Monthly Archives: December 2020

Road Reports Dec 30, 2020

Please share road reports. Conditions change quickly this time of year. Be prepared for rocks and trees in the road, and deep snow in higher elevation. Remember there is no cell phone service.

Yellow Pine: Dec 30 we have an average of 9″ of snow on the ground. Local streets are snow covered. Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN.
“Drivers don’t speed through neighborhoods or most anywhere. Locals brake for kids, wandering dogs, deer, elk, moose, fox, beaver, squirrels and chipmunks. Most are lifetime members of SPLAT, the Society to Prevent Little Animal Tragedies.” – IME
link: Local Forecast
Yellow Pine Webcam: (check date on image)

Highway 55 Webcams Link:
No Winter construction – All lanes open

Warm Lake Highway: Open
No current report
link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

South Fork Road: Open
Road conditions Dec 23: Milepost 18 on South fork has interesting ice on the river. There are holes in the ice showing the water about three feet below. Two ice flows on the road just downstream from Krassel; they’ll be nasty later as they sloped down to the river. Off and on sections of deep ruts from Goat Creek to Penny Springs. Best driving time is early morning when it’s frozen. Will be nasty if we get our usual thaw in January. Headlights on makes you more visible. -SL
Report Saturday (Dec 26) vehicle slid off the road in the Jakie Creek area. There is ice under the snow.
Wednesday (Dec 30) report from mail truck driver (Ray) says the road was plowed yesterday (Tuesday?)
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Open
Wednesday (Dec 30) Ray did not mention any problems today.
Road Conditions Dec 23: Rocks breaking loose and falling on East Fork, but a good frozen floor.
Johnson Creek Road: Deep snow at Landmark. No current report. Not recommended for wheeled traffic.
link: Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam
link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
Note: The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Not recommended for wheeled traffic.
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Not recommended for wheeled traffic. No current report.
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcam: (check date on image)

Video report courtesy SA

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open.
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Not recommended for wheeled traffic. No current report.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Not recommended for wheeled traffic. No current report.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: Not recommended for wheeled traffic. No current report.
Note: The approx. elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′

New Link
Valley County Road Maintenance Dashboard
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Winter Weather Advisory Dec 30, 8am to Dec 31, 2am

Winter Weather Advisory Dec 30, 8am to Dec 31, 2am

Dec 30 morning snow totals:
Yellow Pine = 9″
Big Creek Summit = 39″
Deadwood Summit = 49″

Yellow Pine Forecast

Today Snow, mainly after 11am. High near 32. West wind 3 to 5 mph. Chance of precipitation is 80%. Total daytime snow accumulation of less than one inch possible.

Tonight Snow. Low around 24. Light and variable wind. Chance of precipitation is 80%. New snow accumulation of 1 to 2 inches possible.

Thursday A 50 percent chance of snow. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 35. Light west southwest wind. New snow accumulation of less than a half inch possible.

Thursday Night Mostly cloudy, with a low around 20. Calm wind.

Winter Weather Advisory

URGENT - WINTER WEATHER MESSAGE
National Weather Service Boise ID
230 AM MST Wed Dec 30 2020

West Central Mountains-Upper Weiser River-Baker County-
230 AM MST Wed Dec 30 2020 /130 AM PST Wed Dec 30 2020/

...WINTER WEATHER ADVISORY IN EFFECT FROM 8 AM MST /7 AM PST/
THIS MORNING TO 2 AM MST /1 AM PST/ THURSDAY...

* WHAT...Snow expected. Total snow accumulations of 1 to 3 inches
  in the valleys, and 3 to 6 inches in the mountains.

* WHERE...In Oregon, Baker County zone. In Idaho, West Central
  Mountains and Upper Weiser River zones.

* WHEN...From 8 AM MST /7 AM PST/ this morning to 2 AM MST /1 AM
  PST/ Thursday.

* IMPACTS...Plan on slippery road conditions.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...

Slow down and use caution while traveling.

The latest road conditions can be obtained by calling 5 1 1.

Dec 27, 2020 The Yellow Pine Times

Dec 27, 2020 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Reminder: We are still under a boil water order until further notice.

Community Calendar:

Apr 17 – Boil water order issued
Aug 11 – Valley County Mask Order
(details below)
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From Valley County

Valley County Mask-Up
A county-wide mask mandate was approved the CDH August 11th, and is now in effect for Valley County. (link)

Rebound – Idaho Governor’s phasing program
link:

COVID 19: Recommendations and Resources for Safe Business Practices
link: (lots of info for businesses)
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Local Events:

Potluck December 25

At 3pm Christmas Day, locals gathered in the Community Hall for the holiday potluck dinner.

20201225XmasPotLuck-a
courtesy DF
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Village News:

South Fork Slide-Off

A 2nd hand report Saturday (Dec 26) that someone slid off the South Fork road in the Jakie Creek area. Fortunately another traveler came along and was able to pull them out. I was asked to pass along a reminder to SLOW DOWN on back country roads!
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Riding into Big Creek last weekend

20201223BigCreekRide1-a
Chris & Lois

20201223BigCreekRide2-a
courtesy Scott Amos

video link:

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Yellow Pine General Store

Please welcome Josh Jones as the new owner of the Yellow Pine General Store.
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Boil Water Order issued April 17 still in effect.

Update Nov 29: Warren replaced the water meter because of inconsistent readings. With the new meter, the community is currently using over 55,000 gallons of water per day. A leak has been identified and will be repaired as soon as we can coordinate the contractor, equipment needed and weather together. It is difficult to get everything planned in the winter. When the repair is scheduled, the community will have a few days notice before the water is shut down. Since we are using more water than the rated use through the sand filters, the boil order will remain in effect. We continue the grant request process that is extremely slow. – Steve H

Update Nov 25: the boil order is still in effect due to the large quantity of water that is leaking from the system. – Warren D

Update July 5: the boil order is in effect due to extremely high use due to leaks.

Update June 12: The boil order is still on. We still are experiencing excessive water use because of leaks. Not sure when this will be lifted. We are applying for grants to repair the system.

Update June 2: The water plant is experiencing high water in Boulder Creek which brings more debris into the sand filter.

The high demand caused by leaks in the system plugs the sand filters prematurely. We will be on a boil order until further notice.
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Critters

Be Fox Aware

* Do not feed foxes human food
* Feed domestic pets indoors
* Make sure your pets are updated on Rabies vaccines
* Small pets could become a snack

Be Mountain Lion Aware

* NEVER run away from a mountain lion. The lion’s instinct is to chase and ultimately catch what they perceive as potential prey.
* NEVER turn your back on a lion. Always face them while making yourself look as large as you can. Yell loudly, but don’t scream. A high-pitched scream may mimic the sound of a wounded animal.
* SLOWLY back away while maintaining eye contact with the lion.
* Safety equipment you may choose to carry could include bear spray, a noise device, like an air-horn, and if you walk in the dark, a very bright flashlight.
* If you are attacked, fight back!
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Road Reports

Link: to current road reports.
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Yellow Pine US Mail

The 3-day a week mail delivery started Nov 2nd. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 55 cents. Support our local post office and purchase your holiday stamps here.
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Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Update Dec 15: The Boise NF burned the pile and there was still room in the dumpsters.

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

20190429Dump2-bYellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is located approximately 3 miles south on Johnson Creek Road.

The TRANSFER STATION is for household trash and yard waste:
* Household trash must be put inside (and fit) the dumpster;
* Yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, etc.) goes in the burn pile on the south end of the turn-around;
* Cardboard boxes should be flattened before putting the in the dumpster,

The DUMPSTERS are NOT for:
* Furniture (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station).

The BURN PILE is NOT for:
* Cardboard boxes (flatten and put in dumpster);
* Furniture and appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Drywall and building material (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wire or fencing (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Foam Rubber (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wood with metal (like nails) attached (take to Donnelly Transfer Station.)

When closing the DOORS on the front of the dumpsters:
* Make sure the “U” brackets at the top and bottom of the door are engaged;
* The retaining bar at the middle of the door is slid into the pipe;
* And the “L” bars at the bottom of the doors dropped into place.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: 208/634-7176
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Local Groups

YPWUA News:

The annual Water meeting for 2020 was held July 5th at the Community Hall 2pm.
link: minutes 20200705YPWUA.docx

Boil Water Order issued April 17, 2020. This could last until leaks are repaired.

Boil Water Advisory Notice

Boil Your Water Before Using

Bring tap water to a rolling boil, boil for one minute, and cool before using or use bottled water. Boiled or bottled water should be used for drinking, making ice, washing dishes, brushing teeth, and preparing food until further notice.

This Boil Water Advisory Notice applies to The Yellow Pine Water System

The system is being monitored and checked daily for compliance.

You will be informed when you no longer need to boil your water.

Please share this information with other people who drink this water, especially anyone who may not get this notice directly (for example, people in apartments, nursing homes, schools, and businesses).

You can do this by posting this notice in a public place or distributing copies by hand or mail.

State Water System ID#: 4430059 Date distributed: 3-22-2020

Notice of Intent to File an Application with USDA, Rural Development

The Yellow Pine Water Users Association, Yellow Pine, Idaho intends to file an Application with USDA, Rural Development to obtain a drinking water system facility Emergency Community Water Assistance Grant (ECWAG). Emergency Community Water Assistance Grant (ECWAG).

If any additional information is needed, please contact:
Willie Sullivan
Treasurer
ypwater @ gmail.com

Distributed to Yellow Pine Water Users Association customers via Yellow Pine Times on June 12, 2020.

The 2019 Yellow Pine Water Users Shareholders meeting was Sunday July 7, 2019.
link: 20190707YPWUAminutes
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VYPA News:

The Community Hall toilet is functional! It was christened at the Thanksgiving Potluck. Many hands were involved over the last three months to get this far. The goal is to have it completely finished by Christmas. Thanks to everyone who was able to lend a hand or give advice. Couldn’t have done it without you.

Minutes from September 12 VYPA meeting
link:

Minutes from August 8, 2020 VYPA meeting
link:

Minutes from July 11, 2020 VYPA meeting
link:

Minutes from June 13, 2020 VYPA meeting
link:

VYPA Bylaws adopted 8/8/2020 (link)

YPAC Corp Bylaws (link)
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YPFD News:

After Action Report meeting Oct 13, 2020 (no minutes yet.)

YPFD had a budget meeting on September 30th at 10am at the fire station. (No minutes yet.)

Make sure to clean and check chimney fitting before starting that first fall fire in your cabin. Cleaning brushes can be borrowed from the YPFD.

There was a YP Fire Commissioner meeting on June 27, 2020 at 10am at the Fire Station.
Link: 20200627 Fire Dept minutes June 27

YPFD COVID19 Policy

link: YPFD Covid 19 SOP

link: Covid-19 EMS (May 23)

Pile burning: Dress appropriately, have enough help on hand (people, water and tools) and make a firebreak before you start. Call your local fire protection district chief to let them know you’ll be conducting a debris burn. This saves them from sending emergency responders to your property if they are not needed. Do NOT burn on breezy afternoons.

Better yet, “Bring It, Don’t Burn It”, you can take your yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, etc.) to the burn pile at the Transfer Station on the south end of the turn-around. Remember, keep the pile neat. Woody debris only, no nails, no cardboard and no furniture! The Boise NF will burn the pile in the fall when it is safe and doesn’t pollute our fine YP air.

YP Fire Commissioners:
Sue Holloway – District 1
Dan Stiff – District 2
Merrill Saleen – District 3
(TBA) – Fire Chief

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice

The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.” Click the link: to view 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation
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Biz Listings:

The Corner (208) 633-3325

Starting Nov 3rd open 3 days a week on mail days.
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Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233

Winter Closure: November 14, 2020 to April 16, 2021
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Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377

Closed Nov 3rd for winter.
— — — —

Yellow Pine General Store (208) 633-3300

Closed Nov 3rd for winter.
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Murph’s RV Park & Mary’s Cabins
FB page link
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Knotty Kat Crochet Works – 208-502-0940
FB page link
open Tue – Sat, 9-5
Yellow Pine eggs $3/doz
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Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Tom & Sarah Lanham
156 Yellow Pine Ave, Yellow Pine Id 83677
website:
Facebook:
Starting June 2020 We will be doing trail rides out of Yellow Pine along with summer pack / camping trips to high mountain lakes in the area!

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
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Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430 open 830am-5pm Monday-Friday, closed weekends.
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Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

The Star-News

click to subscribe:
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine

Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, will service Yellow Pine

B&T Safety Solutions LLC
208-271-1600 Based out of Donnelly
Snow removal, cleaning chimneys and stoves, we do cabin staining/chinking as well
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (Dec 21) yesterday and last night’s rain total was 0.33″, overnight low of 32 degrees, this morning low overcast and light fog obscured the sunrise (it was after 1030am.) The rain didn’t melt much snow, average of 6″ on the ground. Water on top of ice on the paths. Nuthatches, hairy woodpecker, jays, flicker and a pine squirrel visiting. Overcast and foggy towards the river at lunch time, high of 47 degrees. Mail truck was a little late coming in. Breaks in the clouds and bits of sunshine early afternoon. Partly clear and a bit breezy at sunset (before 315pm.) Above freezing and partly cloudy at dusk. By the time it was dark the Great Conjunction was already below the horizon. Breezy after midnight. Windy after 2am (Stibnite recorded 33mph gust at 305am.) Rain then snow during the night/early morning.

Tuesday (Dec 22) overnight low of 23 degrees, an inch of new snow (rain+snow = 0.14″) and 7″ total snow on the ground. Low overcast sitting down on VanMeter hill, flaking snow and light breeze this morning. Lots of birds this morning: Red-breasted nuthatch, Mtn. chickadee, dark-eyed juncos, downy and 2 hairy woodpeckers, jays and flicker visiting, along with a crazy pine squirrel. Steady light snow right after lunch time, high of 27 degrees. Snowed on and off until about a half hour before sundown, mostly clear and cold breezes by sunset. Another snow flurry (half cloudy half clear) just after 4pm. Mostly cloudy at dusk. Cloudy before midnight. Clearing during the night and cold.

Wednesday (Dec 23) overnight low of 6 degrees, measured a scant 1/4″ of snow from yesterday’s flurries (SWE=0.01″) and 6″ of snow on the ground. Sunrise approx 1045am. Lots of bird activity this morning, flicker, chickadees, dark-eyed juncos, red-breasted nuthatches, hairy woodpecker and jays, pine squirrel chasing birds. Clear and cold at lunch time, high of 29 degrees. Mail truck was just a little bit late. Sun set behind the ridge at 315pm and partly cloudy. Dropping into the teens by dusk and partly cloudy. Partly clear before midnight, waxing moon casting shadows.

Thursday (Dec 24) overnight low of 5 degrees, clear sky this morning, estimate 6″ of snow on the ground. Pine squirrel, jays and red-breasted nuthatches visiting. Clear and cold at lunch time, high of 34 degrees. Hairy woodpecker stopped by. Sun slipped behind the ridge at 319pm and mostly hazy. Female downy woodpecker stopped by. It was 20 degrees at dusk. Looked mostly cloudy before midnight.

Friday (Dec 25) 24 hour low of 8 degrees from Thurs morning, mostly hazy sky this morning and 15 degrees before sunrise, an average of 6″ of old snow on the ground. Northern flicker, dark-eyed juncos, female downy and both male and female hairy woodpeckers, red-breasted nuthatches, mountain chickadees, jays and the pine squirrel feasting at the feeders. Quiet morning a person walking dogs in the forest. Blue sky to the north and cloudy to the south at lunch time, icicles dripping, high of 40 degrees. Dark clouds and blustery before sunset. Gusty, overcast and starting to snow at dusk. Fat trace before midnight. More snow during the night and early morning.

Saturday (Dec 26) 24 hour low of 15 degrees from Fri morning, low overcast – foggy ridge tops, 2 1/2″ new snow and 8″ total snow on the ground. Light snow falling before 11am. Lots of birds: Clark’s nutcracker, northern flicker, 2 hairy woodpeckers, several jays, red-breasted nuthatches, dark-eyed juncos and the silly pine squirrel. Socked in nearly to the valley floor at lunch time, stopped snowing (no accumulation), high of 35 degrees. Just after sunset low overcast, occasional flake and almost misting, very humid. Snowing lightly at dusk. Not snowing and higher clouds before midnight.

Sunday (Dec 27) overnight low of 10 degrees, a trace of new snow from last evening and 8″ total snow on the ground, clear sky this morning and frosty. Chickadee calling, flicker, jays, nuthatches, hairy and downy woodpeckers, dark eye-juncos and pine squirrel visiting. Sunny and clear at lunch time, high of 32 degrees. Partly cloudy before sunset, “mare’s tails” coming from the southwest. Looked mostly clear at dusk, bright waxing moon up over the ridge to the north of Golden Gate peak.
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Idaho News:

1,248 new Idaho COVID-19 cases, 25 new deaths

Dec 24, 2020 Local News 8

Idaho officials reported 1,248 new COVID-19 cases and 25 new deaths on Thursday.

That brings the total confirmed and probable cases reported since March to 135,233.

There are a total of 112,397 confirmed cases and 22,836 probable cases in all 44 of the 44 counties in Idaho, according to numbers released from the local health districts and the state. …

25 new deaths were reported bringing the total recorded deaths to 1,349.

full story:
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Idaho Dec 19th Hospitalizations and ICU


source: KTVB
— — — — — — — — — —

Third death from COVID-19 reported in Valley County

By Tom Grote for The Star-News Dec 24, 2020

A third death from COVID-19 in Valley County was reported by Central District Health this week.

The third death was a woman over 60, a health district spokesperson said. No other details were released.

The total number of positive COVID-19 cases in Valley County since the start of the pandemic surged to 440 cases by Tuesday, up 84 cases from 356 a week ago, health officials said.

St. Luke’s McCall on Tuesday reported 357 total positive cases from testing done at the hospital, up 82 cases from 275 a week ago.

Cascade Medical Center reported 83 positive cases through Tuesday, or two more than the 81 cases reported last week.

Central District Health reported 322 of the positive cases were confirmed to be Valley County residents as of Tuesday, which is 49 more than the 273 cases reported a week ago.

The difference between the hospital figures and the health department figures are those who tested positive but did not declare Valley County as their residence.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Hospital workers get COVID-19 vaccine

More doses on the way for St. Luke’s, CMC

By Tom Grote for The Star-News Dec 24, 2020

Health-care workers at St. Luke’s McCall and Cascade Medical Center this week received vaccines to guard against catching COVID-19.

Workers at St. Luke’s McCall received the vaccine on Wednesday, St. Luke’s McCall Chief Operating Officer and Chief Nursing Officer Amber Green said. The number of employees receiving the vaccine was not available.

“For the first time since COVID-19 hit Idaho in March, we are all excited that there is now a light at the end of the tunnel,” Green said.

About 100 of the more than 300 total employees at St. Luke’s McCall are eligible for the first rounds of the vaccine under the state’s priority plan, Green said.

They include providers, nurses, respiratory therapists, emergency transport, medical assistants, environmental linen services, home care and hospice employees, all of who have exposure to patients with COVID-19, she said.

“We are already receiving more than initially planned and are scheduling more appointments as McCall’s allocation increases,” Green said.

All St. Luke’s McCall employees who have the greatest risk of exposure to COVID-19 and choose to receive the vaccine will likely get their first shots in the next few weeks, she said.

