Monthly Archives: February 2021

Feb 28, 2021 The Yellow Pine Times

Feb 28, 2021 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Reminder: We are still under a boil water order until further notice.

Community Calendar:

Apr 17 – Boil water order issued
Feb 19 – Valley County Mask Advisory
Feb 28 – 2pm Fest Planning Meeting
June 12 – VYPA Meeting
(details below)
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Local Events:

School Bond Ballots

A quick thinking local noticed that return postage was not included with the school bond ballots and contacted the county. The county has since made arrangements with the Yellow Pine Post Office to process the ballots without postage and be reimbursed later since we are a “vote by mail precinct.”
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Next Festival Planning Meeting

Sunday, Feb 28, 2021 @ Community Hall, 2pm
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Village News:

Avalanche Closes Road to Stibnite

The morning of Feb 23rd, we received a message there are slides on the road to Stibnite. “These slides start below Tamarack creek then up around the corner where the 2019 slides were.” They will keep us posted. Please don’t attempt to go up there to look and get in the way.
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Another Snowy Week in YP

Yellow Pine has received snow every day of the week, adding up to over 9″ of new snow. Saturday morning we had an average of 31″ of snow on the ground on the open flat down by the school. We received a total of 35.8″ of new snow for the month of February. We have received a total of 90″ of snow so far this winter.

P1000661-20210227WeatherStation
YP Weather Station Feb 27th

Check the Weather Page for snow totals for other months and years.
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From Gov Brad Little Feb 19th

20210219GovLittleYPshots-a

The Village of Yellow Pine sends a big Thank You to Cascade Medical Center.
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Yellow Pine General Store

Please welcome Josh Jones as the new owner of the Yellow Pine General Store.
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Critters

Be Fox Aware

* Do not feed foxes human food
* Feed domestic pets indoors
* Make sure your pets are updated on Rabies vaccines
* Small pets could become a snack

Be Mountain Lion Aware

* NEVER run away from a mountain lion. The lion’s instinct is to chase and ultimately catch what they perceive as potential prey.
* NEVER turn your back on a lion. Always face them while making yourself look as large as you can. Yell loudly, but don’t scream. A high-pitched scream may mimic the sound of a wounded animal.
* SLOWLY back away while maintaining eye contact with the lion.
* Safety equipment you may choose to carry could include bear spray, a noise device, like an air-horn, and if you walk in the dark, a very bright flashlight.
* If you are attacked, fight back!
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Road Reports

Link: to current road reports.
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Yellow Pine US Mail

The 3-day a week mail delivery started Nov 2nd. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 55 cents. Support our local post office and purchase your holiday stamps here.
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Yellow Pine Transfer Station

The dump (and road) were plowed on Saturday, Feb 27th.

20190429Dump2-bYellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: (208) 634-7176
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Local Groups

YPWUA News:

The annual Water meeting for 2020 was held July 5th at the Community Hall 2pm.
link: minutes 20200705YPWUA.docx

Boil Your Water Before Using
Boil Water Order issued April 17, 2020.
Link: to Notice

Update Nov 29: Warren replaced the water meter because of inconsistent readings. With the new meter, the community is currently using over 55,000 gallons of water per day. A leak has been identified and will be repaired as soon as we can coordinate the contractor, equipment needed and weather together. It is difficult to get everything planned in the winter. When the repair is scheduled, the community will have a few days notice before the water is shut down. Since we are using more water than the rated use through the sand filters, the boil order will remain in effect. We continue the grant request process that is extremely slow. – Steve H

Update Nov 25: the boil order is still in effect due to the large quantity of water that is leaking from the system. – Warren D
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VYPA News:

VYPA Meetings are the 2nd Saturday of June, July, August, and September (June 12, July 10, August 14, September 11) at 2:00pm at the Community Hall.

Village Council members:
Deb Filler, Chairman
Matt Huber, Vice Chairman
Ronda Rogers, Treasurer
Rhonda Egbert, Secretary
Ron Noel, Member at Large

VYPA Bylaws adopted 8/8/2020 (link)

YPAC Corp Bylaws (link)

Festival
Anyone interested in being a part of the Festival Planning/Working committee, please contact Deb Filler. Meetings will begin at the end of January. Even if you aren’t physically in YP, you can participate in the committee.
Next Festival Planning Meeting Sunday, Feb 28, 2021 @ Community Hall, 2pm
2021 Planning Notes Link:
Yellow Pine Music and Harmonica Festival Policy and Procedure Link:
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YPFD News:

After Action Report meeting Oct 13, 2020 (no minutes yet.)

YPFD had a budget meeting on September 30th at 10am at the fire station. (No minutes yet.)

Make sure to keep your chimney clean. Cleaning brushes can be borrowed from the YPFD.

YPFD COVID19 Policy
link: YPFD Covid 19 SOP
link: Covid-19 EMS (May 23)

Pile burning: Dress appropriately, have enough help on hand (people, water and tools) and make a firebreak before you start. Call your local fire protection district chief to let them know you’ll be conducting a debris burn. This saves them from sending emergency responders to your property if they are not needed. Do NOT burn on breezy afternoons.

Better yet, “Rake It and Take It” yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, etc.) to the burn pile at the Transfer Station on the south end of the turn-around. Remember, keep the pile neat. Woody debris only, no nails, no cardboard and no furniture! The Boise NF will burn the pile in the fall when it is safe and doesn’t pollute our fine YP air.

YP Fire Commissioners:
Sue Holloway – District 1
Dan Stiff – District 2
Merrill Saleen – District 3
Tim Rogers – Fire Chief

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice

The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.” Click the link: to view 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation
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Biz Listings:

The Corner (208) 633-3325
Starting Nov 3rd open 3 days a week on mail days.
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Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233
Winter Closure: November 14, 2020 to April 16, 2021
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Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377
Closed Nov 3rd for winter.
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Yellow Pine General Store (208) 633-3300
New owner, plans to open this spring.
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Murph’s RV Park & Mary’s Cabins
FB page link
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Knotty Kat Crochet Works – 208-502-0940
FB page link
open Tue – Sat, 9-5
Yellow Pine eggs $3/doz
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Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Tom & Sarah Lanham
156 Yellow Pine Ave, Yellow Pine Id 83677
website:
Facebook:

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
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Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430 open 830am-5pm Monday-Friday, closed weekends.
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Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

The Star-News

click to subscribe:
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine

Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, will service Yellow Pine

B&T Safety Solutions LLC
208-271-1600 Based out of Donnelly
Snow removal, cleaning chimneys and stoves, we do cabin staining/chinking as well
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Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
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Local Observations:

Monday (Feb 22) the 24 hour high of 33 degrees was this morning and the low of 23 degrees was from Sunday morning. Measured a fat 1/2″ new snow (SWE=0.04″) and 27″ of snow on the ground, sky is overcast. Looks like every fox in the valley was partying in our yard last night, lots of tracks. Hairy woodpecker, red-winged blackbird, jays, chickadees, nuthatches and the pine squirrel visiting. Cloudy at lunch time, high of 40 degrees. Gusty breezes early afternoon. Lower clouds, gusty breezes and misty sprinkles mid-afternoon. Calmer and cloudy at dusk. Gusty breezes after dark. Rain then rain/snow mix ending before midnight. More rain and snow after midnight.

Tuesday (Feb 23) overnight low of 21 degrees, measured 1/2″ new snow (rain+snow=0.24″) measured 25-27″ snow on the ground (average 26″.) Gusty breezes this morning, big patch of blue sky to the south and black clouds to the north. Jays, nuthatches, chickadees and the pine squirrel visiting. Mostly cloudy and breezy at lunch time, high of 34 degrees. Low clouds, foggy, light breeze and fine light snow falling early afternoon. Flaking or lightly snowing during the rest of the afternoon, alternating between mostly cloudy and socked in with variable breezes. Breaks in the clouds and fat moon to the east at dusk. Hazy sky and filtered moonlight before midnight. Snowed before morning.

Wednesday (Feb 24) overnight low of 20 degrees, measured a fat 2 1/4″ new snow (SWE=0.14″) and 27-29″ snow on the ground (average 28″.) Jays, red-winged blackbird, a white-breasted and several red-breasted nuthatches, chickadees and the pine squirrel visiting. A few flakes of snow falling from mostly cloudy skies for a little while before lunch time. Internet went wonky around 1140am, back on by 1215pm. Mail truck was a little late today. Breaks in the clouds early afternoon and icicles dripping, high of 38 degrees. The internet blipped out and back at 235pm. Partly cloudy and just above freezing mid-afternoon, beautiful blue sky over VanMeter hill. A report of 10 red-winged blackbirds in a flock up here. Sunset was pretty close to 6pm. Almost clear sky and temperature dropping at dusk. Cold and breezy late evening. Clear and cold before midnight, bright waxing moon high in the sky. Cold night.

Thursday (Feb 25) overnight low of -4 degrees, no measurable new snow and an average of 27″ on the ground, overcast sky and cold breezes. Jays, female hairy woodpecker, male red-winged blackbird, dark-eyed junco, red-breasted nuthatches, chickadees and pine squirrel visiting. Socked in and started snowing at lunch time, high of 27 degrees. Gusty winds, still socked in and snowing early afternoon. Below freezing, calmer but still socked in and snowing mid-afternoon, less then 1/2″ so far. Still snowing at dusk and calmer. Snowing pretty good before midnight. Looks like it snowed all night.

Friday (Feb 26) 24 hour low of 10 degrees from Thurs morning, measured 3 1/2″ new snow (SWE=0.15″) and an average of 30″ on the ground, sky overcast – foggy ridges, steady light snow falling and breezy. Jays, red-winged blackbird, dark-eyed juncos, red-breasted nuthatches, mountain chickadees, hairy woodpecker and pine squirrel visiting. Light snowfall at lunch time, breezy and overcast, high of 32 degrees. Break in the snow early afternoon for about an hour, then lowering clouds, chilly breezes and light snow mid-afternoon. Two pine squirrels yelling at each other near the golf course. Break in the snow late afternoon and thin spots in the clouds. Cold, cloudy and not snowing at dusk. Snowing lightly after dark, thinner clouds and filtered moonlight. Still snowing lightly at midnight. Snowed most of the night, ending around 630am.

Saturday (Feb 27) overnight low of 15 degrees, patches of clear sky early then mostly cloudy. Measured a fat 2 1/4″ new snow (SWE=0.16″) and an average of 31″ on the ground. Blackbird, jays and chickadees calling, also nuthatches, hairy woodpecker and pine squirrel visiting. Snowing lightly at noon, lasted about half an hour then partly clear, high of 35 degrees. Short little flurry around 1pm then partly sunny. Partly cloudy, below freezing and gusty breezes mid-afternoon. Calmer, mostly cloudy and cold at dusk. Partly clear before midnight and down to single digits, bright full moon peeking out from a large gap in the clouds.

Sunday (Feb 28) overnight low of -4 degrees, a trace of new snow and an average of 29″ snow on the ground, the sky was overcast this morning. Very vocal pine squirrel, hairy woodpecker, jays, nuthatches and chickadees visiting. Overcast at lunch time, high of 32 degrees. Overcast and just below freezing mid-afternoon. Overcast and quiet at dusk, did not see the sun all day.
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RIP:

Tasha

Tasha was abandoned in Yellow Pine by her previous owner. Rescued and given a new home by John and Andi and taken to McCall in September of 2020 for the remaining months of her life. “She loved to catch popcorn, walk in tall weeds, and go visit a nearby cat playground dumpster, we called Kitty City. She brought us so much happiness.” She passed away Wednesday, Feb 24, 2021.
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Idaho News:

312 new Idaho COVID-19 cases, 9 new deaths

Feb 26, 2021 Local News 8

Idaho officials reported 312 new COVID-19 cases and 9 new deaths on Friday.

That brings the total confirmed and probable cases reported since March to 170,907.

There are a total of 138,652 confirmed cases and 32,255 probable cases in all 44 of the 44 counties in Idaho, according to numbers released from the local health districts and the state. …

The state said 233,241 people have received the vaccine, and 346,393 total doses have been administered. …

The state said 8 new hospitalizations have been reported bringing the total number to 7,065 and 1 new case has been admitted to the ICU bringing the total to 1,229.

There are 10,321 asymptomatic reported cases and 9,558 cases among health care workers.

9 new deaths were reported bringing the total recorded deaths to 1,859.

full story:
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Idaho Hospitalizations Feb 21, 2021


source: KTVB
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New COVID-19 cases in Valley County rise by 10 in week

Hospitals give 2,325 first doses of vaccines

By Tom Grote for The Star-News Feb 25, 2021

The number of new positive COVID-19 cases in Valley County rebounded slightly after declining the previous four weeks, health officials said.

The total number of positive cases since the pandemic reached Valley County last summer totaled 713 by Tuesday, up 10 cases from 703 a week ago, health officials said.

That compared to a total of four new cases reported week, 17 new cases two weeks ago, 28 new cases three weeks ago and 24 new cases four weeks ago.

St. Luke’s McCall on Tuesday reported 612 total positive cases from testing done at the hospital since the pandemic reached Valley County last summer, up nine cases from 603 cases a week ago.

Cascade Medical Center reported 101 total positive cases through Monday, or one more than the 100 cases reported last week.

Central District Health reported 625 of the positive cases were confirmed to be Valley County residents as of Tuesday, which is seven more than the 618 cases reported a week ago.

The difference between the hospital figures and the health department figures are those who tested positive but did not declare Valley County as their residence.

Four confirmed deaths and one probable death of Valley County residents related to COVID-19 have been reported by Central District Health.

continued:
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2,325 Vaccinations

By Tom Grote for The Star-News Feb 25, 2021

A total of 2,325 people had received the first dose of the COVID-19 vaccine from Valley County’s two hospitals by Tuesday, the hospitals reported.

St. Luke’s McCall had given 1,270 of the first doses as of Tuesday and 581 of the required second doses of the vaccine.

St. Luke’s McCall continues to schedule vaccine appointments three days a week. This week 368 appointments are scheduled for first and second doses, an increase of 97 appointments over the previous week.

Cascade Medical Center had given out 1,055 first doses by Monday while 154 people had received the second dose.

Five clinics have been scheduled at the Cascade American Legion Hall through April 29, where a total of 1,360 first doses and 1,640 second doses are scheduled to be given.

… To request a vaccination from Cascade Medical Center, go to (link) or call 208-382-4285.

continued:
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Health board lifts Valley County mask order

Action comes after decline in new COVID-19 cases

By Max Silverson for The Star-News Feb 25, 2021

The mandatory mask order for Valley County was lifted by the Central District Health board on Friday.

The mandatory mask order that had been in place since last August was replaced by a health advisory that strongly encourages people to wear masks to prevent the spread of COVID-19.

The order was lifted because of a steady decline in cases and reduced strain on hospitals across the district, health district Director Russ Duke said.

In Valley County, the number of new cases reported by St. Luke’s McCall and Cascade Medical Center dropped to four during the previous week.

That is down from 48 new cases reported a month prior, but 10 new cases were reported in the past week.

continued:
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McCall City Council approves new mask mandate

The move comes after the Central District Health Board last week voted to lift public health orders for Ada and Valley counties.

February 25, 2021 KTVB

The McCall City Council on Thursday passed a new mask mandate with the “intention to protect its tourism-based community” from COVID-19.

The mandate goes into effect immediately and will remain in place for 45 days.

The move comes after the Central District Health Board last week voted to lift public health orders for Ada and Valley counties and implement public health advisories for the two counties.

continued:
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March 9 bond would roll over previous bond, lower cost

By Max Silverson for The Star-News Feb 25, 2021

McCall-Donnelly School District voters will be asked on March 9 to approve a $33 million bond to expand Donnelly Elementary School and Payette Lakes Middle School as well as refinance existing debt.

The vote requires a two-thirds majority to pass, or one more than 66.6% in favor.

The largest share of the bond, about $22.5 million, would be spent on the school renovations. About $10.7 million of the levy would refinance the district’s outstanding bond.

The outstanding bond is from a 2012 refinancing of a 2006 bond. The 2006 bond, which was for $28.6 million, was used to build Barbara R. Morgan Elementary School, expand Donnelly Elementary and remodel McCall-Donnelly High School.

Refinancing will allow the district to borrow at an interest rate of 1.65%, compared to the 2012 rate of 3.29%, for a savings of about $51,000 over the course of the loan.

The annual total cost to taxpayers would decrease from $53 per $100,000 in taxable value to $51. The bond would be paid off in 2038.

continued:
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ITD continuing work on Highway 55 Smiths Ferry and the Rainbow Bridge

By Meredith Spelbring Feb 26, 2021 KIVI


Photo by: ITD

Idaho Transportation Department is sharing new details about plans to improve Highway 55.

That work between Smiths Ferry and the Rainbow Bridge is expected to start March 8. Drivers can plan for daytime work with a 15-minute delay through March 12. Spring construction starts March 15 with full road closures during the day from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Monday through Thursday.

“The important thing to note is that this is all weather dependent,” said Vincent Trimboli, ITD spokesperson. “If we get a major storm that comes through we’ll probably shut it down, it’ll go back to one lane and we won’t have closures.”

continued:
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Boise man killed in rollover crash near Horseshoe Bend

Police say Everett Fowler died after his Ford pickup went off the highway and rolled. He was ejected from the truck.

A Boise man was killed in a rollover crash near Horseshoe Bend Friday afternoon.

Idaho State Police say shortly after noon, 69-year-old Everett Fowler was northbound on State Highway 55 when his Ford F-350 pickup crashed.

Investigators say Fowler failed to negotiate a curve while descending a grade, the truck went off the right shoulder and rolled. The crash happened at milepost 59.

continued:
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Earthquake reported west of Stanley

Feb 22, 2021 Local News 8


USGS

The U.S. Geological Survey is reporting a 3.5 magnitude earthquake was registered at around 3:40 p.m. about 12 kilometers west of Stanley, Idaho.

The quake was fairly deep, at an estimated 8 kilometers.

source:
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Mining News:

Thunder Mountain Gold Reports Significant Drill Intercepts in the Texas Zone at its High-Grade Polymetallic South Mountain Project

22 February 2021 Thunder Mountain Gold Inc.

Boise, Idaho and Vancouver, British Columbia, Feb. 22, 2021 (Globe Newswire) — Thunder Mountain Gold, Inc. is pleased to report on the latest analytical results from its Phase 2 underground diamond drilling program at the high-grade South Mountain Zinc-Silver-Gold-Copper Project (“South Mountain” or “South Mountain Project” or the “Property”) in southwestern Idaho, U.S.A. The Company`s 2020 drill results demonstrate that South Mountain’s Texas Zone contains both high-grade Copper-Silver and Zinc-Silver-Gold mineralization (See Tables 1 and 2). The Company’s core drilling program intersected mineralization at depths beyond any historical drilling of the Texas Zone and the deposit remains open to depth (See Figure 1). Further drilling results will be reported when received from the laboratories.

continued:
[h/t SM]
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Public Lands:

Lake Cascade park reports 30% rise in campers

Ponderosa park notes 10% drop during 2020

By Max Silverson for The Star-News Feb 25, 2021

Ponderosa State Park reported a 10% decrease in campers in 2020, while Lake Cascade State Park reported a 29% increase in overnight camping visitors, the Idaho Department of Parks and Recreation reported.

Lake Cascade park reported a 13% decrease in day-use visitors in 2020. A count of day-use visitors for Ponderosa park was not available because the park traffic counter did not operate properly, park manager Matt Linde said.

Camping numbers were down in Ponderosa because the park closed one of the camping loops the day after Labor Day to make repairs and improvements, Linde said.

Despite the curtailed season, the park hosted about 78,000 campers in 2020..

continued:
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Busy Season of Trails Work Planned for the McCall and New Meadows Ranger Districts

McCall, Idaho, [February] 22, 2021 – The trails program on the Payette National Forest’s McCall and New Meadows Ranger Districts have a busy 2021 field season planned. Priority projects include three bridge replacements which were funded in part by an Idaho Parks and Recreation grant and work under the Great American Outdoors Act (GAOA), in additional to annual maintenance of the trail system.

Bridges to be replaced include: the Alex Creek bridge on the Secesh River Trail near Chinook Campground; the Center Ridge Trail bridge which is accessed from Warren Wagon Road (about a half mile past the bridge completed in 2020); and, the second bridge on the Pete Creek Trail, accessed from the Three Mile Creek dispersed camping area.

Funds received from the Great American Outdoors Act (GAOA) will allow for reroutes to be completed on the French Creek and Bear Pete Ridge trails, which were approved in the mid-2010s. GAOA funds are also planned to replace the Jenkins Crossing bridge, further north on the French Creek Trail. Completion of this project in 2021 will depend on contractor and material availability.

Other planned work includes deferred maintenance on several trails in the Rapid River drainage and a cooperative project with the Payette’s Heritage program to improve conditions on the Chinese Cemetery Trail outside of Warren.

Annual maintenance such as log out, brushing, drainage maintenance, and tread repair will continue across both Ranger Districts, much of it off Goose Creek Road, Warren Wagon Road, and Lick Creek Road.

McCall and New Meadows trails staff are also looking forward to working with their regular project partners this coming summer, including Montana Conservation Corps (MCC), Idaho Conservation Corps (ICC), Idaho Trails Association (ITA), Central Idaho Trail Riders Alliance (CITRA), Back Country Horsemen of Idaho (BCHI), and Central Idaho Mountain Bike Association (CIMBA). Last year alone, these partners assisted in the maintenance of over 300 miles of trails!

