Jan 17, 2021 The Yellow Pine Times

Jan 17, 2021 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Reminder: We are still under a boil water order until further notice.

Community Calendar:

Apr 17 – Boil water order issued
Aug 11 – Valley County Mask Order
(details below)
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From Valley County

Valley County Mask-Up
A county-wide mask mandate was approved the CDH August 11th, and is now in effect for Valley County. (link)
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Local Events:

Chili Cook-Off Jan 16

On Saturday, January 16, 2021, at 3pm the Annual Chili Cook-Off was held at the Community Hall.

Judging:

20210116ChiliCookOff-a

The winners:
1st – Christy Peterson
2nd – Kat Amos
3rd – Lexi Redmond

20210116ChiliCookOffWinners-a
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Village News:

Wednesday’s Storm Jan 13

An overnight storm with rain and wind in the early hours of Wednesday gave Yellow Pine 1/2″ of rain on top of snow and frozen ground making paths and roads icy and dangerous. It was so bad that Ray Arnold had to turn around and go back to Cascade with our mail and supplies. Our power blipped off and back on at 112pm. The temperature dropped to 8 degrees by Thursday morning. Studded tires and/or chains are needed to drive up the hill to the post office. A report that the corner by The Corner is very treacherous. Boot cleats are necessary to walk around outside. Ray made it in on Thursday, reporting that the road is a “sheet of ice all the way in from Cascade.”
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Fest 2021

Anyone interested in being a part of the Festival Planning/Working committee, please contact Deb Filler. Meetings will begin at the end of January. Even if you aren’t physically in YP, you can participate in the committee.
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Yellow Pine General Store

Please welcome Josh Jones as the new owner of the Yellow Pine General Store.
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Critters

Be Fox Aware

* Do not feed foxes human food
* Feed domestic pets indoors
* Make sure your pets are updated on Rabies vaccines
* Small pets could become a snack

Be Mountain Lion Aware

* NEVER run away from a mountain lion. The lion’s instinct is to chase and ultimately catch what they perceive as potential prey.
* NEVER turn your back on a lion. Always face them while making yourself look as large as you can. Yell loudly, but don’t scream. A high-pitched scream may mimic the sound of a wounded animal.
* SLOWLY back away while maintaining eye contact with the lion.
* Safety equipment you may choose to carry could include bear spray, a noise device, like an air-horn, and if you walk in the dark, a very bright flashlight.
* If you are attacked, fight back!
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Road Reports

Link: to current road reports.
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Yellow Pine US Mail

The 3-day a week mail delivery started Nov 2nd. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 55 cents. Support our local post office and purchase your holiday stamps here.
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Yellow Pine Transfer Station

20190429Dump2-bYellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: (208) 634-7176
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Local Groups

YPWUA News:

The annual Water meeting for 2020 was held July 5th at the Community Hall 2pm.
link: minutes 20200705YPWUA.docx

Boil Water Order issued April 17, 2020. This could last until leaks are repaired.

Update Nov 29: Warren replaced the water meter because of inconsistent readings. With the new meter, the community is currently using over 55,000 gallons of water per day. A leak has been identified and will be repaired as soon as we can coordinate the contractor, equipment needed and weather together. It is difficult to get everything planned in the winter. When the repair is scheduled, the community will have a few days notice before the water is shut down. Since we are using more water than the rated use through the sand filters, the boil order will remain in effect. We continue the grant request process that is extremely slow. – Steve H

Update Nov 25: the boil order is still in effect due to the large quantity of water that is leaking from the system. – Warren D

Boil Water Advisory Notice

Boil Your Water Before Using

Bring tap water to a rolling boil, boil for one minute, and cool before using or use bottled water. Boiled or bottled water should be used for drinking, making ice, washing dishes, brushing teeth, and preparing food until further notice.

This Boil Water Advisory Notice applies to The Yellow Pine Water System

The system is being monitored and checked daily for compliance.

You will be informed when you no longer need to boil your water.

Please share this information with other people who drink this water, especially anyone who may not get this notice directly (for example, people in apartments, nursing homes, schools, and businesses).

You can do this by posting this notice in a public place or distributing copies by hand or mail.

State Water System ID#: 4430059 Date distributed: 3-22-2020

Notice of Intent to File an Application with USDA, Rural Development

The Yellow Pine Water Users Association, Yellow Pine, Idaho intends to file an Application with USDA, Rural Development to obtain a drinking water system facility Emergency Community Water Assistance Grant (ECWAG). Emergency Community Water Assistance Grant (ECWAG).

If any additional information is needed, please contact:
Willie Sullivan
Treasurer
ypwater @ gmail.com

Distributed to Yellow Pine Water Users Association customers via Yellow Pine Times on June 12, 2020.
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VYPA News:

VYPA Meetings are the 2nd Saturday of June, July, August, and September (June 12, July 10, August 14, September 11) at 2:00pm at the Community Hall.

Village Council members:
Deb Filler, Chairman
Matt Huber, Vice Chairman
Ronda Rogers, Treasurer
Rhonda Egbert, Secretary
Ron Noel, Member at Large

Anyone interested in being a part of the Festival Planning/Working committee, please contact Deb Filler. Meetings will begin at the end of January. Even if you aren’t physically in YP, you can participate in the committee.

VYPA Bylaws adopted 8/8/2020 (link)

YPAC Corp Bylaws (link)
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YPFD News:

After Action Report meeting Oct 13, 2020 (no minutes yet.)

YPFD had a budget meeting on September 30th at 10am at the fire station. (No minutes yet.)

Make sure to keep your chimney clean. Cleaning brushes can be borrowed from the YPFD.

YPFD COVID19 Policy

link: YPFD Covid 19 SOP

link: Covid-19 EMS (May 23)

Pile burning: Dress appropriately, have enough help on hand (people, water and tools) and make a firebreak before you start. Call your local fire protection district chief to let them know you’ll be conducting a debris burn. This saves them from sending emergency responders to your property if they are not needed. Do NOT burn on breezy afternoons.

Better yet, “Bring It, Don’t Burn It”, you can take your yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, etc.) to the burn pile at the Transfer Station on the south end of the turn-around. Remember, keep the pile neat. Woody debris only, no nails, no cardboard and no furniture! The Boise NF will burn the pile in the fall when it is safe and doesn’t pollute our fine YP air.