About a dozen staffers at Cascade Medical Center were vaccinated on Monday with a total of 30 employees due to be vaccinated by the end of the week, CEO Tom Reinhardt said. The hospital has about 60 total employees.

“Getting this vaccine to our front line health care team is the first step in our journey out of COVID-19,” Reinhardt said.

“It will be many months before there is enough vaccine available to achieve herd immunity,” he said. “Until then, we ask everyone to mask-up when in public, especially at the store or other indoor public places.”

continued:
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Governor talks vaccines, masks on public call

Idaho will likely remain in Stage 2 for foreseeable future

Gretel Kauffman Dec 23, 2020 IME

Idaho will likely remain in a modified Stage 2 of its economic rebound plan for the foreseeable future, Gov. Brad Little said in a public call held by AARP Idaho on Tuesday.

In the same call, the governor again defended his decision not to implement a statewide mask mandate, saying he does not believe a mandate would be effective in increasing mask use.

Little described the COVID-19 vaccination process, which is underway in Idaho as of last week, as “a sign that we’ve really turned the corner” in the coronavirus pandemic. However, the governor added, “That doesn’t mean we’re out of the woods by any stretch of the imagination.”

continued:
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96 Santas hit the slopes at Tamarack Resort

Santas, elves, multiple Mrs. Clauses and a Grinch took advantage of free skiing at Tamarack on Christmas Day.


Courtesy of Tamarack

A collection of Kris Kringles spread some Christmas cheer on the slopes of Tamarack Resort Friday.

The ski resort offered free skiing to anyone who dressed up as Santa Claus on Christmas Day.

According to Tamarack, ninety-six Santas took them up on the offer – along with several Mrs. Clauses, a handful of elves, and a Grinch.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Report: Tamarack fire started by employees

No decision yet on whether resort must pay costs

By Max Silverson for The Star-News Dec 24, 2020

Employees of Tamarack Resort burning slash piles caused the West State Fire that burned 61 acres and threatened an unfinished lodge last month, an investigation found.

The investigation did not say whether the employees or the resort were liable for the estimated $400,000 cost of fighting the fire.

No citations or demand for reimbursement had been issued as of Wednesday.

The fire started on Nov. 2 when sparks escaped from one of three burn piles made up of trees and brush from thinning the Mystery Glade ski run, an investigation by the Idaho Department of Lands said.

The fire quickly spread beyond control of the five people tending to the piles.

The fire burned through trees and brush near the resort’s unfinished mid-mountain lodge before being declared contained on Nov. 6.

The investigation found that the resort workers had been burning slash in the area for about two weeks prior to the fire and previously had problems with fire “creeping” through the grass.

continued:
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Letter to Share:

Health systems express gratitude for public leaders

To the Editor: (The Star-News Dec 24, 2020)

As Dec. 31 draws near, we often reflect on significant events to define the year. In 2020, many things have been unprecedented, but expressing gratitude remains essential and important. COVID-19 took center stage early this year and has not yielded its grip. However, it has not diminished our spirit.

As health-care organizations, we have witnessed inspiring levels of compassion and bravery. We’ve also seen actions – and reactions – that cause us great concern. We want to recognize those who have continued to dedicate themselves to taking care of others, often making difficult and, at times, controversial decisions.

Our elected and appointed officials, including mayors, county commissioners, school district trustees, and public health officials, as well as business and public health leaders, educators, and others, have strived to implement measures that serve the health, safety, and welfare of our communities.

They have had to learn about infectious disease overnight, balancing many factors, including the local economy, public health, education, and the consequences of inaction, to name a few. None of these decisions are clear cut.

These decisions would be difficult even in the best of circumstances. Still, many of our local public officials have faced the added stress of concern for their families’ safety. The threats and intimidation they receive daily by letter, email, phone, social media, and in-person before and during their public meetings, and sometimes at their own homes, must be painfully difficult to endure.

They did not and should not expect to face such extreme personal threats. We thank them for their efforts to help keep Idahoans safe in this time of crisis. Their dedication and commitment in the face of such adversity is inspiring.

We want to build on the good and vital work so many across our state have accomplished. Businesses large and small have innovated in so many ways; investing in safety protocols while their revenue declined; establishing new remote work environments, creating new avenues for patrons to buy essentials, entertainment, and exercise. We applaud the businesses who have implemented changes to protect the health of their employees and customers.

Our non-profits have seen larger numbers of people who need assistance. They have found new ways to provide their services and have given extra hours, often volunteering their time.

Educators have found new ways to teach and connect with our children, providing them with knowledge and ways to cope with a strange new reality.

As we look ahead to 2021, we are filled with optimism. While our optimism, indeed, is bolstered by the promise of vaccines to help us return to a more familiar way of life, it is truly fueled by the spirit demonstrated by our leaders, our businesses, and our community partners who do so much to help others.

A great deal of work lies ahead in the coming days, weeks, and months. As healthcare organizations, we are here for you. We will continue to do everything in our power to care for you, to inform you, and to advocate for you.

Jim Souza, MD, Chief Medical, Officer, St. Luke’s Health System

Tom Reinhardt, Chief Executive, Officer, Cascade Medical Center

(Note: This letter was also signed by representatives of 19 other medical providers in Southwest Idaho.)

source:
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Public Lands:

Controversial Sawtooth cell tower project highlights Idaho Endowment Trust Lands

By Steve Dent Dec 20, 2020 KIVI

Several organizations and locals in the Stanley area have been openly opposed to a cell tower project south of Stanley that would be visible from Red Fish Lake and the surrounding area.

First Net has proposed building 195-foot antennae that would tower above the surrounding trees allowing AT&T to boost its coverage in an area that doesn’t have very good service and plenty of dark spots.

continued:
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Critter News:

Researchers study moose mortality

Dec 22, 2020 Local News 8


Eric Van Beek / IDF&G

New research from the Idaho Fish and Game Department and University of Idaho indicates moose populations are declining.

In the short term, 90% of adult cow moose with tracking collars survived through the fall, but long term numbers are another story.

Of 9 radio-collared moose than died, more than half fell to parasites or disease, mostly ticks. Two were attributed to predators; one to a wolf and the other to a lion or bear. Another was killed by a car and one animal’s death couldn’t be determined.

continued:
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Pet talk – Immune-Mediated Hemolytic Anemia

By Dr. Allani Delis May 22, 2020 IME

Anemia is defined as a low red blood cell count. The red blood cells’ primary function is to transport oxygen to tissues. If tissues do not get enough oxygen, it can be deadly. Immune-mediated hemolytic anemia occurs when the body’s immune system destroys its own red blood cells. Certain breeds of dogs are predisposed to this kind of anemia. They include cocker spaniels, poodles, West Highland white terriers, old English sheepdogs, schnauzers and Irish setters.

Immune-mediated hemolytic anemia can be either primary or secondary. In the primary form, the immune system incorrectly recognizes the blood cells as foreign and destroys them. The secondary form is caused by toxins, infections, blood parasites, cancer, drug reactions or inherited red blood cell defects. In dogs, 60 to 75 percent of immune-mediated hemolytic anemia cases are primary and not related to an underlying cause. In cats, the secondary form is more common and is associated with feline leukemia virus or blood parasites.

continued:
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Letters to Share:

My babies have grown up!

Good morning all, The Gamebird Foundation, with some help from the Region #2 IDFG Department would like to pass on some of the success that we have accomplished with our Pheasant raising and releasing program. We receive the chicks as day old from Little Canyon Shooting Sports in Peck Idaho. We raise them in our own designed Brooders and soft release pens. We keep them in the soft release pens for about 10-11 weeks and then release them into good habitat. Bruce has been raising and releasing pheasants for several years. He has a new Brittney hunting dog and this year by the first part of November there had been over 30 birds harvested over the dog. The whole Wassmith family and many friends are now raising pheasants on the Camas Prairie. We have many off these accomplishments in Region #2 by the Foundation. Now you know why we need help buying feed. Please donate by going to our web site. (link)

Please pass on to your friends. God bless be safe and a Very Merry Christmas and the best in the New Year.

20201110GBFPheasants-a
One of the places I release chicks. There were no birds in this area 5 years ago. Now, we see them weekly on our way to school.

“The Pheasant Guy”
Jim Hagedorn
— — — — — — — — — —

Mystic Farm Merry Christmas

Oh, what a year 2020 has been! Many fawns were successfully raised and released from the farm. Many folks were educated as to the proper protocol of “Do Not Touch” when you find a fawn. Many kind and caring people stepped forward and pitched in or contributed when we needed it most. Without you, Mystic Farm would not exist. Thank you.

The biggest news to come out of this year is my decision to start the process of stepping down from operating the rescue. My heart hurts…but not nearly as much as my failing body! It is time. Stay tuned for updates of the “new” Dory. The Idaho Department of Fish & Game has approved a successor. Her name is Kari. She has a huge heart for rescue and will be a wonderful asset – not only to Mystic Farm but to wildlife rescue in general. I will be working with her and training her to step into my rubber boots this next season, then turn it over to her full time when we both feel comfortable. I feel confident and you should, too…

So, my “Deer” friends, join me in this next step of the rescue journey and my life. It has been a sweet ride and will be a bittersweet departure for this old lady.

I have nothing but gratitude for you all. Again, thank you.

Happy Holidays!
Mystic Farm Wildlife Rescue, Inc.
—————-

Fish & Game News:

F&G Commission adjusts outfitter set-aside for nonresident elk tags

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Supervisor
Tuesday, December 22, 2020

Idaho Fish and Game Commission on Dec. 22 approved increasing the outfitter set-aside for nonresident elk tags from 2,400 to 2,800 using temporary rulemaking, after they approved a rulemaking petition seeking to increase the outfitter set-aside up to 25 percent of the nonresident quota for general nonresident deer and elk tags.

The increase of 400 elk tags for the outfitter set-aside is effective immediately, however the commission must still approve the allocation of those 400 tags to specific zones and units if there is a demonstrated need among outfitters, which may come at a later date.

Fish and Game staff will continue to work with the outfitting industry to review use and will further discuss this issue with the Commission at its regular January meeting, scheduled for January 28, 2021.

source:
— — — — — — — — — —

Upland bird hunting opportunities stretch through the end of January

By Brian Pearson, Conservation Public Information Specialist
Monday, December 21, 2020

Chukar, gray partridge and quail hunting can be great in the early winter, and here are some things to consider for winter hunts

By the time winter rolls around in Idaho, many of the state’s hunting seasons have closed, but for hunters who aren’t quite ready to pack it in for the year, early winter can be an excellent time to hunt for upland birds, particularly chukar, quail and gray (Hungarian) partridge.

“Idaho offers a diversity of upland game bird hunting opportunities on millions of acres of public land,” said Jeff Knetter, upland game bird program manager. “Seasons in parts of the state stretch through the end of January, and hunters willing to make the effort often find good success.”

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

More F&G News Releases

link:
———————————-

Crazy Critter Stuff:

Santa delivers gifts to Cincinnati Zoo animals before heading back to North Pole

by Zachary Rogers, WKRC Tuesday, December 22nd 2020

Ol’ Saint Nick spread some Christmas cheer at the Cincinnati Zoo by giving gifts to a few of its residents.

Fiona the Hippo, Ajani Joe, Pocket the Wallaby, Lucas the baby red Panda and Theo the Giraffe all got a visit from the big man in red, who was wearing a mask.

continued: w/videos and photos
——————-

Seasonal Humor:

CovidJackFrost-a
————–

Idaho History Dec 27, 2020

Idaho 1918-1920 Influenza Pandemic

Part 37

Idaho Newspaper clippings March 1-6, 1919

Some photos are courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

March 1

Evening Capital News., March 01, 1919, Page 1

19190301ECN1

19190301ECN27,354,000 Fighting Men Paid the Supreme Sacrifice

19190301ECN3
Heaviest Price Paid By Russia With 1,700,000; Boches Second
U. S. Trails List With Loss in Battle and From Wounds of 50,000; France Third, 1,385,300, Austria Fourth.
Demobilization To Date Totals 1,301,959 Yanks
352,922 Troop Embarkations From France Up to Feb. 20; 2,056,122 Yankees Sent Overseas When War Ended.

Washington, March 1. — Seven million, three hundred and fifty-four thousand men died in the war, according to the official figures given out today by Chief of Staff March.

Russia paid the heaviest price, with 1,700,000 deaths, while Germany was second, France third and the United Sates last among the great powers.

19190301ECN4

source: Evening Capital News. (Boise, Idaho), 01 March 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Evening Capital News., March 01, 1919, Page 2

19190301ECN5

(ibid, page 2)
— — — —

Evening Capital News., March 01, 1919, Page 5

Around Boise Valley Loop

Caldwell

C. A. Hanson has recovered from an attack of pneumonia.

As a result of the Methodist church building in this city being used for public meetings, President John Smeed of the Commercial club has launched a campaign to secure the donation of liberty bonds at par to pay off the indebtedness of the church, which amounts to $8000.
— —

Star

Mrs. John Stergeon is on the sick list.

(ibid, page 5)
— — — —

Evening Capital News., March 01, 1919, Page 8

Little News of Boise

New Semester

The second semester of the Boise schools commence Monday, March 3. Children six years old by April 1 are entitled to enter, and should be present from the very first day.

Some Crowd

Despite the disagreeable weather, hundreds of youngsters were on hand at the Majestic Saturday morning show, and stood for some time waiting for the doors to open.
— —

Deaths – Funerals

Carlson — Ella Johanna Carlson, wife of A. S. Carlson of Cascade, died this morning at a Boise hospital from a complication of diseases. She was 18 years of age. She is survived by her husband, also her father and mother, who reside at Lakeport. The remains will be shipped to Lakeport on Monday, and the funeral will be held on Tuesday afternoon. …

(ibid, page 8)
— — — — — — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., March 01, 1919, Page 1

19190301DSM1

19190301DSM2
Influenza Again Appears In Moscow
Ten New Cases Discovered In Six Homes, All From High School Students

Influenza has reappeared in Moscow and today 10 cases are reported in six homes. There are five cases in one home. Dr. Adair, city health officer says these all came from high school students although it has been spread to students of the grades.

Drastic measures are to be adopted at once to stop the disease from spreading. Pupils of the schools will not be permitted to attend any public gathering. This includes both high school and grade pupils and they are forbidden to attend picture shows, dances, Sunday school and all other gatherings. No one living in a home where this is a case of tonsillitis or bad cold will be permitted to attend school or any public meeting. Dr. Adair issued the following statement:

“Owing to the fact that there are 15 or more cases of infectious colds and tonsillitis among the high school pupils and cases of influenza reported at the following places: A. Dillie, 309 South Asbury; D. House, 130 South Polk; H. Scheyer, corner of Mabel and Lind; Frank Price and Mr. Higgins on North Main, there being five cases at the latter.

“It has been decided after a conference with Superintendent Rich and the school board to prohibit all public school pupils from attending public gatherings. These include picture shows, dances, basket ball games and Sunday school, until further notice.

“Pupils will not be permitted to go to school from houses where there are cases of severe colds or tonsillitis.”
— —

19190301DSM3
Much Influenza Near Juliaetta
Nine Cases in One Family Requires Special Nurse – All Cases Are Mild

The third outbreak of influenza which has prevailed in Juliaetta and surrounding country during the last week seems now to be well-nigh spent.

Principal of Schools Earl Z. Crum, Mrs. Crum and their little daughter were all down with the disease at the same time. A trained nurse for them was secured from Kendrick and the family are all now about well.

On Fix ridge another family, Mr. and Mrs. William Heimgartner, are both down with the flu, but are reported to have it only in mild form.

The family of Robert Heimgartner, a brother of Will, took the disease, also his wife and five children, his hired man and his sister – nine in all – are down with the flu. The sister, who had come up from Clarkston to help take care of her brother and his family, contracted the disease promptly on arrival. The trained nurse who had taken care of the Crum family, left the first of this week to take care of the nine patients in the family of Robert Heimgartner. The patients are all reported as doing nicely.

Allen Aldrich, a bachelor living just below Juliaetta developed pneumonia, following and attack of the flu, but he too is reported to be convalescing at this time.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 01 March 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., March 01, 1919, Page 2

Dr. Barrows Returns.

Dr. F. L. Barrows, who left Moscow last April to serve in the medical corps of the army and was on the fighting front in France 60 days after leaving Moscow, is here on a short visit, having secured a 30 days’ furlough. Dr. Barrows was “gassed” and suffered other injuries from which he has not fully recovered and the war department will not discharge him until he is pronounced in a good physical condition as when he entered the army. Dr. and Mrs. Barrows are visiting friends in Moscow for a few days. Mrs. Barrows has been on the coast while her husband was in Europe. His many friends here are glad to welcome him back to Moscow, where he will probably return and take up his practice after he is discharged from the service. Dr. Barrows now has the rank of captain.

(ibid, page 2)
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., March 01, 1919, Page 3

Dodge Ambulances.

The United States Marine hospital on Long Island uses a fleet of Dodge Brothers ambulances for transferring daily hundreds of incoming wounded soldiers of the American expeditionary forces from the docks to the hospitals in New York City and Brooklyn.

The ambulances consist of specially designed bodies mounted on Dodge Brothers commercial car chassis with extended wheel base.

Every illustration and every word concerning Dodge Brothers cars engaged in war work, or in the aftermath of war, as is the case of these ambulances, is another tribute to this wonderful car.

(ibid, page 3)
— — — — — — — — — —

Dodge Ambulance from 1918-19

1918-1919-Dodge-Ambulance-a

source: Ram Trucks Vintage Photo Friday, Part I (1918-1935)
— — — — — — — — — —

March 2

Evening Capital News., March 02, 1919, Page 11

19190302ECN1

Around Boise Valley Loop

Nampa

Mr. and Mrs. E. Wing, who were called here from their home in Buhl the first of the week to attend the funeral of their daughter, Mrs. James, returned home yesterday.
— —

Meridian

J. M. Anderson, who has been quite ill for the last several weeks, is reported to be much improved.

The reception given last evening by the senior class of the rural high school at the high school auditorium to returning soldiers was a very enjoyable affair and was very largely attended.
— —

Eagle

A number of families near the Pleasant View school are reported suffering from Spanish influenza.

E. H. Fikkan as been on the sick list this week.

Miss Genevieve Polley, who has been ill with tonsillitis, is much improved.

source: Evening Capital News. (Boise, Idaho), 02 March 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Evening Capital News., March 02, 1919, Page 12

Week’s Chronology in the Legislature

House

Feb. 26. — Passed almost $2,000,000 in appropriations, including biennial appropriations for the state asylums, feeble minded institute, penitentiary, Solder’s Home and Children’s home; … Monson bill giving financial relief to school districts wherein schools were closed because of influenza; …

(ibid, page 12)
— — — — — — — — — —

Cabarton Idaho ca. 1919 (1)

Cabarton1919Fritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

March 3

Evening Capital News., March 03, 1919, Page 5

19190303ECN1

Around Boise Valley Loop

Meridian

J. M. Jackson is reported quite ill.
— —

Nampa

Henry Peacock, a 16-year-old boy, lies in a serious condition at his home in this city as a result of having been shot in the left thigh Saturday night by Billy Buchanan at the entrance of the State rooming house, where the two had gone from Billy Grice’s pool hall.

According to a statement of young Peacock made to his parents, Buchanan had called him from the pool hall to show him a gun which he had just purchased and that after reaching the entrance to the State rooming house, it was discharged, the ball entering Peacock. It is understood that Buchanan claims that he did not know the pistol was loaded.

