Idaho History Oct 18, 2020

Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic

Part 27

Idaho Newspaper clippings January 17-18, 1919

School Photos courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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January 17

The Rathdrum Tribune., January 17, 1919, Page 1

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Flu Ban On Again
Rathdrum Has New Outbreak of Epidemic.

The village authorities put the flu ban back into effect Tuesday night, stopping all public gatherings in Rathdrum for an indefinite period.

The Rathdrum schools were closed again Tuesday morning on account of a new outbreak of influenza among the pupils since last Saturday. In three days ten cases were reported, nearly all of them being students of the high school. Since then the disease has been communicated to a few other people. The school closing order is indefinite but Supt. Swenson adopted a plan of assigning lessons for home study to high school students and to the two upper grades of the grammar school. The plan includes keeping some of the teachers on duty in the high school to who students may go individually for help as occasion requires.

At the instance of the school board the village trustees met Tuesday night and restored Ordinance No. 63 in effect. A committee was also appointed to ask the county commissioners to prohibit dances and public gatherings in the county districts of this vicinity. The authorities feel

(Continued on Page Two.)

Flu Ban On Again.

(Continued From First Page.)

convinced that the epidemic is being spread by “walking carriers”, persons having the disease and mingling with others before becoming ill enough to call a physician.

Country Dances Illegal.

The above committee got in communication Wednesday with the county commissioners and county physician and was informed that the state health order issued last fall prohibiting public gatherings throughout the state was never lifted except as to the schools and to pubic gatherings in incorporated towns and cities, and that the ban then placed on dances and public gatherings in country districts outside of incorporated towns is still in effect and will remain in effect throughout the state until the influenza epidemic is entirely over. This is something that was not generally known. However, it clears up all question as to the country dances, showing that they have been illegal since the state health order was issued and that people managing and participating in these affairs were subject to arrest. The order has not been enforced so far, but The Tribune is informed that the authorities, now that they know their power, will see to it that the law shall be no longer violated in this respect or if violated that the guilty parties shall be punished.

Homes Quarantined.

Homes quarantined in Rathdrum, due to illness of school students, since Saturday are: Sunday – Rev. Carrick, A. H. Richmond; Monday – C. F. Lanthrop, J. Biemond, Mrs. Mary Post; Tuesday – Frank Thompson.

Three cases are reported in the family of F. H. Bradbury, residing just outside the town limits.

Rev. Carrick, C. F. Lanthrop, F. H. Bradbury and F. Thormpson are quarantine out of attending to their affairs as usual. J. Biemond had also been quarantined out but later became ill and is now quarantined in with his family.

It was reported Wednesday that Lewis Satchwell, another school student, living in the country, had become ill with the flu.
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From Over The County

Post Falls

The Post Falls schools re-opened with about 75 per cent attendance.

A band has been organized with dues fixed at $1.25 per month. There are seventeen pieces. Prof. James Hopkins has been employed as instructor at $2.50 per night once a week.
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Harrison

Influenza patients are required to remain under quarantine ten days after the board of health considers them recovered, and all persons exposed must remain under quarantine the same length of time.
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Spirit Lake

Captain E. W. White of Fort Wright arrived last week to help Dr. McCormick in fighting the influenza epidemic.

Hugh Tallman, who died at Usk of influenza, was buried at Spirit Lake Saturday morning.

J. W. Brooks, age 30, died Wednesday of last week of influenza. He leaves his widow and one child.

Mrs. Grover C. Hearing and infant died last Friday of influenza. The husband and two children survive.
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Idaho State News Items.

Everyone in Boise who wishes to take influenza vaccine** will be supplied by the city without charge.

Hereafter when influenza develops in a Boise family no one, not even the breadwinner, will be permitted to leave the house. This drastic action in regard to quarantine of influenza has been taken by the city board of health, following the request of the home service section of the Red Cross, Boise Ministerial association, and professional men of the city. The family will be cared for by the Red Cross.

[** “Many vaccines were developed and used during the 1918–1919 pandemic. The medical literature was full of contradictory claims of their success; there was apparently no consensus on how to judge the reported results of these vaccine trials.” (link)]

source: The Rathdrum Tribune. (Rathdrum, Idaho), 17 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Rathdrum Tribune., January 17, 1919, Page 2

19190117RT3
The School Column.
From The School

Articles of news value are given preference. Essays will be published as space permits, in the order in which they are received.

To Study At Home

It has been necessary again to close our schools because of epidemic conditions. We are, however, continuing our work from the Sixth grade up thru the High school. Assignment of work has been made to all pupils in these grades. Teachers are on hand at the High school building on usual school days, and students are asked to confer with them singly whenever they need help.

Students have welcomed this opportunity which affords a possibility of completing their year’s work. Thus far many have come to teachers for help. We have had evidence that a large number are doing consistent work under this plan.

It should be borne in mind by both student and parent, however, that, to do the work required of students, they must spend five or six hours in study daily. All are given the same opportunity to complete the work that has been planned for this year. Those who apply themselves well and are conscientious in fulfilling requirements will be promoted or graduated. Others of course will fail.

We are counting on the co-operation of parents. They should realize that pupils need the same amount of time for study that they had at school. Also, they can do much to encourage them and to help them.
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The Danger In Influenza

Dr. J. B. Anderson, Spokane city health officer, says:

“The danger in influenza is the walking carrier, or the person in the early stages who thinks is has not go it, or the person in the convalescent state who thinks that he is well.”
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Like Banco’s ghost*, the flu will not down.

[*”The ghost of Banquo later returns to haunt Macbeth at the banquet in Act Three, Scene Four”.]

source: The Rathdrum Tribune. (Rathdrum, Idaho), 17 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Rathdrum Tribune., January 17, 1919, Page 3

Personal Mention.

O. S. Hinds was ill the first of the week with an attack of pneumonia, but is reported alright again.

Grandma Satchwell of Rathdrum prairie was reported quite ill the first of the week with an attack of pneumonia.

Claud Fryer of Portland, Ore., who had been visiting his Corvallis classmate, Clorin Layton, and was delayed here on account of illness with influenza, departed Monday night on his return home.
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Local Paragraphs.

The churches and lodges are closed again by the influenza regulations.

The Odd Fellows installed officers last Friday night and enjoyed a pleasant time with refreshments.

Dead pole wood is now being hauled in from a distance of more than five miles, the nearer supply of that class of fuel having been exhausted.
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Sad News From Midvale.

Word was received Wednesday by Mrs. A. O. Skinner from her husband at Midvale, Idaho, announcing the deaths by influenza of Harvey J. Borthwich, and son Bryan, and daughter Jane, who resided at Council. Other members of the family were stated to be ill with the disease.

… Jane, the eldest child, was a school teacher and clerk, and Bryan had charge of the farm at Council the past few years. Three younger daughters and one son survive with their mother, who is a sister of Chase. and John Green of Rathdrum prairie. …
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Worry gives the undertaker more business than hard work ever did. (ibid page 4)

source: The Rathdrum Tribune. (Rathdrum, Idaho), 17 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Evening Capital News., January 17, 1919, Page 5

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Star

Mrs. Barker and children, who have had the Spanish influenza, are reported to be recovering rapidly.
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Meridian

Charles Harris is reported seriously ill.

Walter Evans is reported ill with the Spanish influenza.
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Nampa

H. O. Kimmel of the Robert Dry Goods company is reported ill with the Spanish influenza.

F. K. Robinson, who has been quite ill the past week, is reported to be recovering rapidly.

Mrs. Charles Stevens of the Leader-Herald reportorial staff is reported ill with the Spanish influenza.

source: Evening Capital News. (Boise, Idaho), 17 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Evening Capital News., January 17, 1919, Page 6

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Red Cross Can Use Canned Fruits For Its Flu Patients

Announcement is made that the Red Cross, in charge of assisting those ill with influenza, desires canned fruit donated for use of the patients in a number of instances. This fruit may be left at the Salvage shop of the Red cross on Main Street. donations will appreciated.

source: Evening Capital News. (Boise, Idaho), 17 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Evening Capital News., January 17, 1919, Page 7

19190118ECN5Little News of Boise

Stop Dance.

One of the city’s special policemen working on the enforcement of the quarantine put a quietus on a Basque dance at Ninth and Grove streets Thursday night by stopping it and ordering the hall closed.

Mrs. Biwer Sick.

The home of Dr. E. t. Biwer, secretary of the state board of health, is quarantined, thus preventing the health board secretary from attending to his official duties for a time, the occasion being the taking ill of Mrs. Biwer from influenza.

source: Evening Capital News. (Boise, Idaho), 17 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Cottonwood Chronicle. January 17, 1919, Page 1

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School Notes
By Wm. A. Lustie

New Students

2d. grade: Evelyn Bennett, Alice Bennett, and Richard Amos.
3d. grade: Helen Hensley.
4th. grade: Kenneth Hensley and Beth Bennett.
5th. grade: Harold McCully.
7th. grade: John McCully, Hildagarde Oldham, Donald and Nellie Bennett.
H.S. students: Marie McCully, Sabelle and Margaret Nash.

