

When A. R. Mulkey returned home to Leadore the other day from Montana he found himself up against the rigors of the local quarantine, for the authorities would not let him escape the provisions against the appearance of the epidemic in that town although he lives there. Thus it is shown that the way to quarantine is to be quarantined. Leadore is still free from the dreaded disease, like Challis and other communities that are not too large to be amenable to sensible regulations that are made to be enforced.

A score or more new cases of influenza were reported in Salmon this week.

Jessee Ledbetter, who suffered a relapse after his severe flu attack, was operated on for congestion of one of his lungs last Sunday. Thus was relief afforded the sufferer, who has been greatly afflicted. He is now recovering.

The Red Cross workers of Salmon held their parade on Monday last in spite of a raw and biting fog that enveloped the city. And it was an enthusiastic parade too, with the municipal band in line, and winding up with some speechifying at the pavilion.

source: The Idaho Recorder. (Salmon City, Idaho), 20 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Recorder. December 20, 1918, Page 7

Northwest Notes

At a meting of the grade school board of Meridian Wednesday evening it was decided to open the grade school Monday morning.

In order to protect the regular passengers and to give the best service to its employees and their families who may be ill with the influenza, that Oregon Short Line has run a special hospital car into Boise for the last seven weeks.
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Wage War on Dirt.

Dirt is sin, and it takes a bacteriologist to tell the difference between clean dirt and dirty dirt. So we can afford to take no chances. Unless we cultivate cleanliness of mind and body, cleanliness of home, of city and country, cellar and garret, warf [sic] and shop, markets and roads, of the air we breathe, of the milk and water we drink and the food we eat, all the serums and regulations of preventive medicines will not save us. For health, like morality, is more than an individual matter; it is a community affair.

source: The Idaho Recorder. (Salmon City, Idaho), 20 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Montpelier Examiner. December 20, 1918, Page 5

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Carl Fredericks, who had a severe tussle with the flu, has re-opened his “shoe hospital” and is again ready to attend to the wants of all whose soles need repairing

Mrs. Frank Preston of Pocatello, visited several days this week with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Redel. She reports that her brother, Lloyd, and several of his children had the flu in Pocatello, the former having had a severe attack of it, but all have fully recovered from it.

Mrs. and Mrs. Walter Brown and son returned Sunday from Denver, where they spent several weeks, while Mr. Brown was recuperating from the flu. He is back on the job as manager at the club house.

Morell, the six-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Burke, died from influenza Wednesday night. short funeral services were held at the cemetery yesterday afternoon. Mrs. Burke is still quite ill with the disease, but Mr. Burke and the younger son, who were also down with it, are now convalescing.

Montpelier “kiddies” will miss the usual Christmas festivities so far as the churches are concerned, which had planned a big time but abandoned on account of the flu epidemic.
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Bear Lake Has Had Small Loss in France

… While only three or four have fallen victims to Hun bullets, the dreadful and mysterious influenza, which has swept this country, has taken a much larger number of our young men in the training camps. Besides those who died in the camps, two were accidentally killed.

Thus, is the uncertainty of life strangely illustrated. The percentage of loss among Bear Lake boys, who were undergoing hardships in France and facing the extreme dangers on the battlefields, was much less than it was among those who were in the training camps at home.

source: Montpelier Examiner. (Montpelier, Idaho), 20 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Montpelier Examiner. December 20, 1918, Page 8

Medical Society Adopts Resolutions

At a meeting of the Bear Lake County Medical Society, held at Paris, on December 15, 1918, the following resolutions were adopted:

“Resolved, That all obstetrical cases shall be attended for a minimum fee of $25, which fee shall be payable before or upon discharge of completion of the case.

“Resolved, That on or after January 1, 1919, all parties indebted to the physicians of Bear Lake county, and who have refused and neglected to make proper settlement of said indebtedness, will be refused medical assistance by the physicians of this county, until said unpaid accounts shall be satisfactorily arranged by the parties concerned. A list of such delinquent persons will be kept on files in each physician’s office for reference.

“Resolved, That all town visits to contagious diseases of any kind or all kinds will be $3.00.

“Resolved, That all town visits for non-contagious diseases from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. will be $2.00.

“Resolved, That all town visits for non-contagious diseases from 8 p.m. to 8 a.m. will be $3.00.

Signed:
E. F. Guyon, President.
Geo. F. Ashley, Vice President
R. J. Sutton.
H. H. King
L. T. A. Hotten.

source: Montpelier Examiner. (Montpelier, Idaho), 20 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Republican. December 20, 1918, Page 1

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Dr. Hoover Talks About Influenza

Dr. C. A. Hoover of the county board of health in speaking of the influenza Wednesday, said that it is nearly stamped out in the town of Blackfoot, but that there is a great deal in the country. It is not showing such virulent form as it was and he believed it is due to the fact that people are learning to go to bed and stay there until they get over it. Most of the serious cases, he said, were traceable directly to some exposure or efforts to bear up or do something they ought not to after the attack or in getting out too soon when convalescing.

The doctor says the way to treat the flu is to go right to bed and stay there until at least twenty-four hours after the flu is done with the patient. The vital thing is getting into bed early and not getting ambitious near the close of the race.
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Former Blackfoot Resident Passes Away

Mrs. Frank W. Randall, wife of Dr. Randall, age thirty-five years, died at her home in Douglas, Ariz. Monday afternoon, after suffering an attack of influenza-pneumonia.