An operation for the extraction of the ball from Peacock’s body is to be performed tomorrow.
— —

Star

Mrs. Bingman and children are confined to their home with the “flu.”
— —

Ustick

The ladies of this vicinity are urged to assist in knitting for Red Cross as garments for the refugees are needed, especially children’s garments and the work can be obtained at the Red Cross rooms on Idaho street, between Seventh and Eighth, Boise.

A Child’s Welfare day program was given at the home of Mrs. J. E. Roberts, Friday afternoon. A good many mothers were present. Miss Minie Jellison of Boise gave a splendid talk on a subject which will be a benefit to those present. Mrs. Claud Frost gave a reading and two musical selections were rendered by Misses Ardis and Bessie Roberts.

source: Evening Capital News. (Boise, Idaho), 03 March 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Evening Capital News., March 03, 1919, Page 6

Roll of Honor
Northwest Casualties

Idaho

Died of disease – Lieutenant Joseph H. Murray, Nampa; Maila Pitkin, Burley.

Oregon

Died from accident and other causes – William A. Aberson, Corvallis
Died of disease – Benjamin E. Fisher, Elmyra.

Washington

Died of disease – Corporal Ellsworth E. Albertson, Mount Vernon.
Killed in action – Harry E. Requa, Seattle
Died from wounds – Elmer T. Jensen, Seattle.
Died, previously reported missing in action – Eugene C. Royse, Seattle.
Wounded severely – Dwight Hawley, Seattle; Clarence C. Reynolds, Spokane.
Wounded, previously reported killed in action – Corporal John Henry Fortner, Darrington.
Returned to military control, previously reported missing in action – Clark Cherry, Seattle.

19190303ECN2

(ibid, page 6)
— — — —

Evening Capital News., March 03, 1919, Page 7

Little News of Boise

Recovers From Flu.

W. H. Thorpe, former state fish and game warden, has recovered from a severe attack of the flu which he was taken down with shortly after leaving office.

Former Boise Woman Dead.

D. G. Farquhar, formerly connected with the Isis theater, had advised a Boise friend that he is now of the 318th company tank corps, stationed at La Pailly, France, having arrived in France on Oct. 30. He also states that Mrs. Farquhar, who will be remembered by many, passed away during the same month with the influenza at Salt Lake.

(ibid, page 7)
— — — — — — — — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., March 03, 1919, Page 1

19190303DSM1

19190303DSM2
Order Quarantine In Moscow Again
New Cases of Influenza in Moscow Make Conditions Requiring Caution

There are a number of new cases of influenza in Moscow and some of them are regarded as serious. A meeting of Mayor Truitt, City Health Officer Adair, County Health Officer Stevenson and others was held today and it was decided best to stop all dancing, parties and basket ball games this week. The two games at the University of Idaho with the University of Washington team will be permitted, but no high school or public school students or pupils will be permitted to attend these or to attend any picture show or other gathering.

Most of the cases so far reported are confined to students of the high school and pupils of the grade schools but several new cases are reported among adults, including Professor and Mrs. Jonte, B. F. Rowe, deputy county treasurer and Mrs. W. F. Morgareidge, wife of Moscow’s postmaster.

Most of the cases appear to be in light form, but there are a few that are causing much uneasiness. If conditions improve by the end of the week the ban on school children attending meetings may be lifted, but Dr. Adair urges that the utmost care be used in reporting all suspicious cases and that any one with sore throat, tonsillitis or cough remain at home until it is learned that it is not influenza.
— —

Elks Ball Postponed

Owing to the influenza situation the Elks ball, which was to have been held tonight, has been indefinitely postponed. Announcement will be made when the next date for the dance is fixed.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 03 March 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., March 03, 1919, Page 4

Contribution Box

To the Editor of the Star-Mirror:

We have been talking about a community building which might give expression to the community spirit and respond to community needs.

May I call your attention to a very simple thing that if performed, would show a greater comprehension of neighborliness than almost anything else just now? It is the matter of cleaning the sidewalks.

Do we enjoy seeing our women folk wading slush to their ankles? In fact do any of us enjoy this laborious procedure? Is the present a good time to let our walks remain covered with slush when we are informed that the influenza is threatening its appearance again? It is practically impossible to walk along our streets and keep one’s feet dry.

I am informed that there is an ordinance requiring the occupants of houses within the city limits, to keep the snow shoveled off and making it a misdemeanor not to do so, punishable by a fine. I have not seen the ordinance and do not know its terms, but I know if there is one, it is not enforced.

But we ought to have enough community spirit and enough regard for the health and welfare of others to make such an ordinance unnecessary. This slush is likely to freeze and make travel exceedingly dangerous and if any one should be hurt the city would be liable in damages for the injury and the house occupant may be liable also. We would pick up a child that had fallen and been hurt, why not prevent the injury? It is worth while to talk big things about community enterprises when we are lacking in these elementary matters?

Yours truly, Alvin E. Evans

(ibid, page 4)
— — — — — — — — — —

P.A. Palmer Sawmill, Cabinet, Idaho

CabinetFritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

March 4

Evening Capital News., March 04, 1919, Page 6

19190304ECN1

Dr. C. S. Allen Receives Welcome Information That Brother Is Safe

A letter received by Dr. C. Sandford Allen of Boise conveys the welcome information that his brother, Captain W. D. Allen, with the medical corps of the Fifth division, U. S. A., is safe in Luxemburg, Germany, and has been promoted to the rank of mayor [sic].

Dr. Allen has been much concerned about his brother, the captain having been taken with a severe attack of Spanish influenza some months ago. Dr. Allen tried by cable to get into communication with his brother but failed, and did not know whether he was alive or dead until he received the letter from him this morning.

Major Allen writes that the Germans are doing everything possible to get into the good graces of the Yankee army of occupation he is with, but that the officers and men are holding themselves rather aloof, and discouraging familiarity. He says that the people of Germany invite them to dinner and try in every way to show their apparent friendship, but that he has learned that the boche cannot be trusted, and so have other officers as well as enlisted men. He writes that he has organized baseball, basketball and football teams in his command, and the boys have some hot battles every day with the Germans as a dull audience.

source: Evening Capital News. (Boise, Idaho), 04 March 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Evening Capital News., March 04, 1919, Page 7

How American Red Cross Doctor Let Sunshine Into Lives of the Refugees
Work of Dr. J. F. Roach Among Sick in Soissons – Chateau Thierry Region Was Typical of Good Deeds Done All Over France

By Victor M’Naught. Paris – (Special Correspondence.)

[excerpts]

When the time comes to write an adequate story of the work of the American Red Cross in the war, it is doubtful whether one large volume will hold the history of the innumerable acts of humanity that have been performed. Surely no single organization has ever done more good in the name of the American people. My purpose now is to tell of a single bit of activity, a mission of good work carried on by a St. Louis doctor, which is typical of the spirit shown by the Red Cross all over France.

… As was bound to be the case, the returning families have been plagued with sickness, due to privation, exposure, lack of proper food, and general insanitary conditions. The influenza epidemic added new troubles to burdens borne no one knows how.

What Dr. Roach Found

Dr. J. F. Roach, who went to France from St. Louis a few months ago, was stationed for a while at Chateau Thierry, where he helped care for our sick and wounded soldiers. When the war ended and the hospital there was closed, Dr. Roach looked about him in the neighborhood, and found that the returning civilians were having a very hard time of it.

“I investigated conditions in the region between Chateau Thierry and Soissons,” Dr. Roach told afterward, “and found them so desperately bad that I sent word to the Red Cross headquarters in Paris at once for supplies. Without a moment’s hesitation the Red Cross sent out to me an ambulance and a motor truck, loaded with beans, lentils, canned milk, rolled oats, sugar, coffee, tea, bouillon cubes, shoes, layettes for the babies, sweaters, capes, socks, underclothes, cots and blankets. These were exactly the things that the sick, cold, and hungry people needed, and with my assistants I set to work at once to distribute them among the needy, and to get ready to take care of the sick.

“I held two clinics every day, one at Oulchy and one at Neuilly St. Front, where I had my headquarters. Every week my two nurses, my ambulance driver and I took care of from 400 to 600 people. We covered 30 towns in our work, and we were busy constantly. Those wonderful nurses; I shall never forget how faithfully they kept at it.

One Father’s Troubles

“I visited one home in Rozet St. Alban where four were lying ill with influenza. While I was there, the father of the family, a soldier on three days’ leave, came in with a priest. ‘I hope you will excuse me,’ the father said, ‘but the priest has come to bury my little boy.’ Then I noticed a box in the corner, which they carried out with them. I obtained an additional six days for the father, and did what I could to lighten his load. .

“I could enumerate scores of instances of hardship an suffering, but this one will stand as fairly representative; in a single room I found five children sick with influenza, and their mother was attending to them alone, although she had a baby only a week old. How people can live through such experiences almost passes understanding, but they do, and they manage to get well again.

“All our services were given free to the French people, even though they often tried to pay me. The middle class people with a little money saved up could not understand why I refused it.” …

(ibid, page 7)
— — — —

Evening Capital News., March 04, 1919, Page 9

Around Boise Valley Loop

Caldwell

Infant M’Kinley Dies

James Allen, the two-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Fred McKinley, died at their home in this city last night after an illness of only three days. Funeral services have not yet been made.
— —

Star

The little son of Mr. and Mrs. White is reported ill at this writing.

The family of Elmer Stoops is ill with the “flu.”

(ibid, page 9)
— — — — — — — — — —

The Idaho Republican. March 04, 1919, Page 5

19190304TIR1

Local News

George Ezell was ill the last of the week and unable to attend to his duties as deputy sheriff.
— —

Wapello

There are several cases of flu in this vicinity. The Tucker, Call and Ziegler families are the victims, but so far no pneumonia cases are reported.
— —

Pingree

There was no Sunday school here last Sunday on account of so much sickness in the neighborhood.

Leonard Troutner is suffering with influenza-pneumonia and is very ill at this writing.

Mr. Moody and son William have been quite sick with the flu, but we are glad to report that they are much improved.

Mrs. E. N. Day is recovering from a two-weeks’ siege of the flu.

The Ropp family is quite sick with the mups [sic].

Dale Day, Ester and Don Inskeep were Sunday guests at the Ropp home.

Iris Inskeep has been acting as nurse at the Troutner home for the past week.

Jessie Thompson is on the sick list this week.

The storm Tuesday night and Wednesday was the worst we have had and it was indeed bad for the stock.

The dance given at Pingree Friday night was well attended.
— —

Good Attendance at Stock Show

The meeting of the Idaho Cattle and Horse Growers’ association was held in Boise last week. Close to 350 delegates have attended the convention at one time, but this year war conditions and the influenza situation in some parts of the state prevented a record-breaking attendance.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 04 March 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Idaho Republican. March 04, 1919, Page 7

To Nurse Flu Patients

Mrs. H. A. Gardner left Saturday morning for Ogden, where she was called to be with relatives who are suffering with influenza.

Mrs. Gardner expects to return home the last of the week if everything goes nicely.
— —

Australians Wear Flu Masks.

Melbourne. — Because of prevalence of influenza, the government of Victoria has ordered every person appearing on the streets or in public gatherings to wear a mask.

(ibid, page 7)
— — — — — — — — — —

Sydney, Australia April 1919

In Sydney, Australia, nurses leave Blackfriars Depot in Chippenedale during the flu epidemic in April of 1919. NSW State Archives / Tara Majoor

source: Photos of the 1918 Flu Pandemic Alan Taylor April 10, 2018 “30 Photos of the 1918 Flu Pandemic” The Atlantic
— — — — — — — — — —

Bonners Ferry Herald. March 04, 1919, Page 4

19190304BFH1

Local Pick-ups

Mr. and Mrs. Allan DeWolf, of Cranbrook, B. C., are guests at the home of Mr. DeWolf’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. M. P. DeWolf. Shortly after coming here last week Mr. DeWolf became sick with the influenza. Mr. and Mrs. DeWolf returned home Sunday.

Mrs. J. T. Lawless recently returned from Spokane where she had been called by the illness of her daughter.

Miss Lillian O’Calaghan plans to leave Thursday for Spokane to resume her course in nursing at the Sacred Heart hospital.
— —

Great U. S. War Picture Comes
“America’s Answer” at Amazon Theater on Saturday night

“America’s Answer,” the second of the series U. S. official war film produced by the division of films, Committee on Public Information, with the object of showing to the people of the country, the details of America’s participation in the great war, will be presented at the Amazon theater on Saturday of this week.

The hundreds of scenes making up the feature, “American’s Answer,” have been selected and assembled from over 30,000 feet of films which were made under orders from Gen. Pershing and photographed by the signal Corps of the American Expeditionary Forces in France. The film has been viewed by Gen. Pershing and has his approval and he is the authority for the statement that it is a comprehensive accounting of his stewardship during the first year of the war.

The picture shows the transportation of American troops to France and the effective convoy work done by the U. S. navy.

It shows the enormous docks, refrigerating plants, and industrial assembling plants in France, the marvelous feats of the engineers in forestry, arranging port facilities, constructing miles of railroads and performing achievements that have astounded the French and British. An interesting feature of the film is that showing the arrival and landing of the American Expeditionary Forces, their movements to the camps and their daily life in the trenches and the rest camps. Also highly interesting scenes are shown of the American troops engaged in actual warfare. The real purpose to make American’s participation the deciding factor in winning the war is the one impression that is received upon viewing the film.

Another strong feature of this film be scenes showing how Camp Lewis was constructed and this is entitled “Over Here”. This film depicts the making of a city of 40,000 from a virgin forest in only 52 days.

source: Bonners Ferry Herald. (Bonners Ferry, Idaho), 04 March 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

“America’s Answer” (USA, 1918)

America’s second official World War I feature film, produced by the Committee on Public Information. Copied from the files of the National Archives in Washington, DC.

1:01:33 courtesy Ron van Dopperen
— — — — — — — — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., March 04, 1919, Page 1

19190304DSM1

19190304DSM2
Thirty Influenza Cases In Moscow

Dr. Adair announced that there are 30 influenza cases in Moscow and that 20 homes are quarantined with flags out. New cases today are at 411 S. Jackson, 435 E. 8th street, 122 N. Washington, 446 E. 8th, 725 E. Third, 334 North Washington, 105 N. Jackson, C. D. Bell, a man named Indy and another named Gossett, just outside of town. No town people will be admitted to the basket ball game tonight.
— —

Idaho Defeats The University Of Wash.

In a splendid exhibition of basket ball last night Idaho defeated the University of Washington by a score of 31 to 28. Idaho came from behind in the latter end of the game and defeated the visitors. The two teams play again tonight. Town people will not be admitted, because of the influenza in town.
— —

City Council Held Regular Monthly Meeting

At the city council last evening, Councilman Boyd, Conner, Morris, Nesbit, Richardson and Smith were all present. The usual business was transacted including the payment of claims. …

Rebates were allowed Robbins, Robinson and Tucker on their businesses on account of their businesses being closed 60 days during the influenza ban.
— —

Wireless Stations In The Far North
Natives Learning to Send and Receive Messages Through the Air

Cordova, Alaska. — By means of an efficient and far reaching system of education the aborigine of the far north, not only is able to send written communications through the mails, but also is being taught the scientific art of communication by wireless telegraphy.

During the recent influenza epidemic a superintendent in the Alaska School Service, anxious to learn whether this dread plague had invaded the native village on Atka Island, three hundred miles west of Unalaska in the north pacific ocean, sent a wireless message asking for a report on health conditions to that remote village from Anchorage, Alaska, and received the reply “No unusual sickness.”

This message of importance to the service was made possible because the United States bureau of education established a small wireless plant at the Atka Island government native school, where the teacher in charge is a wireless operator. The wireless apparatus was purchased at a necessarily small cost owing to the meager funds available, the resourceful teacher constructing his own aerial out of galvanized pipe, and with this improvised arrangement he has succeeded in transmitting messages a distance of three hundred miles to the Dutch Harbor station near Unalaska.

At Nurvik, Alaska where the U. S. bureau of education has established a wireless station in connection with the government native school the natives are also taught to operate the wireless. This is said to be the most northerly wireless station in the world.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 04 March 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., March 04, 1919, Page 2

[Editorial]

Don’t Get Panicky.

There is no need for a panicky feeling over the influenza situation. There are a few mild cases in a few homes in Moscow. School children are being watched closely to prevent an outbreak in the schools, but there is no epidemic and no cause for general alarm. If people use ordinary care they can go about their business as usual with no danger of taking or spreading the disease. There is more need of caution than there is cause for alarm.

“Keep your heads cool and your feet warm” is advice that is given in influenza cases and there never was a time when it applied better than it does right now in Moscow.

(ibid, page 2)
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., March 04, 1919, Page 3

City News

The Woman’s Home Missionary Society of the M. E. church has been postponed indefinitely on account of the influenza.
— —

Minors Get Jail Sentences.

Before Judge Strong four minors were fined $10 and costs, amounting to $15 for playing billiards in the billiard halls, violating the laws regarding minors. The boys were Ernest Estes, Earl Silvey, Guy Hazeltine and Harry Hazeltine.

The boys refused to pay the fines and were given the sentence of 10 days in the city jail.

(ibid, page 3)
— — — — — — — — — —

Street Scene, Caldwell, Idaho ca. 1916 (1)

Caldwell1916Fritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

March 5

Evening Capital News., March 05, 1919, Page 9

19190305ECN1

Around Boise Valley Loop

Meridian

Mrs. Alice Fazier is reported quite ill.

J. M. Jackson has recovered from a brief illness.
— —

M’Dermott

Rev. L. G. Knight, who has been quite ill for some time is staying in Boise this week for special treatment.

source: Evening Capital News. (Boise, Idaho), 05 March 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

The Challis Messenger., March 05, 1919, Page 5

19190305CM1

Purely Personal

Dudley Cameron has been on the sick list for the past week.

Mrs. Rodger Brasseur has been quite ill for the past week or so.

The stormy weather of the past week has made the roads of Central Idaho almost impassable. The road between here and Pahsamaroi is drifted full of snow in many places and the stage has difficulty in negotiating the trip.

source: The Challis Messenger. (Challis, Idaho), 05 March 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Challis Messenger., March 05, 1919, Page 7

Idaho Legislature

Senator J. W. Tyler of Gem county, who has been kept from his duties for more than two weeks by an attack of influenza, has resumed his seat.

(ibid, page 7)
— — — —

The Challis Messenger., March 05, 1919, Page 8

Order

In the District Court of the Sixth Judicial District, of the State of Idaho, in and for the County of Custer.

In the matter of the October, 1918, term of the District Court in and for said County.

The Judge of this Court, having heretofore, during the month of October, 1918, made an order postponing the regular October, 1918, term called to sit on the 21st day of October, until the 9th day of December, 1918, and having thereafter made a further adjournment of said term until the 16th day of December, both of such adjournments having been made on account of the prevalence of an epidemic of influenza in the County of Custer, Idaho;

And it now appearing to the Judge of the said Court that such epidemic has not entirely abated, and that certain quarantine regulations exist in the said country, making it difficult for parties litigant to attend at the county seat of said county;

And, further, that it is difficult for the officers or said Court to obtain accommodations at Challis, county seat of said county, while attending the said Court;

It is, therefore, ordered that a further postponement of said term of Court be made until the next regular term of Court there in to be held for the year 1919; and all causes now on the calendar of said Court, which might, or could be, heard during such term are continued until the next regular term of said Court.

