Monthly Archives: October 2020

Rx burn South Fork Salmon River

Rx burn South Fork Salmon River planed

Update Oct 30: For your planning purposes and general knowledge. We are narrowing down our window for prescribed fire operations in Four Mile. Tentatively we are looking at burning Monday (11/2/20) or Tuesday (11/3/20) depending on weather. Ignitions will start in the afternoon and will last one day. I expect some residual smoke for a couple days. A system is expected to enter the burn area Wednesday which should bring cooler temps, high humidity’s and increased ventilation. Thank you for your interest and have a good weekend, Patrick

The Payette National Forest, Krassel Ranger District, is planning to conduct prescribed burning in the Four Mile project area this fall. The Four Mile project area is on both sides of the South Fork of the Salmon River between Poverty Flat Campground and Reed Ranch. The area that will be targeted for fire this fall is to the east of the South Fork Rd between Reed Ranch and Poverty Flat Campground. First priority burn block will be the area between Nasty and Four Mile creeks. Ignitions should take 1-3 days for each burn block, with smoke and fire most likely present in the project area until the next significant precipitation.

The decision to implement prescribed fire always includes assessing the risk and impacts to communities, firefighters and forest resources. This season additional consideration will be given to complexity associated with COVID19, cumulative smoke exposure in our communities from wildfire and the commitment of fire resources locally and nationally.

If you will be operating in the area or have any questions please contact Laurel Ingram, Fuels Tech or Patrick Schon, Fuels Specialist, so that we can collaborate on timing.

Patrick Schon
Email: patrick.schon@usda.gov
Laurel Ingram
Email: laurel.ingram@usda.gov

Map Link: FourMile Fall 2020 Notification
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Road Reports Oct 28, 2020

Please share road reports. Conditions can change quickly this time of year. Be prepared for rocks and trees in the road, and possible snow in higher elevation. Remember there is no cell phone service.

Yellow Pine: Rain, then cold weather have improved local streets. Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN.
“Drivers don’t speed through neighborhoods or most anywhere. Locals brake for kids, wandering dogs, deer, elk, moose, fox, beaver, squirrels and chipmunks. Most are lifetime members of SPLAT, the Society to Prevent Little Animal Tragedies.” – IME
link: Local Forecast
Yellow Pine Webcam: (check date on image)

Highway 55 Webcams Link:
Link: Fall 2020 ID-55, Smiths Ferry Improvements
ID-55 is closing between Smiths Ferry and Rainbow Bridge starting Monday, Sept. 21. for rock blasting and cleanup. Plan ahead for full road closures Monday-Thursday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. through November, and use U.S. 95 as an alternate route.
State Highway 55 Construction Work Scheduled starts Tuesday, September 8th, 2020
Fall (September through November) and Spring (March through May)
– Daytime and nighttime work seven days a week
– Full road closures Monday through Thursday from 10:00am to 2:00pm
– One-way alternating traffic during all other time frames
link: more info
Note: Due to the Hwy 55 construction from Smith’s Ferry to Rainbow Bridge, the County Commissioners have ordered the closure of Smith’s Ferry Dr. at Packer John Rd. and Round Valley Rd. This closure does not apply to the property owners.

Highway 95: Detour around slide.
Update Oct 27: Drilling on the face of the slope is now complete. Next crews will start installing mesh at the top of the slope and removing the rock berm on the south side. Impacts to traffic – delays up to 15 minutes – are expected to remain the same until early November.
Remaining work includes installing cable netting on the face of the slope, installing fencing at the bottom of the slope, repairing the surface of US-95 and making minor changes to Old Pollock Road. Work is expected to wrap up in mid-November.
Check ITD (link)
French Creek Road is not an official, nor a recommended detour for Highway 95.

Warm Lake Highway: No problems reported.
link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

South Fork Road: Open
Saturday (Oct 24) mail truck driver (Taylor) said the South Fork paving is complete and the road is in good shape.
“No closure of the SF Road due to [planned] Rx Fire.” – PNF
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Saturday (Oct 24) mail truck driver (Taylor) reports they had run the grader over some of the rough spots.

Johnson Creek Road: Open
Report Wednesday (Oct 28) mail truck driver (Taylor) says the road is in good shape.
link: Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam
link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
Note: The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Open. No current report.
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Open. No recent reports.
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcam: (check date on image)

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open. No recent reports.
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Travel at your own risk. No recent reports. Be prepared for high elevation snow this time of year.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Cinnabar: Open? Travel at your own risk. Be prepared for high elevation snow this time of year. No recent reports.
Reports of off road travel this summer cutting through the switchbacks and tearing up the hillside.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Travel at your own risk. No recent reports.
Be prepared for high elevation snow this time of year.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Warrens Wagon Road: No recent reports.

Deadwood Summit: Open, travel with caution. No recent reports. Be prepared for high elevation snow this time of year.
Note: The approx. elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′

New Link
Valley County Road Maintenance Dashboard
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Oct 25, 2020 The Yellow Pine Times

Oct 25, 2020 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Reminder: We are still under a boil water order until further notice.

Community Calendar:

April 17 – Boil water order issued
Aug 11 – Valley County Mask Order
Aug 12 – Firewood Permits at The Corner
Sept 8 – Hwy 55 work started
Oct 31 – Halloween at the YP Tavern 7pm
Fall 2020 – Rx burn South Fork Salmon River planed
Nov 1 – Daylight Savings Time ends
Nov 2 – 3-day a week mail starts
Nov 26 – Thanksgiving potluck Community Hall 2pm
Nov 30 – Firewood Season Ends
(details below)
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From Valley County

Valley County Mask-Up
A county-wide mask mandate was approved the CDH August 11th, and is now in effect for Valley County. (link)

Rebound – Idaho Governor’s phasing program
link:

COVID 19: Recommendations and Resources for Safe Business Practices
link: (lots of info for businesses)
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Local Events:

Yellow Pine Tavern Annual Halloween Party

20201031YPTavernMask-a

Join us for the “Most Original Covid Mask” Contest at the Tavern October 31 at 7pm. Our Annual Salmon Bake, End of Deer Season, Halloween Party Potluck. Alaskan Salmon provided by Tom Wood.
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Thanksgiving

Thursday, November 26th, 2pm. Yellow Pine Thanksgiving Potluck Dinner, at the Community Hall.
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Rx burn South Fork Salmon River planed

The Payette National Forest, Krassel Ranger District, is planning to conduct prescribed burning in the Four Mile project area this fall. The Four Mile project area is on both sides of the South Fork of the Salmon River between Poverty Flat Campground and Reed Ranch. The area that will be targeted for fire this fall is to the east of the South Fork Rd between Reed Ranch and Poverty Flat Campground. First priority burn block will be the area between Nasty and Four Mile creeks. Ignitions should take 1-3 days for each burn block, with smoke and fire most likely present in the project area until the next significant precipitation.

The decision to implement prescribed fire always includes assessing the risk and impacts to communities, firefighters and forest resources. This season additional consideration will be given to complexity associated with COVID19, cumulative smoke exposure in our communities from wildfire and the commitment of fire resources locally and nationally.

If you will be operating in the area or have any questions please contact Laurel Ingram, Fuels Tech or Patrick Schon, Fuels Specialist, so that we can collaborate on timing.

Map Link: FourMile Fall 2020 Notification
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Highway 55 Closure starts Monday, Sept 21st

Fall (September through November) and Spring (March through May)
– Daytime and nighttime work seven days a week
– Full road closures Monday through Thursday from 10:00am to 2:00pm
– One-way alternating traffic during all other time frames
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Village News:

Yellow Pine Precinct

Yellow Pine is a “vote by mail” precinct. You must be registered to vote in the Yellow Pine precinct to receive a mail in ballot.

The 2020 ballots have arrived. Make sure you follow instructions and SIGN the outer envelope. There were questions about return postage – the answer is the bar code sticker on the back of the outer envelope with your name is the postage. Ballots must be received by the Valley County Clerk no later than Nov 3rd.
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After Fire Action Meeting

On Tuesday, Oct 13, there was a meeting at the community hall to compile an “After Action Review” for the Buck Fire. (No report yet.)
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Help Support the Yellow Pine Volunteer Fire Department

Thank you for all your offers of help and support. Now you can help support the Yellow Pine Fire District by donating through our Go Fund Me account. Just click on the link to get started.

Even a small donation could help reach the fundraising goal. And if you can’t make a donation, it would be great if you could share the fundraiser to help spread the word.

Thanks for taking a look!

FAQ: YPAC is the charity that was set up to allow the Village to apply for grants. It was the only 501.c3 the Village has to allow GoFundMe to recognize an authorized EIN. So, funds will go to YPAC then they will cut a check to the fire district. YPAC is lead by Corey Phillips and Matt Huber is the Secretary.
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Boil Water Order issued April 17 still in effect.

No update for August or September.

Update July 5: the boil order is in effect due to extremely high use due to leaks.

Update June 12: The boil order is still on. We still are experiencing excessive water use because of leaks. Not sure when this will be lifted. We are applying for grants to repair the system.

Update June 2: The water plant is experiencing high water in Boulder Creek which brings more debris into the sand filter.

The high demand caused by leaks in the system plugs the sand filters prematurely. We will be on a boil order until further notice.
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Critters

Be Bear Aware

* Keep all household garbage secured in a garage or other enclosed area.
* Leftovers or discarded fish or meat bones give off a strong odor and should be stored in your freezer until you haul the garbage to the transfer station.
* Keep attractants like B-B-Q grills, bird seed or pet food stored where bears cannot find them.
* Bird feeders should be taken down May through October or placed well out of reach of bears.

Be Mountain Lion Aware

* NEVER run away from a mountain lion. The lion’s instinct is to chase and ultimately catch what they perceive as potential prey.
* NEVER turn your back on a lion. Always face them while making yourself look as large as you can. Yell loudly, but don’t scream. A high-pitched scream may mimic the sound of a wounded animal.
* SLOWLY back away while maintaining eye contact with the lion.
* Safety equipment you may choose to carry could include bear spray, a noise device, like an air-horn, and if you walk in the dark, a very bright flashlight.
* If you are attacked, fight back!
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Latest Road Reports

Link: to current road reports.
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Yellow Pine US Mail

The 6-day a week mail delivery started June 1st. The 3-day a week mail delivery will start Nov 2nd. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 55 cents. Support our local post office and purchase your holiday stamps here.
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Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Report the bins were emptied Wednesday Oct 14th.

Road is good from YP to the dump.

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

20190429Dump2-bYellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is located approximately 3 miles south on Johnson Creek Road.

The TRANSFER STATION is for household trash and yard waste:
* Household trash must be put inside (and fit) the dumpster;
* Yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, etc.) goes in the burn pile on the south end of the turn-around;
* Cardboard boxes should be flattened before putting the in the dumpster,

The DUMPSTERS are NOT for:
* Furniture (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station).

The BURN PILE is NOT for:
* Cardboard boxes (flatten and put in dumpster);
* Furniture and appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Drywall and building material (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wire or fencing (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Foam Rubber (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wood with metal (like nails) attached (take to Donnelly Transfer Station.)

When closing the DOORS on the front of the dumpsters:
* Make sure the “U” brackets at the top and bottom of the door are engaged;
* The retaining bar at the middle of the door is slid into the pipe;
* And the “L” bars at the bottom of the doors dropped into place.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: 208/634-7176
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Local Groups

YPWUA News:

The annual Water meeting for 2020 was held July 5th at the Community Hall 2pm.
link: minutes 20200705YPWUA.docx

Boil Water Order issued April 17, 2020. This could last until leaks are repaired.

Boil Water Advisory Notice

Boil Your Water Before Using

Bring tap water to a rolling boil, boil for one minute, and cool before using or use bottled water. Boiled or bottled water should be used for drinking, making ice, washing dishes, brushing teeth, and preparing food until further notice.

This Boil Water Advisory Notice applies to The Yellow Pine Water System

The system is being monitored and checked daily for compliance.

You will be informed when you no longer need to boil your water.

Please share this information with other people who drink this water, especially anyone who may not get this notice directly (for example, people in apartments, nursing homes, schools, and businesses).

You can do this by posting this notice in a public place or distributing copies by hand or mail.

State Water System ID#: 4430059 Date distributed: 3-22-2020

Notice of Intent to File an Application with USDA, Rural Development

The Yellow Pine Water Users Association, Yellow Pine, Idaho intends to file an Application with USDA, Rural Development to obtain a drinking water system facility Emergency Community Water Assistance Grant (ECWAG). Emergency Community Water Assistance Grant (ECWAG).

If any additional information is needed, please contact:
Willie Sullivan
Treasurer
ypwater @ gmail.com

Distributed to Yellow Pine Water Users Association customers via Yellow Pine Times on June 12, 2020.

The 2019 Yellow Pine Water Users Shareholders meeting was Sunday July 7, 2019.
link: 20190707YPWUAminutes
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VYPA News:

Heat was installed in the Community Hall on April 30, 2020.

Addition for Community Hall bathrooms October 15, 2020.

Minutes from September 12 VYPA meeting
link:

Minutes from August 8, 2020 VYPA meeting
link:

Minutes from July 11, 2020 VYPA meeting
link:

Minutes from June 13, 2020 VYPA meeting
link:

VYPA Bylaws adopted 8/8/2020 (link)

YPAC Corp Bylaws (link)
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YPFD News:

Burn Ban rescinded Oct 20, 2020

After Action Report meeting Oct 13, 2020 (no minutes yet.)

YPFD had a budget meeting on September 30th at 10am at the fire station. (No minutes yet.)

Make sure to clean and check chimney fitting before starting that first fall fire in your cabin. Cleaning brushes can be borrowed from the YPFD.

There was a YP Fire Commissioner meeting on June 27, 2020 at 10am at the Fire Station.
Link: 20200627 Fire Dept minutes June 27

YPFD COVID19 Policy

link: YPFD Covid 19 SOP

link: Covid-19 EMS (May 23)

Pile burning: Dress appropriately, have enough help on hand (people, water and tools) and make a firebreak before you start. Call your local fire protection district chief to let them know you’ll be conducting a debris burn. This saves them from sending emergency responders to your property if they are not needed. Do NOT burn on breezy afternoons.

Better yet, “Bring It, Don’t Burn It”, you can take your yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, etc.) to the burn pile at the Transfer Station on the south end of the turn-around. Remember, keep the pile neat. Woody debris only, no nails, no cardboard and no furniture! The Boise NF will burn the pile in the fall when it is safe and doesn’t pollute our fine YP air.

YP Fire Commissioners:
Sue Holloway – District 1
Dan Stiff – District 2
Merrill Saleen – District 3
(TBA) – Fire Chief

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice

The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.” Click the link: to view 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation
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Biz Listings:

The Corner (208) 633-3325

Open 11am-8pm Closed Tuesdays thru end of hunting season. Calling ahead works best. Groceries, Ice Cream, Beer and Soda. Our menu fluctuates but typically have Smoked Brisket, Tri Tip, Chicken, Burgers and Wings on hand.
Starting Aug 12th Firewood Permits at The Corner
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Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233

Open Daily 8am to 10pm. Outside Dining and Bar. Breakfast and Bar Food.
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Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377

Open until November 3rd.
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Yellow Pine General Store (208) 633-3300

The store is open now and will be thru October (closing November 3rd for the winter.) Hours are 9 am to 6 pm Tuesday through Saturday. Closed Sunday and Monday.
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Murph’s RV Park & Mary’s Cabins
FB page link
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Knotty Kat Crochet Works – 208-502-0940
FB page link
open Tue – Sat, 9-5
Yellow Pine eggs $3/doz
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Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Tom & Sarah Lanham
156 Yellow Pine Ave, Yellow Pine Id 83677
website:
Facebook:
Starting June 2020 We will be doing trail rides out of Yellow Pine along with summer pack / camping trips to high mountain lakes in the area!

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
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Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430 open 830am-5pm Monday-Friday, closed weekends.
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Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

The Star-News

click to subscribe:
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine

Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, will service Yellow Pine

B&T Safety Solutions LLC
208-271-1600 Based out of Donnelly
Snow removal, cleaning chimneys and stoves, we do cabin staining/chinking as well
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (Oct 19) yesterday’s rain showers totaled 0.06″, overnight low of 38 degrees, mostly cloudy sky this morning. Jays and a vocal pine squirrel visiting. Partly cloudy after lunch time. Gusty breezes and decreasing clouds mid-afternoon, high of 63 degrees. Pine squirrels hunting for the scarce pine cones. Clouds to the west at sunset were colorful. Partly cloudy and variable breezes at dusk. Blackbird on the power line. Cloudy before midnight.

Tuesday (Oct 20) 24 hour low temp of 41 degrees was from Monday morning, overcast sky this morning. Jays visiting. Gray overcast at lunch time. Boom at 219pm. Gray overcast and mild temperatures mid-afternoon, light breezes, high of 59 degrees. Brown truck speeding down the hill on main street. Mostly cloudy at dusk. Looked cloudy before midnight.

Wednesday (Oct 21) overnight low of 40 degrees, mostly cloudy sky and breezy this morning. Mail truck was a little late today, no problems reported. Mostly cloudy and breezy after lunch time. Cooler, mostly cloudy and breezy mid-afternoon, high of 54 degrees. Gusty late afternoon. Overcast at dusk, blustery and a short bit of rain and graupel. Overcast and breezy before midnight. Trace of snow fell during the night.

Thursday (Oct 22) overnight low of 26 degrees, trace of snow on the ground, partly clear sky this morning. Partly cloudy and breezy at lunch time. Steller Jays visiting. Cool, partly cloudy and chilly breezes mid-afternoon, high of 47 degrees. Clear sky at dusk and just above freezing. Clear and cold at midnight.

Friday (Oct 23) overnight low of 16 degrees, clear sky this morning, slight cold breeze and frosty. Sunny and breezy at lunch time. Cloudy, cool and gusty winds mid-afternoon, high of 48 degrees. Steller jays hanging out. Cloudy and calmer at dusk. Cloudy and calm before midnight. Rain early morning.

Saturday (Oct 24) 24 hour low of 17 degrees from Friday morning (stayed above freezing last night), rain early morning total = 0.03″, this morning clouds sitting halfway down the mountains and clearing above. Just before lunch a few flakes of snow falling (no accumulation,) mostly cloudy and breezy. Scattered sunshine after lunch. Mostly cloudy and chilly gusty breezes mid-afternoon, high of 47 degrees. Blustery, cold and dark overcast at dusk. Partly clear and breezy before midnight, Mars up.

Sunday (Oct 25) overnight low of 16 degrees, clear sky and cold breezes this morning. A little more traffic than usual. Clear and breezy at noon. Cool, clear and breezy mid-afternoon, high of 36 degrees. Blustery afternoon. Clear sky at dusk, below freezing and light breeze.
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RIP:

Ken Boatman

September 11, 1951 – October 17, 2020

20050102KenBoatman

Ken Boatman, of Yellow Pine, formerly of New Plymouth and Sandpoint, Idaho, passed away at 630pm Friday, October 17, 2020 after a very long illness.

Mr. Boatman moved to Yellow Pine in the early 1990’s and worked at the Stibnite Mine as a heavy equipment operator.

Ken was preceded in death by his father Lloyd and his canine companion Rocky. Survived by sister Connie and daughter Danelle and grandchildren.
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Idaho News:

1,073 new Idaho COVID-19 cases, 9 new deaths

Oct 23, 2020 Local News 8

Idaho officials reported 1,073 new COVID-19 cases and 9 new deaths on Friday.

That’s 21 cases less than the record reported cases on a single day of 1,094 last Friday, Oct. 16.

That brings the total confirmed and probable cases reported since March to 57,673.

There are a total of 50,902 confirmed cases and 6,771 probable cases in all 44 of the 44 counties in Idaho, according to numbers released from the local health districts and the state.

… 9 new deaths were reported bringing the total recorded deaths to 562.

full story:
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Idaho Friday, October 23


source: KTVB
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Some Idaho hospitals ‘reaching crisis stage’ as coronavirus cases surge, medical experts warn

The next two weeks will be crucial in determining the future status of hospital capacities throughout the Gem State, according to Dr. Steven Nemerson.

Katija Stjepovic (KTVB) October 22, 2020

As COVID-19 cases in North Idaho continue to surge, Panhandle Health District moved two counties under its jurisdiction to the highest risk category on Thursday.

Kootenai Health in Coeur d’ Alene is nearing its capacity for COVID-19 patients and may have to transfer some of them to out-of-state locations. Kootenai County’s positivity rate has surpassed 20%.

A similar situation is developing in South-Central Idaho, where doctors and health district officials are very concerned about the rising number of coronavirus cases and the resulting burden being placed on hospitals there.

continued:
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Valley County COVID-19 cases up 4, now stand at 144

By Tom Grote for The Star-News Oct 22, 2020

The total number of positive COVID-19 cases in Valley County reached 148 cases on Tuesday, up four cases from 144 a week ago, health officials said.

St. Luke’s McCall on Tuesday reported 115 total positive cases from testing done at the hospital, up two cases from 113 a week ago.

Cascade Medical Center reported 30 positive cases, or two more than the 28 cases reported last week.

In addition, the private testing cooperative Crush the Curve has found three confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Valley County with no change in the past week.

Nearly all of the positive cases reported by the hospitals were found following the start of the summer visitor season in mid-June.

Central District Health reported 99 of the positive cases were confirmed to be Valley County residents as of Tuesday, which is two more than the 97 cases reported a week ago.

The difference between the hospital figures and the health department figures are those who tested positive but did not declare Valley County as their residence.

One death from COVID-19 has been reported in Valley County since the pandemic reached Idaho in March. An 85-year-old McCall man died July 15 at St. Luke’s Boise hospital due to complications of COVID-19 infection.

continued:
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Found Safe

Report from Midas Gold Oct 19, 2020 via FB

This weekend, a gentleman got lost from his hunting party near Thunder Mountain. The news traveled to our team at Stibnite and we jumped into action, alongside many other first responders, to help with the search and provide backcountry communications support. Thankfully, the search and rescue helicopter saw a light late Saturday evening, which helped everyone hone our search Sunday and find the lost man!!!

We are so grateful to have wonderful search and rescue personnel in Idaho and that everyone is safe today.
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Valley County prepares for in-person voting Nov. 3

Voters will be required to wear masks, have temperatures taken

By Max Silverson for The Star-News Oct 22, 2020

In-person voters in Valley County on Nov. 3 will be required to wear a mask and have their temperature taken, Valley County Clerk Doug Miller said.

Voters with elevated temperatures would not be allowed to enter the polling location, but would be able to do curbside voting outside instead, Miller said.

Voters will be required to maintain six feet from each other, poll booths will be sanitized after every voter and public areas will be sanitized every 15 minutes, among other safety precautions and sanitation procedures, Miller said.

… “We would respectfully ask that if a voter has requested an absentee ballot and has not received it that they contact our office immediately at 208-382-7103 for us to determine what the issue is and for us to make sure that the voter has the ability to cast a vote,” he said.

full story:
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WICAP seeks applications for winter home energy assistance

The Star-News Oct 22, 2020

The Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program will accept applications for the winter starting on Nov. 1.

The program offers assistance with heating and cooling energy costs, bill payment, energy crisis, weatherization and energy-related home repairs.

To apply for assistance, visit https://wicap.org and click on LIHEAP application or call 208-382-4577.

Information on the program is also available on the Western Idaho Community Action Partnership website.

source:
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McCall LOT taxes hold steady despite COVID-19

Collections show busiest tourist season ever

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News Oct 22, 2020

McCall saw its busiest summer tourism season on record this year despite the COVID-19 pandemic, according to city tax collection reports.

The city’s two local-option taxes combined to bring in about $1.1 million in June, July and August, or about $26,000 more than the previous record highs set in 2019.

The taxes are a barometer for tourism in McCall because much of the money is generated through sales taxes on overnight lodging, like motels and short-term rentals.

continued:
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Donnelly man given jail time for shooting into home

Woman recounts terror of bullets smashing into house

By Max Silverson for The Star-News Oct 22, 2020

A Donnelly man was sentenced on Monday to six months in jail and three years of probation for firing his rifle into a neighbor’s home on March 27 while a woman and her three children were inside.

Christopher Kaufman, 49 was arrested on five felony offenses when he fired more than a dozen rounds from a semi-automatic rifle into his neighbor’s home, which was occupied by the woman and her children ages 1, 3 and 6.

Kaufman later pleaded guilty to one count of shooting at an occupied dwelling and one count of injury to a child, both of which are felonies.

As part of his plea agreement, two additional counts of injury to a child and one count of malicious injury to property were dropped.

Fourth District Court Judge Jason Scott said his decision to primarily issue probation instead of jail time was a matter of luck that the shots fired did not hit anyone.

continued:
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Letter to Share:

Stibnite mine access on Johnson Creek would be a tragedy

To the Editor:

I can agree with the part of your editorial of Oct. 8 bemoaning the idea of the Midas Gold project at Stibnite building 20 miles of new haul road through an area of wilderness bordering on wilderness, and home of threatened species as well as summering grounds for all the ungulate species inhabiting and taking refuge there from the heavily peopled areas to the West (“Upgrade Johnson Creek Road for Stibnite mine,” The Star-News).

Its construction would be a tragedy. But even more problematic and tragic would be a route down the Johnson Creek Road from Landmark which borders Johnson Creek for most of its way, home to a struggling and slowly reviving population of Chinook salmon and one of the last best West Slope cutthroat populations in the Northwest.

Also claiming habitat here are bull trout, a signal of the purest waters available for fisheries habitats. The results of chemical or other spills along this route, as opposed to the Burntlog new construction route, are dramatically more damaging since the latter does not offer the companion road/stream embrace.

In addition to possible (and certain, given the reconstruction of the Johnson Creek Road route) damage to one of the most valuable fisheries in the Northwest, the Johnson Creek Road route would conflict with the heavy (and I do mean heavy) current use of that road for fishermen, campers, hikers, ATV/UTV motorcycle users, and homeowner motorists.

It has become the Valley County’s most used recreational access in its eastern sector. It is my understanding that Midas wishes for a gate at the Landmark entrance to its new proposed haul road which would eliminate all but mining traffic, leaving the recreational access northward toward Yellow Pine and Big Creek and the southward access toward Deadwood and Stanley free from heavy mining traffic.

While this does not resolve the conflicts and damages wrought on the Warm Lake Road, it does still allow those willing to face the heavy mining traffic there some less dangerous access to recreational areas after the completion of the haul road.

Before its completion, of course, the plans for all the alternatives in the EIS is to access the Stibnite area via Johnson Creek. A better plan would be to complete the haul road before accessing Stibnite via other routes.

If permanent access were decided to be along Johnson Creek, thence through Yellow Pine, as the editorial suggests, it would be the death knell for my business, a backcountry retreat for sportsmen offering wilderness quiet and access, as well as degradation of environment for nine year-round and part-time residents of the Johnson Creek corridor (several of whom would lose property in the “improvement” of the road to accommodate mining traffic).

In addition, a route through Yellow Pine would take private property on one or both sides of their through route, again, to accommodate large trucking traffic. I would doubt that traffic would be stopping for food or lodging there, they’d be highballing it through to meet time commitments. I could foresee the death of Yellow Pine, as well. Perhaps one or two would profit from land sales, but the town would become an oil spot on the road to Stibnite.

I won’t even venture to dream as to how the East Fork Road between Yellow Pine and Stibnite would be made usable for today’s modern mining/hauling equipment. A disaster waiting to happen.

It is inconceivable to me that the editorial writer encouraging the Johnson Creek access alternative has ever driven the Johnson Creek/Yellow Pine/East Fork route to Stibnite. As a long time resident of Johnson Creek and traveler on these roads, and as much as I loath the idea of the new Burntlog haul road, I see no alternative but the latter route.

Truly, our only alternative to chaos in the Valley County backcountry is to pray that entities more powerful than us are able to quash or significantly reduce the impact of the Midas Gold mining plan at Stibnite.

I recommend a reading/rereading of Mary Faurot Peterson’s letter to the editor last week (“Restoration of Stibnite area can be done without mining,” The Star-News, Oct 15, 2020). She’s a lady who knows and should be heard!

And I thought the McCall City Council’s letter to the Forest Service objecting to use of roads and route through their city to facilitate the Midas Gold plan was timely to my response to the Oct. 8 editorial.

I was going to suggest that if an alternative to the Burntlog Route was to be sought, it should be via the Lick Creek/East Fork road to Yellow Pine. Guess we know how that would fly with the Council and McCall residents.

We’re all NIMBY folks, but understand that Stibnite is in all our back yard and threatens not only our access to our recreational areas but to our very life style, tranquility of living and livelihoods, as well. Please, please wake up to the danger!

Diana Bryant, Wapiti Meadow Ranch

source: The Star-News Oct 22, 2020
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Mining News:

NM, Adams County weigh in on Midas Gold

More assistance sought for expected growth from Stibnite mine

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News Oct 22, 2020

Midas Gold should give more consideration to assisting local communities with economic growth brought by its proposed Stibnite Gold Project, according to the New Meadows City Council.

The council recently submitted its comments on a draft environmental study of the proposed gold and antimony mine near Yellow Pine in a letter to the Payette National Forest.

The Payette, which is the lead permitting agency for the proposal, is accepting public comments on the draft study until Wednesday at 5 p.m.