In addition to the projects described above, the Forest is seeking public input on two planned trail reroutes intended to improve public safety, user experience, and watershed condition in the Secesh Summit area.

* The Bear Pete Ridge Trail (#142) is a popular trail approximately 20 miles from McCall, Idaho, Township 22 North, Range 4 East, section 28, Boise Meridian. In 2013, the District approved work on a number of sections of this trail to bring it up to Forest Service standards; however, this section was not included in that original NEPA. Under this proposal, approximately 0.2 miles of heavily-eroded sections would be obliterated and replaced with 0.4 miles of new trail. This trail would reduce trail grade by constructing a switchback which would accommodate motorcycle use.

* The Willow Basket Trail (#141) is located in Township 22 North, Range 5 East, sections 32 & 33, Boise Meridian and provides access to the Loon Lake trail system. The current proposal is to relocate the trail which involves obliterating 0.3 miles of trail, removing dilapidated structures and constructing 0.7 miles of new trail. The segment of the Willow Basket Trail proposed for reroute travels through a flat meadow and contains six trail structures (bridges, puncheons, and turnpikes) which are in various stages of disrepair. The proposed realignment follows the toe of the slope and crosses two drainages in more confined locations where two small trail structures would be constructed.

More information about the trail reroute project and a comment form can be found at: (link). Comments are requested by March 30, 2021.

If you have questions about these projects, please contact Central Zone Recreation Manager Michael Beach at michael.beach@usda.gov or 208-315-5263 or Central Zone Trails Lead Adam Larson at adam.larson@usda.gov or 208-634-0419.

Brian Harris
Public Affairs Officer
Payette National Forest
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Critter News:

Proposed legislation would reduce Idaho’s 1,500 wolves to 500

by Associated Press Tuesday, February 23rd 2021

Legislation allowing the use of snowmobiles, ATVs, powered parachutes and other methods to hunt and kill wolves year-round with no limits in most of Idaho has been introduced.

A House panel on Tuesday cleared the way for a public hearing on the proposed law backers say is needed because Idaho has too many wolves. Former Republican Sen. Jeff Siddoway, who is filling in for a senator who is out with COVID-19, says the plan is to reduce Idaho’s wolf population from about 1,500 to 500.

Wolves could be hunted year-round in the state with no limits in all but a rugged area of central Idaho.

source:
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Three sheep guard dogs stolen from Emmett ranch, commission says

by Ryan L Morrison Thursday, February 25th 2021 CBS2

The Idaho Rangeland Resources Commission says three sheep guard dogs were stolen from a ranch near Emmett.

The commission says the Gem County Sheriff’s Office has issued a felony warrant against a Washington man in connection with the incident. CBS2 has reached out to Gem County to confirm this information.

According to sheep rancher Harry Soulen, the young dogs were taken on Dec. 16 while they were with a herd of about 50 sheep along Hanna Road. The dogs were left with the sheep on purpose for them to bond with the sheep and guard them against predators.

continued:
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World Center for Birds of Prey starts campaign to expand

By Katie Kloppenburg Feb 23, 2021 KIVI

The Peregrine Fund’s World Center for Birds of Prey has launched the public phase of a $3.2 million capital campaign to expand educational opportunities and exhibits at its interpretive center. The campaign, called HATCHED, has raised 84 percent of the funding needed for the project to break ground this summer.

A news release says the Center has seen a 48 percent growth over a four-year period, as well as a need to reinvest in aging infrastructure. Nearly a million guests and around 500,000 children have visited the Center since it opened.

The design will double the capacity to serve students and the public, create STEM learning opportunities and show how we can act on behalf of wildlife and crucial landscapes, according to the release.

continued:
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Fish & Game News:

Feb. 22: Upper Salmon River Steelhead Fishing Report

By Brent Beller, Fisheries Biologist 1
Tuesday, February 23, 2021

Fish and Game began interviewing steelhead anglers along the upper Salmon River Feb. 19

Angler effort over the weekend was low, and the majority of interviews were obtained in location code 17 between the Lemhi and Pahsimeroi rivers. No interviews were obtained from downstream of the Middle Fork Salmon River in location code 14. Upstream of the Middle Fork in location code 15, interviewed anglers averaged 27 hours per steelhead caught. Upstream of North Fork in location code 16, interviewed anglers averaged 14 hours per steelhead caught, and upstream of the Lemhi River in location code 17, interviewed anglers averaged 63 hours per steelhead caught. No anglers interviewed upstream of the Pahsimeroi River in location code 18 reported catching a steelhead.

River conditions varied depending on location but were generally good. On Sunday, the river had cloudy visibility downstream of the Lemhi River and clear visibility upstream of the Lemhi River with river temperatures in the low to mid 30s. Currently the Salmon River is flowing at 1,040 cfs through the town of Salmon, which is 95 percent of average for today’s date.

continued:
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Southwest Idaho River Otter Season Closes

By Evin Oneale, Regional Communications Manager
Thursday, February 25, 2021

By order of the Idaho Department of Fish and Game, the river otter trapping season in Idaho’s Southwest Region will close on February 26th due to the regional harvest quota of 20 otters being met on February 23rd.

River otters must be presented at a regional office to obtain the appropriate pelt tag within 72 hours of harvest. Any trapper who has already reached their personal quota of three otters, and/or checks any otters after March 1st, must surrender those otters at an IDFG office for a $10 reward.

For more information regarding the otter season closure in Southwest Idaho, contact the Fish and Game Nampa office at 208-465-8465 or the McCall office at 208-634-8137.

source:
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Fish and Game offers three self-paced Project WILD courses for educators

Monday, February 22, 2021 – 3:05 PM MST

Idaho Fish and Game’s Project WILD program will not host in-person workshops until late summer or fall, but the program will offer three courses that are self-paced with a completion deadline of May 10.

Idaho Ecosystems with WET, WILD and PLT

This class is a “sampler platter” of three leading environmental education programs (Project WILD, Project WET and Project Learning Tree) explored through the lens of Idaho ecosystems. There are three synchronous meetings and the rest is on your own time.

continued:
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More F&G News Releases

link:
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Crazy Critter Stuff:

Animals Playing in Snow

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Seasonal Humor:

WinterDogWater-a

CovidCats-a
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Idaho History Feb 28, 2021

Idaho 1918-1920 Influenza Pandemic

Part 46

Idaho Newspaper clippings April 1-4, 1919

Some photos courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

Main Street, Eagle, Idaho

EagleFritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

April 1

The Idaho Republican. April 01, 1919, Page 2

19190401TIR1

Sterling

G. William Parsons died at his home near the canal Tuesday, March 25 at 12 o’clock from an attack of influenza. Mr. and Mrs. Parsons had just returned from Ogden where they went to bury Mr. Parsons’ mother. Mr. Parsons contracted the disease there and came home. It was not generally known there was a case in the vicinity, when the community was shocked by the sad news of his death. Funeral arrangements have not been made.

Bishop R. A. Ward returned Saturday from Malad, Idaho, where he attended the funeral of his brother.

Miss Blanche Claypool was on the sick list the last of the week.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 01 April 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Idaho Republican. April 01, 1919, Page 3

19190401TIR3
Greater Red Cross Planned
Unified Action by Societies of the World Proposed
Plans Approved by Wilson
H. P. Davison Gives in Outline at Paris Banquet Red Cross Program for World Welfare – Distress in All Nations to Be Relieved — Epidemics to Be Combated — Central Bureau at Geneva.

Members of the peace delegations of all the powers interested in the proposed league of nations and ambassadors and ministers from various countries, with several hundred newspaper representatives from allied and neutral countries, at a dinner in Paris recently heard H. P. Davison of the American Red Cross announce in outline international Red Cross plans for world welfare. Mr. Davison has been named chairman of a committee of Red Cross societies representing the organizations in the United States, Great Britain, Italy, France and Japan “to formulate and propose to the Red Cross societies of the world a program of extended Red Cross activities in the interest of humanity.” …

“The situation in the world today is tragic beyond description. The distress in the world is of course greater than ever before and beyond comprehension. To me, therefore, it is clear that while the leading men of the world are convened to draw up conditions of peace there is no man or set of men who can by pencil and paper establish a peace which can endure in the presence of the distress throughout the world. I refer of course primarily to conditions in those countries which have suffered directly from the war.

“But our experience and studies have revealed conditions in other countries which are conductive to disquiet and unrest and which will continue to breed a spirit of dissatisfaction until they are at least in some degree improved. The fundamental basis of these conditions is primarily lack of proper foods, but also lack of medical, scientific and general health practice.” …

“If it had been possible to effect this organization two years ago it is conceivable that there would be going today to the various countries now in distress supplies and aid which would give comfort to and restore to health millions of people who cannot now be cared for. No one knows how many millions have died during the last year from influenza. …”

(ibid, page 3)
— — — —

The Idaho Republican. April 01, 1919, Page 4

Moreland

The infant child of Mr. and Mrs. Bert Grimmett died last Wednesday after a short illness.
— —

Wicks

The George Carlson family have the influenza at the present writing, but are not dangerously ill.

A large crowd attended the dance at the school house on Thursday evening. The music was good and everyone had a good time.
— —

Grandview

William Parson, who lived at the big fill, departed this life on Tuesday, March 25, suffering from influenza. Mr. Parsons leaves a devoted wife and ten children to mourn his loss. Interment was made in the Yuma cemetery Wednesday afternoon.

The roads are greatly improved the last few days making it possible for cars to travel.

(ibid, page 4)
— — — —

The Idaho Republican. April 01, 1919, Page 5

Local News

Mrs. W. G. Homer returned last week from Salt Lake, where she had been attending her son Edmond, who was in the hospital for treatment of an abscess of the lung, following influenza.

A. Andren, manager of the Andren Auto company, has been seriously ill for two weeks, and is slowly regaining his health.

Mrs. Eliza Lee of Buhl arrived Monday morning on her way to Darlington to be with her daughter Mrs. R. Y. McGee, who has been seriously ill.

H. E. Duffin of Aberdeen has been in Blackfoot for a week taking treatment of Dr. Flodquist; his health had suffered a general run down, but his is improving.
— —

In The Gem State

The governor has vetoed senate measure No. 35, by Porter, which would remove teachers in this state from the protection of the provisions of the workmen’s compensation act. The governor holds there is no reason for making such an exception and that teachers in the state are entitled to protection as employees.
— —

19190401TIR2Flu Slays Poor Mexicans

Ravages of Spanish influenza among the poor charcoal burners who live in the mountains surrounding the Mexican capital are said to be responsible for the unprecedented price which that commodity is bringing. In the last month charcoal, which is generally used for cooking purposes, has increased about 300 per cent in cost. The municipality has made arrangements to buy this product in quantities and retail it at reduced figures. One paper in the capital states that almost 90 percent of the Indians who supplied the City of Mexico with the fuel were victims of the scourge.

(ibid, page 5)
— — — —

The Idaho Republican. April 01, 1919, Page 6

Centerville

Little Hazel Haynes was quite sick Saturday and Sunday last week.

Mrs. Maud Farnsworth is able to be up and around again.

Hazel and Emma Killion are listed among the sick this week.
— —

Lavaside

Lavaside school is the proud owner of a piano-cased organ. There’ll be music in the air now.
— —

Springfield

The death of Mr. Parsons, living near the big fill was reported Monday. Influenza was given as the cause of his death.

Mrs. Thomas has been quite ill at her home west of Springfield recently.

(ibid, page 6)
— — — —

The Idaho Republican. April 01, 1919, Page 7

Army Found Many Unfit
467,694 Draftees Turned Down During Last Ten Months of War

In the last ten months of the war, 467,694 men in the United States were found unfit for military service, according to the final report on the draft by provost Marshal General Crowder.

Defective heart and blood vessels were the causes of most of the rejections, 61,142 being barred in those cases. Defective bones and joints barred 57,744 men from the service in the final ten-month period, and 49,801 were rejected because of poor eyes.

(ibid, page 7)
— — — —

The Idaho Republican. April 01, 1919, Page 8

Three Hundred Papers In Distress …

… The men facing these problems are confronted with these facts:

The supply of print paper made scarce during the war may become harder to get.

The skilled newspaper men and printers who went to war have not generally returned alive or in condition to resume their work, or have chosen to go into other lines of activity.

Very few apprentices were learning the trade during the war, and the number who were working at it, very few became proficient and stuck to the work.

[Mortality] among newspaper men due to influenza, were very high, and it takes from ten to twenty years to develop writers of any marked ability to to fill their places. …

(ibid, page 8)
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Evening Capital News., April 01, 1919, Page 9

19190401ECN1

Around Boise Valley Loop

Caldwell

Jay Galligan, manager of the Caldwell flouring mills, is reported seriously ill.

Star

Mr. and Mrs. G. W. Chinn received word that their son, Sergt. Walter, who has been seriously ill at Fort Riley hospital, is improving nicely.
— —

How Diphtheria is Contracted

One often hears the expression, “My child caught a severe cold which developed into diphtheria,” when the truth was that the cold had simply left the little one particularly susceptible to the wandering diphtheria germ. If your child has a cold when diphtheria is prevalent you should take him out of school and keep him off the street until fully recovered, as there is a hundred times more danger of his taking diphtheria when he has a cold.

When Chamberlain’s Cough Remedy is given it quickly cures the cold and lessens the danger of diphtheria or any other germ disease being contracted. — Adv.
— —

He Escaped Influenza

“Last spring I had a terrible cold and grippe and was afraid I was going to have influenza,” writes A. A. McNeese, High Point, Ga. “I tried many kinds of medicine, but remained clogged with cold. I then took Foley’s Honey and Tar Compound, feeling relief from the first. I used seven small bottles. It was a sight to see the phlegm I coughed up. I am convinced Foley’s Honey and Tar saved me from influenza.” Checks coughs, colds, croup and whooping cough. — Whitehead’s Drug store. –– Adv.

source: Evening Capital News. (Boise, Idaho), 01 April 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

Bonners Ferry Herald. April 01, 1919, Page 2

19190401BFH1

Army-Made Picture Films to Aid Victory Liberty Loan Drive …

Washington, D. C. — Resources of the motion picture industry have been mobilized for the Victory Liberty loan drive Beginning April 21. The treasury department announces that appeals which would be conveyed to bond buyers through the silent drama would form the most extensive propaganda campaign ever conducted by means of the screen theaters. …

Films made by 27 motion picture stars for the fourth loan, which it was not possible to show in many cities because of the influenza epidemic, have been altered and retitled to suit the present loan, and will do duty as intended.

source: Bonners Ferry Herald. (Bonners Ferry, Idaho), 01 April 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Bonners Ferry Herald. April 01, 1919, Page 5

Local News

Mr. and Mrs. T. J. Jones and family returned to Bonners Ferry last Thursday after having spent the winter in Moscow, Idaho, in order that their children could attend the state university. Both Mr. and Mrs. Jones have just recovered from attacks of the Spanish influenza, the epidemic having struck Moscow recently.

W. W. Ferbrache, accompanied by his sister-in-law, Mrs. H. C. Ferbrache, returned Friday from Pullman, Wash., where they were called to attend the funeral of Mr. Ferbrache’s brother-in-law, John Brooks. The deceased was a resident of this city the year of 1906. He was buried at Pullman last Thursday.

(ibid, page 5)
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The Daily Star-Mirror., April 01, 1919, Page 1

19190401DSM1

19190401DSM2
Seniors Take “Sneak” Under Classes Too
Sign Stating Seniors Had The “Flu” Posted on Administration Building

Students of the university were surprised to see a sign on the administration building bulletin board stating that the senior class “had flu.”

It developed that the seniors had chosen April first for their annual sneak picnic. The fourth year class stole out on the picnic early this morning, but the news had spread and other classes decided to be absent from classes for the day. Juniors were to be seen promenading, wearing the seniors’ traditional hat and cane. …

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 01 April 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

Eastport, Idaho – Kingsgate BC, at International Line

EastportFritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

April 2

Evening Capital News., April 02, 1919, Page 10

19190402ECN1

Mountain Home

Mr. and Mrs. Oliver E. Norell who have been quite ill with influenza are improving rapidly.

source: Evening Capital News. (Boise, Idaho), 02 April 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Evening Capital News., April 02, 1919, Page 12

Deaths – Funerals

Boswell — Rose Boswell, aged 16 years, died of influenza at St. Anthony Tuesday. She was the daughter of J. S. Boswell. Her sister was with her when the end came and will bring the body home for burial.

(ibid, page 12)
— — — — — — — — — —

The Daily Star-Mirror., April 02, 1919, Page 1

19190402DSM1

19190402DSM2Three Residences Quarantined

Dr. W. A. Adair, city health officer reports today that so far this week three flu cards were placed on residences in this city. The places quarantined are Reeds, 404 East B street; Lillibridge, 406 East Sixth street, and Hansons, on West Third street.
— —

Presbyterians Hold Congregational Meet …

The Presbyterian church held its annual business meeting of the congregation last night in the church auditorium. Annual reports were heard from all the departments of church activity. One fact stands out clearly: The church is thoroughly alive. In spite of the serious handicap of the extended influenza quarantine the work has gone forward with remarkable success. Forty-eight men members have been added during the year. The report of Benevolences for the church year is the best in the history of the church. …

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 02 April 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

View of Main Street, Elk City, Idaho

ElkCityFritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

April 3

Evening Capital News., April 03, 1919, Page 9

19190403ECN1

Caldwell

Attorney and Mrs. W. A. Stone were visitors to Boise yesterday. Mrs. Stone remained and entered a hospital for medical treatment.

Greenleaf

Ralph Antrim is sick with the flu.

Miss Ester Reece has been confined to her home for several days with an attack of the flu.

Mrs. W. J. Bailley who has been sick for some time and was moved to the hospital at Caldwell last week, is reported better.

Nampa

Ormand, the two-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. N. S. Smith, died yesterday afternoon from pneumonia. Funeral arrangement have not yet been announced. Three other children are ill with the same disease.

Star

The pupils of Star high enjoyed an all day April fool picnic at Liberty Tuesday.

source: Evening Capital News. (Boise, Idaho), 03 April 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Evening Capital News., April 03, 1919, Page 10

19190403ECN2
World’s Scientists Preparing Program To Combat Disease
Fifty Notables of Great Britain, France, Italy, Japan and U. S. in Conference in France; Red Cross Chief Agent

Cannes, France, April 3. — Fifty leading scientists and business men of the United States, Great Britain, France, Italy and Japan have opened an international congress which will prepare a program for united action in combating disease. The Red Cross will be one of the chief agents, through which this work will be carried on.

The congress is expected to continue for two weeks. The American representatives include Henry Davison, Henry Morgenthau, Colonel Richard Strong, Dr. Emmet L. Holt and Major William Lucas.

Dr. Roux, director of the Pasteur institute, was elected president of the congress; Dr. Machiafva, of Italy, vice president, and Dr. William H. Welch, of Baltimore, chairman of the executive committee.

Davison, as chairman of the Red Cross societies made the opening address. He said he regarded the congress as the most important scientific conference ever held, not only because of the eminence of the delegates, but because of the practical results that will be achieved for the benefit of humanity.

Other speakers expressed the conviction that practical means of carrying out the plans of the congress will be found in the Red Cross societies.

(ibid, page 10)
— — — —

Evening Capital News., April 03, 1919, Page 12

Deaths – Funerals

Boswell – The funeral of Rosa Lee Boswell, who died of influenza at St. Anthony Tuesday, will be held at the Fry & Summers chapel Friday afternoon at 3 o’clock. Rev. G. S. Prout of the Adventist church will officiate and burial will be in Morris Hill cemetery. The funeral will be by automobile.

Caldwell — Fields Caldwell, aged 39 years, died of pneumonia Wednesday evening at a Boise hospital. He is survived by his wife, two daughters, three brothers and four sisters. Mr. Caldwell was a plumber and made his home in Boise since 1903. The body is at the Fry and Summers chapel and no funeral arrangement will be made until the arrival of his brother this evening from Salt Lake.

(ibid, page 12)
— — — — — — — — — —

Payette Enterprise., April 03, 1919, Page 1

19190403PE1

Personal and Local Mention

Chief of Police Finske has been sick and unable for duty for several days. W. R. Williams has been on the job during his absence.

Mr. John Boyd who has been seriously ill is now slowly improving.
— —

Letter From Homer Lauer

Neuenahr, Germany. February 27th, 1919.

Dear Mother: —

Just received your letter yesterday morning the first for four or five weeks. You can’t imagine how glad I was to hear from you. I have never heard about any tracer you or anybody else sent after me.

I have written quite often and you should have heard from me at least three or four times a month. I heard from Albert once in base 27 and I wrote to him repeatedly but heard no more from him. Although he stated he was feeling fine and expected he would be on his way home before I received his letter.

I know the influenza is claiming its enormous number of victims without you mentioning the fact.