Mrs. Randall was a former resident of Blackfoot and was Miss Agnes Heaton before marriage. She is a sister of Mrs. Leon Messlin of this city. …

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 20 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Republican. December 20, 1918, Page 2

Shelley

All lodges here are resuming their weekly meetings.

Misses Grace and Floy Johnson are out and around again after having the flu.

The doctors report a rapid decrease in the number of new influenza cases. People here seem to think now that the flu will be blotted out of this community, as a strict quarantine is being maintained over any new case that may appear.

Lester Norris is up and around again, after a case of the flu.

The people of Shelley are asked to sincerely co-operate in maintaining a strict quarantine over every case of the influenza in this community, so as to avoid the spread of the disease. We now have this dreaded disease on the decline and let us blot it out as soon as we can.

Mrs. Viola Hansen is recovering from a severe case of the influenza.

Mrs. Delos Killian is recovering from a severe case of the influenza.

Willis A. Dial has recovered from a slight case of the flu.

Last Saturday was a busy day in Shelley as many people were in town doing their Xmas shopping.

Business houses which do a large amount of business in the evenings were ordered closed. Later they received word that they might open up again Saturday to their usual routine of business.

Remember, do all you can to kill the flu.
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Death of Mrs. Hampton and Son

Mrs. Leon Hampton and young son both died recently of the influenza. The funeral of both was held last Saturday. Mrs. Hampton leaves a devoted husband and several children to mourn her loss. This is probably the saddest death which has occurred here for some time past. Mrs. Hampton and her son were both well-known in Shelley and they had many friends who will mourn. The boy, Goldie Hampton, was just growing into manhood being seventeen years of age. It seems as tho the influenza must take away dear ones in every community.
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Springfield

Died of Influenza

Ida Edwards, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Edwards died at their home Friday morning from influenza pneumonia. Miss Edwards came to this community a small child and thruout [sic] her school days and later years at home endeared herself to a hose of friend. She has suffered poor health for some time and rising from the sick bed too soon to nurse other sick in the family caused the fatal relapse. …
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Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Edwards are recovering from influenza. Mrs. Edwards contracted the disease while doing volunteer nursing throut [sic] the community.

Mr. and Mrs. Hugh Wells are reported much improved after an attack of the influenza. Mrs. Wells was quite seriously ill for some time. Dallas Wells is about to be out again.

Dr. McKinnon has been [in] the neighborhood almost daily visiting the sick.

Dr. Patrie of Blackfoot has made many professional visits here also.

Mrs. L. Shelman has been suffering from complications after a severe attack of the influenza.

Heber Wells, Thomas Blackburn and Mrs. H. V. Chandler and Mr. Robins have been acting as volunteer nurses for influenza cases.
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Sterling

Mrs. W. R. Leach was quite ill the first of the week.

Mr. Verbeck is very seriously ill with the influenza. Mrs. Verbeck is just recovering from the same disease.

A. Y. Satterfield, a former resident of here and son of Mr. and Mrs. J. Satterfield is seriously ill in the hospital in Pocatello, with quick consumption, which he contracted following the influenza.

One of Mr. and Mrs. Ben Atkin’s son is quite ill with pneumonia.
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Rose

Miss Iva Ilzna is here taking care of the Carl Nelson family, who have the flue [sic].

Mrs. H. A. Gardner is able to be out and around again.

Mrs. D. A. Stewart has recovered after an attack of the flue [sic].
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Kimball

There are about five families who have the influenza at present. All are reported to be getting along fairly well except John Landon, who is quite sick. Dr. Cutler was in attendance.

There are a few of the farmers that have been hauling the beets out of the pile to the cars, but on account of so much influenza in the neighborhood help has been very difficult to get.

M. Jensen intended spending the winter at Hyrum, Utah, but was unable to buy a ticket for that place on account of it being under the influenza quarantine.
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Jameston

Miss Bertha Fielding is staying with Mr. and Mrs. George Longhurst of Shelley. Mrs. Longhurst is ill, but is getting along nicely now.

Mrs. Hen Bolander and brother Everet Vest are on the sick list.
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Centerville

The influenza seems to be leaving this community as no new cases have been reported.

Howard Bishop has been on the sick list the past week.

Lorenzo Edwards who has been ill the past two months with pneumonia is very slowly improving.

The family of Carl Nelson, who have been very ill with the flu are now recovering nicely for which we are grateful.

The household of Mrs. Emma Nelson are at this writing very ill with influenza and one case of diptheria [sic]. Dr, Mitchell is in attendance.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 20 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Republican. December 20, 1918, Page 4

No Spitting In Corners
Big Factory Puts Ban on Old Custom of Men.

It is a known fault of men that they like to spit into dark corners. Said spitting is known to spread disease, and the Nela Park works of the General Electric company at Cleveland, in promoting an anti-spitting campaign in an effort to check influenza, has hit upon a scheme that is said to be working extremely well in checking spitting in corners. Every corner in the great plant has had a while strip painted on the baseboard and a while quarter circle on the floor. The workers, seeing the reminder, hesitate to spit, and the result has been the virtual elimination of spitting in corners at the factory.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 20 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Idaho Republican. December 20, 1918, Page 5

Local News

Miss High was on the sick list the first of the week.

A. T. Springer has a mild attack of the influenza.

Mrs. Jessie Larson is able to be out again, after suffering with an attack of influenza.

R. G. Bills is confined to his home with the influenza. At last reports he was doing nicely.

Miss Mary Dunn was ill the first of the week, but at this writing was somewhat improved.

Master Wesley Boise, son of Mr. and Mrs. H. R. Boise, has been on the sick list for the past few days.