The city did not endorse or oppose the project in its comment letter, but instead listed how the 12-year to 15-year life of mining operations could alter life in New Meadows.

… The letter also noted an existing housing shortage of about 70 units in New Meadows, which could “double if not triple” if the mine were to be permitted by the Payette.

“The region is already in a housing crunch,” the letter said. “We believe any project should assist the region in developing affordable housing.”

The city’s letter expressed cautious optimism that modern mining regulations and improved technology could help undo damage at Stibnite left by historic mining operations.

full story: © Copyright 2009-present Central Idaho Publishing Inc. • All rights reserved (used w/permission)
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Adams likes Stibnite project’s economic, environmental benefit

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News Oct 22, 2020

Adams County commissioners support Midas Gold’s proposed Stibnite Gold Project due to its anticipated economic and environmental benefits, a letter from the commissioners said.

The commissioners on Monday approved a comment letter to the Payette National Forest on its draft environmental study of the proposed gold and antimony mine near Yellow Pine.

The Payette, which is the lead permitting agency for the proposal, is accepting public comments on the draft study until Wednesday at 5 p.m.

The county supports Alternative 2 as outlined in the draft study, which is an updated plan submitted by Midas Gold that reduces traffic and harm to water quality compared to other project alternatives studied.

“Adams County approves of the extra measures proposed by Midas Gold to protect the environment and help restore habitats for local wildlife and fish populations,” the letter said.

In particular, the letter focused on the economic benefits that could trickle down from the mine into Adams County.

An average of about 600 direct jobs with Midas Gold during the three-year construction phase and 12 to 15-year life of mining would keep average annual payroll at nearly $50 million.

Many of those jobs could go to local residents and give younger generations a chance at well-paying jobs close to their hometowns and families, the letter said.

Those jobs, plus another 290 indirect local jobs expected to be supported by the mine, would decrease the local economy’s reliance on tourism and government jobs, the letter said.

“This project represents some encouraging news about the potential for economic growth and revitalization within Adams County,” the letter said.

The county’s letter commended Midas Gold for its “unique approach” to crafting its mining plan, which has emphasized community collaboration to maximize local benefits.

One example of this is the Stibnite Advisory Council, which is a panel of representatives from local communities who meet every other month with Midas Gold officials.

“Through the council, local community members have been able to learn more about the project, request additional information from Midas Gold, voice concerns, and have their questions answered,” the letter said.

The county also expressed confidence in modern mining regulations and financial bonding requirements to ensure environmental restoration work is completed as planned.

Adams County was required to review and comment on the draft environmental study of the mine as a condition of it signing a Community Agreement with Midas Gold in 2018.

The agreement was posed to all local communities that could be affected by the mine. Each signatory was granted a seat on the Stibnite Advisory Council.

Eight local communities signed the agreement, including the cities of Cascade, Donnelly, New Meadows, Council and Riggins, as well as Idaho and Adams counties and the community of Yellow Pine.

The City of McCall and Valley County declined to sign the agreement, citing potential conflicts of interests.

source: © Copyright 2009-present Central Idaho Publishing Inc. • All rights reserved (used w/permission)
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Comments on Stibnite Gold Project due by Wednesday

The Star-News Oct 22, 2020

Public comments on the draft environmental study of Midas Gold’s proposed Stibnite Gold Project are being accepted until 5 p.m. on Wednesday.

The entire draft study can be viewed by clicking on the “Analysis” tab on the Payette Forest’s project webpage at (link).

Comments can be submitted through the virtual public meeting room that is being used in lieu of in-person public meetings due to the COVID-19 pandemic. That can be found at (link).

Written comments can be mailed to the Payette Supervisor Linda Jackson at 500 Mission St., Building 2, McCall, Idaho 83638. Comments are not being accepted in person due to the pandemic.

Only “substantive” comments that raise questions about specific elements of the draft study or Midas Gold’s proposal will be taken into consideration in the Payette’s drafting of a final study.

Analysis of the alternatives in the draft study will be further refined and could change before a “preferred alternative” is defined in the final environmental study, which is tentatively expected by August 2021.

source: © Copyright 2009-present Central Idaho Publishing Inc. • All rights reserved (used w/permission)
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Public Lands:

Prescribed fires to be set this fall on Payette National Forest

The Star-News Oct 22, 2020

Prescribed fires will be conducted this fall on the Council Ranger District, New Meadows Ranger District, McCall Ranger District and Krassel Ranger District.

The Payette conducts prescribed fires to reduce risk to homes from wildfires, protect healthy timber, improve wildlife habitat and improve the forest’s resilience to fire, pests and disease.

Here is a list of the planned fires:

Council Ranger District

• 15 landing piles in among the Middle Fork of the Weiser River, 9 miles southeast of Council.

New Meadows Ranger District

• 30 acres adjacent to west side of Lost Valley Reservoir.

• 170 acres of hand piles west of Hwy 95 near Evergreen Campground.

• 10 acres of hand piles in the Last Chance Campground.

• 4 landing piles between Meadows Valley and Goose Creek.

McCall Ranger District

• 410 acres of hand piles in the Bear Basin area.

• 8 landing piles near the Brundage Road.

Krassel Ranger District

• 1,300 acres along the east side of the South Fork of the Salmon River south of Reed Ranch Airstrip.

Trailheads and roads that lead into these areas will be posted with caution signs and maps of prescribed burn locations.

source:
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From rock slides to trails, ongoing earthquakes are changing the shape of the Sawtooths

Oct 20, 2020 by Nicole Blanchard Idaho Statesman

Six months after a major earthquake rattled Idaho, the rumbling has continued with a quake shaking near Stanley as recently as Monday morning. Since March 31, the earthquakes have intrigued scientists and, in some cases, reshaped the landscape of the Sawtooth mountains near their epicenter.

The initial magnitude-6.5 quake and its aftershocks caused multiple avalanches in the Sawtooths, but many of the effects were masked by snow. As the weather warmed — and as strong quakes continued — more ramifications came to light: the ‘liquefaction’ of a popular beach at Stanley Lake, toppled rock climbing destinations, structural damage to lava tubes at Craters of the Moon National Monument and Preserve and debris strewn over trails.

“The earthquakes and their effects on the Sawtooth skyline have been an interesting exclamation mark on an already surreal year,” said Ed Cannady, former backcountry manager for the Sawtooth National Recreation Area, in an email.

continued:
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Closure Order Terminated for the Woodhead Fire, Hazards Remain

October 20, 2020, Payette National Forest

McCall, Idaho –Forest Supervisor Linda Jackson has terminated the Woodhead Fire Closure Order, effective October 19th. With the change in weather patterns and associated precipitation in the fire area, fire behavior is minimal and is no longer a threat to containment objectives. Fire suppression resources continue to work in the area and some smoke may still be visible.

Forest users entering the burned area are reminded that there are still hazards in the area, including fire-weakened trees, smoldering fire, and heavy equipment operating in and around the fire area. A burned landscape presents several safety hazards that either did not exist prior to the fire, or have been exacerbated by the effects of the fire. Those travelling or recreating in the burned area are reminded to be very aware of your surroundings and follow warming signs and directions from agency personnel. Hazards include unstable terrain, displaced wildlife, hazard trees, burned stump holes and root chambers, and the possibility of flash flooding and debris flows during periods of heavy rain. Travelers should exercise caution and patience while traveling on narrow roads in and around the burned area.

The Woodhead Fire, northwest of Cambridge, Idaho, started on September 9, 2020, and has burned on lands managed by the Payette National Forest, the Bureau of Land Management, the Idaho Department of Lands, the Andrus Wildlife Management Area, and privately owned land. Suppression damage repair and burned area emergency response are in process.

Additional information about the termination of the closure order, traveling in the burned area, and rehab activities can be found at (InciWeb)
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Idaho parks outline plans for COVID-19 relief funds

Oct 19, 2020 Local News 8

The Idaho Parks and Recreation Department will receive $1.3 million in CARES Act funding. The department said Monday it will use the money to repair and improve park facilities, cover increased operational expenses, and acquire equipment to maintain high-use areas.

As of October 1, visitation at Idaho State Parks set an annual record of more than 6.5 million visitors, despite a 60-day closure early in the year. That surpassed the prior annual visitation record by 100,000 visitors and there are still more than two months in the year.

Parks and Recreation Board Chairman said the COVID-19 pandemic has created an increased burden on Idaho’s 30 state parks.

continued:
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Critter News:

Pet Talk – Antifreeze toxicity in dogs and cats

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt Oct 23, 2020 IME

Wintertime is approaching and we all want to make sure that our automobiles are functioning properly. This means changing our radiator fluids and adding new antifreeze. Antifreeze products can contain ethylene glycol, propylene glycol, methanol, or a combination of these agents. Most automotive antifreeze liquids contain ethylene glycol and pose the greatest hazard to pets; they are often dyed fluorescent green. Propylene glycol is generally recognized as safe, but can also be dyed a green or blue color. Methanol is present in the windshield washer fluids as well as gasoline antifreezes.

All three compounds can develop a serious metabolic condition known as acidosis after pets drink these fluids. They can depress the brain and cause drunken behavior, mental depression, and coma. Of the three compounds, ethylene glycol is of the most serious concern for pets. It is said to have a sweet taste that is attractive to dogs and cats. When it is metabolized by the body, crystals form that are deposited in the kidneys. These crystals can cause permanent kidney failure.

Signs can occur within one hour after ingestion. Anywhere from 12-36 hours after ingestion, kidney failure may develop with decreased urine production. The kidney damage is often irreversible and fatal.

continued:
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MCPAWS to host cat adoption Saturday at thrift store

The Star-News Oct 22, 2020

MCPAWS will host a no-cost cat adoption event on Saturday from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the MCPAWS Thrift Store in downtown McCall thanks to a Rachael Ray No-Kill Excellence Grant.

The McCall shelter has teamed up with partners in the Idaho Shelter Coalition for this statewide adoption event in their effort to make Idaho a no-kill state.

“The goal of the coalition is to end the unnecessary euthanasia of dogs and cats in Idaho by 2025,” said Amber Kostoff, executive director of MCPAWS and vice president of the Idaho Shelter Coalition.

The Idaho Shelter Coalition received the $30,000 grant to distribute to the organizations’ 20 members.

“We know we have a lot of work to do, and events like this represent just one strategy that the coalition has developed to accomplish this goal,” Kostoff said.

MCPAWS Thrift Store is located at 301 Lenora St.

source:
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Idaho Humane Society, Kuna PD and several citizens rescue horse at skatepark

by Ariana Pyper Saturday, October 24th 2020

Idaho Humane Society officers rescued a horse that fell into the Kuna Skate Park on Saturday.

A minor was out riding the horse when she got too close and fell into the bowl.

Officers say the horse appears to be in good health but the horse has a limp and her hock is bleeding.

“We are hoping she has a speedy recovery. Thank you to our Humane Officers who are called out around the clock and those who assisted in this case,” the Humane Society said.

continued: w/video
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Colville man shoots wolf to escape encounter

By RaeLynn Ricarte Statesman Examiner Tuesday, October 20, 2020

Colville, WA — A Colville man who found himself surrounded by wolves on Oct. 7 in the forest near Rocky Creek Road, just east of town, shot and killed a young male in the pack to escape.

“The man called us as soon as he managed to get back to a place where he had cell service, and the incident was investigated by the county’s wildlife conflict specialist, Jeff Flood, and the state Department of Fish and Game,” said Stevens County Sheriff Brad Manke. “Investigators went to the scene and found the dead wolf. From the evidence, they confirmed the man’s story and determined that he acted completely within the law because he was threatened.”

Manke said the identity of the man is being kept confidential to avoid making him a potential target for retaliation from wolf advocates. The incident occurred about 6:30 p.m. on Wednesday, Oct. 7, he said. According to Manke, the man had gone into the woods to check on his trail cameras. After walking through tall grass, he encountered multiple wolves in front of him. Manke said the man then began to slowly retreat, but looked behind to find other wolves flanking him.

continued:
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Letter to Share:

If you are not pheasant hunting you are missing the best.

from The Gamebird Foundation

Hi all you folks that like to hunt pheasants, or just go out and look at these beautiful birds. I am up several mornings and out in the afternoon, evenings. I have not seen as many pheasants in the last several years as I have seen this year. The areas where we are raising pheasants and releasing them are producing clutches of chicks from the birds we released last year. You need to get out and visit these areas.

I spend quite a bit of time around the Access Yes areas. Lots of pheasants, but very few hunters. Just came back from the Youth Access Area over on the Palouse River area. We see pheasants everywhere, but very few hunting. We visited with a young fellow, grinning from ear to ear. He harvested 2 roosters. His dad said that he missed more than he harvested. The farther said they were seeing roosters everywhere. They had just returned from elk hunting and his son wanted to go pheasant hunting. They checked and no one signed up to hunt so they went hunting. Dad said that the boy likes to hunt pheasants much more than elk and deer hunting. I had better sign of or I may fill the page. Give me a call or email if you want to know how to find these places.

“The Pheasant Guy”
Jim Hagedorn
208-883-3423
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Fish & Game News:

Four bull moose illegally shot at, three killed in Valley County over the weekend

By Brian Pearson, Conservation Public Information Specialist
Monday, October 19, 2020

Conservation Officers seek help locating the individuals responsible for killing and leaving a trophy Shiras moose to waste near Tripod

An illegally killed bull moose was discovered recently in Idaho Fish and Game’s Southwest Region, and Fish and Game conservation officers are asking the public for information to bring the poacher to justice.

On Saturday, Oct. 17, a large bull moose was found dead and suspected of being poached west of Tripod Meadow, which is west of Smiths Ferry, in Unit 24. Conservation officers believe the animal was shot sometime between Oct. 10 and Oct. 17.

continued:
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Nonresident fee increase takes effect Dec. 1 and 2021 nonresident deer/elk tags will be available then

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Supervisor
Wednesday, October 21, 2020

Nonresident deer and elk tags sold out in 2020 and demand is expected to be high

Most nonresident hunters, anglers and trappers will pay higher prices for licenses, tags and fees starting Dec. 1. Price increases will vary by item, but here are new prices for some of the most popular licenses and tags for adult nonresidents:

continued:
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Protect people, protect bats and avoid rabies

By Rita Dixon, Wildlife Natural Resource Program Coordinator
Thursday, October 22, 2020

Bats are beneficial, but often misunderstood wildlife

Idaho Fish and Game — in collaboration with the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Bat World Sanctuary, and Ravenswood Media — has released a short film (see below) called “Protect People, Protect Bats, Avoid Rabies!” Funded through a grant from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s White-Nose Syndrome Small Grants Program, and a Peekaboo Rescue Fund Grant from Bat World Sanctuary, the film promotes a One Health message by explaining the connection between human health, bat health, and the environment and how best to avoid a rabies exposure.

Late September through October brings our last wave of migrating bats through Idaho. This is a time of year when people are likely to come into contact with bats, which is why it’s important to understand how to avoid a rabies exposure. Although most of our bats are resident and make short-distance movements to their hibernation sites, two Idaho bat species, the Hoary Bat and Silver-haired Bat (both species of greatest conservation need), are long-distance migrants that make twice yearly journeys between their summer and winter grounds, traveling as far as over 900 miles and as far south as southern California and Arizona. These migratory tree bats undertake some of the longest seasonal movements of any bat species and can travel over 150 miles per night, making much needed stopovers for sanctuary or short-term rest. When not in flight, bats often enter daily torpor (controlled reductions in body temperature and metabolism), which reduces their energy costs.

continued:
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Wildlife Express Newsletter & Educational Activities

A new issue of Wildlife Express is out, and we’re expanding beyond the school year so that you can enjoy monthly wildlife features and activities all year long.

Have you ever had a quiet hike interrupted by an exploding bird? If so, you encountered a member of the grouse family. These birds don’t really explode, but their sudden getaway right at your feet will seem like a feathered explosion.

Take a closer look at Idaho’s forest grouse in the October edition of Wildlife Express.

link:
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Windows to Wildlife newsletter header

In this Fall 2020 issue:

* Studying the surprisingly elusive American white pelican
* Watchable Wildlife
* Idaho birding trails
* News from the Field
– * Great Basin Collared Lizard

link:
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More F&G News Releases

link:
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Crazy Critter Stuff:

Elephant Smash Giant Pumpkins

Oregon Zoo Oct 23, 2020

They did the mash!

The elephant family stomped and snacked on over 1,200 lbs of pumpkins this morning during our Squishing of the Squash! Big thanks to growers Larry Nelson and Jim Paino for the gourd time!

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Cute co-pilot! Owl lands in helicopter fighting California wildfires

by KMPH Staff Wednesday, October 14th 2020


Co-pilot owl lands inside helicopter fighting Creek Fire in California (Photo Courtesy: Dan Alpiner / Sky Aviation)

Fresno County, Calif. (KMPH) — It’s odd to have an owl enter an aircraft. It’s unheard of to have it enter while it’s in-flight.

“It’s an unexplainable and magical miracle for it to stay with you for several water drops, then leave just as it arrived – safe and unannounced,” said helicopter pilot Dan Alpiner.

The pilot was flying water drops on the Creek Fire in California in a UH-1 Huey Helicopter.

The pilot said the bird just flew inside, sat on the co-pilot’s chair for a long time, long enough for several water drops and returns.

source:
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Seasonal Humor:

“Do not covid thy neighbors wife, wear a mask.”
— —

CovidHalloweenMask-a
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Idaho History Oct 25, 2020

Idaho 1918-1920 Influenza Pandemic

Part 28

Idaho Newspaper clippings January 19-23, 1919

School Photos courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

January 19

Evening Capital News., January 19, 1919, Page 1

19190119ECN1

19190119ECN2
8000 Yankees Arrive; 150 Flu Cases Aboard
Cruisers South Dakota and Montana and the Transport President Grant Carry Men; Three Men Die on Voyage.

New York, Jan. 18. – Nearly 8000 troops arrived here today on the cruisers South Dakota, Montana and the transport President Grant. All showed evidence of tempestuous weather prevailing on their trip across.

There were 150 influenza cases on the President Grant. Three men died on the voyage. Their bodies will be sent to their homes. …
— —

Mary’s Well Again.

Los Angeles, Jan. 18 – Mary Pickford, who has been suffering from influenza, was virtually recovered tonight, it was announced from her home here.

source: Evening Capital News. (Boise, Idaho), 19 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Evening Capital News., January 19, 1919, Page 3

19190119ECN3
City Health Board Finds Influenza Is Not Crowd Disease
Investigation of Four Days Proves That Most Victims Did Not Contract It at Any Public Gathering.
Closing Ban At An End
Will Continue to Investigate Source of Disease and Recommend Those Feeling Badly to Stay Away From Crowds.

The city board of health will no longer enforce the closing ban in Boise. Its members are of the opinion that influenza is not contracted in crowds, and they base their conclusions upon an investigation of cases to ascertain how the victims caught the disease. Finding that but a few of them had been out in crowds, and that a vast majority contracted the disease from members of the family having it, the city board of health will take no further action in closing public places as a preventative measure.

Mayor Hays Saturday night issued the following statement concerning the investigations and gives a report from Rev. Willsie Martin, chairman of the home service department of the Red Cross:

“The City board of health has been much subject to criticism. The manner in which influenza should be prevented has not been thoroughly worked out by the medical profession. Heretofore in all cases the board acted on medical advice. When called on by the Red Cross committee, and closing of the pool halls and picture shows was urged, we did not do so, but acted under the belief in closing them that that was what the people wanted, although our investigation had led us to believe that this was a wrong method.

“There are stores into which a larger number of people enter than any other institutions in Boise. Three Main street stores in the height of the epidemic employed 166 clerks, only six of them had the disease. The picture shows employ seven people who constantly come in touch with the public; none of them had the disease. If the disease was primarily spread in crowds, the clerks and the picture show employees should all have had it.

Investigation Made.

“The board determined to find out how the people who had the disease thought they contracted it. They made an investigation in the last four days of 138 cases. They found that only one of these persons had been at a dance, only one in a pool hall and two at a picture show. Ten got it visiting, 21 did not know how they got it, and 14 got it from various causes, such as delivering at houses not quarantined and other like causes and 92 cases were contracted from other members of the family. Quarantine of churches, lodge meetings, or picture shows on this showing is not warranted. Family visiting was responsible altogether for 30 cases out of 138, a large enough percentage to justify a quarantine against visiting and to authorize its continuance. We had previously requested the Red Cross to investigate this question through their nurses.

Spreads Rapidly In Families.

“The spread in the families of the persons originally taking the disease is very great. It amounted to 92 cases out of the 138. This must be prevented as much as possible. The board is studying the problem. While we say the ban against public gatherings is not justified, but the facts should not be understood that we recommend them. We say keep away from crowds unless you are feeling perfectly well.”

Rev. Willsie Martin, head of the home service section of the Red Cross, reports as follows:

“Many are uncertain were they contracted the ‘flu,’ most are suspicious of crowds. But in the large majority of cases the parties having the ‘flu’ feel they got it from some neighboring family or individual who had the ‘flu’ prior to their contracting it. The answers indicate that in many instances the family from whom contagion came was not quarantined and that in many instances there was no fumigating of the home or clothes or bedding in the family that spread the contagion.”
— —

Payette.

Dr. McDonald returned from training camp and has reopened his office in the old location.

Dr. Crouch of the medical department, now in France, has been promoted to the rank of captain. His commission dates from September, 1918.
— —

Pneumonia Causes The Death Of Prominent Emmett Woman

(Capital News Special Service.)

Emmett, Jan. 18 – Mrs. Ellen Boone Bostetter, wife of Emery O. Bostetter, died Saturday morning at the family home on the bench. Pneumonia following influenza caused her death. With her husband she came to Emmett 11 years ago and since been active in affairs of the community and was a devoted, Cristian woman and had been a member of the Congregational church for 30 years. Besides her husband she leaves three children, Harold aged 14, Ruth 12 and Richard 11, two brothers, H. K. Boone of Boise; Ray Boone of Iowa; four sisters, Mrs. Robert McClure of Emmett; Mrs. W. B. Anderson, Toledo, Ia.; Mrs. George Beyton, Rawley, Ia.; Mrs. Howard Antlers of Cedar Rapids, Ia. The funeral will be held Monday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the Bucknum chapel. Rev. A. C. Lanthrop will officiate and burial will be in the Emmett cemetery.

source: Evening Capital News. (Boise, Idaho), 19 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Evening Capital News., January 19, 1919, Page 4

[News from University of Idaho]

Influenza still puts the glimmer on college social activities at Moscow. Churches and theaters operate on the alternate row basis, but public or private dancing is still taboo. Several all college dances have been announced, but the city health officer fails to see the light of the dancing bug, and the danceless spend their spare evenings otherwise, probably studying.

source: Evening Capital News. (Boise, Idaho), 19 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Evening Capital News., January 19, 1919, Page 10

Meridian.

Charles Harris is reported seriously ill with the Spanish influenza.

Mrs. L. A. Songer is reported quite Ill.
— —

Eagle.

James Morrison and family, who have been quite ill with influenza, are able to be out among their friends again.

K. Fujikawi returned home today from a Boise hospital, where he has been the past few weeks.
— —

Caldwell.

Judge H. H. Richards of Boise transacted legal business in the city today.

Judge J. M. Thompson transacted legal business in Boise today.
— —

Nampa.

Miss Lillian Moore, of the faculty of the University of California, left this afternoon to resume her work in that institution after having spent the holidays in the city with her parents, Judge and Mrs. G. T. Moore.

G. N. Conyers is spending the week in Boise with his wife, who is under medical treatment in a hospital in that city. Mrs. Conyers is reported to be progressing nicely.
— —

Infant Lockwood Funeral.

Caldwell, Jan. 18. – Funeral services were held from the family residence this afternoon at 2:30 o’clock for Laura, the infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Lockwood, who died yesterday from the influenza. Interment was in Canyon Hill cemetery.
— —

Ustick.

The schools here will open at 8:30 Monday morning.
— —

State’s Quota for Armenians in Sight
Headquarters Reports Twelve Counties Have Raised Proportionate Share – Others Coming Fast.

Twelve Idaho counties have raised their quota of funds for the relief of starving Armenians and Syrians and the state will come across with its quota of $75,000, is practically assured. The drive has been on during the past week in most of the counties of the state. Several, including Ada and Canyon, are held up for the present by the influenza epidemic and organization is just being completed. …

source: Evening Capital News. (Boise, Idaho), 19 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Evening Capital News., January 19, 1919, Page 11

19190119ECN4
Noble Sacrifice Made By Nurse
Mrs. Zubala Nurses Brother Through Crisis, Then Contracts Influenza and Dies Saturday Night.

There is sadness today among the sisters and nurses at St. Alphonsus’ hospital. Another of the nurses, who graduated from the hospital training school has sacrificed her life on the altar of love and duty – Mrs. Narcissa Gestel Zubala, who died Saturday night at 8:30 of pneumonia following influenza.

Mrs. Zubala, who was married a year ago and has since made her home at Brigham, Utah, came to Boise a short time ago to nurse her brother, Manuel Gestel, who was stricken with influenza. For three days and nights during the critical period of his illness, his faithful sister stayed at his bedside. She was then stricken with the disease in its worst form, pneumonia followed which caused her demise.

Mrs. Zubala was born and reared in Boise. Her parents were among the oldest inhabitants of the city and were at one time owners of a portion of the Union block on Idaho street. Mr. Gestel built and operated the first greenhouse in Boise. He died some three years ago. Mrs. Gestel graduated from St. Alphonsus training school some five years ago and followed her chosen profession until her marriage. She was regarded as an exceptional nurse, having many patients in southern Idaho and eastern Oregon.
— —

19190118ECN5Little News of Boise

Examinations This Week.

The regular eighth grade examination for students will be held throughout the county Wednesday, Thursday and Friday of this week. Owing to health conditions, the examinations will be held in the schoolhouses instead of the capitol building.

Kelly – C. J. Kelly, aged 50 years, died of pneumonia at a Boise hospital Saturday. He leaves no known relatives in this state. Mr. Kelly came to Idaho years ago from Pennsylvania and has since made this his home. The funeral will leave the Schreiber & Sidenfaden chapel Monday morning at 8:45. Services will be held at St. John’s cathedral at 9 o’clock and burial will be in St. John’s cemetery.

Council of Women Voters.

Members of the Idaho legislature will address the Council of Women Voters Tuesday night at its regular session on pending bills before the legislature. The addresses will follow a business meeting of the council.
— —

19190119ECN5

(ibid, page 19)

source: Evening Capital News. (Boise, Idaho), 19 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

Southwick School during Construction, Southwick, Idaho ca. 1909

SchoolSouthwickSchoolSouthwick1909Fritz-a

courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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January 20

The Daily Star-Mirror., January 20, 1919, Page 1

19190120DSM1

19190120DSM2
Ban Both Public and Private Dances
Health Officer Adair Put Stamp of Disapproval on Dances During Epidemic

The first case of influenza to be reported to Moscow authorities for twelve days was that of Cecil Ryan, son of Mrs. G. C. Ryan, 106 S. Polk St. Physicians state that the case is not serious.

A ban on all dancing, public and private has been issued by Dr. W. A. Adair as an additional precautionary measures against the disease. Persons who are reported as violating this order will be quarantined for a period of four days.

Dr. Adair wishes it made clear that private dances are included in the ban. City health authorities have prohibited public dancing for some time, but despite this ruling several informal dances have been held. These must be discontinued, says Dr. Adair until all danger from the epidemic is past.
— —

Former Moscovite Dies in Norway.

Myklebust brothers and their sister Anna, all residents of this city until recently, when they removed to Troy, were advised by cablegram from Norway Wednesday of last week of the death of their brother, Albert. Deceased formerly resided here and was employed in the department store of N. Williamson until he returned to Norway in the fall of 1913. The cablegram did not state the cause of his death, but his relatives here believe it was due to influenza, which they learned he had contracted early last fall and which left him in a weakened condition. During the past five years he was employed as a missionary for the Chinese Mission stationed in Norway. The young man had a number of friends in Moscow who will regret to learn of his untimely death.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 20 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., January 20, 1919, Page 3

Three Deaths From Influenza.

The death from influenza of Mrs. George Davidson of American ridge last Friday has been reported. Death from the dread disease has also invaded the home of the Whybark family on Big Bear ridge, where one child died Thursday morning and another Friday morning. While nursing the children the mother also contracted the disease, but is reported to be recovering. A number of cases are reported on that ridge and the situation on Texas ridge was reported much worse last week, there being altogether about 33 cases reported.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 20 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., January 20, 1919, Page 4

Young Nurse Has Novel Experience

Sandpoint. – Sunday night, through the nonarrival of an expected extra helper, the Red Cross hospital was left in charge of one nurse, and she a mere girl. Before morning this heroic young helper was called on to minister at a death and a birth besides giving regular care to 10 or 12 influenza cases.

Mrs. Davis, head nurse at the red Cross hospital, has broken down under the strain of caring for influenza patients is now herself a patient in the City hospital. Mrs. Davis’ condition is not considered at all serious, and she has not contracted the influenza; but the doctor through it imperative that she should be removed from the atmosphere of the disease. On Monday a call to Spokane for help brought the answer that not a nurse could be spared from that city.
— —

Clinton News Items

It has been decided to open the Hunt school on Monday, Jan. 20th.

