Idaho History Jan 31, 2021

Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic

Part 42

Idaho Newspaper clippings March 18-20, 1919

Photos courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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March 18

Evening Capital News., March 18, 1919, Page 9

19190318ECN1

19190318ECN2
Mrs. John Mills Funeral

Nampa, March 18. — Funeral services were held from the Robinson chapel this afternoon at 2:30 o’clock for Mrs. John Millis, who died at her home near Post station Saturday evening from complications following the influenza, Rev. H. W. Parker conducting the services.

The deceased is survived by her husband, a son, Phillip Millis, and a daughter, Mrs. J. J. Powers who lives in Canada, but who was with her mother in her illness.

source: Evening Capital News. (Boise, Idaho), 18 March 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Republican. March 18, 1919, Page 2

19190318TIR1

Centerville

Little Fay Brown is on the sick list this week.

Mrs. Henry Farnworth is on the sick list this week.

Word has been received here by friends of the Trullinger sisters, that their schools have been closed at Franklin, Idaho. Miss Nora is now teaching at Crystal, Idaho and Miss Ruby at Malad City.
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Upper Presto

Mrs. Olive Sibbett, who has just recovered from influenza visited with her sister Mrs. E. W. Hansen Saturday.

Eddie Teeples, who has been confined to his bed for five weeks, due to a kick on the knee by a horse, is just able to be around. …
— —

Shelley

The school teachers here attended a very good teachers meeting at Blackfoot last Saturday.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 18 March 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Idaho Republican. March 18, 1919, Page 3

Moreland

John England is on the sick list at this writing.
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Sterling

R. A. Ward was called to Malad Monday evening to the bedside of his brother, who was not expected to live.
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Centerville

Mr. and Mrs. Joe Tressel received the joyful news Wednesday morning that their son Rudolph had landed safe in New Jersey and would soon be home.

(ibid, page 3)
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The Idaho Republican. March 18, 1919, Page 5

Local News

Mrs. Charles Kiefer is recovering nicely from an attack of the flu.

Dr. Jackson made a trip to Idaho Falls Thursday.

Miss Ruby Hilliard has accepted a position as bookkeeper at the asylum and private secretary to Dr. Hoover the medical superintendent.

Books on the war at the public library in the city hall at Blackfoot.

(ibid, page 5)
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Bonners Ferry Herald. March 18, 1919, Page 1

19190318BFH1Death of J. T. Yack

J. T. Yack, for ten years a resident of the Porthill district, died on January 10 at Coeur d’Alene, Idaho and was buried there on January 13th.

Mr. Yack and family moved to Coeur d’Alene less than a year ago in hopes of benefiting the health of his young daughter. About the first of the year he and his entire family were afflicted with the Spanish influenza and Mr. Yack developed pneumonia from which he died. He is survived by his wife and two children, a boy ten year old and a girl seven years old. Mrs. Yack is administratrix of the estate of the deceased and was here last week attending to business of the estate returning to Coeur d’Alene Saturday.

Mr. Yack was well known here and in the Porthill district and was respected and admired by scores of friends.

source: Bonners Ferry Herald. (Bonners Ferry, Idaho), 18 March 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Bonners Ferry Herald. March 18, 1919, Page 2

Summary Of The World’s Events …

Belief that at least half of New York’s 40 cases of sleeping sickness are sequels of Spanish influenza is expressed.
— —

Approximately one-third of the correspondents and photographers representing the press of many nations at the front were killed or wounded during the entire period of the war.
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Idaho News Paragraphs …

The act authorizing a tax levy to raise funds to build and support tuberculosis hospitals, one in northern and another in southern Idaho, was signed. Governor Davis said the measure would be a “blessing to mankind.”

Miss Vesta Nepean, a young woman residing with her parents on Doumecq plains, in the Salmon river country, was shot recently by Mrs. Newton Otto, a neighbor. The shooting followed a quarrel in which Miss Nepean’s brother and George Lynch, Mrs. Otto’s brother, are said to have participated. The bullet entered the leg and unless blood poisoning should develop serious results are not anticipated.

(ibid, page 2)
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Bonners Ferry Herald. March 18, 1919, Page 4

Local Pick-ups

The children attending the Indian Mission school are taking a great deal more interest in the work required of them than ever before, thanks to the earnest endeavors of Mr. and Mrs. F. S. Fisher. There is an enrollment of 23 at the school and thus far not one of the scholars has been tardy or absent. Some record.

