Idaho History Jan 17, 2021

Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic

Part 40

Idaho Newspaper clippings March 12-14, 1919

Photos courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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March 12

Evening Capital News., March 12, 1919, Page 8

19190312ECN1

19190312ECN2Little News of Boise

Mothers’ Pensions

Thirty mothers in Ada county are now receiving pensions under the Mothers’ Pension act. The total amount for February for pensions by the county commissioners, totaled $525. The influenza epidemic has left a number of mothers in the county who are receiving the benefits allowed by the act.
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Can Get Wise Here

Soldiers desiring information about $60 bonus and how to get it may find their questions answered by a bulletin posted on the public library board in front of the city hall.

source: Evening Capital News. (Boise, Idaho), 12 March 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Clarkia, Idaho 1922

Clarkia1922Fritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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March 13

Evening Capital News., March 13, 1919, Page 1

19190313ECN1

19190313ECN2
Boise Soldiers To Arrive Tonight Or On Friday Morning
Twenty members of 116th Engineers From Capitol City Discharged at Fort Logan Wednesday and on Way Home

Twenty Boise men in the 116th engineers, formerly the old Second Idaho regiment, who left for France in September, 1917, were discharged at Fort Logan, Col., Wednesday, March 12, left for this city on the same day and are expected to arrive here either at 9:30 o’clock tonight or early Friday morning, according to a wire received by the Boise Commercial club from Lieutenant Donald Kutnewsky this morning.

The wire received from Lieutenant Kutnewsky reads as follows: “Impossible for Boise men to come home together. About 20 leaving Wednesday.” …

source: Evening Capital News. (Boise, Idaho), 13 March 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Evening Capital News., March 13, 1919, Page 7

19190312ECN2Little News of Boise

Soldier Boy Dead

Word has been received of the death from pneumonia Feb. 18, of Corporal Martin S. Ward, of Company F, Second engineers. Mr. Ward was one of the old Second Idaho boys, a member of Company G, of Caldwell, and was one of the first to respond to the call to the border and later left with the company for duty overseas.
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Back From Seattle

M. C. Gillum, who has been employed in Seattle at the large shipyards, returned to Boise this morning in response to a call from his son Harry, advising that Mrs. Harry Gillum was in a critical condition at a Boise hospital.

(ibid, page 7)
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Evening Capital News., March 13, 1919, Page 8

With The State Exchanges

Quarantine Moscow Again

There are a number of new cases of influenza in Moscow and some of them are regarded as serious. A meeting of Mayor Truitt, City Health Officer Adair, County Health Officer Stevenson and others was held today and it was decided best to stop all dancing, parties and basketball games this week. The two games at the University of Idaho with the University of Washington team will be permitted, but no high school or public school students or pupils will be permitted to attend these or to attend any picture show or other gathering. – Star-Mirror, Moscow.
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19190313ECN3“Fake” Aspirin Was Talcum

Millions of fraudulent Aspirin Tablets were sold by a Brooklyn manufacturer which later proved to be composed mainly of Talcum Powder. “Bayer Tablets of Aspirin,” the true genuine, American made and American owned Tablets, are marked with the safety “Bayer Cross.” … (ad)

(ibid, page 8)
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The Emmett Index. March 13, 1919, Page 2

19190313EI1

Tales of Town

A paper published at Colony, Kan., reports that the town has not suffered a single death from influenza; that there are fewer widowers and fewer old maids in that town than in any other of similar size in the state; and that there are more songbirds per capita in Colony than in any other town in the state. This condition he ascribes to the fact that Colony is a catless town. The entire cat population has been exterminated, after a long fight. The invasion of mice and rats predicted by the cat partisans never materialized. And now the town is free from germs. The absence of cat hair in the grub encourages marriage; and the lack of cat companionship discourages single blessedness among timid women.

source: The Emmett Index. (Emmett, Idaho), 13 March 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Emmett Index. March 13, 1919, Page 5

News of Gem County
By The Index’s Correspondents

Letha

The flu is again in the community. Mrs. Robinson and two children have light attack and Mr. Robinson has only lately recovered from what he thought was grip, but which the doctor says was probably flu.
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Bramwell

A number of the neighbors and friends of Elmer Newman “went in” on them last Friday evening. The entertainment consisted of cards and dancing, with a lunch at midnight. It was the first gathering of the kind in many months and everyone enjoyed it fully.
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Hanna

Don’t forget the box supper at the schoolhouse tomorrow (Friday) night. This is for the benefit of the fund to purchase a bell. Everybody is invited and assured of the worth of their money.