The little son of Mr. and Mrs. Clinton Havens has been seriously ill but is now improving.

Miss Ruby Helland is confined to her home with a bad cold.
— —

19190120DSM3

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 20 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

Evening Capital News., January 20, 1919, Page 6

19190120ECN1

19190118ECN5Little News of Boise

“Flu” Improving

The spread of “flu” at the penitentiary has been stopped, apparently, for no new cases have developed, and those who are sick are on the road to convalescence. The quarantine on the “pen” will be removed shortly if no new cases are found.

No New Cases

Dr. Pond, city physician, reports that no new cases of influenza have been reported as needing his services, and but six new cases reported to Health Officer Pfirman Saturday. Doctors agree that the mild weather of the past few days is having a great deal to do with the cessation of the disease.

Editor and Wife Improving.

Mr. and Mrs. Guy Flenner, who were taken ill with influenza, are much better. Mr. Flenner was able to sit up a short time Sunday. Their daughter, Mrs. George Graff, and the latter’s son, have also recovered. The quarantine may be lifted from the home today.

No Serum Yet.

The serum that was supposed to have been received by the city a few days ago has been delayed on account of the Mayo brothers not getting the order, it going through a mistake to some other establishment. It was received finally by the Mayos, and they wired the city today that a shipment would come forward at an early date.

Recuperating.

Mrs. A. Tyler and her daughters, Monica and Anna, have recovered sufficiently from their attacks of influenza to be able to be out.
— —

Kuna.

The school board has decided on Jan. 27 as the date on which school will reopen unless there is a recurrence of the influenza epidemic.

The Baptist church resumed its regular services Sunday after several weeks’ vacation due to the illness of the pastor and his flock.

source: Evening Capital News. (Boise, Idaho), 20 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Goodrich School, Goodrich, Idaho

SchoolGoodrichSchoolGoodrichFritz-a

courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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January 21

The Idaho Republican. January 21, 1919, Page 1

19190121TIR1

19190121TIR2
Martha Winkler Victim of Influenza
End Comes Sunday Morning After Hard Suffering. Died at Kirk Home in Groveland
Parents were at Bedside

Miss Martha Winkler, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. F. Winkler of Taber, passed away at the home of George Kirk Sunday morning, Jan. 19 at 9 o’clock, from pneumonia and brain fever, following influenza.

Miss Winkler had been working at the Kirk home since early last fall and was with them at the time the dread disease compelled her to go to bed. Her parents were sent for as soon as her condition became serious and were at the bedside since Friday. All that could be done to restore the young woman to health was done, but the grim reaper made a strong fight and conquered.

The sociable, happy disposition and warm heart of Miss Winkler made for her many friends who will not forget her. She is survived by a mother and father, five brothers and two sisters.

Rev. Colver of the Baptist church, of which Miss Winkler was a member and for which she worked ardently, will conduct the funeral services at the grave in the Grove City cemetery, at 2 o’clock this Tuesday afternoon.
— —

19190121TIR3
Howe Boy Dies at Blackfoot
Fred Rogers Jr. Succumbs to Influenza at Home of Grandparents Sunday
Will be Buried at Howe

Earl Rogers Jr., nineteen years of age, son of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Rogers of Howe, Idaho and eldest grandson of John R. Rogers of this city, passed away at the home of his grandparents Sunday morning, Jan. 19, at 1:30 o’clock.

The young man had suffered hard for two weeks with influenza-pneumonia and all that skilled care and loving hands could do was done to save the precious life, but in vain. His home was in Howe, Idaho, but the fatal sickness came upon him while visiting in Blackfoot and he was immediately taken to the home of his grandparents where he remained until the end came.

Mr. Rogers was born at Howe, December 12, 1899 and he made his home at that place continuously. The associates and friends that will mourn his loss are many. The body will be taken to the home at Howe, and interment made in the cemetery at that place Wednesday.
— —

[Mr. Yandell]

… He has his workshop where he makes all manner of repairs of farming implements, both in wood and iron, and when his family had influenza last fall, he took care of them himself without the aid of a physician. He kept records of temperature and respiration, and went about it as methodically as a physician. His records of temperature were not at all slipshod, for they were kept in fractions of a degree. …

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 21 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Republican. January 21, 1919, Page 2

Idaho Budget

The triplets of Mrs. Thomas Moran of Boise, which have caused so much attention on the part of Idaho people ever since their birth, are all sick with influenza. Mrs. Moran’s husband is serving with the army in France.

Influenza conditions are so serious at Kellogg that all public gatherings and schools have been put under the ban by order of the board of health. No gatherings of any nature in excess of six adults at any one place is permitted under penalty of arrest.

There have been a total of 24 fatalities in Lemhi county from influenza, 18 of which occurred at Salmon City. This is a result of several hundred cases which have been reported in the county since the first outbreak of the disease, about the middle of October.

The ushering in of the Greek new year at Pocatello was the cause of wholesale arrests by the police in Greek quarters on gambling charges. A general roundup by members of the police and sheriff’s forces resulted in thirty-seven arrests, and in each case the participants of the “poker” games were caught redhanded.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 21 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Idaho Republican. January 21, 1919, Page 3

19190121TIR4
School Notes

All work at the schools is progressing very nicely at the present time. The school nurse turned in a report Friday that indicated a much better condition all thru the schools the last of the week than the first. The attendance has scarcely attained the normal condition as yet, but most absentees are traced to colds or other ailments than influenza. In the entire school enrollment there are just two cases of flu.

At the high school there is an actual attendance of 297 pupils which means an enrollment of over 300. In order to seat all in the assembly it was necessary to move the seats together in rows of two and thereby make room for a few additional rows of seats. An audience of 600 can be comfortably seated by placing chairs in the aisles.

The honorable school board have about concluded to permit the various classes to conduct properly chaperoned dances in the new building. If the students will co-operate with the authorities for a short time and refrain from attending dances during the influenza epidemic they will soon be tripping the light fantastic to their hearts’ content. The room is scarely [sic] large enough to make room for the entire school to conduct a dance at one time, so each class will have their turn.

The entire building is heated with one pound of steam under the plan in operation. Under former plans fifteen to twenty-five pounds of steam would be necessary to heat the same number of cubic feet of air. At the base of each radiator is a little trap door that can be opened for ventilation. When the little shutter or trap door is opened the cold air from out of doors passes in and rises thru the radiator, thereby cooling the radiator and slightly warming the air before it is distributed thru the room.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 21 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Republican. January 21, 1919, Page 5

19190121TIR6
Local News

Miss Marie Dore is on the sick list this week.

Al Miller is recovering nicely from his recent illness.

George Kirk who has been suffering with a severe attack of influenza is much improved.

W. F. Martin, who has been ill most of the winter, is able to be around at the present.

Rev. J. E. Gooding of Gooding conducted services at the Methodist church Sunday evening.

Miss Margaret Lyons, who has been nursing influenza patients at Aberdeen for the past week has returned.

Mrs. Sarah Snyder of Ogden, who is visiting with her daughter Mrs. F. A. Sloan, is recovering nicely from her recent illness.

Mrs. Lewis Robbins was called to Idaho Falls Saturday on account of the seriousness illness of her mother at that place.

Miss Clara Chamberlain was on the sick last the latter part of the week and unable to attend to her duties at the Hassing Studio.

Frank Spanbauer Sr., who has had a hard segie [sic] of sickness, was in town Friday for the first time in several months.

Mr. and Mrs. Wilford Chapman are suffering with influenza at this writing.

F. C. Parkinson returned Friday night from Preston, where he was called on account of the illness of his father, who at this writing is much improved. Mr. Parkinson says they are having a very pleasant winter in Cache Valley with no snow as yet.
— —

Quarantine Notice

Pursuant to law the board of county commissioners consisting of R. G. Bills, M. A. Fugate, James Christensen, W. E. Patrie M. D., the last named having been appointed by said commissioners January 15, 1919 met as a county board of health; proceedings as follows:

Whereas, this board in regular meeting on January 13, 1919 adopted a certain resolution or regulation wherein all churches and theaters were ordered closed and all meetings and public assemblages of every kind absolutely prohibited thruout [sic] Bingham county until further order of the board.

Now, said matter coming on for rehearing after the appointment of a new county physician, Dr. W. E. Patrie, and upon consultation with said officer, and a more thoro [sic] examination into said matter and the board being fully advised in the premises.

It is hereby ordered that the said regulations of January 13, 1919 be modified, so that same shall remain in full force and effect as to the territory lying south of Pingree, embraced Independent school districts Nos. 54 and 58 and common school districts Nos. 1, 56, 57 and 60 and thruout [sic] the balance of Bingham county, picture shows, churches, lodges and other public assemblages, may be opened and held, with the exception of dances both public and private which are positively prohibited.

It is further ordered, that all picture shows shall only be permitted to operate on conditions, as follows:

Exclusion of known, apparent or doubtful persons who may have, or are recently recovering from influenza or other contagious diseases.

Free ventilation, a clean place of business, strict enforcement of the laws of sanitation as defined by the state and city, and a willing compliance with suggestion of this board including instructions to public which may be given on slides and state of the show instructing public.

Every second row of seats to remain vacated.

All persons are positively prohibited from expectorating or spitting upon any sidewalk, or upon the floors or walls of any store, hotel, depot, picture show, theater, pool hall, office, stairs or hall in any public or private place, and any persons violating the provisions of this order will be proceeded against under the penal laws of the state.

Dated January 16, 1919, 12 m.
By County Board of Health,
R. G. Bills, Chairman.
Attest: W. E. Patrie Secretary.
— —

Death At County Hospital

Joe Lopez, age forty years, died at the county hospital Thursday afternoon, Jan. 16.

Six weeks ago he contracted influenza and soon developed tuberculosis. He was taken to the county hospital for care about three weeks ago and suffered very severely while he lived.

He was a brother to the famous Lopez bandit, but of a respectable character and all who know him held him in high esteem. He has lived in this community for the past few years.
— —

Succumbs to Pneumonia

Mr. Chappel, age twenty-eight died at his home in Sterling, Thursday morning from pneumonia following influenza. Mr. Chappel was depot agent for the railroad company at that place. He is survived by a wife and one child besides several brothers and sisters.

Funeral services were conducted Friday afternoon by Rev. Peterson and the body was laid to rest in the Sterling cemetery. …

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 21 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Idaho Republican. January 21, 1919, Page 6

Kimball

The Wright family is suffering with influenza at present.
— —

Moreland

Mrs. Matilda Benson and Mrs. England are on the sick list.
— —

Springfield

The community was deeply grieved to learn of the death of Keith Nelson of Sterling. The father John Nelson and a younger brother Park, are very low with the influenza. John Nelson is one of the earliest settlers in this country and Keith was well known thruout [sic] the valley. Many friends extend their sympathy to the bereaved family.
— —

Sterling

The sheriff came down Friday and ordered all influenza cases quarantined. Ezra Wheeler was busy Saturday and Sunday quarantining all the new cases.

Mrs. Ed Chappel of Pocatello is here nursing the H. R. Chappel family, who are ill with the flu.

Miss Hazel Quigley and Marie Verbick of Grandview have been assisting at the H. R. Chapple home this week.

H. R. Chappel is very seriously ill with the flu and is not improving as fast as his friends would like to see him. Mrs. Chappel and Lee are convalescing.

The Greenwood family are ill with the flu.

Charles Thompson and family are all ill with the flu.

Frank Herr is ill with the flu, but is getting along nicely.

The Patten family are ill with the flu. Lila is very seriously ill.

Alvin Partridge was on the sick list the first of the week.

The John Grouch family are reported ill with the flu.

Mr. and Mrs. John Nelson and two sons are ill with the flu, Mrs. Nelson is much improved, but Mr. Nelson and the boys are very seriously ill. A trained nurse from Pocatello is in attendance.

Dr. Patrie of Blackfoot has been a frequent visitor here this week on professional business.

Miss Nazzie Bowling and Miss Rosa Hale came down on Saturday to take up their duties as teachers.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 21 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Evening Capital News., January 21, 1919, Page 2

19190121ECN1

19190121ECN3
Claims Masks Bar To Justice; Want Make-Ups Removed

San Francisco, Jan. 21. – The wearing of influenza masks may hamper justice, it was declared in Judge Graham’s court today.

Attorney Walter L. Lindforth, representing one of the litigants in a will contest before Judge Graham, asked that witnesses be instructed by the court to remove their masks, declaring that the statute entitles him to see the faces of the witnesses. He also declared that the facial expression of the witnesses during testimony was often as significant as their words.

Judge Graham refused to lift his order that masks be worn continually in court. He suggested that Attorney Lindforth establish authority for his claim and determine whether the mask ordinance conflicts with the statute.

source: Evening Capital News. (Boise, Idaho), 21 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Evening Capital News., January 21, 1919, Page 6

19190118ECN5Little News of Boise

Good School Attendance.

An attendance ranging from 90 per cent in the high school to from 70 to 85 per cent in grade schools was reported Monday evening on the first day of the reopening of the schools since they were closed prior to Christmas. Seven children were sent home because of illness by the nurse, but the number is regarded very small for the enrollment.

Five Influenza Victims.

Five members of the family of Frank Johns, formerly of Boise, died in Portland last week of influenza, the deaths occurring within 24 hours. Frank Johns,, aged 63, died Thursday and his four grand children died Friday morning. The dead children are Joel Baldwin aged 12, Maude age 6, Frances aged 6, and Robert aged 10. They were the children of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Baldwin and their deaths leave them childless. Mr. John has been in Portland for a year, having moved there from Boise.
— —

Auditor Back at Desk.

E. H. Gallett, state auditor, who has been ill for several days with influenza, is back at his desk again prepared to take up his work.

source: Evening Capital News. (Boise, Idaho), 21 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Evening Capital News., January 21, 1919, Page 9

Star.

Richard Wing, who has had the flu, is able to be out again.
— —

Meridian.

A bronze service tablet has been received by the rural high school. On it are inscribed the names of the following members of the 1918 graduating class who entered the military service of their country: James Fuller, Alvin Hashbarger and Lawrence Hosford. Of these young men Hashbarger made the supreme sacrifice and Hosford has been decorated for gallant service.

Mrs. Ed. Eartman and children are recovering from the influenza.

L. V. Barber is reported seriously ill with pneumonia.

source: Evening Capital News. (Boise, Idaho), 21 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Bonners Ferry Herald. January 21, 1919, Page 1

19190121BFH1

Boundary County’s Legislators Write From The State Capitol

… letter to the editor, dated January 18th, Senator Walker writes in part:

“The influenza plague is letting up to some extent so that the schools here are to resume Monday. There are 12 beds vacant in the Alphonsus hospital – the first time for two months that that or all other like institutions were not overflowing. …”
— —

W. W. Nelson Dead

Miss Anna Nelson was called to Ronan, Mont. last Wednesday by the illness of her brother, W. W. Nelson, with Spanish influenza. Pneumonia developed and Mr. Nelson died Saturday morning according to a telegram sent to J. W. Reid by Miss Nelson.

The deceased formerly lived here and was head of the grocery department of Brown’s Department Store for two years.

source: Bonners Ferry Herald. (Bonners Ferry, Idaho), 21 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Bonners Ferry Herald. January 21, 1919, Page 6

19190121BFH2
Local News

Eighth grade state examinations will be conducted in the various schools of the county on Wednesday, Thursday and Friday. The examinations will be in charge of the teachers of the various districts as the county superintendent of schools, Mrs. C. W. Flood did not think it advisable to call the students to the county seat for the midwinter examinations as there are but few to take these examinations.

Mrs. Earl Tomlinson and young son are recovering from an attack of the influenza.

Mrs. Perry Wilson, who became seriously ill the first of the week with Spanish influenza, is reported to be improving now.

Mrs. Sarah Hardesty, of Lewiston, has accepted a position as teacher of the seventh grade of the Bonners Ferry schools and assumed her duties yesterday. The vacancy was caused by the death of Mrs. Agnes Crocker.

C. A. Friend, a business man of Whitefish, Mont., arrived here Sunday to join his wife in a few days visit at the home of Mrs. Friend’s brother, J. A. Jacoby. Mrs. friend is a trained nurse and came here about ten days ago to take care of Mrs. Jacoby who, for a while, was seriously ill with Spanish influenza. Mrs. Jacoby is improving but is not out of danger.

source: Bonners Ferry Herald. (Bonners Ferry, Idaho), 21 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Bonners Ferry Herald. January 21, 1919, Page 8

19190121BFH3
Idaho News Paragraphs
Recent Happenings in This State Given in Brief Items for Busy Readers.

Kendrick is free from influenza.

The influenza situation in Moscow is improving, there being but few cases of the disease.

Influenza is raging throughout Bonner county unabated, though not many cases are fatal. Only three deaths are reported for the week. Owing to the illness of a number of the teachers two of the schools of the city have closed. The health officers are tightening the quarantines, though schools, churches and theaters are still permitted open.

The health officer at Kellogg, has issued the following regulations during the influenza quarantine: Public schools to open Monday under supervision of school nurses, three to be employed. Churches may resume services, only every other pew to be occupied and buildings to be disinfected before and after each service; pool halls and cigar stores may open and also the moving picture shows, the latter to use only every other seat in every other row; no person under 21 to be allowed in pool halls, cigar stores, theaters, or other public places; all dances, social gatherings, public meetings and lodge meetings are prohibited.

Peter Probach, age 40, well known throughout the Coeur d’Alenes, died recently from pneumonia following influenza. He had resided in the district for 20 years.

source: Bonners Ferry Herald. (Bonners Ferry, Idaho), 21 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Bonners Ferry Herald. January 21, 1919, Page 10

Influenza at Sandpoint

The Spanish influenza epidemic in Sandpoint has gained alarming proportions, according to reports at hand.

Two of the city schools were closed last week because of illness with the influenza and exposure. The Civic Relief organization, the Red Cross and other institutions are working together to stamp out the plague. Last Friday there were 17 cases at the Red Cross influenza hospital. There have been many deaths in Bonner county from the disease.
— —

Local Pick-ups

A “Hard Times” dance will be given for the benefit of the school at the Northside schoolhouse on Friday evening, January 24th. Good music has been secured, refreshment will be served and the general public is invited to come and join in the good time assured.
— —

Pre-Nursing Course

The pre-nursing course at the Lewiston State Normal school will open on February 3rd. The course was organized at the urgent request of the government and it is desired to interest all graduates of secondary schools and colleges, who are not actively engaged in other fields of useful service.

Text books required for the various courses are furnished by the normal school. Room and board may be obtained for $5.50 a week and students should, with reasonable economy, be able to complete the twelve weeks course for from $75.00 to $80.00.

source: Bonners Ferry Herald. (Bonners Ferry, Idaho), 21 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., January 21, 1919, Page 1

19190121DSM1

19190121DSM2
Public Schools Again Running Normally
For The First Time Since October All Grades Are Again At Work

As announced in The Star-Mirror Saturday all of the grade public schools in Moscow opened for work this morning. The grades that were opened to the children of the district this morning are the first to the fifth, inclusive. All other grades, including the High school, had previously resumed. This is the first time since last October that the public schools of Moscow are again running normally.

There has certainly been a serious break in the public school work of the year in Moscow on account of the flu epidemic, and it is the sincere hope of every one interested in them that no more interruptions will occur. To this end all connected with the schools should work harmoniously, and parents of children should observe strictly the rules and orders promulgated by the school board. One of these orders, a most merited precautionary measure, was given out by the board this morning. It is to the effect that parents should keep their children at home as long as possible between school hours, allowing for only ample time for the children to reach the school rooms at 9 o’clock in the morning and at 1 o’clock in the afternoon. By observing this rule children will be prevented from congregating in large numbers in the halls of the buildings, which would obviously be bad in times of an epidemic like the present. To make this rule more simple of observance by the parents and children the noon recess has been reduced to one hour, the sessions resuming work promptly at 1 o’clock instead of 1:15 as heretofore.
— —

Examinations Be Held This Week
Eighth Graders of County Will Take The Test This Week

County Superintendent Lillian Skattaboe with the assistance of other teachers, will conduct the state eighth grade examinations Wednesday, Thursday and Friday, at different centers throughout Latah county.

In Moscow Miss Skattaboe will be assisted by Miss Clarice Moody, and about 18 students expected.

Miss Myra Moody will conduct the examination at Genesee, where 50 students will take the test.

Other centers are Potlatch, superintended by Mrs. H. W. Chatterton; Juliaetta, by Mrs. Mary Adams; Deary, by Mrs. A. Holdeck; Bovill, by Oakey Hall; Princeton, by Miss Etta Brown and Harvard by Miss Margaret Terry.

Troy was to have been a central point for the examination but on account of the prevalence of influenza, no tests will be taken there.

From all schools of Latah county about 150 pupils have been reported as ready to take the tests. This number is far below what it would have been, and the influenza not so hindered the progress of the schools.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 21 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., January 21, 1919, Page 3

19181202DSM3
City News

The Steele school on Big Bear ridge has closed its term of school for the winter, on account of influenza. Miss Maud Loy of Lewiston was the teacher.

Mrs. John Prophet of Garfield arrived in Moscow last evening to do nursing.

Mrs. H. P. Hull of Kendrick is in Moscow to remain at the hospital a week.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 21 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Public School Clarks Fork, Idaho (1)

SchoolPublicSchoolClarksForkFritz-a

courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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January 22

Evening Capital News., January 22, 1919, Page 2

19190122ECN1

19190122ECN2source: Evening Capital News. (Boise, Idaho), 22 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Evening Capital News., January 22, 1919, Page 8

19190122ECN3First Idaho “Millionaire Legislature” Was Center Of A Severe La Grippe Attack in 1891

Influenza new to Boise? Not at all. Only “la grippe” camouflaging under a new name. The same maddening plague of 1889-1890 which, instead of coming by way of Spain, as it has this time, chose to travel from Russia through France and across the seas, where it found a temporary home in the great ports of the east. From these it spread north, west and south, and at last in the two first winter months of 1891, it reached Idaho, seriously interfering with the duties of the members of the first state legislature, which important body was in Boise, the capital of the new state.

State But Six Months Old.

Idaho had entered the Union only six months before, on the fourth of July, 1890. Some thought the young state had emerged too soon from its territorial chrysalis, and, had “la grippe” made its appearance a year earlier, the brain stupefying effect of the epidemic might have influenced some of the sponsors of statehood to yield. But the “millionaire legislature,” composed largely of mining men, was made up of sturdy material, and came to the capital well equipped with health.

Made Senators Victims.

Terrible Madame “La Grippe” christened with this feminine title as it raced through France, presumably because it resembled the Furies, chose the senate at its principal place of strewing germs. Like the “poison maidens” of India, whose slightest breath blew out the lamp of life, the vampire’s noisome caress sent icy chills through the shivering frames of its victims, and the dignified senators succumbed to the inevitable and those who escaped a week’s Liberation in their rooms wandered listlessly through the mazes of legislative work attired in sackcloth or its equivalent, wrapped in voluminous folds about their necks, a modification of the senatorial toga.

Captain Joseph De Lamar (of the sea), Idaho’s Monte Christo, multimillionaire and man of mystery to the day he died very recently in New York, escaped in spite of his French title, which some declared to be assumed and only adopted by its owner as a facetious reminder of his former vocation. Senator Finch of Spokane failed to sufficiently protected by a wonderful fur lined and fur collared overcoat, which was the joy of every attaché of the legislature, and which enveloped him like the rumor of his great wealth, the latter a substantial fact to this day.

Senatorial Fight Stayed.

It was during that historical first session of Idaho’s legislature the great battle for the United States senatorship was staged between Claggett of the “panhandle” and Dubois of Bingham. The balloting continued for days. The “gray eagle of the north” swept down upon his southern opponent with not only his own grim force of keen political acumen and long experience in maneuvering human chessmen, but was loyally aided by the additional power of youth and beauty in the form of two of the sweetest, loveliest girls that ever adorned a drawing room. One was his own daughter and the other his niece from the society circles of Washington, D. C.

Dubois, young, alert, with the inherited French tendencies which make for victory, fenced admirably. Both were too intent upon the political game they were playing so dramatically to leave even a brain cell open for a germ to nest in. Every atom of vitality was concentrated upon the contest they waged so cleverly. The galleries and lobbies were thronged each day with members of the third house, using their persuasive powers to influence personal friends in favor of one or the other long before the balloting commenced.

Dubois The Victor.

W. E. Borah, now United States senator, watched quietly, learning his lessons from the daily fight as it went on and the minor skirmishing on the outposts. He was a student and his time was coming. Then suddenly one day the balloting was ended and Fred T. Dubois entered the arena of Washington congressional contests to do battle for Idaho.

Whether that French Apache, “La Grippe,” followed him there and was again foiled is not recorded. But it is certain it caught him this winter, under its new name, “influenza,” and thus revenged itself for having had to wait such a length of time.

source: Evening Capital News. (Boise, Idaho), 22 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Evening Capital News., January 22, 1919, Page 3

19190122ECN4
School Bill In House To Cause Lively Debate
Proposes to Change Present System of Providing Funds for Support of Public Schools in Idaho.

It is anticipated that the Hunt-Nielson-Monson bill introduced in the house of representatives, providing for a complete change in the present system of providing funds for the support of the schools, making a direct state tax, will cause a lively discussion before the present legislature. This is not the first time the change has been proposed. For the last several sessions similar bills have been introduced but were not passed.

The real object of the bill, it is said, is to provide for a fairer and more equitable distribution of school funds, so that all may be treated alike. It is claimed that under the present system school districts fortunate in having heavy assessed valuations, such as railroad mileage, raise a surplus for the support of their schools, in proportion to their valuation, while other districts having no public utilities on which to assess, but with large school populations are badly handicapped for want of funds.

The new bill changes this by substituting the following system as outlined in its provisions:

“The state board of equalization shall levy annually upon all the taxable property within the state an amount which, when added to the income derived from the common school fund, will produce a fund sufficient to provide $20 per capita for all the children of school age in the state.

“The state board of education shall annually certify on or before the fourth Monday of August, to the state board of equalization, the school census of the state, showing the total number of children of school age, and the income from the state school fund for the preceding 12 months, together with an estimate of the income from said school fund for the ensuing 12 months.”

Four years ago the state board of education recommended the passage of a similar act, but it did not survive both houses.
— —

Minimum School Terms Necessary
This Construction placed on Law if Districts Expect to Share in State and County Funds – Trustees Given Implied Power.

If school trustees are responsible for closing schools in their districts and fail to hold the minimum terms of nine and seven months they are not entitled to participate in either state or county funds, but if their schools are closed by order of the health authorities so they cannot hold the minimum terms then they may participate in both funds. An opinion to this effect was handed to Miss Ethel E. Redfield, state superintendent of public instruction by the attorney general’s department late Tuesday afternoon.

The holding is in substance that the trustees of both common and independent school districts have implied power to suspend school temporarily any time, subject only to the absolute requirement that not less than the minimum term of seven or nine months, as the case may be, be held during the year.

Trustees of neither class of districts have any power to suspend school for such a length of time as would invade the minimum term for the year. The minimum term is seven months in school districts having less than 75 pupils and nine months in districts having more than that number. On the other hand, the local health authorities have express power to close the schools at any time and for any length of time.

If the schools are closed by order of the health authorities, as distinguished from the district trustees, the school receives its share of both county and state funds, but, on the other hand, if the district trustees themselves keep the school closed to such an extent that the minimum term is not held, the district is entitled to participate in neither the state or county funds.
— —

Kuna.

The Kuna schools plan to reopen Monday, Jan. 27.

W. H. Beckdolt is out again after an attack of influenza. Mrs. J. Beckdolt is improving as are all other flu patients in town except Wayne Bell whose condition is unchanged.

Mrs. Thomas Green died Monday afternoon from influenza and complications.

A daughter was born Sunday morning to Mr. and Mrs. James Arnett. The baby died immediately and was buried Monday in the Kuna cemetery. The mother, Anna Reynolds Arnett, is seriously ill at her parents’ home. The father was in France when last heard from.

source: Evening Capital News. (Boise, Idaho), 22 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

School House, Hayden Lake, Idaho

SchoolHouseHaydenLakeFritz-a

courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

January 23

Evening Capital News., January 23, 1919, Page 5

19190123ECN1

Fruitland.

Mrs. E. L. Davis has been called to Seattle, Wash., by illness in her son Frank’s home.
— —

Mountain Home

Miss Wilkerson, one of the teachers in the high school who has been at the hospital for the past two weeks with influenza, is able to take up her duties again.

Frank R. McWilliams who has been quite ill with influenza is on the road to recovery.

Mrs. Effie Quinn who is working in the recorders office has been confined to her home the past few days on account of illness.

Mrs. Joseph E. Sullaway was called to Portland, Ore., by the serious illness of her daughter, Mrs. E. P. Habel, who has since passed away. Mrs. Sullaway was accompanied by Mrs. Elvira Guay, a daughter who is here visiting her from Salt Lake. Mrs. E. P. Habel was formerly Miss Gladys Sullaway of this city.

James H. Whitson of Chicago, was called to Mountain Home to attend the funeral of his brother, Earl Whitson.

source: Evening Capital News. (Boise, Idaho), 23 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Evening Capital News., January 23, 1919, Page 6

Kuna.