You may also tell Aunt Emma I wrote to her twice without receiving any answer. Also tell her that I am glad to hear she came out fine as to her operation. You ask when I think I will get home. Well, that is not for me to say; although I hope in the near future I will look upon the good old U. S. A. …

With love to all, Wag. Homer K. Lauer.

source: Payette Enterprise. (Payette, Canyon Co., Idaho), 03 April 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

The Grangeville Globe. April 03, 1919, Page 1

19190403GG1

Grangeville Boy Home

Gaylord Eimers, son of Mr. and Mrs. John P. Eimers, arrived home last Sunday evening from Camp Taylor Kentucky, where he had been occupied in the military band. While in the service Gay spent a lot of time in the hospital, having been afflicted with most all of the ailments that the boys in the service encountered. However he returns looking fine and in the best of health and spirits.

source: The Grangeville Globe. (Grangeville, Idaho), 03 April 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Grangeville Globe. April 03, 1919, Page 5

[Local News]

After a week’s siege of the “flu” Mr. and Mrs. A. F. Parker are again able to be about. Mr. Parker being down town for the first time on Wednesday.
— —

Eighth Grade Examination

State seventh and eighth grade examinations will be held at the school houses named below on April 9, 10 and 11, and on May 27, 28 and 29:

Greencreek, Cottonwood, Whitebird, Riggins, Elk City, Warren, Clearwater, Grangeville, Kooskia, Ferdinand and Kamiah.

Pupils furnish their own pens, ink, pencils and paper.

Special examiners will conduct the examinations which begin each morning at nine o’clock.

Margaret Sweet, County Supt. of Schools

(ibid, page 5)
— — — —

The Grangeville Globe. April 03, 1919, Page 8

[Local News]

Mrs. Dr. P. J. Scallon is still confined to her home with illness. She contracted the influenza and has been unable to overcome the after effects of the malady.

Mr. and Mrs. A. C. McCloskey of Spokane sister and brother-in-law of Floyd Swank of the Globe force, who arrived here last Friday evening, returned to their home on Sunday morning’s train. Mr. McCloskey was unfortunate in being stricken with a mild form of illness shortly after his arrival which marred the enjoyment of his visit.

Wild geese in large numbers going north have been passing over the city during the past couple of days.
— —

School Notes

The past few days of beautiful weather have permitted the students to be out of doors between school hours. However, they have not let the “call of the wild” interfere with their school work.

Last Monday, during the absence of the regular teacher, Miss Hupp, Mrs. Arnold had charge of the fourth grade.

(ibid, page 8)
— — — — — — — — — —

Idaho County Free Press. April 03, 1919, Page 1

19190403ICFP1

19190403ICFP2
Recover From Influenza

Mr. and Mrs. A. F. Parker have recovered from attacks of Spanish influenza, which kept them confined to their home for a week. Mr. Parker, who receives a number of London papers, says English physicians, after a study of Spanish influenza, have concluded that the disease is identical with the old Black plague, of London.

source: Idaho County Free Press. (Grangeville, Idaho), 03 April 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Idaho County Free Press. April 03, 1919, Page 2

Ferdinand

Dr. Buchanan of Ilo was transacting business here Wednesday.

Sewing will be discontinued at the Red Cross rooms, owing to lack of workers.

(ibid, page 2)
— — — —

Idaho County Free Press. April 03, 1919, Page 5

Whitebird

Mr. Berrig has returned from St. Joseph’s hospital in Lewiston where he has been confined since last October.

Miss Alice Mead has returned to work again at the Whitebird hotel after two weeks’ rest.

(ibid, page 5)
— — — — — — — — — —

The Nezperce Herald., April 03, 1919, Page 1

19190403NH1

Local News

J. B. McCully accompanied the remains of his one-day-old grandson to this city yesterday from Cottonwood and tenderly laid the little body to rest in the local cemetery. The child was born to Mrs. Gerald McCully on the 1st instant and survived but a few hours. Thus members of three generations of this stricken family have been called across the Great Divide within the past six months, the others being the child’s father, Gerald McCully, and its great grandfather, Judge Adams G. Johnson.
— —

Central Ridge News

Mrs. Stump is quite ill at this writing.

Clarence Reed is on the sick list.

R. W. Senters is on the sick list.

Mrs. Bill Poole is recovering from a severe illness.

Mrs. Coon and daughter, Ella, have the mumps.

The farmers of this section are busy plowing and seeding.

source: The Nezperce Herald. (Nezperce, Idaho), 03 April 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Nezperce Herald., April 03, 1919, Page 7

Locals and Personal News Notes

Bernice Thomas returned last week from the army service at Camp Lewis having received his discharge. He looks fine and has apparently entirely recovered from the serious siege of influenza and pneumonia he endured some weeks ago. His many friends are glad to have him back.

(ibid, page 7)
— — — —

The Nezperce Herald., April 03, 1919, Page 8

Obituary

Mrs. Gertrude Flossy Jackson was born August 31, 1889, in Coleridge, Neb. She came west with her parents at the age of seven, and settled on the Nez Perce reservation when it was opened. She died at Ekalaka, Mont., on Monday, March 17, from a liver and kidney affection following an attack of influenza. The funeral was held at the Brethren church in Nezperce at 2 p.m., Wednesday, March 26.

The deceased had many dear friends and she was liked by all who knew her. She was always loving and kind to her homefolks and her departure into the hereafter leaves a void here that cannot be filled. Her two daughters, Hallie and Winnie Parrish and baby son, Frank Jackson, are with their grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Chandler, of this vicinity.

(ibid, page 8)
— — — — — — — — — —

Main Street, Elk River, Idaho ca. 1914

ElkRiver1914Fritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

April 4

Evening Capital News., April 04, 1919, Page 12

19190404ECN1

Little News of Boise

Speaks at Weiser Saturday

An illustrated health lecture will be given at Weiser Saturday evening by M. S. Parker, field secretary of the Idaho Anti-Tuberculosis association of Boise. No admission will be charged and the people of Weiser and vicinity are most cordially invited to be present. Some high-class health pictures will be shown on the canvas by Mr. Parker. The campaign for better health conditions that is being waged in this state is part of a great national campaign financed by the American Red Cross and carried on by the National tuberculosis association, with the fight against the dread disease as the central idea. People everywhere are becoming very much interested in this work and it is sure to result in great good.

Gooding School Plans

Wayland & Fennell have started the plans for the school building for the deaf and blind school to be built at Gooding. The building is a combined dormitory for the girls and school. It will be two stories with a full basement. The legislature appropriated $50,000 for the improvement. The plans will be completed in 30 days.
— —

Deaths – Funerals

Guerricagortia — The funeral of E. Guerricagortia, who died of lobar pneumonia at Emmett last Monday, was held this morning at 9 o’clock at the Church of the Good Shepherd. Burial was in St. John’s cemetery and the funeral was by automobile. The young Spaniard was 22 years of age and unmarried.

source: Evening Capital News. (Boise, Idaho), 04 April 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

The Meridian Times., April 04, 1919, Page 3

19190404MT1

Inland Northwest

The “influenza signal” in wild spots is two rifle shots in quick succession, followed by a third at an interval. The signal saved W. L. Campbell, a rancher of the Craig district, in Montana. He was in the last stages of the disease when his shots brought neighbors.

source: The Meridian Times. (Meridian, Idaho), 04 April 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Meridian Times., April 04, 1919, Page 8

Meridian Local News

Leslie Wallace, the infant son of Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Kellar, born March 25th, was buried in the local cemetery Sunday afternoon. A brief service was conducted at the grave by Carman E. Mell, pastor of the Christian church. Mrs. Kellar is at the home of her sister Mrs. L. R. Lembke and is convalescent. The Kellars reside on a ranch south of Boise.

T. E. LaForce, a prominent citizen of the Ten Mile and Kuna communities, died March 23, age 60 years. He came to Idaho with his now bereaved wife 25 years ago. They have eight children to mourn the loss of a kind father.

(ibid, page 8)
— — — — — — — — — —

The Caldwell Tribune. April 04, 1919, Page 1

19190404CT1

19190404CT2Frank Soper Passed Away Very Suddenly
Had Been Unwell Since Suffering Attack of Influenza — Survived by Wife and Children

Frank E. Soper, well known business man of Caldwell, died Sunday evening. Mr. Soper sustained an attack of the influenza some time ago from which he never fully recovered. More recently he underwent an operation for appendicitis but it was too late to save him. Mr. Soper was about 37 years of age. He is survived by his wife, three children and other relatives.

The funeral was held from the family residence Wednesday. The services were under the auspices of the Odd Fellows. The Rev. F. L. Cook conducted the services. Interment was at Canyon Hill cemetery.

source: The Caldwell Tribune. (Caldwell, Idaho), 04 April 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Caldwell Tribune. April 04, 1919, Page 7

Items of Interest From Surrounding Territory

Roswell

Eunice Rockwood has returned home from a stay of three weeks in a Boise hospital.

Frank Soper, who formerly lived in Roswell, died Sunday evening in Caldwell. He was stricken with appendicitis while recovering from influenza.

Mr. and Mrs. Ed Stemper and Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Paine were in Caldwell Saturday where they were called by the illness of Frank Soper. Mr. and Mrs. Ben Paine and Mr. and Mrs. C. H. Aellen were at the same place Sunday.

Lake Lowell

Harold Gibbens has the scarlet fever.

There was no school in Mrs. Reavis’ room Tuesday on account of Mrs. Reavis’ daughter being bitten by a rabid dog. Mrs. Reavis took her daughter to Boise for treatment.

Greenleaf

Mrs. Bailey is quite ill with influenza. She was taken to Caldwell to the hospital the last of the week.

Marble Front

Prof. Edwards, principal of the Midway schools has been in quarantine at the county farm with smallpox for the last two weeks and a half. He was released this last week.

Midway News

Several members of the O. M. Hamilton family are suffering from the flu.

Mrs. S. W. Rowland is nursing Mrs. David Strand who is in a critical condition.

Mrs. J. F. Riskemire spent Thursday with her sister, Mrs. Emmett Wilson of Bowmont, who was quite ill.

Prof. E. A. Edwards, who has been a victim of smallpox for the past three weeks, was able to resume his school work Wednesday.

Miss Edith Clements, teacher of the Intermediate department, has been suffering several days with a slight attack of appendicitis. Mrs. Florence Appy of Nampa substituted for her Monday and Tuesday.

(ibid, page 7)
— — — —

The Caldwell Tribune. April 04, 1919, Page 10

Items of Interest From Surrounding Territory

Arena Valley

Miss Nola Peterman has recovered from a severe case of the flu.

Brier Rose

Mrs. Enoch has returned from the hospital in Boise and is at the Krezeck home at present.

John Dennerline, who was reported very ill last week, died Sunday and was buried Monday afternoon.

Mrs. Reavis’ two children were bitten by their dog on Sunday. The dog was supposed to have rabies and was killed and the head sent to Boise for examination.

What might have resulted in a serious accident occurred Sunday when Mrs. McCarthy and her sister-in-law were walking home from church. A cow and yearling came behind them and pushed them down trampling and bruising them considerably. They are very lame and sore, but no bones were broken.

(ibid, page 10)
— — — —

Clearwater Republican. April 04, 1919, Page 1

19190404CR1

Women’s Committee of Council of Defense Report

The women’s committee of the Council of Defense, Clearwater Co., Idaho, was organized in the fall of 1917 with a chairman in each district.

After the organization was effected, the first work of the Women’s Committee of the council of Defense was the registration of the women. The response exceeded all expectations – women patriotically offering their services for work of various natures, some even volunteering to manage farms or work on them, thus doing their bit to add to the world’s food supply. This Council of Defense committee has done splendid work throughout the county, assisting all other committees and generally keeping the organization in good working spirit.

Through the generous cooperation of our Demonstration Agent, Miss Dorothy Taylor, we were able to do much in the Home Economics Department. The literature, including recipes and explanations, was carefully and thoroughly distributed through an arrangement of a series of meetings. Each precinct chairman, with the assistance of Miss Taylor gave demonstrations of war-recipes and substitutes. This was intensified by good, practical talks on the many subjects vital to housekeepers. In this manner the practical work was carried to the remotest districts.

The various exhibits of cooked foods and made-over clothing were generously supported and recipes largely called for. The made-over clothing work by Miss Erwin was far reaching in its effects. In connection with one meeting Miss Permeal French, Dean of Women of the University of Idaho, spoke to the women on the subject bearing on what should be done for the girls.

During the canning season, representatives from the precincts met in Orofino for canning demonstrations and they, in their turn, conducted similar meetings, each in her own community. Information was persistently sought relative to the subject of food preservation during the entire period of the war. The meetings demonstrating the labor-saving devices and general household economics were stopped by the quarantine caused by the influenza epidemic. This work has been of inestimable value to the women, not only in proving our patriotism, but in bringing us closer sympathy in our own branches of work. …

source: Clearwater Republican. (Orofino, Idaho), 04 April 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Clearwater Republican. April 04, 1919, Page 2

Boy Asleep 28 Days, But Happy

Beaumont, Texas. — Thurman McNeal, age 14, son of Young McNeal, hotel proprietor at Voth, 8 miles north of this city, March 30 completed his 28th day in a state of coma. Attending physicians pronounce it a case of “sleeping sickness.” The boy appears to be gaining weight. He eats heartily and doctors regard it as remarkable that he is apparently enjoying his trip into aphasia, as at times he laughs most heartily over what appear to be his dreams. So far as known he is oblivious of everything that goes on around him.

(ibid, page 2)
— — — — — — — — — —

The Kendrick Gazette. April 04, 1919, Page 8

19190404KG1

Gleanings

Gus Birchmier of Texas ridge went to Moscow Saturday to visit his father-in-law, who is quite ill.

Dr. Kelly of Lewiston was in Kendrick last Saturday on business.

The call for volunteers to make convalescent gowns received very little response. Mrs. Frank Fredrickson of American ridge was the only one who volunteered to make one of the gowns – not a single volunteer among the ladies of Kendrick. These gowns are needed and must be made up immediately. Call at the Kendrick Store and Mr. Dammarell will give you the material all cut out and ready for you to sew.

source: The Kendrick Gazette. (Kendrick, Idaho), 04 April 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — — — — — — — —

Montpelier Examiner. April 04, 1919, Page 5

19190404ME1

Local News

June A., the ten-months-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Cochran, died last Sunday evening, from pneumonia following the influenza. Funeral services were held from the home Tuesday afternoon.

Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Cochrane desire to express their sincere thanks to the friends and neighbors for the kindly assistance rendered during the illness and after the death of their infant daughter.

Russle D., the seven-months-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Ira Chaffin, died last Friday night from pneumonia. Short funeral services were held at the home Sunday morning.

Mr. and Mrs. A. F. Gould, who were called here by the death of Mrs. G’s father, George Munns, left Tuesday for their home at Baker City, Oregon.

Funeral services for the late George Munns were held at the Methodist church last Sunday afternoon. At the grave the Masonic burial services were conducted.

source: Montpelier Examiner. (Montpelier, Idaho), 04 April 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
—————–

Influenza Camp 1918

1918Atlantic30-a
Original caption: “Photo shows a scene in the influenza camp at Lawrence, Maine, where patients are given fresh air treatment. This extreme measure was hit upon as the best way of curbing the epidemic. Patients are required to live in these camps until cured.” Bettmann / Bettmann Archive

source: Alan Taylor April 10, 2018 “30 Photos of the 1918 Flu Pandemic” The Atlantic
——————

Further Reading

When The Pandemic Came To The Inland Northwest — 102 Years Ago

Nicholas Deshais April 3, 2020

Flu1918SpokaneParade-a
An undated photo of military parade in downtown Spokane in 1918. Courtesy of the Northwest Museum of Arts and Culture

NOTE: This story is a collaboration between the public media Northwest News Network, Spokane Public Radio, Northwest Public Broadcasting and the Spokesman-Review.

Two weeks before Spokane went on lockdown, the news was the disease wouldn’t come here.

The newspaper told its readers that “there is no reason to be greatly alarmed” because the “imported type” of viral infection was “not available” here.

The city’s public health officer offered soothing words.

“If Spokane people will sneeze in their handkerchiefs and turn their heads the ‘other’ way when they cough, there is but a remote chance that the city will be attacked,” he told the paper.

They were wrong.

The virus arrived, and the city’s theaters, schools, churches, dance halls and every other place where people gathered were ordered closed, as were events like funerals and weddings.

The year was 1918 – the last time a pandemic reached Spokane. A century has passed, and Spokane and the world are once again contending with quarantine and the powerful role public health officials can play in times of outbreak.

It’s a frightening time, with a sedate city anxiously waiting to see how bad it gets. But some look back to see a way forward.

“My reaction about learning about the disease today, about COVID-19, my first reaction as a historian was to try to give it context,” said Logan Camporeale, a local historian. “Based on the newspaper record, what we did in 1918, in October 1918, is much of what we’re dong in March of 2020.”

Dr. Bob Lutz, the health officer for the Spokane Regional Health District, agreed that 1918 is a good analogy to now.

“I think there are a lot of comparisons to 1918,” Lutz said. “So to say that we’ve been here before, yeah, we’ve been here before a century ago, but not in the recent past. Not in the past anyone here can remember.”

The inability to recall how bad things got here has led people to dismiss the threat, Lutz said.

“I think that we have, as a society, become so independent that when I tell you that I require you to do this, there’s a lot of, ‘Well don’t tell me, I don’t believe it,’” he said. …

That brings up another difference between 1918 and 2020.

“Back then, you did not have testing. Now you have testing,” Lutz said. “Back then you – essentially based upon a constellation of symptoms – you said this person had flu and you treated them accordingly. Now we have a constellation of symptoms, which is consistent with COVID-19, and we have a test for COVID-19, but we don’t have the testing materials to provide the evidence.”

In other words, people don’t believe the outbreak is here until there is a test confirming it’s here. And if they don’t believe it’s here, they won’t follow Lutz’s recommendations for social distancing.

“To some degree, until people truly believe that it is here, they are pushing back against a lot of the social distancing recommendations that we are providing,” Lutz said.

As testing proved on March 14 that the novel coronavirus had arrived in Spokane, Lutz urged people to take it seriously.

“We’ve not had anything of this complexity and severity for a century,” he said.

War Brings Flu Home

… The 1918-19 influenza pandemic infected 500 million people worldwide, and killed between 17 and 100 million people – upwards of 5% of the human population.

It didn’t spare the U.S., where more than 500,000 people died. Joseph Waring, a medical historian in South Carolina, called it “the greatest medical holocaust in history.” And Isaac Starr, in the Annals of Internal Medicine, ranked it as “one of the three most destructive human epidemics” along with the Justinian plague in the year 541 and the Black Death in the mid-1300s.

Flu1918Pullman11-1918parade-a
A naval unit in Pullman, Washington, on Nov. 11, 1918, celebrating the end of World War I. Courtesy of the Franks Collection, Northwest Museum of Arts and Culture

At the same time, the world was seeing the end of what would later be called World War I, referred to at the time as the Great War.

The so-called “War to End All Wars” would result in the deaths of 9 million combatants and 7 million civilians, making it the third deadliest war ever, behind World War II and the Mongol conquests of the 13th century.

It’s no coincidence the war and influenza pandemic struck at the same time.

Though the war began in Europe in 1914, the U.S. didn’t join the Allies until 1917. The draft was extended, and the Army went from having tens of thousands of troops to millions.

While theories compete about the flu’s source, there is no argument that it was ravaging the soldiers in Europe in 1917, where the newly expanded American Army was headed.

During their tours, men from around the world, including Americans, lived in tight, squalid conditions that “favored the transmission of influenza. Men moved between camps frequently and went overseas and back, facilitating the transmission of the disease over even wider areas,” wrote Keirsten Snover in her 2008 master’s degree thesis for Eastern Washington University called “The Spanish Influenza Epidemic of 1918-1919: The Spokane Experience.”

“Because of the war, what might have been a limited epidemic quickly became a pandemic, with troops spreading infection all over the globe,” Snover wrote.

“Fear Of Influenza”

Dr. John Anderson was strolling down Riverside Avenue in downtown Spokane when a man spit on the sidewalk in front of him – a common, if foul, occurrence.

It was also an arrestable offense, as the man would soon find out.

The year was 1918, and Spokane was under something like martial law – but instead of the military giving orders, it was the public health authority.

And Dr. Anderson, Spokane’s chief public health officer, called the shots.

The man wasn’t arrested. Instead, Anderson ordered him to wipe his own spittle off the sidewalk, which he did, with Anderson watching.

The date was Oct. 8, and Anderson could be forgiven for his extreme reaction. He and 17 Spokane physicians had just met to discuss a telegram they’d received from T.D. Tuttle, the state commissioner of health, urging them to ban public gatherings.

Anderson and the doctors agreed. At midnight that day, Oct. 8, all theaters, schools, churches, dance halls and every other place where people gathered were ordered closed, as were events like funerals and weddings.

When Anderson ordered the closure of most of Spokane’s public places, there were few who protested, even if most people didn’t believe or understand the danger of influenza. The city streets were “as sparsely filled as in a blizzard,” The Spokesman-Review reported.

The first day of those quiet streets – Oct. 9, 1918 – Spokane had its first reported flu death.

In an article titled “Epidemic grows, girl succumbs,” the Spokesman reported the death of Vera Wood, 17, the daughter of “pioneers of the Sprague region” who lived near the old Spokane University in Spokane Valley. She was “stricken last Saturday,” and contracted the flu from her brother, Vernon Wood, a Lewis and Clark High School student. He recovered, she didn’t.

