Idaho History Jan 24, 2021

Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic

Part 41

Idaho Newspaper clippings March 14-17, 1919

Photos courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

March 14 (continued)

The Daily Star-Mirror., March 14, 1919, Page 1

19190314DSM1

19190314DSM2
More Influenza Cases Reported
A Number of New Cases in Moscow and Many in the Surrounding Country

There are a number of new cases of influenza in Moscow while the epidemic seems to be spreading in the neighboring country and many of the cases reported as quite serious. Dr. W. A. Adair, city health officer, says that Fred Scott, living near the Mrs. Hutton farm, east of town is very sick, having had a temperature of more than 105 and his wife’s temperature was 104 last night. All of the children are also quite sick with the disease. He says a number of families in the country are down with it, every member of the family being ill.

In Moscow the new cases reported for yesterday and today are the Adrianson family at 533 North Main street; Schwartz, at 215 North Washington; J. Hilton, corner Washington and D streets; one case at 108 N. Howard, name not given, and one at 39 East D street, name not given. Dr. Clarke reports another case but Dr. Adair did not get the name or address.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 14 March 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., March 14, 1919, Page 3

City News

Miss Signa Carlson came home last evening from Spokane, called by the illness of her mother, Mrs. John Carlson, who is quite ill with an attack of influenza.

Mr. and Mrs. Quincy Hill of Viola are in Moscow on account of the illness of their infant child.

(ibid, page 3)
— — — — — — — — — —

The Kendrick Gazette. March 14, 1919, Page 1

19190314KG1

19190314KG2
No Public Meeting in Troy

As a precaution against a renewal of the flu epidemic in Troy, it was decided by the town authorities Wednesday evening to close all churches, theatres and pool halls and to stop all public gatherings, parties, etc., for a while at least. There is no flu in Troy, but in Moscow the epidemic has broken out again and a ban has been put on all public gathering places there. Church notices received by The News for this week’s issue are being omitted on account of the action of the council. As quickly as the situation clears up in outside places and no danger is apparent here the churches, theatres and pool halls will be permitted to open again.

— Troy News

source: The Kendrick Gazette. (Kendrick, Idaho), 14 March 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Kendrick Gazette. March 14, 1919, Page 6

Idaho News Paragraphs …

The influenza situation at Moscow is so much improved that the city health officer announces that the high school will be permitted to open and that picture shows may resume by admitting only adults and occupying only every alternate row of seats.

Idaho state bonds amounting to $1,200,000, consisting of $900,000 for the completion of the state capitol building and the erection of memorials commemorating the services of the soldiers of Idaho in the European war, and $300,000 highway improvement bonds, have been authorized by the Idaho legislature and have been approved by Governor Davis.

The ad valorem tax bill to raise $2,000,000 for support of the state government during the next two years was passed by the house and approved by the senate, together with a measure authorizing the state to borrow $1,800,000 for financing the state road program and $4,000,000 to finance the state government until there is a return on taxes, treasury certificates to be issued in lieu thereof. … A tax levy was authorized to raise sufficient funds to build two tuberculosis hospitals in the state, one in the north and one in the south; $75,000 was appropriated to build the state to McCall road; $25,000 for the Kootenai county drainage work; the general deficiency bill carrying $145,000; $30,000 to Idaho technical institute to buy grounds. …

(ibid, page 3)
— — — —

The Kendrick Gazette. March 14, 1919, Page 7

Juliaetta News

George Helfred and family have returned to their home after a three-month’s stay in Spokane. Mr. Helfred has improved very much in health since he went to Spokane.
— —

Fairview Notes

School has been started again with a very good attendance.

Mrs. Walker Helton went to Clarkston to care for her mother who has been ill with the flu.

(ibid, page 7)
— — — —

The Kendrick Gazette. March 14, 1919, Page 8

Gleanings

The flu ban was again lifted at Moscow and school reopened Wednesday. The situation there has greatly improved although there are still a number of cases.

Charles Riggle has been carrying the mail on route two in a two-wheel cart. He came in on the home stretch Tuesday on one wheel, the other having been wrenched off in a rut in the road. Another little indication of the condition of the roads in this locality.