In the grades the school attendance is about 70 per cent of what is as before the Flu closed the schools. In the High School it is about 72 percent.

Miss Jessie Wardrobe is teaching the 5th and 6th grades instead of 3d and 4th., and Miss Martha Lehmann of Spokane the 3d and 4th grades.

“Back to school is today the government’s watch word because the government knows that illiteracy is a personal and national loss and that children at work when they should be in school forecast stunted, under-educated men and women.” …
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Dr. Alcorn in Chicago

Dr. R. J. Alcorn of Ferdinand has gone to Chicago to attend a meeting of medical men which has for its purpose a more thorough investigation of the so called Spanish influenza. Dr. Alcorn expects to be absent about four weeks, during which time he will have a competent physician in charge of his hospital.
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Mrs. Albert Nau.

Mrs. Albert Nau who died at the Alcorn hospital in Ferdinand Sunday morning at 5:30 was 29 years of age and was born near Keuterville. She was ill only four days, death resulting from pneumonia following an attack of influenza. She was a sister-in-law of A. H. Nau of this city. Interment was made at Ferdinand Wednesday. Besides her husband she leaves four children.

source: Cottonwood Chronicle. (Cottonwood, Idaho), 17 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Cottonwood Chronicle. January 17, 1919, Page 6

Cottonwood and Vicinity
Personal Mention and Local Happenings of the Week

C. A. Johnson was around on the streets Monday, the first time since he was confined with the influenza a month ago.

Gertie[?] Schaecher is able to be out after a long siege of influenza.

William Burr of Genesee spent several days in Cottonwood this week. Mrs. Burr is a teacher in the local public schools.

source: Cottonwood Chronicle. (Cottonwood, Idaho), 17 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Kendrick Gazette. January 17, 1919, Page 1

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School Starts Monday

At a meeting of the school board this week it was decided to start school next Monday, January 20. All of the teachers are here and are ready to begin their work. Prof. White has recovered from his attack of the flu and is rapidly regaining his strength. The board felt that as there were so many who were protesting against keeping school closed any longer, it was best to resume work as long as the town is free from influenza cases.
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No Flu in Kendrick

There have been no new cases of flu in Kendrick for some time and the few who are still confined to the house with the disease are past the state where any danger of contagion exists. Conditions at present look very favorable in town, although there are a large number of cases in the territory [?], as nearly all of the ridges have a number of cases, some of them quite serious.
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Death of Frank Brocke

Frank Brocke, son of Mr. and Mrs. N. Brocke, died at his home on American ridge last Sunday afternoon at three o’clock, from influenza followed by pneumonia. He was ill but a few days and although a man of splendid physihque [sic], he could not withstand the disease.

Frank Brocke was born in Latah county October 15, 1897. He was married October 21, 1903. To this union five children were born, four boys and one girls. The deceased is survived by his mother and father, three sisters and four brothers. …
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Two Deaths in One Family

The entire community was saddened to learn that Mr. and Mrs. William Whybark of Bear ridge have suffered the loss of two little children, their death being caused by influenza. All of the members of the family were ill with the disease at the time death visited the home.

Last Friday morning, January 10, little Nellie Carrol Whybark, age four years, succumbed to the disease. The same night her little brother, Royal, age six, passed away from the same cause.
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Death of Tommy McDowell

Tommy McDowell, little son of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas McDowell died at the home of his parents last Sunday afternoon. His death was due directly to influenza which developed into pneumonia. For nearly a year his health had been poor and his weakened condition was not equal to ward off the attack of influenza. He was six years of age at the time of his death. …
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Not Hold Farmers’ Week

Owing to the influenza situation throughout the northwest the U. of I. will not hold Farmers’ and Housekeepers’ Week. Plans are being formulated for a big program next year.

source: The Kendrick Gazette. (Kendrick, Idaho), 17 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Kendrick Gazette. January 17, 1919, Page 2

Big Bear Ridge

Steele school has closed for an indefinite time.

We are pleased to state that the Will Whybark family are recovering nicely from a severe attack of influenza, at this writing. They are cared for by a trained nurse from Moscow.

Mrs. Flora Harrison has gone to Bovill to nurse her son Ernest, who is ill with influenza in a hospital at that place.

Sawing wood and putting up ice is the chief occupation these days.

source: The Kendrick Gazette. (Kendrick, Idaho), 17 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Kendrick Gazette. January 17, 1919, Page 6

Idaho News Paragraphs
Recent Happenings in This State Given in Brief Items for Busy Readers.

Eleven new cases of influenza were reported to the city health officer at Wallace Saturday. This is less than the number reported during the preceding days. It is thought that the crest reached of the epidemic has been reached, but the ban is to remain until conditions improve.

Charles E. Struthers, United States district employment agent for the five northern countries of Idaho, died at Wallace Saturday of pneumonia following influenza. He was a member of the 1917 legislature. His widow is very low with the disease.

Influenza conditions have again become such that all public gatherings and the schools have been put under the ban at Kellogg. By order of the board of health no gathering of any nature in excess of six adults at anyone place is permitted under penalty of arrest. Children of school age are not permitted to leave their homes, and parents are held responsible for the enforcement of this rule. Influenza cases are being strictly quarantined. About 150 cases of influenza are reported together with several cases of smallpox.
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Mining Notes

The coal production of British Columbia in 1918 will have a value of around $1,000,000 over last year, though production has been much reduced during the past six weeks by the influenza epidemic. …
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The Associations.

The annual convention of the National Wool Growers’ association, which was to have taken place in Salt Lake City January 16, 17 and 18 has been indefinitely postponed, owing to influenza conditions. Dr. S. W. McClure, secretary, said the wool growers may convene in April, during the stock show to be held there that month.
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Knitting wasn’t in vain – look at the yarns the boys are bringing back.

source: The Kendrick Gazette. (Kendrick, Idaho), 17 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Recorder. January 17, 1919, Page 1

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Schools Not To Open Yet

By direction of the county health board, at a hearing of the matter on Wednesday last at the courthouse, it has been found advisable to continue the order of keeping the city schools, dances and theatres closed yet awhile longer. Superintendent Rand is arranging that his staff of teachers shall undertake to carry on a measure of regular school work by giving out lessons over the telephone and correspondence methods, which he hopes will go some way at least in preventing much of the loss of time in the regular school work of the city. To this end children are requested to get in touch with their teachers at once.

Mrs. W. C. McCormick will meet the pupils of seventh grade in their recitation room at the high school building Monday at 2 p.m.
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“Flu” Sufferers Away From Home

William H. Shoup was advised by wire Wednesday morning that his son Richard, enlisted in the naval reserve and San Diego, California, has been taken ill and was in a hospital there. The father and mother at once started for the bedside, leaving Salmon by special motor driven by Harry White, hoping to connect with the evening train south from Armestead.

Mrs. and Mrs. Shoup succeeded in making their train south after some difficulty in getting over the divide where they had to walk from one side to the other. The news came to Salmon Thursday that their son was in an improved condition.

Reports received last week told of the alarming illness of Miss Alta Hibbs in Portland. Her mother is with her. The young lady has been a flu sufferer. Newton Hibbs was advised a few days before of the intention of the two to return to Salmon and he advised that they remain away for a time awaiting the abatement of the epidemic at the family home here.

The same visitation that took so many members of the same family in the flu epidemic all over the world claimed the mother and three children of the family of Thomas McPherson, a brother of the Salmon merchant, J. M. McPherson, in their Saskatchewan home. This news came to Salmon a few days ago. The dead were all buried the same day.
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Dr. Hanmer is Appointed.

At a meeting of the board of country commissioners on Monday Dr. Charles F. Hanmer was appointed county health officer and physician to the indigent poor. Dr. Wright had held this office heretofore for a number of years.
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Two Come For O’Quinn Child

Mrs. LeRoy Myers come to Salmon on Wednesday from Emmett.

On the way to this city Mrs. Myers met the father of the late Jack O’Quinn who was coming to this city on the same mission that brought him here.

“My son and his wife died there not long ago,” Mr. O’Quinn was saying, “and I am going to take charge of a little two-year-old boy they left. My home is in Missouri.”

“Why,” Mrs. Myers rejoined, “I am going after that boy too, having been requested by his maternal grandparents to do so.”