It was later reported that James Alphea Howe was the first 1918 influenza death. When he died on Oct. 5, 1918, it was first thought the 79-year-old had succumbed to pneumonia, but later ascribed to influenza.

The cases piled up. By Oct. 10, 1918, there were 220 reported cases of influenza in Spokane and Anderson ordered all doctors in the city to file daily reports with him. The city’s hospitals were at capacity and Anderson saw the situation deteriorating.

Anderson and the local Red Cross formulated a plan to transform one of the city’s hotels into a hospital. Near the corner of Lincoln Street and First Avenue, the Lion Hotel was perfect. It had big and small rooms, and was centrally located near Deaconess Hospital.

On Oct. 16, the city seized the Lion Hotel to convert for people “with severe cases or those who were homeless,” according to the newspaper. The owners objected, and the following day the Spokane Daily Chronicle reported Anderson’s indifference to their concerns.

“We don’t care a rap what the owners of the building think about it or about us,” Anderson said. “We don’t propose to haggle with them over it. This is a very serious emergency and if the owners of the Lion Hotel think they can put a dollar in one side of the scale and a human life in the other and get away with it they are very, very badly mistaken.”

It was just the beginning of Anderson’s increasingly belligerent tone against people who disagreed with his measures to combat the flu. The number of reported cases was growing by 75 each day, and the total stood at 815 when the Lion became an influenza ward.

Flu1918SpokaneNurse-a
In the family papers of Robert O’Brien, old newsletters tell the story of Mary Philomena O’Brien, who volunteered to care for WWI soldiers as well as those afflicted with the 1918 flu. She died of the flu after caring for patients. Credit: Jesse Tinsley/The Spokesman-Review

Two days later, on Oct. 18, a total of 15 people had died from the flu, and Anderson put Spokane under an even stricter quarantine: gatherings in private clubs were now banned, and passengers on the city’s streetcars were no longer allowed to stand in the aisle and hang on a strap if the seats were full.

On Oct. 23 – just two weeks after the city’s first death – the city had its worst day yet, with 300 new cases reported. Anderson was furious, blaming lax adherence to his measures, and promised to squelch such activities.

“It has been brought to my attention that some people have disobeyed the order by giving private social affairs at their homes,” he said. “Upon the first information I have that such a thing is being planned, we will appear on the scene and arrest the ringleaders without respect to their prominence or social standing.”

Four days later, Anderson was “shocked” to see 1,500 people gather at the Great Northern Depot, site of the clocktower in Riverfront Park, to see young men go off to war. He banned public send-offs of the troops then and there.

“There is a difference between wholesome fear of influenza and morbid dread of the disease,” Anderson told the Chronicle. “Spokane people, for their own good, must realize the difference.”

If he couldn’t get them to fear the disease, he would rule the city with an iron, health-minded fist. He considered shutting the entire city down, except grocery stores and restaurants, but backed off without explanation. Instead, he outlawed Halloween masks, and ordered police to stop masked trick-or-treaters.

“Small Plants Called Germs”

As a doctor, Anderson was well-versed in his day’s theories of sickness and health.

But he, like everyone else in 1918, didn’t know that influenza was a virus, a fact only revealed in 1933 when the human influenza virus was first isolated from a pig. Since its identity as a virus wasn’t yet known, there was no flu vaccine, and would not be on widely available until 1945.

But Anderson knew about germ theory, and he was happy to explain it to those who balked at his strict measures.

“Spanish influenza is caused by very small plants called germs that come from the mouth or nose of persons suffering from it,” he told the Chronicle. “The person gets the germ into his body by breathing into the nose or mouth the drops or spray that have been sneezed or coughed out into the air by a person sick with influenza or else he gets the germs into his body by putting into his mouth something soiled by the spit of a sick person.”

In a full-page ad in the Spokesman, the city’s health department told people, “Don’t Be Alarmed – Be Careful!” The ad advised people to go to bed if they were feeling sick, keep the windows open, take laxatives and consume milk, eggs and broth every four hours. Nurses were told to wear a mask and wash their hands frequently. Workers were urged to avoid streetcars, walk to work and “eat good, clean food.”

Nowadays, the explanation and remedies seem less than satisfactory, and we have a more nuanced understanding of viruses.

In short, a virus is so small and simple it’s not considered a living thing. Instead, it invades living things, and only once it has infected a life form does it replicate. The only identifiable function of a virus is to reproduce, and it will reproduce until the cell it has invaded bursts, sending its millions of duplicates out to invade more cells.

The 1918 influenza virus went by a few names back then: Influenza, the Spanish flu, la grippe, the grip.

Now, we know it as H1N1, which describes the type of proteins that make up the virus, as well as its shape. It’s also called swine flu. …

When H1N1 struck in 1918, it decimated the usual victims – the very young, and the very old. But it was unusually fatal for healthy adults as well.

In his book “The Great Influenza,” John Barry writes that the immune systems of healthy adults “mounted massive responses to the virus. That immune response filled the lungs with fluid and debris, making it impossible for the exchange of oxygen to take place.”

Instead of saving them, the immune systems drowned their masters.

Despite his odd description of the germ-plants, Anderson showed that he and other medical professionals knew how the virus was spread: through the air and by an exchange of fluids between the healthy and the infected.

War Is Over

As November 1918 began, the war and flu raged on, and things weren’t looking good in Spokane.

It hadn’t even been a month since the first H1N1 death, and the city had tallied 4,000 flu cases and more than 100 dead. There weren’t enough doctors and nurses to staff the city’s many sick wards.

Anderson told the Chronicle the “situation is grave … really serious, more serious than the general public seems to realize.”

Flu1918Cincinatti-a
Volunteers wearing gauze masks at a street kitchen in Cincinnati serve food to children of families afflicted by the flu pandemic in the winter of 1918-1919. Courtesy of Spokesman-Review Archives

On Nov. 4, the state health board issued a new order: Everyone had to wear a mask while out in public, including at stores and restaurants. The masks had to be a certain size – 5 by 6 inches – with six layers of sewn-and-bound gauze.

Two days later, the local Red Cross sold the masks at City Hall. Two types of masks were priced at 5 or 10 cents and all 500 sold out in a half-hour. Hundreds of people were turned away. The Red Cross hastily made 4,000 more masks, but they hung loosely on the face and were unpopular and uncomfortable.

The next day, 800 masks were sold in the first half-hour. The paper tallied the dead at 117.

On Nov. 9, the front-page of the Chronicle screamed in large, bold letters, “Kaiser Quits.” The war was over, at least in Europe. Anderson tried to cool any hearts that may have been warmed by the news.

“Stay home all you can. Order your merchandise over the telephone. Don’t forget to keep your windows open both night and day and keep in the fresh air as much as possible and comply with all rules and regulations,” Anderson said.

He was ignored. With the end of war, celebrations broke out around Spokane on Nov. 11, Armistice Day, including a parade on Riverside Avenue. Thousands of motorists and marchers created a “bedlam of sound” with horns, klaxons, tin cans, streetcar whistles and gongs. The parade, which started at 1 p.m., continued deep into the night. Public parties lasted throughout the day.

More than 4,500 Spokane men had gone to war, and more than 200 had died in the fight. Anderson, fighting to prevent more death, knew he couldn’t stop the celebration, but lamented that the “merrymakers as a rule disregarded the mask rule as a hindrance to their vocal powers.”

The same day, the state health commissioner lifted the mask rule, and news of his ruling reached Spokane that evening and “immediately circulated among a population already in the midst of celebrating the end to the war,” according to the Influenza Encyclopedia, a website with an account of the illness in the city based on newspaper reports of the time.

Anderson, buoyed by peace, said he thought all the restrictions could be lifted soon.

With Anderson – and therefore probably most of the city – believing the flu was on its way out, the Spokesman wrote a fawning profile of the health officer, saying “it is probably fair to say that he has earned the respect and admiration of his fellow citizens in a way no other public official of Spokane has approached.”

Anderson used logic to convince his fellow citizens, the profile said. Failing that, he wielded power.

In the profile, Anderson likens his fight against the flu to the war won in Europe. More to the point, he demanded the power of a general to finally vanquish his “invisible enemy.”

“It is just as necessary to concentrate responsibility and authority in one man here as on the battlefield. Perhaps more so, for the soldier fights a visible foe while the health authorities and the physician are combating an invisible enemy. All we see is results of the foe’s strength,” he said. “It is prompt action which saves the day, and we know it as never before after this epidemic.” …

Theaters Revolt

As December 1918 began, nothing changed. Every day, 200 cases of the flu were reported. Still, Anderson believed the flu was waning, lifted some restrictions and said school would be in session again, after seven weeks of closure. Theaters were allowed to open, but with strict temperature and humidity controls.

At a time before radio and television, the bored people of Spokane rejoiced. Social life would begin again, just in time for the holidays.

It didn’t last. The flu roared, and the city counted 231 dead. Anderson blamed the war celebrations and recent Thanksgiving gatherings.

“Keep away from crowds,” he said. “Influenza is a crowd disease. The present increase should convince the most skeptical that the gatherings of the Thanksgiving week have been dangerous.”

SpokaneTheatersPetition-a
Local businesses affected by the flu ban were gathering signatures to have it lifted. “They might as well save their ink,” said the city’s health officer. Credit: Spokesman-Review Archives

On Dec. 3, 300 new influenza cases were reported and again the city’s schools were ordered shut. Anderson again recommended a full ban on public gatherings, causing a “near-riot” at a city board of health meeting on Dec. 6.

“Hooting, hissing and cat-calling came from the back of the room, and one man had to be cautioned by police Sgt. Daniel to keep quiet or leave the room,” reported the Chronicle.

Facing a would-be mob, Anderson and the board compromised: Churches would be allowed one service each week, but with no singing because it “acts as a releaser of germs during the singing, nearly the same as during coughing, and that would be dangerous.” Theaters could remain open, but would have to “close between the hours of 5 and 7 p.m., to air out the theater building.”

That day, there were 342 new cases of the flu and eight deaths.

Despite the death and disease, business owners were tired of the forced closures, and people were too. The Empress Theater, at Riverside and Browne Street, violated the quarantine. Two health inspectors went to the theater and found “84 people standing in the lobby, in direct violation of the quarantine order,” Anderson said. There also were children under 12 in attendance and the gallery was overcrowded. When the health inspectors ordered the lobby cleared, “management paid no heed.”

If the Empress tried to reopen, Anderson said he’d arrest the manager, the ticket seller, the doorkeeper and every other employee.

Later that week, with deaths tallied at 374, the owner of the Hippodrome on Howard Street said he was closing the theater for good, and blamed the financial losses stemming from the quarantine.

The next day, Dec. 17, a coalition of theater owners said they had collected several thousand signatures asking for the end of the ban on public gatherings.

“Those petitions will have as much effect on me as water on a duck’s back,” Anderson said. “The people circulating and signing the petitions might just as well save their ink.”

He said the partial ban would go on until January and suggested the businesspeople were putting profits ahead of the public good. “A dollar is good, but it is no good to a dead man,” he said.

Around this time, Anderson outlawed Christmas and New Year’s celebrations.

Forget All About The Flu

Over the next few weeks, the situation improved. The worst was over. On Dec. 30, Anderson announced all restrictions would be lifted at noon New Year’s Day, and schools would reopen Jan. 2.

Even Anderson’s rhetoric shifted.

“Forget all about the ‘flu.’ Dismiss it from your mind,” Anderson said, according to the Jan. 4, 1919, paper. “I believe everybody would be better off if they would just forget all about the ‘flu.’ I don’t mean by this that people should mingle with persons who have the disease, but I do mean that people should get away from the idea that if they have a little pain or ache they should think it is the influenza. Just quit thinking about it as much as possible. This is my suggestion.”

On Jan. 13, Anderson closed the Lion Hotel hospital, which “truly signaled the end of Spokane’s epidemic,” according to the Influenza Encyclopedia. Over 89 days, the hospital had treated 617 people and saw 68 deaths.

By the end of the flu’s course through Spokane, some 17,000 Spokanites got the flu, and 1,045 died. The severity of the disease in Spokane led to a higher death rate than in Seattle. And its three “peaks” – two in October and one in December – were more than the typical American city, which saw just two.

The number of cases and deaths would grow outside of this October-to-February window, but Anderson wouldn’t stay in Spokane to see it all the way through. Deaths would continue to mount after February 1919, but at a slower rate.

On April 18, Anderson was given a farewell reception by the employees of the city health office and members of the Rivercrest Contagion Hospital, according to the May 10 edition of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

He was retiring as the city’s health officer after eight years and had been named the state commissioner of health. …

full story: NWPB
———————

Back to Table of Contents
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 1)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 2)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 3)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 4)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 5)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 6)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 7)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 8)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 9)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 10)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 11)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 12)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 13)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 14)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 15)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 16)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 17)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 18)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 19)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 20)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 21)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 22)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 23)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 24)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 25)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 26)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 27)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 28)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 29)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 30)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 31)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 32)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 33)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 34)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 35)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 36)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 37)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 38)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 39)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 40)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 41)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 42)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 43)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 44)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 45)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 46)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 47)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 48)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 49)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 50)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 51)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 52)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 53)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 54)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 55)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 56)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 57)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 58)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 59)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 60)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 61)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 62)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 63)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 64)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 65)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 66)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 67)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 68)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 69)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 70)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 71)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 72)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 73)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 74)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 75)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 76)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 77)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 78)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 79)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 80)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 81)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 82)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 83)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 84)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 85)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 86)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 87)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 88)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 89)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 90)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 91)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 92)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 93)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 94)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 95)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 96)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 97)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 98)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 99)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 100)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 101)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 102)

Road Reports Feb 28, 2021

The Stibnite road was closed by an avalanche Feb 22 in the Tamarack Creek area.

Please share road reports. Please turn on your vehicle lights when traveling our narrow mountain roads. Conditions change quickly this time of year. Be prepared for rocks and trees in the road, icy conditions and deep snow in higher elevation. Remember there is no cell phone service.

Yellow Pine: Local streets are snow covered. Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN.
Main roads plowed Saturday (Feb 27.)
“Drivers don’t speed through neighborhoods or most anywhere. Locals brake for kids, wandering dogs, deer, elk, moose, fox, beaver, squirrels and chipmunks. Most are lifetime members of SPLAT, the Society to Prevent Little Animal Tragedies.” – IME
link: Local Forecast
Yellow Pine Webcam: (check date on image)

Highway 55 Webcams Link:
No Winter construction – All lanes open
Preliminary work activities on ID-55 between Smiths Ferry and the Rainbow Bridge will start on March 8. Drivers can expect daytime work with a 15-minute delay through March 12. Spring construction and full road closures start March 15.

Warm Lake Highway: Open
Wed (Feb 24) Mail truck driver reported no problems.
link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

South Fork Road: Open
Will be plowed today, Sunday, Feb 28.
Wed (Feb 24) mail truck driver, Taylor, reported the county grader plowed the upper 14 miles of the road. The lower part is snow covered ice and “bumpy”.
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Open
Will be plowed today, Sunday, Feb 28.
Wed (Feb 24) mail truck driver says the road is somewhat better with the snow covering the ice, but it is rather bumpy.

Johnson Creek Road: Upper end closed to wheeled vehicles at Landmark.
Lower end plowed Saturday (Feb 27.)
link: Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam *Note: currently down*
link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
Note: The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcam: (check date on image)

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Closed near MM7 by Avalanche Feb 22nd
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The approx. elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′

New Link
Valley County Road Maintenance Dashboard
——————

Winter Storm Warning Feb 25, 5pm to Feb 27, 5am

Winter Storm Warning Feb 25, 5pm to Feb 27, 5am

10-14″ possible

Yellow Pine Forecast

Thursday Snow likely after 11am. Increasing clouds, with a high near 29. Wind chill values between -1 and 9. South southwest wind 7 to 9 mph. Chance of precipitation is 60%. New snow accumulation of less than a half inch possible.

Thursday Night Snow. Low around 20. South southwest wind 5 to 7 mph. Chance of precipitation is 90%. New snow accumulation of 1 to 3 inches possible.

Friday Snow. Some thunder is also possible. Areas of blowing snow after 11am. High near 27. West southwest wind 8 to 13 mph, with gusts as high as 25 mph. Chance of precipitation is 100%. New snow accumulation of 3 to 7 inches possible.

Friday Night Snow. Some thunder is also possible. Low around 14. West northwest wind 5 to 9 mph becoming calm in the evening. Chance of precipitation is 90%. New snow accumulation of 3 to 5 inches possible.

Saturday Snow likely. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 29. Chance of precipitation is 70%. New snow accumulation of less than one inch possible.

Winter Storm Warning

URGENT - WINTER WEATHER MESSAGE
National Weather Service Boise ID
1230 PM MST Wed Feb 24 2021

West Central Mountains-
1230 PM MST Wed Feb 24 2021

...WINTER STORM WARNING IN EFFECT FROM 5 PM THURSDAY TO 5 AM MST
SATURDAY...

* WHAT...Heavy snow and blowing snow expected. Total snow
  accumulations of 9 to 15 inches, except 1 to 2 feet above 6000
  ft. Winds gusting as high as 35 mph.

* WHERE...West Central Mountains zone.

* WHEN...From 5 PM Thursday to 5 AM MST Saturday.

* IMPACTS...Travel could be very difficult to impossible.

* ADDITIONAL DETAILS...Blowing snow will make keeping the roads
  clear extremely difficult. Plan on treacherous travel conditions.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...

If you must travel, keep an extra flashlight, food, and water in
your vehicle in case of an emergency.

The latest road conditions can be obtained by calling 5 1 1.

Road Reports Feb 24, 2021

Note: Sunday (Feb 24) there is an average of 28″ of snow on the ground, down by the school house.

Please share road reports. Please turn on your vehicle lights when traveling our narrow mountain roads. Conditions change quickly this time of year. Be prepared for rocks and trees in the road, icy conditions and deep snow in higher elevation. Remember there is no cell phone service.

Yellow Pine: Local streets are snow covered, main roads last plowed Saturday (Feb 20.) Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN.
“Drivers don’t speed through neighborhoods or most anywhere. Locals brake for kids, wandering dogs, deer, elk, moose, fox, beaver, squirrels and chipmunks. Most are lifetime members of SPLAT, the Society to Prevent Little Animal Tragedies.” – IME
link: Local Forecast
Yellow Pine Webcam: (check date on image)

Highway 55 Webcams Link:
No Winter construction – All lanes open

Warm Lake Highway: Open (no current report.)
Wed (Feb 24) Mail truck driver reported no problems.
link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

South Fork Road: Open
Wed (Feb 24) mail truck driver, Taylor, reported the county grader plowed the upper 14 miles of the road. The lower part is snow covered ice and “bumpy”.
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Open
Wed (Feb 24) mail truck driver says the road is somewhat better with new snow covering the ice, but it is rather bumpy.

Johnson Creek Road: Upper end closed to wheeled vehicles at Landmark.
Lower end may have been plowed Saturday (Feb 19.)
link: Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam
link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
Note: The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcam: (check date on image)

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Closed near MM7 by Avalanche Feb 22nd
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The approx. elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′

New Link
Valley County Road Maintenance Dashboard
——————

Feb 21, 2021 The Yellow Pine Times

Feb 21, 2021 The Yellow Pine Times – Valley County, Idaho

Reminder: We are still under a boil water order until further notice.

Community Calendar:

Apr 17 – Boil water order issued
Feb 19 – Valley County Mask Advisory
Feb 28 – 2pm Fest Planning Meeting
June 12 – VYPA Meeting
(details below)
———-

Local Events:

Next Festival Planning Meeting

Sunday, Feb 28, 2021 @ Community Hall, 2pm
———-

Village News:

Snowy Week in Yellow Pine

We have received measurable snow every day this week. Monday 1.5″, Tuesday 5″, Wednesday 3.5″, Thursday .5″, Friday .8″, Saturday 2.8″ and Sunday .5″ for a total of 14.6″ new snow. The snow depth has varied from 24″ to 30″ this week. Sunday morning measured an average of 26.5″ on the ground. So far in February we have had 26.6″ of snow fall and average 22″ on the ground. Average high 36F and average low 14F.

P1000655-20210216-a
Feb 16th University of Yellow Pine over the fence.
— — — —

Internet and Phone Outage

On Thursday a report that folks were unable to call in from the outside – or out from the inside. Thank you to Marty for noticing and calling it in to MTE – the phones were working again by late afternoon. Friday evening, Feb 19, Yellow Pine internet and long distance went down. Saturday morning we also discovered that 911 was also down. We could call each other locally but could not call out to report the outage. However, Nate from MTE must have gotten the “bat signal” and managed to get our internet/phones working again by 1230pm Saturday. A report that it was ice and snow causing the outage. Yellow Pine owes Nate from MTE a big Thank You.
— — — —

South Fork Bull

20210218SoFkBullElk-a
photo by Ray Lutz Feb 17th
— — — —

Yellow Pine General Store

Please welcome Josh Jones as the new owner of the Yellow Pine General Store.
— — — —

Critters

Be Fox Aware

* Do not feed foxes human food
* Feed domestic pets indoors
* Make sure your pets are updated on Rabies vaccines
* Small pets could become a snack

Be Mountain Lion Aware

* NEVER run away from a mountain lion. The lion’s instinct is to chase and ultimately catch what they perceive as potential prey.
* NEVER turn your back on a lion. Always face them while making yourself look as large as you can. Yell loudly, but don’t scream. A high-pitched scream may mimic the sound of a wounded animal.
* SLOWLY back away while maintaining eye contact with the lion.
* Safety equipment you may choose to carry could include bear spray, a noise device, like an air-horn, and if you walk in the dark, a very bright flashlight.
* If you are attacked, fight back!
— — — —

Road Reports

Link: to current road reports.
— — — —

Yellow Pine US Mail

The 3-day a week mail delivery started Nov 2nd. The Post Office in Yellow Pine is open six days a week year around: M-F 845am-245pm Saturday 9am-245pm. Forever Stamp: 55 cents. Support our local post office and purchase your holiday stamps here.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Transfer Station

Report Monday (Feb 1) Dumpsters were empty and the building was clean, also there were some muddy bear paw prints on the outside of the doors. The road to the dump is plowed wide and smooth, nice drive.