W. H. Richardson returned home on Tuesday from a several weeks business trip to coast points. Since his return home he has been confined to his home with a bad case of tonsillitis. Mrs. Richardson went to Spokane to meet her husband and while there became ill and was taken to a hospital. At last reports she was recovering and would soon be home again.

Just Arrived — A few fever thermometers, guaranteed to be thoroughly tested. Only $1.50 each at the Brody Drug Store.

(ibid, page 4)
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The Daily Star-Mirror., March 18, 1919, Page 1

19190318DSM1

19190318DSM2Influenza Situation Reported Better Today

Dr. W. A. Adair, city health officer, reports the situation better today, as six quarantine flags were taken down and only two were put up. One of these is at Cameron’s home, 364 E. B street, and one at Parkinson’s on Ashbury street. He says the ban is still on against grade and high school children attending shows, dances and parties, including class parties.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 18 March 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., March 18, 1919, Page 5

City News

Little Billie, son of Mr. and Mrs. Ray Carter, has been seriously ill the past week with pneumonia. There is a little improvement in his condition today.

The entering freshman class of the high school was given its usual initiation yesterday.

(ibid, page 5)
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View from Grain Elevator, Cottonwood, Idaho ca. 1914

Cottonwood914Fritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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March 19

Evening Capital News., March 19, 1919, Page 7

19190319ECN1

Little News of Boise

Is Improving

Mrs. Cora Esterberg, 615 South Seventh street, who has been at the point of death for weeks from an attack of Spanish influenza and pneumonia at St. Alphonsus hospital, is recovering slowly, and is now believed to be out of danger. Mrs. Esterberg’s husband, A. E. Esterberg, is with the army of occupation in Germany, enlisting in July, 1917.
— —

Personals

James Youren came down from Placerville today for medical treatment and is stopping at the Oxford.

source: Evening Capital News. (Boise, Idaho), 19 March 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Evening Capital News., March 19, 1919, Page 9

Around Boise Valley Loop

Meridian

Mrs. J. M. Jackson, who has been quite ill, is reported to [be] much improved.

(ibid, page 9)
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The Challis Messenger., March 19, 1919, Page 2

19190319CM1

Idaho Budget

The enrollment at the Gooding college has more than doubled since December 30, and student activities have taken on a new life.

The value of the gold, silver, copper, lead and zinc mined in Idaho in 1918, according to the estimates of C. N. Gerry of the United States geological survey, department of the interior, was about $38,140,000, a decided decrease of $16,700,000 from the value in 1917.

source: The Challis Messenger. (Challis, Idaho), 19 March 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Challis Messenger., March 19, 1919, Page 3

Inauguration Had To Wait
Why George Washington was Not Formally Made President Until April 30, in 1789

Although March 4 is the date set by law for the ceremony of the inauguration of our presidents, there was one occasion where the rule was not observed, for George Washington was inaugurated on April 30, 1789, instead of March 4.

When the Constitution had been ratified by the requisite number of states the Continental congress by resolution of September 13, 1788, set the first Wednesday of the following March (March 4, 1789) as the “time for commencing proceedings” under the new form of government.

Owing to delays of various kinds, such as difficulties of travel, etc., members of the first congress were very slow to assemble in New York, and a quorum of both houses was not obtained until April 6. The counting of the electoral vote, the notification of Washington of his election to his high office, and his journey from Mount Vernon to New York took until April 23, and his inauguration was set for April 30.

His term of office was, however, construed as having commenced on March 4, the date set by the Continental congress for the inauguration of the new government, and so it came to an end on March 4, 1793, although it lacked nearly two months of the four years provided for by the Constitution.

— New York Times
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19190319CM2

(ibid, page 3)
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The Challis Messenger., March 19, 1919, Page 5

Items About People You Know

Tewalt Ill — Dave Tewalt was taken seriously ill the latter part of last week but is able to be out and around again now. He expects to go to Salt Lake soon for medical treatment.
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Purely Personal

Mrs. Rodger Brasseur is able to be out and around again after a couple weeks’ illness.