Miss Marie Derfler returned to Blackfoot Tuesday from Arco, where she has been nursing influenza patients.
— —

Library Notice

The Blackfoot public library is now open afternoons only for the loan of books.

Reading tables cannot be used and no crowding will be permitted.

Anyone coughing or sneezing will be asked to leave.

Please return borrowed books as soon as possible. After December 21 fines will be collected.

Edna Gillispie, Librarian.

Magazines for Sick Folks

Miss Gillespie wishes to announce that she has magazines she can send out to homes where persons are ill and wish to read. Magazines used in this way are to be burned after reading.
— —

Flu precautions in San Francisco have resulted happily for some of the inhabitants down by the Golden Gate as attested by a friend who writes facetiously in reference to the situation there, closing with: “Thank the Lord I am happy at last. The churches are closed, the saloons are open and the women are huzzled*.” Fair enough.

[*Huzzled: to hug for a good amount of time]

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 20 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Idaho Republican. December 20, 1918, Page 8

Has Gone To Pahsimeroi

A. E. McCoy left Monday for Pahsimeroi valley to look at a band of cattle with the view of buying them.

There is a quarantine in affect [sic] in that valley and anyone wishing to go in is required to isolate himself three days before going about among the people and Mr. McCoy will take that plan. Settlers coming out for supplies go to a vacant house at the upper end of the valley and batch for three days before going to their homes. Any one desiring to travel thru the valley without stopping can do so on condition that they carry a yellow streamer on the vehicle as a warning to the inhabitants to keep at a distance. …
— —

Upper Presto

Mrs. J. W. Stoddard went to Idaho Falls Monday to nurse some sick folks.

The family of Will Mecham are just recovering from the influenza, seventeen people were all sick with the disease at the same time.
— —

Springfield

H. Berg is ill and is reported to have the flu.

Mrs. Hugh Wells is improving, after a dangerous attack of the influenza.

Mrs. Bert Hoskins and children of Portage, Utah are visiting with her parents Mr. and Mrs. E. U Wells. Mr. and Mrs. Hoskins recently lost their daughter with the influenza.
— —

For a Laugh

“And what did the doctor tell you?”

“Why, he looked me over and asked me if I had made a will.”

“Ah, is your condition so bad?”

“I don’t know; but his brother is a lawyer.”

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 20 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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West School, Weiser, Idaho ca. 1920

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courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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The Daily Star-Mirror., December 20, 1918, Page 1

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Six Million Killed By The Influenza

London, Dec. 19. — The Times medical correspondent says that it seems reasonable to believe that throughout the world about six million persons perished from influenza and pneumonia during the past three months.

It has been estimated that the war caused the death of 20,000,000 persons in four and one-half years. Thus, the correspondent points out, influenza has proved itself five times deadlier than the war, because in the same period at its epidemic rate influenza would have killed 100,000,000. Never since the black death has such a plague swept over the world he says, adding that the need of a new survey of public health measures has never been more forcibly illustrated.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 20 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., December 20, 1918, Page 2

Lillian Goodwin Funeral.

The funeral of Lillian Goodwin, who died of pneumonia, following influenza, will be held in the yard of the T. T. Goodwin home on Orchard avenue. A short service will be held at 1 o’clock Saturday afternoon, the Rev. Mr. Smith conducting the services.
— —

If every one in Moscow does his or her part the town will be entirely cleaned of the influenza by the time school opens at the university on January 6th and the old students can return and new students can come without fear of the disease. Let us all do our part to bring about his happy condition.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 20 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., December 20, 1918, Page 4

19181220DSM2
Flu Situation Is Worse Today
Dr. Adair Reports Several New Cases – Calls for Observance of Rules

Dr. W. A. Adair, city health officer, reports the influenza situation as worse today. Seven members of S. J. Hall’s family have the disease and there are some new cases reported. Dr. Adair insists that all quarantine regulations be observed strictly if the plague is to be conquered here. Elsewhere in this issue is a statement from London that the plague has cost more than 6,000,000 lives in three months. Dr. Adair’s statement follows:

“The ‘flu’ situation is not as favorable as we had hoped for. Up to noon today the following cases have been reported: Two at Stanley’s’ one at N. Williamson’s and three more, making seven in all at Sam Hall’s.

“If the ‘good people’ of Moscow wish this plague stamped out they must realize that it rests to a great extent upon their cooperation. It is indeed obvious that parties held in private homes, where the rooms are small, and various games are played, are unnecessary risks and should be considered as such by those so eager to have every home in which there is a case of flu quarantined.”

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 20 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Meridian Times., December 20, 1918, Page 10

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Meridian News Notes

Joe Curtis who has been ill with influenza, is much improved.

All the influenza cases are getting along OK according to the doctors and there are no fatalities to report.

At a meeting of the grade school board it was decided to give two weeks for the holiday vacation to teachers and pupils. The schools close this Friday. It is hoped by the board that there will be no influenza when the school opens again. The high school has been closed for some time and will not open until January 6th.

source: The Meridian Times. (Meridian, Idaho), 20 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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High School, Moscow, Idaho ca. 1913

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courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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December 21

The Daily Star-Mirror., December 21, 1918, Page 1

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19181221DSM2
Genesee Hard Hit By The Influenza
Five Deaths in One Week and 200 Cases – Doctors and Nurses Needed

The influenza situation has become critical and new cases are being reported daily. It has been estimated that there is probably as high as 200 cases in the community. Dr. C. F. Tuomy is the only available doctor in the community as Dr. W. H. Ehlen still remains too ill to make any calls. Dr. Gritman of Moscow and Dr. White of Lewiston have been in the territory several times and have visited some of the more serious cases.