The funeral of Mrs. Tom Green, who died of influenza, was held Tuesday, interment being in the Kuna cemetery.

Mrs. Arnette and daughter, of Boise came out Monday to attend the funeral of Mrs. Arnette’s grandchild.

Mr. and Mrs. John Pethtel returned to Kuna this week after several months absence. Mr. Pethtel has been with the spruce division and after his work with it was completed they took a trip to California. Mr. Pethtel was stricken with influenza at San Francisco.

source: Evening Capital News. (Boise, Idaho), 23 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Evening Capital News., January 23, 1919, Page 8

19190118ECN5Little News of Boise

To Open Franklin School.

The board of trustees announces that it considers it safe to open the Franklin school Monday, Jan. 27.

“Flu” Subsiding.

According to Mayor S. H. Hays, the “flu” epidemic has reached its peak and is subsiding; there being only three cases reported Wednesday, and none up to noon today. The break of the plague he attributes to the sudden change in temperature, and the strict quarantine on families visiting each other. The serum has not arrived, but it is expected on any train. It is a question now as to whether the serum will be of any use with the strength of the malady almost gone.

Fine Eats

The Red Cross shop packed and dispatched to the domestic science department of the local high school Wednesday, two boxes filled with preserves and jellies, which will be distributed among the 14 influenza convalescents in the school.
— —

Deaths – Funerals

Omar – The body of Thomas Omar arrived in Boise Wednesday evening from Emmett and the funeral will leave the Schrieber & Sidenfaden chapel Friday morning at 8:45. Services will be conducted at St. John’s cathedral at 9 o’clock and the burial will be in St. John’s cemetery.

Hanley – Jean J., 5 months old son of Mr. and Mrs. A. H. Hanley of Barber, died at the home Wednesday afternoon after an illness of but a few days. The funeral will be held at the Fry & Summers chapel Saturday afternoon at 2 o’clock. Rev. H. J. Reynolds will officiate and burial will be in Morris Hill cemetery. The funeral will be by automobile.
— —

Announcements

Will all teachers, parents and pupils of the Bible school of the First Baptist church take notice that all departments of the school will be opened next Sunday morning at 10 o’clock? Everyone is urged to be on hand.

source: Evening Capital News. (Boise, Idaho), 23 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Lincoln County Times., January 23, 1919, Page 1

19190123LCT1

The Influenza

Influenza, labeled Spanish, came and beat me to my knees; seven doctors couldn’t banish from my form that punk disease; for it’s not among the quitter; vainly doctors pour their bitters into ailing human critters; they just sneeze and swear and sneeze.

Said my doctor, “I have tackled every sort of ill there is; I have cured up people shackled with the gout and rheumatiz; with the itch and mumps I’ve battled, and my triumphs have been tattled, but this ‘flu’ stuff has me rattled, so I pause to say G Whiz.”

I am burning, I am freezing, in my little truckle bed; I am cussing, I am sneezing, with a poultice on my head; and the doctors and the nurses say the patient growing worse is, and they hint around of hearses, and of folks who should be dead.

Doom has often held the cleaver pretty near my swan-like neck; I have had the chills and fever till my system was a wreck; I have had the yaller janders, foot and mouth disease and glanders, and a plague they brought from Flanders on an old windjammer’s deck.

But this measly influenzy has all other ills outclassed; it has put me in a frenzy, like a soldier who’s been gassed, if the villainous inventor this my lodge of pain should enter I would use the voice of Stentor till he had been roundly sassed.

May the influenza vanish! Of all the ailments it’s the worst; but I don’t believe it’s Spanish – haven’t thought so from the first; on my couch of anguish squirmin’, I’ve had leisure to determine that the blamed disease is German, which is why it is acurst.

– Walt Mason.
— —

Helpful Advice Given For Treating Flu In The Home

The following instructions for nurses caring for influenza patients have been issued by the state board of health of North Carolina:

“The normal pulse rate is 72 to 80 beats per minute for adults; more rapid for children. Pulse can best be felt on the front of arm just above the wrist on the thumb side. (The nurse need not feel disturbed if the pulse remains well below 80.)

“The normal temperature is about 98 1/2 degrees. In taking the temperature place the thermometer under the patient’s tongue and have the lips closed. Be sure to shake the thermometer down before using. After using the thermometer should be dipped in an antiseptic solution and then washed in clean, cold water. Never use hot water for this purpose. In children take the temperature by placing thermometer well under the arm. (A 5 per cent solution of carbolic acid is good to keep the thermometer in or to dip it in as a disinfectant. The nurse need not be disturbed if the patient’s temperature records 97 1/2 to 98 1/2 on the thermometer.) If the patient has temperature of 102 degrees or more put ice cap to head and rub back and limbs occasionally with camphor or witch hazel, keeping the body covered during the process. Bathe face and hands with cold water. If patient gets chilly put hot water bottle or hot brick or iron to feet and limbs.

“Make patient drink freely of water.

“See that bowels do not become constipated. If necessary use enema, oil or salts.

“As long as fever lasts give only liquid diet – fruit juice, broths, soups and meat juice.

“Have patient spit in paper or old cloths. Keep soiled paper or cloths in a paper bag. Burn these soiled articles.

“Keep patient in bed until there is no longer danger in permitting him to get up. Err on the side of safety.

“Keep the sheets clean and see that there is enough cover for comfort.

“Make a record of everything done and every happening and of every observation that it is thought likely may be of use to the attending physician.

“The sick room should be sunny and well ventilated. It should be aired several times a day.

“All unnecessary furniture should be removed from the room.

“The room should be kept quiet. (A skillful nurse can give as much relief by the proper use of pillows and by the proper care of the bed as can an unskilled nurse with sedatives.”

The following precautions are advised for nursing influenza patients. They apply to the nursing of other forms of contagion as well:

“The nurse should wear a face mask when waiting on the patient. The mask should consist of four thicknesses of fine mesh gauze and it should cover the mouth and nose. The mask should be sterilized by boiling daily.

“The hands should be washed each time after touching patient or bedclothes. It is safer to dip hands in 1000 to 2000 bichloride solution.”

source: Lincoln County Times. (Jerome, Idaho), 23 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Lincoln County Times., January 23, 1919, Page 5

The local Red Cross has leased the room over the Racket store from the Masonic lodge and have opened an emergency hospital for the treatment of those suffering from the flu. The expenses of maintaining the hospital will be shared by the village, county and local red Cross chapter. Mrs. Stuhlsatz, a competent trained nurse will be in charge, and it has been announced that any time from Friday on any one wishing to take the serum treatment, may call at the hospital and have it administered free of charge.

Mrs. C. W. Young was called to Boise Tuesday on account of the serious illness of her daughter, who is residing there.

John Rummell, a returned soldier who has been assisting at the Jerome Drug company, left for his home in Salt Lake after spending only a few days in Jerome. He is called to his home by the illness of his parents.
— —

[Red Cross]

… On account of the influenza epidemic we are behind in our allotments and are again asking for more help.
— —

Says Poison Gasses Used Is Responsible For Flu

Dr. Croft of Chicago recently in an address before the Chicago Medical society stated that the present epidemic of influenza was, in his opinion, caused by an “irritated atmosphere.” Poison gas used on the battlefields of Europe are supposed to have started all this trouble.

His theory is that the disease is caused by inhaling small amounts of depressing, highly irritated, high density gas, especially at night, when the air is charged with moisture.

He says further in support of his contention, that its spread is far too rapid to be caused by bodily contact and too erratic for germ transmission.

source: Lincoln County Times. (Jerome, Idaho), 23 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Payette Enterprise., January 23, 1919, Page 5

19190123PE1

Fruitland Department
Mrs. R. G. Wilson
“As ‘Twas Told To Me”.

Mr. H. Solterbeck has been sick the past week but is better now.

The quarantine was lifted at the Reimer home last Thursday.

Lou Ramsey, Mr. and Mrs. Roy Sparks and Miss Goldie Wells are quarantined at Maneman’s place with the flu. They are all getting along very nicely.

D. D. Hunter, who was recently sick with pneumonia, took a cold last week which caused a relapse.

Sunday Mr. Harry Beckwith telephoned up here from Weiser saying that his little daughter, Vera, had the flu and that he wanted a teacher to take his place while he was quarantined.
— —

Little Willow

Word was received that Mrs. Ellis Hartley passed away at her home at Council, from pneumonia following the flu. The kindest of sympathy from a host of friends goes out to Ellis Hartley and the children in this their sad hour. There are three little ones left with the father and her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Hanson and brother and sister at Council.

Milam Davis has his neat little bungalow nearly completed. Mr. Walters was called home to Fruitland by the illness of his wife. As soon as weather conditions will permit the family will move into the new house on the Davis ranch.
— —

North Payette

Mrs. Whittier-Thresher and children have been seriously ill with pneumonia but are now improving.

Mrs. Press Jimmerson is expecting her sister and niece from North Dakota. They come to Idaho seeking health.

source: Payette Enterprise. (Payette, Canyon Co., Idaho), 23 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Payette Enterprise., January 23, 1919, Page 6

Yep! I’ve Had the Flu.

The “Garlic” grip I’ve heard about
Has finally put my health to rout.
It leaped upon me unawares
And now I’m forced to stay up stairs;
Also in bed.

I ache and pain in every place,
I’ve had four spasms in my face,
My ears are quite convulsive too,
I guess with life I’m almost through.
I’m nearly dead.

The doctor poked and pummeled me;
I moan and groan in agony.
I have to live on malted hay;
Can’t go the cabaret.
Life’s a blank.

Fever four hundred and two;
My head feels like an oyster stew.
A barrel of water is one good drink
But it nearly put me on the blink.
Must be a tank.

One minute I’m in Heaven’s vale,
The next, my guide has a forked tail,
Along the banks of the brimstone sea
Where other imps are awaiting me
In numbers without end.

I am nearly ready for harp and rings,
Or hoofs and horns and sundry things
I cannot tell just where I’ll go;
Perhaps above, perhaps below;
My future life to spend.

No other ailment that I know
With this blamed thing would stand a show.
It is a cheat, darned hard to beat.
I’ve had small pox, and the mumps,
Boils and bunions and sundry bumps,
But this thin’s got my Nanny.

My eyes are filled with pearly dew,
Around my gills I’m deepest blue.
My hair has turned from brown to gray;
My nose is wearing fast away,
By process quite erosive.

Whene’re I am compelled to sneeze
I nearly bust my B.V.D.’s
Compared with it, naught else is fit
To be a high explosive.

I’ve weathered all these aches and chills
By taking forty different kinds of pills.
Now I must take a “shot” of netrocarbolenza.
‘Twill leave me stiff and lame and sore
But nothing can “faze” me any more,
For I’ve had the dog gone Spanish influenza.

– Ed. C. Shellworth

Dedicated to my fellow sufferers.

source: Payette Enterprise. (Payette, Canyon Co., Idaho), 23 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Emmett Index. January 23, 1919, Page 3

19190123EI1

19190123EI2News of Gem County
By The Index’s Correspondents

Montour
By Mrs. R. E. Noland

The friends of Mrs. Lew Idle are pleased to hear that she is improving and will soon be able to come home.

Sam Bostic went back to Twin Falls, after a pleasant visit with his brother’s family. While here Mr. Bostic was very ill for several days with the flu, but was fully recovered before returning to his work. Miss Bostic remained to finish her visit.

The son of Mr. Henry, who was ill last week, had only a derangement of the stomach and not the influenza, as was first feared. So far as we know there is not a single case of the flu in or around this place.

Mrs. M. A. Vaughn was a dinner guest at Montour Heights Sunday. Mr. Vaughn, who has not been strong since an attack of the influenza, is much better now.

We are pleased to report the return of Mrs. McSparran from the Emmett Slope and glad to know she did not contract the dread disease. Miss McSparran came home with her mother to be nursed back to her real self again before taking up her school duties.
— —

South Slope
By Mrs. C. W. Cook

The ice in Squaw creek did considerable damage to the flume in the Canyon canal that spans the creek.
— —

Bramwell
By E. F. Wells

School was started again here Monday and it is hoped that the flu will not interfere again.

The Vanderdasson school, after being closed three weeks, in which time everybody in the district had the flu, opened up again Monday.
— —

Bissell Creek
by Mrs. Ward M. Fuller

James Stephens and Little Phillip Fuller have recovered from the influenza. Mr. and Mrs. Fuller were fortunate enough to escape having it.
— —

Ola

R. H. Baldwin had a very severe sick spell Friday and went to Boise Saturday to consult a physician.

The Baldwin family are able to be out again.

We are having our annual January thaw and the Saturday’s mail did not reach Ola until Sunday morning.

source: The Emmett Index. (Emmett, Idaho), 23 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Emmett Index. January 23, 1919, Page 4

Emmett News

George Trgaskis, who was reported seriously ill last week, is recovering nicely.

The E. C,. Rundstrom family have all recovered from the influenza and Mr. and Mrs. Rundstrom were able to make a business trip to Boise on Tuesday.

Miss Helen Hand is spending some time at the home of her uncle, H. T. Davis, recuperating her strength from a recent siege of flu. Miss Helen is attending St. Margaret’s school for girls in Boise this year.

Ed Plant is a recent influenza sufferer.

Mrs. Casper, who has been nursing in Emmett during the flu epidemic, returned to her home beyond Freezeout.

News of Senator Tyler’s condition is encouraging. Mr. Tyler hopes to be able to assume his duties as a law maker very soon.

Dr. Ia Wood accompanied Dr. Steward to Boise last Thursday to consult a specialist regarding the condition of his ear. Dr. Wood has experienced a partial deafness since his recent tussle with flu. He returned Friday.

Ad M. Simon, local manager of Alexander’s clothing store here, went to Boise on Sunday to visit his brother and Governor Alexander. He was drafted to assist in invoicing the big Boise store and didn’t return until Tuesday. Today he is confined to his rooms by sickness.

source: The Emmett Index. (Emmett, Idaho), 23 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Emmett Index. January 23, 1919, Page 8

19190123EI2News of Gem County
By The Index’s Correspondents

Central Mesa

More youngsters are going to school since the flu has about run its course.

Chas. Whitsell was on the sick list for a few days last week, but not with the flu.
— —

Upper Mesa

A number of families on the upper Mesa have been having a siege of the flu, but all are getting better.

The Eighth grade class are taking final examinations in some of their studies this week.
— —

Letha

Saturday, the point of interest and excitement was the Anderson school, where a special election was held to determine whether the site of the school in District 21 should be the present one or on the Letha townsite. Letha lost by a few votes.

Mrs. Cook, a sister of Mrs. Cummings, received word that her folks in Portland had the flu, this being the second time this year.
— —

Haw Creek
By Mrs. E. Tennyson.

Miss Marie Hanthorn is home from her school at Weiser, visiting her parents. She expects to return when the flu epidemic is better.

Little Wayne Smith is reported ill with the flu, although not seriously.

The Henry Meier family have now fully recovered from the flu and are able to be out again.
— —

Central Mesa
Regina Conrad

Mrs. Ellis Walters returned home Sunday, after assisting the Howards a week taking care of the sick.

Mrs. Crozer was on the sick list several days last week.
— —

Mrs. Ellen L. Boone Bosteder, died at the Bosteder home near Hanna Saturday morning from Pneumonia following Flu. … She leaves besides her husband three children Harold, aged 14, Ruth, aged 12, and Richard, aged 11. …

source: The Emmett Index. (Emmett, Idaho), 23 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., January 23, 1919, Page 1

19190123DSM1

Ravages of Influenza in South Africa.

Cape Town. — It is authoritatively stated here that the epidemic of influenza in South Africa has resulted in a financial loss to the leading insurance companies of approximately $7,500,000. One insurance manager said it was a startling fact that in the course of a few weeks the epidemic had cost the companies more than they had been called upon to pay for all of their war risks.
— —

Minors Fined for Frequenting Pool Halls.

Two young men of minor age, Ted Kitley and Eugene O’Conner were taken before Police Judge Strong, charged with frequenting billiard halls, contrary to the law regarding such cases. They were fined $10 and costs, which amounted to $15 each.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 23 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., January 23, 1919, Page 3

19181202DSM3
City News

Mrs. A. M. McInturff and two children, who live southeast of Moscow, left today for Johnson, Wash., called by illness of influenza of Mrs. McInturff’s mother and sisters.

The tractor school which was to have begun January 27th, at the University will be postponed until a later date. It will be announced in The Star-Mirror when it will open.
— —

Potlatch News Items

The flu situation is much improved again there being but five cases on the list. Miss Mabel Egan, who has been seriously ill at her home, is improving. All other cases are reported doing nicely.
— —

Idaho Industrial Notes

Total expenditures for Idaho’s educational institutions for past biennium $1, 791,557.

Idaho metal output dropped $19,011,542 in 1918. Due to labor shortage caused by war says state mine inspector.

New Meadows to have new sawmill. Boilers, engines and machinery arrive.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 23 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Nezperce Herald., January 23, 1919, Page 1

19190123NH1

News Of Our Neighbors.

The flu ban was lifted in Kamiah Sunday.

Emmet Webb, for eighteen years a popular resident of the Reubens community, died of influenza complications on the 16th instant at Portland, where he and his wife had made their home the past six months. The remains were shipped to Reubens and interment made there Saturday.
— —

Miss Wilson Assumes Duties of County Superintendent.

Miss Norma P. Wilson, county superintendent of schools-elect, who was prevented from taking up her official duties with the other county officers on Monday of last week by an attack [of] influenza, had sufficiently recovered to take over the work the first of this week, and the necessary formalities of clothing her with the powers of the office will be transacted at an adjourned meeting of the county commissioners tomorrow.
— —

Harry A. Billow Succumbs to Influenza.

Harry A. Billow died early Friday morning, Jan. 17, at the White hospital in Lewiston, where he had been taken for treatment for pneumonia resulting from an attack of influenza. The deceased had recently arrived with his family in Clarkston, from Canada, and had stopped over there for a visit with his wife’s folks before they came on to Nezperce to again take up their residence after an absence of six years. He had suffered an attack of influenza before leaving Canada, and shortly after reaching Clarkston a relapse overcame him, and after pneumonia developed he was taken to the hospital, where heroic efforts were continued to save him. … He married Miss Rena Huffman near Greencreek nine years ago, and she and a son and two daughters and his aged parents survive him, and to these, on whom the blow of his untimely death falls with the most crushing force, this community extends its sincere sympathy.

source: The Nezperce Herald. (Nezperce, Idaho), 23 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Nezperce Herald., January 23, 1919, Page 2

[Editorial]

The selfish ambition of an unprincipled ruler has made itself felt from one end of the world to the other, and has produced results far beyond any intention or expectation. For instance, Dr. Robertson, the head of the Chicago health department, estimates that of the 400,000 deaths from influenza and pneumonia in this country, one-half could have been prevented if the sufferers had had skilled nursing. This it was impossible to supply, for the army had required 20,000 trained nurses to meet its needs. This left at home barely enough experienced nurses for ordinary times, and when the epidemic arrived the scarcity of nurses was immediately felt. The people who died on account of insufficient care in their sickness were as truly victims of the Prussian military system as if they had died on the field of battle.

source: The Nezperce Herald. (Nezperce, Idaho), 23 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Nezperce Herald., January 23, 1919, Page 7

Local and Personal News Notes

The rainy weather is said to be dispelling the flu in many sections.

Miss Blanche Sweet returned Thursday evening from Ilo, where she was nursing influenza patients.

Mr. and Mrs. Roy Thompson attended the funeral of Frank Brocke in Kendrick on Wednesday of last week. Roy returning immediately thereafter and Mrs. Thompson returning last Monday evening.

Auctioneer Harry C. Cranke on Monday received a message stating that the San Francisco live stock show, to have been held Feb. 8-15 and at which he was to handle the pure bred shorthorn sales, had been annulled on account of the influenza epidemic.
— —

Frank Brocke Flu Victim.

Frank Brocke, a cousin of Mrs. Gay Miller and Mrs. Roy Thompson of this city, died at his home in the Kendrick section on the 12th instant, from pneumonia following an attack of influenza. The deceased was ill but a few days. … He was 39 years of age and leaves a wife and five children. …
— —

19190123NH2

(ibid, page 5)

source: The Nezperce Herald. (Nezperce, Idaho), 23 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
—————

Back to Table of Contents
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 1)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 2)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 3)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 4)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 5)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 6)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 7)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 8)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 9)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 10)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 11)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 12)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 13)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 14)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 15)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 16)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 17)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 18)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 19)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 20)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 21)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 22)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 23)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 24)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 25)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 26)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 27)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 28)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 29)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 30)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 31)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 32)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 33)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 34)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 35)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 36)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 37)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 38)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 39)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 40)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 41)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 42)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 43)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 44)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 45)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 46)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 47)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 48)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 49)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 50)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 51)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 52)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 53)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 54)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 55)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 56)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 57)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 58)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 59)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 60)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 61)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 62)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 63)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 64)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 65)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 66)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 67)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 68)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 69)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 70)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 71)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 72)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 73)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 74)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 75)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 76)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 77)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 78)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 79)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 80)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 81)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 82)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 83)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 84)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 85)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 86)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 87)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 88)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 89)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 90)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 91)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 92)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 93)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 94)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 95)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 96)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 97)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 98)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 99)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 100)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 101)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 102)

Road Reports Oct 25, 2020

Please share road reports. Conditions can change quickly this time of year. Be prepared for rocks and trees in the road, and possible snow in higher elevation. Remember there is no cell phone service.

Yellow Pine: Rain, then cold weather have improved local streets. Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN.
“Drivers don’t speed through neighborhoods or most anywhere. Locals brake for kids, wandering dogs, deer, elk, moose, fox, beaver, squirrels and chipmunks. Most are lifetime members of SPLAT, the Society to Prevent Little Animal Tragedies.” – IME
link: Local Forecast
Yellow Pine Webcam: (cameras down today)

Highway 55 Webcams Link:
Link: Fall 2020 ID-55, Smiths Ferry Improvements
ID-55 is closing between Smiths Ferry and Rainbow Bridge starting Monday, Sept. 21. for rock blasting and cleanup. Plan ahead for full road closures Monday-Thursday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. through November, and use U.S. 95 as an alternate route.
State Highway 55 Construction Work Scheduled starts Tuesday, September 8th, 2020
Fall (September through November) and Spring (March through May)
– Daytime and nighttime work seven days a week
– Full road closures Monday through Thursday from 10:00am to 2:00pm
– One-way alternating traffic during all other time frames
link: more info
Note: Due to the Hwy 55 construction from Smith’s Ferry to Rainbow Bridge, the County Commissioners have ordered the closure of Smith’s Ferry Dr. at Packer John Rd. and Round Valley Rd. This closure does not apply to the property owners.

Highway 95: Detour around slide.
Check ITD (link)
French Creek Road is not an official, nor a recommended detour for Highway 95.

Warm Lake Highway: No problems reported.
link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

South Fork Road: Open
Construction nearly over, paving commenced last week.
Saturday (Oc 17) mail truck driver (Taylor) said they had made good progress in the paving, by Wednesday (Oct 21) he noticed equipment being hauled out.
“No closure of the SF Road due to Rx Fire. The construction is winding up with paving prep and paving this week and into next. No hard closures anymore, but potential delays of 30 minutes as vehicle approach the paving operation.”
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Saturday (Oct 17) mail truck driver (Taylor) reports the road is “degrading” but not bad.

Johnson Creek Road: Open
Report Wednesday (Oct 21) mail truck driver (Taylor) says the road was graded all the way to YP, but skipped some sections. Currently the road is in good shape.
link: Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam
link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
Note: The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Open. No current report.
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Open. No current report.
Report Sept 20: “Profile’s in pretty good shape.” BMc
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcam: (check date on image)

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open. No recent reports.
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Travel at your own risk. Be prepared for high elevation snow this time of year.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Cinnabar: Open? Travel at your own risk. Be prepared for high elevation snow this time of year.
Reports of off road travel this summer cutting through the switchbacks and tearing up the hillside.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Travel at your own risk.
Be prepared for high elevation snow this time of year.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Warrens Wagon Road: No currents report.

Deadwood Summit: Open, travel with caution. Be prepared for high elevation snow this time of year.
Scott Mountain is also open.
Note: The approx elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′

New Link
Valley County Road Maintenance Dashboard
——————

Weather Reports Oct 18-24, 2020

Oct 18 Weather:

At 10am it was 44 degrees and overcast with dark clouds. Short sprinkle at 1010am. At 1pm it was overcast. Light rain started before 130pm and probably done by 2pm. At 330pm it was 48 degrees and dark overcast. Started sprinkling lightly around 545pm. At 645pm it was 47 degrees, dark lowering overcast and very light sprinkles (not sure when it quit.) At 840pm not raining. Rained some time before 120am (probably between 9pm-930pm.)

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time October 19, 2020 at 10:00AM
Mostly cloudy
Max temperature 48 degrees F
Min temperature 38 degrees F
At observation 41 degrees F
Precipitation 0.06 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Oct 19 Weather:

At 10am it was 41 degrees and mostly cloudy. At 1pm it looked partly cloudy. At 245pm it was 62 degrees. At 3pm gusty breezes. At 4pm it was 62 degrees, mostly clear and light breezes. At 7pm it was 52 degrees, partly cloudy and variable breezes. Looked cloudy at 11pm.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time October 20, 2020 at 10:00AM
Overcast
Max temperature 63 degrees F
Min temperature 41 degrees F <– Monday AM
At observation 44 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Oct 20 Weather:

At 10am it was 44 degrees and overcast. At 1pm a gray overcast sky. At 330pm it was 56 degrees and gray overcast. At 650pm it was 51 degrees and gray overcast. Looked cloudy at 11pm.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time October 21, 2020 at 10:00AM
Mostly cloudy, breezy
Max temperature 59 degrees F
Min temperature 40 degrees F
At observation 44 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Oct 21 Weather:

At 10am it was 44 degrees, mostly cloudy and breezy. At 1pm it was 54 degrees, mostly cloudy and breezy. At 330pm it was 47 degrees, mostly cloudy and breezy. Gusty at 530pm. At 645pm it was 41 degrees, overcast, breezy and spit little snowballs and rain drops for a few minutes, not enough to get wet. At 7pm foggy ridges but not raining and flag flapping breezy. At 11pm it looked cloudy and dry. Snowed a trace during the night.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time October 22, 2020 at 10:00AM
Partly clear
Max temperature 54 degrees F
Min temperature 26 degrees F
At observation 29 degrees F
Precipitation Trace
Snowfall Trace
Snow depth Trace
— — — — — — — — — —

Oct 22 Weather:

At 10am it was 29 degrees and partly clear. Partly cloudy and breezy at 1pm. At 350pm it was 44 degrees, partly cloudy and chilly breezes. At 635pm it was 34 degrees, clear sky and calmer. At 930pm it was 25 degrees and frosting. Clear and cold at midnight.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time October 23, 2020 at 10:00AM
Clear, frosty, light breeze
Max temperature 47 degrees F
Min temperature 16 degrees F
At observation 17 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Oct 23 Weather:

At 10am it was 17 degrees, clear sky and frosty. Sunny and breezy at 1pm. At 330pm it was 44 degrees, overcast and very gusty. At 645pm it was 42 degrees, cloudy and much calmer. Looked cloudy at 1045pm. Rain early morning, probably around 5-7am.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time October 24, 2020 at 10:20AM
Mostly cloudy, low on ridges
Max temperature 48 degrees F
Min temperature 17 degrees F <– Friday AM
At observation 38 degrees F
Precipitation 0.03 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Oct 24 Weather:

At 1020am it was 38 degrees, mostly cloudy – clouds halfway down the flanks of the mountains and clearing above. Cloudy and spitting snow just before 12pm. At 1215pm it was 43 degrees, mostly cloudy, breezy and little flakes of snow falling. Not snowing at 1240pm. Breaks in the clouds and scattered sunshine 1pm-2pm. At 330pm it was 40 degrees, mostly cloudy and gusty breezes. At 630pm it was 33 degrees, dark overcast and gusty breezes. Breezy and 32 degrees after dark. At 11pm it looked partly clear and breezy. Clearing during the night.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time October 25, 2020 at 10:00AM
Clear, cold breezes
Max temperature 47 degrees F
Min temperature 16 degrees F
At observation 17 degrees F
Precipitation Trace
Snowfall Trace
Snow depth 0 inch
——————-

Road Reports Oct 21, 2020

Winter storm coming this weekend. Please share road reports. Conditions can change quickly this time of year. Be prepared for rocks and trees in the road, and possible snow in higher elevation. Remember there is no cell phone service.