(ibid, page 5)
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West Main Street, Craigmont, Idaho

CraigmontFritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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March 20

Evening Capital News., March 20, 1919, Page 6

19190320ECN1

Kuna

The little daughter of Mr. and Mrs. C. B. Myers, who arrived last week from Missouri to visit Mrs. Myers’ parents, Mr. and Mrs. L. R. Lawrence, died Sunday from pneumonia following influenza. The little one was laid to rest in the Kuna cemetery Monday.
— —

Greenleaf

Mrs. Will Bailey has been on the sick list for several days.

source: Evening Capital News. (Boise, Idaho), 20 March 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Evening Capital News., March 20, 1919, Page 9

Around Boise Valley Loop

Star

Mrs. Jim Butts, who has been ill for some time, is able to be out again.
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Deer Flat

Mrs. Taggart is seriously ill with the flu and pneumonia.

Miss Mayor, primary teacher at the Scism school, was taken to a Boise hospital Friday with the flu.

E. N. Corey and children moved on the J. S. Scism ranch Wednesday. Mr. Corey’s mother-in-law, Mrs. Mary E. Swanson, is keeping house for him.

Mr. and Mrs. Paul Tiller are staying with the former’s parents, caring for them while they are sick with the influenza.

Mrs. Reed Moody is ill with an attack of appendicitis.
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Lake Lowell

Miss Florence Gibbons who has been quite ill is somewhat improved.

Mrs. Luther Petty who has been sick is greatly improved.
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Middleton

Lester Lovejoy died at Nampa Tuesday night from paralysis caused by the “flu,” after several weeks illness. Besides the wife, there are several children to mourn his death. The funeral was held in Nampa Thursday afternoon at 3 p.m. Mrs. Lovejoy is a daughter of Mrs. E. G. Williams of this place.

(ibid, page 9)
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Jerome County Times., March 20, 1919, Page 4

19190320JCT1

Arcadia Valley

Mr. Goemmer was a little under the weather for a few days last week.

Mr. and Mrs. Tony Habermann went to Wendell Monday to consult a doctor about Baby Donald, who has not recovered from what was supposed to be mumps. It was found necessary to lance the swelling.

The nine-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Casto, who are on the Witty place, is quite ill this week.

A number of school children missed the school wagon Monday. What will they do when the time is changed again?
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Appleton

Mrs. C. H. Humphrey spent Tuesday with Mrs. J. H. Silbaugh, helping care for the sick babies.

We are glad to report that the Silbaugh twins are on the road to recovery.

The work on the telephone line is progressing nicely.

Our mail carrier finds horses better travelers than his car on bad roads.
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High School Notes

Most of the report cards were given out Tuesday. In the high school there were more very low grades and very high grades than ever before this school year. An effort is now being made to bring all work done up to standard.

source: Jerome County Times. (Jerome, Idaho), 20 March 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Jerome County Times., March 20, 1919, Page 9

[Local News]

Mrs. Jordan, who has been ill for some time is reported to be much improved at present.

Mrs. H. H. Cone, who came here from McCammon two weeks ago while convalescing from a serious illness, has now almost regained her normal condition of health.

(ibid, page 9)
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The Nezperce Herald., March 20, 1919, Page 2

19190320NH1

Sven Thompson Writes

Nezperce lad, the younger son of Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Thompson of north of this city, who took a very active part in the closing battles of the war, writes interestingly of his trip across and experiences thereafter:

Belleme, France, Feb. 22.

Dear Folks at Home:

I have not heard from home for two weeks, but hope you are all well. We are having a few cases of flu in our company. One of the boys died yesterday. …

From the Argonne Forest we went to Belgium. But the fight there was easy. The Huns ran like coyotes. On the 12th of November I went to the hospital with pneumonia, but was lucky enough to pull through. …

Corp. Sven Thompson, Co. G 361 Infantry, American E. F., A. P. O.776

source: The Nezperce Herald. (Nezperce, Idaho), 20 March 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Nezperce Herald., March 20, 1919, Page 4

Route 2 News

None of the farmers are turning out these days to break the road for the mail carrier.
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Central Ridge News

Evalona McGee is quite sick.

Irene Coon has the mumps.
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Last Week’s News – Received Too Late for Publication

Donald Coon is quite sick with pneumonia.

(ibid, page 4)
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The Nezperce Herald., March 20, 1919, Page 5

Local and Personal News Notes

Dr. J. U. White, of Lewiston, arrived in this city Sunday night, having been called here in consultation with Dr. Gist on the illness of Gay Miller, who was quite ill of pneumonia, but has shown improvement the past three days. Mr. Miller suffered an attack of the influenza some three weeks ago and from this he had almost recovered when a relapse merged into pneumonia.