YP Fire Commissioners:
Sue Holloway – District 1
Dan Stiff – District 2
Merrill Saleen – District 3
(TBA) – Fire Chief

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice

The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.” Click the link: to view 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation
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Biz Listings:

The Corner (208) 633-3325
Starting Nov 3rd open 3 days a week on mail days.
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Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233
Winter Closure: November 14, 2020 to April 16, 2021
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Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377
Closed Nov 3rd for winter.
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Yellow Pine General Store (208) 633-3300
New owner, plans to open this spring.
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Murph’s RV Park & Mary’s Cabins
FB page link
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Knotty Kat Crochet Works – 208-502-0940
FB page link
open Tue – Sat, 9-5
Yellow Pine eggs $3/doz
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Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Tom & Sarah Lanham
156 Yellow Pine Ave, Yellow Pine Id 83677
website:
Facebook:

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
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Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430 open 830am-5pm Monday-Friday, closed weekends.
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Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

The Star-News

click to subscribe:
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine

Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, will service Yellow Pine

B&T Safety Solutions LLC
208-271-1600 Based out of Donnelly
Snow removal, cleaning chimneys and stoves, we do cabin staining/chinking as well
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (Jan 11) overnight low of 8 degrees, partly clear – partly hazy sky, estimate 12″ old snow on the ground. Sunrise a little after 1035am. Red-breasted nuthatches, mountain chickadees, steller jays and the local pine squirrel visiting. Mostly sunny at lunch time and above freezing, high of 39 degrees. Mostly clear at sunset and a little above freezing. Clear and below freezing at dusk. Cloudy before midnight. Light snow before sunrise.

Tuesday (Jan 12) 24 hour low of 12 degrees from Monday morning, this morning overcast – sitting down on ridgetops, breeze gusting up once in a while and lightly misting. Measured 1/4″ new snow (SWE=0.02) and estimate 12″ snow on the ground. Nuthatches, a jay, a female hairy woodpecker and pine squirrel visiting. Socked in lower, sprinkling and breezy after lunch time, high of 42 degrees. Low overcast after sunset and light drizzle. Still raining lightly at dusk. A break in the rain but breezy before 930pm. More rain after midnight, wind gusts on and off, rained all night.

Wednesday (Jan 13) overnight low of 32 degrees, measured 0.50″ of rain in the gauge and 10″ old snow on the ground, mostly clear sky this morning and above freezing. Very slick paths – boot cleats required. Jays, nuthatches, female hairy woodpecker and pine squirrel visiting. Mail truck had to turn around and go back to Cascade. Power off/on at 112pm. Mostly clear and breezy early afternoon, high of 43 degrees. Mostly clear sky and breezy after sunset, still above freezing. Really icy. By dusk it had dropped to 25 degrees under clear skies. Looked mostly clear before midnight. Clear cold night.

Thursday (Jan 14) overnight low of 8 degrees, no new precipitation, measured 10″ old crusty snow on the ground, paths are glare ice (roads too.) Jays, nuthatches and pine squirrel visiting. Sunny and cold at lunch time, high of 35 degrees. Mail truck was a little early, roads are solid ice. High thin haze over most of the sky, light breezes and below freezing at sunset. Stars out before midnight.

Friday (Jan 15) 24 hour low of 9 degrees from Thurs morning, overcast sky this morning, measured 10″ old snow, paths and streets are very icy. Jays, mountain chickadees, red-breasted nuthatches and a pine squirrel visiting. Socked in and snowing mid-afternoon, high of 33 degrees. About 1/4″ snow by 4pm. Break in the snow at dusk, more than 1/2″ new snow. Snowing lightly after dark for a while. Stopped snowing before midnight.

Saturday (Jan 16) 24 hour low of 18 degrees from Fri morning, 1″ new snow (SWE=0.07″) and 11″ total snow, “cracked” overcast this morning, new snow just hides the glare ice underneath on the paths, very slick. Jays, nuthatches, a pair of hairy woodpecker and the pine squirrel visiting. Clear sky after lunch time, high of 39 degrees. Clear and cold after sundown. Looked cloudy before midnight.

Sunday (Jan 17) overnight low of 19 degrees, overcast sky this morning, measured 11″ snow on the ground. Jays, hairy woodpecker, red-breasted nuthatches and nutty pine squirrel visiting. Cloudy and quiet at lunch time, high of 39 degrees. Short snow flurry mid-afternoon, barely a trace. Partly clear after sunset, breezy and above freezing. Breezy at dusk.
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RIP:

Davis Mosqueda

August 26, 2000 – December 30, 2020

Boise, Idaho – Davis was born on August 26, 2000 in Boise, Idaho. He is survived by his parents, John J. Mosqueda and Monica L. Mouw. Davis has 5 siblings, Adriana, John, Michael, Lillian, and Joseph. Davis fell in love with the outdoors at an early age while spending time in Yellow Pine, Idaho with his great-grandparent’s John and Barbra Davis, his name sake.

Davis loved spending time on fishing and hunting trips with his dad, grandfathers, brothers, and extended family. Davis had a love of history and anything to do with muscle cars; especially Ford Mustangs. Davis was also passionate about shooting, playing sports including baseball and football, talking about cars and going on camping adventures with his sisters, brothers, cousins and close friends. One of Davis’ favorite past times was simply hanging out at home. Davis loved playing video games with his brothers. He was always happiest when surrounded by his brothers, sisters and cousins.

Alongside his mother Monica, Davis had several grandmothers, aunts and his step-mother Dominque, all of which loved him deeply. Davis took great joy in being around all these great women. They taught him to always be a gentleman and to respect all women. Davis loved pretending that he did not like being babied by them, yet basked in their affection. He truly loved and worried about them all.

Davis had a strong faith in GOD and he shared that with his family, friends and his beautiful girlfriend, Mary, who Davis deeply cared for. Before Davis came home Mary had written that during her time with Davis, he had “shared his relationship with the Lord..” and “opened (her) eyes to the boundlessness of His forgiveness.” and that, “We have to forgive those that hurt us, because Jesus died for us so that we could be forgiven.”

Davis’ kind heart and spirit could not stand to see anyone who couldn’t protect themselves be in danger. His complete loyalty to his family and friends was never in doubt. Initially the desire to help others began so that he could be like his childhood heroes; Superman and Spiderman, followed by a close second was his father, grandfathers and uncles. As Davis grew older, Davis still felt that calling and felt the best way to do that was to earn the title of U.S Marine. Joining the USMC was never about using the money for college or just doing something after high school. It was something Davis had decided he wanted to do, since he was in the 4th grade. He really wanted to help people by protecting them as a U.S Marine. He left for bootcamp in late July of 2018. He was still 17 when he enlisted.

Davis always pushed himself and was continually striving to be the best that he could be. As a result, he was chosen to join the elite Silent Drill Platoon. Davis always held himself to a high standard and was driven to make his family proud.

“Lance Corporal Mosqueda was one of only 19 Marines selected out of 86 early last year, from there, he outcompeted his peers during spring training while in Yuma, AZ to earn a spot on the Marching 24. In November, he was one of 3 Marines nominated to be the next Assistant Drill Master; a coveted position meant for our very best. He was ultimately selected for the job by the company board (T.A. PASTEL, Colonel, USMC Commanding Officer)”.