Yellow Pine: The recent rains have improved local streets. Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN.
“Drivers don’t speed through neighborhoods or most anywhere. Locals brake for kids, wandering dogs, deer, elk, moose, fox, beaver, squirrels and chipmunks. Most are lifetime members of SPLAT, the Society to Prevent Little Animal Tragedies.” – IME
link: Local Forecast
Yellow Pine Webcam: (check date on image)

Highway 55 Webcams Link:
Link: Fall 2020 ID-55, Smiths Ferry Improvements
ID-55 is closing between Smiths Ferry and Rainbow Bridge starting Monday, Sept. 21. for rock blasting and cleanup. Plan ahead for full road closures Monday-Thursday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. through November, and use U.S. 95 as an alternate route.
State Highway 55 Construction Work Scheduled starts Tuesday, September 8th, 2020
Fall (September through November) and Spring (March through May)
– Daytime and nighttime work seven days a week
– Full road closures Monday through Thursday from 10:00am to 2:00pm
– One-way alternating traffic during all other time frames
link: more info
Note: Due to the Hwy 55 construction from Smith’s Ferry to Rainbow Bridge that starts in September (after Labor Day), the County Commissioners have ordered the closure of Smith’s Ferry Dr. at Packer John Rd. and Round Valley Rd. This closure does not apply to the property owners who live beyond the intersection of Packer John Rd. and Smith’s Ferry Dr.

Highway 95: Detour around slide.
Check ITD (link)
French Creek Road is not an official, nor a recommended detour for Highway 95.

Warm Lake Highway: No problems reported.
link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

South Fork Road: Open
Construction nearly over, paving commenced this last week.
Saturday (Oc 17) mail truck driver (Taylor) said they had made good progress in the paving, by Wednesday (Oct 21) he noticed equipment being hauled out.
“No closure of the SF Road due to Rx Fire. The construction is winding up with paving prep and paving this week and into next. No hard closures anymore, but potential delays of 30 minutes as vehicle approach the paving operation.”
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Saturday (Oct 17) mail truck driver (Taylor) reports the road is “degrading” but not bad.

Johnson Creek Road: Open
Report Wednesday (Oct 21) mail truck driver (Taylor) says the road was graded all the way to YP, but skipped some sections. Currently the road is in good shape.
Johnson Creek Airstrip looking North

link: Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam
link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
Note: The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Open. No current report.
Report Sept 21: Lick Creek Road was recently graded by Valley County.
Report Sept 23: road is very bumpy. – BJB
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Open. No current report.
Report Sept 20: “Profile’s in pretty good shape.” BMc
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcam: (check date on image)

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open. No recent reports.
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Travel at your own risk. Be prepared for high elevation snow this time of year.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Cinnabar: Open? Travel at your own risk. Be prepared for high elevation snow this time of year.
Reports of off road travel this summer cutting through the switchbacks and tearing up the hillside.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Travel at your own risk.
Be prepared for high elevation snow this time of year.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Warrens Wagon Road: No currents report.

Deadwood Summit: Open, travel with caution. Be prepared for high elevation snow this time of year.
Scott Mountain is also open.
Note: The approx elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′

New Link
Valley County Road Maintenance Dashboard
——————

Oct 18, 2020 The Yellow Pine Times

Oct 18, 2020 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Reminder: We are still under a boil water order until further notice.

Community Calendar:

April 17 – Boil water order issued
May 15 – Firewood Season starts
Aug 11 – Valley County Mask Order
Aug 12 – Firewood Permits at The Corner
Sept 8 – Hwy 55 work starts
Oct 28 – Comment deadline Midas Gold
Oct 31 – Halloween at the YP Tavern 7pm
Fall 2020 – Rx burn South Fork Salmon River planed
Nov 26 – Thanksgiving potluck Community Hall 2pm
(details below)
———-

From Valley County

Valley County Mask-Up
A county-wide mask mandate was approved the CDH August 11th, and is now in effect for Valley County. (link)

We need Your Help to protect the place and the people we all Love.
link:

Valley County Covid-19 Response Page
link:

Valley County Emergency Operations Center
link:

Rebound – Idaho Governor’s phasing program
link:

COVID 19: Recommendations and Resources for Safe Business Practices
link: (lots of info for businesses)
——————-

Local Events:

Yellow Pine Tavern Annual Halloween Party

Join us for the “Most Original Covid Mask” Contest at the Tavern October 31 at 7pm. Our Annual Salmon Bake, End of Deer Season, Halloween Party Potluck. Alaskan Salmon provided by Tom Wood.
— — — —

Thanksgiving

Thursday, November 26th, 2pm. Yellow Pine Thanksgiving Potluck Dinner, at the Community Hall.
——————-

Rx Burn South Fork Salmon River planed

The Payette National Forest, Krassel Ranger District, is planning to conduct prescribed burning in the Four Mile project area this fall. The Four Mile project area is on both sides of the South Fork of the Salmon River between Poverty Flat Campground and Reed Ranch. The area that will be targeted for fire this fall is to the east of the South Fork Rd between Reed Ranch and Poverty Flat Campground. First priority burn block will be the area between Nasty and Four Mile creeks. Ignitions should take 1-3 days for each burn block, with smoke and fire most likely present in the project area until the next significant precipitation.

The decision to implement prescribed fire always includes assessing the risk and impacts to communities, firefighters and forest resources. This season additional consideration will be given to complexity associated with COVID19, cumulative smoke exposure in our communities from wildfire and the commitment of fire resources locally and nationally.

If you will be operating in the area or have any questions please contact Laurel Ingram, Fuels Tech or Patrick Schon, Fuels Specialist, so that we can collaborate on timing.

Map Link: FourMile Fall 2020 Notification
— — — —

Highway 55 Closure starts Monday, Sept 21st

Fall (September through November) and Spring (March through May)
– Daytime and nighttime work seven days a week
– Full road closures Monday through Thursday from 10:00am to 2:00pm
– One-way alternating traffic during all other time frames
———-

Village News:

Fall Fuel Delivery

The Diamond truck returned Wednesday morning (Oct 14) to deliver more winter fuel to Yellow Pine.
— — — —

Friday Food Boxes

Friday’s mail truck delivered food boxes to Yellow Pine. Milk, cheese, yogurt, lots of nice fruit, veggies and packets of ready to eat taco meat and chicken drum sticks.
— —

After Fire Action Meeting

On Tuesday, Oct 13, there was a meeting at the community hall to compile an “After Action Review” for the Buck Fire.
— —

Help Support the Yellow Pine Volunteer Fire Department

Thank you for all your offers of help and support. Now you can help support the Yellow Pine Fire District by donating through our Go Fund Me account. Just click on the link to get started.

Even a small donation could help reach the fundraising goal. And if you can’t make a donation, it would be great if you could share the fundraiser to help spread the word.

Thanks for taking a look!

FAQ: YPAC is the charity that was set up to allow the Village to apply for grants. It was the only 501.c3 the Village has to allow GoFundMe to recognize an authorized EIN. So, funds will go to YPAC then they will cut a check to the fire district. YPAC is lead by Corey Phillips and Matt Huber is the Secretary.

If reading this makes you feel inspired to donate (especially the part about how we’re all over the age of 60…) – it will help us acquire more fire hose, hose fittings, needed pumps, and 2 replacement tires for our super old excess military water tender, plus other necessary items. Thank you for your consideration!!
— — — —

Midas

EIS draft copy for public reading is available in Yellow Pine Community Hall

A complete Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for Midas Gold’s proposed Stibnite mine has been placed in the Yellow Pine Community Hall so everyone can read and respond before 5 p.m. on Oct. 28 deadline for public comment. Read about your ares of concern, write a letter or submit your comments online before October 13th. Your comments really influence what happens in Stibnite.

-LI
— — — —

Boil Water Order issued April 17 still in effect.

No update for August or September.

Update July 5: the boil order is in effect due to extremely high use due to leaks.

Update June 12: The boil order is still on. We still are experiencing excessive water use because of leaks. Not sure when this will be lifted. We are applying for grants to repair the system.

Update June 2: The water plant is experiencing high water in Boulder Creek which brings more debris into the sand filter.

The high demand caused by leaks in the system plugs the sand filters prematurely. We will be on a boil order until further notice.
— — — —

Critters

Wasps – long legged wasps are around on warm afternoon. Watch for nests under eves and under propane tank lids.

West Nile has been found in Ada, Canyon and Gem county mosquitoes.

Be Bear Aware

* Keep all household garbage secured in a garage or other enclosed area.
* Leftovers or discarded fish or meat bones give off a strong odor and should be stored in your freezer until you haul the garbage to the transfer station.
* Keep attractants like B-B-Q grills, bird seed or pet food stored where bears cannot find them.
* Bird feeders should be taken down May through October or placed well out of reach of bears.

Be Mountain Lion Aware

* NEVER run away from a mountain lion. The lion’s instinct is to chase and ultimately catch what they perceive as potential prey.
* NEVER turn your back on a lion. Always face them while making yourself look as large as you can. Yell loudly, but don’t scream. A high-pitched scream may mimic the sound of a wounded animal.
* SLOWLY back away while maintaining eye contact with the lion.
* Safety equipment you may choose to carry could include bear spray, a noise device, like an air-horn, and if you walk in the dark, a very bright flashlight.
* If you are attacked, fight back!
— — — —

Latest Road Reports

Link: to current road reports.
— — — —

Yellow Pine US Mail

The 6-day a week mail delivery started June 1st. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 55 cents. Support our local post office and purchase your holiday stamps here.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Report Friday (Oct 9) Bins were full (including 2 mattresses) at the transfer station. Road is good from YP to the dump.

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

20190429Dump2-bYellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is located approximately 3 miles south on Johnson Creek Road.

The TRANSFER STATION is for household trash and yard waste:
* Household trash must be put inside (and fit) the dumpster;
* Yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, etc.) goes in the burn pile on the south end of the turn-around;
* Cardboard boxes should be flattened before putting the in the dumpster,

The DUMPSTERS are NOT for:
* Furniture (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station).

The BURN PILE is NOT for:
* Cardboard boxes (flatten and put in dumpster);
* Furniture and appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Drywall and building material (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wire or fencing (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Foam Rubber (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wood with metal (like nails) attached (take to Donnelly Transfer Station.)

When closing the DOORS on the front of the dumpsters:
* Make sure the “U” brackets at the top and bottom of the door are engaged;
* The retaining bar at the middle of the door is slid into the pipe;
* And the “L” bars at the bottom of the doors dropped into place.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: 208/634-7176
———-

Local Groups

YPWUA News:

The annual Water meeting for 2020 was held July 5th at the Community Hall 2pm.
link: minutes 20200705YPWUA.docx

Boil Water Order issued April 17, 2020. This could last until leaks are repaired.

Boil Water Advisory Notice

Boil Your Water Before Using

Bring tap water to a rolling boil, boil for one minute, and cool before using or use bottled water. Boiled or bottled water should be used for drinking, making ice, washing dishes, brushing teeth, and preparing food until further notice.

This Boil Water Advisory Notice applies to The Yellow Pine Water System

The system is being monitored and checked daily for compliance.

You will be informed when you no longer need to boil your water.

Please share this information with other people who drink this water, especially anyone who may not get this notice directly (for example, people in apartments, nursing homes, schools, and businesses).

You can do this by posting this notice in a public place or distributing copies by hand or mail.

State Water System ID#: 4430059 Date distributed: 3-22-2020

Notice of Intent to File an Application with USDA, Rural Development

The Yellow Pine Water Users Association, Yellow Pine, Idaho intends to file an Application with USDA, Rural Development to obtain a drinking water system facility Emergency Community Water Assistance Grant (ECWAG). Emergency Community Water Assistance Grant (ECWAG).

If any additional information is needed, please contact:
Willie Sullivan
Treasurer
ypwater @ gmail.com

Distributed to Yellow Pine Water Users Association customers via Yellow Pine Times on June 12, 2020.

The 2019 Yellow Pine Water Users Shareholders meeting was Sunday July 7, 2019.
link: 20190707YPWUAminutes
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VYPA News:

Work Continues on the community hall bathroom
20201015CommunityHall1-aOctober 15, 2020 (photo provided by DF)

Heat was installed in the community hall on April 30th.

Village of Yellow Pine Association Meeting Minutes September 12, 2020

The regular meeting was called to order at 2:00 at the community hall by Deb Filler, Chairman.

Council Members Present: Deb Filler, Chairman; Matt Huber, Vice Chair; Ronda Rogers, Treasurer; Rhonda Egbert, Secretary.

Attendees: Virginia Bartholomew, Belinda Provancher, Jake Strohmeyer, Tom Reinhardt, Candy Sullivan, Teri Norrell, Ann Forster

Approval of minutes from August 2020 meeting as published.

Jake Strohmeyer from Boise National Forest gave updates on the Buck Fire.

Tom Reinhart CEO from Cascade Medical gave information on the telehealth programs available thru Cascade medical clinic. Call office to set up a zoom visit.

Treasurer’s report was given by Ronda, see attachments.

Cemetery: had nothing to report.

Community Hall Report: Grant money from Midas Gold has been received and storage shed has been ordered.

Community Hall Toilets: Working on options since Willie is unable to continue due to medical concerns.

Infrastructure Committee Report: Speeding continues to be an issue within town. Dogs and people are feeling unsafe due to vehicles speed. It was discussed to get better signage. Would like three signs on main road. Want to have fun with it. Belinda said s he would check into Midas helping with expenses of sandwich boards.

Festival Report: Refunds have been received. 2021 Festival Budget is replenished to $12,000. Thank you for the fundraising efforts that got us there.

Stibnite Advisory Council Update: Lynn Imel n/a.

Stibnite Foundation Update: Ronda went over grant apportions and how they work.

Reviewed Letters of Interest from Rhonda Rogers and Lynn Imel No other letters were submitted. Ginny made a motion that Ronda and Lynn serve another year. Tim Rogers seconded. Motion carried.

Update from Midas Gold: Belinda encouraged everyone to write a comment letter on the Draft EIS for the Stibnite Project.

Update from YPWA: representative not available, however, it was noted that past due payments are coming in.

Only one person, Deb Filler, expressed interest in being the 2021 Festival Chairman. Deb was appointed chairman.

[Don’t] forget to get your flu shot and write letters for Midas Gold after meeting.

Meeting adjourned at 2:45 by Deb Filler.

Minutes submitted by Rhonda Egbert Secretary

Minutes from September 12 VYPA meeting
link:

Minutes from August 8, 2020 VYPA meeting
link:

Minutes from July 11, 2020 VYPA meeting
link:

Minutes from June 13, 2020 VYPA meeting
link:

VYPA Bylaws adopted 8/8/2020 (link)

YPAC Corp Bylaws (link)
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YPFD News:

YPFD had a budget meeting on September 30th at 10am at the fire station. (No minutes yet.)

Make sure to clean and check chimney fitting before starting that first fall fire in your cabin. Cleaning brushes can be borrowed from the YPFD.

There was a YP Fire Commissioner meeting on June 27, 2020 at 10am at the Fire Station.
Link: 20200627 Fire Dept minutes June 27

YPFD COVID19 Policy

link: YPFD Covid 19 SOP

link: Covid-19 EMS (May 23)

May 10th Burn Permits – contact the YPFD

Pile burning: Dress appropriately, have enough help on hand (people, water and tools) and make a firebreak before you start. Call your local fire protection district chief to let them know you’ll be conducting a debris burn. This saves them from sending emergency responders to your property if they are not needed. Do NOT burn on breezy afternoons.

Better yet, “Bring It, Don’t Burn It”, you can take your yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, etc.) to the burn pile at the Transfer Station on the south end of the turn-around. Remember, keep the pile neat. Woody debris only, no nails, no cardboard and no furniture! The Boise NF will burn the pile in the fall when it is safe and doesn’t pollute our fine YP air.

YP Fire Commissioners:
Sue Holloway – District 1
Dan Stiff – District 2
Merrill Saleen – District 3
(TBA) – Fire Chief

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice

The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.” Click the link: to view 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation
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Biz Listings:

The Corner (208) 633-3325

Open 11am-8pm Closed Tuesdays thru end of hunting season. Calling ahead works best. Groceries, Ice Cream, Beer and Soda. Our menu fluctuates but typically have Smoked Brisket, Tri Tip, Chicken, Burgers and Wings on hand.
Starting Aug 12th Firewood Permits at The Corner
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Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233

Open Daily 8am to 10pm. Outside Dining and Bar. Breakfast and Bar Food.
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Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377

Open until November 3rd.
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Yellow Pine General Store (208) 633-3300

The store is open now and will be thru October (closing November 3rd for the winter.) Hours are 9 am to 6 pm Tuesday through Saturday. Closed Sunday and Monday.
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Murph’s RV Park & Mary’s Cabins (208) 633-6677

Cabins are not available in 2020. RV Spaces $25/night; $150/week; $300/month. Tent spaces $10/night. Shower house is closed for 2020.
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Knotty Kat Crochet Works – 208-502-0940
FB page link
open Tue – Sat, 9-5
Yellow Pine eggs $3/doz
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Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Tom & Sarah Lanham
156 Yellow Pine Ave, Yellow Pine Id 83677
website:
Facebook:
Starting June 2020 We will be doing trail rides out of Yellow Pine along with summer pack / camping trips to high mountain lakes in the area!

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
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Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430 open 830am-5pm Monday-Friday, closed weekends.
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Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

The Star-News

click to subscribe:
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine

Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, will service Yellow Pine

B&T Safety Solutions LLC
208-271-1600 Based out of Donnelly
Snow removal, cleaning chimneys and stoves, we do cabin staining/chinking as well
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (Oct 12) overnight low of 36 degrees, rain during the night = 0.22″, mostly cloudy and light breezes this morning. Dark clouds at lunch time. Rained a little early afternoon, then broken cloud cover. Raven calling. A few misty drops mid-afternoon, not enough to get wet, high of 55 degrees. Mostly cloudy and breezy at dusk. Partly clear before midnight, Mars high above Golden Gate. Warm front came in around 6am bringing clouds and raising temperatures. Started raining before 920am.

Tuesday (Oct 13) overnight low of 33 degrees, started raining before 920am plus yesterday’s light showers = 0.01″. Dark overcast sky, light rainfall and a little breezy this morning. Short sprinkle after lunch time, dark clouds and gusty breezes. Clark’s nutcrackers, jays and a few blackbirds visited. Dark overcast, chilly breezes and light rain splatters mid-afternoon, high of 50 degrees. Breezy showers all afternoon. At dusk it was overcast with light sprinkles and breezy. Cloudy and breezy before midnight.

Wednesday (Oct 14) overnight low of 32 degrees, mostly cloudy sky with open patches of blue this morning and good air quality, 24 hour rain total = 0.18″. Diamond Fuel & Feed truck delivering fuel this morning. Mail truck was a little late, but had a good trip in. Partly clear and breezy after lunch time. Steller jays visiting. Blustery, cool and mostly cloudy mid-afternoon, high of 54 degrees. Very light traffic. Calmer at dusk and mostly cloudy. Cloudy and calm before midnight.

Thursday (Oct 15) overnight low of 27 degrees, hard freeze but little frost, mostly cloudy-hazy sky this morning (almost looks like smoke.) Steller jays bopping around and scolding. Cool and partly cloudy after lunch time. Mostly hazy to partly clear mid-afternoon and very light breezes, high of 53 degrees. Shooting on the west side of the golf course after sundown. Cool and hazy at dusk, the whole sky was orange and cast a golden glow on every hing. Looked somewhat hazy before midnight, a few stars visible.

Friday (Oct 16) overnight low of 28 degrees, partly clear sky and no dew this morning. Sunrise getting later. Jays visiting. Partly hazy at lunch time. Mail truck came in on time. Mostly cloudy and breezy mid-afternoon, high of 65 degrees. Increased traffic. Mostly cloudy at dusk, ruby red clouds to the west. Looked cloudy before midnight. Rain early morning.

Saturday (Oct 17) overnight low of 36 degrees, rained probably around 6am = 0.05″, mostly cloudy sky this morning. Jays and a pine squirrel visiting. Helicopter flew over at 1145am. High hazy clouds at lunch time. Warmer, mostly hazy and gusty breezes mid-afternoon, high of 62 degrees. Sound of chainsaws in the distance, locals getting ready for winter. Lots of jays in the neighborhood. Thicker darker clouds at dusk and light breeze. Looked cloudy before midnight, no rain yet.

Sunday (Oct 18) overnight low of 42 degrees, trace of rain before sunrise, dark overcast sky. Short sprinkle of rain fell at 1010am, just enough to dampen roofs. Jays visiting. Dark clouds and sprinkles of rain after lunch time. Chilly and dark clouds but not raining mid-afternoon, high of 48 degrees. Light sprinkles and showers early evening. At dusk clouds starting to sit down on top of VanMeter Hill and still sprinkling. Air smells like vehicle exhaust.
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RIP:

Ken Boatman formerly of Yellow Pine passed away at 630pm Friday, October 17, 2020
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Letter to Share:

Common purpose, resolve, will help us get through the pandemic

By Gregory Irvine, MD

I have serious pandemic fatigue. We all do. We all desperately want our lives to return to what we had in January of this year.

SARS CoV2 is not experiencing the same fatigue. In fact, as has been shown everywhere on Earth, when we become fatigued and let our collective guards down, the virus takes the opportunity and comes roaring back with a vengeance.

Pandemics end when there is no longer an available reservoir of susceptible human bodies to infect so that the virus can use their cells to reproduce. This pandemic will end when that happens, either through “natural” herd immunity, which will exact a horrible toll on humanity, or through herd immunity created by a widely distributed vaccine against SARS CoV2.

There were no vaccines during the 1918 Spanish Influenza pandemic and approximately 50 million people perished from the influenza worldwide. We will likely have a vaccine and/or an antiviral therapeutic next year. In the meantime, we must do everything possible to reduce the spread of the virus in our communities.

We are all well aware of the measures that we can each take to do our part to reduce the spread of the Coronavirus: maintain physical distance, avoid crowds from outside our immediate household, perform frequent hand hygiene, strictly isolating when experiencing fever and/or respiratory symptoms, and properly wear a two-layer fabric or surgical mask when in public.

If these measures are strictly followed, as has been shown worldwide, viral transmission is significantly limited, and morbidity and death are substantially reduced.

The spread of SARS CoV2 has proven to be difficult to control because, unlike with other similar viral pandemics (SARS, MERS, H1N1, etc.), a significant number of infected individuals who are capable of spreading the virus are asymptomatic. Isolating only those who are sick is simply inadequate for preventing the spread of SARS CoV2. Therefore, all of us need to follow the well-known precautions.

The issue of universal masking needs to be specifically called out. Masks, when worn consistently and properly, work. Any opinion to the contrary is simply untrue. There has been a great deal of scientific validation of the utility of masks in reducing the spread of the Coronavirus, especially when correctly worn by both members of any interaction outside our family bubble.

Masks need to be two layers of tightly woven fabric and worn over the mouth and nose. No mask is perfect and viral particle can penetrate almost any permeable material, but we have learned that with SARS CoV2, viral load, the amount of virus that enters our respiratory tract correlates with the severity of illness.

Masks, worn by both individuals in an interaction, reduces viral load and thereby likely reduces the severity of COVID-19 when virus is transmitted. We, in Valley County, have been, for the most part, very consistent in the use of masks in public spaces. That has made an undoubted difference in our infection rates and must continue.

The issue of masks has, unfortunately, become far too political. These are issues of public health, not of politics. When it comes to issues of science, I am personally apolitical. My views are rooted in a constant search to understand the human body, the natural world and biology.

As this pandemic has descended on us in Valley County, there have been many heroes among us who have responded in a spirit of common purpose and resolve. These heroes are too numerous to mention here, but I would specifically call out Elt Hasbrouck, the Chairman of the Valley County commission. In Valley County’s response to the pandemic, Elt has exhibited leadership, wisdom, and a genuine concern for the health and safety of all of us in the county. The citizens of Valley owe him a debt of gratitude for all that he has done, often without calling attention to himself.

We must remind ourselves that the pandemic is not over yet, far from it. Nonetheless, with the precautions that we know work to reduce the spread of the virus, we can safely continue on with our livelihoods, our businesses, our schools, and our lives. Common purpose and resolve will get us through these challenges together. As I have said before, in this pandemic, we are truly our brothers’ keepers.

(Gregory Irvine, MD, is Chief of Staff of St. Luke’s McCall Medical Center.)

source: The Star-News Oct 15, 2020
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Idaho News:

Record 1,094 new Idaho COVID-19 cases, 6 new deaths

Oct 16, 2020 Local News 8

Idaho officials reported a record 1,094 new COVID-19 cases and 6 new deaths on Friday.

That brings the total confirmed and probable cases reported since March to 51,704.

There are a total of 46,086 confirmed cases and 5,618 probable cases in all 44 of the 44 counties in Idaho, according to numbers released from the local health districts and the state.

… 6 new deaths were reported bringing the total recorded deaths to 523.

full story:
— — — — — — — — — —

Idaho Daily New Cases as of 10/15/2020

source: KTVB
— — — — — — — — — —

With Idaho stuck in Stage 4 again, Little urges personal responsibility to slow COVID-19

by Ruth Brown and Jacob Scholl Idaho Statesman Oct 15, 2020

Idaho has reached record-high numbers of new coronavirus cases this week, and Gov. Brad Little announced Thursday that the state must stay in Stage 4 of his reopening plan and urged people to behave responsibly to slow the spread.

Little continued to encourage Idahoans to wear masks and practice social distancing, rather than moving to implement stricter measures statewide.

He said the state’s rising coronavirus case count has a direct impact on Idaho’s health care facilities and workers. The more coronavirus patients hospitalized, the less access others will have for essential medical treatment.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

As schools reopen, children’s coronavirus case numbers double in two months

Idaho Education News Oct 17, 2020

Coronavirus case numbers for Idaho school-aged children have doubled in two months — exceeding even the state’s rapid increase in cases.

These numbers correlate with the start of the 2020-21 school year, and attempts to reopen K-12 schools to face-to-face instruction.

On Tuesday, the state reported 4,270 coronavirus cases involving 5- to 17-year-old children. No Idaho children have died from COVID-19, which has killed more than 500 Idahoans.

… Last week, the White House’s coronavirus task force said outbreaks in 10 Idaho counties could be tied to school reopenings, and the task force suggested shifting to online instruction.

full story:
— — — — — — — — — —

Valley County COVID-19 cases up one, now stand at 144

By Tom Grote for The Star-News Oct 15, 2020

The total number of positive COVID-19 cases in Valley County reached 144 cases on Tuesday, up one case from 143 a week ago, health officials said.

St. Luke’s McCall on Tuesday reported 113 total positive cases from testing done at the hospital, up one case from 112 a week ago.

Cascade Medical Center reported 28 positive cases, the same as reported last week.

In addition, the private testing cooperative Crush the Curve has found three confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Valley County with no change in the past week.

Nearly all of the positive cases reported by the hospitals were found following the start of the summer visitor season in mid-June.

Central District Health reported 97 of the positive cases were confirmed to be Valley County residents as of Tuesday, which is two more than the 95 cases reported a week ago.

The difference between the hospital figures and the health department figures are those who tested positive but did not declare Valley County as their residence.

Valley County schools this week remained in the “yellow” category designation by Central District Health. The health department switched the designation from “green” to “yellow” on Oct. 5 after a spike in confirmed cases.

The schools continue to operate under “yellow” precautions, which includes staggered classroom sessions and online learning.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Hospitals seek community help to “flatten the curve”

Oct 15, 2020 Local News 8

Fourteen regional hospitals have released a joint statement encouraging eastern Idahoans to “flatten the curve” of COVID-19.

As of this week, hospitals are experiencing the highest number of hospitalizations due to COVID-19 that have ever been seen since the pandemic began. They said it is placing a significant strain on hospital resources and especially health care workers.

The “flatten the curve” concept is explicitly aimed at helping hospitals handle the demand brought on by community spread of the virus.

continued:
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WICAP seeks applications for winter energy assistance

The Star-News Oct 15, 2020

The Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program will accept applications for the winter starting on Nov. 1.

The program offers assistance with heating and cooling energy costs, bill payment, energy crisis, weatherization and energy-related home repairs.

To apply for assistance, visit https://wicap.org and click on LIHEAP application or call 208-382-4577.

Information on the program is also available on the Western Idaho Community Action Partnership website.

source:
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Idaho 55 crew says their jobs are both art and science

By Max Silverson for The Star-News Oct 15, 2020

Tim Shaub poured an unassuming pitcher of tiny pink pellets and placed what looked like a yellow sausage into a series of holes drilled in the bedrock along Idaho 55 between Smiths Ferry and the Rainbow Bridge.

A short time later, the rock shattered from a quick series of precise but powerful explosions that detonated the pellets, an explosive called ammonium nitrate fuel oil, and the sausage, which is an explosive similar to dynamite

Shaub is the safety manager for Ryno Works Inc., the drilling and blasting contractor based in McCall that was hired to conduct the controlled blasting on the Smiths Ferry project on Idaho 55.

The blast was only one of many that the company has detonated since the project began on Sept. 8.

The two-year project will widen and straighten about a mile of highway. In order to reshape the road, about 140,000 cubic yards of rock needs to be removed, much of it by blasting.

continued:
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Mining News:

McCall: More study needed on Stibnite trucks

Council worries about spills into North Fork

By Dew Dodson for The Star-News October 15, 2020

More analysis on how semi-trucks carrying hazardous materials to and from Stibnite could affect McCall is needed before approval of Midas Gold’s proposed mine, according to the McCall City Council.

The council unanimously approved submitting a letter to the Payette National Forest outlining what it sees as shortcomings of the agency’s draft environmental study of the mine as it relates to the city.

Public comments to the Payette on the proposed gold and antimony mine near Yellow Pine are due by Oct. 28 at 5 p.m.