And so it happened that little Pat O’Quinn found himself a child very much sought from having only strangers to look after him since the death of his parents in the flu attack in Salmon more than a month ago. Mr. O’Quinn, the paternal grandfather, and Mrs. Myers, who used to live near Salmon but now resides at Emmett where she knows the little fellow’s maternal grandparents, had come after the child. Mrs. Myers had known little Pat’s mother since early childhood.

Mr. O’Quinn offered an easy solution of the problem presented by saying that the child should be taken to Emmett and that both himself and Mrs. Myers should go along with him, the custody of the orphan to be determined after they got there. He said he had not been advised of the death of his son or of his wife until a postoffice report came to him from a parcels post shipment of Missouri syrup for his son and which the report said could not be delivered. The postmaster went on to tell of the calamity that had overtaken the family for whom the syrup had been intended as a Christmas present. The old gentleman lost no time in starting for Salmon. He found his little grandson a beautiful child, well cared for and now in good health, fully recovered from the same attack that had taken his parents. Since the child was bereft of parents he had been placed in the care of Mrs. M. C. Manfull, whose daughters and Miss LaRue Ramey had given all the attention that any boy could wish to have for his health and happiness.

His father belonged to the Salmon national forest forces.

A Change in Conditions.

A change in program came about this morning with the designation of the public administrator to look after the affairs of the estate in this county. County Treasurer Gailbreath will assume this duty as pertaining to his office. This change, after an administrator had already been appointed at Emmett, caused still another change with respect to the custody of the child, the grandfather having determined to leave for his Missouri home taking the baby with him on the next train out.

It will take some of the renowned wisdom of Solomon to settle all this controversy, if, as seems to be the case, there are contentions to arise as between the two sets of grandparents. In the first place it is claimed as a fact that the husband died first. If so then the heirs of the wife, who died afterward, would become the heirs of the estate without questions and entitled to its administration. And this, it would seem, according to legal opinion at this stage of the case, would carry with it the care and custody of the little boy, who would of course be the natural heir of all the estate as the only survivor of the family. The father it is said left liberty bonds and cash to the amount of about $1,000, besides other property.

source: The Idaho Recorder. (Salmon City, Idaho), 17 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Recorder. January 17, 1919, Page 5

Salmon Locals

Anton Bregvic has been appointed administrator for the two children of Joe Davis who died in Salmon last month. An insurance policy of $500 is favor of the children was the only estate left to the children.

John Michelson was a Salmon business visitor from Fourth of July on Tuesday, the first he has been able to make since an attack of the flu.

Mrs. LeRoy Myers, who came to Salmon from Emmett on Wednesday’s train, reports the recent severe illness of her husband from influenza which was developed soon after he arrived at their new home He recovered but had a close call.

Mrs. Alma Ashton is reported a sufferer from smallpox at her home east of this city, with one or two other patients in the same family afflicted. R. Hanmer, health officer, quarantined the house on Wednesday. He states that the cases are not serious at all.

The Malcom family on the upper Salmon river is afflicted with smallpox. Mrs. Malcom’s mother, Mrs. Webb, was called from Salmon to nurse her grandchildren through a case of flu, but found smallpox to be the affliction. The invalids are reported all recovering.

Supplies for many places throughout the country in the line of caskets have run short in the flu epidemic, it having been necessary for the undertakers to go back to their old custom of making these burial receptacles at home which after all are just as good for the dead if not so showy for the living.

The flagstaff over the Pioneer store has carried the colors at half-mast since the death of former President Theodore Roosevelt.

source: The Idaho Recorder. (Salmon City, Idaho), 17 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Recorder. January 17, 1919, Page 6

Portland Goes After Flu.

Portland, Jan. 11, – New stringent measures to combat the influenza were resorted to here yesterday as a result of a conference between representatives of the city, county and school board. A physician has been made director-general of the fight against the epidemic and has been given complete charge of operations. An emergency hospital has been opened and a call sent to the surgeon general in Washington for additional nurses. Quarantine regulations are being more strictly enforced.

source: The Idaho Recorder. (Salmon City, Idaho), 17 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Recorder. January 17, 1919, Page 7

In The Gem State

Managers or proprietors of five local pool halls at Nampa and the manager of the Majestic theatre were arrested last week for alleged violation of the resolution passed by the county board of health recently which ordered all public places, including pool halls and theatres, closed until January 6.

More than 10,000 men were furnished under the draft from Idaho during 1918.

The 1918 war efforts of the state, coupled with those of 1917, brought the number of men from Idaho who donned Uncle Sam’s uniform to more than 25,000.

A committee of 93 women of the state has been appointed by the National woman’s Suffrage association, for the purpose of seeing that the coming legislature ratified the federal suffrage amendment if it passes the United States senate this session of congress.
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Northwest Notes

Influenza caused 571 deaths in Seattle during the first eleven months of 1918, according to the annual report of the city health commissioner. Since the epidemic started 200,000 does of vaccine* have been given out by the city health department, the report showed.

The live stock sanitary board of Montana has put a quarantine on sheep from Idaho, where scabies is said to have appeared. Shipments in future will be permitted only under federal health certificates.

The Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers in Montana will ask the coming legislature to pass a bill compelling automobiles to stop at railroad crossings in an effort to reduce the number of accidents in this state.

A resolution memorializing congress to pass the Susan B. Anthony woman suffrage amendment to the federal constitution was adopted by both houses of the Colorado legislature.

[* Note: A good paper from Stanford University, “The Medical and Scientific Conceptions of Influenza” on the search for the cause and vaccine. (link)]

source: The Idaho Recorder. (Salmon City, Idaho), 17 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Montpelier Examiner. January 17, 1919, Page 1

19190117ME1

Commissioners Talk Over Health Conditions

After allowing claims against the county and disposing of some routine business, the county commissioners adjourned last Monday evening to meet again next Monday morning as a board of health and also to transact unfinished county business. Before adjourning, they held a conference with Supt. of Schools Spencer and County Physician King to discuss the health situation throughout the county and the advisability of re-opening the schools. Mr. Spencer stated that he had consulted with practically all of the school trustees and full three-fourths of them were opposed to opening the schools at present and some were opposed to opening again during the present school year. This question will be further considered by the board next Monday. …
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Gives Opinion of Interest to Teachers

Teachers in common school districts can collect their salaries for time lost during the influenza epidemic but independent school district teachers cannot collect if the trustees choose to terminate the teachers’ contracts and discharge them permanently by reason of the epidemic.

This is the gist of the first opinion rendered by the attorney general’s office under the new administration. The opinion was written in response to hundreds of requests for more light on the law, and was submitted Monday afternoon to Miss Ethel E. Redfield, state superintendent of public instruction.

What Statutes Provide.

After citing statutes regarding powers of the two kinds of districts to discharge teachers the opinion recites “that our supreme court held that trustees of any ordinary school district cannot discharge a teacher before the end of the term without giving him a reasonable hearing, and that such discharge when made must be founded upon neglect of duty or some cause that in the opinion of the board renders the services of the teachers unprofitable to the district.”

Regarding independent districts it is stated that the courts hold the board of trustees has unlimited and unrestricted power to dismiss either with or without notice to the teachers and the exercise of such discretion by the board is not subject to review or control by the courts.

May Discharge Teachers.

“It therefore follow,” states the opinion, “that so far as independent districts are concerned, if the board of trustees chooses to terminate the teachers’ contracts and discharge them permanently for the term by reason of the epidemic, they may do so.

“But, on the other hand, until such time as the contracts are finally terminated and discharged, the district would remain liable for the teachers’ agreed compensation in accordance with the contract, as until that time the teacher would remain to hold herself in readiness to perform her undischarged contract, if called upon.”

In common school districts “the matter becomes entirely a question of the construction of the particular contract the teacher and the district have made.”
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Mrs. J. Straubhaar Dies From Flu at Rupert.

Funeral services were held at the cemetery last Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock for Mrs. Jacob Straubhaar, who died from influenza at her home near Rupert on Jan. 9. … She was the mother of six children, four of whom survive her. Besides her children and husband, she is survived by one sister, Mrs. Ernest Sommers of this city, and four brothers – one residing at Rexburg, one at Otis, Colo., and two in this city – Ernest and Alfred Bloser.

At the time of her death, her husband was critically ill with the flu and several of the children had it in mild form. Word was received from Rupert this week to the effect that Mr. Straubhaar and the children were all doing nicely.

source: Montpelier Examiner. (Montpelier, Idaho), 17 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Montpelier Examiner. January 17, 1919, Page 4

[Editorial]

The Flu Situation.

The influenza situation in Montpelier today is not as good as it was a week ago. That is, there are a few more cases than there were last Friday, but the victims all have it in mild form. It begins to look as though we were going to have the flu with us for some time to come, and the fact that the number of cases have increased within the past week goes to show very plainly that a strict quarantine does not prevent the spread of the disease. This is further shown by the fact that in most of the cities where the quarantine has been lifted the disease has not spread in any greater degree than it has in the closed towns.