Davis was never one to openly express what he was feeling or whom he had deep feelings for, unless he was in private, or the person in need just really needed to hear it…whether they wanted to or not. Even through that tough exterior, the people close to him never doubted how much Davis loved them. Davis’ love, affection, and loyalty were extended to his family, friends, and Marine Brothers. Davis always wanted the best for those in his circle and would never give up on them. Davis was constantly calling to check on his family, and friends, just in case they needed anything. He was always there for everyone, and if you were a friend or family member, Davis always had your back. Davis would always put others first. Even if that put his own life on hold or in jeopardy.

He didn’t stray from his beliefs, especially on Dec. 30, 2020 when he was taken from us while protecting a young lady. Davis died like he lived, and he bravely lived up to being a U.S. Marine. He faced his attacker head on, and did not turn and run. Davis, died like a man. Davis, made his father, his mother, and every one of his family and friends proud. Davis may no longer be physically with us, but Davis’ love, loyalty, humor, sense of honor, and bravery will continue to be a part of everyone that new him. Until we are all together again in GOD’s glory, rest in peace Davis Mouw Mosqueda, Lance Corporal, USMC, our son, grandson, brother, nephew, cousin, boyfriend and friend.

source:
[h/t B]
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Diana Lynne Julian

August 23, 1952 – December 15, 2020

Diana Lynne Julian, 68, of Cascade, Idaho passed away on December 15, 2020. While her passing was unexpected, she fortunately did not suffer and was at peace.

At the request of family, there is no service planned at this time.

Diana was born in Kemmerer, Wyoming on August 23, 1952 as the eldest child of Glenn and Marilyn Roberts. She graduated high school and enrolled at the University of Wyoming in the fall of 1970. A chance meeting Ronn Julian during the summer blossomed into a relationship that would last 50 years. The couple was married on July 17, 1971 at the Berta A. Penny Memorial Methodist Church in Kemmerer.

The young couple established residency in Kemmerer where Ronn worked at the Kemmerer coal mine and with his father on the family ranch. Their first son Chad came along in 1973. An opportunity for a professional Forest Service career surfaced in 1974 and the three relocated to Meeteetse, WY. Second son Eric was added to the family in 1975. An opportunity for advancement created the need to relocate to Powell, WY in the fall of 1977 and daughter Stacie was added to the clan the next spring. In 1982 the family moved to the prairie land of Wall, South Dakota and remained there until 1987 when the mountains of Idaho were calling and they relocated to Cascade. They have resided here for the past 33 years.

Diana worked at Wheelers Pharmacy for nearly two decades and staffed the old Corner Store for much of that time. She had a love for music and passed that flame to nearly forty piano students she taught in her home over the years. Family was important to Diana and she worked tirelessly decorating the family home each Christmas. She also enjoyed cooking for her family and baking, especially using her Mother’s recipes. She looked forward to visits from her kids and grandchildren including the frequent video chats of the technology age.

She is survived by husband Ronn of 49 years, father Glenn of Yuma, Arizona; brother Glennie and spouse of Bar Nunn, WY; sister Shelley and spouse of Castlerock, Colorado; children Chad, Eric and Stacie Cavner and their spouses; and three grandchildren.

She is preceded in death by her Mother, Marilyn Roberts; grandson Myles Cavner.

published: The Star-News Jan 14, 2021
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Idaho News:

1,112 new Idaho COVID-19 cases, 12 new deaths

Jan 15, 2021 Local News 8

Idaho officials reported 1,112 new COVID-19 cases and 12 new deaths on Friday.

That brings the total confirmed and probable cases reported since March to 154,470.

There are a total of 126,422 confirmed cases and 28,048 probable cases in all 44 of the 44 counties in Idaho, according to numbers released from the local health districts and the state. …

12 new deaths were reported bringing the total recorded deaths to 1,603.

full story: (Valley Co: 603 cases 4 deaths)
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Idaho Wednesday, January 13

source: KTVB
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Valley County COVID-19 cases reach 572, up 51 in week

By Tom Grote for The Star-News Jan 14, 2021

The total number of positive COVID-19 cases in Valley County since the start of the pandemic surged to 572 cases by Tuesday, up 51 cases from 521 a week ago, health officials said.

St. Luke’s McCall on Tuesday reported 480 total positive cases from testing done at the hospital, up 48 cases from 432 a week ago.

Cascade Medical Center reported 92 positive cases through Monday, or three more than the 89 cases reported last week.

Central District Health reported 474 of the positive cases were confirmed to be Valley County residents as of Tuesday, which is 60 more than the 414 cases reported a week ago.

The difference between the hospital figures and the health department figures are those who tested positive but did not declare Valley County as their residence.

Three confirmed deaths of Valley County residents related to COVID-19 have been reported. The health district also reported one probable death from COVID-19, a man over age 80. No other information was disclosed for privacy reasons.

continued:
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Cascade hospital takes reservations for COVID-19 vaccine

The Star-News Jan 14, 2021

Cascade Medical Center is now taking reservations to give the COVID-19 vaccine to essential members of the community starting in February.

The hospital began vaccinating employees of the hospital and clinic as well as EMS personnel in December, a process that will continue until the end of January when all of those workers will have received both their initial and booster doses, hospital CEO Tom Reinhardt said.

“Included in the next round will be front line ‘essential workers’ such as first responders, school staff, and store employees,” Reinhardt said.

“We will open it up to seniors and high risk residents after that, and then the general population,” he said.

Those who want to receive the vaccine can call 208-382-4285, follow the prompts, and leave a message or go to (link)

source: © Copyright 2009-present Central Idaho Publishing Inc. • All rights reserved. Used with permission.
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Valley sets Tuesday hearing on Idaho 55 jake brake ban

By Max Silverson for The Star-News Jan 14, 2021

Rules that would outlaw the use of air compression brakes on Idaho 55 between Lake Fork and McCall are set to go before Valley County Commissioners on Tuesday.

The commission will hold a public hearing at 1 p.m. Tuesday at the Valley County Courthouse in Cascade to restrict air compression brakes, commonly called “jake brakes” on five miles of Idaho 55 between Elk Haven Lane and McCall.

To view the hearing, visit (link) and follow the link “watch commissioner meeting minutes live.”

To comment via phone or in person, call 208-382-7102 before Friday at 5 p.m. or email County Clerk Douglas Miller at dmiller@co.valley.id.us.

continued:
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Online course set Jan. 21 on opioid overdose response

The Star-News Jan 14, 2021

Valley County residents can learn about preventing, recognizing and responding to an opioid overdose during a virtual training next Thursday, Jan. 21, from 3 p.m. to 4 p.m.

The training will also include information on Idaho’s Good Samaritan Law and where to access overdose prevention tools and recovery support services.