Chief among the city’s worries are that one third of all mine traffic is projected to travel through McCall via Deinhard Lane and Boydstun Street during the 12 to 15-year life of operations.

But the draft study did not specifically study the effects of mine traffic in McCall, which would carry hazardous materials, like cyanide, antimony or sulfuric acid, near the North Fork of the Payette River, the letter said.

“Additionally, Big Payette Lake is the sole source of drinking water for the City of McCall and we cannot afford a hazardous material spill into the lake,” the letter said.

No mine traffic carrying explosives or toxic materials should be allowed to travel through McCall until the risks are analyzed by regulators and necessary safety improvements are identified, the city said.

The Payette should also bind Midas Gold to making road upgrades in McCall that are needed to handle mine traffic, the letter said.

Midas Gold has verbally agreed to pay to expand the intersections of Idaho 55 with Deinhard Lane and Boydstun Street, but is not required to do so by regulators.

Also, the city noted potential catastrophic consequences a toxic spill could have since it would take about four hours for a specialized clean-up team to respond from Boise.

“The Forest Service should require the applicant to provide HazMat response resources in McCall or another nearby location to allow for a timely response,” the letter said.

One possibility for that could be staging toxic spill response trailers in strategic locations, similar to safeguards Midas Gold has proposed along either primary mine access route it could use.

The letter also points to the importance of backcountry access to McCall’s economy and asks that the Payette work to preserve that access and backcountry recreation as much as possible.

That should include the Payette banning mine traffic from using Lick Creek Road through McCall, the city said.

The mine would not use Lick Creek Road for either primary access route under consideration, but some Midas Gold workers currently travel to Stibnite using the road, the letter said.

source: © Copyright 2009-present Central Idaho Publishing Inc. All rights reserved (Used with permission.)
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Comments on Stibnite Gold Project due by Oct. 28

By Dew Dodson for The Star-News October 15, 2020

Public comments on the draft environmental study of Midas Gold’s proposed Stibnite Gold Project are being accepted until 5 p.m. on Oct. 28.

The entire draft study can be viewed by clicking on the “Analysis” tab on the Payette Forest’s project webpage at (link).

Comments can be submitted through the virtual public meeting room that is being used in lieu of in-person public meetings due to the COVID-19 pandemic. That can be found at (link).

Written comments can be mailed to the Payette Supervisor Linda Jackson at 500 Mission St., Building 2, McCall, Idaho 83638. Comments are not being accepted in person due to the pandemic.

Only “substantive” comments that raise questions about specific elements of the draft study or Midas Gold’s proposal will be taken into consideration into the Payette’s drafting of a final study.

Analysis of the alternatives in the draft study will be further refined and could change before a “preferred alternative” is defined in the final environmental study, which is tentatively expected by August 2021

source: © Copyright 2009-present Central Idaho Publishing Inc. All rights reserved (Used with permission.)
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Letter to Share:

Restoration of Stibnite area can be done without mining

To the Editor:

In response to “‘No action’ at Stibnite would not solve problems” (The Star-News, Oct. 8, 2020).

The article implies that restoration cannot happen without mining, and that the Stibnite Gold Project is the only way to address degraded water quality and threats to endangered fish.

In my 20-plus years of working in the Stibnite area as a fisheries biologist and land manager, I can attest that restoration can, has been, and will be done without mining. After reading much of the draft EIS, I conclude with certainty that the Stibnite Gold proposed restoration and mining will have long-lasting impacts to water and fish.

In response to environmental impacts left by a century of mining, the Forest Service and others have already spent millions of dollars on restoration in the Stibnite area and the East Fork South Fork. Streams and riparian areas have been isolated from mine waste, salmon and trout habitats have been reconnected, unstable slopes have been secured, miles of unneeded sediment-producing roads have been improved or removed, and acres of bare mine area have been revegetated. The Nez Perce Tribe spends over $2 million a year on fish research, watershed restoration, and hatchery supplementation in the South Fork Salmon River.

Is there more restoration needed? Of course. Are there funding sources and capable, interested organizations that can accomplish restoration without mining? Yes.

Will decades of work and millions of dollars spent on restoration be negated by the Stibnite Gold Project? Undoubtedly.

Will the Stibnite Gold Project (mining plus restoration) result in further degradation to fish and water in the East Fork South Fork Salmon River, its tributaries, and downstream in the watershed, to endure long after reclamation is complete? Absolutely. It says so in the Draft EIS.

According to the Draft EIS:

• Up to seven miles habitat for bull trout, and four miles for salmon will be destroyed .

• About 100,000 fish are modeled to be injured/killed from stream removals and diversions.

• Some stream temperatures will increase to lethal levels for salmon and trout.

• Exceedences of arsenic and mercury are anticipated to extend indefinitely post-closure.

Does this sound like restoration to you? If not, please send your comments to the Forest Service now, before the Oct. 28 deadline!

Mary Faurot Petterson, McCall

source: The Star-News Oct 15, 2020
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Public Lands:

Prescribed Fire to Begin This Fall on the Payette National Forest

McCall, Idaho, October 13, 2020 – Prescribed fires will be conducted this fall on the Council Ranger District, New Meadows Ranger District, McCall Ranger District and Krassel Ranger District.

The Payette National Forest conducts prescribed fires to reduce community risk, protect timber values, improve wildlife habitat and improve stand resiliency. Prescribed fires are important to natural resources management.

Below is a list of where these prescribed fires will take place.

Council Ranger District

* 15 landing piles in among the Middle Fork of the Weiser River, 9 miles southeast of Council

New Meadows Ranger District

* 30 acres adjacent to west side of Lost Valley Reservoir

* 170 acre of hand piles west of Hwy 95 near Evergreen Campground

* 10 acres of hand piles in the Last Chance Campground

* 4 landing piles between Meadows Valley and Goose Creek

McCall Ranger District

* 410 acres of hand piles in the Bear Basin area

* 8 landing piles near the Brundage Road

Krassel Ranger District

* 1,300 acres along the east side of the South Fork of the Salmon River south of Reed Ranch Airstrip

Trailheads and roads that lead into these areas will be posted with caution signs and maps of prescribed burn locations. The public is encouraged to call their local ranger district with questions regarding prescribed burning.
— — — — — — — — — —

Payette forest crew restores lookout cabin in wilderness

Arctic Point site was built in 1938

By Max Silverson for The Star-News Oct 15, 2020

Morgan Zedalis stood in front of the run-down cabin with her seven-person crew and realized their mission of restoring the structure would be no small feat.

Zedalis, archaeologist on the Payette National Forest, led a grueling backcountry journey this summer into the Arctic Point Fire Lookout deep in the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness.

The Arctic Point site, built in 1936, consists of a small log cabin about 27 miles northeast of Big Creek.

The group from the Payette’s Heritage Program had to make the journey on foot with pack animals carrying supplies and only a few hand tools. All motors are banned from the wilderness.

continued:
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BAER Assessment underway for Woodhead Fire on the Payette National Forest

McCall, Idaho, October 13, 2020 – The Woodhead Fire has burned almost 100,000 acres to date, though the fire is not yet contained. The fire is located east of Council, Idaho including lands in the Payette National Forest. Starting September 28, a team of Forest Service specialists are conducting field assessments to determine the need for burned area emergency response (BAER) treatments. Specialists include hydrology, soils, engineering, botany, range, recreation, fisheries, archeology, and wildlife. BAER is a specific effort to reduce further damage due to the land being temporarily exposed in a fragile condition. Loss of vegetation exposes soil to erosion; water runoff may increase and cause flooding; sediment may move downstream and damage houses or fill reservoirs, putting habitat and community water supplies at risk. The BAER program is designed to address these situations through the key goals of protecting life, property, water quality, and deteriorated ecosystems.

Led by West Zone Hydrologist Melanie Vining, the Woodhead Fire BAER Team uses satellite imagery of the burned area to classify the landscape into low, moderate, and high soil burn severity. Ground-truthing the satellite imagery is ongoing, but generally the fire on the forest burned in a mosaic pattern with most of the burned area preliminarily classified as unburned, low severity, or moderate severity. The burned area is initially classified using the satellite imagery and adjustments in classification are being made based on ground surveys and updated imagery while the fire is not yet contained. Eventually these efforts will result in a final soil burn severity map which can be shared with adjacent landowners, other agencies, and the interested public.

The entire burned area is mapped, though the field work and treatments identified by the Forest Service BAER Team are limited to only the acres of burned area on the Payette National Forest. A BAER Plan summarizing the assessment results and describing the proposed treatments will be prepared and submitted for approval. Approved treatments will be implemented over the next 12 months using federal dollars on federal lands.

Areas of concern for watershed impacts are in places that experienced higher burn severity, namely in Crooked River, No Business Basin, and Brownlee Creek. To date, major federal infrastructure was not lost to the fire, though there is likely damage to trails, signage, fences, and similar minor infrastructure that might need replacement. The BAER assessment team will be looking at those impacts more closely over the coming days.

After the fire burn severity map is completed and the BAER treatment plan is approved additional information will be provided to the public. While the BAER program does not prescribe treatments on non-federal lands, the assessment and hydrologic risk analysis can be useful to adjacent and downstream landowners to inform their own range of possible treatments. The Woodhead BAER team continues to share information with County officials and other agencies who in turn coordinate with affected landowners.

Information about fire operations, maps, and closure information for the Woodhead fire is available at (link) InciWeb.
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Critter News:

Close encounter with a mountain lion

October 12, 2020 Local News 8

Provo, Utah (KIFI/KIDK) – A Utah man had a scary encounter while taking a hike in Slate Canyon outside of Provo Saturday.

Kyle Burgess shared the video on his Instagram.

Just a couple of minutes before that video, he came across two baby mountain lion cubs.

Seconds later mom came running out of the woods towards him, and he reacted correctly, according to Idaho Fish and Game, by not turning around and running away.

continued: w/video
— — — — — — — — — —

Elk almost drowns near Ketchum after getting caught in hammock

by Ryan L Morrison Thursday, October 15th 2020 CBS2


Elk almost drowns near Ketchum after getting caught in hammock. (Photos Courtesy of Blaine County Sheriff’s Office)

An elk was found almost drowning near Ketchum after getting caught in a hammock.

The Blaine County Sheriff’s Office said the bull elk got wrapped up in someone’s yard hammock last week near Broadway Run, south of Ketchum.

The elk was found almost drowning in the Big Wood River. Idaho Department of Fish and Game officers and BCSO deputies rescued the elk from the river.

continued:
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Fish and game says elk depredation “tools” are working, look toward relocating elk

By Natasha Williams Oct 14, 2020 KIVI

Elmore County, Idaho — Idaho Fish and Game biologists say they’ve been focusing hard this year on non-lethal methods of preventing elk depredation–and they’re starting to pay off.

“At the property where we’ve had a lot of issues in the past near Little Camas Reservoir, our technicians have been hazing since July 15, and the elk use in those agriculture fields has been extremely low,” said John Guthrie, a Regional Wildlife Biologist with Fish and Game.

This summer, they focused hard on four management “tools” in their toolbox:

continued:
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Fish and Game to trap, translocate elk responsible for repeated crop damage

Oct 15, 2020 Local News 8

In mid-October, Fish and Game will conduct a trapping and translocation project on private property to remove elk responsible for ongoing depredation issues in the Little Camas region of southern Idaho.

Elk in this area has a long history of expensive damage to crops on private property at night and then retreating to adjoining private property during the day.

Because all activity will be on private ground, there will not be any disruption to ongoing hunting seasons.

continued:
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Idaho Fish and Game are testing deer samples for CWD

By Cole Sams October 14, 2020 Local News 8

Deer season may also help detect the spread of a virus.

The Idaho Fish and Game have set up stations for Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) testing in the southeast region of the state. CWD is a contagious and always-fatal neurological disease that affects deer, elk, and moose.

“In Idaho we haven’t detected Chronic Wasting Disease but we are still monitoring our populations for the disease,” said Idaho Fish and Game Regional Communications Manager Jennifer Jackson.

continued:
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Trumpeter releases help restore population

Oct 15, 2020 Local News 8


NPS

Eight young trumpeter swans were released at Alum Creek in Hayden Valley September 9 as part of an ongoing restoration project. The project was directed by Yellowstone National Park and included the Wyoming Wetlands Society and Ricketts Conservation Foundation.

The birds have undergone a decades-long decline. 60 birds and 17 territorial pairs were recorded in the early 1960’s, but that number fell to only four birds in 2009 and 2010.

Researchers said the decline may be due to any one of several reasons including nest success, the number of territorial pairs, and the number of cygnets (young birds) produced each year.

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Idaho Power stocks Snake River with over 70,000 trout

By Lynsey Amundson Oct 15, 2020 KIVI

Are you looking for an outdoor family activity that you can safely do while socially distanced?

Idaho Power started the process of stocking more than 70,000 rainbow trout along the Snake River this week. Another 8,000 trout will head to American Falls in November.

Idaho Power tankers dropped off the trout at the Bell Rapids Sportsmans Area, Centennial Park in Twin Falls, and CJ Strike Reservoir, south of Mountain Home.

continued:
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Fish & Game News:

Mule deer buck left to waste near American Falls

By Jennifer Jackson, Regional Communications Manager
Wednesday, October 14, 2020

Idaho Department of Fish and Game is seeking information regarding the waste of a 4-point mule deer buck in Power County. On October 12, Senior Conservation Officer Morgan Scott received a call from Citizens Against Poaching about a mule deer buck left to waste in a ditch along Ferry Hollow Road approximately 5 miles southeast of American Falls.

Evidence at the scene indicates that the deer was standing above a ditch on private property and was shot from the road sometime on October 10 or October 11. The deer fell into the ditch and was left there to waste. Both sides of the road are bordered by private property.

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Check out these F&G resources for a refresher on field dressing big game, upland birds

By Brian Pearson, Conservation Public Information Specialist
Friday, October 16, 2020

No matter what kind of game you’re hunting, the hunt doesn’t end after the harvest. Properly field dressing your quarry is the crucial next step in getting delicious wild game meat from the field to your table.

Field dressing can sometimes seem like the most challenging part of the hunt, especially among those who have never hunted before.

To make it less intimidating, Fish and Game provides a number of resources for hunters who need a refresher about how to field dress wild game, including how-to videos for big game animals and upland game birds, as well as a virtual reality elk field dressing tutorial for people with an Oculus Rift VR headset. Check out the videos and link below.

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More F&G News Releases

link:
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Crazy Critter Stuff:

Gray parrots separated at zoo after swearing a blue streak

by The Associated Press Wednesday, September 30th 2020


Steve Nichols/Lincolnshire Wildlife Park via AP

A British zoo has had to separate five foul-mouthed parrots who keepers say were encouraging each other to swear.

Billy, Eric, Tyson, Jade and Elsie joined Lincolnshire Wildlife Centre’s colony of 200 gray parrots in August, and soon revealed a penchant for blue language.

“We are quite used to parrots swearing, but we’ve never had five at the same time,” said the zoo’s chief executive, Steve Nichols. “Most parrots clam up outside, but for some reason these five relish it.”

continued:
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Seasonal Humor:

HuntingGuideTrees-a

Cookies for 2020

CovidCookies-a
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Idaho History Oct 18, 2020

Idaho 1918-1920 Influenza Pandemic

Part 27

Idaho Newspaper clippings January 17-18, 1919

School Photos courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

January 17

The Rathdrum Tribune., January 17, 1919, Page 1

19190117RT1

19190117RT2
Flu Ban On Again
Rathdrum Has New Outbreak of Epidemic.

The village authorities put the flu ban back into effect Tuesday night, stopping all public gatherings in Rathdrum for an indefinite period.

The Rathdrum schools were closed again Tuesday morning on account of a new outbreak of influenza among the pupils since last Saturday. In three days ten cases were reported, nearly all of them being students of the high school. Since then the disease has been communicated to a few other people. The school closing order is indefinite but Supt. Swenson adopted a plan of assigning lessons for home study to high school students and to the two upper grades of the grammar school. The plan includes keeping some of the teachers on duty in the high school to who students may go individually for help as occasion requires.

At the instance of the school board the village trustees met Tuesday night and restored Ordinance No. 63 in effect. A committee was also appointed to ask the county commissioners to prohibit dances and public gatherings in the county districts of this vicinity. The authorities feel

(Continued on Page Two.)

Flu Ban On Again.

(Continued From First Page.)

convinced that the epidemic is being spread by “walking carriers”, persons having the disease and mingling with others before becoming ill enough to call a physician.

Country Dances Illegal.

The above committee got in communication Wednesday with the county commissioners and county physician and was informed that the state health order issued last fall prohibiting public gatherings throughout the state was never lifted except as to the schools and to pubic gatherings in incorporated towns and cities, and that the ban then placed on dances and public gatherings in country districts outside of incorporated towns is still in effect and will remain in effect throughout the state until the influenza epidemic is entirely over. This is something that was not generally known. However, it clears up all question as to the country dances, showing that they have been illegal since the state health order was issued and that people managing and participating in these affairs were subject to arrest. The order has not been enforced so far, but The Tribune is informed that the authorities, now that they know their power, will see to it that the law shall be no longer violated in this respect or if violated that the guilty parties shall be punished.

Homes Quarantined.

Homes quarantined in Rathdrum, due to illness of school students, since Saturday are: Sunday – Rev. Carrick, A. H. Richmond; Monday – C. F. Lanthrop, J. Biemond, Mrs. Mary Post; Tuesday – Frank Thompson.

Three cases are reported in the family of F. H. Bradbury, residing just outside the town limits.

Rev. Carrick, C. F. Lanthrop, F. H. Bradbury and F. Thormpson are quarantine out of attending to their affairs as usual. J. Biemond had also been quarantined out but later became ill and is now quarantined in with his family.

It was reported Wednesday that Lewis Satchwell, another school student, living in the country, had become ill with the flu.
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From Over The County

Post Falls

The Post Falls schools re-opened with about 75 per cent attendance.

A band has been organized with dues fixed at $1.25 per month. There are seventeen pieces. Prof. James Hopkins has been employed as instructor at $2.50 per night once a week.
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Harrison

Influenza patients are required to remain under quarantine ten days after the board of health considers them recovered, and all persons exposed must remain under quarantine the same length of time.
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Spirit Lake

Captain E. W. White of Fort Wright arrived last week to help Dr. McCormick in fighting the influenza epidemic.

Hugh Tallman, who died at Usk of influenza, was buried at Spirit Lake Saturday morning.

J. W. Brooks, age 30, died Wednesday of last week of influenza. He leaves his widow and one child.

Mrs. Grover C. Hearing and infant died last Friday of influenza. The husband and two children survive.
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Idaho State News Items.

Everyone in Boise who wishes to take influenza vaccine** will be supplied by the city without charge.

Hereafter when influenza develops in a Boise family no one, not even the breadwinner, will be permitted to leave the house. This drastic action in regard to quarantine of influenza has been taken by the city board of health, following the request of the home service section of the Red Cross, Boise Ministerial association, and professional men of the city. The family will be cared for by the Red Cross.

[** “Many vaccines were developed and used during the 1918–1919 pandemic. The medical literature was full of contradictory claims of their success; there was apparently no consensus on how to judge the reported results of these vaccine trials.” (link)]

source: The Rathdrum Tribune. (Rathdrum, Idaho), 17 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Rathdrum Tribune., January 17, 1919, Page 2

19190117RT3
The School Column.
From The School

Articles of news value are given preference. Essays will be published as space permits, in the order in which they are received.

To Study At Home

It has been necessary again to close our schools because of epidemic conditions. We are, however, continuing our work from the Sixth grade up thru the High school. Assignment of work has been made to all pupils in these grades. Teachers are on hand at the High school building on usual school days, and students are asked to confer with them singly whenever they need help.

Students have welcomed this opportunity which affords a possibility of completing their year’s work. Thus far many have come to teachers for help. We have had evidence that a large number are doing consistent work under this plan.

It should be borne in mind by both student and parent, however, that, to do the work required of students, they must spend five or six hours in study daily. All are given the same opportunity to complete the work that has been planned for this year. Those who apply themselves well and are conscientious in fulfilling requirements will be promoted or graduated. Others of course will fail.

We are counting on the co-operation of parents. They should realize that pupils need the same amount of time for study that they had at school. Also, they can do much to encourage them and to help them.
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The Danger In Influenza

Dr. J. B. Anderson, Spokane city health officer, says:

“The danger in influenza is the walking carrier, or the person in the early stages who thinks is has not go it, or the person in the convalescent state who thinks that he is well.”
— —

Like Banco’s ghost*, the flu will not down.

[*”The ghost of Banquo later returns to haunt Macbeth at the banquet in Act Three, Scene Four”.]

source: The Rathdrum Tribune. (Rathdrum, Idaho), 17 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Rathdrum Tribune., January 17, 1919, Page 3

Personal Mention.

O. S. Hinds was ill the first of the week with an attack of pneumonia, but is reported alright again.

Grandma Satchwell of Rathdrum prairie was reported quite ill the first of the week with an attack of pneumonia.

Claud Fryer of Portland, Ore., who had been visiting his Corvallis classmate, Clorin Layton, and was delayed here on account of illness with influenza, departed Monday night on his return home.
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Local Paragraphs.

The churches and lodges are closed again by the influenza regulations.

The Odd Fellows installed officers last Friday night and enjoyed a pleasant time with refreshments.

Dead pole wood is now being hauled in from a distance of more than five miles, the nearer supply of that class of fuel having been exhausted.
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Sad News From Midvale.

Word was received Wednesday by Mrs. A. O. Skinner from her husband at Midvale, Idaho, announcing the deaths by influenza of Harvey J. Borthwich, and son Bryan, and daughter Jane, who resided at Council. Other members of the family were stated to be ill with the disease.

… Jane, the eldest child, was a school teacher and clerk, and Bryan had charge of the farm at Council the past few years. Three younger daughters and one son survive with their mother, who is a sister of Chase. and John Green of Rathdrum prairie. …
— —

19190117RT4— —

Worry gives the undertaker more business than hard work ever did. (ibid page 4)

source: The Rathdrum Tribune. (Rathdrum, Idaho), 17 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Evening Capital News., January 17, 1919, Page 5

19190117ECN1

Star

Mrs. Barker and children, who have had the Spanish influenza, are reported to be recovering rapidly.
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Meridian

Charles Harris is reported seriously ill.

Walter Evans is reported ill with the Spanish influenza.
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Nampa

H. O. Kimmel of the Robert Dry Goods company is reported ill with the Spanish influenza.

F. K. Robinson, who has been quite ill the past week, is reported to be recovering rapidly.

Mrs. Charles Stevens of the Leader-Herald reportorial staff is reported ill with the Spanish influenza.

source: Evening Capital News. (Boise, Idaho), 17 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Evening Capital News., January 17, 1919, Page 6

19190117ECN2
Red Cross Can Use Canned Fruits For Its Flu Patients

Announcement is made that the Red Cross, in charge of assisting those ill with influenza, desires canned fruit donated for use of the patients in a number of instances. This fruit may be left at the Salvage shop of the Red cross on Main Street. donations will appreciated.

source: Evening Capital News. (Boise, Idaho), 17 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Evening Capital News., January 17, 1919, Page 7

19190118ECN5Little News of Boise

Stop Dance.

One of the city’s special policemen working on the enforcement of the quarantine put a quietus on a Basque dance at Ninth and Grove streets Thursday night by stopping it and ordering the hall closed.

Mrs. Biwer Sick.

The home of Dr. E. t. Biwer, secretary of the state board of health, is quarantined, thus preventing the health board secretary from attending to his official duties for a time, the occasion being the taking ill of Mrs. Biwer from influenza.

source: Evening Capital News. (Boise, Idaho), 17 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Cottonwood Chronicle. January 17, 1919, Page 1

19190117CC1

School Notes
By Wm. A. Lustie

New Students

2d. grade: Evelyn Bennett, Alice Bennett, and Richard Amos.
3d. grade: Helen Hensley.
4th. grade: Kenneth Hensley and Beth Bennett.
5th. grade: Harold McCully.
7th. grade: John McCully, Hildagarde Oldham, Donald and Nellie Bennett.
H.S. students: Marie McCully, Sabelle and Margaret Nash.

In the grades the school attendance is about 70 per cent of what is as before the Flu closed the schools. In the High School it is about 72 percent.

Miss Jessie Wardrobe is teaching the 5th and 6th grades instead of 3d and 4th., and Miss Martha Lehmann of Spokane the 3d and 4th grades.

“Back to school is today the government’s watch word because the government knows that illiteracy is a personal and national loss and that children at work when they should be in school forecast stunted, under-educated men and women.” …
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Dr. Alcorn in Chicago

Dr. R. J. Alcorn of Ferdinand has gone to Chicago to attend a meeting of medical men which has for its purpose a more thorough investigation of the so called Spanish influenza. Dr. Alcorn expects to be absent about four weeks, during which time he will have a competent physician in charge of his hospital.
— —

Mrs. Albert Nau.

Mrs. Albert Nau who died at the Alcorn hospital in Ferdinand Sunday morning at 5:30 was 29 years of age and was born near Keuterville. She was ill only four days, death resulting from pneumonia following an attack of influenza. She was a sister-in-law of A. H. Nau of this city. Interment was made at Ferdinand Wednesday. Besides her husband she leaves four children.

source: Cottonwood Chronicle. (Cottonwood, Idaho), 17 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Cottonwood Chronicle. January 17, 1919, Page 6

Cottonwood and Vicinity
Personal Mention and Local Happenings of the Week

C. A. Johnson was around on the streets Monday, the first time since he was confined with the influenza a month ago.

Gertie[?] Schaecher is able to be out after a long siege of influenza.

William Burr of Genesee spent several days in Cottonwood this week. Mrs. Burr is a teacher in the local public schools.

source: Cottonwood Chronicle. (Cottonwood, Idaho), 17 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Kendrick Gazette. January 17, 1919, Page 1

19190117KG1

School Starts Monday

At a meeting of the school board this week it was decided to start school next Monday, January 20. All of the teachers are here and are ready to begin their work. Prof. White has recovered from his attack of the flu and is rapidly regaining his strength. The board felt that as there were so many who were protesting against keeping school closed any longer, it was best to resume work as long as the town is free from influenza cases.
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No Flu in Kendrick

There have been no new cases of flu in Kendrick for some time and the few who are still confined to the house with the disease are past the state where any danger of contagion exists. Conditions at present look very favorable in town, although there are a large number of cases in the territory [?], as nearly all of the ridges have a number of cases, some of them quite serious.
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Death of Frank Brocke

Frank Brocke, son of Mr. and Mrs. N. Brocke, died at his home on American ridge last Sunday afternoon at three o’clock, from influenza followed by pneumonia. He was ill but a few days and although a man of splendid physihque [sic], he could not withstand the disease.

Frank Brocke was born in Latah county October 15, 1897. He was married October 21, 1903. To this union five children were born, four boys and one girls. The deceased is survived by his mother and father, three sisters and four brothers. …
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Two Deaths in One Family

The entire community was saddened to learn that Mr. and Mrs. William Whybark of Bear ridge have suffered the loss of two little children, their death being caused by influenza. All of the members of the family were ill with the disease at the time death visited the home.

Last Friday morning, January 10, little Nellie Carrol Whybark, age four years, succumbed to the disease. The same night her little brother, Royal, age six, passed away from the same cause.
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Death of Tommy McDowell

Tommy McDowell, little son of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas McDowell died at the home of his parents last Sunday afternoon. His death was due directly to influenza which developed into pneumonia. For nearly a year his health had been poor and his weakened condition was not equal to ward off the attack of influenza. He was six years of age at the time of his death. …
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Not Hold Farmers’ Week

Owing to the influenza situation throughout the northwest the U. of I. will not hold Farmers’ and Housekeepers’ Week. Plans are being formulated for a big program next year.

source: The Kendrick Gazette. (Kendrick, Idaho), 17 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Kendrick Gazette. January 17, 1919, Page 2

Big Bear Ridge

Steele school has closed for an indefinite time.

We are pleased to state that the Will Whybark family are recovering nicely from a severe attack of influenza, at this writing. They are cared for by a trained nurse from Moscow.

Mrs. Flora Harrison has gone to Bovill to nurse her son Ernest, who is ill with influenza in a hospital at that place.

Sawing wood and putting up ice is the chief occupation these days.

source: The Kendrick Gazette. (Kendrick, Idaho), 17 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Kendrick Gazette. January 17, 1919, Page 6

Idaho News Paragraphs
Recent Happenings in This State Given in Brief Items for Busy Readers.

Eleven new cases of influenza were reported to the city health officer at Wallace Saturday. This is less than the number reported during the preceding days. It is thought that the crest reached of the epidemic has been reached, but the ban is to remain until conditions improve.

Charles E. Struthers, United States district employment agent for the five northern countries of Idaho, died at Wallace Saturday of pneumonia following influenza. He was a member of the 1917 legislature. His widow is very low with the disease.

Influenza conditions have again become such that all public gatherings and the schools have been put under the ban at Kellogg. By order of the board of health no gathering of any nature in excess of six adults at anyone place is permitted under penalty of arrest. Children of school age are not permitted to leave their homes, and parents are held responsible for the enforcement of this rule. Influenza cases are being strictly quarantined. About 150 cases of influenza are reported together with several cases of smallpox.
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Mining Notes

The coal production of British Columbia in 1918 will have a value of around $1,000,000 over last year, though production has been much reduced during the past six weeks by the influenza epidemic. …
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The Associations.