In Pocatello, where the picture shows and schools have been open for two weeks, the situation has improved to such an extent that the ban has been lifted from public and private dances and all lodges have been meeting for the past month. There is not a case in the Idaho Technical institute and the enrollment in the public schools is gradually increasing. At Rexburg, where the disease was as fully as bad as it has been here, the schools opened on Jan. 6, and the disease has not broken out again. At Evanston, Who., which was fairly alive with the flu, a short time ago, the schools have been open for some time, and we hear no more about the flu there. In Kemmerer, which had it in epidemic form, the schools and picture shows are open. In Salt Lake, where the schools have been open for two weeks, the situation is about the same as it was before they opened.

When you mention the opening of schools in Montpelier some people throw up their hands in holy horror. According to their ideas the school room is the hot bed for every disease germ known, while to our mind a properly heated and ventilated school room is about the last place disease germs would lodge, and that children are less liable to contract the flu there than they are in the average home.

While the flu has increased in some of the towns where the schools have opened, it has not been proven that the increase was due to the opening of the schools. The fact that 95 per cent or more of the victims in these towns have been adults goes to prove that the opening of the schools had little, if anything to do with the spread of the disease.

We would be the last person in Montpelier to advocate doing a thing which would result in the death of a person, especially a child, but we are honest in our belief that the situation here would be no worse with the schools open than it is at the present, and the children would be better off than they are roaming the streets. Of course we realize that our opinion doesn’t amount to much when weighed against the opinion of the learned gentlemen of the medical profession, but there is no ban against one expressing his opinion, so we have given ours, and we have the satisfaction of knowing there may be others who believe as we do.
— —

Tribute To Mrs. Howard Huff

Mrs. Freda Huff, nee Allenbeck, was born in Geneva, Idaho, Sept. 30, 1891, and departed this life on Thursday, Dec. 26, 1918, at 11 p.m., aged 27 years, 2 months and 26 days.

She was married to Howard Huff on Sept. 6, 1917.

Owing to the epidemic of influenza her funeral services were held at the cemetery in the presence of a congregation who had assembled to pay the last tribute of respect to her memory by taking part in this service for the departed, and in token of the pure soul that had taken its flight. …

The husband should be consoled with the thought that, “if she is not safe, who is?” … About six weeks prior to her death she had influenza, and it was in hopes that her health was improving, but for all her health gave away completely, and after one week later she breathed her last. Everything that medical skill and loving care could suggest was done to alleviate her suffering, to the hour when death released her. …

source: Montpelier Examiner. (Montpelier, Idaho), 17 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Montpelier Examiner. January 17, 1919, Page 5

Local News

The meeting which was held at the city hall last Monday night to discuss the feasibility of opening the public schools, was lightly attended. In fact, there were not to exceed 25 persons there who have children of school age. All of the school teachers who are in the city were present, but only two of them – Supt. Cummings and B. K. Farnsworth – expressed themselves on the question, which was discussed pro and con for two hours or more. While the preponderance of sentiment was against the opening of schools at present, it was also against the closing them for the balance of the school year.

Miss Laker went to Burley Monday to nurse Mrs. J. W. Stringer, who is ill with the flu. Mrs. Stringer is a sister of Jeff Davis of this city.

From the Salt Lake Tribune we learn of the death of Mrs. Willard Sargent, which occurred at Philadelphia on Jan. 11. Death was caused from influenza. The deceased was formerly Miss Sarah Hutteballe of Malad, and for a year was a teacher in the Fielding academy at Paris. [Idaho]

Mose Lewis, who was taken down with the flu in Salt Lake last week, is getting along nicely and will be able to leave the hospital in a day or two. However, he will not return home for a couple of weeks.

source: Montpelier Examiner. (Montpelier, Idaho), 17 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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North Side Primary School, Shoshone, Idaho ca. 1917 (1)

SchoolNorthSidePrimarySchoolShoshone1917Fritz-a

courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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The Caldwell Tribune. January 17, 1919, Page 2

19190117CT1

19190117CT4City and County Intelligence

Flu on Decrease.

“We had a lot of sickness this winter, more than in years, but the Flu is on the decrease now, and I believe the worst is over. Our schools are churches are now open but all places of amusement are closed. [Jordan Valley]

Notice.

There is urgent need for help with the sewing at the Red Cross rooms. During this time of quarantine the chairman of the sewing committee begs that women make a special effort to come to the rooms on Wednesdays and Fridays for work that can be taken home. headquarters is urging the need of haste with refugee garments as they must be sent before long to do any good this winter. The government is asking that more pajamas and convalescent robes be made for our wounded soldiers in the hospitals. Can you not come and help.

Henry Shaw Funeral Saturday.

Funeral services for Henry Shaw were held Saturday. Death resulted from Spanish influenza. Interment was at Canyon Hill cemetery. Deceased leaves a wife and seven children.

Death of Clifford Shaw.

Clifford Shaw, son of Mrs. Henry Shaw died Friday of Spanish influenza. The young man’s father had died a few days before of the same disease. Clifford Shaw was 16 years of age.

Card of Thanks.

We desire to thank the many friends and neighbors who assisted us after the death of our daughter and sister, Mrs. Mary Pearson, which occurred at Pocatello January 3rd. The many acts of thoughtfulness and kindness will always be remembered.

Mrs. E. B. Smith, Theodore Smith.
— —

New Officers Take Charge of Affairs
County Court House Sees Few Changes – Most County Officers Were Re-elected.

Monday the new county officers took charge of their offices at the court house with the exception of Mrs. Fern Hart, county treasurer. Mrs. Hart is very sick with influenza and was unable to take charge.
— —

19190117CT2Well Known Young Woman Laid to Rest Saturday
Mrs. A. C. Pearson, nee Mary Smith, Died of Influenza at Pocatello January 3rd.

Saturday occurred the funeral of Mrs. A. C. Pearson at Canyon Hill cemetery. Mrs. Pearson died at Pocatello, January 3rd from Spanish influenza.

Mrs. Pearson was the only daughter of Mrs. E. B. Smith of this city. She was living at Twin Falls but had gone to Pocatello for a short visit with her husband’s parents when she was stricken with the disease. …

Mrs. Pearson is survived by her husband, A. C. Pearson of Twin Falls by her mother, Mrs. E. B. Smith of Caldwell and by two brothers. …

source: The Caldwell Tribune. (Caldwell, Idaho), 17 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Caldwell Tribune. January 17, 1919, Page 3

Local and Personal

Mr. and Mrs. John Flynn were both sick the fore part of the week but are now much better.

R. B. Scatterday returned Monday from Pontiac, Illinois, where he was called by the death of his brother who died of Spanish influenza.

source: The Caldwell Tribune. (Caldwell, Idaho), 17 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Caldwell Tribune. January 17, 1919, Page 5

Marble Front Items

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Hodges and son Elmer are recovering from the influenza.

Mrs. G. W. Milliner went to Boise last week to visit friends and relatives and decided to remain and assist the Red Cross in nursing during the influenza epidemic.

Orval Whitney is reported ill with influenza at his father’s home in Middleton.

Ira Brinkley was very ill the first of the week but is reported better.

Mrs. S. H. Vassar spent last week with her mother, Mrs. Wilson of Maple Grove. Mrs. Wilson has been sick, but is better now.
— —

Middleton

The local schools will not open for another two weeks.

The youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. Carl Jarrett died at their home Monday about 5 p.m. The child had been sick for several weeks with influenza and had not recovered. The funeral was held at 1 p.m. Tuesday.

Walter Crockett is recovering from a siege of the Flu.

Mr. and Mrs. James King are able to be out again after a siege of the Flu.

Wm. Lemon is recovering from a siege of the Flu.
— —

Midway News

Miss Mildred Robinson is recovering nicely from the influenza.

Hy J. Davis, who was taken to a Boise hospital a week ago suffering from influenza, returned to his home Sunday.

Mrs. Frank Hoffman and little son Carl who have been seriously sick with influenza, are gaining rapidly.

Mr. and Mrs. Bright and two children who have been sick with influenza are slightly improved, Mr. Bright being seriously ill for several days.

Mr. and Mrs. J. F. Riskemire were callers at the L. A. Weymouth home in Franklin, Sunday evening, and found the sick very much improved.

Several persons in the community have taken the serum*** treatment to prevent influenza.

[***The serum was a “convalescent plasma”: blood plasma extracted from an animal or human patient who has “convalesced” or recovered from infection with a particular disease. (link)]
— —

[Boise]

The truth is out at last. Boise has been forced to take steps to suppress the Flu which has been raging in the capital city for months. The methods adopted at Boise truly reflect the spirit of that city. It is stated upon reliable authority that there are between 1000 and 2000 cases of Flu in Boise and vicinity.

source: The Caldwell Tribune. (Caldwell, Idaho), 17 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Caldwell Tribune. January 17, 1919, Page 6

19190117CT3Suggestions For Control of Influenza in Schools
Member of Board of Trustees Officers Suggestions That He Thinks Might Do Some Good.