The Village Council has prohibited ball playing in the park for the reason that the trees were being damaged and the grass damaged considerably.
— —

Big Bear Ridge

Mr. and Mrs. Sneve are in receipt of a letter from their son Eddie, who is ill at a hospital in Germany. He was improving when the letter was written.

The Big Bear Ridge Red Cross auxiliary is requested to make another drive for refugee garments, beginning March 24. This drive is to be similar to the one which was carried out last September. Any one having garments or material which could be used or made over will please send them to the Red Cross rooms.

(ibid, page 8)
— — — — — — — — — —

The Idaho Recorder. March 14, 1919, Page 1

19190314IR1

May

Mrs. Val Maelzer is still quite ill at her home on Sulpher creek.

There is to be a dance here St. Patrick’s day.

The dance which was to have been given last week by Ezra Baker was postponed indefinitely owing to Mrs. Baker’s illness.

source: The Idaho Recorder. (Salmon City, Idaho), 14 March 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Idaho Recorder. March 14, 1919, Page 5

Idaho State News

Sunday afternoon, March 2, memorial services were held at Pocatello in memory of the twenty-two young men of Bannock county who gave up their lives for their country in the great world war. The number represents all the young men who have been killed in action, died of wounds and succumbed to disease in France and in the camps in the United States.

(ibid, page 5)
— — — — — — — — — —

Montpelier Examiner. March 14, 1919, Page 3

19190314ME1

Idaho State News

The lid went on in Moscow last week, tighter than ever since influenza made its first appearance last fall. With between 30 and 40 cases in town, there will be no public or private schools, no picture shows, no church services or public meetings for a time.

Petitions are being circulated at Twin Falls, asking for the convening of the first grand jury ever assembled in Twin Falls county to investigate “open, notorious and public disregard and violation of the prohibition laws of the state.”

The advance of from $3 to $6 a gallon on whiskey in Wyoming over the previous high prices has checked the inflow of liquor to Pocatello, and few arrests have been noted since the extra raise, which, it is said was made by the government as war tax on liquor.

source: Montpelier Examiner. (Montpelier, Idaho), 14 March 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Montpelier Examiner. March 14, 1919, Page 5

Influenza Claims Two Victims at Georgetown.

Sorrow was brought to the homes of Georgetown people yesterday by the deaths of Mrs. John Bee and Ira Payne. Both were victims of the influenza.

Mrs. Bee died yesterday morning about 11 o’clock. She ha been ill about a week and was unconscious for three days prior to her death. She is survived by her husband and seven children, the youngest only six months old.

Mr. Payne is survived by his wife and two children.
— —

Local News

Charlie Hager went to Lava Hot Springs last Tuesday to remain for a week or more in the hopes of obtaining relief from rheumatism.

(ibid, page 5)
— — — — — — — — — —

Shoshone Journal. March 14, 1919, Page 1

19190314SJ1

Court House Notes

The flu quarantine has been lifted by the Board of Health. This means that dances and public gathering may be resumed once more, after several weeks of prohibition.

Nicholas Hentz was called before the Probate Court Tuesday charged with keeping his children out of school. He was reprimanded by the court and released on a promise that hereafter he would see that his children attended school regularly.
— —

Big Wood River News

Mrs. Earl Burdette has been quite sick the past week.

Mrs. A. L. Horne still continues to be very sick.
— —

Miss Frankie Moffett, who has been looking after the health of our people in these distressing times of the flu, has returned to Twin Falls and resumed her duties in Doctor Boyd’s hospital.

The patriotic impulses which promised to give such a great reception to our returning soldiers yielded to the demands of the health interests and adjourned the reception till some time when the flu shall be less threatening.
— —

Card of Thanks

We can not thank our neighbors and friends enough for all their kind deeds and loving sympathy during the sickness and death of our darling little Ruth.
– Mr. and Mrs. A. L. Horne and sister V.
— —

Y. W. C. A. Drive

Before April 1st Shoshone is asked to raise $25.00 for reconstruction work in the Y. W. C. A. Owing to industrial conditions resulting from the close of the war, the need for Y. W. C. A. work in small towns as well as cities is greater than ever before. The problem of the girls who suddenly find themselves out of positions because of the returning soldiers is a grave one. This drive is carried on under the auspices of the Women’s Council of Defense. The members of the local committee are: Mildred Barger, Keith Horne, Leah Borden and Lenora Noble.

source: Shoshone Journal. (Shoshone, Idaho), 14 March 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Shoshone Journal. March 14, 1919, Page 3

19190314SJ2

Keep away from the cougher, sneezer or spitter who does not use a handkerchief.