The Temple Theater was unable to give shows Monday and Tuesday evening because the films depended on from Cottonwood were returned from that point direct to the film exchange at Seattle, instead of being routed by Nezperce. This mistake happened through the illness of the Cottonwood theater manager, who has the influenza, and a misunderstanding by the party who was running the show for him. It was a condition over which Mr. Bilodeau, our local manager, had no control, and he regrets more than any one that it came about.

Mrs. S. D. Stoufer returned Friday from Lewiston, much improved from the illness which confined her in the hospital there several weeks. She was accompanied home by Miss Iva Rouse of Lewiston, who is a guest of the family this week.

The report comes that Mrs. Lewis Clark has sufficiently recovered from her recent serious illness to be removed from the Lewiston hospital to the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. S. Marker, in Clarkston.

Mrs. John McKinley is said to be convalescing satisfactorily at the hospital in Lewiston.

A recent letter from Ben. Rassbach, Savageton, Wyo., states that they have had a bad siege of the flu, but are getting over it.

Victor Agrell is managing to get around after a serious attack of tonsillitis.

(ibid, page 5)
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The Filer Record., March 20, 1919, Page 3

19190320FR1

Local News Notes

Mrs. Ward Blakely is on the sick list this week.

The dragging of the streets yesterday made a vast improvement in traffic conditions. The road drag is a hamley [sic] thing but it certainly is one of the most useful in making good roads.

source: The Filer Record. (Filer, Idaho), 20 March 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.

[Note: This is the first edition of this publication.]
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The Filer Record., March 20, 1919, Page 8

19190320FR2

(ibid, page 8)
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Further Reading:

History repeated

A century ago, quarantine boredom was still hard to beat

By Riley Haun October 11, 2020

1918Diary-aActual passages from Esthers diary.
(click here for larger size)

The paper is yellowed, the binding cracked and split. Emerald handwriting, cramped and neat, fills blocks of text across the months. The font is reminiscent of a grandmother’s, but the sentiments contained in the loops of florid lettering are frighteningly familiar to a 21st-century reader.

“All schools closed now,” Esther Thomas wrote. “Forty cases of the flu at the university. Bum at home all day.”

As a home economics student at the University of Idaho, Esther kept a diary as part of her scrapbook. Every day of 1918 bears a line or two about what she’d done that day, how she was feeling or which friends she’d seen.

Esther’s years in Moscow had been busy, with a party on Greek Row or dinner at a friend’s house to attend whenever boredom struck. She filled her scrapbook with programs and tickets from fraternity dances and barn parties, noting the boys she’d danced with and the friends she’d gotten ready with beforehand. Now, the parties and dates were quickly drying up.

1918diaryphotos-a
Photos added to Esther’s scrapbook in 1918.
(click here for larger size)

The Spanish flu, as it was then known, had already been circulating for months before it reached tiny, distant Moscow. The disease had popped up in military bases in the United States and on the European front as soldiers filled the trenches of World War I. Soon, it was in every corner of the earth, eventually infecting up to one-third of the world’s population, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

It disproportionately sickened and killed the young and healthy, who on UI’s campus were encouraged to stave off the disease by avoiding crowds, keeping windows open, chewing their food thoroughly and avoiding tight clothing — shots in the dark against an unknown assailant at the time.

When it did come, in October 1918, three members of the Student Army Training Corps (SATC) were the first to fall ill on campus. The school gym where the student soldiers slept had its heat shut off in an attempt to “freeze out” the flu germs, The Argonaut wrote.

To prevent further spread of the sickness, UI’s campus would be quarantined from the outside world starting that October. Esther grew increasingly desperate. She’d been sick with the flu herself for a few days — only a mild case, she wrote, but the worst part was the doctor’s orders keeping friends away from her bedside.

Esther, who lived off-campus in her family’s home, found herself stuck inside even after her recovery. The white voile dress and black velvet jacket she’d just bought for the beginning of the semester would languish in her closet, she lamented.

“Still doing nothing,” she wrote Oct. 21. “I am almost desperate.”

She bided her time by sewing sheets for the SATC boys in the infirmary. But there’s only so much sewing one girl can do in quarantine, after all.

“Made some more sheets,” Esther wrote Oct. 22. “Desperation increases. What will become of me?”