20190429Dump2-bYellow Pine Transfer Station (aka, the dump)

Please do not abuse our Transfer Station or we may lose it. Household trash must be placed in the bins, flattened cardboard boxes can also go into the bins. Do not stack trash in front of the doors. Woody yard debris only for the burn pile. No furniture, appliances, tires or construction debris allowed, those items must be hauled out to the Donnelly station by you.

The Yellow Pine Transfer Station is Valley County responsibility. If it is not kept tidy, use of the Transfer Station may be revoked. That would result in residents having to take all household trash and yard waste to the Donnelly Transfer Station.

If Dumpsters Are Full, Contact Lake Shore Disposal at: (208) 634-7176
———-

Local Groups

YPWUA News:

The annual Water meeting for 2020 was held July 5th at the Community Hall 2pm.
link: minutes 20200705YPWUA.docx

Boil Your Water Before Using
Boil Water Order issued April 17, 2020.
Link: to Notice

Update Nov 29: Warren replaced the water meter because of inconsistent readings. With the new meter, the community is currently using over 55,000 gallons of water per day. A leak has been identified and will be repaired as soon as we can coordinate the contractor, equipment needed and weather together. It is difficult to get everything planned in the winter. When the repair is scheduled, the community will have a few days notice before the water is shut down. Since we are using more water than the rated use through the sand filters, the boil order will remain in effect. We continue the grant request process that is extremely slow. – Steve H

Update Nov 25: the boil order is still in effect due to the large quantity of water that is leaking from the system. – Warren D
— — — —

VYPA News:

VYPA Meetings are the 2nd Saturday of June, July, August, and September (June 12, July 10, August 14, September 11) at 2:00pm at the Community Hall.

Village Council members:
Deb Filler, Chairman
Matt Huber, Vice Chairman
Ronda Rogers, Treasurer
Rhonda Egbert, Secretary
Ron Noel, Member at Large

VYPA Bylaws adopted 8/8/2020 (link)

YPAC Corp Bylaws (link)

Festival
Anyone interested in being a part of the Festival Planning/Working committee, please contact Deb Filler. Meetings will begin at the end of January. Even if you aren’t physically in YP, you can participate in the committee.
Next Festival Planning Meeting Sunday, Feb 28, 2021 @ Community Hall, 2pm
2021 Planning Notes Link:
Yellow Pine Music and Harmonica Festival Policy and Procedure Link:
— — — —

YPFD News:

After Action Report meeting Oct 13, 2020 (no minutes yet.)

YPFD had a budget meeting on September 30th at 10am at the fire station. (No minutes yet.)

Make sure to keep your chimney clean. Cleaning brushes can be borrowed from the YPFD.

YPFD COVID19 Policy
link: YPFD Covid 19 SOP
link: Covid-19 EMS (May 23)

Pile burning: Dress appropriately, have enough help on hand (people, water and tools) and make a firebreak before you start. Call your local fire protection district chief to let them know you’ll be conducting a debris burn. This saves them from sending emergency responders to your property if they are not needed. Do NOT burn on breezy afternoons.

Better yet, “Rake It and Take It” yard waste (limbs, pine needles, brush, etc.) to the burn pile at the Transfer Station on the south end of the turn-around. Remember, keep the pile neat. Woody debris only, no nails, no cardboard and no furniture! The Boise NF will burn the pile in the fall when it is safe and doesn’t pollute our fine YP air.

YP Fire Commissioners:
Sue Holloway – District 1
Dan Stiff – District 2
Merrill Saleen – District 3
Tim Rogers – Fire Chief

Yellow Pine Fire Protection District Community Service Notice

The purpose of this letter is to show how you as a Yellow Pine Resident can help protect your structure against a wildland fire by being “Fire Wise.” Click the link: to view 20190724 Yellow Pine Fire Protection mitigation
——–

Biz Listings:

The Corner (208) 633-3325
Starting Nov 3rd open 3 days a week on mail days.
— — — —

Yellow Pine Tavern (208) 633-2233
Winter Closure: November 14, 2020 to April 16, 2021
— — — —

Yellow Pine Lodge (208) 633-3377
Closed Nov 3rd for winter.
— — — —

Yellow Pine General Store (208) 633-3300
New owner, plans to open this spring.
— — — —

Murph’s RV Park & Mary’s Cabins
FB page link
— — — —

Knotty Kat Crochet Works – 208-502-0940
FB page link
open Tue – Sat, 9-5
Yellow Pine eggs $3/doz
— — — —

Buck Horn Outfitters LLC 208-633-3614
Tom & Sarah Lanham
156 Yellow Pine Ave, Yellow Pine Id 83677
website:
Facebook:

Wapiti Meadow Ranch – Johnson Creek (208) 633-3217
or 208-315-3554 – cabin rentals
website:

Deadwood Outfitters
website:
— — — —

Local Fuel Suppliers

Amerigas Phone: (208) 634-8181
Ed Staub & Sons Phone: (208) 634-3833
Diamond Fuel & Feed Phone: (208) 382-4430 open 830am-5pm Monday-Friday, closed weekends.
— — — —

Outside Biz that will service Yellow Pine:

The Star-News

click to subscribe:
A reminder that those who live in other states can subscribe to the online edition only since the mail can take days for hard copy to reach them.

Rocky Mountain Mechanical – Plumbing – Heating – Air conditioning
(208) 365-PIPE (7473), Emmett, will service Yellow Pine

Elkhorn Heating & Cooling
(208) 906-4067 Middleton, Idaho, will service Yellow Pine

B&T Safety Solutions LLC
208-271-1600 Based out of Donnelly
Snow removal, cleaning chimneys and stoves, we do cabin staining/chinking as well
— — — —

Follow The Yellow Pine Times on Facebook (updated more often than emails)
———————–

Local Observations:

Monday (Feb 15) 24 hour low of 17 degrees from Sunday morning. This morning 1.5″ new (SWE=0.09″) from overnight snow and 24″ on the ground, socked in fairly low and steady light snowfall. Hairy and downy woodpeckers, a clark’s nutcracker, jays, red-winged blackbird, chickadees, nuthatches and the pine squirrel visiting. Fresh fox tracks. Light snow ended after lunch time and clouds lifted on the hills, high of 35 degrees. Snowing big flakes and socked in mid-afternoon, just above freezing. Break in the snow late afternoon, then snowing and socked in again before dusk. Alternating light and moderate snowfall after dark. Snowed all night.

Tuesday (Feb 16) overnight low of 26 degrees, low overcast this morning, light breeze and snowing lightly. Measured 5″ new snow (SWE=0.38″) and 28.5″ average snow depth. Northern flicker, male red-wing blackbird, hairy woodpecker, jays, nuthatches, chickadees and pine squirrel visiting. Fresh fox tracks. Clouds lifting and a bit brighter at lunch time, a break in the snow while trees were dumping snowloads, high of 35 degrees. Flaking or snowing on and off during the afternoon, overcast and light breeze. Snowing lightly at dusk, about 1/2″ so far today. Snowed a little after dark. Some stars out around 1030pm, then snow after midnight. Looks like it snowed all night.

Wednesday (Feb 17) overnight low of 18 degrees, broken overcast this morning. Measured 3.5″ new snow (SWE=0.21″) and an average of 30″ on the ground. Hairy and downy woodpeckers, young red-winged blackbird, jays, nuthatches, chickadees and the pine squirrel visiting. Socked in and 30 minute snow flurry around 1030am, then broken clouds and scattered sunshine. Big patch of blue sky to south west, dark cloud to north east at lunch time, high of 37 degrees. Mail truck made it in on time. Partly clear and warmer early afternoon. Socked in to the floor, breezy and snowing hard mid-afternoon, a whiteout for about 30 minutes, then thinning clouds. Partly clear after sunset, mix of dark lower clouds and higher pink poofy clouds. Mostly cloudy and cold at dusk. Cloudy before midnight.

Thursday (Feb 18) overnight low of 0 degrees, high thin haze covered the sky, measured 1/2″ new snow (SWE=0.03″) and 29″ on the ground. Red-winged blackbird, jays, clark’s nutcracker, hairy woodpecker, nuthatches, chickadees and the pine squirrel visiting. Overcast and cold at lunch time, high of 30 degrees. Gusty breezes mid-afternoon, overcast and below freezing. A report that our phones were down for a while (no outside calls.) A few flakes late afternoon, calmer and cold. Cloudy at dusk. Started snowing before 11pm. More snow after midnight.

Friday (Feb 19) 24 hour low of 5 degrees from Thurs morning, measured a fat 3/4″ new snow (SWE=0.05″) and 28″ total snow on the ground. Broken overcast this morning and flaking lightly. Red-wing blackbird, jays and chickadees calling, nuthatches, hairy woodpecker and squirrel visiting. Cloudy at lunch time, icicles dripping, high of 40 degrees. Light snowfall early afternoon, no measurable accumulation. Overcast, occasional flake of snow and icicles dripping late afternoon. Right at freezing at dusk. Internet was wonky around 715pm, then out for the rest of the evening. Started snowing around 11pm. Looks like it snowed most of the night.

Saturday (Feb 20) overnight low of 19 degrees, measured 2 3/4″ new snow (SWE=0.24″) and 29″ on the ground, high thin hazy overcast. Jays, red-winged blackbird, nuthatches, chickadees, female hairy woodpecker and pine squirrel visiting. Partly clear at lunch time, icicles dripping, high of 39 degrees. Internet (and phones) back on by 1230pm. Partly sunny early afternoon. Mostly cloudy, light breezes and flaking snow late afternoon for about half an hour, temperature dropping, then socked in down to the floor, foggy (low visibility) and snowed hard for a little over half an hour. Partly cloudy at dusk and temperature dropping. Cloudy before midnight.

Sunday (Feb 21) overnight low of 14 degrees, measured 1/2″ new snow (SWE=0.04″) from yesterday’s storm, and an average of 26.5″ on the ground. Snowing lightly before 10am and overcast. Hairy woodpecker, jays, chickadees, nuthatches and squirrel (tracks) visiting. Still snowing lightly at lunch time, high of 32 degrees. Still snowing lightly and just below freezing mid-afternoon, less than 1/2″ accumulation so far. Still snowing lightly at dusk, a bit over 1/2″ had stacked up.
—————–

Idaho News:

Central District Health changes Ada, Valley county health orders to advisories

by CBS2 News Staff Friday, February 19th 2021

The health orders in Ada and Valley Counties are now shifted to health advisories, after a vote by the board of Central District Health Friday morning.

A Public Health Advisory is a set of strong recommendations, rather than requirements.

The advisories do not replace or supersede orders in place by cities or by the state, according to the board. For example, the mask order for the city of Boise is still in effect, as is the federal order for masks while using public transportation.

continued:
— — — —

City of Boise re-issues public health emergency order mandating face coverings, social distancing

link: KIVI story
— — — — — — — — — —

314 new Idaho COVID-19 cases

Feb 19, 2021 Local News 8

Idaho officials reported 314 new COVID-19 cases on Friday.

That brings the total confirmed and probable cases reported since March to 168,953.

There are a total of 137,279 confirmed cases and 31,674 probable cases in all 44 of the 44 counties in Idaho, according to numbers released from the local health districts and the state. See the chart below.

The state said 205,152 people have received the vaccine, and 258,541 total doses have been administered. …

Zero new deaths were reported bringing the total recorded deaths to 1,826.

full story:
— — — —

Idaho February 15, 2021


source: KTVB
— — — — — — — — — —

New COVID-19 cases in Valley County continue to decline

Just four new cases reported during previous week

By Tom Grote for The Star-News Feb 18, 2021

The number of new positive COVID-19 cases in Valley County declined for the fourth straight week last week, health officials said.

The total number of positive cases since the pandemic reached Valley County last summer totaled 703 by Tuesday, up just four cases from 699 a week ago, health officials said.

That compared to a total of 17 new cases reported last week, 28 new cases two weeks ago, 34 new cases three weeks ago and 48 new cases four weeks ago.

St. Luke’s McCall on Tuesday reported 603 total positive cases from testing done at the hospital since the pandemic reached Valley County last summer, up three cases from 600 cases a week ago.

Cascade Medical Center reported 100 total positive cases through Monday, or one more than the 99 cases reported last week.

Central District Health reported 618 of the positive cases were confirmed to be Valley County residents as of Tuesday, which is seven more than the 611 cases reported a week ago.

The difference between the hospital figures and the health department figures are those who tested positive but did not declare Valley County as their residence.

Four confirmed deaths and one probable death of Valley County residents related to COVID-19 have been reported by Central District Health.

continued:
— — — —

1,939 Vaccinations

By Tom Grote for The Star-News Feb 18, 2021

A total of 1,939 people have received the first dose of the COVID-19 vaccine from Valley County’s two hospitals, the hospitals reported.

St. Luke’s McCall had given 1,324 of the first doses as of Tuesday and 220 of the required second doses of the vaccine.

St. Luke’s McCall has been averaging 240 appointments per week since opening to those 65 and older on Feb. 1.

Cascade Medical Center has given out 615 first doses while 64 people have received the second dose.

The Cascade hospital will hold its next vaccination clinic today where 460 first doses and 90 second doses are scheduled to be given.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Valley County mulls buying land for employee housing

The Star-News Feb 18, 2021

County would be landlord with small mobile home

By Max Silverson for The Star-News Feb 18, 2021

Buying property to rent out to new Valley County employees was proposed as a short-term housing solution by Valley County commissioners on Monday.

In their weekly meeting at the Valley County Courthouse in Cascade, commissioners discussed the possibility of purchasing an empty lot or a lot with a park model mobile home on it. The county would then act as landlord to new employees looking for permanent housing.

“We’ve all just been talking about how difficult it is to hire employees right now, because they can’t find housing,” commissioner Sherry Maupin said.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Grants available for Wildifire Community Preparedness Day

The Star-News Feb 18, 2021

Wildfire Community Preparation Day is a national campaign to encourage people and organizations to come together to take action to raise awareness and reduce wildfire risk.

This year’s event will focus on what residents can do on and around their home to protect against wildfires.

There are more than 150 funding awards made possible through donations from State Farm.

For more information on application links and projects, email VCFirewise@gmail.com

source:
——————-

Letters to Share:

Next Chapter of Stibnite Gold Project – Exciting Company News

Busy time at our company today, a lot has happened recently at our company. A few months ago, regulators wrapped up the comment period on our Draft Environmental Impact Statement. We recently released our feasibility study, which shows a very positive outlook for the Stibnite Gold Project. Just a few weeks ago, we moved our corporate office home to Idaho and today we are announcing that we were approved to trade on Nasdaq (which will begin Feb 18).

Each exciting milestone has been a point of reflection for our team. And the more we thought about the future, the more we realized we’ve outgrown our old name.

I am very proud to announce our team is changing our name to Perpetua Resources. VIDEO link:

Perpetua Resources is a nod to our Idaho roots and our commitment to follow our state’s tradition of Esto Perpetua, translated to mean let it be eternal. We have always been stewards of Idaho’s vast resources. Our new name is simply a public declaration that we will always do our part to make sure our water, land, air and the opportunities for Idaho families will endure for this generation and many to come.

Our name may be new but I want to make sure you know nothing else has changed. We are still the same dedicated team of Idahoans. Our commitment to Idaho remains strong. And our plan to responsibly and ethically mine America’s only domestically mined source of the critical mineral antimony and one of the top-grade gold deposits is moving full steam ahead.

Making the transition to Perpetua Resources does mean I have a new email. You can now contact me at belinda.provancher@perpetua.us . If you happen to write me at my old email, please know, over the next several months, it will still find its way to me. If you want to see the new logo and look, please check out our new website (link) If you have any questions, do not hesitate to reach out to me.

Belinda Provancher
Belinda.Provancher@Perpetua.us
— — — — — — — — — —

Burntlog Road route is the safest access to Stibnite Gold Project

To the Editor:

In a recent letter to The Star-News, questions were brought up regarding access to the Stibnite Gold Project, specifically around transportation of materials, supplies and our workforce to the project.

Safety is, and always will be, our top priority.

We spent a lot of time evaluating the safest route to Stibnite. We wanted to avoid traveling in parallel to the East Fork of the South Fork Salmon River and Johnson Creek and we wanted to minimize impacts to recreationalists and residents. We also wanted the safest route in terms of avoiding known hazards.

During the course of our transportation study, local residents pointed to the Burntlog Road as a possible option. The Burntlog Route accesses Stibnite from Warm Lake Road and connects to the old Thunder Mountain Road which keeps our traffic away from the rivers and reduces interaction with residents and recreationalists. It also avoids more known hazards.

This route utilizes existing roads wherever possible and will be updated to meet the 2011 guidelines and standards for designing National Forest System Roads as published in the U.S. Forest Service Handbook (FSH 7709.56) and cross-checked against Valley County road design standards. Additionally, we will upgrade culverts to allow for fish passage during the redevelopment of the road.

Our plan projects about 50 vehicles per day. Only one mile of the Burntlog Road travels the edge of the Middle Fork Salmon River watershed. This is an existing section of road along the Meadow Creek Lookout Road. The road will be widened from approximately 12 feet to 21 feet to ensure safe transport.

It is important to note that we will maintain the road year-round using the same methods approved by the forest and county today. In the summer, we will apply magnesium chloride as a dust suppressant on gravel roads to help limit additional sediment into waterways and to improve travel conditions. This is the dust suppressant used across the forest and county today.

The road between Yellow Pine and Stibnite is known to have avalanches during the winter/spring season and is precisely why we’ve proposed the Burntlog Route. For example, the Stibnite Road avalanche that occurred in April 2019 left the road buried by 40 to 50 feet of snow and downed timber.

The avalanche was naturally caused, and similar events will likely continue to occur whether or not we have a project. However, we were happy to lend a hand and our crews worked tirelessly to help clear the road.

We also pitched in to repair a section of the road and helped facilitate permitting in support of the emergency repair action in coordination with federal disaster relief funding.

We have been working with avalanche mitigation experts to develop best practices towards implementing a mitigation plan for all transportation routes during construction and operations.

For many years now we have had a road use agreement with the county to make sure we do our part to help maintain the roads we use. To date, we have spent more than $800,000 in maintaining and upgrading Stibnite and Johnson Creek roads. Should the Project move forward, we expect to include regular grading, dust suppression application, gravel application, and winter plowing.

The Idaho Transportation Department is responsible for the state highway system. However, we have committed to cooperatively designing and funding intersection improvements at Warm Lake Road and Idaho 55.

Significantly, no “ore trucks” will ever be on any road outside of the mine site. All truck traffic and supply deliveries will be in standard highway rated transport truck-trailers (WB-67). Permits will be obtained for oversized or overweight loads, the bulk of which will occur during construction.

We proposed that Warm Lake Road would be plowed open during the winter months. We understand that our proposed access route to the site will impact existing snowmobile routes along Warm Lake and Johnson Creek Roads.

However, we have worked diligently with the local snowmobile clubs to mitigate these impacts and have identified an alternative route to Landmark. Project traffic use of the Warm Lake Road will not prohibit Yellow Pine and Warm Lake residents and recreationalists from utilizing this route and has the possibility of increasing access to backcountry winter recreational opportunities.

We recognize that transportation safety is important to everyone. Finding the safest routes, investing in care and maintenance, communicating regularly with our communities and other users, and holding a high standard for transportation safety, are all a part of what we do every day and will continue to do every day.

We welcome continued conversation and encourage anyone with questions or ideas to reach out to us at community@perpetua.us.

Note: Midas Gold has changed its name to Perpetua Resources to better reflect our commitment to Idaho and to protect and sustain our state’s vast resources. Our people, our project, and our commitments are the same.

Kyle Fend, Field Operations Manager, Perpetua Resources

source: The Star-News
——————-

Mining News:

Midas Gold Announces Name Change to Perpetua Resources and Approved Nasdaq Listing

News Provided By Midas Gold Corp. Feb 16, 2021

New Name Reinforces Commitment to Idaho

Restoration of Legacy Mining District and Domestic Production of Critical Mineral Antimony

Shares to Begin Trading on Nasdaq on February 18

Management Team Strengthened with Hiring of Jessica Largent and Promotion of Tanya Nelson

Boise, Idaho, Feb. 16, 2021 – Perpetua Resources Corp. (formerly Midas Gold Corp.) (“Perpetua Resources” or the “Company”) announced today that it has changed its name to “Perpetua Resources Corp.” effective February 15, 2021 and the Company’s common shares have been approved for listing on the Nasdaq Stock Market (“Nasdaq”).