Cost is free for Valley County residents. For more information or to register, visit (link

source:
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UI Extension, Valley County Winter 2020-2021

A six-week online class for individuals who want to can and preserve foods for their families. No prior knowledge is required. For more information, click the link below.

Cost: $35 per person

Next class starts in January 2021.

link:
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Idaho snowpack mostly strong in southwestern Idaho

The atmospheric river that dropped snow and rain throughout the region on Tuesday and Wednesday has helped increase snow levels.

January 14, 2021 KTVB


Credit: IDWR

Idaho’s snowpack levels for the region remained mostly strong in January, laying the groundwork for a good water year, officials say.

According to the Idaho Water Supply Committee, the Boise, Payette, and Weiser basins all hit 95 to 96 percent of the 25-year average for snowpack this time of year. The atmospheric river that dropped snow and rain throughout the region on Tuesday and Wednesday helped bring those levels up.

continued:
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Letters to Share:

Administrative Settlement Agreement and Order on Consent (ASAOC) for the Historical Stibnite Mining District

Water quality at abandoned mine site will see much needed help through U.S. Government direction

“While we did not cause the problems impacting water quality today, we have always been clear in our intentions to be a part of the solution. So, when we saw the need to address sources of water contamination more quickly at Stibnite, we knew we had to offer our help.
– Laurel Sayer, CEO Midas Gold Corp, and Midas Gold Idaho

On January 15, 2021, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Forest Service (USFS), with concurrence by the U.S. Department of Justice, signed an Administrative Settlement Agreement and Order on Consent (“ASAOC” or the “Agreement”) with Midas Gold that instructs Midas Gold to clean up contaminated conditions within Idaho’s abandoned Stibnite mining district. While Midas Gold did not cause the environmental problems at Stibnite, the Agreement directs and authorizes the company to provide private investment and conduct time critical cleanup actions to address water quality concerns that have plagued the abandoned hardrock site for decades. The Agreement is a necessary step for a private entity, such as Midas Gold, to provide investment and environmental cleanup at an abandoned mine site.

Water at Stibnite is heavily impacted from decades-old mining activity largely stemming from unregulated mining around the World War II era. However, through a series of settlements between prior operators and government agencies, the site has been effectively abandoned with no responsible parties left to address existing conditions. Through the multi-year process of evaluation and discussions, the EPA concluded in the Agreement that current site conditions constitute an “actual or threatened release of hazardous substances” which warrants immediate and time critical actions to protect human health, welfare, and the environment.

To provide investment and cleanup of legacy environmental hazards and waste left behind at Stibnite under a clear plan approved by regulators, Midas Gold reached an agreement with federal agencies under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (“CERCLA”) to define the work the company will conduct and to clarify protections for the company from inheriting the environmental liability of past actors who abandoned the site.

Midas Gold’s vision is that private industry can provide environmental solutions and today’s agreement shows that the commitment to restoring the site is not only theoretically possible but can become a reality. Under the agreement, Midas Gold is authorized to conduct EPA supervised activity to provide improvements to water quality. Phase 1 of the agreement will remove 325,000 tons of legacy waste, provide water diversions, and involve environmental, site characterization and cultural studies of the site to better inform actions in phases 2 and 3 which would occur if the Stibnite Gold Project is approved for mining through the National Environmental Policy Act (“NEPA”). Work conducted under this Agreement will be approved and closely overseen by the Environmental Protection Agency and United States Forest Service and will be safeguarded by financial assurance to make sure the work is completed.

The agreement is separate from project approval for the Stibnite Gold Project and will have no impact on the permitting process for the Project which is currently underway. Nor does the agreement change the schedule to complete the comprehensive environmental review and analysis under NEPA.

“Water quality in the Stibnite Mining District has been a known problem for decades. As the closest community to the site, I can tell you that cleanup is long overdue. This agreement between the EPA and Midas Gold is the first meaningful step toward real improvements in water quality conditions for the East Fork South Fork Salmon River and downstream communities like Yellow Pine. We have seen Midas Gold’s commitment to doing business the right way and their willingness to help with clean up now tells me they are the right partner for this effort.”
–Willie Sullivan, Yellow Pine Resident, and board member of the Yellow Pine Water Users Association

Important Facts

1. The historical Stibnite mining district in central Idaho has seen mining activity for over 100 years and was a critical source of antimony and tungsten for the U.S. war efforts through WWII (World War II) and the Korean War. Today, legacy sources of water pollution largely stemming from War-era mining activity are impacting the East Fork of the South Fork of the Salmon River, Meadow Creek, and ground water sources in the region.

2. From 2000 to 2012, three Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) settlements were signed between previous operators at Stibnite and U.S. agencies regarding the historical Stibnite mining district. These settlements provided some improvements to site conditions but effectively left Stibnite with no parties responsible for remaining environmental conditions. Yet, water quality has continued to be impacted by the release of hazardous substances stemming from legacy features. In some areas of site, recent data shows arsenic in ground water can peak at 700 times the drinking water standard. EPA has considered Stibnite for listing on the National Priority List of sites needing attention since 2001.

3. Midas Gold recognizes that if redevelopment of mining activity were to occur at Stibnite, it needs to address the environmental legacies that have been left behind. Therefore, the proposed Stibnite Gold Project was designed to address the legacy conditions within the mine’s footprint in parallel with proposed mining activity and has been under NEPA review since 2016. Project operations alone would likely leave contaminated conditions outside the Project footprint unaddressed and provide no environmental uplift before mining begins. The ASAOC will both provide action now and provide long term sitewide cleanup during future operations.

4. In 2018, Midas Gold approached the EPA regarding water quality conditions at Stibnite that were troubling and sought to identify a path to clarify how the Company could address these legacy sources of water contamination without inheriting the liability belonging to past actors.

5. Through many years of discussion and planning lead by the EPA, the ASAOC is a legally enforceable order that will direct Midas Gold in the immediate cleanup of important areas of the historical mining district and allow for site-wide legacies to be addressed should the Stibnite Gold Project be approved. The Agreement provides clarity to both Midas Gold and the EPA on expectations, milestones and outcomes for site cleanup and penalties.

6. The ASAOC does not authorize mining activity nor does it change the NEPA permitting process or anticipated timeline for the NEPA review of the Stibnite Gold Project.

7. The ASAOC recognizes that Midas Gold had no role in creating the problems at Stibnite and may conduct, under agency direction, work to address environmental conditions at Stibnite without inheriting the liability of the conditions left by past operators.

8. The ASAOC comes with a determination by federal regulators that site conditions presently constitute an “actual or threatened release of hazardous substances” and that time critical removal actions are necessary to protect human health, welfare and the environment. As such, the Agreement directs Midas Gold to conduct near-term actions focused on addressing the most immediate needs to improve water quality and then provides a path for the long-term comprehensive cleanup of the site should the Stibnite Gold Project be approved.