Up to Wednesday of this week there have been four deaths of pneumonia, following influenza, Raymond Koster, Carl Baumgartner and Mr. and Mrs. George Johann, having succumbed.

The new cases reported since last week include Mrs. C. P. Whalen and little daughter, Marie. The latter is critically ill and Dr. White of Lewiston has been here to see her but her condition remained grave up until Wednesday noon, when it was thought there was some improvement.

George Ebel is critically ill of pneumonia.

Mr. and Mrs. George Blume are both still very ill and Mr. Blume especially shows little improvement.

Mrs. Fred Bershaw has about recovered. Mr. Bershaw is improving again after having a severe relapse the latter part of last week.

All of the Genesee teachers, except Miss Black and Miss Brown, are down with the disease. The are acting as nurses for the others as well as rendering valuable help to other stricken families. Miss Davis, whose sister is here caring for her, is improving slowly. Misses Henkins, Burke, Bracken and Walker are recovering nicely. Prof. G. E. Sunderlin is able to be about the house again, but Mrs. Sunderlin has been very ill and her improvement is slow.

Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Arthur and children have all been stricken but are doing nicely.

– Genesee News.

Since the News was published George Ebel has died and it is though there are several others who cannot recover. The situation there is regarded as critical. Genesee raised the quarantine, opened schools, had a big party and dance and the second wave of influenza resulted.
— —

Christian Women Play Santa Claus
Young People’s Class of Christian Sunday School to Distribute Gifts

Christmas packages are being prepared for every member of the Sunday school of the Christian church by Mrs. J. Quincy Biggs, wife of the pastor, and the young people’s class of the Sunday school. The quarantine regulations forbid children to attend Sunday school and the usual Christmas trees and entertainments will be deprived of their usual Christmas entertainments but Mrs. Biggs and the young people’s class will see that every member of the Sunday school is provided with presents. Each will have a sack of dainties prepared and delivered Santa Claus fashion, with sleigh-bell accompaniment. The committee will go from house to house Christmas eve and see that every child is provided with presents. This plan will take the place of the usual Christmas treat. …
— —

Christmas Services in Local Churches Tomorrow

All of the churches of Moscow will have special Christmas features in their services tomorrow (Sunday) and the services should have a good attendance. The quarantine regulations forbidding children to attend public meetings makes the Christmas trees in Moscow out of place this Christmas and there will be no trees. These features are for the children and without their presence there would not be much of the Christmas spirit in the entertainments, so they will be abandoned. Every church in Moscow is preparing a special Christmas program with fine music for the services tomorrow. The announcements will be found in the column devote to churches in this issue.
— —

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 21 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., December 21, 1918, Page 3

19181202DSM3
City News

Several fair sized Christmas trees have been sent by parcels post through the post office at Moscow during the past few days. The trees come from the fine fir, cedar and blue spruce timber east of Moscow.

Mr. and Mrs. E. J. Smithson arrived today from Colfax to spend the holidays with Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Conner. Mrs. Smithson is slowly recovering from an attack of influenza.

Mrs. W. Klawson and children went to Kendrick today to visit Mrs. Klawson’s mother, Mrs. Flora Harrison, until Mrs. Klawson has thoroughly recovered from a severe attack of Influenza.

Geo. Stewart received word that Fred Theriault was buried today at 4 o’clock in Spokane, where his brother was buried about a month ago, both having died of influenza. Mrs. Theriault will return to Moscow this evening, with Mrs. Geo. Stewart and Mrs. Louise Fry.
— —

Mrs. M. Henderson Dead.

Mrs. Mae Henderson died of influenza December 6 at Twin Falls. Mrs. Henderson was the wife of Dr. L. C. Henderson, who was meat inspector at Moscow some time ago, and both were well known in the city. Mrs. Henderson volunteered her services as a nurse for influenza cases and contracted the disease herself.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 21 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Twin Falls High School, Twin Falls, Idaho ca. 1912

SchoolTwinFallsHighSchool1912Fritz-a

courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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December 23

The Daily Star-Mirror., December 23, 1918, Page 1

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19181223DSM2
24 New Cases Of “Flu” Last Week
Dr. Adair Reports Two Dozen New Cases in Eight Moscow Homes

There were 24 new cases of influenza in Moscow last week, according to the report of Dr. W. A. Adair, city health officer, made today for the week from December 16 to 22, a period of six days. No report was made for Sunday. The cases are in eight Moscow homes, divided as follows: Samuel Hall, 7 cases; Pren Moore, 5 cases; Mr. Stanley, 3: A. C. Jardley, 3; E. E. Ostroot, 2; N. Williamson, 2: W. S. Wilkins, 1; Mr. Beilenberg, 1. In commenting on the influenza situation Dr. Adair said:

“I am very grateful to the people for their cooperation in keeping the children of school age out of public gatherings – however, during the last week, there has been some laxity in observing this and until it seems advisable to open the schools all children of the public schools found in shows or churches shall be requested to leave by the marshal, and the parents of same held accountable.

“I feel that the small number of cases among the children is due to the fact that they have not been allowed to intermingle in indoor crowds. In one of the nearby towns where school was recently re-opened, 18 children came down with it in one day.

“A warning has already been given that those having the disease must produce a certificate of health from the attending physician, before appearing in public. These certificates may be handed directly to the chief of police, who is furnished with a list of all persons having the “flu” or they may be left for him at the Corner Drug store.