The Company’s common shares will begin trading on the Nasdaq on February 18, 2021 under the symbol “PPTA” and on the Toronto Stock Exchange (“TSX”) under the new name at market open on or around February 18, 2021 under the stock symbol “PPTA”. As the Stibnite Gold Project (the “Stibnite Project” or “Project”) continues to advance through major milestones, the listing on a U.S. stock exchange is a strategic decision to focus the Company’s business in the United States and open additional opportunities for American investment.

continued:
— — — —

Midas Gold is now Perpetua Resources

Name change shows ‘a commitment to Idaho’ by mining company

By Drew Dodson for The Star-News Feb 18, 2021

Perpetua Resources Corp. is the new name of Midas Gold Corp., the company that wants to extract gold and antimony from the Stibnite area in Valley County.

The new name, announced on Tuesday, is a nod to the company’s commitment to Idaho, sustainability and environmental restoration at Stibnite, Perpetua Resources President Laurel Sayer said.

“We are proud to enter our next chapter with a name that helps communicate our values and the sustainable future we are working to create for all of us,” Sayer said.

The name is also inspired by Idaho’s state motto, “Esto Perpetua,” which translated from Latin means “Let It Be Perpetual.”

The company’s new logo also draws from imagery in the Idaho state seal, said Mckinsey Lyon, vice president of external affairs for Perpetua.

“Perpetua’s logo and Idaho’s state seal use a protective shield around the river, forest and mountains to reflect a commitment to protect the things that make Idaho special,” Lyon said.

“Both also reference the mineral resources of the state, which are represented by a miner in the state seal and as stars for antimony and gold in our new logo,” she said.

The company also re-named its Idaho-based subsidiary to “Perpetua Resources Idaho,” which formerly was known as Midas Gold Idaho.

The subsidiary and its board of directors were established in 2014 to integrate local interests into the project, but have no decision-making authority.

Perpetua did not consolidate the companies into one because steps to convert from a Canadian company to a U.S. company are still unknown, Lyon said.

“No major decision can be made until then, so there are no changes to our company structure or to the business entities,” she said.

The name change follows last month’s relocation of the company’s corporate headquarters from Vancouver, British Columbia, to offices at 405 S. 8th St. in downtown Boise.

Despite the recent flurry of changes, there are no changes with the company’s personnel, its commitments or the Stibnite Gold Project, Lyon said.

“We want to make sure the community knows our name is the only thing changing,” she said.

A draft decision on the proposed gold and antimony mine near Yellow Pine is currently slated for release in August by the Payette National Forest.

Approval of the project would trigger a three-year construction phase that Perpetua estimates would cost about $1.26 billion.

The re-naming and relocation of Midas Gold stem from a corporate board reshuffling urged in November by Paulson & Co., a New York City investment firm.

The firm has invested about $66 million into Perpetua since 2016 and is the company’s largest shareholder with 44% of all shares.

Midas Gold’s probable mineral reserves in the Stibnite deposits include more than 4 million ounces of gold, or about 125 tons.

The value of the gold is projected to bring in 94% of the mine’s estimated $6 billion in total revenue over the 12-year to 15-year life of the mine.

The reserves also are predicted to contain 100 million pounds of antimony, which is used to make flame-proofing materials, paints, ceramic enamels, glass and pottery.

Antimony is also used in the renewable energy industry, including the development of a battery capable of storing renewable energy, like wind and solar.

About 5% of the mine’s revenue would come from antimony, but it would become the only domestic source of the mineral and supply 30% of the annual demand for the United States.

source: © Copyright 2009-present Central Idaho Publishing Inc. All rights reserved (Used with permission.)
— — — — — — — — — —

BeMetals Reports Significant Copper and Silver Drill Intersections at Its High-Grade Polymetallic South Mountain Project

Vancouver, BC February 9, 2021 / BeMetals Corp. is pleased to announce a new batch of analytical results from its Phase 2 underground diamond drilling program at the high-grade South Mountain Zinc-Silver-Gold-Copper Project (“South Mountain” or “South Mountain Project” or the “Property”) in southwestern Idaho, U.S.A. Today’s results demonstrate that South Mountain’s Texas Zone contains both high-grade Copper-Silver and Zinc-Silver-Gold mineralization (See Tables 1 and 2). The Company’s 2020 program intersected mineralization at depths beyond any historical drilling of the Texas Zone and the deposit remains open to depth (See Figure 1). Further drilling results will be reported when received from the laboratories.

continued:
—————–

Public Lands:

Krassel Spring Burning Notification

Feb 18, 2021

The Payette National Forest, Krassel Ranger District, is planning to conduct prescribed burning on the Four Mile, Bald Hill, and Krassel Administration Site Prescribed Fire projects this spring. Maps of the project areas can be found in the attached document. Units may be broken into smaller portions to aid in implementation. Timing will be dependent on weather; ignitions will most likely occur sometime between March and May 2021. Ignitions should take 1-3 days for each project, with smoke and fire most likely present in the project area until the next significant precipitation.

For any questions or concerns, please email patrick.schon@usda.gov. Thank you and have a nice day.

Link: EZ Spring Burn Notification 2021021820.docx

Will Woods
Fuels Technician (Detail)
Krassel Ranger District, Payette National Forest
— — — — — — — — — —

USDA Forest Service wants you to #RecreateResponsibly during this winter season

Know Before You Go Out in the Snow

17, February 2021 – In light of recent tragic events and the 21 fatalities during the 2020-2021 winter season, the USDA Forest Service wants to remind recreationists to think ahead, plan, and prepare for their outings on National Forest System lands and to recreate responsibly.

To #RecreateResponsibly means to keep yourself healthy, to keep others safe, and to preserve and protect public lands. With another 2-3 months of winter remaining, visitors should exercise increased caution when traveling out into the backcountry. Visitors can mitigate their risk by doing the following:

* Know Before You Go – Check the forecast in advance. Find out if a recreation fee or permit is required. Bring the proper clothing and gear, packing extra layers, waterproof clothing, and avalanche safety gear. In addition, some areas can become dangerous with winter conditions. Keep in mind that roads and facilities may be closed in winter. Visit (link) for more information.

* Recreate with respect – Be respectful of other visitors and the place you are visiting by keeping pets on leash, packing out all trash and waste, and leaving the area better than you found it. Practice physical distancing by covering your nose and mouth and eating and resting outside. If you feel sick, stay home.

* Plan your route in advance – Go early or during the week when visiting popular areas. If possible, visit other sites to beat crowds. Explore locally as driving and parking may be more challenging in winter. Know what kind of roads you will be driving on and ensure that you have the right vehicle to make it to your destination. Do not rely on cell coverage or GPS. Instead, carry a paper map and know how to read it.

* Keep in touch – Always let someone know the details of your trip, including where you’re going and when you will be back. Be sure to stick to your plan.

* Play it safe – Know your limits and your gear. Slow down and choose lower-risk activities to reduce your risk of injury.

By preparing ahead of time and using the resources provided, recreationists become aware of the dangers associated with winter recreation. Recreating responsibly, especially during the winter months, helps save lives.

To learn more about how to recreate responsibly during the winter, please visit (link),
— — — — — — — — — —

Trident submits formal proposal for large (but reduced) McCall-area land swap

by Don Day Feb 16, 2021 KIVI

Trident Holdings formally submitted its application with the State of Idaho to swap timberlands in North Idaho for a significant area around Payette Lake in the McCall area.

The 73-page document outlines Trident’s idea to buy timberland, then exchange it with the State of Idaho for about 26 square miles of land in Valley County. The land includes the tree-covered areas that frame Payette Lake, several islands in the lake itself, a few parcels in Pilgrim Cove and a large parcel near Deinhard Ln. in McCall.

The formal proposal represents a significant reduction from Trident’s earlier vision – to trade for 44 square miles. The updated proposal largely removes lands south of Little Payette Lake, as well as several parcels in Pilgrims Cove. Those lands would remain as Idaho endowment lands.

continued:
——————-

Critter News:

Intermountain Bird Observatory seeing growth in Anna’s Hummingbird population in Idaho

In 2015, there were only about 20 reported sightings of the bird. This winter there have been about 150 sightings.

Chase Biefeldt (KTVB) February 18, 2021

There are just over a handful of species of hummingbirds in Idaho, but one of those species are relatively new to the Gem State.

They are called Anna’s Hummingbirds, and they are quite special.

Most hummingbirds fly to Idaho in April and leave by September, but Anna’s Hummingbirds arrive in October and leave in March, staying here during the coldest months of the year.

The Intermountain Bird Observatory (IBO) is trying to figure out why they can survive these cold months, and why they choose Idaho as their home.

continued:
— —

more info:

Anna’s Hummingbird Identification


link: The Cornell Lab
————————

Fish & Game News:

Draw results available for spring bear controlled hunts

By Brian Pearson, Conservation Public Information Specialist
Friday, February 19, 2021

Most controlled hunts begin April 1

Spring bear controlled hunt draw results are available now at (link),

The results are posted through Fish and Game’s licensing system. Email notifications will be sent to those who provided an email address on their profile.

Hunters whose names were drawn can buy the controlled hunt tags through any Idaho Fish and Game license vendor. The can also buy through the online license system, or by calling 1-800-554-8685 and the tag will be mailed to them after purchase. Tags will be mailed within seven to 10 days, so allow time for shipping.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Annual F&G fur auction moves online for 2021

By Brian Pearson, Conservation Public Information Specialist
Friday, February 19, 2021

After a one-year hiatus, Idaho Fish and Game’s annual fur auction is back – albeit with some significant changes due to COVID.

This year’s auction of furs, hides, antlers, and other items has been moved entirely online, and will be run through Prime Time Auctions (link).

The online auction kicks off on March 1, and ends on April 9. While this unfortunately means potential buyers will not get to inspect items in person this year, they will be able to see photos of them on the Prime Time Auctions website.

Potential buyers will need provide a credit or debit card to register for the online auction, but have other options to pay for items they purchase. Here is more information.

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

Application period for F&G Commission Community Challenge Grants opens March 1

By Roger Phillips, Public Information Supervisor
Friday, February 19, 2021

Program provides funding for nonprofit groups’ projects that enhance fish and wildlife and recreation opportunities

The Idaho Fish and Game Commission’s Community Challenge Grant program is open for applications March 1 though April 15. Grants provide competitive funding for officially recognized nonprofit organizations to implement projects that are broadly supported by the local sporting community and enhance fish and wildlife habitat, populations, or associated recreational opportunities.

The Commission Community Challenge Grant program consists of two different awards:

continued:
— — — — — — — — — —

More F&G News Releases

link:
———————————-

Crazy Critter Stuff:

Key West wants to ban people from feeding roaming chickens

by Associated Press Sunday, January 24th 2021


AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee

Feral chickens run free in Key West, just one of those things that keep the Southernmost City charmingly weird.

But what’s delightful here and there becomes a nuisance when they’re everywhere. With the population getting out of hand, city commissioners are taking action — not by hunting down the fixings for a massive tailgate party, but by going after their human enablers.

They’re making it illegal to feed the free-roaming birds.

… The roaming chickens are fearless when it comes to approaching people, said City Commissioner Mary Lou Hoover.

“They’re becoming more aggressive by the day,” Hoover said. In her district, people have reported that when they go to put dog feces in the trash, chickens come up and attack them, thinking it might be food.

full story:
——————-

Seasonal Humor:

SmallPoxPropaganda-a

(Early fear of smallpox vaccinations – Getty Images)
——————

Idaho History Feb 21, 2021

Idaho 1918-1920 Influenza Pandemic

Part 45

Idaho Newspaper clippings March 28-30, 1919

Photos courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

March 28

Evening Capital News., March 28, 1919, Page 2

19190328ECN1

19190328ECN2
Think Twin Falls Man Has Sleeping Sickness

Twin Falls, March 28. — In the Boyd hospital here there is a man who has been asleep for 16 days. Since Tuesday it has been possible to rouse him at meal times, nourishment prior to that time having been administered through a tube, and he is apparently on the road to recovery. After careful tests and elimination of all other possibilities, attending physicians have diagnosed the case as one of lethargic encephalitis or sleeping sickness. This is the first case of the kind so far reported in the intermountain region.
— —

Mrs. Phoebe Hearst Improved

Pleasanton, Cal., March 28. — The condition of Mrs. Phoebe Hearst, mother of William R. Hearst, newspaper publisher, is improved today. Mrs. Hearst is suffering from the after effects of influenza.

source: Evening Capital News. (Boise, Idaho), 28 March 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Evening Capital News., March 28, 1919, Page 9

Around Boise Valley Loop

Meridian

Duff McKee was called to Parma this morning by the illness of his child.

Star

Verlin and Jessie Bass are confined to their home with the flu.

Mrs. Peterson and son left today for Butte, Mont. in answer to a telegram announcing the serious illness of the former’s daughter.
— —

Idaho Falls

Idaho Falls, March 28 — Doctors J. O. Mellor and D. L. McDonald have taken over the hospital property on E. street formerly known as the Emergency hospital and have renamed the institution the Peoples’ Hospital. The building has been thoroughly remodeled and re-equipped and has beds for 20 patients.

Another hospital is in prospect as the L. D. S. church has a committee looking for a suitable location for the establishment of a big hospital and sanitarium under the supervision of that organization.

(ibid, page 9)
— — — —

Evening Capital News., March 28, 1919, Page 12

19190328ECN3Influenza Case

One influenza patient was brought to Boise from Orchard Thursday evening in the O. S. L. hospital car, and taken to a city hospital. The patient had not developed the disease in its full strength, but it was thought best to take every precaution and secure proper care at once.

(ibid, page 12)
— — — — — — — — — —

The Caldwell Tribune. March 28, 1919, Page 1

19190328CT1

Local and Personal

Delva Modest Northrup, one year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. F. B. Northrup, died Monday, March 24th. The funeral was held Wednesday. interment was at Canyon Hill cemetery.
— —

Lake Lowell

Rev. C. E. Wharton preached at the M. E. church Sunday morning, after an illness of seven weeks.

Florence Gibbens is slowly recovering from her recent illness.

Miss Louise Wright was out of school the forepart of the week on account of pink eye.
— —

Funeral of Frank Gillian

Funeral services were held from the Methodist church Wednesday afternoon for Frank Gillian. The Rev. Mr. Winters had charge of the services. Interment was at Canyon Hill cemetery.

Mr. Gillian died Monday at Hot Lake, Oregon, where he was taken for medical treatment. Death resulted from complications following influenza. He is survived by his wife, parents and three brothers.

Mr. and Mrs. Gillian came to Caldwell a little over a year ago. They were from Wyoming. Mr. Gillian was extensively interested in land at Claytonia and also in and around Caldwell.
— —

Judge Isaac F. Smith who has been seriously sick at his home at Weiser for some time was taken to a Boise hospital Monday morning. He stood the trip well but it is feared that Judge Smith will never recover from his present malady.

source: The Caldwell Tribune. (Caldwell, Idaho), 28 March 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Caldwell Tribune. March 28, 1919, Page 5

Items of Interest From Surrounding Territory

Marble Front

We are glad to report that Mrs. Walter Thomas is improving and able to sit up a little.

Mrs. Fred Kress is on the sick list this week.

Word has been received from Lee Thomas at Hot Lake that he is not improving as they had hoped he would.

Deer Flat

There are a few cases of flu in the neighborhood.

Mrs. Carl Skow is having the mumps and Miss Neva Faris has just recovered from the same happy experience.

Midway News

Thomas Waters is on the sick list.

Fargo News Item

Mr. and Mrs. Elmore Look, who have had the flu, are able to be out again.

There has been several cases of mumps in the Fargo school.

Mrs. John Miller was on the sick list last week.

Roswell

Esther Jacobson, formerly of Rosewell, who has been very ill for many weeks in Boise, is now improving.

Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Rockwood and little Henry Stark were in Boise Sunday to visit Eunice Rockwood who is at St. Luke’s hospital.
— —

19190328CT2

(ibid, page 5)
— — — —

The Caldwell Tribune. March 28, 1919, Page 7

Brier Rose

The Bequeath and McKnight families have the influenza in their homes.

Lt. Merle Howard spent the week end and part of this week helping his brother in Big Bend who is ill with influenza.

John Dennerline is seriously ill with pneumonia.

Mrs. H. E. Smith is on the sick list this week.

John Postuethwaite, Clisby Edelfsen and Paul Christopher have been having the mumps lately. John is back in school.
— —

Finney Hall

Gail Baldridge has been at home all the week with the mumps.

Elizabeth Hine has the mumps. Mr. and Mrs. Hine called at the hall Tuesday to consider taking her home, but decided to leave her in Mrs. Murphy’s care.

Edith McLaughlin went home Wednesday with mumps.

(ibid, page 7)
— — — — — — — — — — —

Dover, Idaho ca. 1920

Dover1920Fritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — — —

The Oakley Herald. March 28, 1919, Page 1

19190328OH1

Basin Items

Miss Edna Wells has been quite ill but is improving.

Miss Myrtle Martin has been confined to her bed for four days.

The farmers have begun to plow.

source: The Oakley Herald. (Oakley, Idaho), 28 March 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Oakley Herald. March 28, 1919, Page 6

Locals and Personals

The family of Henry Tanner, two miles north of Oakley, are recovering from the flu.

Frank McLaws, who lives north of Oakley has had the flu recently.

Mrs. Ed. Young, who lives three miles north of Oakley, is recovering from an attack of influenza.

The many friends of “Uncle” Phill Shaw were glad to see him out on the street again this week.
— —

Boulder

Mrs. Nelson has received word that her daughter, Mrs. Esther Olson, and the latter’s little daughter are very sick with the flu at Phoenix, Arizona.

H. P. Nelson has been very sick the last week, but is feeling better again.

The snow is almost gone. Everybody is rejoicing to see bare ground once more.

(ibid, page 6)
— — — — — — — — — —

The Idaho Republican. March 28, 1919, Page 2

19190328TIR1

Moreland

There are several cases of influenza in our community at the present time.
— —

Goshen

Andrew Anderson has been on the sick list this week.

Heber Killian was seriously ill Sunday evening, but has since recovered much strength.
— —

Sterling

The two small sons of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Grovatt are very ill.

source: The Idaho Republican. (Blackfoot, Idaho), 28 March 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Idaho Republican. March 28, 1919, Page 3

Local News

Probate Judge Good and Truant Officer Mrs. Grace Stevens made a county tour last week rounding up the kids on probation and setting them on the straight and narrow way.
— —

Moreland

The little daughter of Lee Moyer is very ill with tonsillitis and has been out of school for several days.

(ibid, page 3)
— — — —

The Idaho Republican. March 28, 1919, Page 4

19190328TIR2Returns From Salt Lake Takes Down With The Flu

Mr. and Mrs. W. S. Rich returned from Salt Lake City, Saturday, with their two children. Mrs. Rich has been there with the kiddies for several weeks having them doctored by a specialist. On the day after her return, Mrs. Rich was taken ill with the flu, and is laid up with it.

(ibid, page 4)
— — — — — — — — — —

Shoshone Journal. March 28, 1919, Page 1

19190328SJ1

Extending The School Term

The Trustees of some of the school districts are contemplating extending the school term two or three weeks longer, in order to give the pupils more time in which to complete the year’s work.
— —

Died

Stanley Devon Grewell, infant son of Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Grewell, died at the family home March 24, of pneumonia. The baby was two months old March 20th. Burial took place at Richfield cemetery.
— —

[Local News]

Miss Alice Borden had an operation performed on her throat last Saturday at the Dill hospital. She is now well on the way to recovery, but is short one pair of tonsils.
— —

Dietrich

Mrs. L. P. Mustard has been seriously ill the past week, but is now recovering.

Ira Towne, who has been suffering with a hard spell of sickness is now recovering, and hopes to be his former self again.

Mr. and Mrs. L. J Meservey are at Preston, Utah, attending the funeral of Mrs. Meservey’s sister and her daughter.

At the residence of Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Pavlick a babe was born to their daughter, Mrs. Julia Campbell last Friday, living only three days.

source: Shoshone Journal. (Shoshone, Idaho), 28 March 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Shoshone Journal. March 28, 1919, Page 5

Local and Personal News

Fred W. Gooding and wife, and their daughter, Mrs. D. Sidney Smith, will leave Long Beach, California, for Shoshone next Tuesday. Their homeward trip has been delayed on account of an attack of pneumonia on Mr. Gooding.

“Doc” Smith of Twin Falls died at his home there last Sunday after a long illness. He was one of the old timers in this section and was noted for many eccentricities of manner but was universally respected for his sterling qualities.

(ibid, page 5)
— — — — — — — — — —

The Idaho Recorder. March 28, 1919, Page 1

19190328IR1

19190328IR2
… Lew Wells Dies

… Gardner Wells, wife of … of Pahsimaroi, died in … Friday morning, March … pneumonia. On the previous … she gave birth to a child … at birth, and on Thursday … symptoms of pneumonia.
[Possibly buried in May Cemetery]
— —

Old Resident is Ill

Charles H. Reynolds is under hospital treatment in Salmon, being well taken care of by old friends, Billy Carpenter and R. W. McDonald. Mr. Reynolds is an old and highly esteemed resident of the county.
— —

This Priest’s Circuit Covers Five Hundred Miles

Rev. E. O. D. Hynes, pastor of the Catholic church of Salmon and having under his spiritual care small flocks of the faithful scattered widely over the two counties of Lemhi and Custer, perhaps has the most extensive circuit of missions found anywhere in the Northwest if not the most extensive in all the United States of America. To make the complete around of his pastorate he is required to travel over mountain roads and trails for most of the way perhaps 500 miles. His field covers all of Lemhi county and all of Custer but Mackay, which is served by the priest at Blackfoot. For the winter time of the year it would be out of the question for Father Hynes to make his rounds of pastoral calls complete over any but the well traveled roads and highways. During the past winter the quarantine against the epidemic somewhat restricted his visits even in the localities where deep snow did not bar his way.