9. Phase 1, which is based on a plan developed with regulators in consultation with two Idaho tribes, will take four years and includes the removal of 325,000 tons of legacy waste, investigation of five adit areas, a site characterization study, three water diversions, a biological assessment, Section 404 Clean Water Act evaluation and a cultural resource survey. Phase 1 actions were determined by the agencies to improve water quality most efficiently within the financial resources of Midas Gold currently. Should the Stibnite Gold Project be approved and phases 2 and 3 undertaken, the order provides a path to comprehensive site cleanup in conjunction with an approved mining plan.

10. The Government Accountability Office’s 2020 report on abandoned hardrock mines, prepared for the Ranking Subcommittee Member on the Interior, Environment and Related Agencies Subcommittee of the U.S. Senate’s Committee on Appropriations, cited a lack of resources and concerns around liability as the primary roadblocks to providing solutions to the nation’s abandoned mines. It noted that “state agency officials and other stakeholders we interviewed, such as nongovernmental organizations and mining companies, have limited their participation in projects to address environmental hazards at abandoned mines because of concerns about their potential legal liability under CERCLA and the Clean Water Act” (p.35). Within the report, USFS estimates that, assuming no private party contribution, it would cost USFS approximately $6 billion to address environmental hazards at 6,600 abandoned hardrock mine sites on USFS land.
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ASAOC Frequently Asked Questions

What is an Administrative Settlement Agreement and Order on Consent (ASAOC)?

An ASAOC is a voluntary but legally binding and enforceable cleanup agreement entered between a private party and federal entities under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (“CERCLA”). These agreements will often outline work that needs to be conducted to address an environmental concern and will establish an agreed upon schedule for cleanup work, required financial assurances to ensure work is completed and establish potential penalties if the agreement is not followed.

Why did Midas Gold Pursue an Agreement Under an ASAOC?

An ASAOC is necessary to allow a third-party, like Midas Gold (“Midas Gold” or “Company”), to voluntarily address environmental conditions at an abandoned mine site without inheriting the liability of the conditions left behind by past operators.

In order to provide investment and cleanup of legacy environmental hazards and waste left behind at Stibnite, both through near-term actions and via a more comprehensive approach should the Stibnite Gold Project (“Project”) be approved, Midas Gold needed an agreement with federal agencies under CERCLA to gain permission and define the work the company will conduct and to clarify protections for the company from inheriting the environmental liability of past actors who abandoned the site.

What is The Problem at Stibnite?

The historical Stibnite mining district in central Idaho had seen mining activity for over 100 years and was a critical source of antimony and tungsten for the U.S. war efforts through WWII (“World War II”) and the Korean War. Today, legacy sources of water pollution largely stemming from War-era mining activity are impacting the East Fork of the South Fork of the Salmon River, Meadow Creek, and ground water sources in the region. However, from 2000 to 2012, three CERCLA settlements were signed between previous operators at Stibnite and U.S. agencies regarding conditions at the historical Stibnite mining district. These settlements provided some improvements to site conditions but effectively left Stibnite with no parties responsible for unaddressed environmental conditions. Unfortunately, water quality has continued to be impacted by the release of hazardous substances stemming from legacy features.

In the Company’s investigation of the site, Midas Gold identified and subsequently alerted regulatory agencies to water quality data indicating concerning levels of antimony and arsenic in groundwater at Stibnite. In some areas of the site near legacy features, recent data shows arsenic in ground water can peak at 700 times the drinking water standard. Midas Gold reached out to EPA in 2018 as to the water quality data it was observing. This started discussions that led to the ASAOC.

Who was Involved in the Agreement Process?

The voluntary cleanup agreement was agreed to by Midas Gold, the Environmental Protection Agency (“EPA”) and the U.S. Forest Service (“USFS”) in concurrence with the U.S. Department of Justice (“DOJ”). It is the result of three years of discussion with the EPA, and which later included the U.S. Department of Justice, U.S. Forest Service, State of Idaho, the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Natural resource trustees, including the Fish and Wildlife Service, were also participants in discussions. Before finalizing the agreement, the EPA was also responsible for conducted government-to-government consultation with the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes and Nez Perce Tribe.

Is this Unique to Midas Gold?

No. Contamination on abandoned mining sites remain a significant problem in the United States, often impacting water quality. The federal government and states lack the resources to clean up these abandoned sites and need to attract privately funded entities to do so. To attract cleanup financing, it is important to find a way to address legacy contamination on private and public land without making the private entity liable for the environmental conditions it did not create. This ASAOC meets these twin goals.

The Government Accountability Office’s 2020 report on abandoned hardrock mines for the Ranking Member for the Subcommittee on Interior, Environment and Related Agencies of the U.S. Senate Committee on Appropriations, cited a lack of resources and concerns around liability as the primary roadblocks to providing solutions to the nation’s abandoned mines. Specifically, the report announced that “state agency officials and other stakeholders we interviewed, such as nongovernmental organizations and mining companies, have limited their participation in projects to address environmental hazards at abandoned mines because of concerns about their potential legal liability under CERCLA and the Clean Water Act” (p.35). Within the report, USFS estimates that, assuming no private party contribution, it would cost USFS approximately $6 billion to address environmental hazards at 6,600 abandoned hardrock mine sites on USFS land. (link

Does the Agreement Impact the Stibnite Gold Project or Include Mining?

No. The agreement does not supersede the ongoing regulatory review process under NEPA (National Environmental Policy Act) for the Stibnite Gold Project and only applies to the environmental cleanup activities specified in the order. We anticipate having an official decision on the Stibnite Gold Project in late 2021.

Why Does the Agreement Authorize Activity Now?

Within the ASAOC, the federal agencies determine that site conditions constitute “actual or threatened release of hazardous substances” and that time critical removal actions are necessary to protect human health, welfare, and the environment. Therefore, phase 1 of this agreement is intended to address these most pressing needs that should not wait for the potential approval of the Stibnite Gold Project.

When will Environmental Cleanup Work Begin?

We have already started to identify and prepare work plans with the EPA to allow work to begin as soon as spring conditions allow. The work will continue over the next four years.

What Work Does the Agreement Include?

The first phase of the Agreement consists of CERCLA response actions is designed to have an immediate improvement on water quality over the next four years. It includes three “time critical” removal actions where 325,000 tons of historical mine waste near the East Fork South Fork Salmon River affecting water quality in the river will be removed from key locations. Midas Gold will also conduct three water diversions designed to keep clean water away from areas of the site where interaction with large-scale legacy features have been degrading water quality. Phase 1 also provides for the examination of five adits, a biological assessment, a Section 404 Clean Water Act evaluation, and a cultural resources study in addition to a characterization study to evaluate and inform additional actions in Phase 2 and 3 of the Agreement.