“If we prevent a spread of the disease in a severe form like they are having at Genesee and Palouse, where there have been about ten deaths during the last week, every individual must assume their part of the responsibility.”
— —

19181223DSM3
Moscow People Respond To Appeal For Christmas Cheer

The spirit that was brought into the world in Bethlehem 1918 years ago next Wednesday, is not lacking in Moscow. This has been shown repeatedly but never more so than in response to the appeal in The Star-Mirror of last Thursday, when a list of those who would be without Christmas cheer unless furnished by the people of this locality, was published. The article, ably written by Mrs. Hutton, whose generosity and industry have been the leading feature of many “drives” for funds in Moscow, appealed to every one who read it. The Star-Mirror had hardly appeared on the streets of Moscow before people began to call at the office of the Veatch Realty company to join the Associated Charities or renew their membership, or to leave packages for the needy whose condition was described in the article referred to.

Tonight every want mentioned in that appeal has been met. Not one of those mentioned will be without the Christmas cheer and it will have been provided by the truly Christian spirit of the people of Moscow and vicinity.

Mr. Veatch’s office today looks like a general merchandise store. There are virtually wagon loads of goods stored there. The gifts range from a pair of stockings to entire outfits for girls and boys who were mentioned in the article telling the people of Moscow that there are in our midst children who are actually in need of clothing and food. Several of the stores of Moscow gave entire outfits, from shoes to cap, including under and outer wear of warm and good quality, for boys and girls of various ages. Others gave sacks of flour, sacks of potatoes, boxes of apples, packages of clothing, shoes, stockings, hats, caps, dresses, coats, in fact everything that was mentioned in the article as being needed has been given in generous quantity.

In addition to this more than $75 in cash was given, ranging from $1 to $20. Many persons who had been members of the Associated Charities, which has collected no dues for three years, renewed their memberships. Others who had not been members, joined, paying the fee of $1 for the year’s membership.

Today Mr. Veatch and Mrs. Hutton are sorting the gifts and sending them out to those who need them, and the money is being used to buy fuel and food for the most needy. Teams will be sent out with the gifts which will bring cheer and thankfulness into many homes. The response has been hearty, spontaneous and beautiful and generous donors of these needed gifts will enjoy their Christmas dinner next Wednesday more than would have been possible had they not manifested the spirit Christ brought to the world nearly two thousand years ago.

The appeal has demonstrated two things clearly. The Star-Mirror is thoroughly read in Moscow and vicinity and the people here have the true Christian spirit and are very liberal. All that is needed is to show them the need of charity and the need is met promptly and willingly.

The need for assistance is due to the influenza epidemic which took the bread winner in many homes from their work and the heavy expense of a spell of sickness left the families without means, but there will be no suffering here and no one will be without a Christmas dinner and all the comforts of the season, thanks to the generosity of Moscow people.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 23 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., December 23, 1918, Page 5

19181202DSM3
City News

Mrs. N. H. Smith and son, G. P. Smith of the S. A. T. C., left Saturday for their home at Addie, Idaho. Mr. Smith is the soldier boy who has been very ill five weeks of influenza, but has now practically recovered. he expects to return after the holidays to take up his studies at the university.

Miss Dora Smith, who is teaching at Viola, is home to spend Christmas.

Miss Theo. Smith, who is teaching at Avon, came home for the holidays.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 23 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Van Buren School, Caldwell, Idaho

SchoolVanBurenSchoolCaldwellFritz-a

courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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December 24

The Idaho Republican. December 24, 1918, Page 2

19181224TIR1

Sterling

Miss Louise Verbick resumed her work at the J. W. Sprague store Monday, after a two week absence during which time she was ill with the flu.

The funeral of Miss Ida Edwards was held Sunday at 2 o’clock at the Springfield cemetery, where the body was interred. … The services where short on account of the severity of the weather. She leaves besides her father and mothers two brothers, one of who is in France, and three sisters to mourn her loss besides a host of friend. Ida has been a sufferer from other diseases for several years and could not withstand the influenza when it attack her constitution, but she went peacefully to sleep and to rest in the land where there is no pain.

Dr. Patrie was here on professional business Thursday.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 24 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Republican. December 24, 1918, Page 3

Beet Growers’ Convention Postponed

The beet growers’ convention, which was scheduled to be held at Fort Collins, Colo. the week of December 9-13 was cancelled on account of influenza regulations and Mr. Manwaring, the Idaho delegate, from Blackfoot, was informed by telegram not to report until further notice as the gathering has been postponed indefinitely.
— —

Carl Nelson of Lavaside was transacting business in Blackfoot Wednesday. Mr. Nelson’s entire family have just recovered from influenza and this was Mr. Nelson’s first visit to town since being released from quarantine.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 24 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Republican. December 24, 1918, Page 5

Local News

Word has been received here that the Owendale school which lies east of Shelley was closed early last week on account of the flu. Mr. Owens who was formerly state senator from this county and Miss Violet Bannister the teacher were the first to be afflicted with the epidemic.

The Bingham county board of health met at the court house Wednesday afternoon, Dec. 18 and decided to prohibit the holding of teachers’ examinations at the present time. They considered such a meeting would be a menace to public health.

Miss Gertrude Gill is ill and confined to her bed at the present time.

Mrs. Mae Young, principal of the Groveland school, is quite ill and under the doctor’s care at the present writing.

Word has been received by friends of Miss Mary L. Henaby of her illness with the influenza. Miss Henaby is in Granger, Wash.