It is for this reason that the busy season of this priest opens with the spring and summer months. As soon as his present Lenten services are over in the city he will be able to set forth on his regular far-flung lines of ministrations in the interior. He is now holding services twice a week in Salmon besides the regular Sunday masses as they are appointed here and elsewhere.

Father Hynes goes about his duties without ostentation and ministers to all wherever he finds ministrations needed, without regard to limitations or restrictions of creed. It was not long ago in the midst of the flu epidemic in Salmon that he hurried over one day to help the family of the minister of another communion when they were all stricken, offering to fetch in their wood and coal.

Father Hynes thinks the Salmon country is about the best he ever knew and has been zealous in his work always to say a good word for the community on every occasion that offers.
— —

When the Bottom Drops Out

Travelers report numbers of bad places in the road between Baker and Salmon and other spots in the lower Salmon road that are formidable holes. A car from the Bradley garage on the way to Gibbonsville on Monday mired itself and encountered others worse off and helpless. One traveler on this road said he saw a car sunk into the depths of a hole above the engine hood. There was a team kept all day Monday on the job at one place on the Baker road pulling out submerged cars. The commissioners are doing everything possible to relieve the situation temporarily until permanent repairs can be made.

source: The Idaho Recorder. (Salmon City, Idaho), 28 March 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

The Idaho Recorder. March 28, 1919, Page 3

Idaho State News

Tuberculosis will be scientifically tested in Idaho in the future through the medium of the two new tuberculosis hospitals, as Governor Davis has signed house bill No. 117, passed by the legislature, authorizing a tax levy to provide funds for their erection.

Idaho miners will not profit materially from a measure passed at the recent session of congress for the purpose of granting relief to those who made heavy expenditures with the view of producing rare metals urgently demanded for war use but virtually unmarketable in times of peace.

(ibid, page 3)
— — — —

The Idaho Recorder. March 28, 1919, Page 5

Salmon Locals

Mrs. P. J. Dempsey was down town on Wednesday for a car ride, the first visit she has made since her recent illness. Mrs. Dempsey is now well on toward the complete restoration to health after being kept at home since early in the winter.

U. S., Marshall Ish was in Salmon this week summing [sic] witnesses for a trial in United States district court now in session in Boise growing out of the quarantine in Custer county last winter. It was said that altogether about 20 witnesses were called. The trial is said to have arisen over the forcible ejection of a soldier sent into Custer county for draft work.

E. J. Bauman, another six-foot soldier boy, is back home at Patterson, having come in from Camp Fremont on Wednesday by way of Salmon. He enlisted from Challis and left that place August 8 last. He was in the camp hospital four weeks with a session with the flu, where there were 500 fatal attacks of the scourge. He was mustered out at Camp Lewis, coming directly home as soon as released. His father, J. J. Bauman lives in the Pahsimaroi valley. Young Bauman is now in splendid health and like all other soldiers returning from training, whether in camp or in field, is good to see.

(ibid, page 5)
— — — — — — — — — —

Main Street, Declo, Idaho

DecloFritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
— — — — — — — — — —

Clearwater Republican. March 28, 1919, Page 1

19190328CR1

Local News

Mrs. Celia Brown’s youngest son, who has been afflicted with the influenza, died Monday, and interment took place Tuesday. We are informed another one of her boys is sick. We extend our sympathy to the suffering family.

Ed Donath, our accommodating harness maker, departed for Spokane, Wednesday morning, to visit his wife, who is still under the doctors care.

Miss Vallie Noble went to Clarkston Saturday morning to visit with her parents and see her sister, Mrs. J. E. DeBaun, who we are informed, is gradually recovering.

Dr. Fairly had the misfortune to lose his faithful old horse Packline, this week. The doctor will have a hard time to find another such animal as the reliable Packline.

Jas. Tyra, of the Canyon Creek country, was in Orofino Monday, and reports snow fast disappearing in that section.

source: Clearwater Republican. (Orofino, Idaho), 28 March 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
— — — —

Clearwater Republican. March 28, 1919, Page 2

19190328CR2Saved by “Influenza Signals”

Helena, Mont. — The “influenza signal” in uninhabited spots is two rifle shots in quick succession, followed by a third at an interval. The signal saved W. L. Caldwell, a rancher of the Craig district, it was learned Monday. He was in the last stages of the disease when his shots brought neighbors. It is said he will recover.

(ibid, page 2)
— — — — — — — — — —

The Rathdrum Tribune., March 28, 1919, Page 3

19190328RT1

Personal Mention

Dr. D. F. Hollister is out again, recovering from his illness.

John Stine and family of Ford, Wash., write that they have all been ill with the influenza but have recovered.

Mrs. Alta McIntosh is in Spokane taking treatments for complications following influenza from which she suffered during the early part of the winter.
— —

Local Paragraphs

Summer school is to be held in the Chilco and Ramsey-Garwood districts, to start April [?] and continue if possible until September. The schools have been closed the past winter on account of the epidemic conditions.

The aurora borealis were visible here several nights last week, marking the high point in the equinoxial period.

source: The Rathdrum Tribune. (Rathdrum, Idaho), 28 March 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Cottonwood Chronicle. March 28, 1919, Page 1

19190328CC1

Mrs. J. V. Baker and daughter Vivian are both confined to their home this week with severe cases of influenza. While the flue [sic] has taken a firm grip on these two patients nothing dangerous seems to be evident at this time and they are now slowly recovering from the same which will be welcome news to their many friends.
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News Around The State …

There seems to be a mild return of influenza epidemic in Lewiston, although no serious cases are reported. Quarantine regulations are being observed in these cases, but there is no official limitation on public activities.
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Set Shooting Case for Hearing

The date of the preliminary hearing in the case arising from the shooting of Miss Vesta Neapan by Mrs. Newton Otto at Whitebird last Saturday has been set for April 13, to be held before Probate Judge Wilbur L. Campbell. Owing to the prominence of both families the case is attracting wide attention throughout the country and especially in the Salmon river country where the parties connected with the trouble have resided for some time.

The bullet wound in Miss Neapan’s ankle is healing nicely according to reports.

Mrs. Otto, it is said, claims that she brandished the gun in an effort to compel Miss Neapan and Reggie Neapan to leave the Otto premises and that it was discharged accidentally.

source: Cottonwood Chronicle. (Cottonwood, Idaho), 28 March 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Cottonwood Chronicle. March 28, 1919, Page 5

Local News

Miss Minnie Lange is confined to her home this week with an attack of what seems to be influenza. She was taken down with the malady Wednesday.

Mrs. J. D. Shinnick, son Tom, and daughter Rose Mary are expected to arrive home next week. While in Lewiston, after Tom was able to leave the hospital, his sister was attacked with influenza which caused another delay.

Wilbur Box returned Thursday evening from Lewiston where he has been receiving medical treatment.

(ibid, page 5)
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Cottonwood Chronicle. March 28, 1919, Page 6

Cottonwood and Vicinity
Personal Mention and Local Happenings of the Week

P. A. Gaul was able to come up town last Monday afternoon for the first time since recovering from a severe attack of influenza followed by pneumonia and which has kept him confined to his home for the past six weeks.

Mrs. Peter Johann was an arrival Monday evening from her home at Culdesac and will spend several days at the home of Mr. and Mrs. John Johann. Members of the Johann family have all been confined to bed with light attacks of sickness, excepting John, who has been acting as nurse, cook and etc. His mother comes up to relieve him from these duties.

Mrs. Felix Martzen accompanied by her husband and Dr. Shinnick was taken to Lewiston Thursday morning for the benefit of her health. Mrs. Martzen has just recently recovered from an attack of influenza which left her heart in a very weak condition. Her many friends hope that the change of climate will improve her health rapidly.

Dr. Orr returned Monday evening from Lewiston where he accompanied the 7-year-old daughter of Albert Nan of Ferdinand and there operated on the little girls. She has been very ill for several days with a severe attack of pneumonia and is recovering nicely from the effects of the operation according to the latest information received from the gateway city.

Mrs. J. B. Hattrup is suffering from a bad cold or light attack of the flu.

(ibid, page 6)
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The Kendrick Gazette. March 28, 1919, Page 1

19190328KG1

At a meeting of the school board last Saturday night it was decided to enforce the truancy regulations. There have been a number of children who have not attended school since it closed down on account of the flu. The board feels that there is no further excuse and will expect every child of school age to attend, or be reported to the county officials.
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Southwick Items

The children of the Southwick school have been suffering from an epidemic that resembles mumps very much.
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Big Bear Ridge

Miss Evelyn Tesch closes a very successful term of school at Taney Friday.
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Leland News

Dr. Stoneburner was on sick duty a few days the early part of the week, but is reported convalescing.

Mr. A. H. Smith who has been on sick duty at home is again out, and able to take his place in the store.

Miss Helen Koepp is on the sick list at the home of her mother.
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School Notes

A number of cases of influenza have broken out in the high school again. Miss Payne took sick Monday evening.

source: The Kendrick Gazette. (Kendrick, Idaho), 28 March 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Kendrick Gazette. March 28, 1919, Page 8

Gleanings

The American ridge school closed this week on account of the flu. The Ben Callison family is all ill with the flu.

A number of cases of flu developed in Kendrick the first of the week. The epidemic is now confined to the following homes: Gentry, Rogers, Hanson and Miss Payne. There are also several cases on American ridge.

Jack Freeborn was again making this territory the first of the week after quite an extended absence, occasioned by an attack of pneumonia. He has a host of friends in this community who are very glad indeed to learn of his recovery.

(ibid, page 8)
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The Daily Star-Mirror., March 28, 1919, Page 1

19190328DSM1

Will of Asa V. Bradrick is Filed for Probate

In the probate court before Judge Nelson the will of Asa V. Bradrick, who died December 5, 1918 in Spokane of influenza, was filed leaving all the estate to his son, Asa W. Bradrick, of Latah county, who lived near Palouse. The son, Asa W. Bradrick, died of the same disease March 7, 1919, and his will is filed in the same court, leaving all the estate to his wife, Mattie Bradrick and she is appointed as executrix.

The estate consists of a farm and other property valued at about $30,000 in Latah county, besides large holdings in the state of Washington.

The father, Asa V. Bradrick, left $19,000 life insurance to his son, who carried $15,000 in favor of his wife, Mattie Bradrick.
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Former Moscow Girl Dies in Spokane

Mrs. Walter J. Keiser, formerly Miss Eveline Hasseltine of this city, died in Spokane Sunday, following a brief illness, and was buried in Greenwood cemetery Wednesday. …

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 28 March 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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The Daily Star-Mirror., March 28, 1919, Page 5

City News

Chas. Summerfield, deputy sheriff, returned today from St. Anthony. He reports the influenza as raging in that city, the industrial school being closed by quarantine the day he arrived.

Mrs. W. E. Wallace has just received word of the death of her nephew, Henry Clay, Jr., at Cobens, of pneumonia. Mr. Clay was a major in aviation and had been overseas since last August. He was an American ace, having downed eight German airplanes, and was on his way home when taken ill. He will be remembered by many Moscow friends, as he visited here with his mother when a mere lad.
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Pearly Childers Returns From Across Seas

Pearly Childers returned to Moscow yesterday from overseas. His parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. M. Childers, live just north of Moscow. Mr. Childers was a telegraph operator at St. John, Wash., when he enlisted and his training in the army has been for a wireless operator of a pursuit aero-squadron. He was 13 months abroad, five of which were spent in training in England. He was in several air raids of the Germans inside the allied lines and has seen a number of aeroplanes fall in flames. The bombing plane was the Hanley-Page and carried four men, with two Liberty engines of 200 horse power each. They carry 18 bomb[s] weighing 150 to [sic] pounds each. Mr. Childers’ duty was to find directions and indicate where shells were to be dropped. He has been to the height of 12,000 feet. He states the conditions of the St. Nazaire, the port he sailed from, was very hard on the boys in the way of dampness and mud, the camps not being well located. This exposure brought on disease and 1300 soldiers were buried in one week from St. Nazaire.

Mr. Childers came home on the U. S. S. Mexico, which carried 2500 men and which was in the terrible storm reported by the press. Two men were lost by jams during the storm. They were 15 days coming across. Mr. Childers was mustered out at Camp Lewis. He is offered his former position with the railroad company.

(ibid, page 5)
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Drummond, Idaho (1)

DrummondFritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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March 29

Evening Capital News., March 29, 1919, Page 5

19190329ECN1

Bethany Presbyterian

R. A. Finlayson, Pastor

… The annual congregational meeting of the church, which was held last Wednesday evening, was well attended. The splendid reports of the different departments of the church work were a surprise to many, who had not realized that much work was going on during the year, in spite of influenza and the war conditions. …

source: Evening Capital News. (Boise, Idaho), 29 March 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Evening Capital News., March 29, 1919, Page 6

Around Boise Valley Loop

M’Dermott

Mrs. Earl Coleman who has been in Boise for medical treatment returned to her home Wednesday.

Caldwell

M. T. Hargrove, the local real estate man, is reported quite ill.

Middleton

Mrs. W. D. Robinson, formerly of this place, is very ill with influenza at Nyssa, Ore.
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Under The Capitol Dome

19190329ECN2Influenza In Institution

At the request of J. Fred Williams, superintendent, the state department of education sent three nurses to St. Anthony to assist in curbing the epidemic of Spanish influenza that has broken out in the industrial training school there. Nine cases have developed.
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First Death Reported

Walter Hoggan, aged 37, a resident of Rigby, is the first known victim of “sleeping sickness” in the state of Idaho. His death was reported to the state board of health.
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Idaho News In Brief

Twin Falls — J. W. Laubenheim, founder of the Saxon Motor Sales company here, is critically ill at his home from an attack of influenza, the second attack this year.

(ibid, page 6)
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Evening Capital News., March 29, 1919, Page 7

Red Cross Clothing Drive Ends in Success

The Red Cross clothing drive ended today. The final effort put forth by the committee to complete the allotment of 10 tons met with success and by tonight the big boxes will be packed ready for shipment to northwest headquarters at Seattle.

Seventeen automobiles driven by girls and manned with boy scout buglers and workers covered Boise and South Boise, with the result that load after load was brought to the receiving station and more women had to be called in to handle the packing. At 1 o’clock today it was estimated that the allotment had been reached and there is a probability that it may have been exceeded.

(ibid, page 7)
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The Daily Star-Mirror., March 29, 1919, Page 6

19190329DSM1

19190329DSM2
Grade Children Still Under Influenza Ban

Owing to the fact that there have been one or two new families quarantined with influenza each day for the last week, it will not be safe for the ban to be lifted on children of the grade school, Dr. Adair states to The Star-Mirror. As there have been no cases developed in the high school for some time, pupils of the high school will be permitted to attend Sunday school tomorrow and may attend picture shows if they desire, the first of next week. Dr. Adair states: “I would strongly advise against going to any public gathering where not necessary, because of the danger of causing the disease to appear again in epidemic form, and thus result in the schools being closed for the balance of the year. The danger still exists in Moscow the same as elsewhere. In St. Anthony, this state, 72 cases developed in 24 hours this week, necessitating the closing of the schools.

“There are several mothers in Moscow who are seriously ill with the disease, which was carried to them by their children, who contracted it in the grade schools.”

Flags were put up yesterday as follows: Hills, 246 North Washington; Barcherman, 220 North Howard. Each family has two cases. There continues to be a number of cases in families where the flags are still up.
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Army’s Health Excellent

Washington. — Health conditions in the army at home and abroad continue satisfactory, according to a report issued yesterday by the surgeon general for the week ending March 21. The report stated there was no unusual prevalence of disease at any camp or station within the United States, and that the non-effective list in the expeditionary forces had continued to decline and now was lower than similar rates in this country.

source: The Daily Star-Mirror. (Moscow, Idaho), 29 March 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Jack Waite Mine, Duthie, Idaho (1)

DuthieFritz-a

Photo courtesy: the Mike Fritz Collection, History of Idaho
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March 30

Evening Capital News., March 30, 1919, Page 9

19190330ECN1

Around Boise Valley Loop

Star

Mrs. Partridge, who has been nursing the infant child of Mr. and Mrs. Lee Kincaid at Middleton, returned home today.

Joe Kincaid was in Middleton Friday visiting his son and family. He reports his little grandson, who has been very ill, is much improved.

Meridian

Miss Vera Thomas is reported quite ill.

source: Evening Capital News. (Boise, Idaho), 30 March 1919. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.
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Evening Capital News., March 30, 1919, Page 10

19190330ECN2Over Half Inmates in Training School Down With the Flu
Within One Week Number of Cases Increased to 120 Including 14 Officers

The record in Idaho for rapid spread of influenza was reported Saturday to the state board of education from the Idaho Industrial Training school at St. Anthony. One week ago one case developed. Saturday there were 120 cases, some very serious. Besides over 100 inmates committed to that institution, 14 of the officials are down with the disease, and three members of the family of J. Fred Williams, medical superintendent, including Mrs. Williams.

During the recent state-wide epidemic of influenza the institution was closed either to new students coming in or inmates being discharged. The ban was raised in February and those who had been committed were admitted. It is believed one of them carried the flu into the institution. It would not be surprising if the 200 inmates and officials were all taken ill say school authorities.
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Two Tons Short in R. C. Clothing Drive; Will Collect Monday

The Boise district fell two tons short on making its quota of 10 tons in the refugee clothing campaign. Efforts to collect the additional tonnage will be made Monday.

This announcement was made Saturday night by Mrs. Harvey Short, chairman of the collection committee, who found when the clothing had all been weighed that there were 4000 pounds yet to be added to make the amount assigned to the Boise chapter of the Red Cross.

Early Saturday afternoon Mrs. Short was positive the amount would be raised by evening, but all of a sudden the machines failed to come in with such large loads as in the morning. The pace slackened and the quota failed.

Mrs. Short announces, however, that as yet the Boise chapter has never failed to give its full quota and the clothing campaign will be waged stranger than ever Monday to make up the slight deficiency and she wants everyone who can spare even one garment to respond. …

(ibid, page 10)
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Evening Capital News., March 30, 1919, Page 11

19190330ECN3

(ibid, page 11)
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Further Reading

Idaho Juvenile Corrections Center at St. Anthony

IdahoJuvenileCorrectionsCenterStAnthony-a

The Idaho Juvenile Corrections Center (1905), also know as the Industrial Reform School, at St. Anthony, Idaho, was designed by J. Flood Walker.
Date 31 March 1905 Source The Idaho Republican, March 31, 1905, pp 7
Wikimedia:
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JCC: The first 50 years

By Lynette Staker – Rexburg Standard Journal Jun 9, 2003

This is the first in a series of three stories highlighting the history of the state Juvenile Corrections Center west of St. Anthony as it celebrates its centennial.

Saturday, the Idaho Juvenile Corrections Center west of St. Anthony will celebrate its 100-year birthday with an open house.

And it’s been a long and interesting road from the start to the present.

The center started in 1903 as the Idaho Industrial Reform School after the Idaho Legislature passed a bill establishing an institution for the commitment of wayward youth.

According to information in “Snake River Echoes,” a publication of the Upper Snake River Valley Historical Society, the state decided the school would be located two or three miles from St. Anthony.

The determining criteria was the fertility of the soil, unlimited supply of water and being near the metropolis of the county where water works and electric lights could be supplied at a very reasonable cost.

A tract of land one-half mile west of the city was chosen on 200 acres. The purchase price was $8,500, or about $42.50 per acre. A Tudor gothic style school building was built in 1904, with power, lighting and a heating plant located in the basement of the building.

The industrial department of the building included the carpenter’s shop, shoe shop, steam laundry and cold storage. There was a culinary department in the rear of the basement, a chapel, public offices, dining rooms, dormitories, a sewing room, dressing room, shower and bath rooms and help’s quarters in the building as well.

In 1905, the Legislature decided to change the name of the school d to the Idaho Industrial Training School. And the school began a social calendar designed to bring the kids into a better environment, according to “Echoes.” The boys were allowed to go to town to watch a ball game between St. Anthony and Pocatello, and it was decided this was a successful experiment to show the group could go off campus without running away.

In 1911, the board of directors for the school purchased an additional 80 acres west of the school and had appropriated about $32,000 for this land and the construction of several more buildings on the original site. The shops would include a blacksmith shop, carpenter’s shop, tailor shop, laundry and more. The boys were allowed to work on construction of these buildings under the direction of a supervisor.

Governor James H. Hawley suggested the school was “one of the greatest, if not the greatest, institution in the state.”