The cleanup actions will be overseen by federal agencies and secured with financial assurance. The Agreement established Midas Gold will provide $7.5 million in financial assurance to the federal agencies to guarantee the first phase of work.

How Much will these Actions Improve Water Quality?

EPA will be approving water diversions and waste removal actions based on data and best management practices to keep clean water clean and remove mine waste impacting water quality. The projects in Phase 1, to be closely overseen by EPA, are being designed to have the most efficient and immediate improvement of water quality in high priority areas in the district.

What will Happen in Phase 2 and Phase 3?

Phase 2 and 3 are contingent upon the Stibnite Gold Project being approved. Phases 2 and 3 will focus on the non-time critical removal actions that fall outside of the project footprint for the Project. This work will be informed by a site characterization study and may require larger scale action, planning and public review.

If the Stibnite Gold Project receives full regulatory approval, Phase 2 and Phase 3 of the Agreement may proceed with such CERCLA response actions occurring side-by-side with redevelopment and operations of the Stibnite Gold Project that includes mine site reclamation. These two phases of the Agreement would focus on areas in the historic Stibnite mining district that are outside of our proposed project, expanding reclamation and restoration work into areas of the historical mining district that would otherwise not be addressed through our plans.

Phase 3 calls for response actions to be developed that would provide for permanent environmental solutions for areas of the site left previously unaddressed, in essence, the final phase of a comprehensive effort to finally cleanup and restore the Stibnite Mining District.

What will Happen if the Project does not move Forward?

If the Stibnite Gold Project is not permitted, the ASAOC will terminate after Phase 1 and Phases 2 and 3 will not proceed.

How Does the ASAOC Impact Future Liability for Midas Gold?

Midas Gold is not absolved of any potential liability for its own actions under any other Federal or state law as a result of being a party to this ASAOC. Instead, the agreement clarifies that by pursuing early work to help clean up environmental legacies at Stibnite, Midas Gold will not create new liability for itself for the harm caused in these contaminated areas of the site by previous operators.

Will the Agreement Release Midas Gold from the Lawsuit with the Nez Perce Tribe?

We do not know what impact the Agreement might have on the lawsuit but in a previous phase of the litigation, the federal judge overseeing the case invited the Company to renew its previous motion to stay the litigation when a CERCLA order was “imminent.”

What we do know is that the ASAOC will allow for the near-term removal of sources that are causing water contamination in areas addressed by the suit. We hope that the Agreement will provide an opportunity to reach resolution with the Tribe as we would prefer to be out of the courtroom and focused on doing good work on the ground that can benefit all parties. It is important to point out the EPA and Midas Gold first started discussing the problems at site and the potential agreement well before a lawsuit over water quality was filed.

What impacts will this have on the NEPA Process?

The Agreement does not replace or supersede our ongoing permitting process or environmental review under NEPA. The proposed construction, mining operations, site restoration and other actions are summarized in the Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) released by the U.S. Forest Service in 2020. The Project will continue to be analyzed under the various review processes outlined in NEPA.

The ASAOC addresses cleanup of areas inside and outside of our proposed project footprint. If the Stibnite Gold Project is permitted, the ASAOC provides a future pathway for the ultimate restoration of the entire site, including contaminated areas beyond those being evaluated under NEPA which Midas Gold is not responsible for creating and which would not otherwise be addressed through mining.

see also:
EPA Authorizes Immediate Cleanup at Site
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Mining News:

Midas Gold Reaches Agreement to Begin Environmental Restoration at Abandoned Mine Site and Announces Relocation to United States

* Agreement Signed with Federal Agencies to Improve Water Quality at Stibnite
* Midas Gold Moves Headquarters to Idaho and Intends to Redomicile to United States
* Nasdaq Listing Application Submitted and Related Share Consolidation Approved

Jan. 15, 2021

Midas Gold Corp. today announced, after three years of extensive discussions, federal agencies have authorized and directed the Company to perform agreed immediate clean up actions to address contaminated legacy conditions within Idaho’s abandoned Stibnite mining district that are negatively impacting water quality. While Midas Gold did not cause the legacy environmental problems at Stibnite, the recently signed agreement points to the need for timely environmental action and is a testament to the Company’s willingness to take part in environmental restoration. The Agreement (as defined below) is necessary to allow the Company to voluntarily address environmental conditions at the abandoned mine site without inheriting the liability of the conditions left behind by past operators. As such, the Company may now provide the early clean up actions deemed necessary by the federal government to improve water quality. Should the Stibnite Gold Project (“Project”) move forward with proposed mining and restoration activities, this Agreement will also allow for comprehensive site cleanup by directing the Company to address legacy features including millions of tons of legacy mine tailings that fall outside of the Project footprint and would otherwise not be addressed. With the Agreement in place, Midas Gold is now moving forward with plans to relocate its corporate headquarters from British Columbia, Canada to Boise, Idaho and intends to redomicile the Company to the United States. Midas Gold has also approved a share consolidation in connection with a planned U.S. listing on the Nasdaq Stock Market (“Nasdaq”).

Agreement Reached to Address Legacy Water Quality

Through an Administrative Settlement Agreement and Order on Consent (“ASAOC” or the “Agreement”) signed on January 15, 2021 by the Environmental Protection Agency (“EPA”) and U.S. Forest Service, with concurrence by the U.S. Department of Justice, Midas Gold has been instructed to clean up certain contaminated conditions within the Stibnite mining district in Idaho. The sources of contamination to be addressed by the Agreement are decades old and largely stem from tungsten and antimony mining during World War II and the Korean War, long before Midas Gold started planning for redevelopment of the site.

The cleanup Agreement was entered into under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (“CERCLA”) and is the result of almost three years of discussion with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The EPA also lead discussions with U.S. Department of Justice, U.S. Forest Service, State of Idaho, and two Idaho tribes. Before finalizing the agreement, the EPA also conducted government-to-government consultation with the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes and Nez Perce Tribe.

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EPA: Stibnite gold mine study lacks detail

Midas Gold says water quality info already provided

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News Jan 14, 2021

A federal study of Midas Gold’s proposed Stibnite Gold Project lacks details needed to accurately gauge the project’s harm to water quality, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

A 29-page letter outlining shortcomings of a draft environmental study of the project was sent to the Payette National Forest, the lead permitting agency for the mine and author of the draft study.

The letter was submitted after the Oct. 28 public comment deadline, but that deadline did not apply to the EPA, Payette forest Public Affairs Officer Brian Harris said.

“The EPA is a federal agency, and as a cooperating agency in preparing the EIS, they communicate with the Forest Service on a frequent basis,” Harris said.

Nearly all of the details and further analysis requested by the EPA has already been provided in supplemental reports over the last two years, Midas Gold spokesperson Mckinsey Lyon said.