Keep out of crowds whenever possible.

Don’t use dishes of towels who have been used by others until they have washed in boiling water.

Don’t put your lips against the telephone mouthpiece and don’t put into your mouth pencil or any other article that has been used by another.

Wash your hands and face immediately upon reaching your home and change your clothes if possible before mingling with the rest of the family.

Keep in the fresh air and sunlight as much as possible and wear sufficient clothing to keep warm.

Sleep in a well ventilated room under plenty of bed clothes.

Walk instead of using the street cars whenever your journey is a short one.

Be temperate in eating and observe the ordinary rules of hygiene. …

[From ad for “Laxcarin Products”]

(ibid, page 3)
— — — —

Shoshone Journal. March 14, 1919, Page 4

[Local and Personal News]

Friends of Mrs. Mary Burkhill are in receipt of a letter from Portland in which the information is given that while visiting her daughter there Mrs. Burkhill has had the misfortune to have suffered a severe attack of the flu and at the same time to have suffered a dislocated shoulder.

(ibid, page 4)
— — — —

Shoshone Journal. March 14, 1919, Page 5

Local and Personal News

May Johnson has been on the sick list during the week.

Catherine Newman is on the sick list.

Mrs. Will Sinclair is on the sick list this week.

Miss Grace Kiker, one of the High School teachers has been on the sick list for the past week.

A. L. McMahon returned from Boise last Friday. Since his return he has been confined to his bed. His daughter Miss Verna, has also been on the sick list this week.

The A. L. McMahon family is undergoing a siege of tonsillitis this week.

Mrs. Elizabeth Williams was on the sick list the first of the week.

Walter H. Copp has been ill with tonsillitis this week.

Miss Montana Murray has been ill this week with an attack of chicken pox.

Niel Hubbs was in town Monday from his Wood river ranch. He is still confined to crutches from a broken leg caused by falling from a scaffold.

(ibid, page 5)
— — — — — — — — — —

The Meridian Times., March 14, 1919, Page 1

19190314MT1

19190314MT2Case Of Sleeping Disease Near Meridian Reported

A case of the “sleeping disease” following influenza has been reported by Dr. H. F. Neal of Mrs. John Millis, residing southwest of Meridian. For eleven days it has been impossible to awaken the patient, but the last two days a slight improvement has been noticed and the chances for recovery are more favorable. Mr. and Mrs. Millis are recent arrivals in the Meridian community.

source: The Meridian Times. (Meridian, Idaho), 14 March 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Meridian Times., March 14, 1919, Page 8

Meridian Local News

A business meeting of the Meridian Red Cross will be held next Monday afternoon at 3 o’clock in the rural high school building. The election of officers will be at this time.

There will be a box social and spelling match at the Locust Grove school next Friday night, March 21. This is for the Armenian relief. Everybody invited.

(ibid, page 8)
— — — — — — — — — —

View of Fourth St. Coeur d’Alene, Idaho

Coeurd'AleneFritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

March 15

Evening Capital News., March 15, 1919, Page 1

19190315ECN1

Famous Actress Ill

Cleveland, Ohio March 15 — Laurette Taylor, actress, is seriously ill with influenza, her husband, J. Hartley Manners, announced today.

source: Evening Capital News. (Boise, Idaho), 15 March 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.

1918LauretteTaylor-a
Laurette Taylor ca. 1918

more info: Wikipedia
— — — —

Evening Capital News., March 15, 1919, Page 8

19190315ECN2
Boise Boy Dies of Pneumonia in France
Clarence F. Williams, Brother of Mrs. J. H. Hopffgarten Succumbs to Disease on February 16.

Friday morning, Lieutenant Whitman called at the office of J. H. Hopffgarten and delivered to him a personal message from his brother-in-law, and business partner, Clarence F. Williams, which was “that he had been detained in France on special duty, but would probably sail for home in about a month.” Saturday morning a telegram came from the war department announcing that Clarence F. Williams had died of pneumonia in France, Feb. 15.