Done at Chambers at Mackay, Idaho, this 16th day of December, 1918.
F. J. Cowen, District Judge.
— —

Teachers’ Examination

There will be an examination in the local subjects [Idaho Law and Civics, Manual of the course of Study and High School Curriculum] for applicants for endorsement certificates, Saturday, March 22, 1919, at Challis, Idaho.

Margaret Burnham, Co. Supt. Public Instruction.

(ibid, page 8)
— — — — — — — — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., March 05, 1919, Page 1

19190305DSM1

19190305DSM2
Tightest Quarantine In History Of Moscow Now On

Bang! Down goes the lid. Everything is closed and closed tight. There will be no picture shows, church services, schools, prayer meetings or lodge meetings before next Monday. Perhaps the lid may be lifted then and perhaps it may be closed down tighter than ever. But the quarantine is on and it is reported there are between 50 and 60 cases of influenza in town now.

The University of Idaho, where there has not been a single case of influenza since last December, is not affected by the order, beyond the fact that there will be no one but the players, referee and officials at the basket ball game with W. S. C. of Pullman Friday night. Following is the order issued by the health officers and the report of the meeting at which this action was taken:

The health officers and the school board met this morning for the purpose of considering the “flu” situation. The health officers consider it serious, and the question came as to whether or not the schools should be closed.

During the discussion it developed that there were between 50 and 60 cases in the city. The majority of these are of a mild form, but there are a few serious cases, there being one case of pleuo-pneumonia.

Superintendent Rich reported that there were between 50 and 60 absences from the high school but there were relative few absentees from the grades. From the discussion had it appeared that this second epidemic has been brought on and spread from two sources: From the high school and from a conference held at Spokane, which was attended by a considerable number of Moscow citizens.

It is the belief of the health officers that a very large number of our citizens have been exposed to the disease, and for the purpose of stopping any further spread, they deemed it desirable to again place upon the city a rigid quarantine, requiring all individuals to minimize their movements so far as possible and to prevent all unnecessary gatherings, for a few days at least, and give time for those that have been exposed to develop the disease.

The following resolutions have therefore been adopted by the health officers and have been concurred in by medical men of the city.

“Whereas a large number of its inhabitants have been exposed thereto.

“Now therefore be it resolved that we the undersigned city and county health officers declare the following quarantine rules and regulations:

1st. That public schools shall be closed, and that all churches, picture shows, lodges and all other organized bodies shall hold no gatherings until such time as the quarantine may be lifted.

2nd. That all public school children shall remain at home, and not permitted to attend any gathering of any kind or character, and shall not be permitted to gather on the streets or indulge in visiting.

3rd. Pool halls, ice cream parlors and other places of amusement together with mercantile establishments will be governed by such restrictions as the health officers may deem necessary.

Warren Truitt, Mayor.
W. A. Adair, City Health Officer.
John w. Stevenson, county Health Officer.

We the undersigned physicians of the city of Moscow heartily concur in the above quarantine rules and regulations.

C. L. Gritman, F. W. Leitch, J. N. Clark.

It is the hope of the health officers that it will be possible for this ban to be lifted very shortly, another meeting will be held Sunday afternoon for the purpose of considering the situation, and if conditions will permit the ban will be lifted and the schools opened again on Monday, and the other restrictions removed. The closing of the schools for any considerable length of time means a great loss to the pupils of the district. The action taken by the health officers is for the purpose of putting a quick stop to the spread of the disease.

Any further loss of time will mean that the students in the senior class in the high school will be unable to graduate, and each of the various grades will lose a half year’s work.

The heath officers and the school board urge all the people of the city to lend their co-operation in again stamping out the prevalence of this disease, by respecting the quarantine regulations individually and collectively by minimizing their movements, and to consider all cases of colds and tonsillitis as influenza and to report the same to their physician.

The re-occurrence of the epidemic in Moscow can be traced to a very considerable extent to the fact that owing to the mild form of the disease, and the difficulty in determining the “flu” from ordinary colds, caused the disease to gain be spread to a very large extent.
— —

Idaho Wins From Washington Again
Bleamaster’s Champions Again Defeat University of Washington Team

By a score of 30 to 23 the University of Idaho champions defeated the University of Washington team in the second basket ball game of the series here last night. The night before Idaho won by a score of 31 to 28, but last night the champions played a better game and the score was not so close.

Idaho is nearer the northwest championship than ever. She has only lost two games, one each to the University of Oregon and W. S. C. She plays W. S. C. here again next Friday night but there will be no one admitted to the game on account of the influenza situation. Coach Bleamaster believes his team will beat W. S. C. the two remaining games to be played by the two teams. Oregon University is next to Idaho, having lost but three games. It defeated Idaho by one point. …

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 05 March 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., March 05, 1919, Page 2

[Editorial]

While the influenza situation is not serious enough to cause alarm it should cause caution to be used by all. “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure” is an old and true saying that should be applied in Moscow now.

(ibid, page 2)
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., March 05, 1919, Page 3

City News

The home department of the Historical club will not hold its meeting Friday afternoon, as had been announced at the home of Mrs. E. J. Iddings, on account of the prevalence of influenza.

The women’s faculty club of the university did not hold the meeting as announced on Tuesday, the session being postponed by the health authorities.

The N. B. B,. O. O. Sewing club will meet Friday afternoon at the home of Mrs. Frank Kelly.
— —

Bar Hunting From Planes
Shooting of Wild Fowl by Airmen With Machine Guns prohibited.

Washington — Shooting of wild fowl with machine guns from airplanes, the latest device employed by sportsmen along the Atlantic coast, has been forbidden by order of the director of military aeronautics. Instructions have been issued by the director to conduct all flights along the coast wherever migratory wild fowl may be found in such a manner to interfere as little as possible with the birds.

(ibid, page 3)
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., March 05, 1919, Page 4

19190305DSM3
“Flu” Serum Useless
Physicians Are Still Hunting for a Preventive.
U. S. Laboratory Director Says No Cure for Baffling disease is Known.

New York — Considering that the insurance companies of the United States lost about $130,000,000 during the three months last year when the influenza epidemic was at its height, it was but natural that when the Association of Life Insurance Medical Directors met in annual convention in Newark the physicians and public health authorities should concern themselves almost exclusively to the search for some preventive measure which would preclude another outbreak of the plague.

And yet, although it was shown that about 6,000,000 people in the world perished from it, 400,000 of whom were Americans, all the medical experts admitted that the disease was completely baffling. Said Dr. G. W. McCoy, director of the hygienic laboratory of the public health service in Washington.

“There is no serum that I know of which is of the slightest value in preventing influenza, nor is there a serum that is of any use whatever in the treatment of the disease.” He made this statement after carefully experimenting with serums and vaccines in all parts of the country where the disease had broken out, and particularly in Pelham Bay and the army camps where the mortality was great.

(ibid, page 4)

[see Vaccines below for McCoy’s study.]
— — — — — — — — — —

Cambridge, Idaho

CambridgeFritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

March 6

Evening Capital News., March 06, 1919, Page 7

19190306ECN1

Kuna

Rev. J. J. Pacey is quite ill.

A message from Donovan, Neb., states that Horace Montgomery, who spent several months here last fall, is seriously ill.

Mr. Landsbury is improved in health but will sell his cows as he is unable to care for them.

source: Evening Capital News. (Boise, Idaho), 06 March 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Evening Capital News., March 06, 1919, Page 9

Around Boise Valley Loop

Meridian

Harry Tolleth and little daughter Dorothy left this morning for Fairburg, Neb., to visit the father of the former who is quite ill.
— —

Nampa

Mrs. H. C. Taylor and her sister, Mrs. C. M. Thompson, of Cimmarron, Kan., who is visiting her, visited in Boise yesterday with Mrs. Isaac Gunpart, who is ill.
— —

Star

Mrs. John Sturgeon who has been very ill is reported much better.

(ibid, page 9)
— — — — — — — — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., March 06, 1919, Page 1

19190306DSM1

19190306DSM2
The Influenza Outlook Is Better
A Number of New Cases Reported But General Conditions Are Improved

Despite the fact that a number of new influenza cases are reported, general conditions are causing much optimism and there are bright prospects that the ban will be lifted Monday if conditions continue to improve. It is believed now that many of the cases thought to have been influenza are tonsillitis, colds and other slight ailments that are not contagious. Many of these who were taken sick several days ago have recovered and there are very few serious cases in town.

New cases are reported at eight different homes in Moscow today. There are more than one case in several of the homes. Dr. W. A. Adair, city health officer, gave the following homes as having been quarantined today: 340 North Washington; 322 North Van Buren; 210 South Jackson, one on West A street; corner Howard and Second; one on North Adams, three cases at the Eggan apartments, one on West Third and one on South Main street.

Children are forbidden to be on the streets, except on business and are not permitted to visit other homes or congregate in large numbers anywhere. The closing of all places of amusement will prevent crowds gathering and it is believed that, if proper care is used, everything will be opened Monday as usual, but people are urged to obey all regulations and help stamp out the disease quickly.

Dr. Adair warns all who have any suspicious symptoms, such as sore throats, cold or temperature to remain at home for all such homes will be quarantined. All members of a family where such symptoms are noted must also remain at home. If they do not do this voluntarily they will be placed under quarantine.
— —

Fourteen Thousand Soldiers Return Home

New York. — The steamship Leviathan, formerly the German “Vaterland” the largest passenger ship afloat, arrived here today with 10,000 troops of the 27th division.

The transport Carona, also arrived today from Brest, with 122 officers and 3,782 colored troops, majority of whom are from the 92nd division.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 06 March 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., March 06, 1919, Page 3

City News

Mrs. H. Lebold of Palouse visited yesterday with her husband, who is ill in a Moscow hospital.

Mrs. John Myer of Genesee visited yesterday with her daughter, Mrs. Tabor, who is ill at a Moscow hospital.
— —

Postpone Tourney Until March 20-21

The state high school basket ball tournament has been postponed one week on account of the “flu” threat in the city of Moscow. The strict quarantine which was clapped on Wednesday is only a stringent precaution, and it is hoped that its strict enforcement for a week or ten days will be sufficient to beat the return of the epidemic which was feared as a result of a few cases developing this week.

The university is still absolutely free of the disease, and, by changing the dates to March 20-21 there is a strong probability that the tourney can be held.

Intense interest in the meet is prevalent in south Idaho. The southeastern section is the scene of a lively scrap centering around Blackfoot and Sugar City, but including a half dozen other strong contenders for the district championship.

In the central section Gooding puts up a high claim for honors.

The additional week will give the south Idaho teams plenty of time to settle district honors beyond a doubt. The keen competition in that part of the state indicates that the teams from below the mountains will fight hard for the pennant in the finals at Moscow.

(ibid, page 3)
— — — — — — — — — —

The Nezperce Herald., March 06, 1919, Page 1

19190306NH1

County Sunday School Convention March 21

The Lewis County Sunday School Association will hold its annual convention in Reubens and Nezperce on Friday, March 21. The morning and afternoon sessions will be held at Reubens and an evening session will be held at the Brethren church in Nezperce. This convention was to have been held last fall, but the influenza epidemic necessitated its postponement, and the program which was to have been given then is to be followed at the coming meetings as nearly as possible. …

source: The Nezperce Herald. (Nezperce, Idaho), 06 March 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Nezperce Herald., March 06, 1919, Page 2

News of Our Neighbors

Joseph M. Pedigo, a former resident of Vollmer, died of pneumonia resulting from influenza, at Yakima, Washington, February 14. He leaves a married sister, a brother, F. F. Pedigo, and a son to mourn his demise. – Ilo Register.

(ibid, page 2)
— — — —

The Nezperce Herald., March 06, 1919, Page 7

Local and Personal News Notes

Cashier Ernst Wienss of the Union State Bank is confined to his home this week by a mild attack of the flu.

Cashier Ernst Wienss is out after being confined to his home a few days by a light attack of the flu.

The many friends of C. W. Felt are glad to know that he is able to be up after a severe illness covering the past ten days.

R. J. Bowman, bookkeeper for the Nezperce Hardware Co., was called to his home at Line, Wn., yesterday morning on account of the serious illness of his child.

Springtime is on the job again today.
— —

Public School Notes

The basket ball game last Saturday night resulted in a score of 25 to 15 in favor of the Nezperce High School. … On the coming Saturday night the Kamiah High School will play the Nezperce second team. Everybody come out and “root.”

Next Wednesday, Supt. Skinner will take the High School ball team to Moscow for the annual basket ball tournament. Fully fifteen Idaho high school teams are expected at the tournament and the Nezperce boys are expecting to pull down their share of honors.

(ibid, page 7)
— — — —

The Nezperce Herald., March 06, 1919, Page 8

Central Ridge News

The many friends of Mrs. Will Ingram are sorry to hear that she is ill again.

Church services were held at the Central Ridge school house Sunday evening by Rev. Pearson.
— —

Route 2 News

Mrs. M. D. Young has been at Walla Walla the past month taking treatment for heart trouble, which was an after effect of the flu, which attacked her a couple of months ago. At last reports her condition is so much improved that she considers herself now almost recovered.

Clarence Tupper recently returned from an eastern army cantonment. While in the army he spent several months in the hospital from a double attack of the flu.

Our mail man has been considerably behind schedule time lately . He lays it to the bad roads.

(ibid, page 8)
— — — — — — — — — —

The Emmett Index. March 06, 1919, Page 1

19190306EI1

In Quarantine

A case of small pox developed in Emmett last week, the patient being Mrs. C. B. Taylor, who is here from Denver to spend a few weeks with her cousin, Miss Roseberry, commercial teacher in the High school. Every precaution was taken from the moment it was discovered, and as a further precautionary measure, Miss Margaret Cupp, who was rooming in the Fairchild home, where the case developed, is remaining from her school duties, pending possible contagion. The strictest quarantine has been observed and no spread of the disease is anticipated. Mrs. R. M. Burlingame is filling Miss Cupp’s position during her absence, and Miss Lois Yeck is taking care of Miss Roseberry’s classes.

source: The Emmett Index. (Emmett, Idaho), 06 March 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Emmett Index. March 06, 1919, Page 3

News of Gem County
By The Index’s Correspondents

South Slope
By Mrs. C. W. Cook

Mrs. Anthony Peterson’s mother is quite ill near the Howard Harper ranch.

Laura Carpenter was sick the past week.

Henry Obermeyer put in considerable time grading a long stretch of the south Slope road last week, only to have one of the hardest, drenching rains follow to muddle the whole thing. However, it will shed the water more quickly and soon be hard and dry and better than ever.
— —

Letha

The flu scare was simply a scare as we have not heard of any cases, though it disorganized school for a couple of weeks.

Mrs. Cummings took the nurse, Mrs. Hoyt, to the train Friday morning, when she left for Emmett. Her patients have recovered.

Mrs. Al Wilson is reported as improving in health this week.

Fred Stowe, Mrs. Kiser’s son who is very ill with spotted fever, was today (Wednesday) thought to be a little better.

Clarence Kirk is back on his job working for the Van Deusens, after a lay off on account of a bad hand. He bruised it and it became inflamed and the doctor lanced it. He is doing the easy jobs, as the hand is still far from well.
— —

Montour
By Mrs. R. E. Noland

R. E. Noland received a letter from his sister, who lives in Jarbridge, telling of the death of her oldest son Edgar Smith and his wife, which occurred Feb. 13 and 17th. They died from influenza and leave a family of eight children, who will be cared for by relatives. The Smith family used to live at Sweet.

The infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Eaton is improving.

Mrs. I. W. Stoddard expects to return home this week from Boise, where she has been for some time receiving medical treatment.

Miss McSparran is teaching the primary room in the Horseshoe Bend school.
— —

Ola

Frank, Ollie and Oliver Bowman were called to be with their mother, who has been quite sick, but who is better now.

J. e. Irbey, the High Valley ranger, was in Ola Tuesday. He reports about five feet of snow there.

The postoffice at Gross was discontinued on Feb. 28.
— —

Hanna
By Mrs. J. I. Guthrie

On Friday evening, March 14, the teachers and pupils of the Hanna school will give a program which promises to be very entertaining. The program will be followed by a box supper. The Hanna ladies have won quite a reputation for their handsome boxes and their delicious lunches which have helped to make our box suppers a decided success. This one will be no exception, and all hungry young men must provide themselves with well filled purses. The proceeds of the evening will be used for the purchase of a school bell.
— —

Haw Creek
By Mrs. E. Tennyson

Mrs. S. T. Johnson, who has been quite sick with spotted fever, is now able to be up again.

(ibid, page 3)
— — — —

The Emmett Index. March 06, 1919, Page 4

Emmett News

Mrs. Ora Bever went to Boise yesterday to attend the funeral of G. M. Greene, which was held today.
— —

Bramwell
By E. F. Wells

Looks like we might have more snow. We are sure having mud.

Elson McGee is back from the army. Eldon says they were about half way across the pond when they received orders to return to the United States.

(ibid, page 4)
— — — —

The Emmett Index. March 06, 1919, Page 5

Emmett News

Mrs. Joel Brown returned Saturday from a 10-days’ visit in Boise, where she went for medical attention, following an operation on the nose a few weeks ago. Mrs. Brown finds it very hard to recuperate her strength since experiencing an attack of influenza.

Mr. and Mrs. John Hillmon of Cascade, who have been in Emmett a few days for medical treatment, returned home Wednesday.

(ibid, page 5)
— — — —

The Emmett Index. March 06, 1919, Page 6

Upper Mesa
Mrs. Geo. R. Parks

Fred Baisch returned home Tuesday from St. Louis, where he had gone last week to bring home his son Henry, who has been sick for some time. Henry is still quite ill.

(ibid, page 6)
— — — —

19190306EI2

(ibid, page 7)
— — — — — — — — — —

Science Further Reading:

“The Medical and Scientific Conceptions of Influenza”

The search for the cause and vaccine.

source: Stanford University
— — — —

Serums

Serums were a “convalescent plasma”: blood plasma extracted from an animal or human patient who has “convalesced” or recovered from infection with a particular disease.

source:
— — — —

Vaccines

Many vaccines were developed and used during the 1918–1919 pandemic. The medical literature was full of contradictory claims of their success; there was apparently no consensus on how to judge the reported results of these vaccine trials. … The most widely used, and historically the most interesting, was the vaccine produced by Edward C. Rosenow of the Mayo Clinic’s Division of Experimental Bacteriology. Rosenow argued that the exact composition of a vaccine intended to prevent pneumonia had to match the distribution of the lung-infecting microbes then in circulation. For that reason, he insisted that the composition of his vaccine had to be frequently readjusted. His initial vaccine consisted of killed bacteria … He later dropped Pfeiffer’s bacillus entirely. The Mayo Clinic distributed Rosenow’s vaccine widely to physicians in the upper Midwest. …

McCoy arranged his own trial of the Rosenow vaccine produced by the Laboratories of the Chicago Health Department. He and his associates worked in a mental asylum in California where they could keep all subjects under close observation. They immunized alternate patients younger than age 41 on every ward, completing the last immunization 11 days before the local outbreak began. Under these more controlled conditions, Rosenow’s vaccine offered no protection whatsoever. McCoy’s article appeared as a one-column report in the December 14, 1918, edition of the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA)

source: The State of Science, Microbiology, and Vaccines Circa 1918
——————

Back to Table of Contents
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 1)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 2)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 3)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 4)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 5)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 6)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 7)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 8)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 9)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 10)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 11)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 12)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 13)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 14)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 15)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 16)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 17)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 18)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 19)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 20)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 21)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 22)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 23)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 24)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 25)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 26)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 27)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 28)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 29)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 30)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 31)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 32)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 33)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 34)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 35)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 36)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 37)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 38)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 39)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 40)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 41)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 42)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 43)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 44)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 45)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 46)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 47)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 48)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 49)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 50)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 51)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 52)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 53)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 54)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 55)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 56)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 57)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 58)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 59)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 60)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 61)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 62)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 63)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 64)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 65)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 66)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 67)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 68)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 69)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 70)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 71)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 72)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 73)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 74)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 75)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 76)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 77)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 78)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 79)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 80)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 81)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 82)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 83)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 84)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 85)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 86)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 87)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 88)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 89)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 90)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 91)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 92)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 93)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 94)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 95)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 96)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 97)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 98)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 99)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 100)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 101)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 102)

Road Reports Dec 27, 2020

Please share road reports. Conditions change quickly this time of year. Be prepared for rocks and trees in the road, and deep snow in higher elevation. Remember there is no cell phone service.