Misses Mary King of Taber and Caroline Lowe of Moore were among the teachers who were disappointed over the postponement of the teachers’ examination. The each came to Blackfoot Wednesday afternoon on the Mackay special and returned Thursday morning.

Miss Francis Miller of Presto, Miss Jessie Armstrong of Shelley, Miss Lizzie Daw of Shelly and Miss Caroline Lowe of Arco, came to Blackfoot the last of the week to take the teachers examination and returned to their homes Saturday.

Frank Mozer is reported ill and confined to his room.

Allen Young of Groveland was on the sick list the first of the week and unable to assist his employer James Yancey, who is building a nice new bungalow for Cyril Wright near the William Younie ranch.

Alvin Nelson, son of Mrs. Emma Nelson of Lavaside school district, who has been in training at the marine Barracks in San Diego, Cal. received his discharge and returned to his home Wednesday morning. Mr. Nelson was surprised and very much grieved to find the entire family ill and unable to leave their beds. The mother and three brothers are influenza patients while the young sister is recovering from an attack of diptheria [sic]. They are being well cared for by Miss Esther Belgum the McDonaldville school teacher who is their volunteer nurse.

Miss Eula Palmer who has been quite ill is much improved.

Rev. George Peacock has returned to Blackfoot for the Christmas holidays. His work in the Sunday school mission field is hindered greatly by the influenza epidemic.

Mr. and Mrs. H. A. Williams of Butte, Mont., are spending the Christmas holidays here with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. D. W. McMillan. Mrs. Williams is just now convalescing from a serious attack of influenza.
— —

Library Notice

The Blackfoot public library is now open afternoons only for the loan of books.

Reading tables cannot be used and no crowding will be permitted.

Anyone coughing or sneezing will be asked to leave. …

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 24 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Idaho Republican. December 24, 1918, Page 6

In The Gem State

A school building at Buhl has been transformed into a temporary hospital for the accommodation of influenza patients. a trained nurse has been retained, and the people are determined to stamp out the disease before an epidemic occurs.
— —

Inland Northwest

The boards of health has removed all restrictions that have been in effect at Butte due to the epidemic of influenza. The disease has practically disappeared after running since early in September.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 24 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Bonners Ferry Herald. December 24, 1918, Page 1

19181224BFH1

Christmas at the Schools

Owning to the fact that the influenza epidemic put all school work many weeks behind, the annual Christmas programs in the various grade rooms have been dispensed with although in many of the grades a short and simple program is being rendered this afternoon. There will be but one day’s vacation and school will be resumed Thursday. There is also to be one day’s vacation on New Year’s day.

At the Northside school there will be vacations on Christmas and on New Years. On account of the lack of time in which to prepare Christmas entertainments there will be no public programs. This afternoon the pupils of Miss Winship’s room will enjoy a taffy pull; Miss Sizer’s pupils are having a “spread” and in Miss Dryden’s room the pupils are having a Christmas tree and short program.

source: Bonners Ferry Herald. (Bonners Ferry, Idaho), 24 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Bonners Ferry Herald. December 24, 1918, Page 2

Idaho News Paragraphs
Recent happenings in This State Given in Brief Items for Busy Readers

The influenza epidemic is becoming serious at Genesee.
— —

Would Sterilize Unfit.

Sterilization of mentally and socially unfit persons is recommended by the superintendent of the Idaho state sanitarium at Nampa, in his annual report to the board of directors of the institution.

“This class of unfortunates has been sadly neglected in this state which has resulted in the propagation and increase of these incompetents to such an extent that additional room must be provided,” says his report.

“Unfortunately, this state has no law whereby the mentally and socially unfit may be sterilized, consequently the only means we have for the prevention of their reproduction is isolation and detention.”

source: Bonners Ferry Herald. (Bonners Ferry, Idaho), 24 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Bonners Ferry Herald. December 24, 1918, Page 4

Local News

Mr. and Mrs. G. W. Nutt, of the south bench, are on the sick list with the Spanish influenza. The disease has also made its appearance in the family of Sol Bauman. There are only two cases of the disease in town now.

E. B. Schlette, of the Curley Creek district, was a visitor in the city Saturday. He states that the Curley Creek school had a very fine Christmas entertainment Friday afternoon. The pupils of the Swanson school had a program and Christmas tree last night.

Miss Ruth Lozier, teacher of the Curley Creek school left Sunday for Seattle, Wash., where she was called by the news that her mother had suffered a stroke of paralysis. The Curley Creek school will have a two weeks holiday vacation on account of the absence of Miss Lozier.

source: Bonners Ferry Herald. (Bonners Ferry, Idaho), 24 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Bonners Ferry Herald. December 24, 1918, Page 5

Local Pick-ups

The pupils of the Bonners Ferry schools had their first fire drill this year on Thursday and marched out of the buildings in one minute from the time the alarm was given.

According to word recently received from Mrs. M. F. McAnelly, at Wilson Creek, Wn., her daughter, Mrs. Fred Griesenger, is improving in health. Mrs. Griesenger was seriously ill with influenza.

E. Osborn, proprietor of the stage line between Porthill and this city, is up and around again after having been confined to his bed for a couple of weeks with Spanish influenza. While he was sick Wm. Warwick was in charge of the stage line and mail carrying business.

Mrs. Perry Wilson was called to Spokane Wednesday afternoon by a telegram telling of the serious illness of her sister, Mrs. Guy Reigle, with Spanish influenza.

source: Bonners Ferry Herald. (Bonners Ferry, Idaho), 24 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Bonners Ferry Herald. December 24, 1918, Page 8

Local Pick-ups

Miss Gladys Ashby is on the sick list this week with an attack of the Spanish influenza which she contracted Sunday.