The Tribune is in receipt of a communication from a member of the board of trustees of a Canyon county school district which offers suggestions for the control of the Flu. The communications follows:

1. Every individual or head of a family can be held strictly accountable to the authorities, under severe penalty, for the contraction and transmission of the disease.

2. The State Board of Health can make a complete system of rules and penalties to this end.

3. Counties can be organized by school districts – each to be platted into farms, with homes located; all homes to be numbered and separately listed with names and phone number and address.

4. The school teachers can be used as inspectors to give daily reports to a central county committee.

5. The sheriffs, deputies, and constables can enforce whatever is necessary.

Then, one can feel as safe at school as at a public sale, a store, show or dance; and more so than it is now.

If the schools are worth it, let the proper authorities get busy or else the schools may be forced to close for the balance of the year.

– A School Trustee.

source: The Caldwell Tribune. (Caldwell, Idaho), 17 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Caldwell Tribune. January 17, 1919, Page 8

Wilder

Miss Holdridge, eighth grade teacher in the Wilder public school, resigned Friday on account of her mother’s illness. Her position will be occupied by Miss McGee of Caldwell.

Mrs. Ernest Walker of Fargo is seriously ill with influenza.

The infant daughter of Rev. and Mrs. W. T. Hertzog, who has been quite ill, has almost entirely recovered.

Several Wilder friends attended the funeral of Mrs. Anna Evans who died January 3. The services were held at Fry & Summers undertaking parlors in Boise, January 7. Mrs. Evans was a former resident of Wilder and was well known in this community.
— —

Deer Flat

School opened in the new building Monday with a good attendance.

The old school building half a mile north of Huston and a strip of land on the north side of the school grounds will be sold at pubic auction Saturday afternoon.

No new Flu cases have been reported in this section for nearly two weeks.
— —

Brier Rose

Mrs. Christopher is substituting this week in the Washington school for one of the teachers who is ill.

The young son of Mr. and Mrs. Peach has the influenza.

Mrs. and Mrs. Ferguson are both sick with the influenza at the Lee Douglas home.

Milton Crew, who has been ill with influenza, is better.
— —

Roswell

Hollis Taylor, who suffered a relapse from influenza the latter part of the week, is again convalescing.

William Parsons, son of Mr. and Mrs. Dell Parsons, is very ill with influenza.

A call for canned goods for the Children’s Home at Boise has been received. Goods may be left at the home of Thomas Rooney.
— —

Ten Davis News

The school board met Saturday evening at the school house. It was decided that school would start January 20th, providing the teachers hired from the east got here by that time.

There are no cases of Flu in the district now.

source: The Caldwell Tribune. (Caldwell, Idaho), 17 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Caldwell Tribune. January 17, 1919, Page 10

Local and Personal

The funeral of Ritta Shaw, aged 7, was held Wednesday afternoon. The child was a victim of influenza and the third member of the family to die of the disease. Interment was at Canyon Hill cemetery.
— —

Arena Valley Items

Miss Mildred Owens has been on the sick list for the past week.

Little Miss Helen Lund and O. F. Packwood are both on the sick list at this writing.

source: The Caldwell Tribune. (Caldwell, Idaho), 17 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Republican. January 17, 1919, Page 1

19190117TIR1

19190117TIR2
New Famine In News Print
Foreign Countries Taking American Product, Influenza Taking Printers and Publishers
Newspapers Suspending

The coming of peace and the opening of world markets for print paper are bringing about conditions of famine in American paper markets, exactly the reverse of what was expected a few weeks ago when the warn industries board release publishers from the drastic rules covering print consumption.

Before the war, America imported a great deal of print paper, and during the war, we had to depend on American mills for the supply. There have been no new mills built, and only two have increased their capacity in ten years, and now the paper supply in America is only sufficient to last the American publishers six weeks, and England, France, Belgium, Italy and South American countries are bidding up in a desperate scramble to get paper, and ships to carry it to those countries. If it were not for the scarcity of ships, the paper supply in America would probably be wiped out before spring, and publishers who have no supply would be shipping it in by express from the mills to make connections quick enough to save them from suspension.

A Hazardous Enterprise

The conditions brought about in newpaperdom by the war and influenza, make the newspaper business one of the very hazardous enterprises. The casualty lists have cut down heavily upon the supply of skilled man power in the printing industries, and the epidemic is taking publishers in a way that is a source of continual surprise and alarm. The lists of deaths printed from week to week in such reports as the Publishers’ Auxiliary and other special compilations, and the growing lists of newspapers advertised for sale, show an almost panicky condition in that line. Printers and publishers are not trained and qualified in a day nor a year, and the available supply is going lower, while the price of their services is mounting higher. With a long paper famine in prospect, and a shortage of skilled workers to produce newspapers, men of national reputation writing on the subject predict sharp advances in the price of subscriptions and advertising and a decided thinning out of newspapers. …

Dubois Idaho Has Experience

The two newspapers at Dubois, Idaho, the Banner and the Enterprise, were rather hard hit by the recent influenza outbreak. Editor Button of the Enterprise and his family were laid up for about five weeks, and as help is scarce in that section Editor N. E. Reynolds of the Banner drafted a printer from the farm and got out both papers until the Enterprise man was able to get back to the office. As Editor Reynolds is also city clerk and police judge of Dubois, and had to attend to his official duties as well as look after the two newspapers, it is a safe bet he was a very busy man. The printer employed on the Banner was the only man to die in Dubois from the epidemic. Mr. Reynolds had only the assistance of the farmer-printer and his twelve year old daughter during the trying time, but weathered the storm and is still putting out an excellent newspaper.

(Continued on page eight.)
— —

Young Man Dies

Kieth Nelson, son of Mr. and Mrs. John Nelson of Sterling, died at the home of his parents, Monday, Jan. 13, after suffering with influenza. …

At the present time the father and a younger brother Park, are dangerously ill with the disease.
— —

Sad News

Monday morning E. N. Bingham of Groveland received a telegram advising him of the death of his brother Jesse Bingham. Mr. Bingham, who has been in the army service since last August, died Monday morning in a hospital at Portland, Ore.

Not long ago an injury in a government logging camp, necessitated his removal to the hospital. Where there he contracted influenza which caused his death.

Mr. Bingham leaves a wife, several brothers and sisters, besides many friends to morning his early demise. …

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 17 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Republican. January 17, 1919, Page 2

Idaho Budget

The domestic science rooms of the Gooding high school have been converted into a temporary hospital for influenza patients.

A serious outbreak of influenza among the horses owned by dry farmers of Bingham county was combated by the farm bureau and $17,000 was saved in actual horse value.

There are now thirty-eight cases of influenza at the penitentiary, only a few having developed in the past week. The sixth death from the disease occurred when Mike Penford, sent up from Bingham county for burglary, passed away.

Out of respect to the memory of the late Colonel Theodore Roosevelt, both houses of the legislature adjourned soon after organizing Monday noon until 10 o’clock Tuesday morning.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 17 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Republican. January 17, 1919, Page 3

School Board Met

The Blackfoot school board met in regular session at the First National Bank Monday evening, with all members present.

The unfinished business pertaining to the newly erected building on the high school grounds, was given attention. Reports to date concerning school attendance are indeed favorable. The grades, Monday averaged 65 per cent and the high school reported 95 per cent of the pupils in attendance. The opening of schools has in no way increased influenza cases thus far.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 17 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Republican. January 17, 1919, Page 5

Local News

Mrs. William Thompson has been on the sick list this week.

W. F. Martin is ill at the present writing and under the care of Dr. Patrie.

Mrs. C. J. Wright is reported in a serious condition with influenza at their home between the rivers.

C. G. Anderson, cashier of the Blackfoot City Bank, is still confined to his home after suffering with influenza.

The friends of Mrs. George Gagon will be pleased to know that she is improving from her recent illness. She is just now able to enjoy short walks these mild afternoons.

Mrs. D. W. McMillan was called to Shelley Thursday afternoon on account of the serious illness of her son D. H. E. McMillan, who is suffering with influenza.

Irwin Burt of Rupert passed thru Blackfoot early Wednesday morning on his way to Moore, where he was called on account of the death of his brother Fred Burt, who died Monday night as a result of influenza.

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Bonner and little son are suffering with influenza at the present time.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 17 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Republican. January 17, 1919, Page 6

Goshen

Herbert Monson, age twenty years son of Mr. and Mrs. George Monson, died Saturday morning at 8 o’clock after a short illness with the influenza. At this writing his father George Monson is very ill with the same disease.