Coming on top of the former message that he was well and expecting to sail for home soon, the news was a severe shock to the family. Clarence Williams was a member of the First Idaho field hospital corps and left Boise a year ago last August for New York to sail for France. He was with Riley Joy, Jack Case and Jess Wetter in the service, and his corps did work along fronts where some of the fiercest battles raged.

His younger brother, Kenneth, a member of a field artillery, was wounded in battle and happened to be brought to the hospital where Clarence was on duty and later received a transfer to the same corps. When the hospital corps was ordered home the younger sailed, but Clarence was held for special duty. He was 31 years old and one of Boise’s well known young men, having lived with Mr. and Mrs. Hopffgarten since he was 17 years of age, and worked with Mr. Hopffgarten until he was taken in as a partner in the firm. He was a member of the Boise lodge of Elks. Besides his sister in Boise, he leaves his mother in Spokane and his brother still in the service. A sister residing in Fargo, N. D., died of influenza two months ago and Clarence had just learned of her death a short time prior to being stricken with the disease.
— —

Little News of Boise

Streets Suffer

Bad weather the past 10 days has played havoc with the recent job of street dragging and repairing just finished by Superintendent of Streets Jack Sharp. An inspection this morning revealed the fact that at least half of the work will have to be done over again.

(ibid, page 8)
— — — — — — — — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., March 15, 1919, Page 1

19190315DSM1

Superintendent Rich Reelected
Moscow Independent District Secures Services Of J. H. Rich Once More

The school board met last night, at which time the matter of the election of superintendent, the arrangements for the opening of the second semester of the school year and the routine business were taken up. …

Owing to the fact that the second semester is to be a short one, and that there is uncertainty as to the ability to be able to keep the schools open, owing to the influenza situation, the board voted not to permit an entering class in the primary department.
— —

Potlatch Soldier Has Not Seen His Son

Mrs. C. L. Ainsworth, daughter of Mrs. and Mrs. A. W. Laird has returned from the hospital at Bovill with her young son, Allison Laird. Mr. Ainsworth was expected to arrive last week from Camp Merritt, N. J., where he received his discharge but contracted influenza while visiting his home at Chippewa Falls, Wis. He is recovering, however, from a mild case and is expected shortly.
— —

Weyerhouser to Build Railroad
Surveying Party Gone to Pierce District to Map Out Line of Road

Lewiston. — Yesterday morning a crew of railroad surveyors left Greer for the Pierce section and are presumably in the employ of the Weyerhouser timber syndicate. This information was brought to the city yesterday by James McCullough who with Mrs. McCullough arrived from their home at Fraser to visit here for two weeks with their daughter.

Mr. McCullough, who is a pioneer of the Fraser section, where he owns valuable farm lands, is noting with interest the movements which seem to indicate an early opening of the vast Clearwater timber belt.

“We are still experiencing considerable winter weather in the Fraser section with six to eight inches of snow, and farmers are still required to feed. Farther back in the Pierce district there is still a great deal of snow. Hay has brought $25 a ton in the barn in the Fraser section.

“While we have been experiencing a good deal of late winter,” continued Mr. McCallough, “yet we have experience little sickness and our district has been remarkable free from the influenza epidemic.”
— —

Americans Kill Many Bolshevists
Reds Reported to Have Lost 500 in Killed – Allies’ Losses Light

Archangle, Thursday — (By the Associated press.) — Compared to the losses inflicted upon the enemy, allied casualties in fighting along the Vaga river since February 28 have been extremely light. It is estimated the bolsheviki have lost at least 500 killed.

American casualties from February 28 to March 9, inclusive, were five killed on the Vaga front and 10 on the Dvina front. No officers were killed. One American soldier is missing and two officers and 30 men were wounded. …

The health of the expeditionary forces since the Spanish influenza epidemic in September and October has been excellent. Of the 69 deaths from disease, 68 occurred before January 4.