John Liechty, Jr., who recently returned from the army, has been sick with a severe cold since coming and narrowly escaped a siege of pneumonia.
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Central Mesa

There is Sunday school every Sunday afternoon at 2 p.m. at the Central Mesa schoolhouse. Our school has been very much run down this winter owing to the flu epidemic. Every effort should be put forth to bring it up to the standard. Teachers and officers ask the hearty co-operation of all, and as it is a non-denomination school we ask all those establishing a new home in our community to come and help the good work along.
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Upper Mesa

Lots of travel now days is by horse back owing to the bad roads.

(ibid, page 8)
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The Grangeville Globe. March 13, 1919, Page 1

19190313GG1

Gone To California
County Physician and Mrs. Stockton Left Wednesday Morning

Dr. and Mrs. Stockton left Wednesday morning for California. They will be joined at San Francisco by their son Andrew, who resigned from the U. S. Naval Academy at Annapolis, Md., last month. Andrew sailed from New York some days ago, coming around by way of the Isthmus of Panama, to San Francisco, from where the family will go south for an indefinite period. The doctor has needed a rest badly for some time, but on account of the influenza epidemic and the serious shortage of physicians throughout the entire country, he deemed it to the best interests of all concerned to postpone his vacation until the epidemic had subsided.

source: The Grangeville Globe. (Grangeville, Idaho), 13 March 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Grangeville Globe. March 13, 1919, Page 2

Winona News

The Patterson family who have been in quarantine for scarlet fever are convalescent.

(ibid, page 2)
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The Grangeville Globe. March 13, 1919, Page 4

High School Notes

The fourth and sixth grades resumed their work again last Monday morning after a week’s dismissal, due to sickness.

Mrs. Arnold was absent last Thursday and Friday on account of sickness.

No assembly was held last Friday. At assembly the week before the student body was entertained by the Girls’ Glee club.

A basket ball game was played last week between the fifth and seventh grades. The fifth won the game by a score of 14 to 0.

(ibid, page 4)
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The Grangeville Globe. March 13, 1919, Page 5

Red Cross Notes

The Red Cross ladies state that it is very urgent that the shipment of socks for the refugees be completed at the earliest possible time. Work may be had at the Red Cross rooms or from Mrs. Hewes. It is requested that members of the Red Cross pay another dollar and receive a magazine for a year.

(ibid, page 5)
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The Grangeville Globe. March 13, 1919, Page 8

[Local News]

Mrs. Melissa McFeron, of Troy, Ida., sister of Mrs. William Connor, of this city, who has been visiting here for the past few weeks caring for the latter during a severe illness, departed for her home on yesterday morning’s train.

(ibid, page 8)
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Railroad Depot, Cocolalla, Idaho

CocolallaFritz

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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The Daily Star-Mirror., March 13, 1919, Page 1

19190313DSM1

Farmers Union Warehouse Increases Capital Stock

The Farmers Union Warehouse company, of Moscow, has increased its capital from $10,000 to $50,000. This was done at a special meeting of the stockholders held last night for the purpose. … The harvest work was followed by the influenza quarantine which forbade public meetings and this is the first opportunity the company has had to increase its stock. …

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 13 March 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., March 13, 1919, Page 5

City News

Mrs. Kendrick, as chairman of the study department of the Historical club, announces that there will be no meeting tomorrow afternoon on account of the health regulations. The next meeting will be held on the fourth Friday of March.

The regular rehearsal of St. Marks choir will take place tonight at 7:30 at the church.
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Plans For State Meet Near Perfection

Final plans for the State High School basket ball tournament on March 21-22, are being perfected. With the influenza situation in Moscow clearing up fast, prospects for making this the best tourney in history assume a rosy hue. The fact that the event comes after final examinations are out of the way is arousing still more enthusiasm. Advance drop has it that except in a few scattered instances, all of the students will remain in Moscow until after the final game.

Every student in the university is going to be asked to support the one big event of the scholastic year by purchasing at least one series ticket. “A big ticket drive will begin Monday morning and if you don’t have a tag you are going to be ridden to the end. We have to make this tournament a go and it is up to each and every student to get behind it for the price of a ticket. This is the statement of Boyde Cornelison, who is at the head of the ticket drive. …
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Summer School

A summer session of the University of Idaho has been authorized. It will open Monday, June 16th, and close six weeks later on July 25th. The courses to be offered will be announced in the near future. Six semester hours will be the limit of the credit which may be obtained by attendance at the Summer Session.