Yellow Pine: Dec 27 we have an average of 8″ of snow on the ground. Local streets are snow covered. Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN.
“Drivers don’t speed through neighborhoods or most anywhere. Locals brake for kids, wandering dogs, deer, elk, moose, fox, beaver, squirrels and chipmunks. Most are lifetime members of SPLAT, the Society to Prevent Little Animal Tragedies.” – IME
link: Local Forecast
Yellow Pine Webcam: (check date on image)

Highway 55 Webcams Link:
No Winter construction – All lanes open

Warm Lake Highway: Open
Wed (Dec 23) mail truck driver reports the highway is in better shape this week. (It has snowed since this report.)
link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

South Fork Road: Open, will be plowed today (Dec 27.)
Wednesday (Dec 23) report from mail truck driver (Taylor) reports the road is in better shape this week and was being plowed this morning.
Road conditions 12/23/2020 Rocks breaking loose and falling on East Fork, but a good frozen floor. Milepost 18 on South fork has interesting ice on the river. There are holes in the ice showing the water about three feet below. Two ice flows on the road just downstream from Krassel; they’ll be nasty later as they sloped down to the river. Off and on sections of deep ruts from Goat Creek to Penny Springs. Best driving time is early morning when it’s frozen. Will be nasty if we get our usual thaw in January. Headlights on makes you more visible. -SL
Report Saturday (Dec 26) vehicle slid off the road in the Jakie Creek area. There is ice under the snow.
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Open
Wednesday (Dec 23) report from mail truck driver the road is snow covered, in good shape and smooth.

Johnson Creek Road: Deep snow at Landmark. No current report. Not recommended for wheeled traffic.
link: Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam
link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
Note: The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Not recommended for wheeled traffic.
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Not recommended for wheeled traffic. No current report.
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcam: (check date on image)

Video report from last weekend (Dec 20-21) courtesy SA

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open.
(Old report Nov 14 of a foot of fresh snow at Stibnite.)
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Not recommended for wheeled traffic. No current report.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Not recommended for wheeled traffic. No current report.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: Not recommended for wheeled traffic. No current report.
Note: The approx. elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′

New Link
Valley County Road Maintenance Dashboard
——————

Weather Reports Dec 20-26, 2020

Dec 20 Weather:

At 1030am it was 33 degrees, overcast and occasional drop of rain, then light sprinkle around 1040am. Light sprinkles before 1pm, cloudy and a bit foggy. At 320pm it was 36 degrees, dark overcast, light rain and light fog. At 530pm it was 34 degrees, low overcast (socked in) and lightly raining. At 1030pm it looked like low clouds and light fog. Sprinkling lightly at 1230am. Likely rained half the night.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time December 21, 2020 at 10:30AM
Low overcast, light fog
Max temperature 36 degrees F
Min temperature 32 degrees F
At observation 35 degrees F
Precipitation 0.33 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 6 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Dec 21 Weather:

At 1030am it was 35 degrees, low overcast and light fog. Cloudy at 1230pm, light fog in the forest. Breaks in the clouds and scattered sunshine before 2pm. At 4pm it was 40 degrees, partly clear and a bit breezy. At 530pm it was 38 degrees and partly cloudy – mostly clear. At 11pm it looked mostly clear. A bit breezy at 1am. Windy at 225am. Snow (likely started as rain) during the night, guessing between 4am and 7am.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time December 22, 2020 at 10:30AM
Low overcast, flaking, light breeze
Max temperature 47 degrees F
Min temperature 23 degrees F
At observation 25 degrees F
Precipitation 0.14 inch
Snowfall 1.0 inch
Snow depth 7 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Dec 22 Weather:

At 1030am it was 25 degrees, low overcast (sitting down on VanMeter,) flaking snow and light breeze. Steady light snow at 1230pm. A few flakes at 2pm. Steady light snow at 230pm. Stopped snowing before 3pm. At 330pm it was 25 degrees, partly cloudy and chilly breezes. Another little flurry just after 4pm, dark clouds to the north, clear sky to the south. At 530pm it was 23 degrees and mostly cloudy. At 7pm it was 23 degrees. At 11pm it was 20 degrees and cloudy.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time December 23, 2020 at 10:30AM
Clear, frosty
Max temperature 27 degrees F
Min temperature 6 degrees F
At observation 6 degrees F
Precipitation 0.01 inch
Snowfall 0.25 inch
Snow depth 6 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Dec 23 Weather:

At 1030am it was 6 degrees, clear and frosty. At 1pm it was 24 degrees and clear. At 330pm it was 21 degrees and partly hazy. At 530pm it was 16 degrees and some high thin clouds. At 650pm it was 19 degrees, high haze. At 1050pm clear spots, sparkly stars to the east and moon casting shadows. At 130am hazy moon.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time December 24, 2020 at 10:30AM
Clear
Max temperature 29 degrees F
Min temperature 5 degrees F
At observation 8 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 6 inch (est.)
— — — — — — — — — —

Dec 24 Weather:

At 1030am it was 8 degrees and clear sky. At 1240pm it was 26 degrees and clear. At 330pm it was 24 degrees and mostly hazy. At 530pm it was 20 degrees. Looked hazy at 11pm.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time December 25, 2020 at 10:30AM
Mostly hazy
Max temperature 34 degrees F
Min temperature 8 degrees F <– previous morning
At observation 15 degrees F
Precipitation 0.00 inch
Snowfall 0.0 inch
Snow depth 6 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Dec 25 Weather:

At 1030am it was 15 degrees and mostly hazy sky. Clear to the north and mostly cloudy to the south at 1pm. At 330pm it was 34 degrees, dark overcast and gusty breezes. At 535pm it was 35 degrees, dark overcast, gusty and starting to snow. At 645pm it was 34 degrees, lighter breezes and snowing lightly. At 730pm it was 34 degrees and snowing lightly. A fat trace by 9pm, probably still snowing lightly. Looked like it wasn’t snowing at 11pm. Most of the snow fell after 2am.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time December 26, 2020 at 10:30AM
Low overcast
Max temperature 40 degrees F
Min temperature 15 degrees F <– previous morning
At observation 33 degrees F
Precipitation 0.19 inch
Snowfall 2.4 inch
Snow depth 8 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Dec 26 Weather:

At 1030am it was 33 degrees and low overcast, foggy ridgetops. Started snowing lightly around 1050am. Stopped snowing before 1220pm. At 120pm low overcast, socked in nearly to the floor. At 330pm it was 34 degrees, low overcast, occasional flake or drop of mist. At 530pm it was 32 degrees and lightly snowing. Doesn’t appear to be snowing at 8pm. Cloudy at 11pm.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time December 27, 2020 at 10:30AM
Clear
Max temperature 35 degrees F
Min temperature 10 degrees F
At observation 11 degrees F
Precipitation 0.03 inch
Snowfall Trace
Snow depth 8 inch
————————–

Winter Weather Advisory Dec 25, 5pm to Dec 26, 5pm

Winter Weather Advisory Dec 25, 5pm to Dec 26, 5pm

Yellow Pine Forecast

Christmas Day Partly sunny, with a high near 38. Calm wind becoming southeast around 5 mph.

Friday Night Snow likely, mainly after 11pm. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 28. South wind 3 to 6 mph. Chance of precipitation is 70%. New snow accumulation of 1 to 2 inches possible.

Saturday Snow. High near 35. West southwest wind around 6 mph. Chance of precipitation is 90%. New snow accumulation of 1 to 2 inches possible.

Saturday Night A 50 percent chance of snow, mainly before 11pm. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 21. New snow accumulation of less than a half inch possible.

Winter Weather Advisory

URGENT - WINTER WEATHER MESSAGE
National Weather Service Boise ID
229 AM MST Thu Dec 24 2020

West Central Mountains-Boise Mountains-Upper Weiser River-
Baker County-
229 AM MST Thu Dec 24 2020 /129 AM PST Thu Dec 24 2020/

...WINTER WEATHER ADVISORY IN EFFECT FROM 5 PM MST /4 PM PST/
FRIDAY TO 5 PM MST /4 PM PST/ SATURDAY...

* WHAT...Snow expected. Total snow accumulations of 2 to 4 inches
  in the Weiser Basin and 4 to 8 inches over the mountains.

* WHERE...Portions of northeast Oregon and west central Idaho.

* WHEN...From 5 PM MST /4 PM PST/ Friday to 5 PM MST /4 PM PST/
  Saturday.

* IMPACTS...Plan on slippery road conditions.

* ADDITIONAL DETAILS...Please allow for extra travel time in the
  advisory area as roads will likely become snow covered.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...

Slow down and use caution while traveling.

The latest road conditions can be obtained by calling 5 1 1.

Updated Road Reports Dec 23, 2020

Please share road reports. Conditions change quickly this time of year. Be prepared for rocks and trees in the road, and deep snow in higher elevation. Remember there is no cell phone service.

Yellow Pine: Dec 23 we have an average of 6″ of snow on the ground. Local streets are snow covered. Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN.
“Drivers don’t speed through neighborhoods or most anywhere. Locals brake for kids, wandering dogs, deer, elk, moose, fox, beaver, squirrels and chipmunks. Most are lifetime members of SPLAT, the Society to Prevent Little Animal Tragedies.” – IME
link: Local Forecast
Yellow Pine Webcam: (check date on image)

Highway 55 Webcams Link:
No Winter construction – All lanes open

Warm Lake Highway: Open
Wed (Dec 23) mail truck driver reports the highway is in better shape this week, too cold to be slick going up Big Creek summit this morning.
link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

South Fork Road: Open, plowed Dec 23.
Road conditions 12/23/2020 Rocks breaking loose and falling on East Fork, but a good frozen floor. Milepost 18 on South fork has interesting ice on the river. There are holes in the ice showing the water about three feet below. Two ice flows on the road just downstream from Krassel; they’ll be nasty later as they sloped down to the river. Off and on sections of deep ruts from Goat Creek to Penny Springs. Best driving time is early morning when it’s frozen. Will be nasty if we get our usual thaw in January. Headlights on makes you more visible. -SL
Wednesday (Dec 23) report from mail truck driver (Taylor) reports the road is in better shape this week and was being plowed this morning.
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Open
Wednesday (Dec 23) report from mail truck driver the road is snow covered, in good shape and smooth.

Johnson Creek Road: Deep snow at Landmark. No current report. Not recommended for wheeled traffic.
link: Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam
link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
Note: The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Not recommended for wheeled traffic.
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Not recommended for wheeled traffic. No current report.
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcam: (check date on image)

Video report courtesy SA

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open.
(Old report Nov 14 of a foot of fresh snow at Stibnite.)
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Not recommended for wheeled traffic. No current report.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Not recommended for wheeled traffic. No current report.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: Not recommended for wheeled traffic. No current report.
Note: The approx. elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′

New Link
Valley County Road Maintenance Dashboard
——————

Dec 20, 2020 The Yellow Pine Times

Dec 20, 2020 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Reminder: We are still under a boil water order until further notice.

Community Calendar:

April 17 – Boil water order issued
Aug 11 – Valley County Mask Order
Dec 21 – Jupiter-Saturn Conjunction
Dec 25 – Xmas potluck 3pm Community Hall
(details below)
———-

From Valley County

Valley County Mask-Up
A county-wide mask mandate was approved the CDH August 11th, and is now in effect for Valley County. (link)

Rebound – Idaho Governor’s phasing program
link:

COVID 19: Recommendations and Resources for Safe Business Practices
link: (lots of info for businesses)
——————-

Local Events:

Xmas Potluck

December 25 at 3pm in the Community Hall.
———-

Village News:

Santa’s Yellow Pine Elves.

The Bags are at the Community Hall ready for stuffing.

Nicki H
— — — —

Yellow Pine General Store

Please welcome Josh Jones as the new owner of the Yellow Pine General Store.
— — — —

Boil Water Order issued April 17 still in effect.

Update Nov 29: Warren replaced the water meter because of inconsistent readings. With the new meter, the community is currently using over 55,000 gallons of water per day. A leak has been identified and will be repaired as soon as we can coordinate the contractor, equipment needed and weather together. It is difficult to get everything planned in the winter. When the repair is scheduled, the community will have a few days notice before the water is shut down. Since we are using more water than the rated use through the sand filters, the boil order will remain in effect. We continue the grant request process that is extremely slow. – Steve H

Update Nov 25: the boil order is still in effect due to the large quantity of water that is leaking from the system. – Warren D

Update July 5: the boil order is in effect due to extremely high use due to leaks.

Update June 12: The boil order is still on. We still are experiencing excessive water use because of leaks. Not sure when this will be lifted. We are applying for grants to repair the system.

Update June 2: The water plant is experiencing high water in Boulder Creek which brings more debris into the sand filter.

The high demand caused by leaks in the system plugs the sand filters prematurely. We will be on a boil order until further notice.
— — — —

Critters

Be Fox Aware

* Do not feed foxes human food
* Feed domestic pets indoors
* Make sure your pets are updated on Rabies vaccines
* Small pets could become prey

Be Mountain Lion Aware

* NEVER run away from a mountain lion. The lion’s instinct is to chase and ultimately catch what they perceive as potential prey.
* NEVER turn your back on a lion. Always face them while making yourself look as large as you can. Yell loudly, but don’t scream. A high-pitched scream may mimic the sound of a wounded animal.
* SLOWLY back away while maintaining eye contact with the lion.
* Safety equipment you may choose to carry could include bear spray, a noise device, like an air-horn, and if you walk in the dark, a very bright flashlight.
* If you are attacked, fight back!
— — — —

Road Reports

Link: to current road reports.
— — — —

Yellow Pine US Mail

The 3-day a week mail delivery started Nov 2nd. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 55 cents. Support our local post office and purchase your holiday stamps here.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Update Dec 15: The Boise NF burned the pile and there was still room in the dumpsters.

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

20190429Dump2-bYellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is located approximately 3 miles south on Johnson Creek Road.

The TRANSFER STATION is for household trash and yard waste:
* Household trash must be put inside (and fit) the dumpster;
* Yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, etc.) goes in the burn pile on the south end of the turn-around;
* Cardboard boxes should be flattened before putting the in the dumpster,

The DUMPSTERS are NOT for:
* Furniture (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station).

The BURN PILE is NOT for:
* Cardboard boxes (flatten and put in dumpster);
* Furniture and appliances (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Drywall and building material (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wire or fencing (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Foam Rubber (take to Donnelly Transfer Station);
* Wood with metal (like nails) attached (take to Donnelly Transfer Station.)

When closing the DOORS on the front of the dumpsters:
* Make sure the “U” brackets at the top and bottom of the door are engaged;
* The retaining bar at the middle of the door is slid into the pipe;
* And the “L” bars at the bottom of the doors dropped into place.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: 208/634-7176
———-

Local Groups

YPWUA News:

The annual Water meeting for 2020 was held July 5th at the Community Hall 2pm.
link: minutes 20200705YPWUA.docx

Boil Water Order issued April 17, 2020. This could last until leaks are repaired.

Boil Water Advisory Notice

Boil Your Water Before Using

Bring tap water to a rolling boil, boil for one minute, and cool before using or use bottled water. Boiled or bottled water should be used for drinking, making ice, washing dishes, brushing teeth, and preparing food until further notice.

This Boil Water Advisory Notice applies to The Yellow Pine Water System

The system is being monitored and checked daily for compliance.

You will be informed when you no longer need to boil your water.

Please share this information with other people who drink this water, especially anyone who may not get this notice directly (for example, people in apartments, nursing homes, schools, and businesses).

You can do this by posting this notice in a public place or distributing copies by hand or mail.

State Water System ID#: 4430059 Date distributed: 3-22-2020

Notice of Intent to File an Application with USDA, Rural Development

The Yellow Pine Water Users Association, Yellow Pine, Idaho intends to file an Application with USDA, Rural Development to obtain a drinking water system facility Emergency Community Water Assistance Grant (ECWAG). Emergency Community Water Assistance Grant (ECWAG).

If any additional information is needed, please contact:
Willie Sullivan
Treasurer
ypwater @ gmail.com

Distributed to Yellow Pine Water Users Association customers via Yellow Pine Times on June 12, 2020.

The 2019 Yellow Pine Water Users Shareholders meeting was Sunday July 7, 2019.
link: 20190707YPWUAminutes
— — — —

VYPA News:

The Community Hall toilet is functional! It was christened at the Thanksgiving Potluck. Many hands were involved over the last three months to get this far. The goal is to have it completely finished by Christmas. Thanks to everyone who was able to lend a hand or give advice. Couldn’t have done it without you.

Minutes from September 12 VYPA meeting
link:

Minutes from August 8, 2020 VYPA meeting
link:

Minutes from July 11, 2020 VYPA meeting
link:

Minutes from June 13, 2020 VYPA meeting
link:

VYPA Bylaws adopted 8/8/2020 (link)

YPAC Corp Bylaws (link)
— — — —

YPFD News:

After Action Report meeting Oct 13, 2020 (no minutes yet.)

YPFD had a budget meeting on September 30th at 10am at the fire station. (No minutes yet.)

Make sure to clean and check chimney fitting before starting that first fall fire in your cabin. Cleaning brushes can be borrowed from the YPFD.

There was a YP Fire Commissioner meeting on June 27, 2020 at 10am at the Fire Station.
Link: 20200627 Fire Dept minutes June 27

YPFD COVID19 Policy

link: YPFD Covid 19 SOP

link: Covid-19 EMS (May 23)

Pile burning: Dress appropriately, have enough help on hand (people, water and tools) and make a firebreak before you start. Call your local fire protection district chief to let them know you’ll be conducting a debris burn. This saves them from sending emergency responders to your property if they are not needed. Do NOT burn on breezy afternoons.

Better yet, “Bring It, Don’t Burn It”, you can take your yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, etc.) to the burn pile at the Transfer Station on the south end of the turn-around. Remember, keep the pile neat. Woody debris only, no nails, no cardboard and no furniture! The Boise NF will burn the pile in the fall when it is safe and doesn’t pollute our fine YP air.