Throughout the fighting American troops have generally been greatly outnumbered, but losses inflicted upon the enemy have been at least five times those suffered by the Americans. As the newly mobilized Russian troops are becoming trained, they are gradually relieving the strain to which the Americans, British and French forces were put in the early days of the campaign. All American troops are now enjoying regular rest periods, either at Archangel or at convenient villages behind the lines.
— —

1,419,386 Discharged

Washington. — Officers and men demobilized now number 1,419,386, the war department announced today. Of this number 88,774 were officers. A total of 1,678,500 men have been ordered discharged to date.
— —

Try Transatlantic Flight

New York. — Rear Admiral D. W. Taylor, chief of the naval bureau of construction and repairs, announced today that the navy will be ready to attempt a Transatlantic flight by heavier-than-air craft within one month.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 15 March 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., March 15, 1919, Page 2

A Deserved Reappointment

The school board acted wisely in reappointing Superintendent J. H. Rich for another year as head of the schools of Moscow. Mr. Rich has shown himself, in the five years he has been here, to be the “man for the place.” His work as head of the Moscow schools has been of a high order in every respect. We are justly proud of our schools because Mr. Rich, with his able corps of teachers, has made them the best schools in a town this size to be found in the west.

Mr. Rich has had a hard and trying time during the past year. With the influenza situation closing the schools twice and keeping them closed for months, he and his assistants and the school board have worked at a great disadvantage, but they have held the schools together, have kept up the moral of the school children and the high school students and have overcome many difficulties that tried the stoutest hearts and the most enduring patience.

The Star-Mirror congratulates the school board on the wisdom of its action and the people of Moscow upon retaining Mr. Rich at the head of their school system. It also congratulates Mr. Rich upon his splendid ability and the fact that he has won the confidence, esteem and respect of the people here as he has. We are glad he will be with us at least another year.
— —

One Pupil in District.

Wallace — There is just one lone little third grade pupil left at the Rex school district as a result of the recent exodus of citizens of that locality and as a result the school has been closed and the teacher, Miss Frances Batterton of Kellogg left for her home yesterday.

When the school opened in September a class of nine pupils was enrolled which progressed splendidly until families began moving to other points. The one pupil left will be obliged to walk a distance of three-quarters of a mile to the school at Interstate as the expense of maintaining the school at Rex cannot be continued for only one pupil, it is declared by those in authority.

(ibid, page 2)
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., March 15, 1919, Page 3

Cora Correspondence

Florence Kidwell came home from Moscow Wednesday to stay until Sunday while convalescing over the “flu.”

Harold Kimbal is among the recent arrivals from far lands, he having been stationed at Gibraltar at the time of his father’s death. Mrs. Belva Clement and husband expect to reside in Spokane and the rest of the Kimbal family in Tacoma.

(ibid, page 3)
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., March 15, 1919, Page 4

Pioneer Resident Dies of Influenza

Mrs. John Carlson died last evening at 7 o’clock at her home on East Eighth street of influenza and complications. Mrs. Carlson was a pioneer resident of Moscow, having lived here about 25 years. She was 50 years of age and had been in ill health a number of years.

She leaves besides her husband, five children, Mrs. Earl Griffin of Spokane, Miss Signa Carlson of Spokane and Violet, Alice and Marie at home. The private services of the funeral will be held Sunday afternoon.
— —

Miss Bartlet is Dead

Miss Iza Bartlett, aged 29, formerly a resident of Palouse, died in Spokane yesterday from a second attack of influenza. She had had the disease earlier in the fall and recovered but died in the second attack. She was a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William Bartlet.
— —

19190315DSM2
Church and Sunday School

Methodist Episcopal Church.

9:45 — Sunday school for adults only. Influenza quarantine prohibits children. …
— —

The Nazarene Church

Sunday school for adults at 10 a.m. …
— —

Church of the Brethren

Services tomorrow will be Sunday school at 10 a.m. for adult classes followed by a sermon at 11 o’clock. …

(ibid, page 4)
— — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., March 15, 1919, Page 5

19190315DSM3
Moscow Had Many Influenza Cases
City Health Officer Reports 71 Cases Under Quarantine – One Death

Dr. W. A. Adair, city health officer, reports the first death from influenza during this epidemic occurred last night, the victim being Mrs. John Carlson, who had influenza, followed by pneumonia. She had previously suffered for a long time with asthma, but Dr. Adair says her death was due to pneumonia brought on by influenza.