A brief funeral service was conducted at the cemetery on Saturday, Jan. 11 by Bishop Peter Monson over the remains of Stella Olsen, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Chris Olsen, who died Friday, Jan. 10 with influenza.

Alfred and Sarah Peterson are sick with the influenza.
— —

Upper Presto

The Charles Lyon family of eleven members are all in bed with the flu. Miss Vilda Mecham is caring for them.

The family of George Monson of Goshen are seriously ill with influenza. Mr. Monson and son Herbert developed pneumonia. The son passed away Saturday morning. He was a young man of about twenty years of age and had a great many friends. He had made Goshen his home almost continuously. This death is mourned by a mother, father and two small sisters as well as many friends. The community sends their deepest sympathy to the grieved relatives. The father is very dangerously ill at this writing.

The family of Willis Higley are just recovering from the fly.

The eight month old baby of Chris Olsen of Goshen died Friday morning, after suffering with influenza. Mr. Olsen has been very ill with pneumonia and was just able to be around at the time of the death of their little one. The entire community extends deepest sympathy to the bereaved family.

John Tolmie has been suffering with qunzy.

The R. H. Teeples family are now able to be about their various duties since suffering with the flu.

The Frank Wilson family are recovering nicely from the flu. Mr. Wilson was quite ill.
— —

Rose

U. W. Taylor has been ill for a few days.
— —

Shelley

The flu situation here has not improved, but in fact, there are a few more cases and there is some talk of closing the schools again. If the schools are closed now they will remain closed the rest of the school year.

Are you doing all in your power to kill the influenza?

Mr. and Mrs. L. Ivan Jensen are ill with light cases of the flu.

N. N. Holm is up and around again after a slight attack of the flu.

Many people were in town last Saturday evening. Many attended the show and the pool halls were well patronized, but few persons attended the dance.

There has been more life in the town the last few weeks as many of the young fellows who left here months ago are back again having received their discharges from the service of the good old U.S.A.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 17 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Republican. January 17, 1919, Page 7

Influenza Quarantine Regulation

The board of county commissioners, sitting in their first regular meeting in January, 1919 as a county board of health, present; R. G. Bills, Chairman; M. A. Fugate, James Christensen, C. A. Hoover, secretary.

It appearing to the board that a certain dangerous, contagious and infectious disease, to wit: Spanish influenza, shows a tendency to become epidemic in the county of Bingham.

And it is further appearing to the board that all possible precautions should be immediately taken to curtail the spread of and to stamp out such contagious disease; and that if is mandatory that all churches be closed, and all meetings and public assemblages to be prohibited during the prevalence of such epidemic.

Now, therefore, in accordance with law, it is hereby ordered that thruout [sic] Bingham county, and every district and locality therein, all churches and theaters shall be closed and all meetings and public assemblages of any kind whatsoever are absolutely prohibited during the prevalence of such epidemic and until the rescission of this order.

It is further ordered, that all persons and places inhabited by any person or persons afflicted with such disease, shall be properly and strictly isolated and quarantined, and the persons so quarantined shall not leave such quarantined house or place without the written permission of the board of health.

It is furthered ordered, that all peace officers shall use all necessary means to enforce the provisions of this resolution for the prevention of said contagious or infectious disease.

It is further ordered that all persons violating this resolution will be dealt with in accordance with the law.

This resolution shall become effective immediately upon its approval by the state board of health, and shall remain in full force and effect until revoked by this board.

Attest: R. G. Bills, Chairman. C. A. Hoover, Secretary.
— —

Springfield

School opened again Monday with a good attendance.

H. K. Wiley was called home from his visit in Boise by the illness of the Taylor family all of whom were ill with the flu.

Ed Sommercorn is ill with influenza and Oscar Sommercorn is acting as nurse.

Charlie Thompson is ill with the flu.
— —

Kellogg Has The Flu

There are about 150 cases of influenza at Kellogg and they are all under tight quarantine. Reports indicate that the disease has taken a firm grip on that place and the nature is serious. All public gatherings and schools have been put under the ban by order of the board of health. No Gatherings of any nature in excess of six adults at any one place is permitted under penalty of arrest. Children of school age are confined to their homes.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 17 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Republican. January 17, 1919, Page 8

Thomas

School opened Monday with a very small attendance owing to the great number of flu cases, and the fear that other cases will occur if the children enter school.

Lee D. Murdock has gone to Idaho Falls to help nurse relatives who have influenza.

Mrs. Joseph Peterson who has pneumonia is still very ill, but is thought to be improving at this writing.

The children of Mrs. Julia Sproul are very ill with the influenza.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 17 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Meridian Times., January 17, 1919, Page 6

19190117MT1

In The Gem State

A strict quarantine is still maintained at the Idaho penitentiary and those who wish to visit the prison are asked to wait until notice of the lifting of the quarantine is given through the press.

The production of the mines of Idaho for the past year will show a decrease over that of the previous year, the shortage being attributed to the fact that miners were hard to get, many having been drafted or enlisted.

source: The Meridian Times. (Meridian, Idaho), 17 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Meridian Times., January 17, 1919, Page 8

Obituary

Death Last Saturday Of Mrs. Harvey Green

Mary Florence Peer, daughter of William H. and Mary A. Peer, was born in Clay Center, Kansas, March 28, 1886, and died at the home of her parents Saturday, January 11, 1919, age 32 years, 7 months and 13 days.

About ten days ago she was stricken with influenza, which developed into pneumonia.

She was married in the summer of 1905 to Frank Huish and to this union four children were born. March 31, 1918, she was again united in marriage to Harvey Green, and to this union a babe (one month old Friday) was born.

Mrs. Green leaves to mourn her loss, besides her husband and children, her parents, brothers and sisters and a host of friends. …
— —

Death of Mrs. Alesta Fay Geerhart

Mrs. Thomas Geerhart, age 22 years and 10 months, died of influenza Monday, January 13, 1919, at her home near Meridian. She was born March 14, 1896, in Putnam county, Missouri. She was married to Tom W. Geerhart, Nov. 23, 1916. A baby boy, born to them, died in March, of last year. …
— —

Mrs. Woodward, Formerly Della Nelson, Buried Here

The funeral of Mrs. Clinton B. Woodward, wife Clinton B. Woodward, of Vale, Oregon, was held Monday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the Meridian cemetery, where she was laid to rest. The service was conducted at the grave by Carman E. Mell, pastor of the Christian church here. She was born at Boise July 6, 1889, and died January 11, 1919, age 29 years.

The deceased was formerly Miss Della Elen Nelson, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Nelson, who live four miles west of Meridian. …

source: The Meridian Times. (Meridian, Idaho), 17 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Shoshone Journal. January 17, 1919, Page 1

19190117SJ1

19190117SJ2The Flu Situation

The flu situation in Lincoln country is at least no better than last week possibly worse, if possible. The new Board of County Commissioners has taken hold of the matter and arranged with the village authorities, the school boards and the Red Cross at Jerome, Dietrich and Richfield for a joint action in handling the epidemic. The Red cross to take full charge of the matter and the cost of administration to be divided equally among the four organizations.

The Board of Commissioners made a thorough canvass of the county and personally investigated the situation. They found cases of distress that shock an American community to know that such distress can exist in America and in our own neighborhood.

Strict quarantine regulations will be enforced. Arrangements have been made to supply FREE SERUM to all who need it and an active and earnest campaign is started to try if possible to master the situation.
— —

Dietrich

This has been a sad week for our little village. After congratulating ourselves that our affliction from the influenza had passed us with only light attacks, it struck again with a heavy hand.

The flu still holds its awful grip on this community. Mr. and Mrs. W. O. Hamilton and family of six children have been severely afflicted. Mrs. Hamilton, at this writing, is in a very critical condition, with but small hope of recovery.

Mr. and Mrs. W. O. Hamilton and all the large family of little children have all been sorely afflicted, but Thur. give more hopeful promise of recovery.

Mrs. W. O. Hamilton daughter of Freemont Dooley, died at noon Thursday after a long struggle with pneumonia following the influenza.

Mrs. Mustard was called to Kimama Wednesday to attend Miss Judy a former teacher here who is stricken with the influenza.

Mrs. O. E. Borden and Rupert have had a hard struggle with the influenza. Rupert has recovered and Mrs. Borden is improving.

Rupert Borden, who has been one of the afflicted of the Borden family, has so far recovered as to be able to resume his studies at the State Technical Institute at Pocatello.

The Dietrich Federal Loan Association held its annual meeting Tuesday. Owing to the prevalence of the flu the attendance was small and an adjournment was taken to Saturday.

Mrs. F. L. Palmer is at the hospital in Shoshone, under the care of Dr. Dill, with a severe case of the flu.