YP Fire Commissioners:
Sue Holloway – District 1
Dan Stiff – District 2
Merrill Saleen – District 3
(TBA) – Fire Chief

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice

The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.” Click the link: to view 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation
——–

Biz Listings:

The Corner (208) 633-3325

Starting Nov 3rd open 3 days a week on mail days.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233

Winter Closure: November 14, 2020 to April 16, 2021
— — — —

Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377

Closed Nov 3rd for winter.
— — — —

Yellow Pine General Store

Closed – New owner will open this spring.
— — — —

Murph’s RV Park & Mary’s Cabins
FB page link
— — — —

Knotty Kat Crochet Works – 208-502-0940
FB page link
open Tue – Sat, 9-5
Yellow Pine eggs $3/doz
— — — —

Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Tom & Sarah Lanham
156 Yellow Pine Ave, Yellow Pine Id 83677
website:
Facebook:
Starting June 2020 We will be doing trail rides out of Yellow Pine along with summer pack / camping trips to high mountain lakes in the area!

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
— — — —

Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430 open 830am-5pm Monday-Friday, closed weekends.
— — — —

Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

The Star-News

click to subscribe:
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine

Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, will service Yellow Pine

B&T Safety Solutions LLC
208-271-1600 Based out of Donnelly
Snow removal, cleaning chimneys and stoves, we do cabin staining/chinking as well
— — — —

Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
———————–

Local Observations:

Monday (Dec 14) low of 18 degrees, 2 1/4″ new snow (SWE=0.13″) and 5 1/2″ total snow on the board, mostly cloudy sky this morning. A pair of hairy woodpeckers, jays and a pine squirrel visiting. Icicles dripping after lunch time and mostly cloudy, high of 32 degrees. Below freezing and mostly cloudy at sunset. Partly cloudy at dusk and cold. Looked cloudy before midnight.

Tuesday (Dec 15) overnight low of 18 degrees, low overcast (top of VanMeter fogged in) and started snowing before sunrise – trace so far this morning, 5 1/4″ total snow on the board. Air smelled like vehicle exhaust. Jays, clarks nutcracker, hairy woodpecker and pine squirrel visiting. A break in the snow around lunch time, high of 31 degrees. Flaking lightly early afternoon and dark overcast. Not snowing at sunset, below freezing and dark overcast. Cold and not snowing at dusk. Didn’t appear to be snowing before midnight.

Wednesday (Dec 16) 24 hour low of 24 degrees from Tuesday morning, scant 1/4″ new snow (SWE=0.01″) and 5″ on the board, partly cloudy sky and light breeze. Jays, nutcracker, flicker, woodpecker and squirrel visiting. Clear and light breezes at lunch time. Mail truck made it in on time. Local snowmobile traffic. Icicles dripping in the sunshine early afternoon, high of 44 degrees. Several red-breasted nuthatches visiting. Above freezing and overcast after sunset. Still above freezing and cloudy at dusk. Snowing before midnight (trace.) Above freezing and probably some rain too, ending before 540am.

Thursday (Dec 17) 24 hour low of 29 degrees from Wednesday morning, overnight snow (and rain?) gave us 1 1/4″ new heavy wet snow (SWE=0.18″) and 6″ total on the board, low overcast with fog belts mid-mountain and occasional flakes of snow this morning. Hairy woodpecker, jays, flicker and pine squirrel visiting, raven calling. After lunch the sun was peeking thru a crack in the clouds, but ridges and hills fogged in, high of 38 degrees. Partly clear and some sunshine (fog had lifted) by mid-afternoon. Mostly cloudy by sunset and above freezing. Just below freezing and cloudy at dusk.

Friday (Dec 18) overnight low of 25 degrees, trace of new snow and 6″ total snow, cracks in the overcast this morning. Red-breasted nuthatches, steller jays, hairy woodpecker, clarks nutcracker and pine squirrel visiting. Overcast at lunch time, high of 36 degrees. Breezy and a few flakes of snow after sunset. Calmer and cloudy at dusk. Elk hanging out in the neighborhoods. Gusty breezes after 9pm. Snowing after midnight.

Saturday (Dec 19) overnight low of 26 degrees, measured a fat 1/4″ of new snow (SWE=0.02″) and a little over 6″ total snow this morning, partly clear and light breezes. Jays and pine squirrel calling. Snowmobile traffic. Icicles dripping and cloudy at lunch time, high of 42 degrees. Cloudy and above freezing before sunset. Still a little above freezing at dusk and cloudy. Elk wandering by after dark. Cloudy and slight breeze before midnight. Snowing and a fat trace by 230am. Warmed up and melted most of the new snow by morning.

Sunday (Dec 20) overnight low of 31 degrees, about 1/10″ of new snow that hadn’t melted yet (SWE=0.02″) and an average of 6″ total snow on the ground, the sky is overcast this morning and light sprinkle of rain. Flicker, nutcracker, jays, nuthatches and pine squirrel visiting. Cloudy after lunch time, sprinkling lightly and light fog. Little downy woodpecker visited. Light rain, above freezing, dark overcast and light fog before sunset, high of 36 degrees. Still sprinkling and above freezing at dusk, low foggy clouds.
——————-

Idaho News:

1,340 new Idaho COVID-19 cases, 16 new deaths

Dec 18, 2020 Local News 8

Idaho officials reported 1,340 new COVID-19 cases and 16 new deaths on Friday.

That brings the total confirmed and probable cases reported since March to 128,218.

There are a total of 106,967 confirmed cases and 21,251 probable cases in all 44 of the 44 counties in Idaho, according to numbers released from the local health districts and the state.

… 16 new deaths were reported bringing the total recorded deaths to 1,275.

full story:
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Idaho Thursday, December 17


source: KTVB
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Valley County reports 42 new COVID-19 cases, total now 356

By Tom Grote for The Star-News Dec 17, 2020

The total number of positive COVID-19 cases in Valley County reached 356 cases on Tuesday, up 42 cases from 314 a week ago, health officials said.

St. Luke’s McCall on Tuesday reported 275 total positive cases from testing done at the hospital, up 33 cases from 242 a week ago.

Cascade Medical Center reported 81 positive cases through Monday, or nine more than the 72 cases reported last week.

Central District Health reported 273 of the positive cases were confirmed to be Valley County residents as of Tuesday, which is 34 more than the 239 cases reported a week ago.

The difference between the hospital figures and the health department figures are those who tested positive but did not declare Valley County as their residence.

Two deaths from COVID-19 has been reported in Valley County.

continued:
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McCall woman, 68, dies from COVID-19

Lorna Hirt is 2nd Valley County death from virus

By Tom Grote for The Star-News Dec 17, 2020

A McCall woman died from complications from COVID-19 Saturday to become the second Valley County resident to die from the virus.

… Hirt was the life partner of Larry Martin, who is the Parks Department Lead for the City of McCall.

“We send our deepest condolences to the family, McCall City Manager Anette Spickard said.

“Lorna’s death and Larry’s tragic loss should ignite a renewed commitment to keep each other safe in our small city,” Spickard said.

full story:
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Central District Board of Health public health order fails to pass on 3-3 vote

by CBS2 News Staff Tuesday, December 15th 2020

A public health order for four counties in southern Idaho has failed on a three to three vote.

Once again, protesters gathered outside of Central District Health for the vote.

continued:
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Idaho remains in red zone with 2nd highest test positivity rate in the country

Dec 17, 2020 Local News 8

The latest White House Coronavirus Task Force report obtained by ABC News shows Idaho is in the red zone for test positivity, indicating a rate at or above 10.1%, with the second-highest rate in the country.

Idaho is also in the red zone for cases, indicating 101 or more new cases per 100,000 population, with the seventh highest rate in the country.

The Gem State has seen an increase in new cases and a decrease in test positivity. Test positivity is still increasing in 13 counties and is over 20% in 18 counties; cases rates continued to increase in 26 counties.

continued:
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Not wearing a face mask at Tamarack could lead to losing season pass without a refund

Face masks are required in its restaurant, indoor areas and while in the line for the lifts. But not when seated and eating or drinking or when skiing.

December 18, 2020 KTVB

Tamarack Ski Resort in Valley County is taking a strong stance on its face mask guidelines, going as far as ending someone’s season pass for the year with no refund or option to roll the pass over to next season.

The resort is the only one in Valley County to require face masks but still have guidelines like other resorts, such as “day-dodging” at your car while locker rooms are closed.

Face masks are required in its restaurant, indoor areas, and while in the line for the lifts. But not when seated and eating or drinking and not when skiing.

continued:
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Gov. Little names December Health Care Worker Appreciation Month in Idaho

Dec 16, 2020 KIVI

Governor Brad Little issued a proclamation today naming December Health Care Worker Appreciation Month in Idaho.

“I ask all Idahoans to share their gratitude for health care heroes in Idaho,” Governor Little said. “We can show our gratitude by minimizing transmissible moments this holiday season. Wear a mask, avoid gatherings with people outside your household, continue to keep safe physical distance, and wash your hands regularly. As individuals, we must choose to do all we can to combat COVID-19 in order to relieve pressure on Idaho’s health care workers.”

Health care workers have been called heroes since the COVID-19 pandemic started. Workers at Idaho’s hospital and long-term care facilities put patients and residents ahead of their own health.

continued:
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Monday deadline noted for Valley, Adams property taxes

The Star-News Dec 17, 2020

The deadline for the first half of the year’s property taxes for Valley and Adams counties will be Monday.

Payments will be accepted through 5 p.m. Monday at the county courthouses in Cascade and Council. The treasurer offices in both counties are staffed Monday through Friday, including the lunch hour.

Late charges begin on Tuesday, and interest begins on Jan. 1, so mailed payments must be postmarked by Monday.

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McCall Activity Barn opening its tubing hill for the season

by CBS2 News Staff Thursday, December 10th 2020


Activity Barn. (Courtesy Photo)

McCall’s Activity Barn is opening up its tubing hill on Friday.

The Barn says it’s opening up three 800-foot tubing lanes. New this season, of course, will be some changes given the pandemic. You’ll need to go online to schedule a two-hour session in advance.

And face coverings will be required in all indoor areas as well as in the line and while riding the Moonrider Conveyor.

The Activity Barn will be open Fridays from 2-6 p.m., Saturdays from 10 a.m. until 6 p.m. and Sundays from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. It will be open every day between Dec. 18 and Jan. 3.

source:
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Public Lands:

Land board debates local involvement

Members ask how much McCall rules should affect state land use

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News Dec 17, 2020

The State Land Board on Tuesday questioned whether a phased long-term management proposal for state endowment lands around McCall caters too much to local preferences.

The plan aired by the Idaho Department of Lands on Tuesday in Boise would guide management of about 5,500 acres of state land around McCall based on local growth as foreseen in city planning documents.

The land board is accepting public comments on the long-term management proposal until Feb. 12 at (link).

Land board chair Gov. Brad Little noted the importance of local involvement, but admitted local goals rarely align with the state’s constitutional mandate to maximize long-term profits from state lands.

“If you let every local group talk about every parcel of state land, there’d be a natural tendency to say, ‘we just want that to be open space that we can all enjoy for our own benefit,’” Little said.

Little suggested outside opinions on how to maximize profits would put more “meat on the bones” of public outreach efforts.

“We always come to this tipping point of ‘how do we maximize our constitutional responsibility and our trust responsibility while basically being good neighbors?’ and I think that’s the issue,” he said.

Secretary of State Lawerence Denney echoed Little and pondered whether the draft plan runs afoul of the state’s constitutional mandate by using city planning documents to guide the plan.

“I wonder about our fiduciary responsibility and whether we should even be concerned about what the City of McCall thinks in their impact area,” Denney told fellow land board members.

continued:
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State eyes development of 390 acres around McCall

Deinhard Lane, Pilgrim Cove parcels high on list

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News Dec 17, 2020

About 390 acres of state endowment land around McCall could be developed within 20 years under a long-term management strategy proposed by the Idaho Department of Lands.

The proposal tabs 56 acres in Pilgrim Cove near Payette Lake and 60 acres off of Deinhard Lane as “probable” for low-density residential development in the next five to 10 years.

Payette Lake’s Shellworth Island and Cougar Island are also identified by the plan for residential development within the next decade.

Meanwhile, about 5,000 acres of state land surrounding the lake would likely be managed as it is today for 20 or more years, under the plan.

continued:
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Lowman Ranger District intends to submit two grant proposals

to Idaho Department of Parks and Recreation

Boise, Idaho, December 16, 2020 — The Lowman Ranger District of the Boise National Forest is applying for grant funding from the Idaho Department of Parks and Recreation (IDPR) to help with trail improvements and maintenance.

The applications will request funding through both the Federal Highway Administration’s Recreational Trails Program (RTP) and Idaho’s Off-Road Motor Vehicle (ORMV) Fund, administered by IDPR.

RTP funds would be used to replace trail structures (puncheon) and repair erosion on the Deadwood Ridge Trail caused by the 2016 Pioneer Fire.

* ORMV funds would be used to maintain trails on the North Zone of the Boise National Forest. These trails receive heavy summer usage from motor bike enthusiasts and other user groups. This grant proposes to address culvert placements, signage, brushing and heavy tread maintenance needs.

All grant proposals will improve visitor experience and mitigate public health and safety hazards. This will also help sustain the capital investment of the trail treads. If received, implementation of the projects would begin in late summer of 2021.

Comments or requests for more information should be submitted to Savannah Steele, Lowman Ranger District, 7539 Highway 21, Lowman, ID 83631, or by calling 208-259-3361.

M. Joseph Schindel
Public Affairs
Boise National Forest
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Critter News:

Lead horse retires from Payette National Forest after over 20 years of service

by Ryan L Morrison Thursday, December 17th 2020


Courtesy of the U.S. Forest Service

“We are proud to announce a retirement! A horse retirement that is.”

The Payette National Forest took to Facebook Wednesday to wish 23-year-old Ajax a happy horse retirement.

“Ajax developed into a competent lead horse, able to do any backcountry and packing job, leading strings all across the wilderness, keeping mules in line, and able to pack anything that was needed,” the post explains.

Ajax was a member of the Krassel Wilderness Pack Stock, and served as one of the lead animals on the pack. He led strings of pack mules across thousands of miles in the Frank Church Wilderness for nearly twenty years.

continued:
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Pet Talk – Cleft palate in dogs

By Dr. Karsten Fostvedt Dec 18, 2020 IME

A cleft palate is a gap or hole in the roof of the mouth. The palate originally forms as two halves, on the left and right side of the mouth. These two halves normally fuse during the development of the fetus. A cleft palate results when the two sides of the palate do not fuse properly prior to birth.

The palate has a hard, bony part which is called the hard palate, and a soft, membranous part which is called the soft palate. A cleft may involve either or both of these parts. Clefts of the front part of the hard palate may also involve the upper lip.

A cleft sometimes forms in the palate after trauma to the head and mouth, such as being hit by car. More commonly, a cleft palate is a congenital birth defect. Affected pets can be of any breed or a mixed breed. Boston terriers, English bulldogs, and pugs are at increased risk.

continued:
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Idaho groups, others sue over federal wolverine verdict

Species faces habitat threat

Emily Jones Dec 18, 2020 IME

A coalition of environmental groups—including the Idaho Conservation League—filed suit against U.S. Fish and Wildlife Services on Monday, arguing that the agency’s Oct. 8 decision to deny long-sought protections to the wolverine under the Endangered Species Act heralds grim consequences for the mountain-dwelling mammal.

The lawsuit contends that wolverines could face accelerated habitat loss and potential extinction in the continental U.S. without a “threatened” or “endangered” listing to unlock further recovery efforts.

Fewer than 300 wolverines live in Idaho, Montana, Washington and Wyoming today, according to a Monday statement from Earthjustice, the environmental nonprofit representing the ICL and nine other conservation groups in the suit.

continued:
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50 ducks found dead near Salmon

by CBS2 News Staff Sunday, December 13th 2020

State wildlife officials are trying to find out what killed approximately 50 mallard ducks in and near Salmon.

The dead ducks were found along an irrigation ditch and in adjacent sloughs and ponds.

Officials say the first dead ducks were found by a concerned resident on Dec. 7, along an irrigation ditch. The Idaho Department of Fish and Game was notified and found more dead ducks along the ditch and in adjacent sloughs and ponds.

Fish and Game conducted necropsies and sent tissue samples to a diagnostic lab for testing. The results are pending.

continued:
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Fish and Game provides mentored waterfowl hunt for disabled American veterans

“(It’s) really important to each of these guys.”

By Natasha Williams Dec 16, 2020


KIVI

Hagerman, Idaho — Idaho Fish and Game volunteers are working together with the Idaho Division of Veteran Services to help provide opportunities for disabled American veterans.

Through Fish and Game, four to eight veterans are able to take part in a day of mentored waterfowl hunting in Hagerman.

Habitat Biologist Skyler Farnsworth summed up the day when he said, “I feel privileged to witness the joy that these mentored waterfowl hunts provide our local veterans.”

continued:
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Letter to Share:

Red-Leg Partridge, don’t miss out.

Hi all, we raised and released 240 of these this year. They are doing great so far. We have not had to do any supplemental feed this winter. We want to see how they survive. We have feed and if it comes down to it we will do. We want to raise more next year. We have 2000 eggs ordered now. If we can raise some more money we would like to get another 1000 eggs. These are one of the easiest birds to raise. We hatched 256 and released 240. The most we lost were those that didn’t hatch well and were very weak to start with. If you would like to raise some of these and could help out with some of the cost we would sure appreciate it. If you can’t raise them, please donate a few $ to help us along. You can go to The Gamebird Foundation Web and make a donation or you can join and pay membership dues with a credit card. Dues are $25.00 for family. Web is (link) we are a 501c3 non-profit. All donations are tax deductible.

This is the best picture I have been able to get of the Red-Leg Partridge.

Chukkar-a

“The Pheasant Guy”
Jim Hagedorn
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Fish & Game News:

Idaho’s wildlife collision salvage rule: what can you salvage?

By Korey Owens, Conservation Officer Sr. – District (DCO) #511
Friday, December 18, 2020

In spring 2012, the wildlife collision salvage rule went into effect in Idaho. This rule allows individuals to keep road-killed wildlife species classified as upland birds, upland game animals, big game, furbearers, and predators that may be lawfully hunted or trapped. Unprotected non-game wildlife are also legal for salvage.

Protected non-game wildlife, Threatened or Endangered species, migratory birds (including waterfowl which are federally protected), and other wildlife species not lawfully hunted or trapped may NOT be recovered, possessed, or salvaged. For a list of wildlife that can and cannot be recovered, possessed or salvaged please visit  (link).

Since the rule started, thousands of deer, elk, moose and other species that would have otherwise been wasted have been salvaged for meat, taxidermy and other uses. If you find a road-killed animal that you would like to salvage, here’s what to do.

continued:
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Potential fungal infection may have caused duck deaths near Salmon

By Mike Demick, Staff Biologist
Friday, December 18, 2020

Final lab results are pending on exact cause

While laboratory test results are pending on the dead ducks found south of Salmon, preliminary necropsies sent to the National Wildlife Health Center indicate a potential acute Aspergillosis infection, a respiratory illness caused by a fungus commonly found in soil, dead vegetation, compost piles and moldy grains.

Formal results are pending on several more tests, which may take up to two weeks to determine the exact cause of death.

continued:
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Every year is different: Steelhead grad study update

By Brett Bowersox, Fisheries Staff Biologist
Wednesday, December 16, 2020

Written by Will Lubenau, University of Idaho

As we near the end of the year, it is a good time for another update on the University of Idaho and Idaho Fish and Game steelhead study. Lately, we have been comparing tag reports from the two years of the study to look for differences in where, when, and how many steelhead are being caught around the Snake River Basin.

What are we seeing so far?