Dr. Adair said:

“We had 71 cases of influenza in Moscow during the week ending last night. This is a record for the entire winter, being the largest number at any time since the disease fir appeared here. It is well for the people of Moscow that the disease is in mild form. But we cannot afford to take any chances and people who have had the disease or have colds or are at all ill must remain away from crowds.”

Dr. Adair reports influenza flags posted today at the following places: Buchanan’s residence, 618 Deakin avenue; E. Hites, 130 North Asbury; Rollefson’s, 314 East Sixth; Steward, East Eighth; Thurston, West Sixth; Hites, West First, and Gardner, near the electric depot.
— —

City News

Prof and Mrs. J. H. Jonte, who have been very ill with influenza are slowly recovering. Mrs. Jonte is up and around and Mr. Jonte is now able to sit up part of the time.

The entire family of F. D. Hawley have been ill with influenza, but have now recovered. The quarantine will be removed today.

Miss Tess Keane, who teaches in Troy, is home for the week end.

Miss Henrietta Safford, who teaches at Asotin, is spending the week end at the Delta Gamma house.

(ibid, page 5)
— — — — — — — — — —

Collins, Idaho (1)

CollinsFritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

March 16

Evening Capital News., March 16, 1919, Page 2

19190316ECN1

Laurette Taylor Improved

Cleveland, Ohio, March 16. — Physicians attending Laurette Taylor, actress, who is suffering from an attack of Spanish influenza, tonight announced the actress’ condition is much improved.

source: Evening Capital News. (Boise, Idaho), 16 March 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Evening Capital News., March 16, 1919, Page 11

Mrs. Roy Pope Funeral

Caldwell, March 15. — Funeral services will be held tomorrow morning at 10 o’clock from the Binford funeral parlors for Mrs. Roy Pope, who died at home near Notus yesterday after a brief illness. The death of the deceased is mourned by her husband and two children. Interment will be in the Canyon Hill cemetery.

(ibid, page 11)
— — — — — — — — — —

Copeland Cotton Wood Co. Copeland, Idaho

CopelandFritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

March 17

The Daily Star-Mirror., March 17, 1919, Page 3

19190317DSM1

W. C. T. U. Meeting Indefinitely Postponed

The meeting of the W. C. T. U. which was to have been held next Wednesday, has been indefinitely postponed. This step was taken owing to the influenza situation. The date of the next meeting will be announced as soon as possible, when a full attendance will be desired.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 17 March 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

Evening Capital News., March 17, 1919, Page 7

19190317ECN1

Deaths – Funerals

McCool — Emler McCool, aged 52 years, died Sunday of a complication of diseases at his home, 1908 North Fifteenth street. Mr. McCool had a severe attack of influenza in January. He was up and around during the latter part of February and until March 7, when he had a relapse. On the Friday before his death the doctors thought he was on the road to recovery, but he took a sudden turn for the worse Saturday morning at 10 o’clock. He was a resident of Boise 14 years, and for 13 years had been employed by the Boise Railway company as a conductor. … He is survived by his wife, Louise, and two daughters, Alice and Lois, a brother Ira McCool, at Marshalltown, Iowa, and two sisters, …
— —

Boise People Wear Green in Honor of St. Patrick’s Day

Green predominated in Boise today.

Green colored carnations decorated the lapels of the coats of hundreds of business and professional men, vases of green carnations were on the tables in nearly every eating establishment, green ties were worn and green ribbons and shamrocks in honor of the memory of the great Irish saint, St. Patrick.

The only entertainment feature for the day is a St. Patrick’s day program tonight at St. John’s hall for the benefit of the cathedral fund. An excellent program has been arranged for the event and the songs of the Emerald Isle and Irish dances will be features of the affair.
— —

Gets Shamrock

Nick Collins’ face lighted up this morning with a smile when he opened a letter he received today. He found several sprigs of genuine shamrock, with a bit of the “ould turf” of the Emerald Isle attached. A friend of his, Larry Cronin, sent the letter and shamrock to “Nifty Nick.”
— —

19190317ECN2

source: Evening Capital News. (Boise, Idaho), 17 March 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
—————–

Further Reading:

“Sleeping Disease”

Encephalitis lethargica

Encephalitis lethargica is an atypical form of encephalitis. Also known as “sleeping sickness” or “sleepy sickness” (distinct from tsetse fly-transmitted sleeping sickness), it was first described in 1917 by the neurologist Constantin von Economo and the pathologist Jean-René Cruchet.