(ibid, page 5)
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The Nezperce Herald., March 13, 1919, Page 1

19190313NH1

Local News

The state high school basket ball tournament will be held at Moscow on March 21 and 22, and Nezperce will be there with her strong team. The earlier date was cancelled on account of a recent flu flurry in the University city.

Dr. E. S. Peterson was a Vollmer visitor last Friday.

Dr. Coggins was a visitor in the city from Ilo Saturday.

Dr. J. L. Kelly and son, Lynn, were visitors in the city from Winchester last night.

John McKinley returned last night from Lewiston, where he spent the first of the week with his wife, who is convalescing in a hospital there.

Yes, Easter comes April 20.
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County Agent Wade brings back word from Conrad Martin and family, whom he visited last week at Nyssa, Oregon, that Mrs. Martin and the two children are ill of the influenza; from which it is hoped by their many Nezperce friends they will speedily recover.
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Mr. and Mrs. A. R. Larson came in Monday from Reubens, where they were guests for a few days of Mr. Larson’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. C. J. Larson’ Mrs. A. R. having stopped over there on her way home from a visit at various points, following her siege in a Spokane hospital, and Albert having joined here there.
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Christian Sunday School Notes

A new high water mark in attendance was set last Sunday. There were 109 present and the collection amounted to $6.86. This is a good showing when it is remembered that the basket ball team and several other regulars were unable to be out.

source: The Nezperce Herald. (Nezperce, Idaho), 13 March 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Nezperce Herald., March 13, 1919, Page 2

Present estimates of military authorities put the number of Americans disabled in the war at 100,000. Of this number, it is estimated that 80,000 will be able to return to their old occupations, leaving 20,000 who need retraining for work suited to their maimed condition.

The federal board of vocational education, appealing to the country today for aid in the campaign to make disabled soldiers independent by making them self-supporting, announced that so far 13,000 men injured in fighting the battle of democracy, have registered for retraining. The applications of 1300 have been approved and 500 actually have started courses in reeducation. At least 15,000 disabled men are expected to enroll for vocational courses.

Tuition, books and living expenses are provided all disabled men taking courses, which may range from six months shop training to a four year college course. In no case does the allowance fall below $65 a month.

(ibid, page 2)
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The Nezperce Herald., March 13, 1919, Page 5

Local and Personal News Notes

R. H. Y. Moser returned Friday from a siege in a Lewiston hospital.

“Grandma” Robbinson, who has seriously ill the first of the week, is reported much better at this time.

The report comes that Mrs. D. E. Bell continues making satisfactory recovery at the hospital in Lewiston and expects to return home the first of next week.

Failure of congress to amend the Daylight Saving Act means that we must set out clocks ahead one hour March 30. Keep this in mind so that you may not miss your train, breakfast, or some other important engagement.

(ibid, page 5)
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The Nezperce Herald., March 13, 1919, Page 6

Route 2 News

Miss Lillie Schafer is succeeding well as teacher at the Alpine school.

Ed. Denton, who is caring for the stock on the former Clem Carey place, was laid up, at last reports, but a severe attack of the mumps.
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Public School News

The High School this week is having their monthly exams for the Month of March.

(ibid, page 6)
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Idaho County Free Press. March 13, 1919, Page 1

19190313ICFP1

19190313ICFP2Two Deaths at Cottonwood
B. Geise and Miss Margaret Lies are Summoned

Two deaths occurred Wednesday in Cottonwood.

Miss Margaret Lies, 19 years old, died Wednesday morning as a result of Spanish influenza. She is survived by her parents and several brothers and sisters.

B. Geise, 76, a retired farmer, died Wednesday afternoon.

A. J. Maugg, Grangeville funeral director, was called to Cottonwood by reason of the deaths.

source: Idaho County Free Press. (Grangeville, Idaho), 13 March 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Idaho County Free Press. March 13, 1919, Page 2

19190313ICFP3

(ibid, page 2)
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Idaho County Free Press. March 13, 1919, Page 3

Extracts From Address By C. J. Breier Before Convention of Store Managers, Held at Lewiston, Feb. 24, 1919

… In regard to shoes, it is the wave of prosperity that went through the country in the retail business before the influenza checked it, in a general agreement of the shoe manufacturers that meet in a monthly and semi-monthly convention that made shoe prices hold up as they are today. …
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Lucile

Miss Laura Twilegar arrived Friday from Spokane and is teaching the Cow creek school.