The table below has the percentage of the total tags released that anglers reported as caught by December 9th in both years of the study. For example, in year 1 of the study, 3.6% of the 1,024 adipose-intact fish tagged were caught in the Snake River by December 9th.

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More F&G News Releases

link:
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Crazy Critter Stuff:

What a hoot! Owl rescued from Rockefeller Center Christmas tree

by Associated Press Wednesday, November 18th 2020


(Lindsay Possumato/Ravensbeard Wildlife Center via AP)

It wasn’t quite a partridge in a pear tree, but a worker helping set up the Rockefeller Center Christmas tree found a holiday surprise — a tiny owl among the massive branches.

The little bird, now named what else but Rockefeller, was discovered on Monday, dehydrated and hungry, but otherwise unharmed, said Ellen Kalish, director and founder of the Ravensbeard Wildlife Center in Saugerties, New York, where the bird was taken.

Kalish said the bird is an adult male Saw-whet owl, one of the tiniest owls. It was taken to a veterinarian on Wednesday and got a clean bill of health.

continued:
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Seasonal Humor:

Covid12DaysXmas-a

CovidXmasRudolph-a
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Idaho History Dec 20, 2020

Idaho 1918-1920 Influenza Pandemic

Part 36

Idaho Newspaper clippings February 28, 1919

Photos courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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February 28

The Rathdrum tribune., February 28, 1919, Page 1

19190228RT1

From Over The County

Post Falls

Mrs. Martha Bennett was called to Rathdrum recently by the illness of her sister, Mrs. Satchwell.

County Commissioner McCrea says that we are due for some big taxes if the legislature passes a law for two mills state road tax and two and a half mills special county road tax.
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Spirit Lake

Mrs. E. W. Marshall, who has been very ill two months with heart trouble, has gone to Neillsville, Wis. She is a sister of Mrs. C. B. Kloph.
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Coeur D’Alene

Wm. Chilstrom is suffering with a fractured collar bone, severe shock and other injuries, as the result of falling a distance of thirty feet through a plate of corrugate iron roofing on the rear porch of the Graham post office building, from which he was shoveling snow.

source: The Rathdrum tribune. (Rathdrum, Idaho), 28 Feb. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Rathdrum tribune., February 28, 1919, Page 2

Town Board Meeting.

The trustees of Rathdrum met Monday evening and discussed various community problems at length. It was decided to take steps to close the armory and other buildings, which is alleged are becoming public nuisances. …
— —

The School Column
From The School

School Notes

The Board of Education decided at a meeting held last week, to extend the school Term for the Grade school three weeks, which would bring the term up to June 13th. An effort is being made to get the time for the State examinations for the Eighth grade changed so as to come later than usual because of this extension. Unless that change can be effected this grade will not be extended beyond the time of the examinations.

New state requirements in the Eighth Grade this year are Brosman’s “History of Idaho,” and Rose’s “Idaho Civics”. Both of these books have just recently been published.

The Rathdrum school board wired to the Kootenai county delegation in the legislature, Wednesday night, protesting against senate bill 94 and house bill 87, which provide for abolishing high schools of less than 75 pupils and putting the schools of the counties under county instead of district control. It was reported that house bill 87 had passed the house Tuesday. Lack of publicity, in news dispatches from Boise, concerning these bills, is the subject of much comment.
— —

Coeur d’Alene Items

Influenza is making its appearance again in Coeur d’Alene.

Wm. Chilstrom died of the injuries received from a fall of 30 feet at the postoffice building.

(ibid, page 2)
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The Rathdrum tribune., February 28, 1919, Page 3

Local Paragraphs

Rathdrum is again free of the flu, the two cases reported last week having recovered.

The Rathdrum school board at a recent meeting decided to extend the Grade School term to June 13. This was due to loss of time during the influenza epidemic.

The cold snap of Sunday night sent the mercury down several degrees below zero for a few hours.

The snowfall of Monday to Tuesday is reported to have broken the 24-hour record in Spokane. This has been the snow week of the winter. On Thursday the snow in Rathdrum and vicinity was over 18 inches deep. The rural mail carriers had a hard trip Tuesday on both routes.

(ibid, page 3)
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The Rathdrum tribune., February 28, 1919, Page 4

World News In Brief

Deaths during the war in the American expeditionary forces and among troops in the United States from all causes from April 1, 1917, to Feb 16, 1919, numbered 107,444. Of these 72,951 died overseas; 48,768 deaths were caused by battle. Disease caused 5000 more deaths than were caused by battle.

(ibid, page 4)
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The Oakley Herald. February 28, 1919, Page 1

19190228OH1

Boulder

Mrs. Emma Clayton has recovered from her illness.

The little daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Cluff Little has been quick sick for a few days, but is recovering.

There is about a foot of snow on the level now.
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Golden Valley

Mr. and Mrs. A. G. Shades have adopted the children of W. A. Keller, Esther and Bessie. A surprise shower was given at the home of Mrs. Shades Tuesday for the benefit of the children.
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Moulton News

The snow at Moulton is two feet deep on the level.
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Burley Notes

A number of Oakley young people took in the Firemen’s Ball. The ball was the social event of the season. the music was fine, the guests were happy, ad the fire-laddies shone as hosts to their many friends in Burley and vicinity.

source: The Oakley Herald. (Oakley, Idaho), 28 Feb. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Oakley Herald. February 28, 1919, Page 3

Locals and Personals

Miss Nancy Holt has been confined to her home since Tuesday morning with a malady that seems to be the flu.

Pres. Wm. T. Jack went to Delco Sunday where he attended memorial services for thirteen people who have died of influenza there this winter.

We’ve licked the Germans, but the Jack Rabbits are still running at large.

(ibid, page 3)
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American Falls Press. February 28, 1919, Page 1

19190228AFP1

Death of Mrs. Herman Noth

Mrs. Herman Noth died at the residence of Dr. and Mrs. R. F. Noth Saturday, following an illness of about ten days. She is survived by her husband, two small children, four sisters, and a father, W. A. Nunnelly, of Arbon.

Funeral services, conducted by Rev. Ford, were held from the residence of Dr. and Mrs. Noth Monday afternoon at 1 o’clock. The pallbearers were selected from among the friends of the deceased when she was a resident of American Falls several years ago, …

The four sisters of Mrs. Noth, Misses Virginia, Mayme, Irene and Thelma Nunnelly, and her father, W. A. Nunnelly, were in attendance. The sisters are all nurses and assisted in the care of the deceased during her illness.

Mrs. Mattie Nunnelly Noth was 28 years of age and a member of the Baptist church. She was a resident of American Falls for several years prior to her marriage, and was very highly esteemed. For the past several years she had resided with her husband at Arbon on a ranch. The death of the young woman has brought sadness to her large circle of friends.
— —

Yankee Camp in France Is Burned

The American camp at Is-Sur-Tille has been destroyed by fire, according to a dispatch to the Havas Agency from Oijon. Despite the prompt and efficient work of the Americans, the entire camp was burned with quantities of clothing and equipment. The damage is estimated at one million francs.

source: American Falls Press. (American Falls, Idaho), 28 Feb. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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American Falls Press. February 28, 1919, Page 5

People and Events

Mr. Will Abercrombie has been quite ill for the past few days.

Have gone to Chicago to take postgraduate work in surgery. Will be back about April 5th. — Dr. C. F. Schiltz.

Mrs. J. S. Miller returned Friday from Murietta Hot Springs, California, where she has been for some time taking baths in the mineral springs for her health and is much improved.

O. H. Barber is improving rapidly and expects to be on the job next week. He howls like a bear with a sore head because the doctor insists on him staying in bed when he says he feels as good as he ever did in his life. He was able to sit up a short time Sunday and has been gaining satisfactorily since.

Mr. H. B. Gessel went home Wednesday evening feeling somewhat under the weather. It is to be hoped it is nothing serious and that he will be able to return to his work in a short time.

(ibid, page 5)
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American Falls Press. February 28, 1919, Page 7

Boy Scouts

Scouts Run An Ambulance

The boy scouts of Richmond during the influenza epidemic performed a great service. The scouts voluntarily secured, equipped and manned an ambulance.

This ambulance carried more than 75 patients to the emergency hospital at the high school. The scouts took every precaution. They wore masks and bathed their hands and faces in bichloride solution.

As many as eight patients were brought from one home, each one carefully placed upon the stretcher by their trained hands, borne to the ambulance and taken out with skill not excelled by veteran ambulance drivers.

This ambulance was on duty night and day. At times it was necessary to carry as many as five patients at one time.

(ibid, page 7)
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Bruneau Hotel, Bruneau, Idaho

BruneauFritz-a

courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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Evening Capital News., February 28, 1919, Page 2

19190228ECN1

19190228ECN2
Public Health Bill Causes Hot Debate In House
Measure Providing County Commissioners May Employ Physicians Passed – Sifting Committee Advances Bills.

The school medical inspection bill authorizing county commissioners to employ physicians to see to the health of students, met with strong opposition in the house of representatives Thursday afternoon during which there was a heated debate, but was passed and sent to the senate. It is one of the public health bills the women of the state are greatly interested in.

Hall of Oneida, led the attack against the measure and was supported by Adamson of Blaine, and others. Givens of Ada, championed the bill and in an address criticized Hall for going back on the stand he had taken and statements he had made about attempting to block progressive legislation. The bill was finally approved by a vote of 49 to 15.
— —

Prominent Citizen of Mountain Home Passes

Judge W. C. Howie, pioneer lawyer and United States commissioner, died Thursday following an attack of influenza. He was in his 59th year. He had lived here almost 30 years, during which time he was a prominent factor in the development of the industrial, educational and other phases of civic life.

source: Evening Capital News. (Boise, Idaho), 28 Feb. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Evening Capital News., February 28, 1919, Page 4

Another Idaho Hero

The recent death in Germany of Lieutenant Joseph H. Murray, of Nampa, adds one more name to the muster-roll of heroic youths whose souls have gone out in a foreign land. He was a native son of Nampa. Brilliant in intellect, manly, companionable, and stainless in character, he was one of the sunniest lads whose smiles have glorified our little valley. He had just been graduated from the University of California when he heard the voice of duty which called him first to the Mexican frontier, and later to three battle fronts of France. He had survived the terrors of the long ocean voyage, and the indescribable hardships of “dugout’ warfare. With the dream of a boy’s heart, he had looked forward to the happy home-coming time. Then came the sad news of his untimely death from pneumonia. He fell asleep without ever dreaming that he was a hero. The soul of “Joe” Murray has joined the heroic company of Idaho lads whose memories have added a new brightness to the annals of our young commonwealth. His modest, brave, dutiful, and unsullied life is a reminder that the days of chivalry are with us still.
— —

Ashamed to Die

A prominent dentist in speaking of the influenza epidemic said that if more people had paid attention to brushing their teeth thoroughly fewer would have died.

An editorial writer in commenting on it says: “Mercy! We shall get to that we are ashamed to die of anything.” …

(ibid, page 4)
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Evening Capital News., February 28, 1919, Page 7

Obie Wilson Dead

A telegram received at Wilson Bros. store here Thursday morning, announced the death of Obie Wilson, who is a cousin of Wilson brothers, and was employed in the store for five years. He died in Camp Zachary Taylor in Louisville, Ky., presumably from the effects of the “flu,” with which it is known he had been a suffered a month ago. It is presumed here that he died last Monday. He was buried yesterday at his former home in Puryear, Tenn. Mr. Wilson was about 25 years old and single. He lived in Nyssa for seven years and was very popular with all classes of people.

(ibid, page 7)
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Evening Capital News., February 28, 1919, Page 8

Around Boise Valley Loop

Middleton

Mrs. Joe Cave who has been ill for some time has had a relapse and is seriously ill.

C. H. Burns returned Sunday from Portland where he took his wife to a sanitarium for treatment. Her daughter, Mrs. Care Rutledge, has gone now to care for her mother. Mrs. Burns is getting along pretty well.
— —

Meridian

J. M. Anderson has recovered from an illness of several weeks.

Joe Marcum, who has been very ill, is reported to be recovered.
— —

Star

The little daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Johnny Means is reported very ill.

Mr. Swalley who has been ill for some time is reported no better.

(ibid, page 8)
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The Idaho Recorder. February 28, 1919, Page 3

19190228TIR1

Idaho State News

The number of young people receiving training at the Idaho Technical institute is more than double the number [?] before the influenza epidemic.

source: The Idaho Recorder. (Salmon City, Idaho), 28 Feb. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Idaho Recorder. February 28, 1919, Page 5

Salmon Locals

Mrs. Laura Murphey was called to Wyoming last week to visit a sick sister. She returned Wednesday.

David Davies is back home at Ulysses after a session with Salmon’s cure for rheumatism at the springs.

A box social was given at the Shoup school when $120 was raise to be used for the improvement of the school. Miss Eva Collins, the teacher, had the affair in hand.
— —

19190228TIR2

(ibid, page 5)
— — — —

The Idaho Recorder. February 28, 1919, Page 8

Leadore

Mid year examinations have been held in the high school, the last ones being given this week at the schoolhouse. A number were given during the quarantine vacation, in spite of loss of time th results have been quite satisfactory as a rule.

The Junior class of the high school give [sic] a party in the audtorium [sic] Friday evening in honor of the six members who have just entered from the grades.

We are glad to note that Ralph Burr is out again after a few days’ illness. Not the flu, however.

Our genial station agent was the victim of an unfortunate accident last week. Crossing a bit of frosty track he slipped and fell, breaking a bone of his right forearm. He went immediately to Salmon where Dr. Stratton cared for the broken bone. We are glad to note he is doing well.
— —

May

The dance held here Saturday night was well attended by Pahsimaroi valley people.

(ibid, page 8)
— — — — — — — — — —

Clearwater Republican. February 28, 1919, Page 1

19190228CR1

Local and Vicinity

The flu ban is off and the Josephine Dominick Concert company of the Midland Lyceum bureau will be at the Rex theatre March 15 with a musical program that no one in Orofino can afford to miss.

Miss Alma O’Hara, who has been teaching school in the Teakean neighborhood, came home Wednesday on account of snow preventing her from going to and from the school house.

Considerable snow has fallen during the present week. Red’s Prairie reports between two and three feet and the Canyon Creek country has had a fall of about two feet.
— —

Eureka Ridge

Winter again, with a foot of snow.

source: Clearwater Republican. (Orofino, Idaho), 28 Feb. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Clearwater Republican. February 28, 1919, Page 2

Urge Health Insurance
Plan is to Provide Cash Benefits for Sick Workmen

New York. — Health insurance laws to provide medical and cash benefits for sick wage earners and their families, and to stimulate measures of prevention are urged as a foremost social and industrial need in the United States in the first number of a special bulletin on “Labor Laws in Reconstruction,” issued by the American Association for Labor Legislation.

“Health insurance laws,” it is declared, “will remove the great fear of sickness, just as workmen’s compensation has gone far to banish the fear of industrial accident.”
— —

Brevities

The last of the war-time coal regulations of the fuel administration still in force will be suspended Mar. 1 if the present comparatively mild weather continues, said an announcement by Fuel Administrator Garfield. These include prohibition against the shipment of coal for reconsignment.

(ibid, page 2)
— — — — — — — — — —

Main Street Looking South, Buhl, Idaho

BuhlFritz-a

courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

Cottonwood Chronicle. February 28, 1919, Page 2

19190228CC1

County Seat News Items

Victor Peterson is again able to attend to his duties at the Farmers warehouse after a week’s illness which is said to have been the influenza.

Wallace Scott, president of the First National bank, on Monday treated the pupils of the Grangeville public schools to a show at the Lyric theatre. “America’s Answer,” a patriotic picture was shown. In the afternoon pupils of the grades were guests of Mr. Scott and in the evening the high school pupils witness the show, Mr. Scott paying all the admissions.

source: Cottonwood Chronicle. (Cottonwood, Idaho), 28 Feb. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Cottonwood Chronicle. February 28, 1919, Page 4

Do we want the daylight saving plan continued, abandoned or modified.. Now is the time to decide. Congressman McKinley of Illinois has introduced into the House of Representative a bill to repeal the so-called daylight saving plan law, under the terms of which the clocks are set forward a hour the last Sunday in March and back again the last Sunday in October. A similar bill has been introduced by Representative Ramseyer of Iowa, who claims that the farmers of his state object to the law on the ground that it is detrimental to their interests.

(ibid, page 4)
— — — —

Cottonwood Chronicle. February 28, 1919, Page 6

Cottonwood and Vicinity
Personal Mention and Local Happenings of the Week

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Strickfaden were Cotton visitors the past week at the home of Joe Gaul. They have been here with their little son, who is receiving medical attention and who is just recovering from a severe attack of pneumonia. The little fellow is well on his way to recovery.

Mrs. Anna Gaul of Lewiston who has been spending a few days visiting at the P. A. Gaul home and helping nurse back to health members of that family, returned to her home Monday morning. The Gauls are now all on their way to recovery and their friends will be glad to see them out again.

Mrs. Fred Drube, who has been a sufferer of dropsy for some time departed Monday morning for Clarkston, accompanied by her daughter Lena, and C. N. Noberg. She expects to receive treatment there and that they may relieve her sufferings is the wish of her relatives and friends.

Miss Jennie Orr, a trained nurse, who is graduate of St. Mary’s hospital at Minneapolis, Minn., and who has been visiting at the home of her brother, Dr. Orr, for some time, has decided to remain here permanently and will practice her profession here.

Mrs. W. A. Robinson, Mrs. Harold Harris and Miss Sadie Robinson, all of Grangeville, are visiting with Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Johnson of this city. Mrs. Robinson recently returned from a visit with relatives in Detroit, Michigan. While in the east her relatives were taken down with sickness and she was engaged most of the time nursing back to health members of her family.

(ibid, page 6)
— — — — — — — — — —

The Kendrick Gazette. February 28, 1919, Page 1

19190228KG1

School Notes

Mary and Lena Bunger are absent from school this week, owing to influenza.

After an absence of three weeks on account of the flu, Miss Abrahamson is again able to resume her teaching. It is needless to say that her pupils as well as the whole school gladly welcome her return, as her sweet smile was greatly missed.

Curtis Bailey is back in school this week. He looks none the worse for an attack of influenza.

George Clem has returned to junior high school.

About fifty of the High School students were present at a party last Friday evening at the high school. It was planned by the teachers of the high school faculty. Various games were enjoyed by all and before departing for home refreshments were served. The evening was much enjoyed by all and we hope for a repetition in the near future.
— —

Southwick Items

Protracted meetings began here last Sunday evening.
— —

Big Bear Ridge

A very pretty and pleasing program was given at the Taney school last Friday afternoon in honor of Washington and Lincoln’s birthdays. The room was most effectively decorated in red, white and blue, forming an alcove over the stage and with a large flag in the background. Only the patrons of the school were present. Miss Tesch is the teacher.

source: The Kendrick Gazette. (Kendrick, Idaho), 28 Feb. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Kendrick Gazette. February 28, 1919, Page 8

Gleanings

The income tax blanks have now arrived and any assistance the banks can extend to their patrons will be gladly given. The income tax statements are due March 15.
— —

Leland News

The Potlatch has been seeing some real winter during the past two weeks. It has stormed every day during that time. At present the snow is 10 inches on the level.

Despite the storm there was quite a crowd at Henry Peters’ sale. Everything sold well except the horses. Nobody was very anxious about them.
— —

Fairview Notes

The T. H. Daugherty family are recovering nicely from an attack of the flu.