The children at the school were taught practical and scientific farming, market gardening, horticulture, stationary and electric engineering, steam fitting, carpentry, masonry, concrete, irrigation, laundering, animal husbandry, dairying, sewing, domestic science, household economy, piano, voice, all stringed and wind instruments, elocution, public speaking, stenography, typewriting, commercial law, bookkeeping, pharmacy, nursing and athletics. Certainly, a variety of subjects kids these days would benefit from as well.

In the fall of 1923, the local newspaper noted there was a full operation of canning and dehydrating of food products to provide food for the officers and children of the school for the winter. Besides a garden, which provided fresh fruits and vegetables, the school also raised animals for meat at their facilities. There were chickens, rabbits, geese and ducks.

In July 1932 the state welfare director visited the school and noted they had 650 acres of land, with 600 under cultivation. There was a herd of 105 registered Holsteins which furnished plenty of milk and butter for the boys and girls. There were 235 boys at that time, and 70 girls.

The cost for maintenance of a student in the years 1941-1942 averaged $1070.11 per student. A survey taken for the boys and girls showed that most were admitted to the school for minor offenses, such as theft, truancy, incorrigibility and immorality for the boys. In the girls’ cases, the most common causes were truancy, incorrigibility, theft and immorality.

A unique approach for the development of the youths at the school was initiated by Maurice Pratt, who took over as head of the school and who planned to make athletics one of the chief instruments in rehabilitating the delinquent youth. He proposed these programs developed healthy bodies, good sportsmanship and relieved the emotional tension generated through a program of nothing but work, study and discipline.

Pratt’s philosophy was to have kindness replace discipline, but the emphasis was still to be on vocational training.

In 1953, 50 years after beginning, Winston Taylor became administrator. It was he who decided to bring in specialists trained in psychology, case workers and therapists, educators and vocational teachers. The idea behind this strategy was that through education, anyone could be made into a model citizen.

In the years since it started, things at the JCC, as it was later named, obviously have changed greatly.

“The main focus now is to deal with criminal behavior and to be able to refocus strengths that the juveniles have into socially acceptable behavior and to try to confront their criminal thinking and behavior,” says JCC Superintendent Jack Cordon.

He says that in the past, children were often placed at the center not only for criminal behavior, but because their parents placed them there because they were having difficulties with them or they were having trouble adjusting in the school setting.

He is also proud of the relationship the JCC has with the surrounding communities, something the center has not always had in the past.

Much of the information for this story is taken from information gathered for a JCC Centennial issue of “Snake River Echoes,” a publication of the Upper Snake River Valley Historical Society.

source:
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WWI Photos of St. Nazaire, France

Established in June 1917, the Naval Operating Base at St. Nazaire, France, began to receive American Expeditionary Forces that same month. The location was also the port where the U.S. Naval Railway Guns arrived for service. The west-coast port was disestablished after the war.

1918StNazaireNavyParade-a
Sailors passing in review, celebrating first anniversary of America’s entry into the war. St. Nazaire, France on April 5, 1918.

Link: to photo gallery at the National Museum of the U.S. Navy
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A Cruel Wind: America Experiences Pandemic Influenza 1918-1920 a Social History

A Dissertation Submitted to the Faculty of the Division of the Humanities in Candidacy for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy Department of History
By Dorothy Ann Pettit The University of New Hampshire December 1976

Abstract

In terms of human mortality, the influenza pandemic of 1918 to 1920 overshadowed World War I. Within the course of less than a year, influenza claimed the lives of twenty million human beings, more lives than all of the battlefield deaths. Although more than a half-million Americans died from the disease and its sequelae during that period, those who have written the history of the twentieth century have, with few exceptions, given only cursory attention to the pandemic. Historians have especially neglected any consideration of the effect of the pandemic upon the mood or psychological state of the nation. One writer after another has described postwar America as a tired nation, but tired in a spiritual, rather than in a physical, sense. This study suggests that the widespread postwar apathy was as much the result of a lingering physical sickness as it was a general spiritual depression. After all, almost every family felt the effects of the pandemic.

The influenza pandemic that began in 1918 was special for several reasons. First, wartime conditions kept the existence of the new strain of flu a secret longer than might have occurred under ordinary circumstances. Pneumonia deaths in the nation’s army camps were already abnormally high before the respiratory plague began its march across the globe. And even as the virus was prostrating hundreds of thousands of victims in Europe in the spring of 1918, Americans tried to convince themselves that the “Spanish flu” had to be the result of inadequate nutrition, a war-related disease that would remain across the ocean. Thus, when a second wave of the new strain of influenza struck the American nation in the fall of 1918, the result was panic and confusion. Physicians did not know if they were dealing with an entirely new disease or if their patients had the more familiar “grippe.” Nor was there any antidote that seemed to provide relief. Second, the disease had the highest mortality rate among the twenty-to-forty-year-olds, the group ordinarily considered to be the healthiest and sturdiest members of society. This penchant for young adults only increased the universal uneasiness and fear of the disease. Finally, when flu came with a special fury in the fall of 1918, it remained at an epidemic level for a remarkably long time— thirty-one weeks Churches, theaters, and places of public amusement and assembly were ordered closed for weeks and sometimes months at a time. Campaign strategies for the off-year elections had to be radically altered. And when the war came to an end in November, influenza struck those who made the peace. The spring following the Armistice was an unhealthy time on both sides of the Atlantic, as it was the following year in 1920, when a third major wave of influenza claimed nearly another one hundred thousand American lives. …

(page 11-12)

Chapter IV
(excerpts)

… Gen. Peyton C. March, whose task it was to see that the A.E.F. grew in might as quickly as possible, cabled General Pershing on October 10: “If we are not stopped on account of influenza, which has passed the 200,000 mark, you will get the replacements and all shortages of divisions up to date by November 30.” The very week March sent that telegram, four our of every thousand men in the United States cantonments died of influenza and its complications. Pershing, meanwhile, was cabling for additional hospital units to be sent abroad. Finally, on October 23 March had to wire the A.E.F. chief: “Epidemic has not only quarantined nearly all camps, but has forced us to cancel or suspend nearly all draft calls….Only a few thousand replacements for November are in service….” Two days later, March cabled Pershing again that every man at Fort Oglethorpe who was available for overseas duty was being sent. The personnel officer March had sent to the Fort “took all men out of organizations far down on priority to fill organizations high on priority,” all, that is, who were not in the clutches of disease.

Yet, if the army personnel from Fort Oglethorpe and other camps were healthy when they boarded the transports bound for Europe, too many of them died before the vessels docked on the other side. While the pandemic raged, a total of 789 deaths occurred on the transports and cruisers. Only a small number, twenty-eight, were buried at sea; the rest were either interred abroad or returned for stateside services. Naval statistics showed that 8.8 per cent of the troops who sailed during the autumn months became ill, and of those who had cases of influenza or pneumonia, 5.9 per cent died. The army’s death rate for the voyages was 0.57 per cent, which means one out of every two hundred men died in transport that fall.

Medical officers in both the army and the navy urged at the height of the pandemic that the flow of troops be temporarily suspended, but the movement remained on schedule. Consequently, September through November was a grim period for the navy. Gangplank medical inspections became the rule for those boarding the transports, but these efforts were at best only partially successful. During the September voyage of the George Washington, as many as 450 men were refused permission to board the vessel. Nevertheless, on the second day out, 550 victims of influenza reported to sick call. By the time the vessel arrived in Brest, there had been 131 cases of pneumonia and 77 deaths. According to one account of the voyage, 101 ailing soldiers were sent to base hospitals upon arrival, “and the remainder of the troops went ashore cheering and in fighting trim.”

On the other hand, the experience of the men on the U.S.S. Leviathan, which sailed from Hoboken on September 29, would suggest that those who disembarked on the other side were not always in “fighting trim.” On that ship’s voyage to France, two thousand of the approximately nine thousand soldiers in transit developed influenza, and ninety-one died before the vessel reached Brest. Those who disembarked in the French port found a storm raging, and camp a long four miles away. Without some heroic efforts on the part of Lieut. Com. W. Chambers, M.C., U.S. Navy, who realized that many of the men were too unwell to march that far, many more than four would have been found dead along the roadside. His naval rescue mission picked up 150 influenza and 80 pneumonia victims, and another 370 men convalescing from influenza, along the road— a total of 600 men, all of them too exhausted to continue the march to camp.

In the midst of the pandemic, a transport convoy composed of the U.S.S. President Grant, Mongolia, Rijndum, Antigone, Pastores, Wilhelmina, and Princess Matoika arrived at St. Nazaire. During the crossing 2,600 men became ill. The senior medical officer on the President Grant said that the conditions on board ship had reminded him of the pneumonic form of bubonic plague. Those who died before the convoy docked numbered 246. Considering that another 204 men died later on shore, the true number of deaths for the convoy might more accurately have been put at 450. Moreover, many of the stricken men who survived the epidemic had to be shipped directly back to the States.

Other vessels arrived in Europe during the fall with fewer cases of influenza and pneumonia reported in transit, but the Battle of the Flu lay ahead. Transport No. 56 — the Olympic — arrived at Southampton towards the end of September. The troops on board had escaped infection in the States, and only nine men developed flu on the crossing. However, when the men were held in Southampton Harbor for twenty-four hours before disembarking, a total of 384 cases of the disease developed. Many of the men were severely affected, frequently showing a temperature of 105 degrees at the onset. Men on guard duty were literally dropping in their tracks. The whole shipment of troops consequently left for a rest camp on a nearby English hillside. Within a week 1,900 cases of influenza developed, with hundreds of cases of pneumonia, and 119 deaths. The medical officer who had been in charge on the crossing escaped the flu — for the time being, that is. Some weeks later on November 16, the day after his arrival at the Neufchateau medical headquarters, he reported sick with chills and a temperature of 103.6 degrees. An ambulance quickly carted the shivering physician off to Hospital No. 18 in Bazoilles. …

link: to full paper The University of New Hampshire Scholars’ Repository
——————

Back to Table of Contents
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 1)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 2)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 3)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 4)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 5)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 6)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 7)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 8)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 9)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 10)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 11)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 12)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 13)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 14)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 15)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 16)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 17)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 18)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 19)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 20)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic (Part 21)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 22)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 23)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 24)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 25)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 26)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 27)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 28)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 29)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 30)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 31)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 32)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 33)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 34)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 35)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 36)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 37)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 38)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 39)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 40)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 41)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 42)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 43)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 44)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 45)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 46)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 47)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 48)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 49)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 50)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 51)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 52)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 53)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 54)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 55)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 56)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 57)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 58)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 59)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 60)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 61)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 62)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 63)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 64)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic (Part 65)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 66)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 67)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 68)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 69)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 70)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 71)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 72)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 73)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 74)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 75)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 76)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 77)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 78)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 79)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 80)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 81)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 82)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 83)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 84)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 85)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 86)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 87)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 88)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 89)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 90)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 91)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 92)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 93)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 94)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 95)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 96)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 97)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 98)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic (Part 99)
Link to Idaho 1918 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 100)
Link to Idaho 1919 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 101)
Link to Idaho 1920 Influenza Pandemic Ads (Part 102)

Road Reports Feb 21, 2021

Please share road reports. Please turn on your vehicle lights when traveling our narrow mountain roads. Conditions change quickly this time of year. Be prepared for rocks and trees in the road, icy conditions and deep snow in higher elevation. Remember there is no cell phone service.

Yellow Pine: Local streets are snow covered, main roads last plowed Saturday (Feb 20.) Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN.
“Drivers don’t speed through neighborhoods or most anywhere. Locals brake for kids, wandering dogs, deer, elk, moose, fox, beaver, squirrels and chipmunks. Most are lifetime members of SPLAT, the Society to Prevent Little Animal Tragedies.” – IME
link: Local Forecast
Yellow Pine Webcam: (check date on image)

Highway 55 Webcams Link:
No Winter construction – All lanes open

Warm Lake Highway: Open (no current report.)
Tues (Feb 16) The County snow plow was working near the South Fork bridge; good snow floor on Warm Lake road.
Wed (Feb 17) mail truck driver reports the county is plowing the highway again today.
link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

South Fork Road: Open – probably plowed Thursday (Feb 18.)
Wed (Feb 17) mail truck driver reports the road has not been plowed, about 12″ of snow up top.
Tues (Feb 16) South Fork road, Warm Lake to Poverty Flat camp area, 10+“ of snow since the last snow plow. The two summits have at least 10” and passing oncoming vehicles can mean backing up to a safe place. Lower SF has about 4” to 6” of new snow.
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Open – probably plowed Thursday (Feb 18.)
Wed (Feb 17) mail truck driver reports up to 12″ of snow on this end of the road (not plowed yet.)
Tues (Feb 16) East Fork snow levels gradually increase to about 8” of new snow.

Johnson Creek Road: Upper end closed to wheeled vehicles at Landmark.
Lower end probably plowed Saturday (Feb 19.)
link: Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam
link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
Note: The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcam: (check date on image)

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open. Plowed by Midas crews.
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The approx. elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′

New Link
Valley County Road Maintenance Dashboard
——————

Weather Reports Feb 14-20, 2021

Feb 14 Weather:

At 10am it was 18 degrees with thinning overcast and filtered sun for a short while after sunrise. At 145pm thicker clouds, foggy peaks and ridge tops. At 345pm it was 29 degrees, overcast and fine light snow falling, did not last long. At 620pm it was 26 degrees and low overcast. At 11pm a scant dusting of snow. Light snowfall at 1am, scant 1/4″. About an inch by 5am. Snowing pretty good at 9am.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time February 15, 2021 at 10:00AM
Socked in, steady light snow
Max temperature 30 degrees F
Min temperature 17 degrees F <– previous morning
At observation 27 degrees F
Precipitation 0.09 inch
Snowfall 1.5 inch
Snow depth 24 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Feb 15 Weather:

At 10am it was 27 degrees, steady light snow and socked in. Light snowfall at 1230pm, not snowing at 120pm, ridges mostly visible. Started snowing big flakes before 315pm, 33 degrees and socked in. Lighter snowfall at 4pm, then ending just after 430pm. Snowing again around 540pm. At 650pm it was 31 degrees snowing lightly. Snowing lightly at 9pm. Snowing pretty good around 11pm. Snowing lightly at 115am. At 5am it was 28 degrees and snowing. Socked in and snowing pretty good at 9am.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time February 16, 2021 at 10:00AM
Low overcast, light snowfall, light breeze
Max temperature 35 degrees F
Min temperature 26 degrees F
At observation 30 degrees F
Precipitation 0.38 inch
Snowfall 5.0 inch
Snow depth 28.5 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Feb 16 Weather:

At 10am it was 30 degrees, low overcast, light snowfall and light breeze. Doesn’t appear to be snowing at 1230pm, trees are dumping snowloads. Occasional flakes at 220pm. Light snowfall at 235pm. At 330pm it was 33 degrees, overcast, flaking lightly and light breeze. Socked in and snowing at 410pm. Stopped snowing, breaks in the clouds to the south at 540pm (top of VanMeter still foggy.) Snowing again at 605pm. At 625pm it was 28 degrees and snowing lightly. At 930pm it 25 degrees and snowing lightly. At 1035pm it was not snowing and stars out to the east. Snowing pretty good at 1220am. Probably snowed all night.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time February 17, 2021 at 10:00AM
Broken overcast
Max temperature 35 degrees F
Min temperature 18 degrees F
At observation 22 degrees F
Precipitation 0.21 inch
Snowfall 3.5 inch
Snow depth 30 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Feb 17 Weather:

At 10am it was 22 degrees and broken overcast. Snow 1025am-1055am (trace) then breaks in the clouds. At 1230pm it was 31 degrees, blue sky to the south west and dark clouds to the north east. At 320pm it was 26 degrees, socked in to the floor and snowing hard until 350pm, then thin spots and clouds lifting some. At 6pm partly clear, some lower dark clouds and some higher pink one touched by the sunset. At 630pm it was 21 degrees and mostly cloudy. At 11pm it looked cloudy, no stars to the east.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time February 18, 2021 at 10:00AM
High thin haze
Max temperature 37 degrees F
Min temperature 0 degrees F
At observation 6 degrees F
Precipitation 0.03 inch
Snowfall 0.5 inch
Snow depth 29 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Feb 18 Weather:

At 10am it was 6 degrees and the sky covered in high thin haze. At 1230pm overcast. At 315pm gusty breezes and overcast. At 340pm it was 29 degrees, variable breezes and overcast. Occasional flakes of snow started at 515pm. At 620pm it was 27 degrees and overcast. At 7pm it was 25 degrees and not snowing. Scant trace of snow by 11pm. Light snowfall at 1am – light dusting. Not sure how long it snowed. Not snowing at 5am.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time February 19, 2021 at 10:00AM
Broken overcast, flaking
Max temperature 30 degrees F
Min temperature 5 degrees F <– previous morning
At observation 27 degrees F
Precipitation 0.05 inch
Snowfall 0.8 inch
Snow depth 28 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Feb 19 Weather:

At 10am it was 27 degrees, broken overcast and flaking lightly. At 1230pm overcast and icicles dripping. Snowing lightly at 130pm. Not snowing at 320pm, icicles dripping. At 340pm it was 36 degrees, overcast and occasional snowflake. At 620pm it was 32 degrees and cloudy. Started snowing around 11pm. At 1220am it was 28 degrees and snowing. Probably done snowing by 5am.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time February 20, 2021 at 10:00AM
High hazy overcast
Max temperature 40 degrees F
Min temperature 19 degrees F
At observation 23 degrees F
Precipitation 0.24 inch
Snowfall 2 3/4 inch
Snow depth 29 inch
— — — — — — — — — —

Feb 20 Weather:

At 10am it was 23 degrees and high hazy overcast. At 1230pm it was partly clear and icicles dripping in the strong sunshine. At 340pm it was 33 degrees, light breezes, mostly cloudy with bits of sun peeking thru and flaking snow (for about 30 minutes.) Not snowing at 420pm. At 445pm socked in to the floor and snowing hard – fat trace so far. Stopped snowing at 520pm and by 550pm blue patches of sky and lighter clouds. At 640pm it was 23 degrees and partly cloudy. At 1020pm it is 20 degrees and partly cloudy. Looked cloudy at 1130pm.

NOAA Weather report:

Observation time February 21, 2021 at 10:00AM
Overcast, flaking
Max temperature 39 degrees F
Min temperature 14 degrees F
At observation 23 degrees F
Precipitation 0.04 inch
Snowfall 0.5 inch
Snow depth 27 inch
————————–

Road Reports Feb 17, 2021

Note: Feb 16th: 5″ new snow. Feb 17th: 3.5″ new snow, 30″, currently on the ground. Another winter storm advisory for Thursday night thru Friday.

Please share road reports. Please turn on your vehicle lights when traveling our narrow mountain roads. Conditions change quickly this time of year. Be prepared for rocks and trees in the road, icy conditions and deep snow in higher elevation. Remember there is no cell phone service.

Yellow Pine: Local streets are snow covered, and about 8″ fresh snow. Please respect residents and wildlife and SLOW DOWN.
“Drivers don’t speed through neighborhoods or most anywhere. Locals brake for kids, wandering dogs, deer, elk, moose, fox, beaver, squirrels and chipmunks. Most are lifetime members of SPLAT, the Society to Prevent Little Animal Tragedies.” – IME
link: Local Forecast
Yellow Pine Webcam: (check date on image)

Highway 55 Webcams Link:
No Winter construction – All lanes open

Warm Lake Highway: Open (no current report.)
Tues (Feb 16) The County snow plow was working near the South Fork bridge; good snow floor on Warm Lake road.
Wed (Feb 17) mail truck driver reports the county is plowing the highway again today.
link: SNOTEL Big Creek Summit 6580′

South Fork Road: Open
Wed (Feb 17) mail truck driver reports the road has not been plowed, about 12″ of snow up top.
Tues (Feb 16) South Fork road, Warm Lake to Poverty Flat camp area, 10+“ of snow since the last snow plow. The two summits have at least 10” and passing oncoming vehicles can mean backing up to a safe place. Lower SF has about 4” to 6” of new snow.
Fri (Feb 12) mail truck driver reports about 6-8″ new snow on the upper South Fork (not plowed.)
link: Tea Pot Weather Station 5175′
link: South Fork Stream Gauge

EFSF Road: Open
Wed (Feb 17) mail truck driver reports up to 10″ or more of new snow on this end of the road (not plowed yet.)
Tues (Feb 16) East Fork snow levels gradually increase to about 8” of new snow.

Johnson Creek Road: Upper end closed to wheeled vehicles at Landmark.
Lower end last plowed Sunday (Feb 7.)
link: Johnson Creek Airstrip Webcam
link: Johnson Creek Stream Gauge
Note: The elevation at Landmark is 6,630 feet

Lick Creek: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The elevation at Lick Creek Summit is 6,877 feet

Profile Creek Road: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The elevation at Profile summit is 7607 feet.

Big Creek Webcam: (check date on image)

Yellow Pine to Stibnite: Open. Plowed by Midas crews.
link: Stibnite Weather Station 6594′

Stibnite to Thunder Mountain: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The elevation at Monumental Summit is 8590 feet.

Big Creek to Elk Summit to Warrens Road: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The elevation at Elk Summit is nearly 9000 feet.

Deadwood Summit: Closed to wheeled vehicles.
Note: The approx. elevation at Deadwood Summit is 6,883 feet.
link: SNOTEL Deadwood Summit 6860′

New Link
Valley County Road Maintenance Dashboard
——————