(ibid, page 3)
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Idaho County Free Press. March 13, 1919, Page 6

School Notes

The fourth and sixth grades have resumed classes after a week’s vacation on account of a sudden outbreak of influenza in those grades.
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Personal

Mackey Williams, of Mount Idaho, was in Grangeville Monday, and while here arranged for advertising matter for a dance and box social at Mount Idaho Friday night. The dance is for benefit of the Mount Idaho school and the Armenian relief fund.

(ibid, page 6)
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Colburn, Idaho

ColburnFritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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March 14

The Oakley Herald. March 14, 1919, Page 3

19190314OH1

Locals and Personals

Miss Nancy Holt is back again at her post as a teacher of the third grade after an attack of influenza.

The one-year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Larson died Monday.
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Announcement

Both of the Oakley banks will close at 1:00 p.m. March 17th, 1919, in honor of the celebration for our Returned Soldier Boys.

Oakley State Bank
Farmers Commercial
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Red Cross to Extend Activities

New York. — Plans for organization of an international Red Cross, to be led by the American Red Cross in a great peacetime campaign to prevent disease, relieve suffering and “make the world what the war was fought for – a better place to live in,” was outlined by Dr. Livingston Farrand, newly appointed chairman of the central committee of the American Red Cross, at a conference of Atlantic division chapter delegates here Saturday.

source: The Oakley Herald. (Oakley, Idaho), 14 March 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Clearwater Republican. March 14, 1919, Page 1

19190314CR1

Red Letter Day For The Fire Department

March third, last will be remembered for a long time to come by the members of the Orofino Fire Department who were present at it’s last meeting in the K. of P. Hall.

… After the entertainment the meeting settled down to business again and a committee of three, consisting of Harry Walrath, B. R. Schmid and Chas. Frensdorf was appointed for the annual Fireman Ball which was postponed on account of the influenza from February 22. …

source: Clearwater Republican. (Orofino, Idaho), 14 March 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Clearwater Republican. March 14, 1919, Page 2

Rheims To Get Hospital
First Great Memorial in Honor of United States Heroes

Paris. — Overlooking the 15,000 roofless houses of Rheims and overshadowed by its battered cathedral will stand the first great memorial to the American dead in France. This seems assured by the official advices that have reached the Paris headquarters of the American fund for French wounded to the effect that the French government will deed to the fund ground in the environs of Rheims on which a great American hospital will be erected. The sum of $100,000 for the purpose has already been guaranteed by the American fund organization in the United States.
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19190314CR2

(ibid, page 2)
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Clearwater Republican. March 14, 1919, Page 6

Summary Of The World’s Events …

During the months of December and January nearly 100,000 persons in the city of Petrograd died from hunger and as the result of epidemics.
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Casualty Total Quarter Million; 91st Shows 5800
Second Regular Division Suffered by Twenty-four Thousand Men, Says Gen. March

Washington. — Battle casualties of the American army in France as shown by revised divisional records announced March 10 by Gen. March totaled 240,197. These include killed in action, wounded, missing in action and prisoners. There probably will be some slight further revisions as final reports are received. The 91st division casualties numbered 5838.
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Idaho News Paragraphs

The influenza situation at Moscow is so much improved that the city health officer announces that the high school will be permitted to open and that picture shows may resume by admitting only adults and occupying only every alternate row of seats.

The Idaho legislature adjourned sine die at 5:30 Saturday afternoon, two days after its sixtieth day and following a rush to get through important pending legislation, including measures carrying millions in appropriations and bonds. The closing ceremonies were marked with simplicity.

(ibid, page 6)
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The Rathdrum Tribune., March 14, 1919, Page 1

19190314RT1

19190314RT2
Modifies Flu Ban
Town Board Permits Dancing Under Restrictions

The trustees of Rathdrum transacted some routine business at their regular meeting Monday evening.

The clerk was ordered to rent a safety deposit box at the bank in which to keep the more important town documents.

Authority was granted Chairman Berges to issue permits, in his discretion, to give invitation dances in Rathdrum, attendance at which to be limited by stipulation. On account of the possible danger of influenza it was not deemed advisable to lift the ban to such an extent as to allow unrestricted dancing. It was also voted to grant a permit to the Epworth League to hold a party in the church as per request. …
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From Over The County

Harrison

Joe Fredericks, while walking on the ice on Chatcolet lake, broke through. With assistance of a pole he managed to get out. He declares he doesn’t care for a repetition of such experience.
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Spirit Lake

Word was received of the death of Robt. Hughes in a hospital at Neurot, Germany. He was a soldier in the army of occupation and died of pneumonia. His parents, Mr. and Mrs. John C. Hughes, reside in Spirit Lake.
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Coeur D’Alene

Stephen Eachon, the ten year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Jack Eachon, died at the family residence Friday night of diphtheria.
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Idaho State News Items.