The members of the family of W. J. Bone have been on the sick list the past week with the Spanish influenza. At last reports all the sick ones were getting along nicely.

Mr. and Mrs. J. W. O’Brien and children are all down with the influenza at the home of relatives at Richmond, Wis. They stopped off at Richmond on their way here from Chisholm, Minn., and contracted the disease there. Mr. and Mrs. O’Brien are former residents here and have decided that “old Bonners Ferry” is a good place to live after all. Mr. O’Brien is a brother of Mrs. L. N. Brown.
— —

Union Church Notice

Services in the Union church next Sunday as usual. Sunday school at 10:00 a.m. Morning service at 11:00 o’clock, subject, “Thoughts for the Closing Year.”

Evening service at 7:30 p.m..

Everybody is cordially invited to these services.

G. H. Wilbur, Pastor.

source: Bonners Ferry Herald. (Bonners Ferry, Idaho), 24 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., December 24, 1918, Page 1

19181224DSM1

19181224DSM3
President Lindley Thanks Moscow
University Head Tells of His Appreciation of Cooperative Spirit

Dr. E. H. Lindley, president of the University of Idaho, wishes the people of Moscow and vicinity to know how he and the university faculty appreciate the splendid spirit of cooperation that has been shown here during the influenza epidemic and in making it possible to secure such a large corps of the S. A. C. T. here. Dr. Lindley has asked The Star-Mirror to publish the following statement:

To the People of Moscow:

I wish to express to you the grateful thanks of the university for extraordinary services rendered. The university is attempting to compile a roll of honor of all who rendered special assistance during the recent ordeal. The list, however, is so lengthy that it will be impossible to render acknowledgment to individuals.

At the outset you assumed large responsibilities in order to provide for the Students’ Army Training Corps. You made possible one of the largest corps in the Northwest, representing every locality in Idaho and a contingent from a sister state.

When the influenza came and death began to stalk among our boys, Moscow rose to her full height and, forgetful of self, cared for the stricken as though they were her own.

On every hand there has been manifested throughout the spirit of kindly hospitality and cooperation. The good name of the city is in consequence diffused throughout the state. From the Panhandle to the Yellowstone the word has passed, “Moscow is taking good care of our boys and girls.”

The demobilization of the Students’ Army Training Corps closes an unique chapter in the history of the university and the state. You helped the university to win a creditable record, the benefits of which will not quickly disappear. Mindful of the noble spirit of your deeds, the university goes forward to meet the perplexing problems of the immediate future with confidence in your continued loyalty to the great trust confided to you by the state of Idaho.

May the memory of the days just passed add to the happiness of the Christmastide of each of you.

E. H. Lindley.
— —

Two Thousand Red Crossers Now Here
Moscow “Went Over The Top” in The Red Cross Christmas Roll Call

Moscow made it. The city reached the goal of membership fixed when the Christmas roll call was started. There are 2,000 members of the Red Cross in Moscow, now. This means that $2,000 has been added to the funds to care for the sick, wounded and afflicted soldiers and supply their needs after the return home from the battle fields.

Moscow always reaches her goal, if you give her time enough. The influenza, the bad weather, all combined to deter the work, but it has gone on steadily from the first day and Moscow has a membership of which her citizens can feel proud. …
— —

No Paper Christmas Day.

Tomorrow is Christmas and The Star-Mirror, in common with all other business enterprises of Moscow, will observe the day. The office will be closed during the day and no paper will be issued. This is to be the greatest Christmas the world has known and it should be observed in fitting manner.

The Star-Mirror wishes every one of its hundreds of patrons a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year. …
(page 2)
— —

19181224DSM2

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 24 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., December 24, 1918, Page 3

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City News

Miss Rose Hawks left Sunday for Nampa, Idaho, called by the illness of influenza, of her sister, Miss Nettie, who left Moscow for a visit about two weeks ago.

W. B. Knosness, farm bureau manager for northern Idaho counties, has returned from the north part of the state where he went on official business, and was taken ill with the influenza. He got to Spokane and spent some time in a hospital there. He has recovered sufficiently to return and is about the streets, but is a little weak yet. Mr. Knosness reports the farm bureau work in the 10 northern counties of Idaho as in a flourishing condition.

Mrs. E. Vanginaux has received word that her daughter, Mrs. Chas. Howard, of Los Angeles is very ill with influenza. Mrs. Howard was a pioneer resident of Latah country.
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source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 24 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Lowell School, Boise, Idaho

SchoolLowellSchoolBoiseFritz-a

courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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December 18 * Last Week *

The Challis Messenger., December 18, 1918, Page 1

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While The Doc’s Away, The “Flu” Gained Sway!
The “Flu” has at Last Reached Challis!

 

Since Friday of this week, 11 cases of Spanish Influenza have developed in this locality.

 

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The picture shows, dances, pool halls, schools and all other public gatherings have been prohibited and it is hoped that the disease will be confined to those who are afflicted with it at present.

It is thought that John McKinney brought the disease in. Mr. McKinney evaded the quarantine guard at the Watt bridge and after being here two days was taken ill with the disease.

The authorities in charge, during the absence of Dr. Kirtley, who was summoned to appear in court at Mackay, did not know what action to take in the matter, as Mr. McKinney stated that he had been five days on the road from Salmon to this city.