EncephalitisLethargica-a
Photo caption: Encephalitis lethargica. Its sequelae and treatment – Constantin Von Economo, 1931

The disease attacks the brain, leaving some victims in a statue-like condition, speechless and motionless. Between 1915 and 1926, an epidemic of encephalitis lethargica spread around the world. The exact number of people infected is unknown, but it is estimated that more than one million people contracted the disease during the epidemic which directly caused more than 500,000 deaths. Many of those who survived never returned to their pre-morbid vigour.

They would be conscious and aware – yet not fully awake; they would sit motionless and speechless all day in their chairs, totally lacking energy, impetus, initiative, motive, appetite, affect or desire; they registered what went on about them without active attention, and with profound indifference. They neither conveyed nor felt the feeling of life; they were as insubstantial as ghosts, and as passive as zombies.

No recurrence of the epidemic has since been reported, though isolated cases continue to occur. …

Cause

The causes of encephalitis lethargica are uncertain.

Some studies have explored its origins in an autoimmune response, and, separately or in relation to an immune response, links to pathologies of infectious disease – viral and bacterial, e.g., in the case of influenza, where a link with encephalitis is clear. Postencephalitic parkinsonism was clearly documented to have followed an outbreak of encephalitis lethargica following the 1918 influenza pandemic; …

Pandemic of 1915–1926

In the winter of 1916–1917, a “new” illness suddenly appeared in Vienna and other cities, and rapidly spread world-wide over the next three years. Earlier reports appeared throughout Europe as early as the winter of 1915–1916, but communication about the disease was slow and chaotic, given the varied manifestation of symptoms and difficulties disseminating information in wartime. Until Constantin von Economo identified a unique pattern of damage among the brains of deceased patients and introduced the unifying name encephalitis lethargica, reports of the protean disease came in under a range of names: botulism, toxic ophthalmoplegia, epidemic stupor, epidemic lethargic encephalitis, acute polioencephalitis, Heine-Medin disease, bulbar paralysis, hystero-epilepsy, acute dementia, and sometimes just “an obscure disease with cerebral symptoms.” Just 10 days before von Economo’s breakthrough in Vienna, Jean-René Cruchet described 40 cases of “subacute encephalomyelitis” in France.

In the 10 years that the pandemic raged, the exact number of people who were infected is unknown, but it is estimated that more than 1 million people contracted the disease which directly caused more than 500,000 deaths. Encephalitis lethargica assumed its most virulent form between October 1918 and January 1919. The pandemic disappeared in 1927 as abruptly and mysteriously as it first appeared. The great encephalitis pandemic coincided with the 1918 influenza pandemic, and it is likely that the influenza virus potentiated the effects of the encephalitis virus or lowered resistance to it in a catastrophic way.

Many surviving patients of the 1915–1926 pandemic seemed to make a complete recovery and return to their normal lives. However, the majority of survivors subsequently developed neurological or psychiatric disorders, often after years or decades of seemingly perfect health. Post-encephalitic syndromes varied widely: sometimes they proceeded rapidly, leading to profound disability or death; sometimes very slowly; sometimes they progressed to a certain point and then stayed at this point for years or decades; and sometimes, following their initial onslaught, they remitted and disappeared. …

Jane Norton Grew Morgan, wife of J. P. Morgan Jr., died of encephalitis lethargica in 1925. At the time, doctors attributed her encephalitis to having contracted influenza during the 1918 pandemic.

more info: Wikipedia
———————-

Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 1)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 2)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 3)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 4)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 5)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 6)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 7)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 8)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 9)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 10)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 11)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 12)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 13)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 14)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 15)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 16)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 17)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 18)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 19)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 20)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 21)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 22)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 23)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 24)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 25)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 26)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 27)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 28)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 29)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 30)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 31)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 32)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 33)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 34)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 35)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 36)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 37)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 38)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 39)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 40)