With from six to eight inches of snow we might enjoy a sleigh ride if the roads were made up of something besides foot-deep mud.

(ibid, page 8)
— — — — — — — — — —

Street Scene, Burke, Idaho ca.1910 (1)

Burke1910Fritz-a

courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

The Caldwell Tribune. February 28, 1919, Page 1

19190228CT1

Arena Valley Items

Albert Trent is on the sick list.
— —

Mrs. A. I. Steensland of Gooding has leased the building formerly used as a hospital, has furnished same and expects to run a first class hospital. Mrs. Steensland is a trained nurse, has had special training in some branches of the work and 20 years experience. Visitors will be received every afternoon from 2:30 till 4:30 o’clock, and every evening from 7 till 8 o’clock, beginning Monday, March 3rd.
— —

E. M. Hendon, assistant cashier of the First National Bank, returned Tuesday evening from Birmingham, Alabama, where he was called by the death of his brother who was a victim of influenza. Mr. Hendon states found the south flouringing [sic]. It is enjoying a wonderful degree of prosperity.
— —

[Idaho Legislature]

One of the most lengthy measures of the session is the new educational bill in the senate. It is said to present far-reaching changes in the classification of teachers and to conform to the laws of a number of eastern states where the rank of schools is higher than in Idaho. The bill was prepared by Dr. E. A. Bryan, commissioner of education. According to statements made on the floor of the house, Idaho ranks thirty-seven in the standing of its schools, while its sister state, Utah, ranks sixth.

source: The Caldwell Tribune. (Caldwell, Idaho), 28 Feb. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Caldwell Tribune. February 28, 1919, Page 2

Mrs. Warner, who has been quite sick the past week, is now reported much better.

(ibid, page 2)
— — — —

The Caldwell Tribune. February 28, 1919, Page 3

Local And Personal

John G. Flynn, who had a hard tussle with the flue [sic] after his return, is now able to be around again but still very weak.

C. A. Hanson, who suffered a severe attack of pneumonia, has full recovered and returned to his work at Oakes Bros., this week.

Will E. Derig was in the city from Barber, Tuesday. He was enroute to his work at Barber from Weiser where he went to attend the funeral of his father, John R. Derig.
— —

John R. Derig Died at Tacoma February 21
Father of M. J. and Will E. Derig of Caldwell Passes Away After Short Sick Spell.

John R. Derig died February 21 at Tacoma, Wash., after a week’s sickness. Death resulted from bronchial pneumonia. Mr. Derig was 64 years and 10 months of age at the time of his death. The funeral was held Monday last at Weiser, Idaho. …

(ibid, page 3)
— — — —

The Caldwell Tribune. February 28, 1919, Page 5

Items of Interest From Surrounding Territory

Roswell

Miss Lettie Weymouth, who is suffering from a relapse from influenza, has gone to her home in Franklin. Miss Mable Robins is substituting in the primary grades.

The one year old child of Mr. and Mrs. Stratton of Dixie was buried Saturday in the Roswell cemetery.

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Blinkerson were given a charivari by the Roswell young people Friday evening at the Thomas Rooney home.
— —

Deer Flat Items

Mrs. Charles Allen has been on the sick list.

Several members of the Rowen family are on the sick list.

Gilgerta Rose has been suffering the last week with an abscess on her neck.

There will be an entertainment and shower at the new Deer Flat school house this Friday evening, February 28th. Everybody is invited to come. Articles for the shower are to be of an individual size but not tin. Anything from spoons to small frying pans will be accepted. These articles are to be used by the domestic science class.

A committee from the grange met last Wednesday evening and voted to use the money in the treasury to furnish the community room in the new school house. A piano and lights will be purchased.
— —

Pleasant Ridge

On Wednesday night of last week a party of young people serenaded Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Springer with the usual tin pan instruments and in return were treated to candy and nuts.
— —

Lake Lowell

Word was received Saturday by Martin Derig that his father, John Derig, ha died of influenza at Tacoma, where he had gone to care for his brother who was ill. Will Derig arrived in Tacoma one hour after his father had passed away. The body will be shipped to Weiser for burial. …

Arthur Clark of the A. E. F., was a visitor Monday night at the G. H. Davis home. Young Clark left the U. S. July 12th, 1918, on the Olympic, fought three days in the Argonne Forest, was wounded by shrapnel on September 28; was returned home as a casual. Arthur is the first of our Deer Flat boys to have returned from overseas.
— —

Fairview

John Green has been on the sick list for the past week.

Ernest Crawford is able to be out after an attack of the flu.

Mrs. Palmer is improving slowly.

Mr. and Mrs. Burnett were both on the sick list, but are able to be out again.

Word came over the phone Friday evening that Mr. and Mrs. Stratton’s 11-months-old baby had died suddenly. The little one had been having a cold for some time but was not considered dangerous. They have the heartfelt sympathy of a host of friends.

(ibid, page 5)
— — — —

The Caldwell Tribune. February 28, 1919, Page 8

Items of Interest From Surrounding Territory

Marble Front

Mrs. G. W. Milliner who has been nursing flu patients at Richfield for several weeks, returned last Tuesday.

Mr. and Mrs. Lee Thomas returned Wednesday after a two weeks stay at Hot Lake, Oregon. They report Mr. Thomas’s health improved.

Mrs. W. H. Gorden has been staying with her daughter in Caldwell for the last week where she can be near the doctor and take treatments. Her health has been poor for some time. Her many friends hope that she will soon be well.

Miss Laura Beckstead left for Boise Monday where she will resume her nurses training course at St. Lukes hospital.
— —

Midway News

Mrs. C. A. Williams is on the sick list this week.

Mrs. F. W. Jordan has been suffering from a severe attack of tonsillitis for several days.

The Parent-Teachers association will hold its regular monthly meeting at the school house Friday afternoon, March 7. Everyone is cordially invited.
— —

Ten Davis News

Harry Penson has been on the sick list a couple of days this week.
— —

Briar Rose

Mr. Brown has been confined to his bed since Saturday by a severe attack of illness supposed to be ptomaine poison.

The Red Cross is out of material to sew on, but some is on the way and they expect to have it on hand by next Tuesday.

(ibid, page 8)
— — — —

The Caldwell Tribune. February 28, 1919, Page 9

Fargo

It is reported that Mr. Walker is seriously ill with dropsy.

Red Cross meetings are held every Thursday afternoon at the home of Miss Pearson. Everyone is invited to attend.

(ibid, page 9)
— — — —

The Caldwell Tribune. February 28, 1919, Page 10

To The People of Caldwell —

950 resident voters of Caldwell have petitioned the the City Council to permit the Motion Picture Theatres of Caldwell to operate on Sunday. These petitions were circulated and the number of signatures testify to the fact, in response to a public demand.

The petitioners feel that they too are entitled to have, as a matter of right, opportunity to rest, amuse and entertain themselves in the manner in which they desire. They do not seek to offend on interfere with others in their rest of recreation on Sunday, but they do feel that neither should they be offended or interfered with.

Other Forms of Rest and Entertainment —

In Caldwell, and by many who take offense at Sunday theatres, motoring, picnicking, base ball, concerts and recitals, meetings and open air band concerts are permitted and enjoyed. Last year the churches themselves closed their doors that their members might enjoy an open-air brass band concert furnished by the Ellison-White Chautauqua System. Every year the Chautauqua has been permitted with the full endorsement of the churches to conduct entertainments of various kinds on Sunday.

Will Not Interfere With Churches —

There are hundreds who have not an automobile, or who take no pleasure in out-of-doors amusements, and who in spite of the fact that no other form of amusement is permitted as a regular thing, refuse or fail to attend church. These hundreds as a matter of right, are entitled to their rest and recreation.

Experience has shown that closing the theatres on Sunday has not forced people to attend church. Opening the theatres will not keep a single member away from his place of worship.

Public Sentiment Expressed —

These petitions express the public sentiment of Caldwell. We, the proprietors of Motion Picture Theatres, feel that the City Council should grant the petitions of this of this overwhelming majority. We are convinced, that this action, cannot interfere with the churches or their prosperity. We feel that the character of pictures shown in this city are quite as edifying as other forms of rest and recreation permitted.

The Sunday Rest Law Not a Sunday Worship Law —

The American people can worship on the day that seems best to them. Every day to the religious is God’s. Sunday is a day of rest and recreation and is so recognized by the statute.

Wholesome recreation is the best rest known. We contend that the Motion Picture Theatre furnishes Caldwell people with rest and recreation.

R. T. Hurtt, Manager Huree Theatre.
I. H. Waters, Manager Bungalow Theatre.

The United States Government Recognized the Motion Picture Business as an Essential Industry During the War.

(ibid, page 10)
— — — — — — — — — —

Overland Avenue, Burley, Idaho

BurleyFritz-a

courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

Montpelier Examiner. February 28, 1919, Page 1

19190228ME1

Improvement At Montpelier Hospital

The Montpelier hospital is undergoing improvement which will make it as strictly sanitary as any hospital in the inter-mountain region. All of the wood work, walls and ceilings are being enameled, six coats being put on in the operating room. A new apparatus of the latest design has been installed for sterilizing the water, instruments and dressings used in operations. The improvements represent an outlay of about $500, and shows a desire on Dr. Ashley’s part to keep up with the times.
— —

County Dads Grind Out Batch of Business

Commissioners Peterson and Wright held a two-day session this week and run quite a beach of busness [sic] through the hopper. Commissioner Howell was detained in Salt Lake and was unable to attend the sessions.

The bonds of several precinct officers were approved, bills were allowed, the jury list for 1919 was drawn, the application of Sheriff Athay for the appointment of a deputy was granted and the salary fixed at $100 a month. Auditor Rich was also granted a deputy at a salary of $90 a month.

Owing to the absence of Commissioner Howell, the appointment of a county physician was deferred until the next meeting on March 11.

source: Montpelier Examiner. (Montpelier, Idaho), 28 Feb. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Montpelier Examiner. February 28, 1919, Page 2

19190228ME2

(ibid, page 2)
— — — —

Montpelier Examiner. February 28, 1919, Page 3

Legislative Notes

Machinery for the eradication of the entire species of contagious and infectious diseases which afflict livestock is provided in a bill introduced in the senate by the upper house livestock committee.

(ibid, page 3)
— — — —

Montpelier Examiner. February 28, 1919, Page 4

High School Notes

The members of the faculty have been assigned to the different departments such as debating and dramatics. Each teacher is expected to encourage the students and help to get them started in this line again. There will be very little work done this year, but the fact that these departments have been organized will be a great benefit next year, as it will enable them to begin their work earlier.

(ibid, page 4)
— — — —

Montpelier Examiner. February 28, 1919, Page 5

Local News

The Montpelier public library is now open each Saturday afternoon from 1:30 to 5 o’clock.

That was some snow storm which struck Bear Lake valley Wednesday night. “The beautiful” came down in gobs for an hour or more and then the wind got busy and piled it up in drifts.

(ibid, page 5)
— — — — — — — — — —

The Idaho Republican. February 28, 1919, Page 2

19190228IR1

Shelly

We don’t hear much about the flu around Shelley any more, guess somebody must have run it out of town, or it has been worn out up in this neck of the woods.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 28 Feb. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Idaho Republican. February 28, 1919, Page 3

Thomas

Mrs. G. C. Parsons returned Friday from St. Anthony, where she had been to attend the funeral of her aunt Mrs. Singleton of that place, who is a victim of the flu. Mrs. Parsons went to St. Anthony last Monday.

Mrs. Hatcliff died here on Sunday night, from influenza. The remains were taken to Cherryville, Kan. for burial. Mr. Hatcliff has been farming the I. A. Johnson farm for the past year.

John Killian, who used to be a familiar figure in our parts is at the home of his brother-in-law, William Parsons, convalescing after a severe attack of the flu. He is still very, very weak.
— —

Taber

The flu is nearly a thing of the past in our community.

Harry Adamson has been very sick the past week.

Harry Adamson, who has been very ill, was able to be in town Saturday.

Mrs. Henry Zeck took her little daughter to Blackfoot for medial treatment Monday.

Uncle Jasper Bentley has been very feeble since he had the flu.

Louie McConnll [sp?] was in Taber Saturday and bore the sad tidings of Mr. Turner’s sudden death at the Marshall home Thursday.

Sleighing is fine now in about eight inches of snow.

(ibid, page 3)
— — — —

The Idaho Republican. February 28, 1919, Page 4

Home Again

Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Johnson, who have been visiting her parents, Dr. and Mrs. J. B. Davis, for some weeks, left Tuesday afternoon for their home in Los Angeles, Cal.

Mr. and Mrs. Johnson came here for a short rest and to recuperate from the after affects of influenza and were both feeling well and strong when they left.

(ibid, page 4)
— — — —

The Idaho Republican. February 28, 1919, Page 5

Local News

Mr. and Mrs. G. H. Hall left Wednesday morning for Salt Lake City, where Mr. Hall will receive medical treatment.
— —

One Hundred Per Cent Red Cross

The pupils of the opportunity room sixth grade and junior high at the Central school, have been working earnestly and diligently to attain a standard of 100 per cent in membership in the junior Red Cross, and it is a source of price to all concerned to know that they reached their standard this week and the three grades mentioned are now 100 per cent Red Crossers.
— —

Dr. Hudson Opens Office

Dr. H. B. Hudson, the dentist man, who closed his office last summer to enter the army, has opened up for business in his comfortable quarters over the First National Bank building. Dr. Hudson took a post-graduate course in the east before returning home, that he might learn the latest methods of his profession.
— —

Wicks

A dance was to be given at the Wicks school house on Friday evening, Feb. 28, but this has been postponed on account of two flu cases in our midst.

Bertha Hansen was on the sick list for several days last week.

Mr. and Mrs. F. H. Miller were called to Salt Lake City last Monday on account of the serious illness of Mrs. Miller’s father.

Frank Spanbauer has been quite ill for the past two weeks and his many friends will be pleased to know that he is somewhat improved at the present writing.

(ibid, page 5)
— — — —

The Idaho Republican. February 28, 1919, Page 7

Sterling

Lewie Tiechert and baby have been on the sick list this week.

Dr. McKinnon of Aberdeen was here on professional business Thursday evening.

The funeral of Dr. J. O. Mote, who passed away Tuesday evening at the family residence, after a long and painful illness of pulmonary tuberculosis, was held Friday at 12:30 at the L. D. S. Church, Bishop A. Ward officiating. After an impressive ceremony the remains were escorted to the Springfield cemetery, where they were tenderly laid to rest. The deceased leaves a devoted wife and two sisters, besides a host of friends to mourn his loss.
— —

Goshen

Mrs. Pearl Landon is suffering with the flu.

All the friends of little Jodie Hansen are glad to see him back. He will stay with Mrs. Bell Hess and go to school here.

(ibid, page 7)
— — — — — — — — — —

The Meridian Times., February 28, 1919, Page 8

19190228MT1

Meridian Local News

Richard Beam has recovered from a slight attack of influenza.

Mrs. Sarah Havner, who has been ill, is much better this week.

J. R. Bell residing 4 1/2 miles south of Meridian is seriously ill from a relapse following influenza.

Uncle J. Daly residing northwest of Meridian, who has been ill for some months, is slowly improving.

Harry H. Hudson died at the age of 28 at the home of his brother, Fred Hudson, at Eagle, Friday. He is survived by his wife, daughter and brother. The funeral was held Saturday at the Joplin cemetery. The Hudsons moved here recently from Kansas and Mr. Hudson was attacked with pneumonia while on his way west.
— —

High School Students Will Honor Soldiers.

What promises to be one of the most enjoyable social affairs of the year is the reception to be given by the members of the Senior class and the alumni of 1918 of the Meridian high school in the gymnasium of the high school building this Friday evening Feb. 28th. at 7:30.

The reception will be an invitation affair and is in honor of the returning sailors and soldiers who have been members of the high school.

source: The Meridian Times. (Meridian, Idaho), 28 Feb. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

Shoshone Journal. February 28, 1919, Page 1

19190228SJ1

Big Wood River News

No Big Wood River News on account of the writer assisting in the flu epidemic.

It certainly takes nerve for a visitor uninvited the first instant, to make a second visit without an invitation. Yet, this is what the flu is doing through the country.

Chas. Cleveland has been on the sick list for the past week.

Mrs. Arthur Horn is quite ill at her home.

Mrs. Chas. Baker was on the sick list for a few days last week.

Nadine the little daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Burdette has been very sick of late.

Mrs. Harrison Ryan was visiting Mrs. Lester Cox last week while she was entertaining the flu.

The family of Joe Silva are all improving. Mrs. Silva had a very narrow escape from death caused by the flu.

The many friends of Mrs. Chas. Furniss will be pleased to know that Mrs. Furniss is able to be up some now after a terrible fight with the pneumonia followed by flu.

The family of L. F. Geisckis are all able to be up again after a severe siege of the flu. Little Margaret and Baby Elizabeth were dangerously sick.

Mrs. Gomes and Mrs. Ryan have been very busy the past five or six weeks helping with the flu and so far, neither of them have had it.

Mrs. Adams a nurse from Gooding who has been nursing at the Geiske home, returned to Gooding Wednesday.
— —

Dietrich

Anton Christensen, a farm owner of this precinct, died recently, on the coast from an attack of flu.

J. R. Smith is able to be about again after an 8 days wrestle with the flu.

On Tuesday, March 11, the people of Dietrich precinct will give a reception to our returning soldiers in the auditorium of the high school building. Orations, music and a bountiful supply of refreshments are on the program.

source: Shoshone Journal. (Shoshone, Idaho), 28 Feb. 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Shoshone Journal. February 28, 1919, Page 5

Local And Personal

Gottfried Gherig, of North Shoshone was in Shoshone Saturday. He reports that Mrs. Gottleib Gherig and family are all down with the flu.

Alvin Butler, of the Shoshone tract expects to move into town soon for the benefit of his little son’s health, who is slowly recovering from the effects of the flu. They intend renting the Stoner house across the river.

Frank Milsaps is on the sick list this week.

Miss Lura Jones returned to her teaching last Monday after a three weeks illness with the flu.

Rev. James left for Nampa Sunday evening to attend the funeral of his daughter who had died of flu.

(ibid, page 5)
— — — —

19190228SJ2

(ibid, page 2)
————-

Further Reading

Influenza in Idaho

How the World’s Deadliest Pandemic Shaped the Gem State

source: Idaho State University Students, Idaho History, Summer 2020 June 25, 2020
——————-

Back to Table of Contents
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 1)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 2)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 3)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 4)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 5)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 6)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 7)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 8)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 9)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 10)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 11)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 12)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 13)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 14)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 15)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 16)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 17)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 18)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 19)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 20)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 21)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 22)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 23)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 24)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 25)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 26)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 27)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 28)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 29)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 30)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 31)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 32)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 33)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 34)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 35)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 36)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 37)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 38)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 39)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 40)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 41)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 42)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 43)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 44)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 45)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 46)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 47)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 48)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 49)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 50)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 51)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 52)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 53)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 54)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 55)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 56)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 57)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 58)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 59)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 60)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 61)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 62)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 63)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 64)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 65)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 66)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 67)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 68)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 69)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 70)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 71)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 72)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 73)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 74)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 75)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 76)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 77)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 78)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 79)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 80)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 81)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 82)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 83)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 84)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 85)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 86)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 87)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 88)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 89)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 90)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 91)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 92)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 93)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 94)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 95)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 96)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 97)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 98)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 99)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 100)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 101)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 102)