“Because most of the information highlighted in the letter has been provided and was analyzed in the (draft study), we are confident that the concerns will be addressed in the Forest Service’s process between now and the final study,” Lyon said.

The supplemental reports relevant to the EPA’s worries are available on request from Midas Gold or the Payette, she said.

The letter recommends ways to resolve the shortcomings in the final environmental study on the project which currently is slated for release in August.

Water Treatment

Permanent water treatment would be needed at Stibnite to prevent water contaminated with pollutants like arsenic, antimony and mercury from entering the East Fork South Fork Salmon River, according to the draft study.

But missing from the draft study are specific details of the water treatment process and how treatment could improve contaminant concentrations predicted by water studies, the EPA letter said.

“It is not clear what the specific water treatment steps would be, and it is not possible to evaluate the ability of the treatment system to meet water quality standards,” the EPA said.

Midas Gold is required to fund all site clean-up work in advance of mining, but water treatment costs also cannot be accurately estimated until complete details are specified, the letter said.

The EPA suggests comparing different water treatment strategies to determine which method would best reduce contamination.

Potentially contaminated water that flows through features of the mine, like waste rock storage areas, would await treatment in storage ponds, which also are not detailed in the draft study, the EPA said.

The final study should specify the locations of the ponds, embankments that would contain them, liners used to prevent leaks and how the ponds would be monitored for leaks, the EPA letter said.

Pollutants

About 32 pounds of airborne mercury particles would be generated each year by mining operations, including about 25 pounds per year from ore processing.

However, the Payette’s draft study does not factor settling of the mercury particles into nearby soil, wetlands and waterways.

“Without this assessment, it is likely that the draft EIS underpredicts the impacts of mercury on surface water quality and aquatic resources,” the EPA letter said.

“Therefore, it is not possible to assess whether additional mitigation would need to be applied,” the letter said.

Midas Gold has proposed air scrubbers and carbon absorption methods to reduce mercury pollution, but the draft study incorrectly implies those methods capture all mercury particles, the EPA said.

The letter also urges management plans for stormwater run-off, dust emissions control and wastewater treatment to increase the accuracy of water quality studies in the draft study.

Groundwater

The final environmental study needs to clarify the duration and extent that contaminated groundwater beneath three open pit mines could spread at Stibnite, the EPA letter said.

“While statements in the draft EIS imply that 100% of the groundwater would migrate to the pits, groundwater flow maps are not presented to support this conclusion,” the letter said.

Contaminated groundwater that does not flow back to the pit mines would not be captured for treatment and could contaminate nearby rivers, streams and wetlands, the letter said.

The EPA also notes that water studies in the draft study do not specify the benefits of Midas Gold cleaning up 12 million tons of historic mining waste currently contaminating groundwater at Stibnite.

source: © Copyright 2009-present Central Idaho Publishing Inc. • All rights reserved. Used with permission.
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Trapped miners in Wallace begin to exit after power restored nearly 24 hours later

The first group of 35 Galena Mine Complex workers made it out of the mine after 10 a.m. on Thursday. They are coming up in two groups.

Megan Carroll January 14, 2021 KTVB

Power has been restored to a mine in Wallace, Idaho, after an outage that began amid a windstorm on Wednesday morning left workers trapped underground.

Staff at Galena Mine Complex ran tests to ensure equipment was safe before bringing the miners up in groups on Thursday morning.

The first group of 35 miners made it out of the mine after 10 a.m. on Thursday. They are coming up in two groups because the mine shaft only holds 35 people, a representative for Galena told KREM 2’s Nicole Hernandez.

The miners were not in danger when they were trapped and had access to fresh air, food and water, the representative told KREM 2’s Nicole Hernandez. Some people made the trek out before power returned.

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Public Lands:

Thousands of trees burned in Woodhead Fire harvested quickly to help fund Idaho schools

Idaho Department of Lands

(McCall, Idaho) Trees blackened by the Woodhead Fire near Council, Idaho still have value in the timber market, but not for long. That’s why Idaho Department of Lands forestry staff began evaluating the potential for selling the burned trees as salvage sales even before the fire was contained. Logging is already underway in the snow-covered area and began in late October.

The Woodhead Fire started September 7, 2020 near Highway 71, northwest of Cambridge, Idaho, near Brownlee Reservoir on Idaho Endowment Land. Within a few days, the fire had grown toward Council, ultimately burning nearly 100-thousand acres.

About 20,000 acres of Idaho Endowment Land was impacted by the fire. These are lands where trees are grown to eventually harvest to generate funds for Idaho schools and other beneficiaries and provide renewable forest products.

“Many of these endowment trees were sold for harvest prior to the Woodhead Fire, but the harvest was not finished before the fire hit,” said Luke Pate, Idaho Department of Lands Forester in the Payette Lakes Supervisory Area. “This was a devastating fire, but instead of letting these trees go to waste, we have modified three timber contracts to account for the burned timber, and there are additional new sales for other burned trees.”

“Where we first started the salvage work it was sad. Just total devastation as far as you could see, there wasn’t a green needle, a green blade of grass, there was nothing,” said Joe Mahon with Tom Mahon Logging.

While the damaged trees are not as valuable as green trees, revenue from the harvests in the area are still expected to generate $2.1 million for endowment beneficiaries. Idaho Department of Lands salvage timber sales in the area will continue for the next couple of years. Reforestation and monitoring of the area for additional damage will be ongoing.

On Forest Service lands within the Woodhead Fire area, the Payette National Forest is working with Idaho Department of Lands through the Good Neighbor Authority partnership on planning salvage and timber sales to capture timber value and promote forest health in the area.
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Letter to Share:

MCPAWS thanks clients for patience during COVID-19

To the Editor:

Dear MCPAWS Community and MCPAWS Veterinary Hospital Clients:

If you are a MCPAWS Veterinary Hospital client, you likely know that the combination of COVID-19 curbside operations and our continued search for an additional full-time veterinarian have placed much pressure on our resources, infrastructure, and staff.

Our phone lines are busy! The call volume being handled by our reception desk is truly astounding. Curbside services necessitate many calls regarding check in, communicating with the veterinarian, follow-up pet care instructions, general questions, and taking payment.

This is in addition to our regular business call volume. If you are having trouble getting through, please don’t give up! Keep calling and we will connect. Emails are always welcome, but we cannot guarantee they will be received in a timely manner and should not be relied upon for appointments or emergencies.

Same-day appointment availability has changed. Factors include cumbersome COVID-19 operations, our ongoing search for another full-time veterinarian, and local population growth.

There are no shortage of pet owners coming to visit or moving to our community. Pets experience health-related emergencies all the time, so we must reserve space to ensure access for “must see” cases.

Same day/week appointments are reserved for urgent cases. Routine appointments will be booked out at least four to six weeks in the future. Please plan accordingly.