The next day, she took some flowers to the sick bay to cheer the boys up. Desperately short-handed, the Red Cross volunteers quickly put Esther to work as a nurse. By the end of the week, her quarantine boredom was a thing of the past.

“Gave my first medicine to the sick men today,” she wrote. “Didn’t kill any of them either.”

As cases began to pick up across Moscow — over 200 cases were recorded among the SATC men alone — orders came down from the U.S. War Department that all student soldiers must wear a gauze face mask.

That mandate was unpopular from the beginning, The Argonaut reported in November. Soldiers had to wear masks at all times unless they were eating, so “many prolonged their eating periods until nearly every minute in barracks was spent with an apple or a Hershey,” the report stated.

Another soldier would let the mask slip below his nose, ready to pull back up if he was called out, because “he was afraid he’d breathed his mask full of germs and didn’t want to breathe them back in again.”

The mask mandate was rescinded within a week, reportedly because of countless complaints about being unable to smoke, The Argonaut reported.

Those quarantined on campus were making the best of their boredom, according to a regular Argonaut section titled “Quarantine Notes.”

In Ridenbaugh Hall, the campus’s main dorm building at the time, students took to holding singing and dancing recitals in the common rooms, and compiled a small newspaper called the “Peek-a-Boo” to disseminate the dorm’s latest gossip.

At the Delta Gamma house, students held a fashion show one night where they served grape juice and popcorn balls. At Sigma Nu, brushing up on “the manly art of self-defense” one particularly boring evening resulted in a broken nose for one member.

By mid-November, Esther joined the girls of Ridenbaugh Hall in quarantine — off-campus students had to receive a health certificate after an isolation period before they could return to classes. She joined other home economics students in cooking meals for the convalescent soldiers. Her days settled into a blur once again — save the end of the war on Nov. 11 — until quarantine was lifted at the end of the month. By the end of that week, Esther was off to Spokane on a date. A week later, it was announced no final exams would be given that quarter — noted in Esther’s diary with a “Hurrah!!!!!!!!!!”

By December, Moscow was almost back to normal. As the burden of disease and of war lifted off the town’s shoulders, an immeasurable sense of relief must have swept the people. But the pandemic had not been without its losses, small as they may have been in remote North Idaho. Twelve SATC men, young and hardy, had died from the disease, their bodies sent by train from Moscow back home to Sandpoint, Coeur d’Alene and Montana.

Across the nation, over 675,000 people died from the Spanish flu, according to the CDC. The virus’s origins, commonly traced to an Army cook in Kansas or an overcrowded field hospital in France, are still not clearly understood.

Americans of the early 20th century grappled simultaneously with the death they’d confronted overseas during the Great War and at home in the war against an unseen attacker. They held their heads high, and they tried to carry on.

An Argonaut article that December looked back at the pandemic’s course through Moscow and wondered whether the precautions taken were the right ones, or whether they’d been made in time to save enough lives.

“Because there was no assured knowledge of how to deal with the disease, the nation was not prepared in advance for the epidemic,” the article reads. “The result was that whatever was done was generally too late…But modern science, even for the time being baffled, refuses to be helplessly passive. It knows a great deal about the disease, despite the beliefs of absolute prevention or infallible cure.”

And Esther got right back into the swing of things. There were still dates to be had, dances to attend and friends to play cards with. That Christmas season, she emerged from quarantine to make candy with the other home economics students and went caroling with friends on First Street. She went Christmas shopping downtown and brought in quite the holiday haul herself — “Old Santa was very good to me this year,” she wrote on Christmas Day 1918.

As 1919 approached, it brought the promise of a clean slate. The snow falling on Moscow blanketed all in sight, and as it melted, maybe it would wash away the pain of 1918.

Esther rang in the new year surrounded by friends and family — no more isolation for her.

“Mama, Papa and I play cards,” she wrote on December 31, 1918. “We make candy. Happy New Year.”

Story: Blot Magazine
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Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 1)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 2)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 3)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 4)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 5)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 6)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 7)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 8)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 9)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 10)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 11)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 12)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 13)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 14)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 15)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 16)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 17)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 18)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 19)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 20)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 21)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 22)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 23)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 24)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 25)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 26)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 27)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 28)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 29)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 30)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 31)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 32)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 33)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 34)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 35)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 36)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 37)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 38)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 39)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 40)
Link to Idaho 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 41)