Guy Eddy who, with his wife, has been laid up with the flu is now at work again bailing hay.

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Oldenburg well known in this precinct as among the oldest settlers here, removed to Spirit Lake last spring where Henry engaged in the auto repair business. The sad news reached here that Mrs. Oldenberg died of pneumonia on Dec. 27th followed by her little daughter Ruth on the 28th. Mrs. Oldenberg was a most industrious wife and mother, well beloved and respected by all. Her untimely death leaves four other children, Gladys aged 12 years; Alice, 10; Willis 8; and a baby of two months, bright and interesting children who will sadly miss a fond mothers care.

On Monday morning the young wife of Church Smith, died at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Dooley leaving her baby boy who was born during her sickness. Interment was Tues. afternoon in the Shoshone cemetery.

J. E. Houston, wife and family have all been severely attacked, but now are getting better. Mr. Houston who has been confined to his home is now out again.

Mrs. J. P. Michel was another Mon. victim. She was the young wife of Jean P. Michel who came here about three years ago and worked industriously preparing the home to which he subsequently brought his bride from the coast, to pass away thus sadly. The remains were laid to rest Wednesday at Shoshone.

James Reed who came with a party of hay-bailers from Richfield occupying the Lachner house two miles south of town, was stricken with the influenza and died with pneumonia, Tuesday. His father has arrived from Utah whither his remains will be taken for burial.

Mrs. Axel Blomberg who was almost given up to die was reported better Thur.

Ed Miller’s family have been having a hard time with the disease but are now recovering.

Mrs. John I. Matson and the children have recovered from the disease and are about the usual duties again.

Christ Frees has been ill with the disease attended with pneumonia and grave fears were entertained for his recovery. Thursday he is reported improving and less fears are entertained.

source: Shoshone Journal. (Shoshone, Idaho), 17 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Shoshone Journal. January 17, 1919, Page 5

Local And Personal News

Free Flu Serum.

The Board of County Commissioners has arranged for 3000 doses of flu serum from the famous Mayo Brothers, at Rochester, Minn., to be distributed free, as needed to our citizens. The serum will arrive in a few days and the services of a nurse and physician will be supplied at each of the four centers Jerome, Dietrich, Richfield and Shoshone.

Miss Tress McMahon is recovering from the flu and has been removed to her home in Richfield where she will stay until she is able to go back into the school room again.

Mrs. W. Hall Horne is ill at the Dill hospital.

Miss Stella McFall has been engaged as the school nurse during the flu epidemic.

Walter Gwin who has been down with the flu is able to be back again at the Strockgrowers.

Mrs. Will Newman is on the sick list.

Mrs. Roy Gilbertson is substituting in the 1st and 2nd grades on the North side during the illness of Miss Tress McMahon.

Miss Lenora Noble went to Kimama Friday to assist with the care of her friend Miss Lena Judy who is seriously ill with the influenza. Miss Judy was removed to the hospital at Rupert.

Miss Fern Noble is ill with the flu at the Dill hospital.

Miss Margaret Lind, one of the teachers at Kimama died in the Rupert hospital last Saturday with the flu.

source: Shoshone Journal. (Shoshone, Idaho), 17 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Shoshone Journal. January 17, 1919, Page 7

Idaho State News

The basement of the school building at Wendell has been fitted up as a hospital for the care of influenza patients. The Red Cross is in charge.

Hereafter when influenza develops in a Boise family no one, not even the breadwinner, will be permitted to leave the house. This drastic action is regard to quarantine of influenza has been taken by the city board of health.

source: Shoshone Journal. (Shoshone, Idaho), 17 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., January 17, 1919, Page 1

19190117DSM1

19190117DSM2
To Give Health Board More Power
Legislature Takes Action To Safe Guard Health Of People Of Idaho

Boise — Centralization of power would be placed in the board of health of the state in a way which it has not before had by the passage of a bill introduced yesterday by the women members of the house.

The bill provides that when the board see danger from epidemics it may enact rules and regulations to be carried out by county officers.

Much conflict has existed during the influenza epidemic where county officers have made their own rules to handle local conditions and several instances are of record where cities or towns under quarantine have refused entry to board of health officials. The new bill gives the latter power to enter any city, town or building and provides a severe penalty for refusal to allow this action by those responsible.
— —

19190117DSM3
Rigid Quarantine Put On In Pullman
Homes Having Influenza To Be Closely Quarantined – All Meetings Stop

Pullman, Wash., Jan. 16. – Pullman again came under the influenza ban today when orders were issued by city Health Officer L. G. Kimzey closing theatres, churches, lodges and all public assemblies. The order does not include pool rooms and bowling alleys, but it is expected that these will be closed if spread of the disease continues. The epidemic is confined almost entirely to school children, although in a few instances entire families have been stricken with the disease. It is estimated that over 50 children are ill, and six teachers have fallen victims to the malady. All of the cases are mild.

All homes in which the disease appears are being quarantined, admittance being denied except to doctors and nurses. The gauze masks that featured the previous epidemic have not put in an appearance again, but many citizens are taking the serum treatment to ward off the disease.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 17 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., January 17, 1919, Page 2

19190117DSM4

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 17 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., January 17, 1919, Page 3

19181202DSM3
City News

The condition of Mrs. Jacob A. Hoke is much improved from a severe attack of influenza.

Dr. J. C. Wilk left Thursday for the coast to recuperate a month or more before resuming his practice in Moscow.

Judge Steele returned yesterday from Lewiston, where he held a short session of court.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 17 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Public School, Bonners Ferry, Idaho

SchoolPublicSchoolBonnersFerryFritz-a

courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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January 18

Evening Capital News., January 18, 1919, Page 2

19190118ECN1

19190118ECN3
Influenza Ban Is Lifted Noon Today
Movies, Pool Halls, Cigar Stores and Soft Drink Parlors Allowed to Resume Business; Non-Visiting Order Still in Effect

At 12 noon today, the quarantine on movies, pool halls, cigar stores and soft drink establishments, will be automatically lifted, and Boise folk will again be allowed to haunt their usual places of amusement, though the order forbidding families, friends and neighbors to visit each others homes will be continued in effect. At a meeting of the health board Friday, it was also decided that hospitals must observe the quarantine regulations the same as homes.

People who have important business to transact with “flu” patients such as drawing up wills, etc., will be permitted to visit them for a very short time upon securing a permit from the city health office. Coffins must be sealed over in the future, or glassed over, so that there will be no possibility of spreading the disease during funeral services.

For the benefit of the public, these sections of the quarantine order will continue in effect:

1. All persons are hereby forbidden to visit the home or premises occupied by another except in case of necessity from Saturday noon, January 18, to Thursday noon, January 23.

2. Children of one family are hereby prohibited from associating with or going to the home of another family from Saturday noon, January 18, to Thursday noon, January 23.

Rigid quarantine will be continued on all homes same as in the past which are afflicted with the disease, and people are cautioned against visiting homes in quarantine which have not been released.

Only five new cases were reported Friday, the decrease being due to the advent of warmer weather, according to the board of health.
— —

19190118ECN2

source: Evening Capital News. (Boise, Idaho), 18 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Evening Capital News., January 18, 1919, Page 3

19190118ECN4Week’s News of the Boise Churches

Catholic.

The tea for the benefit of the Altar fund, which was to have been given on Wednesday last, has been postponed to a later date, of which due notice will be given through the press.

On account of the influenza quarantine the Red Cross unit did not meet to do sewing this week. Plans for next week’s activities will be announced later.

Unless the influenza quarantine prohibit the holding of meetings, the regular meeting of the Knights of Columbus will be held in St. John’s hall Tuesday, Jan. 21. A good program will be presented. The influenza relief committee of the Boise council has at its disposal the services of a competent physician who will answer all calls from influenza patients, regardless of church affiliation, without charge. This physician may be reached by calling the Grand Knight of the council, phone 972, or through Captain Barnes of the Salvation army.
— —

Wright Congregational.

Wright, closed practically since Oct. 7, will resume services Jan. 19. Superintendent J. E. Ingham will conduct services. …
— —

First Presbyterian.

Since the influenza ban has been lifted and the public schools are to resume regular work the 20th, we trust that next Sabbath, the 26th, will find a full attendance at all of our services, both morning and evening, especially the Sabbath school at 10 a.m., let every superintendent, teacher and student plan to be on hand on time, with a smile and ready to resume active, earnest, aggressive work and don’t forget the prayer-meeting on Thursday evening…

Because the influenza has prevented local campaigns, the period for securing the New Era magazine at the introductory rates has been extended to February 1…
— —

Idaho State Sunday School Association Notes.

Suggestions for opening services:

Don’ts.