Our wait times have increased. Again, the additional efforts we must take to keep our staff and clients safe during the pandemic mean that we lose a lot of operational efficiencies.

We are doing everything we can to ensure that you are not stuck in our parking lot for longer than necessary, but despite our very best efforts, delays do happen and we appreciate your patience.

That said, I’m happy to report that several initiatives are being implemented to help relieve the burden and improve client communication!

We have partnered with an independent, telehealth provider to offer virtual, vet care and advice for our clients. VetTriage offers instant, 24/7, video televet sessions with a licensed, experienced veterinarian from any computer or mobile device. No download is necessary and MVH will receive notes regarding your visit.

If you need consultation on whether or not your pet requires an immediate trip to an emergency hospital or you need home care instructions prior to making an appointment with MVH, VetTriage can help! Sessions are $50 each – visit (link) to access the service.

We are transitioning to electronic client communications, meaning we will be able to send text messages to confirm appointments and established clients will receive emails regarding pet vaccinations, as well as information you need regarding MVH operations!

There will be a new part-time veterinarian joining our team in February. Our search for a new, full-time vet continues, but in the meantime, this will be a huge help to increasing our day to day capacities at the vet hospital. Stay tuned for more info!

The year 2020 was tough for all of us, but there are some bright spots on the horizon! Our team remains focused on how MCPAWS can respond to our situation with thoughtfulness and creativity.

Please grant us grace and understanding as we navigate this road together and know that our priority of providing the very best care and service for you and your pets remains. Here’s to a happy and healthy new year focused on taking care of each other.

Amber Kostoff, Executive Director, MCPAWS Regional Animal Shelter

published: The Star-News Jan 14, 2021
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Critter News:

FDA expands Sportmix dog food recall after 70 dogs reportedly died

Jan 12, 2021 Local News 8

The Food and Drug Administration has expanded a recall and is alerting pet owners and veterinary professionals about high levels of aflatoxin in some pet foods after 70 dogs reportedly died and over 80 others were sickened.

The dog food in question has been identified as certain Sportmix products manufactured by Midwestern Pet Foods. The products were voluntarily recalled by the company on December 30, 2020, but Midwestern Pet Foods expanded the recall to include additional products that contain corn and were made in their Oklahoma manufacturing plant on Tuesday, according to the FDA.

The impacted products have and expiration date on or before July 9, 2022, and have “05” in the date or lot code.

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Help dogs and cats cope with separation anxiety when humans return to work

Jan 12, 2021 Local News 8

When one of my co-workers found out about a tiny, orphaned kitten that needed a home a few months ago, he didn’t hesitate to adopt it. He says his new companion helped make the months of COVID-19 isolation at home much less stressful.

He is not alone. Animal shelters and breeders across the country have reported record numbers of dog and cat adoptions in recent months.

But after my co-worker returned to work, he says his adorable kitten started urinating on the kitchen counter while he was away.

Another friend is worried about how her dog will react when she returns to the office. Her big, goofy Labrador retriever follows her everywhere, even to the bathroom. When she leaves to run a quick errand, the dog sits by the back door and whines, awaiting her return.

What should these pet owners do?

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Groups ask federal court to restore protections for gray wolves

Matthew Brown Associated Press January 14, 2021

Wildlife advocates on Thursday asked a federal court to overturn a U.S. government decision that stripped Endangered Species Act protections for wolves across most of the nation.

Two coalitions of advocacy groups filed lawsuits in U.S. District Court in Northern California seeking to restore safeguards for a predator that is revered by wildlife watchers but feared by many livestock producers.

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Bull elk gets antlers stuck in backyard equipment for the second time near Ketchum

by Ryan L Morrison Wednesday, January 13th 2021


Courtesy of the Idaho Department of Fish and Game

Officers had their hands full with a bull elk Monday that got stuck in a backyard swing south of Ketchum.

Before officers arrived, the elk had broken free from the tree the swing was attached to, but the wooden seat and several feet of rope stayed caught in the antlers.

The bull elk was eventually anesthetized using a dart and the swing was removed.

This was the second time this bull had a run-in with a piece of backyard equipment. The first was in mid-October, when it got stuck in a large hammock and almost drowned in the Big Wood River.

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Fish & Game News:

Do your part to protect wintering wildlife by leaving animals undisturbed

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Supervisor
Thursday, January 14, 2021

For some wildlife, being left alone during winter can make a life-or-death difference

Winter is a challenging season for Idaho’s wildlife, especially for big game animals that migrate to lower elevations and spend winter closer to people than during other seasons. People can help animals by leaving them undisturbed so they have a better chance to survive winter.

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Mountain Goat Wounded by Would-be Poachers Located, Euthanized

By Evin Oneale, Regional Communications Manager
Saturday, January 16, 2021

Wounded by a series of crossbow bolts, the goat was emaciated and obviously suffering

A mature mountain goat, suffering from at least three crossbow-related wounds was euthanized by Fish and Game conservation officers earlier this week.

Citizens Against Poaching (CAP) is offering a reward for information in the case and callers can remain anonymous. Contact CAP at 1-800-632-5999 twenty four hours a day.

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Ice fishing update, Jan. 14: Lake Cascade, Payette Lake and Horsethief Reservoir ice, snow and travel conditions

By Mike Thomas, Regional Fisheries Biologist
Friday, January 15, 2021

On Thursday, Jan. 14, we visited two access areas on Lake Cascade to check surface and ice conditions. At Van Wyck access, we measured 5 inches of a slush/ice mix above 13 inches of clear ice. At Boulder Creek access, we measured 3 inches of snow and 7 inches of a slush/ice mix above 17 inches of clear ice (see below).

Due to current surface conditions, we do not recommend bringing wheeled-ATVs onto the Lake Cascade at this time. Additionally, those using snowmobiles should use caution and avoid staying in one spot for too long as to sink and/or freeze their machine in a slush area. Expect slush areas to be partially frozen in the morning and thaw as the day progresses, making travel difficult from one area to another on the lake.


Mike Thomas/IDFG

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More F&G News Releases

link:
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Crazy Critter Stuff:

New healthy anteater pup welcomed at Zoo Boise

by CBS2 News Staff Wednesday, January 13th 2021


Courteay of Zoo Boise

An anteater pup was born at Zoo Boise in December.

Parents Gloria and McCauley welcomed their baby on Dec. 23, according to Zoo Boise.

Zoo Boise’s staff says it’s pleased with how well Gloria is caring for her baby. Their goal is to be as hands-off as possible and allow Gloria to take care of her baby and step in only as needed.

The anteaters are open to the public, but you may have to look carefully to see the baby, because the pup will blend in with mom.

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Seasonal Humor:

WinterBewareOfDog-a

CovidHomeSchool-a
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