However, the “flu” is here! We urge everyone to be particularly careful and aid the health officials in every way in stamping out the disease.
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Actions Against 2 County Officials Dismissed
Huntington Ouster and Adamson Contempt Cases Heard and Taken Under Advisement.

The actions brought against Dr. C. L. Kirtley, county physician and commissioner and M. A. Brown, county attorney, were heard in chambers at Mackay this week.

The action against Dr. Kirtley was brought to put him out of office. Judge Terrell, after hearing the evidence in the case dismissed the action. Judge Cowen dismissed the contempt proceedings against the doctor and M. A. Brown.

The ouster proceedings against Sheriff Huntington occupied several days, Judge Terrell taking the matter under advisement. Mr. Huntington pled guilty to contempt before Judge Cowen, who took the matter under advisement.

The proceedings against W. W. Adamson, charging him with contempt where brought up for consideration and the defendant having entered a plea of guilty, the Judge took the matter under advisement.

All the cases mentioned above resulted from the quarantine against Spanish Influenza which was established in this section some two months ago. The quarantine was in no way interfered with.

George Coryell, Jno. Job, Wm. Oster, M. A. Dillingham, Mabel Keyser, Blanche and Elias Thomas were summoned as witnesses from this city.
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(page 5)

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source: The Challis Messenger. (Challis, Idaho), 18 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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December 25

The Challis Messenger., December 25, 1918, Page 1

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Observe Health Rules

The public is earnestly requested to observe all health regulations. By doing so you will greatly aid in confining the disease to those afflicted at present.
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To the Ranchers

All ranchers are requested to avoid trips to town so far as possible.
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Flu Masks

The local chapter of the Red Cross is making flu masks and all who desire them can get them at the drug stores.

source: The Challis Messenger. (Challis, Idaho), 25 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Challis Messenger., December 25, 1918, Page 4

Compulsory School Law

Section 150. In all districts of this State, all parents, guardians, and other persons having care of children shall instruct them, or cause them to be instructed, in reading, writing, spelling, English Grammar, geography and arithmetic. In such districts, every parent, guardian, or other person having charge of any child between the ages of eight (8) and sixteen (16) years shall send such a child to a public, private or parochial school for the entire school year during which the public school are in session in such district;

Provided, however, That this chapter shall not apply to children over fifteen (15) years of age, where such child shall have completed the eighth (8) grade, or may be eligible to enter any high school in such district, or where its help is needed for its own use or its parents support, or where for good cause shown it would be for the best interest of such child to be relieved from the provisions of this chapter.

Provided, further, That if a reputable physician within the district shall certify in writing that the child’s bodily or mental condition does not permit its attendance at school, such child shall be exempt during such period of disability from the requirements of this chapter.

It shall be the duty of the superintendent of the school district, if there be such superintendent, and if not, then the county superintendent of schools, to hear and determine all applications of children desiring, for any of the causes mentioned here, to be exempted from the provisions of this chapter, and if upon such application, such superintendent, hearing the same, shall be of the opinion that such child for any reason is entitled to be exempted as aforesaid, then such superintendent shall issue a written permit to such child, stating therein his reason for such exemption.

An appeal may be taken from the decision of such superintendent as passing upon such application, to the probate court of the county in which such district lies, upon such child making such application and filling the same with the clerk or judge of said court, within ten days after its refusal by such superintendent, for which no fee to exceed the sum of One Dollar ($1.00) shall be charged, and the decision of the probate court shall be final. An application for release from the provisions of this chapter shall not be renewed oftener than once in three months.

source: The Challis Messenger. (Challis, Idaho), 25 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Challis Messenger., December 25, 1918, Page 5

Items About People You Know

Half Hundred Flu Cases.

To date, nearly fifty cases of Spanish Influenza have developed in Challis and Round Valley. Besides those reported in our last issue as having the disease, there has developed the following new cases: Mrs. Seth Buratedt*, Mary Coryell, Claus Burrtedt*, W. W. Adamson, Frank Baxter and wife, and three children, Mrs. Wells, Roy Chivers, Mrs. W. W. Adamson, Irene Michael, four of Elias Thomas’ children, Floyd Bradley, Hattie Coleman, Beatrice Foley, Mr. and Mrs. Charlie Jensen and daughter, Blanche, Mrs. Roy Chivers and Ivan Hughes.

Mrs. Burstedt* and son, Claus, were over from Pahsamaroi the fore part of the week.

Mrs. Lottie McGown, who was taken ill with the flu at the ‘phone office, was moved to Mrs. Kieupfer’s Monday afternoon.

[*Note: this name is spelled 3 different ways on the same page.]
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Got the Flu at Mackay

W. W. Adamson, who attended court at Mackay last week, and who is at present suffering with the flu, is of the opinion that he contracted the disease at Mackay, as he went directly into quarantine upon his return home and was taken ill shortly afterwards.
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John McKinney Taken Home

John McKinney of Salmon, who was taken ill here last week with the flu, was taken home Saturday. Dr. Kirtley admonished him regarding the danger of making the journey, but the young man insisted on going home. Harry [?], of Salmon, came up after him.

source: The Challis Messenger. (Challis, Idaho), 25 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Challis Messenger., December 25, 1918, Page 8

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source: The Challis Messenger. (Challis, Idaho), 25 Dec. 1918. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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School photos courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
link:
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Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 1)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 2)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 3)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 4)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 5)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 6)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 7)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 8)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 9)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 10)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 11)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 12)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 13)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 14)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 15)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 16)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 17)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 18)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 19)