Don’t always begin with a song.
Don’t talk or sing across empty seats.
Don’t hold an opening service longer than 20 minutes.
Don’t wait on anybody or anything any time.
Don’t do anything to merely occupy time.
Don’t yell or ring a bell.
Don’t make a speech except once in a year or two.
Don’t allow late comers to sit down during any part of service.
Don’t scold, find fault or frown.
Don’t think shouting is singing.
Don’t leave platform during opening service.
Don’t allow running around in room. …

During the period when children under 15 are not allowed in Sunday school, the Baptist school has held a training class of all teachers of the elementary classes. During this time they have taken up plans for making their work better. …
— —

Christian.

All the regular services this week. …

All mid-week services as usual.

The Boy Scouts will resume meetings this week.

In spite of the handicap by the “flu” we are growing in numbers. We have had additions every Lord’s day since the ban was lifted. …
— —

Nazarene Church.

All departments of this church will be active from now on unless further closing order may be put on. The Sunday school has suffered much from recent bans and scares due to “flu” conditions, but it is hoped the high point has been reached in the epidemic and things in general may come back to normal. Let each scholar be present Sunday and secure their new literature for the quarter.
— —

Katherine Baptist Mission.

No Sunday school today.

It is requested that all the teachers get in touch with each member of their class during the coming week, that we may have a full attendance of all classes next Sunday.

With the understanding that the ban will be lifted at noon Saturday, Jan. 18, we will hold our young people’s meeting as usual tonight at 6:45.
— —

St. Michael’s Cathedral.

The services Sunday, Jan. 19, will be at the usual hours…

Our Sunday school scholars are rapidly coming back to their work, and the dean would urge upon every teacher the necessity of being there promptly to welcome the children and conduct the class. …

The ladies of St. Michael’s have been doing noble work this past week in making garments, bandages, pneumonia jackets, hotwater bottle covers, etc., etc., for St. Luke’s hospital. …
— —

Collister M. E. Church.

We have resumed our regular services at this church and cordially invite the public to attend. …
— —

Second Presbyterian.

Attendance at Sunday school is making a steady gain. It is hoped that it will soon be normal again.
— —

First Methodist.

We return to full service Sunday. The Sunday school will meet at 10 a.m. …

source: Evening Capital News. (Boise, Idaho), 18 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Evening Capital News., January 18, 1919, Page 5

19190118ECN5Little News of Boise

Barber Shops Close Early.

Beginning tonight all barber shops in Boise close at 9 o’clock on Saturday night and at 6 o’clock during other nights of the week.

Will Resume Services.

Rev. David H. Jones announces that he will resume services Sunday in Christ and Grace episcopal churches. …

Called By Illness.

Charles Zabala arrived in the city Friday, being called here by the illness of his wife. Mrs. Zabala had been called to Boise by the sickness of her brother, and was suddenly taken ill herself.
— —

Deaths – Funerals

Foster – Charles J. Foster, aged 38 years died Friday evening of pneumonia following influenza at his home near Morris Hill cemetery. His survived by his wife, four small sons and a daughter three days old, his mother, Mrs. Ruffner of Vancouver, Wash., four sisters and one brother. The body is at the Fry & Summers chapel awaiting word from relatives before funeral arrangement are made.
— —

Card of Thanks

We wish to thank the many friends and acquaintances and especially the Red Cross for the kindness and sympathy shown us, and for the floral offerings, during our recent bereavement in the death of our beloved husband, A. L. Perman and daughter and sister, Eunice Perman.

Mrs. H. L. Perman and children, J. H. Foster and Family.
— —

Middleton

Wm. Lemon, the local postmaster, and editor, is able to be out again after several weeks’ illness with influenza.
— —

Caldwell.

John Flynn, of the Flynn Grocery company, who has the pneumonia is reported to be improving.
— —

[Emmett]

“Flu” Ban Till Feb. 1.

At a meeting last night of the Gem county heath board, the city health board and the school board, it was decided to keep the “flu” ban on in Emmett till Feb. 1. The “flu” is being brought under splendid control here. Last week 67 homes were quarantined and now only seven families are quarantined.

source: Evening Capital News. (Boise, Idaho), 18 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., January 18, 1919, Page 1

19190118DSM1

19190118DSM2
Influenza Seems To Have Abated
All Grade Schools Open Tuesday Morning Because No New Cases Reported

There will be school in all grades in the city on Tuesday morning.

This decision so momentous to hundreds of boys and girls in Moscow was reached last evening at a meeting of the school board, together with city Health Officer Dr. W. A. Adair and Dr. Boyd of the health committee of the city council.

Upon the statement of Dr. Adair that no new cases of influenza had been reported to him during the week and that there were only three homes in the city in which previously mentioned cases were still on record, the board voted to open all the school rooms, exercising every possible precaution to prevent a new outbreak of the disease.

All rules and restrictions with reference to public assemblages are to be enforced until it is ascertained what the results will be of opening school to all the little children.

No pupils of the district are to be permitted to attend public gatherings of any kind.

The board wishes, through the columns of the Star-Mirror, to request parents of school children to observe the health of their children carefully, especially of the smallest ones, and to keep them home from school if they show even the slightest indisposition.

The members carried on an interesting discussion as to whether it would be advisable to complete the full year’s work in the grades. Superintendent Rich explained that by keeping up the sessions until July 1, the assigned work for the nine months could be completed. The matter of lengthening the school day and increasing the number of session by holding school on Saturdays was also considered. No definite action was taken in regard to either measure. The board is very desirous of hearing and expression of opinion on the part of the patrons of the school, as to whether it would be desirable to hold school on Saturdays or begin earlier each day in the week.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 18 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., January 18, 1919, Page 3

19181202DSM3
City News

Hallie Reitze, who has recovered from a severe attack of influenza, left today for his work on Potlatch ridge.

Mrs. Anna Colby returned Thursday from Palouse, where she had been doing nursing for some time.
— —

Death of Former Genesee Man.

Mrs. Wes Dorchester of Wetaskiwin, Alta., Canada, has written relatives here of the accidental death near there of Martin Embertson, who formerly resided north of Genesee, where he homesteaded in early days.

Mrs. Dorchester wrote that they had been suffering with a real epidemic of flu in that part of Canada and that help was very hard to obtain. Mr. Embertson’s family were all ill of the flu and he started alone in his automobile, one afternoon recently, for Wetaskiwin for help. Having gone part of the distance to town something went wrong with this automobile and he got down under the car to try and fix it, when it is supposed the car started and ran over him injuring him internally. He was not discovered and laid there until the next day about noon, when he was found and a hurried trip was started to the hospital at Wetaskiwin, but he died on the way, death being due to his injuries an exposure. He leaves a wife and family. …
— —

No Flu in Kendrick.

There have been no new cases of flu in Kendrick for some time and the few who are still confined to the house with the disease are past the stage where any danger of contagion exists. Conditions at present look very favorable in town, although there are a large number of cases in the territory tributary, as nearly all of the ridges have a number of cases, some of them quite serious. – Kendrick Gazette.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 18 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., January 18, 1919, Page 4

19190118DSM3
Pay Can Be Withheld
Independent Districts Need Not Lose Money Through Influenza.

Teachers in common school districts can collect their salaries for time lost during the influenza epidemic, but independent school district teachers cannot collect if the trustees choose to terminate the teachers’ contracts and discharge them permanently by reason of the epidemic.

This is the gist of the first opinion rendered by the attorney general’s office under the new administration. The opinion was written in response to hundreds of requests for more light on the law, and was submitted Monday afternoon to Miss Ethel E. Redfield, state superintendent of public instruction. – Boise Statesman.
— —

Potlatch Schools Open January 27.

Potlatch. – Announcement was made by Supt. Alice Lancaster that the Potlatch schools would not be reopened until Monday, January 27th instead of this coming week on account of the epidemic still prevailing in the city and immediate vicinity. However those wishing to take the regular eighth grade examinations for the purpose of making up back grades, may do so at Princeton in the following subjects only: Wednesday morning, geography; Wednesday afternoon, physiology, and Thursday morning, United States history.
— —

Red Cross in Boise.

It is now planned by the Red Cross to have a worker in each block in the city whose duty it will be to visit the homes in that block each day and make a report to the home service section of the Red Cross telling of any families which have been found in need of assistance. – Boise Statesman.
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19190118DSM4

[** Many vaccines were developed and used during the 1918–1919 pandemic. The medical literature was full of contradictory claims of their success; there was apparently no consensus on how to judge the reported results of these vaccine trials. (link)]

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 18 Jan. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
——————

Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 1)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 2)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 3)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 4)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 5)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 6)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 7)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 8)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 9)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 10)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 11)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 12)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 13)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 14)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 15)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 16)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 17)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 18)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 19)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 20)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 21)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 22)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 23)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 24)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 25)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 26)