The annual convention of the National Wool Growers’ association, which was to have taken place in Salt Lake City January 16, 17 and 18 has been indefinitely postponed, owing to influenza conditions. Dr. S. W. McClure, secretary, said the wool growers may convene in April, during the stock show to be held there that month.
— —

Knitting wasn’t in vain – look at the yarns the boys are bringing back.

source: The Kendrick Gazette. (Kendrick, Idaho), 17 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Recorder. January 17, 1919, Page 1

19190117IR119190117IR2
Schools Not To Open Yet

By direction of the county health board, at a hearing of the matter on Wednesday last at the courthouse, it has been found advisable to continue the order of keeping the city schools, dances and theatres closed yet awhile longer. Superintendent Rand is arranging that his staff of teachers shall undertake to carry on a measure of regular school work by giving out lessons over the telephone and correspondence methods, which he hopes will go some way at least in preventing much of the loss of time in the regular school work of the city. To this end children are requested to get in touch with their teachers at once.

Mrs. W. C. McCormick will meet the pupils of seventh grade in their recitation room at the high school building Monday at 2 p.m.
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“Flu” Sufferers Away From Home

William H. Shoup was advised by wire Wednesday morning that his son Richard, enlisted in the naval reserve and San Diego, California, has been taken ill and was in a hospital there. The father and mother at once started for the bedside, leaving Salmon by special motor driven by Harry White, hoping to connect with the evening train south from Armestead.

Mrs. and Mrs. Shoup succeeded in making their train south after some difficulty in getting over the divide where they had to walk from one side to the other. The news came to Salmon Thursday that their son was in an improved condition.

Reports received last week told of the alarming illness of Miss Alta Hibbs in Portland. Her mother is with her. The young lady has been a flu sufferer. Newton Hibbs was advised a few days before of the intention of the two to return to Salmon and he advised that they remain away for a time awaiting the abatement of the epidemic at the family home here.

The same visitation that took so many members of the same family in the flu epidemic all over the world claimed the mother and three children of the family of Thomas McPherson, a brother of the Salmon merchant, J. M. McPherson, in their Saskatchewan home. This news came to Salmon a few days ago. The dead were all buried the same day.
— —

Dr. Hanmer is Appointed.

At a meeting of the board of country commissioners on Monday Dr. Charles F. Hanmer was appointed county health officer and physician to the indigent poor. Dr. Wright had held this office heretofore for a number of years.
— —

Two Come For O’Quinn Child

Mrs. LeRoy Myers come to Salmon on Wednesday from Emmett.

On the way to this city Mrs. Myers met the father of the late Jack O’Quinn who was coming to this city on the same mission that brought him here.

“My son and his wife died there not long ago,” Mr. O’Quinn was saying, “and I am going to take charge of a little two-year-old boy they left. My home is in Missouri.”

“Why,” Mrs. Myers rejoined, “I am going after that boy too, having been requested by his maternal grandparents to do so.”

And so it happened that little Pat O’Quinn found himself a child very much sought from having only strangers to look after him since the death of his parents in the flu attack in Salmon more than a month ago. Mr. O’Quinn, the paternal grandfather, and Mrs. Myers, who used to live near Salmon but now resides at Emmett where she knows the little fellow’s maternal grandparents, had come after the child. Mrs. Myers had known little Pat’s mother since early childhood.

Mr. O’Quinn offered an easy solution of the problem presented by saying that the child should be taken to Emmett and that both himself and Mrs. Myers should go along with him, the custody of the orphan to be determined after they got there. He said he had not been advised of the death of his son or of his wife until a postoffice report came to him from a parcels post shipment of Missouri syrup for his son and which the report said could not be delivered. The postmaster went on to tell of the calamity that had overtaken the family for whom the syrup had been intended as a Christmas present. The old gentleman lost no time in starting for Salmon. He found his little grandson a beautiful child, well cared for and now in good health, fully recovered from the same attack that had taken his parents. Since the child was bereft of parents he had been placed in the care of Mrs. M. C. Manfull, whose daughters and Miss LaRue Ramey had given all the attention that any boy could wish to have for his health and happiness.

His father belonged to the Salmon national forest forces.

A Change in Conditions.

A change in program came about this morning with the designation of the public administrator to look after the affairs of the estate in this county. County Treasurer Gailbreath will assume this duty as pertaining to his office. This change, after an administrator had already been appointed at Emmett, caused still another change with respect to the custody of the child, the grandfather having determined to leave for his Missouri home taking the baby with him on the next train out.

It will take some of the renowned wisdom of Solomon to settle all this controversy, if, as seems to be the case, there are contentions to arise as between the two sets of grandparents. In the first place it is claimed as a fact that the husband died first. If so then the heirs of the wife, who died afterward, would become the heirs of the estate without questions and entitled to its administration. And this, it would seem, according to legal opinion at this stage of the case, would carry with it the care and custody of the little boy, who would of course be the natural heir of all the estate as the only survivor of the family. The father it is said left liberty bonds and cash to the amount of about $1,000, besides other property.

source: The Idaho Recorder. (Salmon City, Idaho), 17 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Recorder. January 17, 1919, Page 5

Salmon Locals

Anton Bregvic has been appointed administrator for the two children of Joe Davis who died in Salmon last month. An insurance policy of $500 is favor of the children was the only estate left to the children.

John Michelson was a Salmon business visitor from Fourth of July on Tuesday, the first he has been able to make since an attack of the flu.

Mrs. LeRoy Myers, who came to Salmon from Emmett on Wednesday’s train, reports the recent severe illness of her husband from influenza which was developed soon after he arrived at their new home He recovered but had a close call.

Mrs. Alma Ashton is reported a sufferer from smallpox at her home east of this city, with one or two other patients in the same family afflicted. R. Hanmer, health officer, quarantined the house on Wednesday. He states that the cases are not serious at all.

The Malcom family on the upper Salmon river is afflicted with smallpox. Mrs. Malcom’s mother, Mrs. Webb, was called from Salmon to nurse her grandchildren through a case of flu, but found smallpox to be the affliction. The invalids are reported all recovering.

Supplies for many places throughout the country in the line of caskets have run short in the flu epidemic, it having been necessary for the undertakers to go back to their old custom of making these burial receptacles at home which after all are just as good for the dead if not so showy for the living.

The flagstaff over the Pioneer store has carried the colors at half-mast since the death of former President Theodore Roosevelt.

source: The Idaho Recorder. (Salmon City, Idaho), 17 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Recorder. January 17, 1919, Page 6

Portland Goes After Flu.

Portland, Jan. 11, – New stringent measures to combat the influenza were resorted to here yesterday as a result of a conference between representatives of the city, county and school board. A physician has been made director-general of the fight against the epidemic and has been given complete charge of operations. An emergency hospital has been opened and a call sent to the surgeon general in Washington for additional nurses. Quarantine regulations are being more strictly enforced.

source: The Idaho Recorder. (Salmon City, Idaho), 17 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Recorder. January 17, 1919, Page 7

In The Gem State

Managers or proprietors of five local pool halls at Nampa and the manager of the Majestic theatre were arrested last week for alleged violation of the resolution passed by the county board of health recently which ordered all public places, including pool halls and theatres, closed until January 6.

More than 10,000 men were furnished under the draft from Idaho during 1918.

The 1918 war efforts of the state, coupled with those of 1917, brought the number of men from Idaho who donned Uncle Sam’s uniform to more than 25,000.

A committee of 93 women of the state has been appointed by the National woman’s Suffrage association, for the purpose of seeing that the coming legislature ratified the federal suffrage amendment if it passes the United States senate this session of congress.
— —

Northwest Notes

Influenza caused 571 deaths in Seattle during the first eleven months of 1918, according to the annual report of the city health commissioner. Since the epidemic started 200,000 does of vaccine* have been given out by the city health department, the report showed.

The live stock sanitary board of Montana has put a quarantine on sheep from Idaho, where scabies is said to have appeared. Shipments in future will be permitted only under federal health certificates.

The Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers in Montana will ask the coming legislature to pass a bill compelling automobiles to stop at railroad crossings in an effort to reduce the number of accidents in this state.

A resolution memorializing congress to pass the Susan B. Anthony woman suffrage amendment to the federal constitution was adopted by both houses of the Colorado legislature.

[* Note: A good paper from Stanford University, “The Medical and Scientific Conceptions of Influenza” on the search for the cause and vaccine. (link)]

source: The Idaho Recorder. (Salmon City, Idaho), 17 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Montpelier Examiner. January 17, 1919, Page 1

19190117ME1

Commissioners Talk Over Health Conditions

After allowing claims against the county and disposing of some routine business, the county commissioners adjourned last Monday evening to meet again next Monday morning as a board of health and also to transact unfinished county business. Before adjourning, they held a conference with Supt. of Schools Spencer and County Physician King to discuss the health situation throughout the county and the advisability of re-opening the schools. Mr. Spencer stated that he had consulted with practically all of the school trustees and full three-fourths of them were opposed to opening the schools at present and some were opposed to opening again during the present school year. This question will be further considered by the board next Monday. …
— —

Gives Opinion of Interest to Teachers

Teachers in common school districts can collect their salaries for time lost during the influenza epidemic but independent school district teachers cannot collect if the trustees choose to terminate the teachers’ contracts and discharge them permanently by reason of the epidemic.

This is the gist of the first opinion rendered by the attorney general’s office under the new administration. The opinion was written in response to hundreds of requests for more light on the law, and was submitted Monday afternoon to Miss Ethel E. Redfield, state superintendent of public instruction.

What Statutes Provide.

After citing statutes regarding powers of the two kinds of districts to discharge teachers the opinion recites “that our supreme court held that trustees of any ordinary school district cannot discharge a teacher before the end of the term without giving him a reasonable hearing, and that such discharge when made must be founded upon neglect of duty or some cause that in the opinion of the board renders the services of the teachers unprofitable to the district.”

Regarding independent districts it is stated that the courts hold the board of trustees has unlimited and unrestricted power to dismiss either with or without notice to the teachers and the exercise of such discretion by the board is not subject to review or control by the courts.

May Discharge Teachers.

“It therefore follow,” states the opinion, “that so far as independent districts are concerned, if the board of trustees chooses to terminate the teachers’ contracts and discharge them permanently for the term by reason of the epidemic, they may do so.

“But, on the other hand, until such time as the contracts are finally terminated and discharged, the district would remain liable for the teachers’ agreed compensation in accordance with the contract, as until that time the teacher would remain to hold herself in readiness to perform her undischarged contract, if called upon.”

In common school districts “the matter becomes entirely a question of the construction of the particular contract the teacher and the district have made.”
— —

Mrs. J. Straubhaar Dies From Flu at Rupert.

Funeral services were held at the cemetery last Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock for Mrs. Jacob Straubhaar, who died from influenza at her home near Rupert on Jan. 9. … She was the mother of six children, four of whom survive her. Besides her children and husband, she is survived by one sister, Mrs. Ernest Sommers of this city, and four brothers – one residing at Rexburg, one at Otis, Colo., and two in this city – Ernest and Alfred Bloser.

At the time of her death, her husband was critically ill with the flu and several of the children had it in mild form. Word was received from Rupert this week to the effect that Mr. Straubhaar and the children were all doing nicely.

source: Montpelier Examiner. (Montpelier, Idaho), 17 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Montpelier Examiner. January 17, 1919, Page 4

[Editorial]

The Flu Situation.

The influenza situation in Montpelier today is not as good as it was a week ago. That is, there are a few more cases than there were last Friday, but the victims all have it in mild form. It begins to look as though we were going to have the flu with us for some time to come, and the fact that the number of cases have increased within the past week goes to show very plainly that a strict quarantine does not prevent the spread of the disease. This is further shown by the fact that in most of the cities where the quarantine has been lifted the disease has not spread in any greater degree than it has in the closed towns.

In Pocatello, where the picture shows and schools have been open for two weeks, the situation has improved to such an extent that the ban has been lifted from public and private dances and all lodges have been meeting for the past month. There is not a case in the Idaho Technical institute and the enrollment in the public schools is gradually increasing. At Rexburg, where the disease was as fully as bad as it has been here, the schools opened on Jan. 6, and the disease has not broken out again. At Evanston, Who., which was fairly alive with the flu, a short time ago, the schools have been open for some time, and we hear no more about the flu there. In Kemmerer, which had it in epidemic form, the schools and picture shows are open. In Salt Lake, where the schools have been open for two weeks, the situation is about the same as it was before they opened.

When you mention the opening of schools in Montpelier some people throw up their hands in holy horror. According to their ideas the school room is the hot bed for every disease germ known, while to our mind a properly heated and ventilated school room is about the last place disease germs would lodge, and that children are less liable to contract the flu there than they are in the average home.

While the flu has increased in some of the towns where the schools have opened, it has not been proven that the increase was due to the opening of the schools. The fact that 95 per cent or more of the victims in these towns have been adults goes to prove that the opening of the schools had little, if anything to do with the spread of the disease.

We would be the last person in Montpelier to advocate doing a thing which would result in the death of a person, especially a child, but we are honest in our belief that the situation here would be no worse with the schools open than it is at the present, and the children would be better off than they are roaming the streets. Of course we realize that our opinion doesn’t amount to much when weighed against the opinion of the learned gentlemen of the medical profession, but there is no ban against one expressing his opinion, so we have given ours, and we have the satisfaction of knowing there may be others who believe as we do.
— —

Tribute To Mrs. Howard Huff

Mrs. Freda Huff, nee Allenbeck, was born in Geneva, Idaho, Sept. 30, 1891, and departed this life on Thursday, Dec. 26, 1918, at 11 p.m., aged 27 years, 2 months and 26 days.

She was married to Howard Huff on Sept. 6, 1917.

Owing to the epidemic of influenza her funeral services were held at the cemetery in the presence of a congregation who had assembled to pay the last tribute of respect to her memory by taking part in this service for the departed, and in token of the pure soul that had taken its flight. …

The husband should be consoled with the thought that, “if she is not safe, who is?” … About six weeks prior to her death she had influenza, and it was in hopes that her health was improving, but for all her health gave away completely, and after one week later she breathed her last. Everything that medical skill and loving care could suggest was done to alleviate her suffering, to the hour when death released her. …

source: Montpelier Examiner. (Montpelier, Idaho), 17 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Montpelier Examiner. January 17, 1919, Page 5

Local News

The meeting which was held at the city hall last Monday night to discuss the feasibility of opening the public schools, was lightly attended. In fact, there were not to exceed 25 persons there who have children of school age. All of the school teachers who are in the city were present, but only two of them – Supt. Cummings and B. K. Farnsworth – expressed themselves on the question, which was discussed pro and con for two hours or more. While the preponderance of sentiment was against the opening of schools at present, it was also against the closing them for the balance of the school year.

Miss Laker went to Burley Monday to nurse Mrs. J. W. Stringer, who is ill with the flu. Mrs. Stringer is a sister of Jeff Davis of this city.

From the Salt Lake Tribune we learn of the death of Mrs. Willard Sargent, which occurred at Philadelphia on Jan. 11. Death was caused from influenza. The deceased was formerly Miss Sarah Hutteballe of Malad, and for a year was a teacher in the Fielding academy at Paris. [Idaho]

Mose Lewis, who was taken down with the flu in Salt Lake last week, is getting along nicely and will be able to leave the hospital in a day or two. However, he will not return home for a couple of weeks.

source: Montpelier Examiner. (Montpelier, Idaho), 17 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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North Side Primary School, Shoshone, Idaho ca. 1917 (1)

SchoolNorthSidePrimarySchoolShoshone1917Fritz-a

courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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The Caldwell Tribune. January 17, 1919, Page 2

19190117CT1

19190117CT4City and County Intelligence

Flu on Decrease.

“We had a lot of sickness this winter, more than in years, but the Flu is on the decrease now, and I believe the worst is over. Our schools are churches are now open but all places of amusement are closed. [Jordan Valley]

Notice.

There is urgent need for help with the sewing at the Red Cross rooms. During this time of quarantine the chairman of the sewing committee begs that women make a special effort to come to the rooms on Wednesdays and Fridays for work that can be taken home. headquarters is urging the need of haste with refugee garments as they must be sent before long to do any good this winter. The government is asking that more pajamas and convalescent robes be made for our wounded soldiers in the hospitals. Can you not come and help.

Henry Shaw Funeral Saturday.

Funeral services for Henry Shaw were held Saturday. Death resulted from Spanish influenza. Interment was at Canyon Hill cemetery. Deceased leaves a wife and seven children.

Death of Clifford Shaw.

Clifford Shaw, son of Mrs. Henry Shaw died Friday of Spanish influenza. The young man’s father had died a few days before of the same disease. Clifford Shaw was 16 years of age.

Card of Thanks.

We desire to thank the many friends and neighbors who assisted us after the death of our daughter and sister, Mrs. Mary Pearson, which occurred at Pocatello January 3rd. The many acts of thoughtfulness and kindness will always be remembered.

Mrs. E. B. Smith, Theodore Smith.
— —

New Officers Take Charge of Affairs
County Court House Sees Few Changes – Most County Officers Were Re-elected.

Monday the new county officers took charge of their offices at the court house with the exception of Mrs. Fern Hart, county treasurer. Mrs. Hart is very sick with influenza and was unable to take charge.
— —

19190117CT2Well Known Young Woman Laid to Rest Saturday
Mrs. A. C. Pearson, nee Mary Smith, Died of Influenza at Pocatello January 3rd.

Saturday occurred the funeral of Mrs. A. C. Pearson at Canyon Hill cemetery. Mrs. Pearson died at Pocatello, January 3rd from Spanish influenza.

Mrs. Pearson was the only daughter of Mrs. E. B. Smith of this city. She was living at Twin Falls but had gone to Pocatello for a short visit with her husband’s parents when she was stricken with the disease. …

Mrs. Pearson is survived by her husband, A. C. Pearson of Twin Falls by her mother, Mrs. E. B. Smith of Caldwell and by two brothers. …

source: The Caldwell Tribune. (Caldwell, Idaho), 17 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Caldwell Tribune. January 17, 1919, Page 3

Local and Personal

Mr. and Mrs. John Flynn were both sick the fore part of the week but are now much better.

R. B. Scatterday returned Monday from Pontiac, Illinois, where he was called by the death of his brother who died of Spanish influenza.

source: The Caldwell Tribune. (Caldwell, Idaho), 17 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Caldwell Tribune. January 17, 1919, Page 5

Marble Front Items

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Hodges and son Elmer are recovering from the influenza.

Mrs. G. W. Milliner went to Boise last week to visit friends and relatives and decided to remain and assist the Red Cross in nursing during the influenza epidemic.

Orval Whitney is reported ill with influenza at his father’s home in Middleton.

Ira Brinkley was very ill the first of the week but is reported better.

Mrs. S. H. Vassar spent last week with her mother, Mrs. Wilson of Maple Grove. Mrs. Wilson has been sick, but is better now.
— —

Middleton

The local schools will not open for another two weeks.

The youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. Carl Jarrett died at their home Monday about 5 p.m. The child had been sick for several weeks with influenza and had not recovered. The funeral was held at 1 p.m. Tuesday.

Walter Crockett is recovering from a siege of the Flu.

Mr. and Mrs. James King are able to be out again after a siege of the Flu.

Wm. Lemon is recovering from a siege of the Flu.
— —

Midway News

Miss Mildred Robinson is recovering nicely from the influenza.

Hy J. Davis, who was taken to a Boise hospital a week ago suffering from influenza, returned to his home Sunday.

Mrs. Frank Hoffman and little son Carl who have been seriously sick with influenza, are gaining rapidly.

Mr. and Mrs. Bright and two children who have been sick with influenza are slightly improved, Mr. Bright being seriously ill for several days.

Mr. and Mrs. J. F. Riskemire were callers at the L. A. Weymouth home in Franklin, Sunday evening, and found the sick very much improved.

Several persons in the community have taken the serum*** treatment to prevent influenza.

[***The serum was a “convalescent plasma”: blood plasma extracted from an animal or human patient who has “convalesced” or recovered from infection with a particular disease. (link)]
— —

[Boise]

The truth is out at last. Boise has been forced to take steps to suppress the Flu which has been raging in the capital city for months. The methods adopted at Boise truly reflect the spirit of that city. It is stated upon reliable authority that there are between 1000 and 2000 cases of Flu in Boise and vicinity.

source: The Caldwell Tribune. (Caldwell, Idaho), 17 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Caldwell Tribune. January 17, 1919, Page 6

19190117CT3Suggestions For Control of Influenza in Schools
Member of Board of Trustees Officers Suggestions That He Thinks Might Do Some Good.

The Tribune is in receipt of a communication from a member of the board of trustees of a Canyon county school district which offers suggestions for the control of the Flu. The communications follows:

1. Every individual or head of a family can be held strictly accountable to the authorities, under severe penalty, for the contraction and transmission of the disease.

2. The State Board of Health can make a complete system of rules and penalties to this end.

3. Counties can be organized by school districts – each to be platted into farms, with homes located; all homes to be numbered and separately listed with names and phone number and address.

4. The school teachers can be used as inspectors to give daily reports to a central county committee.

5. The sheriffs, deputies, and constables can enforce whatever is necessary.

Then, one can feel as safe at school as at a public sale, a store, show or dance; and more so than it is now.

If the schools are worth it, let the proper authorities get busy or else the schools may be forced to close for the balance of the year.

– A School Trustee.

source: The Caldwell Tribune. (Caldwell, Idaho), 17 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Caldwell Tribune. January 17, 1919, Page 8

Wilder

Miss Holdridge, eighth grade teacher in the Wilder public school, resigned Friday on account of her mother’s illness. Her position will be occupied by Miss McGee of Caldwell.

Mrs. Ernest Walker of Fargo is seriously ill with influenza.

The infant daughter of Rev. and Mrs. W. T. Hertzog, who has been quite ill, has almost entirely recovered.

Several Wilder friends attended the funeral of Mrs. Anna Evans who died January 3. The services were held at Fry & Summers undertaking parlors in Boise, January 7. Mrs. Evans was a former resident of Wilder and was well known in this community.
— —

Deer Flat

School opened in the new building Monday with a good attendance.

The old school building half a mile north of Huston and a strip of land on the north side of the school grounds will be sold at pubic auction Saturday afternoon.

No new Flu cases have been reported in this section for nearly two weeks.
— —

Brier Rose

Mrs. Christopher is substituting this week in the Washington school for one of the teachers who is ill.

The young son of Mr. and Mrs. Peach has the influenza.

Mrs. and Mrs. Ferguson are both sick with the influenza at the Lee Douglas home.

Milton Crew, who has been ill with influenza, is better.
— —

Roswell

Hollis Taylor, who suffered a relapse from influenza the latter part of the week, is again convalescing.

William Parsons, son of Mr. and Mrs. Dell Parsons, is very ill with influenza.

A call for canned goods for the Children’s Home at Boise has been received. Goods may be left at the home of Thomas Rooney.
— —

Ten Davis News

The school board met Saturday evening at the school house. It was decided that school would start January 20th, providing the teachers hired from the east got here by that time.

There are no cases of Flu in the district now.

source: The Caldwell Tribune. (Caldwell, Idaho), 17 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Caldwell Tribune. January 17, 1919, Page 10

Local and Personal

The funeral of Ritta Shaw, aged 7, was held Wednesday afternoon. The child was a victim of influenza and the third member of the family to die of the disease. Interment was at Canyon Hill cemetery.
— —

Arena Valley Items

Miss Mildred Owens has been on the sick list for the past week.

Little Miss Helen Lund and O. F. Packwood are both on the sick list at this writing.

source: The Caldwell Tribune. (Caldwell, Idaho), 17 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Republican. January 17, 1919, Page 1

19190117TIR1

19190117TIR2
New Famine In News Print
Foreign Countries Taking American Product, Influenza Taking Printers and Publishers
Newspapers Suspending

The coming of peace and the opening of world markets for print paper are bringing about conditions of famine in American paper markets, exactly the reverse of what was expected a few weeks ago when the warn industries board release publishers from the drastic rules covering print consumption.

Before the war, America imported a great deal of print paper, and during the war, we had to depend on American mills for the supply. There have been no new mills built, and only two have increased their capacity in ten years, and now the paper supply in America is only sufficient to last the American publishers six weeks, and England, France, Belgium, Italy and South American countries are bidding up in a desperate scramble to get paper, and ships to carry it to those countries. If it were not for the scarcity of ships, the paper supply in America would probably be wiped out before spring, and publishers who have no supply would be shipping it in by express from the mills to make connections quick enough to save them from suspension.

A Hazardous Enterprise

The conditions brought about in newpaperdom by the war and influenza, make the newspaper business one of the very hazardous enterprises. The casualty lists have cut down heavily upon the supply of skilled man power in the printing industries, and the epidemic is taking publishers in a way that is a source of continual surprise and alarm. The lists of deaths printed from week to week in such reports as the Publishers’ Auxiliary and other special compilations, and the growing lists of newspapers advertised for sale, show an almost panicky condition in that line. Printers and publishers are not trained and qualified in a day nor a year, and the available supply is going lower, while the price of their services is mounting higher. With a long paper famine in prospect, and a shortage of skilled workers to produce newspapers, men of national reputation writing on the subject predict sharp advances in the price of subscriptions and advertising and a decided thinning out of newspapers. …

Dubois Idaho Has Experience

The two newspapers at Dubois, Idaho, the Banner and the Enterprise, were rather hard hit by the recent influenza outbreak. Editor Button of the Enterprise and his family were laid up for about five weeks, and as help is scarce in that section Editor N. E. Reynolds of the Banner drafted a printer from the farm and got out both papers until the Enterprise man was able to get back to the office. As Editor Reynolds is also city clerk and police judge of Dubois, and had to attend to his official duties as well as look after the two newspapers, it is a safe bet he was a very busy man. The printer employed on the Banner was the only man to die in Dubois from the epidemic. Mr. Reynolds had only the assistance of the farmer-printer and his twelve year old daughter during the trying time, but weathered the storm and is still putting out an excellent newspaper.

(Continued on page eight.)
— —

Young Man Dies

Kieth Nelson, son of Mr. and Mrs. John Nelson of Sterling, died at the home of his parents, Monday, Jan. 13, after suffering with influenza. …

At the present time the father and a younger brother Park, are dangerously ill with the disease.
— —

Sad News

Monday morning E. N. Bingham of Groveland received a telegram advising him of the death of his brother Jesse Bingham. Mr. Bingham, who has been in the army service since last August, died Monday morning in a hospital at Portland, Ore.

Not long ago an injury in a government logging camp, necessitated his removal to the hospital. Where there he contracted influenza which caused his death.

Mr. Bingham leaves a wife, several brothers and sisters, besides many friends to morning his early demise. …

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 17 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Republican. January 17, 1919, Page 2

Idaho Budget

The domestic science rooms of the Gooding high school have been converted into a temporary hospital for influenza patients.

A serious outbreak of influenza among the horses owned by dry farmers of Bingham county was combated by the farm bureau and $17,000 was saved in actual horse value.

There are now thirty-eight cases of influenza at the penitentiary, only a few having developed in the past week. The sixth death from the disease occurred when Mike Penford, sent up from Bingham county for burglary, passed away.

Out of respect to the memory of the late Colonel Theodore Roosevelt, both houses of the legislature adjourned soon after organizing Monday noon until 10 o’clock Tuesday morning.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 17 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Republican. January 17, 1919, Page 3

School Board Met

The Blackfoot school board met in regular session at the First National Bank Monday evening, with all members present.

The unfinished business pertaining to the newly erected building on the high school grounds, was given attention. Reports to date concerning school attendance are indeed favorable. The grades, Monday averaged 65 per cent and the high school reported 95 per cent of the pupils in attendance. The opening of schools has in no way increased influenza cases thus far.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 17 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Republican. January 17, 1919, Page 5

Local News

Mrs. William Thompson has been on the sick list this week.

W. F. Martin is ill at the present writing and under the care of Dr. Patrie.

Mrs. C. J. Wright is reported in a serious condition with influenza at their home between the rivers.

C. G. Anderson, cashier of the Blackfoot City Bank, is still confined to his home after suffering with influenza.

The friends of Mrs. George Gagon will be pleased to know that she is improving from her recent illness. She is just now able to enjoy short walks these mild afternoons.

Mrs. D. W. McMillan was called to Shelley Thursday afternoon on account of the serious illness of her son D. H. E. McMillan, who is suffering with influenza.

Irwin Burt of Rupert passed thru Blackfoot early Wednesday morning on his way to Moore, where he was called on account of the death of his brother Fred Burt, who died Monday night as a result of influenza.

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Bonner and little son are suffering with influenza at the present time.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 17 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Republican. January 17, 1919, Page 6

Goshen

Herbert Monson, age twenty years son of Mr. and Mrs. George Monson, died Saturday morning at 8 o’clock after a short illness with the influenza. At this writing his father George Monson is very ill with the same disease.

A brief funeral service was conducted at the cemetery on Saturday, Jan. 11 by Bishop Peter Monson over the remains of Stella Olsen, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Chris Olsen, who died Friday, Jan. 10 with influenza.