On account of 40 new cases of influenza, Moscow put the ban on public gatherings a part of last week.

Unusually heavy snows lie on the ground in the Boise basin country and it is said to be more solidly packed than for a number of years. From three and one half to four feet is reported at Idaho City.

source: The Rathdrum Tribune. (Rathdrum, Idaho), 14 March 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Rathdrum Tribune., March 14, 1919, Page 3

Personal Mention

M. B. Layton is out again after being confined to his home a few days by illness.

Miss Marian Laird came home from Ione, Wash., her school having been closed for a week on account of influenza.

Mrs. J. S. Woolery arrived home last Friday from Outlook, Wash., where her daughter, Miss Faye Woolery, who was quite ill with influenza, is now convalescent.

Dr. O. G. Farnsworth, veterinarian, finds himself considerably handicapped by the snow and bad road conditions in making calls to the outer limits of his territory.

F. B. Chambard has been carrying mail a part of the time under difficulties, owing to the heavy snow. He has been making the Ramsey district by train each morning and driving his rig to the head of Twin lakes in the afternoons.
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Local Paragraphs

Robins have appeared in this vicinity and wild geese have been heard honking on their northward migration.

The local Red Cross shop will be open Saturday afternoon for probably the last time, as no donations are now being received. Everything in the shop will be sold at 5 and 10 cents except the following: Crochet bed spread, baby walker, pair of ladies’ shoes, and hand pieced star quilt. If the shop is not open at any time persons wanting these articles are requested to call on the president or vice president, who will be glad to show them.
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19190314RT3

(ibid, page 3)
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Further Reading:

The Debate Over Rebuilding That Ensued When a Beloved French Cathedral Was Shelled During WWI

After the Notre-Dame de Reims sustained heavy damage, it took years for the country to decide how to repair the destruction

By Lorraine Boissoneault Smithsonian Mag APRIL 19, 2019

1914RheimsCathedral-aA German artillery shell hits the cathedral (“Collier’s New Photographic History of the World’s War” (1919) via Wikicommons)

For nearly a millennium, the French city of Reims was synonymous with its towering Gothic cathedral known as Notre-Dame. Not to be confused with the cathedral sharing the same name in Paris, the Reims church was the heart and soul of the region, its tallest towers rising 265 feet above the city’s 50,000 residents, its resplendent halls used for the coronation of nearly every monarch since the 13th century. But on the eve of the First World War in 1914, the cathedral’s magnificence brought it a different kind of attention: that of an easy target.

When the fighting began in August of that year, the invading German army quickly overwhelmed the northeast part of France, including Reims, and transformed the cathedral into an infirmary. They filled the church with 3,000 cots and 15,000 bales of dried grass to use as pallets—all of which remained inside the building after September 4, when the Allied forces of France and the United Kingdom sent the Germans on a rapid retreat after the First Battle of the Marne. With Reims now only a handful of miles from the front, the real destruction began.

Five German artillery shells hit the cathedral on September 18, crashing into the medieval structure, but the more devastating attack came a day later. “The projectiles, perhaps incendiary, set afire first the scaffold [around the towers] and then the hay. No more inflammable tinder could have been devised, and no accelerant was required,” writes historian Jan Ziolkowski. Lead from the burning roof poured through the mouths of the church’s stone gargoyles; windows exploded; the Smiling Angel statue that had stood near the front door for centuries lost its head.

Unlike the recent fire at Notre Dame de Paris, the assault on Reims Cathedral continued for four years. Around 300 German shells smashed into Notre Dame de Reims after its initial fire; around 85 percent of buildings in the city were destroyed as well. By the end of the war, the famous cathedral was a skeleton of its former self, and a symbol of the incomprehensible brutality of the conflict.

continued:
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Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 1)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 2)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 3)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 4)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 5)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 6)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 7)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 8)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 9)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 10)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 11)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 12)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 13)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 14)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 15)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 16)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 17)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 18)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 19)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 20)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 21)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 22)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 23)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 24)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 25)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 26)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 27)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 28)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 29)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 30)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 31)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 32)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 33)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 34)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 35)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 36)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 37)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 38)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 39)