Alfred and Sarah Peterson are sick with the influenza.
— —

Upper Presto

The Charles Lyon family of eleven members are all in bed with the flu. Miss Vilda Mecham is caring for them.

The family of George Monson of Goshen are seriously ill with influenza. Mr. Monson and son Herbert developed pneumonia. The son passed away Saturday morning. He was a young man of about twenty years of age and had a great many friends. He had made Goshen his home almost continuously. This death is mourned by a mother, father and two small sisters as well as many friends. The community sends their deepest sympathy to the grieved relatives. The father is very dangerously ill at this writing.

The family of Willis Higley are just recovering from the fly.

The eight month old baby of Chris Olsen of Goshen died Friday morning, after suffering with influenza. Mr. Olsen has been very ill with pneumonia and was just able to be around at the time of the death of their little one. The entire community extends deepest sympathy to the bereaved family.

John Tolmie has been suffering with qunzy.

The R. H. Teeples family are now able to be about their various duties since suffering with the flu.

The Frank Wilson family are recovering nicely from the flu. Mr. Wilson was quite ill.
— —

Rose

U. W. Taylor has been ill for a few days.
— —

Shelley

The flu situation here has not improved, but in fact, there are a few more cases and there is some talk of closing the schools again. If the schools are closed now they will remain closed the rest of the school year.

Are you doing all in your power to kill the influenza?

Mr. and Mrs. L. Ivan Jensen are ill with light cases of the flu.

N. N. Holm is up and around again after a slight attack of the flu.

Many people were in town last Saturday evening. Many attended the show and the pool halls were well patronized, but few persons attended the dance.

There has been more life in the town the last few weeks as many of the young fellows who left here months ago are back again having received their discharges from the service of the good old U.S.A.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 17 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Republican. January 17, 1919, Page 7

Influenza Quarantine Regulation

The board of county commissioners, sitting in their first regular meeting in January, 1919 as a county board of health, present; R. G. Bills, Chairman; M. A. Fugate, James Christensen, C. A. Hoover, secretary.

It appearing to the board that a certain dangerous, contagious and infectious disease, to wit: Spanish influenza, shows a tendency to become epidemic in the county of Bingham.

And it is further appearing to the board that all possible precautions should be immediately taken to curtail the spread of and to stamp out such contagious disease; and that if is mandatory that all churches be closed, and all meetings and public assemblages to be prohibited during the prevalence of such epidemic.

Now, therefore, in accordance with law, it is hereby ordered that thruout [sic] Bingham county, and every district and locality therein, all churches and theaters shall be closed and all meetings and public assemblages of any kind whatsoever are absolutely prohibited during the prevalence of such epidemic and until the rescission of this order.

It is further ordered, that all persons and places inhabited by any person or persons afflicted with such disease, shall be properly and strictly isolated and quarantined, and the persons so quarantined shall not leave such quarantined house or place without the written permission of the board of health.

It is furthered ordered, that all peace officers shall use all necessary means to enforce the provisions of this resolution for the prevention of said contagious or infectious disease.

It is further ordered that all persons violating this resolution will be dealt with in accordance with the law.

This resolution shall become effective immediately upon its approval by the state board of health, and shall remain in full force and effect until revoked by this board.

Attest: R. G. Bills, Chairman. C. A. Hoover, Secretary.
— —

Springfield

School opened again Monday with a good attendance.

H. K. Wiley was called home from his visit in Boise by the illness of the Taylor family all of whom were ill with the flu.

Ed Sommercorn is ill with influenza and Oscar Sommercorn is acting as nurse.

Charlie Thompson is ill with the flu.
— —

Kellogg Has The Flu

There are about 150 cases of influenza at Kellogg and they are all under tight quarantine. Reports indicate that the disease has taken a firm grip on that place and the nature is serious. All public gatherings and schools have been put under the ban by order of the board of health. No Gatherings of any nature in excess of six adults at any one place is permitted under penalty of arrest. Children of school age are confined to their homes.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 17 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Republican. January 17, 1919, Page 8

Thomas

School opened Monday with a very small attendance owing to the great number of flu cases, and the fear that other cases will occur if the children enter school.

Lee D. Murdock has gone to Idaho Falls to help nurse relatives who have influenza.

Mrs. Joseph Peterson who has pneumonia is still very ill, but is thought to be improving at this writing.

The children of Mrs. Julia Sproul are very ill with the influenza.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 17 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Meridian Times., January 17, 1919, Page 6

19190117MT1

In The Gem State

A strict quarantine is still maintained at the Idaho penitentiary and those who wish to visit the prison are asked to wait until notice of the lifting of the quarantine is given through the press.

The production of the mines of Idaho for the past year will show a decrease over that of the previous year, the shortage being attributed to the fact that miners were hard to get, many having been drafted or enlisted.

source: The Meridian Times. (Meridian, Idaho), 17 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Meridian Times., January 17, 1919, Page 8

Obituary

Death Last Saturday Of Mrs. Harvey Green

Mary Florence Peer, daughter of William H. and Mary A. Peer, was born in Clay Center, Kansas, March 28, 1886, and died at the home of her parents Saturday, January 11, 1919, age 32 years, 7 months and 13 days.

About ten days ago she was stricken with influenza, which developed into pneumonia.

She was married in the summer of 1905 to Frank Huish and to this union four children were born. March 31, 1918, she was again united in marriage to Harvey Green, and to this union a babe (one month old Friday) was born.

Mrs. Green leaves to mourn her loss, besides her husband and children, her parents, brothers and sisters and a host of friends. …
— —

Death of Mrs. Alesta Fay Geerhart

Mrs. Thomas Geerhart, age 22 years and 10 months, died of influenza Monday, January 13, 1919, at her home near Meridian. She was born March 14, 1896, in Putnam county, Missouri. She was married to Tom W. Geerhart, Nov. 23, 1916. A baby boy, born to them, died in March, of last year. …
— —

Mrs. Woodward, Formerly Della Nelson, Buried Here

The funeral of Mrs. Clinton B. Woodward, wife Clinton B. Woodward, of Vale, Oregon, was held Monday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the Meridian cemetery, where she was laid to rest. The service was conducted at the grave by Carman E. Mell, pastor of the Christian church here. She was born at Boise July 6, 1889, and died January 11, 1919, age 29 years.

The deceased was formerly Miss Della Elen Nelson, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Nelson, who live four miles west of Meridian. …

source: The Meridian Times. (Meridian, Idaho), 17 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

Shoshone Journal. January 17, 1919, Page 1

19190117SJ1

19190117SJ2The Flu Situation

The flu situation in Lincoln country is at least no better than last week possibly worse, if possible. The new Board of County Commissioners has taken hold of the matter and arranged with the village authorities, the school boards and the Red Cross at Jerome, Dietrich and Richfield for a joint action in handling the epidemic. The Red cross to take full charge of the matter and the cost of administration to be divided equally among the four organizations.

The Board of Commissioners made a thorough canvass of the county and personally investigated the situation. They found cases of distress that shock an American community to know that such distress can exist in America and in our own neighborhood.

Strict quarantine regulations will be enforced. Arrangements have been made to supply FREE SERUM to all who need it and an active and earnest campaign is started to try if possible to master the situation.
— —

Dietrich

This has been a sad week for our little village. After congratulating ourselves that our affliction from the influenza had passed us with only light attacks, it struck again with a heavy hand.

The flu still holds its awful grip on this community. Mr. and Mrs. W. O. Hamilton and family of six children have been severely afflicted. Mrs. Hamilton, at this writing, is in a very critical condition, with but small hope of recovery.

Mr. and Mrs. W. O. Hamilton and all the large family of little children have all been sorely afflicted, but Thur. give more hopeful promise of recovery.

Mrs. W. O. Hamilton daughter of Freemont Dooley, died at noon Thursday after a long struggle with pneumonia following the influenza.

Mrs. Mustard was called to Kimama Wednesday to attend Miss Judy a former teacher here who is stricken with the influenza.

Mrs. O. E. Borden and Rupert have had a hard struggle with the influenza. Rupert has recovered and Mrs. Borden is improving.

Rupert Borden, who has been one of the afflicted of the Borden family, has so far recovered as to be able to resume his studies at the State Technical Institute at Pocatello.

The Dietrich Federal Loan Association held its annual meeting Tuesday. Owing to the prevalence of the flu the attendance was small and an adjournment was taken to Saturday.

Mrs. F. L. Palmer is at the hospital in Shoshone, under the care of Dr. Dill, with a severe case of the flu.

Guy Eddy who, with his wife, has been laid up with the flu is now at work again bailing hay.

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Oldenburg well known in this precinct as among the oldest settlers here, removed to Spirit Lake last spring where Henry engaged in the auto repair business. The sad news reached here that Mrs. Oldenberg died of pneumonia on Dec. 27th followed by her little daughter Ruth on the 28th. Mrs. Oldenberg was a most industrious wife and mother, well beloved and respected by all. Her untimely death leaves four other children, Gladys aged 12 years; Alice, 10; Willis 8; and a baby of two months, bright and interesting children who will sadly miss a fond mothers care.

On Monday morning the young wife of Church Smith, died at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Dooley leaving her baby boy who was born during her sickness. Interment was Tues. afternoon in the Shoshone cemetery.

J. E. Houston, wife and family have all been severely attacked, but now are getting better. Mr. Houston who has been confined to his home is now out again.

Mrs. J. P. Michel was another Mon. victim. She was the young wife of Jean P. Michel who came here about three years ago and worked industriously preparing the home to which he subsequently brought his bride from the coast, to pass away thus sadly. The remains were laid to rest Wednesday at Shoshone.

James Reed who came with a party of hay-bailers from Richfield occupying the Lachner house two miles south of town, was stricken with the influenza and died with pneumonia, Tuesday. His father has arrived from Utah whither his remains will be taken for burial.

Mrs. Axel Blomberg who was almost given up to die was reported better Thur.

Ed Miller’s family have been having a hard time with the disease but are now recovering.

Mrs. John I. Matson and the children have recovered from the disease and are about the usual duties again.

Christ Frees has been ill with the disease attended with pneumonia and grave fears were entertained for his recovery. Thursday he is reported improving and less fears are entertained.

source: Shoshone Journal. (Shoshone, Idaho), 17 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Shoshone Journal. January 17, 1919, Page 5

Local And Personal News

Free Flu Serum.

The Board of County Commissioners has arranged for 3000 doses of flu serum from the famous Mayo Brothers, at Rochester, Minn., to be distributed free, as needed to our citizens. The serum will arrive in a few days and the services of a nurse and physician will be supplied at each of the four centers Jerome, Dietrich, Richfield and Shoshone.

Miss Tress McMahon is recovering from the flu and has been removed to her home in Richfield where she will stay until she is able to go back into the school room again.

Mrs. W. Hall Horne is ill at the Dill hospital.

Miss Stella McFall has been engaged as the school nurse during the flu epidemic.

Walter Gwin who has been down with the flu is able to be back again at the Strockgrowers.

Mrs. Will Newman is on the sick list.

Mrs. Roy Gilbertson is substituting in the 1st and 2nd grades on the North side during the illness of Miss Tress McMahon.

Miss Lenora Noble went to Kimama Friday to assist with the care of her friend Miss Lena Judy who is seriously ill with the influenza. Miss Judy was removed to the hospital at Rupert.

Miss Fern Noble is ill with the flu at the Dill hospital.

Miss Margaret Lind, one of the teachers at Kimama died in the Rupert hospital last Saturday with the flu.

source: Shoshone Journal. (Shoshone, Idaho), 17 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Shoshone Journal. January 17, 1919, Page 7

Idaho State News

The basement of the school building at Wendell has been fitted up as a hospital for the care of influenza patients. The Red Cross is in charge.

Hereafter when influenza develops in a Boise family no one, not even the breadwinner, will be permitted to leave the house. This drastic action is regard to quarantine of influenza has been taken by the city board of health.

source: Shoshone Journal. (Shoshone, Idaho), 17 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., January 17, 1919, Page 1

19190117DSM1

19190117DSM2
To Give Health Board More Power
Legislature Takes Action To Safe Guard Health Of People Of Idaho

Boise — Centralization of power would be placed in the board of health of the state in a way which it has not before had by the passage of a bill introduced yesterday by the women members of the house.

The bill provides that when the board see danger from epidemics it may enact rules and regulations to be carried out by county officers.

Much conflict has existed during the influenza epidemic where county officers have made their own rules to handle local conditions and several instances are of record where cities or towns under quarantine have refused entry to board of health officials. The new bill gives the latter power to enter any city, town or building and provides a severe penalty for refusal to allow this action by those responsible.
— —

19190117DSM3
Rigid Quarantine Put On In Pullman
Homes Having Influenza To Be Closely Quarantined – All Meetings Stop

Pullman, Wash., Jan. 16. – Pullman again came under the influenza ban today when orders were issued by city Health Officer L. G. Kimzey closing theatres, churches, lodges and all public assemblies. The order does not include pool rooms and bowling alleys, but it is expected that these will be closed if spread of the disease continues. The epidemic is confined almost entirely to school children, although in a few instances entire families have been stricken with the disease. It is estimated that over 50 children are ill, and six teachers have fallen victims to the malady. All of the cases are mild.

All homes in which the disease appears are being quarantined, admittance being denied except to doctors and nurses. The gauze masks that featured the previous epidemic have not put in an appearance again, but many citizens are taking the serum treatment to ward off the disease.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 17 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., January 17, 1919, Page 2

19190117DSM4

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 17 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., January 17, 1919, Page 3

19181202DSM3
City News

The condition of Mrs. Jacob A. Hoke is much improved from a severe attack of influenza.

Dr. J. C. Wilk left Thursday for the coast to recuperate a month or more before resuming his practice in Moscow.

Judge Steele returned yesterday from Lewiston, where he held a short session of court.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 17 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

Public School, Bonners Ferry, Idaho

SchoolPublicSchoolBonnersFerryFritz-a

courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

January 18

Evening Capital News., January 18, 1919, Page 2

19190118ECN1

19190118ECN3
Influenza Ban Is Lifted Noon Today
Movies, Pool Halls, Cigar Stores and Soft Drink Parlors Allowed to Resume Business; Non-Visiting Order Still in Effect

At 12 noon today, the quarantine on movies, pool halls, cigar stores and soft drink establishments, will be automatically lifted, and Boise folk will again be allowed to haunt their usual places of amusement, though the order forbidding families, friends and neighbors to visit each others homes will be continued in effect. At a meeting of the health board Friday, it was also decided that hospitals must observe the quarantine regulations the same as homes.

People who have important business to transact with “flu” patients such as drawing up wills, etc., will be permitted to visit them for a very short time upon securing a permit from the city health office. Coffins must be sealed over in the future, or glassed over, so that there will be no possibility of spreading the disease during funeral services.

For the benefit of the public, these sections of the quarantine order will continue in effect:

1. All persons are hereby forbidden to visit the home or premises occupied by another except in case of necessity from Saturday noon, January 18, to Thursday noon, January 23.

2. Children of one family are hereby prohibited from associating with or going to the home of another family from Saturday noon, January 18, to Thursday noon, January 23.

Rigid quarantine will be continued on all homes same as in the past which are afflicted with the disease, and people are cautioned against visiting homes in quarantine which have not been released.

Only five new cases were reported Friday, the decrease being due to the advent of warmer weather, according to the board of health.
— —

19190118ECN2

source: Evening Capital News. (Boise, Idaho), 18 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Evening Capital News., January 18, 1919, Page 3

19190118ECN4Week’s News of the Boise Churches

Catholic.

The tea for the benefit of the Altar fund, which was to have been given on Wednesday last, has been postponed to a later date, of which due notice will be given through the press.

On account of the influenza quarantine the Red Cross unit did not meet to do sewing this week. Plans for next week’s activities will be announced later.

Unless the influenza quarantine prohibit the holding of meetings, the regular meeting of the Knights of Columbus will be held in St. John’s hall Tuesday, Jan. 21. A good program will be presented. The influenza relief committee of the Boise council has at its disposal the services of a competent physician who will answer all calls from influenza patients, regardless of church affiliation, without charge. This physician may be reached by calling the Grand Knight of the council, phone 972, or through Captain Barnes of the Salvation army.
— —

Wright Congregational.

Wright, closed practically since Oct. 7, will resume services Jan. 19. Superintendent J. E. Ingham will conduct services. …
— —

First Presbyterian.

Since the influenza ban has been lifted and the public schools are to resume regular work the 20th, we trust that next Sabbath, the 26th, will find a full attendance at all of our services, both morning and evening, especially the Sabbath school at 10 a.m., let every superintendent, teacher and student plan to be on hand on time, with a smile and ready to resume active, earnest, aggressive work and don’t forget the prayer-meeting on Thursday evening…

Because the influenza has prevented local campaigns, the period for securing the New Era magazine at the introductory rates has been extended to February 1…
— —

Idaho State Sunday School Association Notes.

Suggestions for opening services:

Don’ts.

Don’t always begin with a song.
Don’t talk or sing across empty seats.
Don’t hold an opening service longer than 20 minutes.
Don’t wait on anybody or anything any time.
Don’t do anything to merely occupy time.
Don’t yell or ring a bell.
Don’t make a speech except once in a year or two.
Don’t allow late comers to sit down during any part of service.
Don’t scold, find fault or frown.
Don’t think shouting is singing.
Don’t leave platform during opening service.
Don’t allow running around in room. …

During the period when children under 15 are not allowed in Sunday school, the Baptist school has held a training class of all teachers of the elementary classes. During this time they have taken up plans for making their work better. …
— —

Christian.

All the regular services this week. …

All mid-week services as usual.

The Boy Scouts will resume meetings this week.

In spite of the handicap by the “flu” we are growing in numbers. We have had additions every Lord’s day since the ban was lifted. …
— —

Nazarene Church.

All departments of this church will be active from now on unless further closing order may be put on. The Sunday school has suffered much from recent bans and scares due to “flu” conditions, but it is hoped the high point has been reached in the epidemic and things in general may come back to normal. Let each scholar be present Sunday and secure their new literature for the quarter.
— —

Katherine Baptist Mission.

No Sunday school today.

It is requested that all the teachers get in touch with each member of their class during the coming week, that we may have a full attendance of all classes next Sunday.

With the understanding that the ban will be lifted at noon Saturday, Jan. 18, we will hold our young people’s meeting as usual tonight at 6:45.
— —

St. Michael’s Cathedral.

The services Sunday, Jan. 19, will be at the usual hours…

Our Sunday school scholars are rapidly coming back to their work, and the dean would urge upon every teacher the necessity of being there promptly to welcome the children and conduct the class. …

The ladies of St. Michael’s have been doing noble work this past week in making garments, bandages, pneumonia jackets, hotwater bottle covers, etc., etc., for St. Luke’s hospital. …
— —

Collister M. E. Church.

We have resumed our regular services at this church and cordially invite the public to attend. …
— —

Second Presbyterian.

Attendance at Sunday school is making a steady gain. It is hoped that it will soon be normal again.
— —

First Methodist.

We return to full service Sunday. The Sunday school will meet at 10 a.m. …

source: Evening Capital News. (Boise, Idaho), 18 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Evening Capital News., January 18, 1919, Page 5

19190118ECN5Little News of Boise

Barber Shops Close Early.

Beginning tonight all barber shops in Boise close at 9 o’clock on Saturday night and at 6 o’clock during other nights of the week.

Will Resume Services.

Rev. David H. Jones announces that he will resume services Sunday in Christ and Grace episcopal churches. …

Called By Illness.

Charles Zabala arrived in the city Friday, being called here by the illness of his wife. Mrs. Zabala had been called to Boise by the sickness of her brother, and was suddenly taken ill herself.
— —

Deaths – Funerals

Foster – Charles J. Foster, aged 38 years died Friday evening of pneumonia following influenza at his home near Morris Hill cemetery. His survived by his wife, four small sons and a daughter three days old, his mother, Mrs. Ruffner of Vancouver, Wash., four sisters and one brother. The body is at the Fry & Summers chapel awaiting word from relatives before funeral arrangement are made.
— —

Card of Thanks

We wish to thank the many friends and acquaintances and especially the Red Cross for the kindness and sympathy shown us, and for the floral offerings, during our recent bereavement in the death of our beloved husband, A. L. Perman and daughter and sister, Eunice Perman.

Mrs. H. L. Perman and children, J. H. Foster and Family.
— —

Middleton

Wm. Lemon, the local postmaster, and editor, is able to be out again after several weeks’ illness with influenza.
— —

Caldwell.

John Flynn, of the Flynn Grocery company, who has the pneumonia is reported to be improving.
— —

[Emmett]

“Flu” Ban Till Feb. 1.

At a meeting last night of the Gem county heath board, the city health board and the school board, it was decided to keep the “flu” ban on in Emmett till Feb. 1. The “flu” is being brought under splendid control here. Last week 67 homes were quarantined and now only seven families are quarantined.

source: Evening Capital News. (Boise, Idaho), 18 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., January 18, 1919, Page 1

19190118DSM1

19190118DSM2
Influenza Seems To Have Abated
All Grade Schools Open Tuesday Morning Because No New Cases Reported

There will be school in all grades in the city on Tuesday morning.

This decision so momentous to hundreds of boys and girls in Moscow was reached last evening at a meeting of the school board, together with city Health Officer Dr. W. A. Adair and Dr. Boyd of the health committee of the city council.

Upon the statement of Dr. Adair that no new cases of influenza had been reported to him during the week and that there were only three homes in the city in which previously mentioned cases were still on record, the board voted to open all the school rooms, exercising every possible precaution to prevent a new outbreak of the disease.

All rules and restrictions with reference to public assemblages are to be enforced until it is ascertained what the results will be of opening school to all the little children.

No pupils of the district are to be permitted to attend public gatherings of any kind.

The board wishes, through the columns of the Star-Mirror, to request parents of school children to observe the health of their children carefully, especially of the smallest ones, and to keep them home from school if they show even the slightest indisposition.

The members carried on an interesting discussion as to whether it would be advisable to complete the full year’s work in the grades. Superintendent Rich explained that by keeping up the sessions until July 1, the assigned work for the nine months could be completed. The matter of lengthening the school day and increasing the number of session by holding school on Saturdays was also considered. No definite action was taken in regard to either measure. The board is very desirous of hearing and expression of opinion on the part of the patrons of the school, as to whether it would be desirable to hold school on Saturdays or begin earlier each day in the week.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 18 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., January 18, 1919, Page 3

19181202DSM3
City News

Hallie Reitze, who has recovered from a severe attack of influenza, left today for his work on Potlatch ridge.

Mrs. Anna Colby returned Thursday from Palouse, where she had been doing nursing for some time.
— —

Death of Former Genesee Man.

Mrs. Wes Dorchester of Wetaskiwin, Alta., Canada, has written relatives here of the accidental death near there of Martin Embertson, who formerly resided north of Genesee, where he homesteaded in early days.

Mrs. Dorchester wrote that they had been suffering with a real epidemic of flu in that part of Canada and that help was very hard to obtain. Mr. Embertson’s family were all ill of the flu and he started alone in his automobile, one afternoon recently, for Wetaskiwin for help. Having gone part of the distance to town something went wrong with this automobile and he got down under the car to try and fix it, when it is supposed the car started and ran over him injuring him internally. He was not discovered and laid there until the next day about noon, when he was found and a hurried trip was started to the hospital at Wetaskiwin, but he died on the way, death being due to his injuries an exposure. He leaves a wife and family. …
— —

No Flu in Kendrick.

There have been no new cases of flu in Kendrick for some time and the few who are still confined to the house with the disease are past the stage where any danger of contagion exists. Conditions at present look very favorable in town, although there are a large number of cases in the territory tributary, as nearly all of the ridges have a number of cases, some of them quite serious. – Kendrick Gazette.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 18 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., January 18, 1919, Page 4

19190118DSM3
Pay Can Be Withheld
Independent Districts Need Not Lose Money Through Influenza.

Teachers in common school districts can collect their salaries for time lost during the influenza epidemic, but independent school district teachers cannot collect if the trustees choose to terminate the teachers’ contracts and discharge them permanently by reason of the epidemic.

This is the gist of the first opinion rendered by the attorney general’s office under the new administration. The opinion was written in response to hundreds of requests for more light on the law, and was submitted Monday afternoon to Miss Ethel E. Redfield, state superintendent of public instruction. – Boise Statesman.
— —

Potlatch Schools Open January 27.

Potlatch. – Announcement was made by Supt. Alice Lancaster that the Potlatch schools would not be reopened until Monday, January 27th instead of this coming week on account of the epidemic still prevailing in the city and immediate vicinity. However those wishing to take the regular eighth grade examinations for the purpose of making up back grades, may do so at Princeton in the following subjects only: Wednesday morning, geography; Wednesday afternoon, physiology, and Thursday morning, United States history.
— —

Red Cross in Boise.

It is now planned by the Red Cross to have a worker in each block in the city whose duty it will be to visit the homes in that block each day and make a report to the home service section of the Red Cross telling of any families which have been found in need of assistance. – Boise Statesman.
— —

19190118DSM4

[** Many vaccines were developed and used during the 1918–1919 pandemic. The medical literature was full of contradictory claims of their success; there was apparently no consensus on how to judge the reported results of these vaccine trials. (link)]

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 18 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
——————

Back to Table of Contents
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 1)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 2)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 3)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 4)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 5)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 6)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 7)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 8)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 9)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 10)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 11)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 12)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 13)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 14)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 15)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 16)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 17)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 18)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 19)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 20)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 21)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 22)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 23)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 24)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 25)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 26)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 27)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 28)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 29)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 30)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 31)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 32)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 33)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 34)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 35)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 36)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 37)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 38)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 39)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 40)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 41)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 42)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 43)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 44)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 45)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 46)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 47)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 48)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 49)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 50)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 51)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 52)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 53)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 54)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 55)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 56)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 57)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 58)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 59)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 60)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 61)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 62)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 63)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 64)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 65)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 66)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 67)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 68)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 69)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 70)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 71)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 72)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 73)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 74)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 75)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 76)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 77)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 78)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 79)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 80)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 81)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 82)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 83)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 84)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 85)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 86)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 87)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 88)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 89)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 90)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 91)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 92)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 93)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 94)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 95)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 96)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 97)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 98)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 99)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 100)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 101)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 102)

Road Reports Oct 18, 2020

Please share road reports. Conditions can change quickly this time of year. Be prepared for rocks and trees in the road, and possible snow in higher elevation. Remember there is no cell phone service.

Yellow Pine: The recent rains have improved local streets. Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN.
“Drivers don’t speed through neighborhoods or most anywhere. Locals brake for kids, wandering dogs, deer, elk, moose, fox, beaver, squirrels and chipmunks. Most are lifetime members of SPLAT, the Society to Prevent Little Animal Tragedies.” – IME
link: Local Forecast
Yellow Pine Webcam: (check date on image)

Highway 55 Webcams Link:
Link: Fall 2020 ID-55, Smiths Ferry Improvements
ID-55 is closing between Smiths Ferry and Rainbow Bridge starting Monday, Sept. 21. for rock blasting and cleanup. Plan ahead for full road closures Monday-Thursday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. through November, and use U.S. 95 as an alternate route.
State Highway 55 Construction Work Scheduled starts Tuesday, September 8th, 2020
Fall (September through November) and Spring (March through May)
– Daytime and nighttime work seven days a week
– Full road closures Monday through Thursday from 10:00am to 2:00pm
– One-way alternating traffic during all other time frames
link: more info
Note: Due to the Hwy 55 construction from Smith’s Ferry to Rainbow Bridge that starts in September (after Labor Day), the County Commissioners have ordered the closure of Smith’s Ferry Dr. at Packer John Rd. and Round Valley Rd. This closure does not apply to the property owners who live beyond the intersection of Packer John Rd. and Smith’s Ferry Dr.

Highway 95: Detour around slide.
Check ITD (link)
French Creek Road is not an official, nor a recommended detour for Highway 95.

Warm Lake Highway: No problems reported.
link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

South Fork Road: Construction nearly over, paving commenced this last week.
“No closure of the SF Road due to Rx Fire. The construction is winding up with paving prep and paving this week and into next. No hard closures anymore, but potential delays of 30 minutes as vehicle approach the paving operation.”
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Saturday (Oct 3) mail truck driver (Taylor) reports the road is “degrading” but not bad.

Johnson Creek Road: Open
Report Wednesday (Oct 14) mail truck driver (Taylor) says the road is being graded today.
link: Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam
Johnson Creek Webcam North

link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
Note: The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Open. No current report.
Report Sept 21: Lick Creek Road was recently graded by Valley County.
Report Sept 23: road is very bumpy. – BJB
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Open.
Report Sept 20: “Profile’s in pretty good shape.” BMc
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcam: (check date on image)

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open. No recent reports.
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Travel at your own risk. Be prepared for high elevation snow this time of year.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Cinnabar: Open? Travel at your own risk. Be prepared for high elevation snow this time of year.
Reports of off road travel this summer cutting through the switchbacks and tearing up the hillside.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Travel at your own risk.
Be prepared for high elevation snow this time of year.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Warrens Wagon Road:
No currents report.

Deadwood Summit: Open, travel with caution. Be prepared for high elevation snow this time of year.
Scott Mountain is also open.
Note: The approx elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′

New Link
Valley County Road Maintenance Dashboard
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